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Sample records for multiple endpoint embryonic

  1. Developing osteoblasts as an endpoint for the mouse embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinrong; Hansen, Deborah K; Merry, Gwenn; DeJarnette, Christian; Nolen, Greg; Sloper, Daniel; Fisher, J Edward; Harrouk, Wafa; Tassinari, Melissa S; Inselman, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    The mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test (EST) using cardiomyocyte differentiation is a promising in vitro assay for detecting potential embryotoxicity; however, the addition of another differentiation endpoint, such as osteoblasts, may improve the predictive value of the test. A number of variables such as culture conditions and starting cell number were investigated. A 14 day direct plating method of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) was used to test the predictivity of osteoblast differentiation as an endpoint in the EST. Twelve compounds were tested using the prediction model developed in the ECVAM validation study. Eight of the compounds selected from the EST validation study served as model compounds; four additional compounds known to produce skeletal defects were also tested. Our results indicate comparable chemical classification between the validated cardiomyocyte endpoint and the osteoblast endpoint. These results suggest that differentiation to osteoblasts may provide confirmatory information in predicting embryotoxicity.

  2. Comparing three novel endpoints for developmental osteotoxicity in the embryonic stem cell test

    SciTech Connect

    Nieden, Nicole I. zur; Davis, Lesley A.; Rancourt, Derrick E.

    2010-09-01

    Birth defects belong to the most serious side effects of pharmaceutical compounds or environmental chemicals. In vivo, teratogens most often affect the normal development of bones, causing growth retardation, limb defects or craniofacial malformations. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is one of the most promising models that allow the in vitro prediction of embryotoxicity, with one of its endpoints being bone tissue development. The present study was designed to describe three novel inexpensive endpoints to assess developmental osteotoxicity using the model compounds penicillin G (non-teratogenic), 5-fluorouracil (strong teratogen) and all-trans retinoic acid (bone teratogen). These three endpoints were: quantification of matrix incorporated calcium by (1) morphometric analysis and (2) measurement of calcium levels as well as (3) activity of alkaline phosphatase, an enzyme involved in matrix calcification. To evaluate our data, we have compared the concentration curves and resulting ID{sub 50}s of the new endpoints with mRNA expression for osteocalcin. Osteocalcin is an exclusive marker found only in mineralized tissues, is regulated upon compound treatment and reliably predicts the potential of a chemical entity acting as a bone teratogen. By comparing the new endpoints to quantitative expression of osteocalcin, which we previously identified as suitable to detect developmental osteotoxicity, we were ultimately able to illustrate IMAGE analysis and Ca{sup 2+} deposition assays as two reliable novel endpoints for the EST. This is of particular importance for routine industrial assessment of novel compounds as these two new endpoints may substitute previously used molecular read-out methods, which are often costly and time-consuming.

  3. Endpoint matrix: a conceptual tool to promote consideration of the multiple dimensions of humane endpoints.

    PubMed

    Ashall, Vanessa; Millar, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework to support appropriate application of endpoints in animal experiments. It is recommended that unpredicted endpoints should be explicitly considered alongside scientific endpoints and justifiable endpoints as the three types of endpoint which comprise the "humane." We suggest there is a need for clear identification of each type of endpoint and an understanding of the interactions between these types. The use of an "endpoint matrix" during study planning is proposed to promote methodically sound and consistent definition, determination, and detection of unpredicted, scientific, and justifiable endpoints in animal experiments. It is claimed that the further development and use of this tool will support a more effective and harmonized practical application of humane endpoints for all animal use in line with best practice recommendations.

  4. Usefulness of field potential as a marker of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, and endpoint analysis of embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Naoteru; Deguchi, Jiro; Yamada, Toru; Funabashi, Hitoshi; Seki, Takaki

    2010-12-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a validated method and a useful screening tool for drug discovery. EST requires microscopic observation of beating cells to be considered cardiomyocytes as an endpoint assay. However, this procedure is time-consuming and limits the throughput performance. Instead of microscopic observation, we previously established a novel assay method based on cardiac field potential as an endpoint. However, cardiac specificity of this field potential is not yet clarified, because beating cells have not been rigorously evaluated as skeletal or cardiomyocyte. Here, we investigated the relationships between field potential, beating, and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) expression, selected as a cardiomyocyte-specific marker, and evaluated suitability of the field potential as a marker for cardiomyocyte in vehicle or 5-fluorouracil treated embryo bodies. Embryoid bodies of mouse embryonic stem cells (D3) were differentiated in a chamber with multi-electrode array for 5 days, and field potential and beating were measured at the end of differentiation. In addition, these chambers were immunohistochemically stained with anti-cTnT antibody, and the correlation between field potential, beating, and cTnT expression was examined. These results indicated the area of field potential or beating mainly coincided with that of cTnT expression. 5-fluorouracil treatment decreased not only the number of field potential detecting electrodes and beating area, but also cTnT expression, and the area of these parameters was also nearly identical. These results indicate that field potential can be used as a suitable cardiac differentiation marker, and can be a promising parameter of EST.

  5. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment. PMID:24819436

  6. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment.

  7. The impact of multiple endpoint dependency on Q and I(2) in meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher Glen; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2014-09-01

    A common assumption in meta-analysis is that effect sizes are independent. When correlated effect sizes are analyzed using traditional univariate techniques, this assumption is violated. This research assesses the impact of dependence arising from treatment-control studies with multiple endpoints on homogeneity measures Q and I(2) in scenarios using the unbiased standardized-mean-difference effect size. Univariate and multivariate meta-analysis methods are examined. Conditions included different overall outcome effects, study sample sizes, numbers of studies, between-outcomes correlations, dependency structures, and ways of computing the correlation. The univariate approach used typical fixed-effects analyses whereas the multivariate approach used generalized least-squares (GLS) estimates of a fixed-effects model, weighted by the inverse variance-covariance matrix. Increased dependence among effect sizes led to increased Type I error rates from univariate models. When effect sizes were strongly dependent, error rates were drastically higher than nominal levels regardless of study sample size and number of studies. In contrast, using GLS estimation to account for multiple-endpoint dependency maintained error rates within nominal levels. Conversely, mean I(2) values were not greatly affected by increased amounts of dependency. Last, we point out that the between-outcomes correlation should be estimated as a pooled within-groups correlation rather than using a full-sample estimator that does not consider treatment/control group membership. PMID:26052849

  8. Effects of ivermectin on Danio rerio: a multiple endpoint approach: behaviour, weight and subcellular markers.

    PubMed

    Domingues, I; Oliveira, R; Soares, A M V M; Amorim, M J B

    2016-04-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is a broad acting antihelmintic used in various veterinary pharmaceuticals. It has been shown that IVM enters the aquatic compartment and adversely affects organisms including fish. This study is based on the hypothesis that long term exposure to IVM affects fish and thus, the main objective was to assess the chronic effects of 0.25 and 25 µg IVM/L to zebrafish using multiple endpoints representative of several levels of biological organization: weight, behaviour (swimming and feeding) and subcellular markers including biomarkers for oestrogenicity (vitellogenin-VTG), oxidative stress (catalase-CAT and glutathione-S-transferase-GST) and neurotransmission (cholinesterase-ChE). Concentrations as low as 0.25 µg IVM/L disrupted the swimming behaviour, causing fish to spend more time at the bottom of aquaria. Such reduction of the swimming performance affected the feeding ability which is likely responsible for the weight loss. The effects on weight were gender differentiated, being more pronounced in males (0.25 µg IVM/L) than in females (25 µg IVM/L). Fish exposed to 25 µg/L exhibited darker coloration and mild curvature of the spine. No effects on VTG and AChE were observed, but a reduction on CAT and GST levels was observed in fish exposed to 25 µg IVM/L, although these alterations probably only reflect the general condition of the fish which was significantly compromised at this concentration. Despite that predicted environmental concentrations of IVM are below 0.25 µg/L, the behavioural effects may be translated into important ecological impacts, e.g. at predator-prey interactions where fish competitive advantage can be decreased. Future work should address the link between behaviour disruption and population fitness. The current study was based on a one experiment and multiple endpoint (anchored) approach, allowing the results to be integrated and linked towards a mechanistic understanding.

  9. Multiple-endpoint assay provides a detailed mechanistic view of responses to herbicide exposure in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Holger; Groh, Ksenia J; Schönenberger, René; Behra, Renata; Schirmer, Kristin; Eggen, Rik I L; Suter, Marc J-F

    2012-04-01

    The release of herbicides into the aquatic environment raises concerns about potential detrimental effects on ecologically important non-target species, such as unicellular algae, necessitating ecotoxicological risk assessment. Algal toxicity tests based on growth, a commonly assessed endpoint, are integrative, and hence do not provide information about underlying toxic mechanisms and effects. This limitation may be overcome by measuring more specific biochemical and physiological endpoints. In the present work, we developed and applied a novel multiple-endpoint assay, and analyzed the effects of the herbicides paraquat, diuron and norflurazon, each representing a specific mechanism of toxic action, on the single celled green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The endpoints added to assessment of growth were pigment content, maximum and effective photosystem II quantum yield, ATP content, esterase and oxidative activity. All parameters were measured at 2, 6 and 24h of exposure, except for growth and pigment content, which were determined after 6 and 24h only. Effective concentrations causing 50% of response (EC50s) and lowest observable effect concentrations (LOECs) were determined for all endpoints and exposure durations where possible. The assay provided a detailed picture of the concentration- and time-dependent development of effects elicited by the analyzed herbicides, thus improving the understanding of the underlying toxic mechanisms. Furthermore, the response patterns were unique to the respective herbicide and reflected the different mechanisms of toxicity. The comparison of the endpoint responses and sensitivities revealed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted earlier or stronger to disturbances than growth. Overall, the presented multiple-endpoint assay constitutes a promising basis for investigating stressor and toxicant effects in green algae. PMID:22357416

  10. The Impact of Multiple Endpoint Dependency on "Q" and "I"[superscript 2] in Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Christopher Glen; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2014-01-01

    A common assumption in meta-analysis is that effect sizes are independent. When correlated effect sizes are analyzed using traditional univariate techniques, this assumption is violated. This research assesses the impact of dependence arising from treatment-control studies with multiple endpoints on homogeneity measures "Q" and…

  11. The contribution of physicochemical properties to multiple in vitro cytotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuyan; Jessen, Bart; Strock, Christopher; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Attrition due to safety reasons remains a serious problem for the pharmaceutical industry. This has prompted efforts to develop early predictive in vitro screens that can assist in selecting compounds with a more desirable safety profile early on in the drug discovery process. Here we examined the relationship between physicochemical properties, such as partition coefficient (clogP), topological polar surface area (TPSA), acid dissociation constant (pK(a)), and in vitro mechanistic endpoints generated using a high content imaging approach. We demonstrate in our initial analysis that compounds with clogP>2 and pK(a)>5.5 flagged more endpoints than compounds with clogP ≤ 2 and pK(a) ≤ 5.5. In contrast, TPSA did not stand on its own in predicting cytotoxicity. When this knowledge was applied to eight different mechanistic cytotoxicity endpoints (cell loss, apoptosis, ER stress, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial potential, nuclear size, neutral lipids/steatosis and lysosomal mass), we found that compounds with such properties preferentially flagged in the lysosomal endpoint. We also saw a slight enrichment of such compounds in the endpoints cell loss, DNA fragmentation and nuclear size. We demonstrate that lysosomal compound accumulation is a potential contributor to cell death and possibly organ toxicity.

  12. Evaluation and QSAR modeling on multiple endpoints of estrogen activity based on different bioassays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanxiang; Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2008-02-01

    There is a great need for an effective means of rapidly assessing endocrine-disrupting activity, especially estrogen-simulating activity, due to the large number of chemicals that have serious adverse effects on the environment. Many approaches using a variety of biological screening assays are used to identify endocrine disrupting chemicals. The present investigation analyzes the consistency and peculiarity of information from different experimental assays collected from a literature survey, by studying the correlation of the different endpoints. In addition, the activity values of more widely used selected bioassays have been combined by principle components analysis (PCA) to build one cumulative endpoint, the estrogen activity index (EAI), for priority setting to identify chemicals most likely possessing estrogen activity for early entry into screening. This index was then modeled using only a few theoretical molecular descriptors. The constructed MLR-QSAR model has been statistically validated for its predictive power, and can be proposed as a preliminary evaluative method to screen/prioritize estrogens according to their integrated estrogen activity, just starting from molecular structure.

  13. Human Embryonic Stem Cells have Enhanced Repair of Multiple Forms of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Swistikowa, Anna Maria; Lee, Jae Wan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Su-Ting; CRUZ, AlEXANDRE DA; Rao, Mahendra; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja; Zeng, Xianmin; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells need to maintain genomic integrity so they can retain the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types without propagating DNA errors. Previous studies suggest that mechanisms of genome surveillance, including DNA repair, are superior in mouse embryonic stem cells compared to various differentiated murine cells. Using single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) we found that human embryonic stem cells (BG01, I6) have more efficient repair of different types of DNA damage (generated from H2O2, UV-C, ionizing radiation or psoralen) than human primary fibroblasts (WI-38, hs27), and, with the exception of UV-C damage, HeLa cells. Microarray gene expression analysis showed that mRNA levels of several DNA repair genes are elevated in human embryonic stem cells compared to their differentiated forms (embryoid bodies). These data suggest that genomic maintenance pathways are enhanced in human embryonic stem cells, relative to differentiated human cells. PMID:18566332

  14. A marginal rank-based inverse normal transformation approach to comparing multiple clinical trial endpoints.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaoyu; Li, Huiyun; Liu, Aiyi

    2016-08-30

    The increase in incidence of obesity and chronic diseases and their health care costs have raised the importance of quality diet on the health policy agendas. The healthy eating index is an important measure for diet quality which consists of 12 components derived from ratios of dependent variables with distributions hard to specify, measurement errors and excessive zero observations difficult to model parametrically. Hypothesis testing involving data of such nature poses challenges because the widely used multiple comparison procedures such as Hotelling's T(2) test and Bonferroni correction may suffer from substantial loss of efficiency. We propose a marginal rank-based inverse normal transformation approach to normalizing the marginal distribution of the data before employing a multivariate test procedure. Extensive simulation was conducted to demonstrate the ability of the proposed approach to adequately control the type I error rate as well as increase the power of the test, with data particularly from non-symmetric or heavy-tailed distributions. The methods are exemplified with data from a dietary intervention study for type I diabetic children. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26990442

  15. Analyzing multiple endpoints in clinical trials of pain treatments: IMMPACT recommendations. Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H; McDermott, Michael P; Bellamy, Nicholas; Burke, Laurie B; Chandler, Julie M; Cleeland, Charles S; Cowan, Penney; Dimitrova, Rozalina; Farrar, John T; Hertz, Sharon; Heyse, Joseph F; Iyengar, Smriti; Jadad, Alejandro R; Jay, Gary W; Jermano, John A; Katz, Nathaniel P; Manning, Donald C; Martin, Susan; Max, Mitchell B; McGrath, Patrick; McQuay, Henry J; Quessy, Steve; Rappaport, Bob A; Revicki, Dennis A; Rothman, Margaret; Stauffer, Joseph W; Svensson, Ola; White, Richard E; Witter, James

    2008-10-31

    The increasing complexity of randomized clinical trials and the practice of obtaining a wide variety of measurements from study participants have made the consideration of multiple endpoints a critically important issue in the design, analysis, and interpretation of clinical trials. Failure to consider important outcomes can limit the validity and utility of clinical trials; specifying multiple endpoints for the evaluation of treatment efficacy, however, can increase the rate of false positive conclusions about the efficacy of a treatment. We describe the use of multiple endpoints in the design, analysis, and interpretation of pain clinical trials, and review available strategies and methods for addressing multiplicity. To decrease the probability of a Type I error (i.e., the likelihood of obtaining statistically significant results by chance) in pain clinical trials, the use of gatekeeping procedures and other methods that correct for multiple analyses is recommended when a single primary endpoint does not adequately reflect the overall benefits of treatment. We emphasize the importance of specifying in advance the outcomes and clinical decision rule that will serve as the basis for determining that a treatment is efficacious and the methods that will be used to control the overall Type I error rate. PMID:18706763

  16. Single locus affects embryonic segment polarity and multiple aspects of an adult evolutionary novelty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The characterization of the molecular changes that underlie the origin and diversification of morphological novelties is a key challenge in evolutionary developmental biology. The evolution of such traits is thought to rely largely on co-option of a toolkit of conserved developmental genes that typically perform multiple functions. Mutations that affect both a universal developmental process and the formation of a novelty might shed light onto the genetics of traits not represented in model systems. Here we describe three pleiotropic mutations with large effects on a novel trait, butterfly eyespots, and on a conserved stage of embryogenesis, segment polarity. Results We show that three mutations affecting eyespot size and/or colour composition in Bicyclus anynana butterflies occurred in the same locus, and that two of them are embryonic recessive lethal. Using surgical manipulations and analysis of gene expression patterns in developing wings, we demonstrate that the effects on eyespot morphology are due to changes in the epidermal response component of eyespot induction. Our analysis of morphology and of gene expression in mutant embryos shows that they have a typical segment polarity phenotype, consistent with the mutant locus encoding a negative regulator of Wingless signalling. Conclusions This study characterizes the segregation and developmental effects of alleles at a single locus that controls the morphology of a lineage-specific trait (butterfly eyespots) and a conserved process (embryonic segment polarity and, specifically, the regulation of Wingless signalling). Because no gene with such function was found in the orthologous, highly syntenic genomic regions of two other lepidopterans, we hypothesize that our locus is a yet undescribed, possibly lineage-specific, negative regulator of the conserved Wnt/Wg pathway. Moreover, the fact that this locus interferes with multiple aspects of eyespot morphology and maps to a genomic region containing

  17. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate.

  18. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M.; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  19. Multiple cell and population-level interactions with mouse embryonic stem cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Danielle; Corrigan, Adam M; Miermont, Agnes; McDonel, Patrick; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2015-08-15

    Much of development and disease concerns the generation of gene expression differences between related cells sharing similar niches. However, most analyses of gene expression only assess population and time-averaged levels of steady-state transcription. The mechanisms driving differentiation are buried within snapshots of the average cell, lacking dynamic information and the diverse regulatory history experienced by individual cells. Here, we use a quantitative imaging platform with large time series data sets to determine the regulation of developmental gene expression by cell cycle, lineage, motility and environment. We apply this technology to the regulation of the pluripotency gene Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Our data reveal the diversity of cell and population-level interactions with Nanog dynamics and heterogeneity, and how this regulation responds to triggers of pluripotency. Cell cycles are highly heterogeneous and cycle time increases with Nanog reporter expression, with longer, more variable cycle times as cells approach ground-state pluripotency. Nanog reporter expression is highly stable over multiple cell generations, with fluctuations within cycles confined by an attractor state. Modelling reveals an environmental component to expression stability, in addition to any cell-autonomous behaviour, and we identify interactions of cell density with both cycle behaviour and Nanog. Rex1 expression dynamics showed shared and distinct regulatory effects. Overall, our observations of multiple partially overlapping dynamic heterogeneities imply complex cell and environmental regulation of pluripotent cell behaviour, and suggest simple deterministic views of stem cell states are inappropriate. PMID:26209649

  20. Incorporation of individual-patient data in network meta-analysis for multiple continuous endpoints, with application to diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hwanhee; Fu, Haoda; Price, Karen L; Carlin, Bradley P

    2015-09-10

    Availability of individual patient-level data (IPD) broadens the scope of network meta-analysis (NMA) and enables us to incorporate patient-level information. Although IPD is a potential gold mine in biomedical areas, methodological development has been slow owing to limited access to such data. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian IPD NMA modeling framework for multiple continuous outcomes under both contrast-based and arm-based parameterizations. We incorporate individual covariate-by-treatment interactions to facilitate personalized decision making. Furthermore, we can find subpopulations performing well with a certain drug in terms of predictive outcomes. We also impute missing individual covariates via an MCMC algorithm. We illustrate this approach using diabetes data that include continuous bivariate efficacy outcomes and three baseline covariates and show its practical implications. Finally, we close with a discussion of our results, a review of computational challenges, and a brief description of areas for future research. PMID:25924975

  1. Multiple biomarkers of the cytotoxicity induced by BDE-47 in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huifeng; Cao, Lulu; Li, Fei; Lian, Peiwen; Zhao, Jianmin

    2015-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as brominated flame-retardants in a variety of industrial products. Among these PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetra-bromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is one of the most predominant congeners inducing multiple toxicities, including hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenecity and immunotoxicity in human body. In this study, the cytotoxicity of BDE-47 in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) was investigated by a set of bioassays, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, oxidative stress and metabolic responses as well as gene expressions related to apoptosis. Results showed that BDE-47 induced an inverted U-shaped curve of cell proliferation in HEK293 cells from 10(-6) to 10(-4) M. Cell apoptosis and ROS overproduction were detected at 10(-5) M of BDE-47 (p<0.05). In addition, the expressions of Bcl-2 family-encoding genes (Bad, Hrk and Bcl-2) increased significantly in 10(-4)M group (p<0.05). Metabolic responses indicated that BDE-47 mainly caused disturbance in energy metabolism marked by differentially altered ethanol, glutathione, creatine, aspartate, UDP-glucose and NAD(+). The increased lactate/alanine ratios indicated the higher reductive state induced by BDE-47 in all exposures confirmed by the overproduction of ROS. PMID:25697951

  2. Embryonic stem cell-specific microRNAs contribute to pluripotency by inhibiting regulators of multiple differentiation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Andreas J.; Grandy, William A.; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Dimitrova, Yoana A.; Pachkov, Mikhail; Ciaudo, Constance; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2014-01-01

    The findings that microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential for early development in many species and that embryonic miRNAs can reprogram somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells suggest that these miRNAs act directly on transcriptional and chromatin regulators of pluripotency. To elucidate the transcription regulatory networks immediately downstream of embryonic miRNAs, we extended the motif activity response analysis approach that infers the regulatory impact of both transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs from genome-wide expression states. Applying this approach to multiple experimental data sets generated from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that did or did not express miRNAs of the ESC-specific miR-290-295 cluster, we identified multiple TFs that are direct miRNA targets, some of which are known to be active during cell differentiation. Our results provide new insights into the transcription regulatory network downstream of ESC-specific miRNAs, indicating that these miRNAs act on cell cycle and chromatin regulators at several levels and downregulate TFs that are involved in the innate immune response. PMID:25030899

  3. EndPoints 2000

    2009-08-13

    The application leads the user through a logical framework to determine the minimum effort and cost necessary to reach the desired end state for each space, system, and facility. Endpoints are used to plan the project work, track and manage the determination, management, verification, and closure of D&D endpoints, consistent with DOE End Point guidance documents.

  4. Rationally optimized cryopreservation of multiple mouse embryonic stem cell lines: I—Comparative Fundamental Cryobiology of Multiple Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Lines and the Implications for Embryonic Stem Cell Cryopreservation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Kashuba, Corinna M.; Benson, James D.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    The post-thaw recovery of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) is often assumed to be adequate with current methods. However as this publication will show, this recovery of viable cells actually varies significantly by genetic background. Therefore there is a need to improve the efficiency and reduce the variability of current mESC cryopreservation methods. To address this need, we employed the principles of fundamental cryobiology to improve the cryopreservation protocol of four mESC lines from different genetic backgrounds (BALB/c, CBA, FVB, and 129R1 mESCs) through a comparative study characterizing the membrane permeability characteristics and membrane integrity osmotic tolerance limits of each cell line. In the companion paper, these values were used to predict optimal cryoprotectants, cooling rates, warming rates, and plunge temperatures, and then these predicted optimal protocols were validated against standard freezing protocols. PMID:24384367

  5. Derivation of Multiple Cranial Tissues and Isolation of Lens Epithelium-Like Cells From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a powerful tool to investigate early events occurring during human embryonic development. In the present study, we induced differentiation of hESCs in conditions that allowed formation of neural and non-neural ectoderm and to a lesser extent mesoderm. These tissues are required for correct specification of the neural plate border, an early embryonic transient structure from which neural crest cells (NCs) and cranial placodes (CPs) originate. Although isolation of CP derivatives from hESCs has not been previously reported, isolation of hESC-derived NC-like cells has been already described. We performed a more detailed analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified cell populations using the surface antigens previously used to select hESC-derived NC-like cells, p75 and HNK-1, and uncovered their heterogeneous nature. In addition to the NC component, we identified a neural component within these populations using known surface markers, such as CD15 and FORSE1. We have further exploited this information to facilitate the isolation and purification by FACS of a CP derivative, the lens, from differentiating hESCs. Two surface markers expressed on lens cells, c-Met/HGFR and CD44, were used for positive selection of multiple populations with a simultaneous subtraction of the neural/NC component mediated by p75, HNK-1, and CD15. In particular, the c-Met/HGFR allowed early isolation of proliferative lens epithelium-like cells capable of forming lentoid bodies. Isolation of hESC-derived lens cells represents an important step toward the understanding of human lens development and regeneration and the devising of future therapeutic applications. PMID:23341438

  6. Concise Review: One Stone for Multiple Birds: Generating Universally Compatible Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dejin; Wang, Xiaofang; Xu, Ren-He

    2016-09-01

    With ongoing clinical trials, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have shown substantial potential for regenerative medicine. However, due to the mismatch of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) between hESC-derived allografts and recipients, immunosuppressant regimens must be used to prevent immune rejection of the grafts. Considerable efforts have been devoted to overcoming this hurdle via the derivation and banking of human nuclear transfer ESCs, parthenogenetic ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells. However, ethical and safety concerns remain, hindering the application of these types of pluripotent cells. Other approaches have recently been explored to generate universally compatible hESCs through the silencing or deletion of HLAs or genes essential for HLA expression, including β-2-microglobulin and class-II MHC transactivator, as well as the induction of immunosuppression via the ectopic expression of non-classical HLAs (e.g., HLA-E and -G), cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 fused with immunoglobulin, and programmed death ligand-1. In this review, we introduce developments in this line of research and discuss strategies to reduce the tumorigenic concerns regarding hESCs, especially after they acquire the capability to escape immune surveillance. Stem Cells 2016;34:2269-2275.

  7. CD44 in Differentiated Embryonic Stem Cells: Surface Expression and Transcripts Encoding Multiple Variants

    PubMed Central

    Haegel, Hélène; Dierich, Andrée

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the surface-adhesion molecule CD44 was investigated during the in vitro differentiation of the embryonic stem (ES) cell line D3. By immunofluorescence analysis, totipotent, undifferentiated ES cells did not show surface expression of CD44, although two transcripts of approximately 1.6 and 3.3 kb were detected on Northern blots. Following 1 week of differentiation in either suspension or substrate-attached cultures, CD44 appeared on the surface of some D3 cells, and synthesis of an additional 4.5 kb mRNA species was detected on Northern blots. At this stage, at least three distinct transcripts encoding CD44 variants were induced within the cultures, resulting from alternative splicing of additional exons in the variable domains of CD44. From PCR analysis, they all appeared to contain the variable exon v10, and two of them in addition contained v6. Taken together, these results suggest that CD44 may play a role in cell migration and adhesion in the early development of the mouse embryo. PMID:7542511

  8. Concise Review: One Stone for Multiple Birds: Generating Universally Compatible Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dejin; Wang, Xiaofang; Xu, Ren-He

    2016-09-01

    With ongoing clinical trials, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have shown substantial potential for regenerative medicine. However, due to the mismatch of human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) between hESC-derived allografts and recipients, immunosuppressant regimens must be used to prevent immune rejection of the grafts. Considerable efforts have been devoted to overcoming this hurdle via the derivation and banking of human nuclear transfer ESCs, parthenogenetic ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells. However, ethical and safety concerns remain, hindering the application of these types of pluripotent cells. Other approaches have recently been explored to generate universally compatible hESCs through the silencing or deletion of HLAs or genes essential for HLA expression, including β-2-microglobulin and class-II MHC transactivator, as well as the induction of immunosuppression via the ectopic expression of non-classical HLAs (e.g., HLA-E and -G), cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 fused with immunoglobulin, and programmed death ligand-1. In this review, we introduce developments in this line of research and discuss strategies to reduce the tumorigenic concerns regarding hESCs, especially after they acquire the capability to escape immune surveillance. Stem Cells 2016;34:2269-2275. PMID:27251112

  9. Scenario-targeted toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in a soil posing unacceptable environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Etxebarria, J; Boatti, L; Marigómez, I

    2015-09-01

    Lanestosa is a chronically polluted site (derelict mine) where the soil (Lanestosa (LA) soil) exceeds screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe) for Zn, Pb and Cd. A scenario-targeted toxicity assessment was carried out on the basis of a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with selected test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates and with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. Besides, the toxicity profile was compared with that of the mine runoff (RO) soil and of a fresh artificially polluted soil (LAAPS) resembling LA soil pollutant profile. Extractability studies in LA soil revealed that Pb, Zn and Cd were highly available for exchange and/or release into the environment. Indeed, Pb and Zn were accumulated in earthworms and LA soil resulted to be toxic. Soil respiration, V. fischeri, vegetative and developmental cycles of D. discoideum and survival and juvenile production of E. fetida were severely affected. These results confirmed that LA soil had unacceptable environmental risk and demanded intervention. In contrast, although Pb and Zn concentrations in RO soil revealed also unacceptable risk, both metal extractability and toxicity were much lower than in LA soil. Thus, within the polluted site, the need for intervention varied between areas that posed dissimilar risk. Besides, since LAAPS, with a high exchangeable metal fraction, was the most toxic, ageing under in situ natural conditions seemingly contributed to attenuate LA soil risk. As a whole, combining multi-endpoint bioassays with scenario-targeted analysis (including leaching and ageing) provides reliable risk assessment in soils posing unacceptable environmental risk according to SVs, which is useful to optimise the required intervention measures.

  10. The use of protozoa in ecotoxicology: application of multiple endpoint tests of the ciliate E. crassus for the evaluation of sediment quality in coastal marine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gomiero, A; Dagnino, A; Nasci, C; Viarengo, A

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of surveys describing adverse effects of contaminated sediments on marine organisms, few studies have addressed protists. In this study, the free-crawling marine ciliate Euplotes crassus was evaluated as the test organism for the screening of sediment toxicity using sediments from both coastal and estuarine sites of the Venice Lagoon (Marghera harbour [MH], Valle Millecampi [MV], Murano island [MI] and Lido inlet [LI]). Two endpoints of high ecological value, mortality (Mry) and replication rate (RpR), were assessed in combination with the two sublethal biomarkers of stress, endocytotic rate (Ecy) and lysosomal membrane stability (NRRT). The results showed a significant inhibition of RpR, Ecy and NRRT paralleled by a small and insignificantly increased Mry of the exposed specimens. Our results thus demonstrate that only a combination of mortality and sublethal biomarkers was able to characterise an exposure-related stress syndrome. The suite of biomarkers described here was also able to detect and resolve a pollution-induced stress syndrome at an early stage of pollution. The contamination level of the sediments was assessed using chemical analysis, by estimating bioavailability and by computing a toxic pressure coefficient (TPC) to account for potential additive effects of different pollutants. The observed biological responses were consistent with the contamination levels in sediments, suggesting a high potential for using Protozoa in bioassays to assess environmental risk in coastal marine systems.

  11. ZFP57 recognizes multiple and closely spaced sequence motif variants to maintain repressive epigenetic marks in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Anvar, Zahra; Cammisa, Marco; Riso, Vincenzo; Baglivo, Ilaria; Kukreja, Harpreet; Sparago, Angela; Girardot, Michael; Lad, Shraddha; De Feis, Italia; Cerrato, Flavia; Angelini, Claudia; Feil, Robert; Pedone, Paolo V.; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Riccio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) need to maintain their parental allele-specific DNA methylation during early embryogenesis despite genome-wide demethylation and subsequent de novo methylation. ZFP57 and KAP1 are both required for maintaining the repressive DNA methylation and H3-lysine-9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) at ICRs. In vitro, ZFP57 binds a specific hexanucleotide motif that is enriched at its genomic binding sites. We now demonstrate in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that SNPs disrupting closely-spaced hexanucleotide motifs are associated with lack of ZFP57 binding and H3K9me3 enrichment. Through a transgenic approach in mouse ESCs, we further demonstrate that an ICR fragment containing three ZFP57 motif sequences recapitulates the original methylated or unmethylated status when integrated into the genome at an ectopic position. Mutation of Zfp57 or the hexanucleotide motifs led to loss of ZFP57 binding and DNA methylation of the transgene. Finally, we identified a sequence variant of the hexanucleotide motif that interacts with ZFP57 both in vivo and in vitro. The presence of multiple and closely located copies of ZFP57 motif variants emerges as a distinct characteristic that is required for the faithful maintenance of repressive epigenetic marks at ICRs and other ZFP57 binding sites. PMID:26481358

  12. A U.S. Human Well-being Index (HWBI) for Multiple Scales: Linking Services Provisioning to Human Well-being Endpoints (2000-2010)

    EPA Science Inventory

    objective of this report is to characterize well-being at multiple scales in order to evaluate the relationship of service flows in terms of sustainable well-being. The HWBI results presented represent snapshot assessments for the 2000-2010 time period. Based on the spatial and t...

  13. A multiple endpoint analysis of the effects of chronic exposure to sediment contaminated with Deepwater Horizon oil on juvenile Southern flounder and their associated microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Brown-Peterson, Nancy J; Krasnec, Michelle; Takeshita, Ryan; Ryan, Caitlin N; Griffitt, Kimberly J; Lay, Claire; Mayer, Gregory D; Bayha, Keith M; Hawkins, William E; Lipton, Ian; Morris, Jeffrey; Griffitt, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to oiled sediments can negatively impact the health of fish species. Here, we examine the effects of chronic exposure of juvenile southern flounder, Paralichthys lethostigma, to a sediment-oil mixture. Oil:sediment mixtures are persistent over time and can become bioavailable following sediment perturbation or resuspension. Juvenile flounder were exposed for 32 days under controlled laboratory conditions to five concentrations of naturally weathered Macondo MC252 oil mixed into uncontaminated, field-collected sediments. The percent composition of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of the weathered oil did not change after mixing with the sediment. Spiked exposure sediments contained 0.04-395mg/kg tPAH50 (sum of 50 individual PAH concentration measurements). Mortality increased with both exposure duration and concentration of sediment-associated PAHs, and flounder exposed to concentrations above 8mg/kg tPAH50 showed significantly reduced growth over the course of the experiment. Evident histopathologic changes were observed in liver and gill tissues of fish exposed to more than 8mg/kg tPAH50. All fish at these concentrations showed hepatic intravascular congestion, macrovesicular hepatic vacoulation, telangiectasia of secondary lamellae, and lamellar epithelial proliferation in gill tissues. Dose-dependent upregulation of Cyp1a expression in liver tissues was observed. Taxonomic analysis of gill and intestinal commensal bacterial assemblages showed that exposure to oiled sediments led to distinct shifts in commensal bacterial population structures. These data show that chronic exposure to environmentally-relevant concentrations of oiled sediments produces adverse effects in flounder at multiple biological levels. PMID:26092636

  14. Early events in xenograft development from the human embryonic stem cell line HS181--resemblance with an initial multiple epiblast formation.

    PubMed

    Gertow, Karin; Cedervall, Jessica; Jamil, Seema; Ali, Rouknuddin; Imreh, Marta P; Gulyas, Miklos; Sandstedt, Bengt; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Xenografting is widely used for assessing in vivo pluripotency of human stem cell populations. Here, we report on early to late events in the development of mature experimental teratoma from a well-characterized human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line, HS181. The results show an embryonic process, increasingly chaotic. Active proliferation of the stem cell derived cellular progeny was detected already at day 5, and characterized by the appearance of multiple sites of engraftment, with structures of single or pseudostratified columnar epithelium surrounding small cavities. The striking histological resemblance to developing embryonic ectoderm, and the formation of epiblast-like structures was supported by the expression of the markers OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-4 and KLF4, but a lack of REX1. The early neural marker NESTIN was uniformly expressed, while markers linked to gastrulation, such as BMP-4, NODAL or BRACHYURY were not detected. Thus, observations on day 5 indicated differentiation comparable to the most early transient cell populations in human post implantation development. Confirming and expanding on previous findings from HS181 xenografts, these early events were followed by an increasingly chaotic development, incorporated in the formation of a benign teratoma with complex embryonic components. In the mature HS181 teratomas not all types of organs/tissues were detected, indicating a restricted differentiation, and a lack of adequate spatial developmental cues during the further teratoma formation. Uniquely, a kinetic alignment of rare complex structures was made to human embryos at diagnosed gestation stages, showing minor kinetic deviations between HS181 teratoma and the human counterpart.

  15. Surrogate Endpoints in Suicide Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortzel, Hal S.; Gutierrez, Peter M.; Homaifar, Beeta Y.; Breshears, Ryan E.; Harwood, Jeri E.

    2010-01-01

    Surrogate endpoints frequently substitute for rare outcomes in research. The ability to learn about completed suicides by investigating more readily available and proximate outcomes, such as suicide attempts, has obvious appeal. However, concerns with surrogates from the statistical science perspective exist, and mounting evidence from…

  16. Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbrother, A.; Berg, M. van den

    1995-12-31

    Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

  17. Challenges in translating endpoints from trials to observational cohort studies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Ehrenstein, Vera; Lash, Timothy L; Acquavella, John; Rørth, Mikael; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are considered the gold standard for examining drug efficacy and for approval of new drugs. Medical databases and population surveillance registries are valuable resources for post-approval observational research, which are increasingly used in studies of benefits and risk of new cancer drugs. Here, we address the challenges in translating endpoints from oncology trials to observational studies. Registry-based cohort studies can investigate real-world safety issues - including previously unrecognized concerns - by examining rare endpoints or multiple endpoints at once. In contrast to clinical trials, observational cohort studies typically do not exclude real-world patients from clinical practice, such as old and frail patients with comorbidity. The observational cohort study complements the clinical trial by examining the effectiveness of interventions applied in clinical practice and by providing evidence on long-term clinical outcomes, which are often not feasible to study in a clinical trial. Various endpoints can be included in clinical trials, such as hard endpoints, soft endpoints, surrogate endpoints, and patient-reported endpoints. Each endpoint has it strengths and limitations for use in research studies. Endpoints used in oncology trials are often not applicable in observational cohort studies which are limited by the setting of standard clinical practice and by non-standardized endpoint determination. Observational studies can be more helpful moving research forward if they restrict focus to appropriate and valid endpoints. PMID:27354827

  18. Challenges in translating endpoints from trials to observational cohort studies in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Ording, Anne Gulbech; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Ehrenstein, Vera; Lash, Timothy L; Acquavella, John; Rørth, Mikael; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are considered the gold standard for examining drug efficacy and for approval of new drugs. Medical databases and population surveillance registries are valuable resources for post-approval observational research, which are increasingly used in studies of benefits and risk of new cancer drugs. Here, we address the challenges in translating endpoints from oncology trials to observational studies. Registry-based cohort studies can investigate real-world safety issues – including previously unrecognized concerns – by examining rare endpoints or multiple endpoints at once. In contrast to clinical trials, observational cohort studies typically do not exclude real-world patients from clinical practice, such as old and frail patients with comorbidity. The observational cohort study complements the clinical trial by examining the effectiveness of interventions applied in clinical practice and by providing evidence on long-term clinical outcomes, which are often not feasible to study in a clinical trial. Various endpoints can be included in clinical trials, such as hard endpoints, soft endpoints, surrogate endpoints, and patient-reported endpoints. Each endpoint has it strengths and limitations for use in research studies. Endpoints used in oncology trials are often not applicable in observational cohort studies which are limited by the setting of standard clinical practice and by non-standardized endpoint determination. Observational studies can be more helpful moving research forward if they restrict focus to appropriate and valid endpoints. PMID:27354827

  19. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Multiple Cardiovascular Fates from Embryonic Stem Cells Predicts Novel Regulators in Human Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Lin, Bo; Yang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the gene expression programs which control the early stage cardiovascular development is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of human heart development and heart disease. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of highly purified human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs), hESC-derived Multipotential Cardiovascular Progenitors (MCPs) and MCP-specified three cardiovascular lineages. A novel algorithm, named as Gene Expression Pattern Analyzer (GEPA), was developed to obtain a refined lineage-specificity map of all sequenced genes, which reveals dynamic changes of transcriptional factor networks underlying early human cardiovascular development. Moreover, our GEPA predictions captured ~90% of top-ranked regulatory cardiac genes that were previously predicted based on chromatin signature changes in hESCs, and further defined their cardiovascular lineage-specificities, indicating that our multi-fate comparison analysis could predict novel regulatory genes. Furthermore, GEPA analysis revealed the MCP-specific expressions of genes in ephrin signaling pathway, positive role of which in cardiomyocyte differentiation was further validated experimentally. By using RNA-seq plus GEPA workflow, we also identified stage-specific RNA splicing switch and lineage-enriched long non-coding RNAs during human cardiovascular differentiation. Overall, our study utilized multi-cell-fate transcriptomic comparison analysis to establish a lineage-specific gene expression map for predicting and validating novel regulatory mechanisms underlying early human cardiovascular development. PMID:25997157

  20. Establishing a group of endpoints to support collective operations without specifying unique identifiers for any endpoints

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksom, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanghon

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  1. Evaluation of multiple mechanism-based toxicity endpoints in primary cultured human hepatocytes for the identification of drugs with clinical hepatotoxicity: Results from 152 marketed drugs with known liver injury profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Doshi, Utkarsh; Suzuki, Ayako; Chang, Ching-Wei; Borlak, Jürgen; Li, Albert P; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-01

    We report here the results of a collaborative research program to develop a robust and reliable in vitro system to allow an accurate definition of the drug-induced liver injury (DILI) potential of new drug entities during drug development. The in vitro hepatotoxic potential of 152 drugs with known DILI profiles were evaluated in primary cultured human hepatocytes with four mechanistically-relevant endpoints: cellular ATP depletion, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) depletion, and caspase activation for apoptosis. The drugs, 80 in the testing set and 72 in the validation set, were classified based on serious clinical/regulatory outcomes as defined by reported acute liver failure, black-box warning, and/or withdrawal. The drugs were further sub-categorized for dominant types of liver injury. Logistic regression models were performed to calculate the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC) and to evaluate the prediction potential of the selected endpoints for serious clinical/regulatory outcomes. The ROS/ATP ratio was found to yield an excellent AUROC in both the testing (0.8989, P < 0.0001) and validation set (0.8545, P < 0.0001), and was found to distinguish drugs associated with severe from non-severe DILI cases (p < 0.0001). The results suggest that evaluation of drugs in primary human hepatocytes using the ROS/ATP ratio endpoint may aid the definition of their potential to cause severe DILI. PMID:26581450

  2. TACC3 is a microtubule plus end-tracking protein that promotes axon elongation and also regulates microtubule plus end dynamics in multiple embryonic cell types.

    PubMed

    Nwagbara, Belinda U; Faris, Anna E; Bearce, Elizabeth A; Erdogan, Burcu; Ebbert, Patrick T; Evans, Matthew F; Rutherford, Erin L; Enzenbacher, Tiffany B; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule plus end dynamics are regulated by a conserved family of proteins called plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs). It is unclear how various +TIPs interact with each other and with plus ends to control microtubule behavior. The centrosome-associated protein TACC3, a member of the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) domain family, has been implicated in regulating several aspects of microtubule dynamics. However, TACC3 has not been shown to function as a +TIP in vertebrates. Here we show that TACC3 promotes axon outgrowth and regulates microtubule dynamics by increasing microtubule plus end velocities in vivo. We also demonstrate that TACC3 acts as a +TIP in multiple embryonic cell types and that this requires the conserved C-terminal TACC domain. Using high-resolution live-imaging data on tagged +TIPs, we show that TACC3 localizes to the extreme microtubule plus end, where it lies distal to the microtubule polymerization marker EB1 and directly overlaps with the microtubule polymerase XMAP215. TACC3 also plays a role in regulating XMAP215 stability and localizing XMAP215 to microtubule plus ends. Taken together, our results implicate TACC3 as a +TIP that functions with XMAP215 to regulate microtubule plus end dynamics.

  3. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial nerve development is involved in the etiology of asymmetric facial palsy, and may suggest a link to the etiology of autism.

  4. Behavioral endpoints for radiation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Hunt, W. A.; Dalton, T. B.; Kandasamy, S. B.; Harris, A. H.; Ludewig, B.

    1994-10-01

    The relative behavioral effectiveness of heavy particles was evaluated. Using the taste aversion paradigm in rats, the behavioral toxicity of most types of radiation (including 20Ne and 40Ar) was similar to that of 60Co photons. Only 56Fe and 93Nb particles and fission neutrons were significantly more effective. Using emesis in ferrets as the behavioral endpoint, 56Fe particles and neutrons were again the most effective; however, 60Co photons were significantly more effective than 18 MeV electrons. These results suggest that LET does not completely predict behavioral effectiveness. Additionally, exposing rats to 10 cGy of 56Fe particles attenuated amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning. This behavior is one of a broad class of behaviors which depends on the integrity of the dopaminergic system and suggests the possibility of alterations in these behaviors following exposure to heavy particles in a space radiation environment.

  5. Exact relativistic {beta} decay endpoint spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, S. S.; Nasri, S.; Schechter, J.; Tortola, M. A.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2007-10-15

    The exact relativistic form for the {beta} decay endpoint spectrum is derived and presented in a simple factorized form. We show that our exact formula can be well approximated to yield the endpoint form used in the fit method of the KATRIN Collaboration. We also discuss the three-neutrino case and how information from neutrino oscillation experiments may be useful in analyzing future {beta} decay endpoint experiments.

  6. Impact of weighted composite compared to traditional composite endpoints for the design of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Jeffrey A; Westerhout, Cynthia M; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used in cardiovascular clinical trials. When using a composite endpoint a subject is considered to have an event when the first component endpoint has occurred. The use of composite endpoints offers the ability to incorporate several clinically important endpoint events thereby augmenting the event rate and increasing statistical power for a given sample size. One assumption of the composite is that all component events are of equal clinical importance. This assumption is rarely achieved given the diversity of component endpoints included. One means of adjusting for this diversity is to adjust the outcomes using severity weights determined a priori. The use of a weighted endpoint also allows for the incorporation of multiple endpoints per patient. Although weighting the outcomes lowers the effective number of events, it offers additional information that reduces the variance of the estimate. We created a series of simulation studies to examine the effect on power as the individual components of a typical composite were changed. In one study, we noted that the weighted composite was able to offer discriminative power when the component outcomes were altered, while the traditional method was not. In the other study, we noted that the weighted composite offered a similar level of power to the traditional composite when the change was driven by the more severe endpoints.

  7. Evaluating endocrine endpoints relative to reproductive success in Japanese quail exposed to estrogenic chemicals [poster

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henry, P.F.P.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Casey, C.S.; Abdelnabi, M.A.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The standard US EPA guidelines for avian reproductive testing may not be sufficiently sensitive to detect effects of sublethal and chronic exposure to endocrine disrupting toxins. There is a need to evaluate endocrine endpoints as potential markers for contaminant effects, and to determine their effectiveness and sensitivity when applied to wildlife. To this end, a three generational test was conducted using the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) and a proven estrogenic PCB. Birds were exposed during embryonic development via maternal deposition and/or direct egg injection at day 4. Standard measures of reproductive success and productivity used in toxicological studies, as well as multiple measures of physiological and behavioral responses used in endocrine studies were collected. Long term effects on growth and apparent development were similar between treated and control offspring. Fertility of treated eggs decreased from 75%+ 4.4 (x + se) for P1, to 59% + 12.5 for F1 and 54% + 14.2 for F2. All paired control birds mated to produce viable eggs, whereas 27 % of the F1 and 41 % of the F2 treated pairs failed to produce at least 1 viable egg. Although some decreases in productivity can be related to direct toxic exposure, the response from one generation to the next was not linear with treatment, indicating a potential effect from behavioral or other endocrine alterations.

  8. [Immunological surrogate endpoints to evaluate vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengfei; Li, Jingxin; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Fengcai

    2015-12-01

    An immunological surrogate endpoints is a vaccine-induced immune response (either humoral or cellular immune) that predicts protection against clinical endpoints (infection or disease), and can be used to evaluate vaccine efficacy in clinical vaccine trials. Compared with field efficacy trials observing clinical endpoints, immunological vaccine trials could reduce the sample size or shorten the duration of a trial, which promote the license and development of new candidate vaccines. For these reasons, establishing immunological surrogate endpoints is one of 14 Grand Challenges of Global Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. From two parts of definition and statistical methods for evaluation of surrogate endpoints, this review provides a more comprehensive description. PMID:26887309

  9. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  10. Multi-Toxic Endpoints of the Foodborne Mycotoxins in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhendong; Xue, Kathy S; Sun, Xiulan; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-12-02

    Aflatoxins B₁ (AFB₁), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), T-2 toxin (T-2), and zearalenone (ZEA) are the major foodborne mycotoxins of public health concerns. In the present study, the multiple toxic endpoints of these naturally-occurring mycotoxins were evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans model for their lethality, toxic effects on growth and reproduction, as well as influence on lifespan. We found that the lethality endpoint was more sensitive for T-2 toxicity with the EC50 at 1.38 mg/L, the growth endpoint was relatively sensitive for AFB₁ toxic effects, and the reproduction endpoint was more sensitive for toxicities of AFB₁, FB₁, and ZEA. Moreover, the lifespan endpoint was sensitive to toxic effects of all five tested mycotoxins. Data obtained from this study may serve as an important contribution to knowledge on assessment of mycotoxin toxic effects, especially for assessing developmental and reproductive toxic effects, using the C. elegans model.

  11. Multi-Toxic Endpoints of the Foodborne Mycotoxins in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhendong; Xue, Kathy S.; Sun, Xiulan; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins B1 (AFB1), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B1 (FB1), T-2 toxin (T-2), and zearalenone (ZEA) are the major foodborne mycotoxins of public health concerns. In the present study, the multiple toxic endpoints of these naturally-occurring mycotoxins were evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans model for their lethality, toxic effects on growth and reproduction, as well as influence on lifespan. We found that the lethality endpoint was more sensitive for T-2 toxicity with the EC50 at 1.38 mg/L, the growth endpoint was relatively sensitive for AFB1 toxic effects, and the reproduction endpoint was more sensitive for toxicities of AFB1, FB1, and ZEA. Moreover, the lifespan endpoint was sensitive to toxic effects of all five tested mycotoxins. Data obtained from this study may serve as an important contribution to knowledge on assessment of mycotoxin toxic effects, especially for assessing developmental and reproductive toxic effects, using the C. elegans model. PMID:26633509

  12. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused.

  13. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused. PMID:26003938

  14. Establishing a group of endpoints in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanhong

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  15. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  16. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study that contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.

  17. Enabling communication concurrency through flexible MPI endpoints

    DOE PAGES

    Dinan, James; Grant, Ryan E.; Balaji, Pavan; Goodell, David; Miller, Douglas; Snir, Marc; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-09-23

    MPI defines a one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. This model captures many use cases effectively; however, it also limits communication concurrency and interoperability between MPI and programming models that utilize threads. Our paper describes the MPI endpoints extension, which relaxes the longstanding one-to-one relationship between MPI processes and ranks. Using endpoints, an MPI implementation can map separate communication contexts to threads, allowing them to drive communication independently. Also, endpoints enable threads to be addressable in MPI operations, enhancing interoperability between MPI and other programming models. Furthermore, these characteristics are illustrated through several examples and an empirical study thatmore » contrasts current multithreaded communication performance with the need for high degrees of communication concurrency to achieve peak communication performance.« less

  18. Colonisation endpoints in Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Auranen, Kari; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Goldblatt, David; Nohynek, Hanna; O'Brien, Katherine L; Satzke, Catherine; Simell, Birgit; Tanskanen, Antti; Käyhty, Helena

    2013-12-17

    Evaluating vaccine efficacy for protection against colonisation (VEcol) with bacterial pathogens is an area of growing interest. In this article, we consider estimation of VEcol for colonisation with Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Colonisation is a common, recurrent and multi-type endpoint that requires both careful definition of the vaccine efficacy parameter and the corresponding method of estimation. We review recent developments in the area and provide practical guidelines for choosing the estimand and the estimation method in trials with a colonisation endpoint. We concentrate on methods that are based on a cross-sectional study design, in which only one nasopharyngeal sample is obtained per study subject.

  19. Estimation of endpoints in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, G

    1984-01-01

    A program, written in BASIC, has been developed to estimate rapidly endpoints from a small number of experimental data. The computational method is based on the work of Reed and Muench (Am. J. Hyg. 27, 493 1938). Several endpoints may be estimated in the same run. A subroutine allows the saving of experimental data in disk file and a printout subroutine permits different types of printout (tabular or graphical). Estimation of several infectious doses (ID) of a guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) Chlamydia psittaci strain is given as sample run.

  20. Sublethal Toxicity Endpoints of Heavy Metals to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, is commonly used as a model organism in ecotoxicological studies. The current literatures have provided useful insight into the relative sensitivity of several endpoints, but few direct comparisons of multiple endpoints under a common set of experimental conditions. The objective of this study was to determine appropriate sublethal endpoints to develop an ecotoxicity screening and monitoring system. C. elegans was applied to explore the sublethal toxicity of four heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium and chromium). Two physiological endpoints (growth and reproduction), three behavioral endpoints (head thrash frequency, body bend frequency and feeding) and two enzymatic endpoints (acetylcholine esterase [AChE] and superoxide dismutase [SOD]) were selected for the assessment of heavy metal toxicity. The squared correlation coefficients (R2) between the responses observed and fitted by Logit function were higher than 0.90 and the RMSE were lower than 0.10, indicating a good significance statistically. There was no significant difference among the half effect concentration (EC50) endpoints in physiological and behavioral effects of the four heavy metals, indicating similar sensitivity of physiological and behavioral effects. AChE enzyme was more sensitive to copper, zinc, and cadmium than to other physiological and behavioral effects, and SOD enzyme was most sensitive to chromium. The EC50 of copper, zinc, and cadmium, to the AChE enzyme in the nematodes were 0.68 mg/L, 2.76 mg/L, and 0.92 mg/L respectively and the EC50 of chromium to the SOD enzyme in the nematode was 1.58 mg/L. The results of this study showed that there was a good concentration-response relationship between all four heavy metals and the sublethal toxicity effects to C. elegans. Considering these sublethal endpoints in terms of simplicity, accuracy, repeatability and costs of the experiments, feeding is the relatively ideal sublethal toxicity endpoint of

  1. Sublethal Toxicity Endpoints of Heavy Metals to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Chen, Jiandong; Wu, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huixin

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, is commonly used as a model organism in ecotoxicological studies. The current literatures have provided useful insight into the relative sensitivity of several endpoints, but few direct comparisons of multiple endpoints under a common set of experimental conditions. The objective of this study was to determine appropriate sublethal endpoints to develop an ecotoxicity screening and monitoring system. C. elegans was applied to explore the sublethal toxicity of four heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium and chromium). Two physiological endpoints (growth and reproduction), three behavioral endpoints (head thrash frequency, body bend frequency and feeding) and two enzymatic endpoints (acetylcholine esterase [AChE] and superoxide dismutase [SOD]) were selected for the assessment of heavy metal toxicity. The squared correlation coefficients (R2) between the responses observed and fitted by Logit function were higher than 0.90 and the RMSE were lower than 0.10, indicating a good significance statistically. There was no significant difference among the half effect concentration (EC50) endpoints in physiological and behavioral effects of the four heavy metals, indicating similar sensitivity of physiological and behavioral effects. AChE enzyme was more sensitive to copper, zinc, and cadmium than to other physiological and behavioral effects, and SOD enzyme was most sensitive to chromium. The EC50 of copper, zinc, and cadmium, to the AChE enzyme in the nematodes were 0.68 mg/L, 2.76 mg/L, and 0.92 mg/L respectively and the EC50 of chromium to the SOD enzyme in the nematode was 1.58 mg/L. The results of this study showed that there was a good concentration-response relationship between all four heavy metals and the sublethal toxicity effects to C. elegans. Considering these sublethal endpoints in terms of simplicity, accuracy, repeatability and costs of the experiments, feeding is the relatively ideal sublethal toxicity endpoint of

  2. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT - MIDPOINTS VS. ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The question of whether to use midpoints or endpoints or both in an LCIA framework is often dependent upon the goal and scope and the decision that is being supported by the LCIA. LCIAs for Enlightenment may not require an aggregation of impact categories and may be most useful ...

  3. IPF clinical trial design and endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Steven D.; Meyer, Keith C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review There remains a dire need for therapies that impact the clinical course of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Indeed, there is a surge of interest in IPF therapeutics, with many candidate agents in various stages of development. Optimal design and implementation of the appropriate prospective clinical trials are essential to demonstrate clinical efficacy of promising drugs for the treatment of IPF. A key element in the success of such clinical trials is the choice of the best endpoint(s) to match the design of the study. Recent findings Although the results of many IPF clinical trials have been disappointing, these trials have provided valuable insights into the epidemiology and natural history of the disease and have sparked debate into the best clinical trial designs and endpoints. Summary This review will discuss the various clinical trial endpoints that have been used or proposed with a focus on their potential utility, as well as possible pitfalls that investigators should consider in the design of such studies. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/COPM/A13 PMID:25022315

  4. Shift endpoint trace selection algorithm and wavelet analysis to detect the endpoint using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Zakour, Sihem; Taleb, Hassen

    2016-06-01

    Endpoint detection (EPD) is very important undertaking on the side of getting a good understanding and figuring out if a plasma etching process is done on the right way. It is truly a crucial part of supplying repeatable effects in every single wafer. When the film to be etched has been completely erased, the endpoint is reached. In order to ensure the desired device performance on the produced integrated circuit, many sensors are used to detect the endpoint, such as the optical, electrical, acoustical/vibrational, thermal, and frictional. But, except the optical sensor, the other ones show their weaknesses due to the environmental conditions which affect the exactness of reaching endpoint. Unfortunately, some exposed area to the film to be etched is very low (<0.5%), reflecting low signal and showing the incapacity of the traditional endpoint detection method to determine the wind-up of the etch process. This work has provided a means to improve the endpoint detection sensitivity by collecting a huge numbers of full spectral data containing 1201 spectra for each run, then a new unsophisticated algorithm is proposed to select the important endpoint traces named shift endpoint trace selection (SETS). Then, a sensitivity analysis of linear methods named principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), and the nonlinear method called wavelet analysis (WA) for both approximation and details will be studied to compare performances of the methods mentioned above. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) is not only computed based on the main etch (ME) period but also the over etch (OE) period. Moreover, a new unused statistic for EPD, coefficient of variation (CV), is proposed to reach the endpoint in plasma etches process.

  5. Murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 expresses all subtypes of muscarinic receptors and multiple nicotinic receptor subunits: Down-regulation of α4- and β4-subunits during early differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Susanne; Schmitz, Luise; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Anspach, Laura; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Wessler, Ignaz

    2015-11-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine mediates its cellular effects via stimulation of the G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors and the ligand-gated ion channel nicotinic receptors. The murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 synthesizes and releases non-neuronal acetylcholine. In the present study a systematic investigation of the expression of nicotinic receptor subunits and muscarinic receptors was performed, when the stem cells were grown in the presence or absence of LIF, as the latter condition induces early differentiation. CGR8 cells expressed multiple nicotinic receptor subtypes (α3, α4, α7, α9, α10, β1, β2, β3, β4, γ, δ, ε) and muscarinic receptors (M1, M3, M4, M5); M2 was detected only in 2 out of 8 cultures. LIF removal caused a down-regulation only of the α4- and β4-subunit. In conclusion, more or less the whole repertoire of cholinergic receptors is expressed on the murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 for mediating cellular signaling of non-neuronal acetylcholine which acts via auto- and paracrine pathways. During early differentiation of the murine CGR8 stem cell signaling via nicotinic receptors containing α4- or β4 subunits is reduced. Thus, the so-called neuronal α4 nicotine receptor composed of these subunits may be involved in the regulation of pluripotency in this murine stem cell line.

  6. Improvement in latent variable indirect response joint modeling of a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui

    2016-02-01

    Improving the quality of exposure-response modeling is important in clinical drug development. The general joint modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress on the latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate, when modeling a continuous and a categorical clinical endpoint, the level of improvement achievable by joint modeling in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters for the individual endpoints, guided by the appropriate representation of drug and placebo mechanism. This was illustrated with data from two phase III clinical trials of intravenously administered mAb X for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and 20, 50, and 70% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR20, ACR50, and ACR70) disease severity criteria were used as efficacy endpoints. The joint modeling framework led to a parsimonious final model with reasonable performance, evaluated by visual predictive check. The results showed that, compared with the more common approach of separately modeling the endpoints, it is possible for the joint model to be more parsimonious and yet better describe the individual endpoints. In particular, the joint model may better describe one endpoint through subject-specific random effects that would not have been estimable from data of this endpoint alone.

  7. A specific endpoint assay for ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, I A; Warms, J V

    1987-01-01

    Simple endpoint assays for free ubiquitin (Ub) and for the Ub-activating enzyme are described. The method for measuring Ub makes use of the reaction of iodoacetamide-treated Ub-activating enzyme (E): [3H]ATP + Ub + E----E X [3H]AMP-Ub + PPi and PPi----2Pi (in the presence of pyrophosphatase). The Ub is then measured by determining the acid-insoluble radioactivity. The reaction is accompanied by a slow enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of the complex to AMP plus Ub. The presence of ubiquitin-activating enzyme in excess of Ub by approximately equal to 0.1 microM assures that the steady state will be close to the endpoint for total Ub. A preparation of the activating enzyme from human erythrocytes that does not depend on affinity chromatography is described. Several applications of the assay are presented. PMID:3031643

  8. Scaling for interfacial tensions near critical endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Shun-Yong; Fisher, Michael E

    2005-01-01

    Parametric scaling representations are obtained and studied for the asymptotic behavior of interfacial tensions in the full neighborhood of a fluid (or Ising-type) critical endpoint, i.e., as a function both of temperature and of density/order parameter or chemical potential/ordering field. Accurate nonclassical critical exponents and reliable estimates for the universal amplitude ratios are included naturally on the basis of the "extended de Gennes-Fisher" local-functional theory. Serious defects in previous scaling treatments are rectified and complete wetting behavior is represented; however, quantitatively small, but unphysical residual nonanalyticities on the wetting side of the critical isotherm are smoothed out "manually." Comparisons with the limited available observations are presented elsewhere but the theory invites new, searching experiments and simulations, e.g., for the vapor-liquid interfacial tension on the two sides of the critical endpoint isotherm for which an amplitude ratio -3.25+/-0.05 is predicted.

  9. Improved Endpoints for Cancer Immunotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; Janetzki, Sylvia; Hodi, F. Stephen; Ibrahim, Ramy; Anderson, Aparna; Humphrey, Rachel; Blumenstein, Brent; Wolchok, Jedd

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluation of some immunotherapy clinical trials require a new development paradigm that includes reconsideration of established endpoints. Between 2004 and 2009, several initiatives facilitated by the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute and partner organizations systematically evaluated an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and created the principles for redefining trial endpoints. On this basis, a body of clinical and laboratory data was generated that supports three novel endpoint recommendations. First, cellular immune response assays generate highly variable results. Assay harmonization in multicenter trials may minimize variability and help to establish cellular immune response as a reproducible biomarker, thus allowing investigation of its relationship with clinical outcomes. Second, immunotherapy may induce novel patterns of antitumor response not captured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors or World Health Organization criteria. New immune-related response criteria were defined to more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Third, delayed separation of Kaplan–Meier curves in randomized immunotherapy trials can affect results. Altered statistical models describing hazard ratios as a function of time and recognizing differences before and after separation of curves may allow improved planning of phase III trials. These recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy trials and may offer a more realistic and useful model for clinical investigation. PMID:20826737

  10. Protein patterns as endpoints in environmental remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.; Brown, D.

    1995-12-31

    Biological endpoints can complement chemical analyses in monitoring environmental remediation. In some cases the levels of chemical detection are so low that the costs of clean-up to no detection would be prohibitive. And chemical tests do not indicate the availability of the contaminants to the biota. On the other hand many if not most biological tests lack specificity. The authors have investigated a protein expression assay to establish an endpoint for clean-up of sulfur mustard and breakdown products. Earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) were exposed to sulfur mustard (SM), a breakdown product thiodiethanol (TDE), and ethylene glycol, the solvent for the two chemicals. Tissue from the lining of the coelomic cavity was taken from each of 6 worms in each treatment class. Soluble proteins were extracted and separated on one and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) gels. The 1 D gels showed no difference by eye but the patterns from control and solvent control worms on 2D gels differed from those of worms exposed to TDE and SM. The 1D gel data were digitized and analyzed by pattern recognition using artificial neural networks. The protein patterns under the two treatments and the two controls were learned in one set of data and successfully recognized in a second. This indicated that what was learned was useful in recognizing patterns induced by SM and TDE. Thus a possible endpoint for remediation would be the protein pattern at no effect levels of chemicals of interest.

  11. Ecosystem Services as Assessment Endpoints in Ecological Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The focus of ecological risk assessment (ERA) is on assessment endpoints, explicit expressions of environmental values to be protected. Traditionally, the ecological entities identified in assessment endpoints have been components of ecosystems deemed by risk assessors to be impo...

  12. Some Endpoint Results for β-Generalized Weak Contractive Multifunctions

    PubMed Central

    Alikhani, H.; Gopal, D.; Miandaragh, M. A.; Rezapour, Sh.; Shahzad, N.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce β-generalized weak contractive multifunctions and give some results about endpoints of the multifunctions. Also, we give some results about role of a point in the existence of endpoints. PMID:24348197

  13. Rationally optimized cryopreservation of multiple mouse embryonic stem cell lines: II—Mathematical prediction and experimental validation of optimal cryopreservation protocols☆

    PubMed Central

    Kashuba, Corinna M.; Benson, James D.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    In Part I, we documented differences in cryopreservation success measured by membrane integrity in four mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines from different genetic backgrounds (BALB/c, CBA, FVB, and 129R1), and we demonstrated a potential biophysical basis for these differences through a comparative study characterizing the membrane permeability characteristics and osmotic tolerance limits of each cell line. Here we use these values to predict optimal cryoprotectants, cooling rates, warming rates, and plunge temperatures. We subsequently verified these predictions experimentally for their effects on post-thaw recovery. From this study, we determined that a cryopreservation protocol utilizing 1 M propylene glycol, a cooling rate of 1 °C/minute, and plunging into liquid nitrogen at −41 °C, combined with subsequent warming in a 22 °C water bath with agitation, significantly improved post-thaw recovery for three of the four mESC lines, and did not diminish post-thaw recovery for our single exception. It is proposed that this protocol can be successfully applied to most mESC lines beyond those included within this study once the effect of propylene glycol on mESC gene expression, growth characteristics, and germ-line transmission has been determined. Mouse ESC lines with poor survival using current standard cryopreservation protocols or our proposed protocol can be optimized on a case-by-case basis using the method we have outlined over two papers. For our single exception, the CBA cell line, a cooling rate of 5 °C/minute in the presence of 1.0 M dimethyl sulfoxide or 1.0 M propylene glycol, combined with plunge temperature of −80 °C was optimal. PMID:24560712

  14. The Role of Ecological Endpoints in Watershed Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape change and pollution in watersheds affect ecological endpoints in receiving water bodies. Therefore, these endpoints are useful in watershed management. Fish and benthic macro invertebrates are often used as endpoints, since they are easily measured in the field and int...

  15. Clinical trial endpoints in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Shaw, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The development and use of consensus criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and the inclusion of recently identified markers of renal parenchymal damage as endpoints in clinical trials have improved the ability of physicians to compare the incidence and severity of AKI across patient populations, provided targets for testing new treatments, and may increase insight into the mechanisms of AKI. To date, these markers have not consistently translated into important clinical outcomes. Is that because these markers of renal injury/dysfunction are measurements of process of care (and not indicative of persistently impaired renal function), or is it because patients do actually recover from AKI? Physicians currently have limited ability to measure renal function reserve, and the ultimate consequence of a case of AKI on long-term morbidity remains unclear. There is little doubt that groups of patients who develop AKI have worse outcomes than groups of patients who do not, but investigators are now realizing the value of measuring clinically meaningful renal endpoints in all subjects enrolled in AKI clinical trials. Important examples of these outcomes include persistently impaired renal function, new hemodialysis, and death. We propose that these major adverse kidney events (MAKE) be included in all effectiveness clinical trials. Adaptation of the MAKE composite assessed 30, 60, or 90 days following AKI (i.e., MAKE30 or MAKE90) will improve our capacity to understand and treat AKI and may also provide a consensus composite to allow comparison of different interventions. Primary endpoints for phase I and II clinical trials, on the other hand, should continue to use continuous markers of renal injury/dysfunction as well as 'hard' clinical outcomes in order to generate meaningful data with limited subject exposure to untested treatments. By doing so, investigators may assess safety without requiring large sample sizes, demonstrate treatment effect of an unknown

  16. Elevated Nuclear and Cytoplasmic FTY720-Phosphate in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts Suggests the Potential for Multiple Mechanisms in FTY720-Induced Neural Tube Defects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FTY720 (fingolimod) is an FDA-approved drug to treat relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. FTY720 treatment in pregnant inbred LM/Bc mice results in approximately 60% of embryos having a neural tube defect (NTD). Sphingosine kinases (Sphk1, Sphk2) phosphorylate FTY720 in vivo to form the bioactive...

  17. Strategies and Endpoints of Antifibrotic Drug Trials

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie; Dranoff, Jonathan A.; Schuppan, Detlef; Friedman, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop antifibrotic therapies for chronic liver disease, and to clarify which endpoints in antifibrotic trials will be acceptable to regulatory agencies. AASLD sponsored an endpoints conference to help accelerate the efficient testing of antifibrotic agents and to develop recommendations on clinical trial design for liver fibrosis. In this review we summarize the salient and novel elements of this conference and provide directions for future clinical trial design. The paper follows the structure of the conference and is organized into five areas: I) Antifibrotic trial design; II) Preclinical proof of concept studies; III) Pharmacologic targets: rationale and lessons to learn; IV) Rational drug design and development; V) Consensus and recommendations on design of clinical trials in liver fibrosis. Expert overviews and collaborative discussions helped to summarize the key unmet needs and directions for the future, including: 1) Greater clarification of at-risk populations and study groups; 2) Standardization of all elements of drug discovery and testing; 3) Standardization of clinical trial approaches; 4) Accelerated development of improved non-invasive markers; 5) Need for exploration of potential off-target toxicities of future antifibrotic drugs. PMID:25626988

  18. Population growth rate determinants for Arbacia: Evaluating ecological relevance of toxicity test endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Nacci, D.; Gleason, T.; Munns, W.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A population dynamics model for the sea urchin, Arbacia punctulata, was recently developed incorporating life stage endpoints frequently measured in acute and chronic toxicity studies. Model elasticity analysis was used to demonstrate that population growth rate was influenced most by adult survival and least by early life stage success, calling into question the ecological relevance of results from standardized Arbacia fertilization and larval development toxicity tests. Two approaches were used to continue this evaluation. Actual and hypothetical dose-response curves for toxicant exposures over multiple life stages were used to evaluate contributions to population growth rate of stage-specific toxicant effects. Additionally, relationships between critical life stages were developed from laboratory data for Arbacia. The results of this analysis underscore the importance of understanding both endpoint sensitivity to toxicants and sensitivity of population growth rate to test endpoints in determining the ecological relevance of toxicity tests results.

  19. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  20. Ecosystem services as assessment endpoints for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Munns, Wayne R; Rea, Anne W; Suter, Glenn W; Martin, Lawrence; Blake-Hedges, Lynne; Crk, Tanja; Davis, Christine; Ferreira, Gina; Jordan, Steve; Mahoney, Michele; Barron, Mace G

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services are defined as the outputs of ecological processes that contribute to human welfare or have the potential to do so in the future. Those outputs include food and drinking water, clean air and water, and pollinated crops. The need to protect the services provided by natural systems has been recognized previously, but ecosystem services have not been formally incorporated into ecological risk assessment practice in a general way in the United States. Endpoints used conventionally in ecological risk assessment, derived directly from the state of the ecosystem (e.g., biophysical structure and processes), and endpoints based on ecosystem services serve different purposes. Conventional endpoints are ecologically important and susceptible entities and attributes that are protected under US laws and regulations. Ecosystem service endpoints are a conceptual and analytical step beyond conventional endpoints and are intended to complement conventional endpoints by linking and extending endpoints to goods and services with more obvious benefit to humans. Conventional endpoints can be related to ecosystem services even when the latter are not considered explicitly during problem formulation. To advance the use of ecosystem service endpoints in ecological risk assessment, the US Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Assessment Forum has added generic endpoints based on ecosystem services (ES-GEAE) to the original 2003 set of generic ecological assessment endpoints (GEAEs). Like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are defined by an entity and an attribute. Also like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are broadly described and will need to be made specific when applied to individual assessments. Adoption of ecosystem services as a type of assessment endpoint is intended to improve the value of risk assessment to environmental decision making, linking ecological risk to human well-being, and providing an improved means of communicating those risks. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  1. Ecosystem services as assessment endpoints for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Munns, Wayne R; Rea, Anne W; Suter, Glenn W; Martin, Lawrence; Blake-Hedges, Lynne; Crk, Tanja; Davis, Christine; Ferreira, Gina; Jordan, Steve; Mahoney, Michele; Barron, Mace G

    2016-07-01

    Ecosystem services are defined as the outputs of ecological processes that contribute to human welfare or have the potential to do so in the future. Those outputs include food and drinking water, clean air and water, and pollinated crops. The need to protect the services provided by natural systems has been recognized previously, but ecosystem services have not been formally incorporated into ecological risk assessment practice in a general way in the United States. Endpoints used conventionally in ecological risk assessment, derived directly from the state of the ecosystem (e.g., biophysical structure and processes), and endpoints based on ecosystem services serve different purposes. Conventional endpoints are ecologically important and susceptible entities and attributes that are protected under US laws and regulations. Ecosystem service endpoints are a conceptual and analytical step beyond conventional endpoints and are intended to complement conventional endpoints by linking and extending endpoints to goods and services with more obvious benefit to humans. Conventional endpoints can be related to ecosystem services even when the latter are not considered explicitly during problem formulation. To advance the use of ecosystem service endpoints in ecological risk assessment, the US Environmental Protection Agency's Risk Assessment Forum has added generic endpoints based on ecosystem services (ES-GEAE) to the original 2003 set of generic ecological assessment endpoints (GEAEs). Like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are defined by an entity and an attribute. Also like conventional GEAEs, ES-GEAEs are broadly described and will need to be made specific when applied to individual assessments. Adoption of ecosystem services as a type of assessment endpoint is intended to improve the value of risk assessment to environmental decision making, linking ecological risk to human well-being, and providing an improved means of communicating those risks. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  2. Factors affecting spontaneous reduction of corpora lutea and twin embryos during the late embryonic/early fetal period in multiple-ovulating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    López-Gatius, F; García-Ispierto, I; Hunter, R H F

    2010-02-01

    Spontaneous reduction of advanced twin embryos has been described in high-producing, Holstein-Fresian (Bos taurus) dairy herds. The first objective of the current study was to determine whether management and cow factors could have an effect on such a reduction in twin pregnancies during the early fetal period. Because loss of a corpus luteum was noted in cows suffering twin reduction, we expanded our study to include multiple-ovulating cows carrying singletons. Pregnancy was diagnosed and confirmed from Days 28 to 34 and 56 to 62 postinsemination. Sixty-nine (23.5%) of 293 pregnant cows with two corpora lutea carrying singletons and 132 (28.4%) of 464 twin pregnancies recorded on first pregnancy diagnosis subsequently lost one of the corpora lutea or one of the embryos, respectively. Thirty-four (25.8%) of the 132 twin pregnancies suffering embryo reduction lost one corpus luteum along with the embryo. Corpus luteum reduction always occurred in the ovary ipsilateral to the gravid horn suffering embryo reduction. Binary logistic regressions were performed considering corpus luteum and embryo reduction as dependent variables in single and twin pregnancies, respectively, and several management- and cow-related factors as independent variables. In cows carrying singletons, the risk of corpus luteum reduction was 14.3 (1/0.07) times lower for a given herd, whereas the interaction season by laterality significantly affected corpus luteum reduction such that in cows with two corpora lutea ipsilateral to the horn of pregnancy, the risk of reduction decreased during the winter period. In cows carrying twins, ipsilateral twin pregnancies were 3.45 (1/0.29) times more likely to undergo the loss of one embryo than bilateral twin pregnancies. As an overall conclusion, both corpora lutea and embryos were vulnerable to the effects of stress factors during the early fetal period in cows maintaining their pregnancies. A strong unilateral relationship between the corpus luteum and

  3. Endpoint distinctiveness facilitates analogical mapping in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2015-03-01

    Analogical thinking necessitates mapping shared relations across two separate domains. We investigated whether pigeons could learn faster with ordinal mapping of relations across two physical dimensions (circle size & choice spatial position) relative to random mapping of these relations. Pigeons were trained to relate six circular samples of different sizes to horizontally positioned choice locations in a six alternative matching-to-sample task. Three pigeons were trained in a mapped condition in which circle size mapped directly onto choice spatial position. Three other pigeons were trained in a random condition in which the relations between size and choice position were arbitrarily assigned. The mapped group showed an advantage over the random group in acquiring this task. In a subsequent second phase, relations between the dimensions were ordinally reversed for the mapped group and re-randomized for the random group. There was no difference in how quickly matching accuracy re-emerged in the two groups, although the mapped group eventually performed more accurately. Analyses suggested this mapped advantage was likely due to endpoint distinctiveness and the benefits of proximity errors during choice responding rather than a conceptual or relational advantage attributable to the common or ordinal mapping of the two dimensions. This potential difficulty in mapping relations across dimensions may limit the pigeons' capacity for more advanced types of analogical reasoning. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall.

  4. Holographic endpoint of spatially modulated phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2010-12-15

    In a previous paper [S. Nakamura, H. Ooguri, and C. S. Park, Phys. Rev. D 81, 044018 (2010)], we showed that the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole in the five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space coupled to the Maxwell theory with the Chern-Simons term is unstable when the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently large. In the dual conformal field theory, the instability suggests a spatially modulated phase transition. In this paper, we construct and analyze nonlinear solutions which describe the endpoint of this phase transition. In the limit where the Chern-Simons coupling is large, we find that the phase transition is of the second order with the mean field critical exponent. However, the dispersion relation with the Van Hove singularity enhances quantum corrections in the bulk, and we argue that this changes the order of the phase transition from the second to the first. We compute linear response functions in the nonlinear solution and find an infinite off-diagonal DC conductivity in the new phase.

  5. Evaluation of Gene Expression Endpoints in the Context of a Xenopus laevis Metamorphosis-based Bioassay to Detect Thyroid Hormone Disruptors

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accentuates the need to examine multiple tissues and provides critical information required for optimization of exposure regimens and endpoint assessments that focus on the detection of disruption in TH-regulatory systems.

  6. Evaluation of 309 Environmental Chemicals Using a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kelly J.; Barrier, Marianne; Jeffay, Susan; Nichols, Harriette P.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Singh, Amar V.; Reif, David M.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Judson, Richard S.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert; Hunter, Edward S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7) and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™) were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500) revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26) that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A) were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation. PMID:21666745

  7. Computer Model for Prediction of PCB Dechlorination and Biodegradation Endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Just, E.M.; Klasson, T.

    1999-04-19

    Mathematical modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) transformation served as a means of predicting possible endpoints of bioremediation, thus allowing evaluation of several of the most common transformation patterns. Correlation between laboratory-observed and predicted endpoint data was, in some cases, as good as 0.98 (perfect correlation = 1.0).

  8. Current state of clinical end-points assessment in transplant: Key points.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Domingo; Muriel, Alfonso; Abraira, Víctor

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ disease. However, organ transplantation can stress the cardiovascular system and decrease immune surveillance, leading to early mortality and graft loss due to multiple underlying comorbidities. Clinical end-points in transplant include death and graft failure. Thus, generating accurate predictive models through regression models is crucial to test for definitive clinical post-transplantation end-points. Survival predictive models should assemble efficient surrogate markers or prognostic factors to generate a minimal set of variables derived from a proper modeling strategy through regression models. However, a few critical points should be considered when reporting survival analyses and regression models to achieve proper discrimination and calibration of the predictive models. Additionally, population-based risk scores may underestimate risk prediction in transplant. The application of predictive models in these patients should therefore incorporate both classical and non-classical risk factors, as well as community-based health indicators and transplant-specific factors to quantify the outcomes in terms of survival properly. This review focuses on assessment of clinical end-points in transplant through regression models by combining predictive and surrogate variables, and considering key points in these analyses to accurately predict definitive end-points, which could aid clinicians in decision making. PMID:26948088

  9. Embryonal cancers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Gemma; Ferrari, Andrea; Stiller, Charles A; Pastore, Guido; Bisogno, Gianni; Trama, Annalisa; Capocaccia, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Embryonal cancers are a heterogeneous group of rare cancers which mainly occur in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to estimate the burden (incidence, prevalence, survival and proportion of cured) for the principal embryonal cancers in Europe (EU27), using population-based data from cancer registries (CRs) participating in RARECARE. We identified 3322 cases diagnosed from 1995 to 2002 (latest period for which data are available): 44% neuroblastoma, 35% nephroblastoma, 13% retinoblastoma and 6% hepatoblastoma. Very few cases of pulmonary blastoma (43 cases) and pancreatoblastoma (seven cases) were diagnosed. About 2000 new embryonal cancers were estimated every year in EU27, for an annual incidence rate of 4 per million (1.8 neuroblastoma, 1.4 nephroblastoma, and 0.5 retinoblastoma); 91% of cases occurred in patients under 15 years. Five-year relative survival for all embryonal cancers was 80% (99% retinoblastoma, 90% nephroblastoma, 71% hepatoblastoma and 68% neuroblastoma). Overall survival was lower in adolescents and adults than in those under 15 years. The cure rate was estimated at 80%. Slightly less than 40,000 persons were estimated alive in EU27 with a diagnosis of embryonal cancer in 2008. Nephroblastoma was the most prevalent (18,150 cases in EU27), followed by neuroblastoma (12,100), retinoblastoma (5200), hepatoblastoma (2700) and pulmonary blastoma (614). This is the first study to delineate the embryonal cancer burden in Europe by age, sex and European region. Survival/cure rate is generally high, but there are considerable gaps in our understanding of the natural histories of these rare diseases particularly in adults.

  10. Choice of study endpoint significantly impacts the results of breast cancer trials evaluating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Hutton, Brian; Dranitsaris, George; Vandermeer, Lisa; Smith, Stephanie; Clemons, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endpoints can be used to evaluate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These endpoints reflect the various combinations of vomiting, nausea and rescue antiemetic use in the acute (0-24 h), delayed (>24-120 h) and overall (0-120 h) periods after chemotherapy. As the choice of outcome measure could potentially change the interpretation of clinical trial results, we evaluated CINV rates using different endpoints on a single dataset from a prospective cohort. Data from 177 breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy was used to calculate CINV control rates using the 15 most commonly reported CINV endpoints. As nausea remains such a significant symptom, we explored the frequency at which pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical company-funded studies included measures of nausea in their primary study endpoint. CINV control rates ranged from 12.5 %, 95 % (CI 7.6-17.4 %) for total control (no vomiting, no nausea and no rescue medication) in the overall period to 77.4 %, 95 % (CI 71.2-83.6 %) for no vomiting in the overall period. Similar differences were found in the acute and delayed periods. Non-pharmaceutical company-funded trials were more likely to include a measure of nausea in the primary study outcome (9/18, 50 %) than pharmaceutical-funded trials (1/12, 8.3 %). The choice of trial endpoint has an important impact on reported CINV control rates and could significantly impact on interpretation of the results. Primary endpoints of studies, including those mandated by regulatory bodies, should account for nausea to reflect patient experience. Reporting of endpoints should be more comprehensive to allow for cross-trial comparisons.

  11. Exactly solvable model for the QCD tricritical endpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A.

    2008-09-15

    An inclusion of temperature and chemical-potential-dependent surface-tension in the gas of quark-gluon bags model resolves a long-standing problem of a unified description of the first-and second-order phase transition with the crossover. The suggested model has an exact analytical solution and allows one to rigorously study the vicinity of the critical endpoint of the deconfinement phase transition. It is found that, at the curve of a zero surface-tension coefficient, there must exist the surface-induced phase transition of the seond or higher order. The present model predicts that the critical endpoint of quantum chromodynamics is the tricritical endpoint.

  12. Composite risk scores and composite endpoints in the risk prediction of outcomes in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation. The Loire Valley Atrial Fibrillation Project.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A; Fauchier, L; Bernard-Brunet, A; Clementy, N; Lip, G Y H

    2014-03-01

    Several validated risk stratification schemes for prediction of ischaemic stroke (IS)/thromboembolism (TE) and major bleeding are available for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). On the basis for multiple common risk factors for IS/TE and bleeding, it has been suggested that composite risk prediction scores may be more practical and user-friendly than separate scores for bleeding and IS/TE. In a long-term prospective hospital registry of anticoagulated patients with newly diagnosed AF, we compared the predictive value of existing risk prediction scores as well as composite risk scores, and also compared these risk scoring systems using composite endpoints. Endpoint 1 was the simple composite of IS and major bleeds. Endpoint 2 was based on a composite of IS plus intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). Endpoint 3 was based on weighted coefficients for IS/TE and ICH. Endpoint 4 was a composite of stroke, cardiovascular death, TE and major bleeding. The incremental predictive value of these scores over CHADS2 (as reference) for composite endpoints was assessed using c-statistic, net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). Of 8,962 eligible individuals, 3,607 (40.2%) had NVAF and were on OAC at baseline. There were no statistically significant differences between the c-statistics of the various risk scores, compared with the CHADS2 score, regardless of the endpoint. For the various risk scores and various endpoints, NRI and IDI did not show significant improvement (≥1%), compared with the CHADS2 score. In conclusion, composite risk scores did not significantly improve risk prediction of endpoints in patients with NVAF, regardless of how endpoints were defined. This would support individualised prediction of IS/TE and bleeding separately using different separate risk prediction tools, and not the use of composite scores or endpoints for everyday 'real world' clinical practice, to guide decisions on

  13. Endpoint behavior of high-energy scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2010-11-01

    In high-energy processes near the endpoint, there emerge new contributions associated with spectator interactions. Away from the endpoint region, these new contributions are suppressed compared to the leading contribution, but the leading contribution becomes suppressed as we approach the endpoint and the new contributions become comparable. We present how the new contributions scale as we reach the endpoint and show that they are comparable to the suppressed leading contributions in deep inelastic scattering by employing a power-counting analysis. The hadronic tensor in deep inelastic scattering is shown to factorize including the spectator interactions, and it can be expressed in terms of the light cone distribution amplitudes of initial hadrons. We also consider the contribution of the spectator contributions in Drell-Yan processes. Here the spectator interactions are suppressed compared to double parton annihilation according to the power counting.

  14. Location of end-points in high-precision coulometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, W F; Poe, D P; Diehl, H

    1975-07-01

    A computer has been used to fit a cubic equation to experimental data obtained in the region of the end-point in high-precision coulometric titrations of 4-aminopyridine and tris(hydroxy-methyl) aminomethane. For these weak bases, the two end-points (points of inflexion calculated by setting the second derivative equal to zero) obtained by choosing first time, and secondly pH, as the independent variable, are in good agreement.

  15. Accurate measurement method for tube's endpoints based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoli; Jin, Peng; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Tubes are used widely in aerospace vehicles, and their accurate assembly can directly affect the assembling reliability and the quality of products. It is important to measure the processed tube's endpoints and then fix any geometric errors correspondingly. However, the traditional tube inspection method is time-consuming and complex operations. Therefore, a new measurement method for a tube's endpoints based on machine vision is proposed. First, reflected light on tube's surface can be removed by using photometric linearization. Then, based on the optimization model for the tube's endpoint measurements and the principle of stereo matching, the global coordinates and the relative distance of the tube's endpoint are obtained. To confirm the feasibility, 11 tubes are processed to remove the reflected light and then the endpoint's positions of tubes are measured. The experiment results show that the measurement repeatability accuracy is 0.167 mm, and the absolute accuracy is 0.328 mm. The measurement takes less than 1 min. The proposed method based on machine vision can measure the tube's endpoints without any surface treatment or any tools and can realize on line measurement.

  16. Preliminary remediation goals for ecological endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.; Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.

    1996-07-01

    Preliminary remediation goals (PRGs) are useful for risk assessment and decision making at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites. PRGs are upper concentration limits for specific chemicals in specific environmental media that are anticipated to protect human health or the environment. They can be used for multiple remedial investigations at multiple facilities. In addition to media and chemicals of potential concern, the development of PRGs generally requires some knowledge or anticipation of future land use. In Preliminary Remediation Goals for Use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (Energy Systems 1995), PRGs intended to protect human health were developed with guidance from Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Volume I - Human Health Evaluation Manual, Part B (RAGS) (EPA 1991). However, no guidance was given for PRGs based on ecological risk. The numbers that appear in this volume have, for the most part, been extracted from toxicological benchmarks documents for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and have previously been developed by ORNL. The sources of the quantities, and many of the uncertainties associated with their derivation, are described in this technical memorandum.

  17. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Rhian M; Tsiatis, Anastasios A

    2013-10-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  18. Efficient estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint when some endpoints are only partially observed

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Rhian M.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.

    2014-01-01

    Two common features of clinical trials, and other longitudinal studies, are (1) a primary interest in composite endpoints, and (2) the problem of subjects withdrawing prematurely from the study. In some settings, withdrawal may only affect observation of some components of the composite endpoint, for example when another component is death, information on which may be available from a national registry. In this paper, we use the theory of augmented inverse probability weighted estimating equations to show how such partial information on the composite endpoint for subjects who withdraw from the study can be incorporated in a principled way into the estimation of the distribution of time to composite endpoint, typically leading to increased efficiency without relying on additional assumptions above those that would be made by standard approaches. We describe our proposed approach theoretically, and demonstrate its properties in a simulation study. PMID:23722304

  19. The effect of endpoint congruency on bimanual transport and rotation tasks

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Andrea H.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    The completion of many goal oriented skills requires the tight coordination of the right and left hands to achieve the task objective. Although the coordination of wrist transport and orientation of the hand before object contact has been studied in detail for discrete bimanual tasks, as yet, very few studies have examined bimanual coordination when the target is already in hand. It has been shown that congruency of the goal facilitates the production of discrete bimanual responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of goal congruency on precision bimanual transport and rotate tasks. In the current investigation, participants transported two cubic objects while rotating them laterally to place them into tight-fitting targets. The magnitude of the rotation could be the same for both hands (i.e., both 45 or 90∘) or different (i.e., one 45 and 90∘) and the endpoint orientations (i.e., goal) could either be congruent or incongruent. Results indicated that when the endpoint orientation was congruent for the two hands, movement times were similar regardless of hand (left or right), rotation magnitude (45, 90∘) and whether the rotation magnitude for the two hands was the same or different. These results suggest that congruency of the endpoint goal facilitates the temporal synchronization of the transport component for two limbs. In contrast, a different pattern of results was obtained when considering the rotation component. Specifically, regardless of whether the hands were rotating the same magnitude or ending in congruent endpoint positions, the coordination of the rotation component between the hands was asynchronous. We hypothesize that the greater requirement to shift visual fixation from one hand/target to the other to ascertain the separate goal orientations may explain these differences. These results provide further evidence that multiple constraints act to influence the performance of skilled bimanual tasks. PMID:25713546

  20. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  1. Origin of electrical signals for plasma etching endpoint detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2011-11-14

    Electrical signals are used for endpoint detection in plasma etching, but the origin of the electrical changes observed at endpoint is not known. They may be caused by changes in the gas-phase densities of etch products and reactants or by changes in substrate surface properties such as photoemitted or ion-induced electron yield. To investigate these effects, experiments were performed in an inductively coupled, rf-biased reactor, during CF{sub 4}/Ar etches of SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers. The rf bias impedance was measured vs. time during etching, simultaneous with Langmuir probe measurements. At endpoint, a decrease in impedance coincided with increases in ion current and electron energy. The data, analyzed by a numerical model of the discharge, indicate that changes in electron emission yield were relatively insignificant or entirely absent. Thus the impedance change is not a surface effect but is, instead, predominantly or entirely a gas-phase phenomenon.

  2. Accuracy of the endpoint assay for virus titration.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L K; Smyth, G K; Greenfield, P F

    1992-01-01

    The statistics of estimators used with the endpoint assay for virus titration were investigated. For a standard assay with 10 wells/dilution, the graphical estimator traditionally used was found to produce estimates with significant positive bias and a relatively low accuracy. Furthermore, the graphical estimator was found to be inconsistent. A superior estimator based on the maximum likelihood principle was developed. The results are discussed in relation to the choice between the endpoint titration assay and the plaque assay, and an alternative two-stage assay is presented.

  3. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  4. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  5. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  6. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 314.510 Section 314.510 Food... a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval... an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under...

  7. Comparison and Evaluation of Laboratory and Field Measured Bioaccumulation Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of bioaccumulation endpoints on a fugacity basis allows provides a framework to assess the biomagnification potential of a chemical and assess data deficiencies, i.e., uncertainties and lack of data. In addition, it is suggested that additional guidance is needed in o...

  8. Digit mechanics in relation to endpoint compliance during precision pinch.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-02-26

    This study investigates the mechanics of the thumb and index finger in relation to compliant endpoint forces during precision pinch. The objective was to gain insight into how individuals modulate motor output at the digit endpoints and joints according to compliance-related sensory feedback across the digits. Thirteen able-bodied subjects performed precision pinch upon elastic resistance bands of a customized apparatus instrumented with six degree-of-freedom load-cells. Compliance levels were discretely adjusted according to the number of bands connected. Subjects were provided visual feedback to control the rate of force application. Fifteen repetitions of low-to-moderate force (<20N) pinches were analyzed at each of five compliance levels, during which force and motion data were collected. Joint angles and moments normalized by pinch force magnitude were computed. Second-order polynomials were used to characterize joint mechanics as a function of compliance. The joint degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) at the finger showed greater dependence on compliance for angular position while the thumb joint DOFs demonstrated greater dependence for normalized joint moment. The digits also adjusted coordination of their endpoint forces according to compliance. Overall, the finger may be altering its position to increase load to the joints of the thumb with changing compliance. These findings describe naturally emergent changes in digit mechanics for compliant precision pinch, which involves motor execution in response to endpoint sensory feedback. Identifying and understanding these motor patterns may provide theoretical basis for restoring and rehabilitating sensorimotor pathologies of the hand.

  9. ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINT MODELING: EFFECTS OF SEDIMENT ON FISH POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment is one of the main stressors of concern for TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) for streams, and often it is a concern because of its impact on biological endpoints. The National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that the EPA promote the development of models that ca...

  10. Is Suicide Ideation a Surrogate Endpoint for Geriatric Suicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Links, Paul S.; Heisel, Marnin J.; Quastel, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The present study explored the validity of treating suicide ideation as a surrogate endpoint that can serve as a proxy for suicide in clinical intervention research with suicidal seniors. Two criteria; that suicide ideation is modulated by the proposed intervention and that modulation of suicide ideation leads to a quantitative reduction in…

  11. Defining response in migraine: which endpoints are important?

    PubMed

    Edmeads, John

    2005-01-01

    The primary endpoint traditionally measured in clinical trials of triptans for acute migraine therapy has been 2-hour pain relief, a decrease in pain intensity from moderate/severe to mild/none. Although harder to achieve, endpoints such as 2-hour pain free and the composite measure sustained pain free are now preferred as they better reflect what patients desire from medication, namely rapid onset of action, and complete and lasting relief of pain. A comprehensive meta-analysis has shown that oral triptans differ in their ability to achieve these endpoints, with almotriptan 12.5 mg, eletriptan 80 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg providing the highest likelihood of success. Although all triptans have simple and consistent pharmacokinetic features, they also have specific differences that may play a part in their differing clinical attributes. Incorporating tolerability to generate a more stringent endpoint, sustained pain free with no adverse events (SNAE), may provide an even better representation of patients' expectations. Comparison of SNAE rates using data from the meta-analysis of oral triptans indicates that almotriptan 12.5 mg has the best balance of high efficacy and good tolerability. PMID:15920334

  12. Detecting curves with unknown endpoints and arbitrary topology using minimal paths.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Vivek; Yezzi, Anthony; Tsai, Yichang James

    2012-10-01

    Existing state-of-the-art minimal path techniques work well to extract simple open curves in images when both endpoints of the curve are given as user input or when one input is given and the total length of the curve is known in advance. Curves which branch require even further prior input from the user, namely, each branch endpoint. In this work, we present a novel minimal path-based algorithm which works on much more general curve topologies with far fewer demands on the user for initial input compared to prior minimal path-based algorithms. The two key novelties and benefits of this new approach are that 1) it may be used to detect both open and closed curves, including more complex topologies containing both multiple branch points and multiple closed cycles without requiring a priori knowledge about which of these types is to be extracted, and 2) it requires only a single input point which, in contrast to existing methods, is no longer constrained to be an endpoint of the desired curve but may in fact be ANY point along the desired curve (even an internal point). We perform quantitative evaluation of the algorithm on 48 images (44 pavement crack images, 1 catheter tube image, and 3 retinal images) against human supplied ground truth. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is indeed able to extract curve-like objects accurately from images with far less prior knowledge and less user interaction compared to existing state-of-the-art minimal path-based image processing algorithms. In the future, the algorithm can be applied to other 2D curve-like objects and it can be extended to detect 3D curves.

  13. The validated embryonic stem cell test to predict embryotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Andrea E M; Spielmann, Horst

    2011-06-16

    In the embryonic stem cell test (EST), differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) is used as a model to assess embryotoxicity in vitro. The test was successfully validated by the European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) and models fundamental mechanisms in embryotoxicity, such as cytotoxicity and differentiation. In addition, differences in sensitivity between differentiated (adult) and embryonic cells are also taken into consideration. To predict the embryotoxic potential of a test substance, three endpoints are assessed: the inhibition of differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes, the cytotoxic effects on stem cells and the cytotoxic effects on 3T3 fibroblasts. A special feature of the EST is that it is solely based on permanent cell lines so that primary embryonic cells and tissues from pregnant animals are not needed. In this protocol, we describe the ECVAM-validated method, in which the morphological assessment of contracting cardiomyocytes is used as an endpoint for differentiation, and the molecular-based FACS-EST method, in which highly predictive protein markers specific for developing heart tissue were selected. With these methods, the embryotoxic potency of a compound can be assessed in vitro within 10 or 7 d, respectively.

  14. Innovative approaches in the embryonic stem cell test (EST).

    PubMed

    Theunissen, Peter T; Piersma, Aldert H

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a high-throughput in vitro screening assay for developmental toxicity free of animal use. The EST uses the ability of murine embryonic stem cells to differentiate into the mesodermal cardiac lineage in combination with two cytotoxicity test systems. Validation of the EST showed that the test system is very promising as an alternative method to animal testing, however to optimize predictability and increase knowledge on the applicability domain of the EST, improvements to the method were proposed and studied. In this review we discuss the first definition of the EST followed by the innovative approaches which have been proposed to increase the predictivity of the EST, including implementation of molecular endpoints in the EST, such as omics technologies and the addition of alternative differentiation models to the testing paradigm, such as neural and osteoblast differentiation and the use of human stem cells. These efforts to improve the EST increase the value of embryonic stem cells used as in vitro systems to predict developmental toxicity.

  15. Genetic evaluation of beef carcass data using different endpoint adjustments.

    PubMed

    Rumph, J M; Shafer, W R; Crews, D H; Enns, R M; Lipsey, R J; Quaas, R L; Pollak, E J

    2007-05-01

    Carcass data from 6,795 Simmental-sired animals born from 1992 to 2001 were used to determine whether adjustment to a constant age, back-fat, HCW, or marbling score would result in differences in heritability of the carcass traits and, correspondingly, if EPD calculated using those variance components and adjustments would result in sire reranking. The endpoints were age (EPA), backfat (EPF), HCW (EPC), or marbling (EPM). The traits analyzed were 12th-rib backfat (FAT), HCW, marbling (MRB), LM area (LMA), and percentage retail cuts (PRC). The data were analyzed using an animal model, where contemporary group was included as a fixed effect and was composed of slaughter date, sex, and herd. Random effects included in the model were direct genetic and residual. Estimates of heritability ranged from 0.12 to 0.14, 0.32 to 0.34, and 0.26 to 0.27 for FAT, HCW, and LMA, respectively, for the corresponding endpoints. Heritability for MRB was estimated to be 0.27 at all endpoints. For PRC, estimates of heritability were more variable, with estimates of 0.23 +/- 0.05, 0.32 +/- 0.05, 0.21 +/- 0.05, and 0.20 +/- 0.04 for EPA, EPF, EPC, and EPM, respectively. However, because the EPF and EPC adjustments adjust for a component trait of PRC (FAT and HCW, respectively), they may be altering the trait to one different from PRC. Spearman rank correlations between EPD within a trait using EPA compared with the other endpoints were >0.90 (P < 0.01) for FAT, HCW, MRB, and LMA. For PRC, Spearman rank correlations with EPA EPD were 0.73 (P < 0.01), 0.93 (P < 0.01), and 0.95 (P < 0.01) for EPF, EPC, and EPM, respectively. For most traits and endpoints, there was little reranking among sires when alternative endpoints were used. However, adjusting PRC to EPF appears to result in a greater heritability and substantial re-ranking of sires, potentially due to the adjustment changing the trait to one other than PRC. PMID:17224467

  16. Arsenic Exposure and Subclinical Endpoints of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Molinaro, Peter; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic evidence suggests that arsenic exposure from drinking water increases the production of reactive oxygen species and influences inflammatory responses and endothelial nitric oxide homeostasis. These arsenic-induced events may lead to endothelial dysfunction that increases the risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We reviewed accumulating epidemiologic evidence that evaluated the association between arsenic exposure and intermediate markers and subclinical measures that predict future cardiovascular risk. Cross-sectional studies have indicated positive associations between high or low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure with indices of subclinical atherosclerosis, QT interval prolongation, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction. The evidence is limited for other intermediate endpoints such as markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, QT dispersion, and lipid profiles. Prospective studies are needed to enhance the causal inferences of arsenic's effects on subclinical endpoints of cardiovascular disease, especially at lower arsenic exposure levels. PMID:25013752

  17. Endpoints for Mouse Abdominal Tumor Models: Refinement of Current Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eden V; Villines, Kimberly A; Hickman, Debra L

    2009-01-01

    Accurate, rapid, and noninvasive health assessments are required to establish more appropriate endpoints in mouse cancer models where tumor size is not easily measured. We evaluated potential endpoints in mice with experimentally induced peritoneal lymphoma, an abdominal tumor model, by comparing body weight, body condition, and behavior with those of a control group of mice not developing lymphoma. Our hypothesis was that body weight would increase or plateau, whereas body condition and behavioral scores would decrease, as disease progressed. Results indicated that body weight did not differ significantly between the control and experimental groups, but the experimental group experienced significant decreases in both body condition and behavioral scores. Our results support the use of body condition and behavioral scoring as adjunctive assessment methods for mice involved in abdominal lymphoma tumor studies in which health may decline despite an increase or plateau in body weight. PMID:19619413

  18. Comparative toxicity based on similar asymptotic endpoints (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, M.A.; Lowrie, L.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the laboratory tests are used in assessing the environmental risk of exposure to industrial chemicals. The combined effects of dose-level exposure and time-duration exposure are tested in the laboratory, but only a single endpoint reflecting the dose-level exposure at the end of the test period is routinely reported and used. At times, this might be sufficient, or the data otherwise inappropriate for calculation of more than a single endpoint. Nevertheless, an approach that makes a more complete use of existing sufficient test information is needed. One method is presented in this paper, the focus of which is the evaluation of an LC50 endpoint at a calculated exposure time. This calculation determines a condition for the toxicity curve to become established along the time axis. The authors refer to this condition of the dose-response curve as an asymptotic state and the LC50 calculated from it as the asymptotic LC50. An analysis of 152 toxicity tests using fathead minnows show that the 96-hr LC50 is 25% more conservative than the asymptotic LC50. The calculation of LC50 under asymptotic conditions better enables comparing toxicities of different chemicals on the basis of comparable dose-level and time-duration exposures.

  19. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Classification of Studies Employing Psychological Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Stephanie A.; Litvak, Margarita; Robbins, Natashia M.; Sandberg, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Psychological outcomes in persons with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have received substantial attention. The objectives of this paper were to (1) catalog psychological endpoints assessed in CAH outcome studies and (2) classify the conceptual/theoretical model shaping the research design and interpretation of CAH-related psychological effects. A total of 98 original research studies, published between 1955 and 2009, were categorized based on psychological endpoints examined as well as the research design and conceptual model guiding analysis and interpretation of data. The majority of studies (68%) investigated endpoints related to psychosexual differentiation. The preponderance of studies (76%) examined a direct relationship (i.e., inferring causality) between prenatal androgen exposure and psychological outcomes. Findings are discussed in relation to the observed imbalance between theoretical interest in the role of prenatal androgens in shaping psychosexual differentiation and a broader conceptual model that examines the role of other potential factors in mediating or moderating the influence of CAH pathophysiology on psychological outcomes in both affected females and males. The latter approach offers to identify factors amenable to clinical intervention that enhance both health and quality of life outcomes in CAH as well as other disorders of sex development. PMID:20976294

  20. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K.; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. Since the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers prior to the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multi-national, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  1. Visual information throughout a reach determines endpoint precision.

    PubMed

    Ma-Wyatt, Anna; McKee, Suzanne P

    2007-05-01

    People make rapid, goal-directed movements to interact with their environment. Because these movements have consequences, it is important to be able to control them with a high level of precision and accuracy. Our hypothesis is that vision guides rapid hand movements, thereby enhancing their accuracy and precision. To test this idea, we asked observers to point to a briefly presented target (110 ms). We measured the impact of visual information on endpoint precision by using a shutter to close off view of the hand 50, 110 and 250 ms into the reach. We found that precision was degraded if the view of the hand was restricted at any time during the reach, despite the fact that the target disappeared long before the reach was completed. We therefore conclude that vision keeps the hand on the planned trajectory. We then investigated the effects of a perturbation of target position during the reach. For these experiments, the target remained visible until the reach was completed. The target position was shifted at 110, 180 or 250 ms into the reach. Early shifts in target position were easily compensated for, but late shifts led to a shift in the mean position of the endpoints; observers pointed to the center of the two locations, as a kind of best bet on the position of the target. Visual information is used to guide the hand throughout a reach and has a significant impact on endpoint precision.

  2. The embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Schulpen, Sjors H W; Piersma, Aldert H

    2013-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test is an animal-free alternative test method for developmental toxicity. Mouse embryonic stem cells are cultured in a hanging drop method to form embryoid bodies. These embryoid bodies, when plated on tissue culture dishes, differentiate to form contracting myocardial cell foci within 10 days. Inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation by test compounds serves as the end point of the assay, as monitored by counting contracting muscle foci under the microscope.

  3. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  4. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective opeartion through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  5. Clinical research and methodology: What usage and what hierarchical order for secondary endpoints?

    PubMed

    Laporte, Silvy; Diviné, Marine; Girault, Danièle

    2016-02-01

    In a randomised clinical trial, when the result of the primary endpoint shows a significant benefit, the secondary endpoints are scrutinised to identify additional effects of the treatment. However, this approach entails a risk of concluding that there is a benefit for one of these endpoints when such benefit does not exist (inflation of type I error risk). There are mainly two methods used to control the risk of drawing erroneous conclusions for secondary endpoints. The first method consists of distributing the risk over several co-primary endpoints, so as to maintain an overall risk of 5%. The second is the hierarchical test procedure, which consists of first establishing a hierarchy of the endpoints, then evaluating each endpoint in succession according to this hierarchy while the endpoints continue to show statistical significance. This simple method makes it possible to show the additional advantages of treatments and to identify the factors that differentiate them.

  6. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  7. The utility of a composite biological endpoint in HIV/STI prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Tyler D; Pequegnat, Willo; Moore, Janet L; Parker, Corette B; Strader, Lisa C; Green, Annette M; Quinn, Thomas C; Wasserheit, Judith N; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2013-11-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as a biological endpoint in HIV prevention trials may not be feasible, so investigators have used surrogate biological outcomes. In a multisite trial, the epidemiology of STIs may be different across sites and preclude using one STI as the outcome. This study explored using a composite STI outcome to address that problem. The combined biological endpoint was the incidence of any of six new STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomonas (women only), syphilis, herpes simplex virus type 2 infection and HIV) during a 24-month follow up period. We investigated how a composite STI outcome would perform compared to single and dual STI outcomes under various conditions. We simulated outcomes for four populations that represented a wide range of sex and age distributions, and STI prevalences. The simulations demonstrated that a combined biologic outcome was superior to single and dual STI outcomes in assessing intervention effects in 82 % of the cases. A composite biological outcome was effective in detecting intervention effects and might allow more investigations to incorporate multiple biological outcomes in the assessment of behavioral intervention trials for HIV prevention.

  8. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  9. Semiparametric regression for the weighted composite endpoint of recurrent and terminal events.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lu; Lin, D Y

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent event data are commonly encountered in clinical and epidemiological studies. A major complication arises when recurrent events are terminated by death. To assess the overall effects of covariates on the two types of events, we define a weighted composite endpoint as the cumulative number of recurrent and terminal events properly weighted by the relative severity of each event. We propose a semiparametric proportional rates model which specifies that the (possibly time-varying) covariates have multiplicative effects on the rate function of the weighted composite endpoint while leaving the form of the rate function and the dependence among recurrent and terminal events completely unspecified. We construct appropriate estimators for the regression parameters and the cumulative frequency function. We show that the estimators are consistent and asymptotically normal with variances that can be consistently estimated. We also develop graphical and numerical procedures for checking the adequacy of the model. We then demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods in simulation studies. Finally, we provide an application to a major cardiovascular clinical trial. PMID:26668069

  10. Evolution of the mammalian embryonic pluripotency gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Tresguerres, Beatriz; Cañon, Susana; Rayon, Teresa; Pernaute, Barbara; Crespo, Miguel; Torroja, Carlos; Manzanares, Miguel

    2010-11-16

    Embryonic pluripotency in the mouse is established and maintained by a gene-regulatory network under the control of a core set of transcription factors that include octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4; official name POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1, Pou5f1), sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box containing gene 2 (Sox2), and homeobox protein Nanog. Although this network is largely conserved in eutherian mammals, very little information is available regarding its evolutionary conservation in other vertebrates. We have compared the embryonic pluripotency networks in mouse and chick by means of expression analysis in the pregastrulation chicken embryo, genomic comparisons, and functional assays of pluripotency-related regulatory elements in ES cells and blastocysts. We find that multiple components of the network are either novel to mammals or have acquired novel expression domains in early developmental stages of the mouse. We also find that the downstream action of the mouse core pluripotency factors is mediated largely by genomic sequence elements nonconserved with chick. In the case of Sox2 and Fgf4, we find that elements driving expression in embryonic pluripotent cells have evolved by a small number of nucleotide changes that create novel binding sites for core factors. Our results show that the network in charge of embryonic pluripotency is an evolutionary novelty of mammals that is related to the comparatively extended period during which mammalian embryonic cells need to be maintained in an undetermined state before engaging in early differentiation events.

  11. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R.; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A.; Harris, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  12. Multiple roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the anterior neural patterning of adherent human embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Novorol, Claire; Smith, Joseph R; Vallier, Ludovic; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Morgan; Biagioni, Stefano; Pedersen, Roger A; Harris, William A

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have successfully produced a variety of neural cell types from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but there has been limited systematic analysis of how different regional identities are established using well-defined differentiation conditions. We have used adherent, chemically defined cultures to analyse the roles of Activin/Nodal, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and Wnt/β-catenin signalling in neural induction, anteroposterior patterning and eye field specification in hESCs. We show that either BMP inhibition or activation of FGF signalling is required for effective neural induction, but these two pathways have distinct outcomes on rostrocaudal patterning. While BMP inhibition leads to specification of forebrain/midbrain positional identities, FGF-dependent neural induction is associated with strong posteriorization towards hindbrain/spinal cord fates. We also demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is activated during neural induction and promotes acquisition of neural fates posterior to forebrain. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is needed for efficient forebrain specification. Finally, we provide evidence that the levels of Activin/Nodal and BMP signalling have a marked influence on further forebrain patterning and that constitutive inhibition of these pathways represses expression of eye field genes. These results show that the key mechanisms controlling neural patterning in model vertebrate species are preserved in adherent, chemically defined hESC cultures and reveal new insights into the signals regulating eye field specification. PMID:23576785

  13. Directional constraint of endpoint force emerges from hindlimb anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Nathan E; McKay, J Lucas; Ting, Lena H; Burkholder, Thomas J

    2010-06-15

    Postural control requires the coordination of force production at the limb endpoints to apply an appropriate force to the body. Subjected to horizontal plane perturbations, quadruped limbs stereotypically produce force constrained along a line that passes near the center of mass. This phenomenon, referred to as the force constraint strategy, may reflect mechanical constraints on the limb or body, a specific neural control strategy or an interaction among neural controls and mechanical constraints. We used a neuromuscular model of the cat hindlimb to test the hypothesis that the anatomical constraints restrict the mechanical action of individual muscles during stance and constrain the response to perturbations to a line independent of perturbation direction. In a linearized neuromuscular model of the cat hindlimb, muscle lengthening directions were highly conserved across 10,000 different muscle activation patterns, each of which produced an identical, stance-like endpoint force. These lengthening directions were closely aligned with the sagittal plane and reveal an anatomical structure for directionally constrained force responses. Each of the 10,000 activation patterns was predicted to produce stable stance based on Lyapunov stability analysis. In forward simulations of the nonlinear, seven degree of freedom model under the action of 200 random muscle activation patterns, displacement of the endpoint from its equilibrium position produced restoring forces, which were also biased toward the sagittal plane. The single exception was an activation pattern based on minimum muscle stress optimization, which produced destabilizing force responses in some perturbation directions. The sagittal force constraint increased during simulations as the system shifted from an inertial response during the acceleration phase to a viscoelastic response as peak velocity was obtained. These results qualitatively match similar experimental observations and suggest that the force

  14. ASPREE Cancer Endpoints Study | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The ASPREE Cancer Endpoint Study (ACES), an ancillary study of the ASPirin in the Prevention of Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) Study, will allow for the examination of the effect of daily low-dose aspirin (100 mg) compared to placebo, on specific DNA biomarkers and selected specific incident and recurrent cancer and metastases. The establishment of this ACES biobank will allow for the exploration of DNA-related molecular mechanisms of aspirin's protective effect against cancer, cancer associated mortality and metastases, using blood or saliva DNA specimens, urine, and tumor tissue. |

  15. Exploring a possible origin of the QCD critical endpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, K. A. Petrov, V. K. Zinovjev, G. M.

    2013-03-15

    We develop a new model of the QCD critical endpoint by matching the deconfinement phase transition line of quark-gluon bags with the similar line at which the bag surface tension coefficient vanishes. Unlike all previous studies of such models the deconfined phase in our approach is defined not by an essential singularity of the isobaric partition function but its simple pole. As an unexpected result we find out that the first-order phase transition which is usually defined by a discontinuity of the first derivative of the bag system pressure results from a discontinuity of the derivative of surface tension coefficient of quark-gluon bags.

  16. Intermediate clinical endpoints: a bridge between progression-free survival and overall survival in ovarian cancer trials.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Oza, Amit M; Ho, Tony W; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer patients are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, experience recurrence after platinum-based chemotherapy, and eventually develop resistance to chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS), which has improved in recent years as more active treatments have been incorporated into patient care, is regarded as the most clinically relevant endpoint in ovarian cancer trials. However, although there remains a significant need for new treatments that prolong OS further without compromising quality of life, it has become increasingly difficult to detect an OS benefit for investigational treatments because of the use of multiple lines of chemotherapy to treat ovarian cancer. Progression-free survival (PFS), which measures the time to disease progression or death, is unaffected by postprogression therapies but does not evaluate the long-term impact of investigational treatments on tumor biology and responses to future therapies. Recent clinical trials of targeted agents in relapsed ovarian cancer have shown improvements in PFS but not OS, and this is possibly reflective of the long postprogression survival (PPS) period associated with this disease. Intermediate endpoints such as the time to second disease progression or death and the time to second subsequent therapy or death may provide supportive evidence for clinically meaningful PFS improvements and may be used to determine whether these improvements persist beyond the first disease progression and throughout subsequent lines of therapy. For clinical trials that have settings with a long PPS duration and/or involve multiple rounds of postprogression therapy, a primary endpoint of PFS supported by intermediate clinical endpoints and OS may provide a more comprehensive approach for evaluating efficacy.

  17. Design questions for Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccine trials with a colonisation endpoint.

    PubMed

    Auranen, Kari; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Goldblatt, David; Nohynek, Hanna; O'Brien, Katherine L; Satzke, Catherine; Simell, Birgit; Tanskanen, Antti; Käyhty, Helena

    2013-12-17

    Evaluation of vaccine efficacy for protection against colonisation (VEcol) with Streptococcus pneumoniae and other bacterial pathogens is often based on a cross-sectional study design, in which only one nasopharyngeal sample is obtained per study subject. Here we investigate the feasibility of this study design by investigating a number of practical design problems. Specific questions are related to the timing of colonisation measurement with respect to the time of vaccination, the adjustment for the within-host replacement of vaccine-type colonisation by the non-vaccine type pneumococci, and the impact of multiple serotype colonisation on VEcol estimation. We also discuss the issue of choosing the control vaccine, including comparison of two active pneumococcal vaccines, as well as the sample size and the statistical power of colonisation endpoint trials. In addition, the statistical design with the specific aim to include information about VEcol in the licensure process of new pneumococcal vaccine products is discussed.

  18. Impact of copula directional specification on multi-trial evaluation of surrogate endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Renfro, Lindsay A.; Shang, Hongwei; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of surrogate endpoints using patient-level data from multiple trials is the gold standard, where multi-trial copula models are used to quantify both patient-level and trial-level surrogacy. While limited consideration has been given in the literature to copula choice (e.g., Clayton), no prior consideration has been given to direction of implementation (via survival versus distribution functions). We demonstrate that evenwith the “correct” copula family, directional misspecification leads to biased estimates of patient-level and trial-level surrogacy. We illustrate with a simulation study and a re-analysis of disease-free survival as a surrogate for overall survival in early stage colon cancer. PMID:24905465

  19. Immediate skin responses to laser and light treatments: Warning endpoints: How to avoid side effects.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Molly; Sakamoto, Fernanda H; Avram, Mathew M; Anderson, R Rox

    2016-05-01

    Lasers are versatile, commonly used treatment tools in dermatology. While it is tempting to follow manufacturer's guidelines or other "recipes" for laser treatment, this approach alone can be a recipe for disaster. Specific and immediate skin responses or endpoints exist and are clinically useful because they correlate with underlying mechanisms that are either desirable (ie, therapeutic), undesirable (ie, warning signs of injury or side effects), or incidental. The observation of clinical endpoints is a safe and reliable guide for appropriate treatment. This article presents the warning endpoints during specific dermatologic laser treatments, and the accompanying article presents the therapeutic endpoints, their underlying mechanisms, and the utility of these endpoints. PMID:27085227

  20. Endpoint force fluctuations reveal flexible rather than synergistic patterns of muscle cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Jason J; Kuo, Arthur D; Bloch, Anthony M; Rymer, William Z

    2008-11-01

    We developed a new approach to investigate how the nervous system activates multiple redundant muscles by studying the endpoint force fluctuations during isometric force generation at a multi-degree-of-freedom joint. We hypothesized that, due to signal-dependent muscle force noise, endpoint force fluctuations would depend on the target direction of index finger force and that this dependence could be used to distinguish flexible from synergistic activation of the musculature. We made high-gain measurements of isometric forces generated to different target magnitudes and directions, in the plane of index finger metacarpophalangeal joint abduction-adduction/flexion-extension. Force fluctuations from each target were used to calculate a covariance ellipse, the shape of which varied as a function of target direction. Directions with narrow ellipses were approximately aligned with the estimated mechanical actions of key muscles. For example, targets directed along the mechanical action of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) yielded narrow ellipses, with 88% of the variance directed along those target directions. It follows the FDI is likely a prime mover in this target direction and that, at most, 12% of the force variance could be explained by synergistic coupling with other muscles. In contrast, other target directions exhibited broader covariance ellipses with as little as 30% of force variance directed along those target directions. This is the result of cooperation among multiple muscles, based on independent electromyographic recordings. However, the pattern of cooperation across target directions indicates that muscles are recruited flexibly in accordance with their mechanical action, rather than in fixed groupings.

  1. Local lymph node assay with non-radioisotope alternative endpoints.

    PubMed

    Suda, Akiko; Yamashita, Masahiro; Tabei, Mitsuyuki; Taguchi, Kazuhiko; Vohr, Hans-Werner; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Suzuki, Ritsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Katsuaki; Sakaguchi, Keisuke; Mochizuki, Kouki; Nakamura, Kazuichi

    2002-08-01

    The local lymph node assay has recently been accepted by regulatory agencies as a stand-alone alternate method for predicting allergic contact dermatitis. To compare the sensitivity of non-radioisotope methods with that of the standard assay, we determined if these modified methods would affect evaluation of sensitization potency. For this reason, we used 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and benzocaine for different sensitizing criteria. Female CBA mice were treated for 3 days with a test compound or vehicle applied to each side of both ears. Bilateral auricular lymph node proliferative activity was assessed by the following endpoints with incorporation of 3H-methyl thymidine (3H-TdR), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in vivo, and BrdU ex vivo, IL-2 production, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression. Ear thickness was also tested. The strong sensitizer DNCB was detectable by any of the non-radioisotope endpoints as well as by radioisotope-dependent standard assay. On the other hand, when evaluating the weak sensitizer benzocaine, significant changes were evident in BrdU incorporation ex vivo and in vivo, and IL-2 production. We believe that these non-radioisotope methods can assess allergic contact dermatitis caused by chemicals even in the laboratory, where it can be difficult to handle radioisotopes.

  2. Population-scale assessment endpoints in ecological risk assessment. Part 1: Reflections of stakeholder values.

    PubMed

    Landis, Wayne G

    2006-01-01

    The selection of appropriate assessment endpoints is a basic element of an ecological risk assessment, especially at regional or watershed scales. Because ecological services often are tied to specific species, the risk to populations is a critical endpoint and feature of ecological risk assessments. The first item is a discussion of the replacement of population-level risk assessment with the construct of a population-scale assessment endpoint. Next, the criteria that are currently used for assessment endpoints are reviewed and evaluated for utility in an ecological risk assessment. Following this examination, assessment endpoints from a number of regional-scale ecological risk assessments are compared. The outcome of this evaluation is that population-scale assessment endpoints are important expressions of the valued components of ecological structures. Finally, a few recommendations for the selection of assessment endpoints at a population scale are listed. PMID:16640323

  3. The use of RT-PCR for determination of separate end-points for the strains IB H120 and IB D274 in titration of the combination vaccine Poulvac IB® primer.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, H J; Meinders, C A M; Snel, J; Duyves, W

    2013-11-01

    Poulvac IB® Primer is a lyophilized vaccine containing two attenuated infectious bronchitis strains in one vial, IB H120 and IB D274. For quantification of the viral content of the vaccine, dilution series of the final product are inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs. After the incubation period of seven days standard practice is for the embryos to be taken from each egg and examined visually for IB specific lesions; these readings are used to determine an end-point in viral titrations. The result is a titre value to which both strains contribute. However, it is not clear what the live virus titre is for strain IB H120 and for strain IB D274. In order to determine end-points in the titration for each of the two strains, we collected the allantoic fluids from each egg after the incubation period and tested these for the presence of IB H120 and IB D274 by a strain specific reverse phase PCR. Based on the data obtained by PCR we were able to determine an end-point for each of the two strains. For a given commercial batch of Poulvac IB primer we determined titres of 10(6.31) EID50 per vial for IB H120 and 10(6.59) EID50 for IB D274 using PCR for end-point determination. These end-points matched well with the end-point determined for both strains cumulatively after visual examination, i.e. 10(6.67) EID50 per vial. It is concluded that PCR is a suitable means to determine end-points in titrations of live viruses.

  4. Trends in Utilization of Surrogate Endpoints in Contemporary Cardiovascular Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi B; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Samman-Tahhan, Ayman; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki V; Fonarow, Gregg C; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-06-01

    Surrogate endpoints facilitate trial efficiency but are variably linked to clinical outcomes, and limited data are available exploring their utilization in cardiovascular clinical trials over time. We abstracted data regarding primary clinical, intermediate, and surrogate endpoints from all phase II to IV cardiovascular clinical trials from 2001 to 2012 published in the 8 highest Web of Science impact factor journals. Two investigators independently classified the type of primary endpoint. Of the 1,224 trials evaluated, 677 (55.3%) primary endpoints were clinical, 165 (13.5%) intermediate, and 382 (31.2%) surrogate. The relative proportions of these endpoints remained constant over time (p = 0.98). Trials using surrogate endpoints were smaller (187 vs 1,028 patients) and enrolled patients more expeditiously (1.4 vs 0.9 patients per site per month) compared with trials using clinical endpoints (p <0.001 for both comparisons). Surrogate endpoint trials were independently more likely to meet their primary endpoint compared to trials with clinical endpoints (adjusted odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.34; p = 0.03). Rates of positive results in clinical endpoint trials have decreased over time from 66.1% in 2001 to 2003 to 47.2% in 2010 to 2012 (p = 0.001), whereas these rates have remained stable over the same period for surrogate (72.0% to 69.3%, p = 0.27) and intermediate endpoints (74.4% to 71.4%, p = 0.98). In conclusion, approximately a third of contemporary cardiovascular trials use surrogate endpoints. These trials are completed more expeditiously and are more likely to meet their primary outcomes. The overall scientific contribution of these surrogate endpoint trials requires further attention given their variable association with definitive outcomes. PMID:27085935

  5. Semi-inclusive hadronic B decays in the endpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.; Zupan, Jure

    2006-10-01

    We consider in the soft-collinear effective theory semi-inclusive hadronic B decays, B{yields}XM, in which an energetic light meson M near the endpoint recoils against an inclusive jet X. We focus on a subset of decays where the spectator quark from the B meson ends up in the jet. The branching ratios and direct CP asymmetries are computed to next-to-leading order accuracy in {alpha}{sub s} and to leading order in 1/m{sub b}. The contribution of charming penguins is extensively discussed, and a method to extract it in semi-inclusive decays is suggested. Subleading 1/m{sub b} corrections and SU(3) breaking effects are discussed.

  6. [Endpoints in clinical trials and their relevance for patients].

    PubMed

    Faber, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    Patient participation, which has been established since 2004, has brought more attention to patients' concerns in healthcare. More and more endpoints in clinical trials are defined with respect to their relevance for patients. But this development has still been found wanting. For important drugs, no evidence-based benefit has been demonstrated in the benefit assessment, which also has become possible since 2004. Furthermore, this assessment has arrived too late for patients who have been medicated for a long time. Healthcare policies, applicants and stakeholders have contributed a lot to the patients' scepticism towards benefit assessments, though, in principle, patients are interested in high evidence levels and reasonable pricing. New drugs are often licensed under less ambitious conditions. Whether this is in the patients' interest needs to be put up for a large-scale, and societal, discussion. PMID:20608257

  7. Assessment of the embryotoxicity of four Chinese herbal extracts using the embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Yan; Cao, Fen-Fang; Su, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Qi-Hao; Dai, Xiao-Yong; Xiao, Xue; Huang, Ya-Dong; Zheng, Qing; Xu, Hua

    2015-08-01

    Rhizoma Atractylodes macrocephala, Radix Isatidis, Coptis chinensis and Flos Genkwa are common herbal remedies used by pregnant woman in China. In this study, their potential embryotoxicity was assessed using the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and a prediction model. The potential embryotoxicity of the herbs was based on three endpoints: the concentrations of the compounds that inhibited the proliferation of 50% of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) (IC50ES), the concentrations that inhibited 50% of 3T3 cells (IC503T3), and the concentrations that inhibited the differentiation of 50% of ESCs (ID50ES). The results revealed that Rhizoma Atractylodes macrocephala and Radix Isatidis are non-embryotoxic compounds. Coptis chinensis extracts appeared to demonstrated weak embryotoxicity, and Flos Genkwa exhibited strong embryotoxicity. These results may be useful in guiding the clinical use of these herbs and in expanding the application of the EST to the field of traditional Chinese medicine.

  8. Relating suborganismal processes to ecotoxicological and population level endpoints using a bioenergetic model.

    PubMed

    Ananthasubramaniam, Bharath; McCauley, Edward; Gust, Kurt A; Kennedy, Alan J; Muller, Erik B; Perkins, Edward J; Nisbet, Roger M

    2015-09-01

    Ecological effects of environmental stressors are commonly evaluated using organismal or suborganismal data, such as standardized toxicity tests that characterize responses of individuals (e.g., mortality and reproduction) and a rapidly growing body of "omics" data. A key challenge for environmental risk assessment is relating such information to population dynamics. One approach uses dynamic energy budget (DEB) models that relate growth and reproduction of individuals to underlying flows of energy and elemental matter. We hypothesize that suborganismal information identifies DEB parameters that are most likely impacted by a particular stressor and that the DEB model can then project suborganismal effects on life history and population endpoints. We formulate and parameterize a model of growth and reproduction for the water flea Daphnia magna. Our model resembles previous generic bioenergetic models, but has explicit representation of discrete molts, an important feature of Daphnia life history. We test its ability to predict six endpoints commonly used in chronic toxicity studies in specified food environments. With just one adjustable parameter, the model successfully predicts growth and reproduction of individuals from a wide array of experiments performed in multiple laboratories using different clones of D. magna raised on different food sources. Fecundity is the most sensitive endpoint, and there is broad correlation between the sensitivities of fecundity and long-run growth rate, as is desirable for the default metric used in chronic toxicity tests. Under some assumptions, we can combine our DEB model with the Euler-Lotka equation to estimate longrun population growth rates at different food levels. A review of Daphnia gene-expression experiments on the effects of contaminant exposure reveals several connections to model parameters, in particular a general trend of increased transcript expression of genes involved in energy assimilation and utilization at

  9. [Laboratory procedures in adenoviruses. II. Sensitivity of various cell cultures as determined by endpoint titration (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wigand, R; Schulz, R

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of human embryonic kidney (HEK), human amnion (HAm) and HeLa cells for human adenoviruses was investigated by means of endpoint titrations of 13 prototype strains and numerous original specimens from patients. Prototypes and original specimens showed the same behavior. Adenoviruses of subgrouppp III produced nearly identical titers in all 3 cell cultures, while for subgroup I HAm cells showed a 10- to 100-fold lower titer. On the other hand, HAm cells are nearly as sensitive as HEK cells for type 8, whereas HeLa cells are less sensitive. For other viruses of subgroup II and for subgrou IV, HAm (for type 12 also HeLa) cells are less sensitive than HEK cells. Out of three HeLa cell strains tested the Bristol strain was inferior to the other two in its sensitivity. Concerning the speed of the CPE development, HEK cells are superior for all types, the difference being greatest for subgroup I towards HAm and HeLa and for type 8 towards HeLa cells. The length of incubation necessary for the appearance of CPE even with minimal amounts of virus is 40 days for type 8 in all kinds of cell cultures, whereas for adenoviruses of sub-groups I and III, which are predominantly isolated in the routine laboratory, 25 days for HEK and 30 days for HAm and HeLa cells may suffice in most cases. When endpoint titrations are compared with titers obtained by immunofluorescence, it appears that this technique may be applied as a screening method; thus long incubation periods of negative specimens can be saved. The amounts of infectious virus present in original specimens are reported; the highest quantity was found in specimens containing subgroup I viruses.

  10. The fungicide propiconazole interferes with embryonic development of the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kast-Hutcheson, K; Rider, C V; LeBlanc, G A

    2001-03-01

    Propiconazole is a fungicide used in a variety of agricultural applications. Preliminary studies had suggested that embryos of the crustacean Daphnia magna are particularly susceptible to the toxicity of this chemical. The goals of the present study were to define endpoints of daphnid embryonic development that could be routinely used to assess the embryo toxicity of chemicals and to characterize definitively the embryo toxicity of propiconazole to daphnids. Daphnid embryonic development was characterized into six readily distinguishable stages based on the degree of tissue differentiation. Embryonic development could be monitored either in the brood chamber of the maternal organism or using embryos removed from the brood chamber and incubated ex vivo. Standard toxicity assessment revealed that propiconazole elicited no significant adverse effects on daphnid survival or fecundity during a 21-d exposure to concentrations as high as 0.25 mg/L. Exposure to 0.25 mg/L propiconazole, however, caused a significant incidence of developmental abnormalities and embryonic death. Abnormalities were consistent with developmental arrest at later stages of embryonic maturation. Propiconazole elicited a steep concentration-response curve with respect to embryo toxicity, with a 10% and a 90% incidence of embryo toxicity measured at 0.50 and 0.82 mg/L, respectively. Direct exposure of embryos to propiconazole resulted in toxicity, though the incidence and characteristics of developmental abnormalities were not consistent with that observed during chronic exposures. However, maternal exposure to propiconazole followed by transfer of early embryos to propiconazole-free media resulted in embryo toxicity consistent with that observed during chronic exposure. These results indicate that propiconazole interferes with the later stages of daphnid embryonic development, and that this toxicity is manifested largely via maternal exposure to the fungicide.

  11. Quantitative In Vivo Imaging of Embryonic Development: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Chelsea L.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models are critically important for mechanistic understanding of embryonic morphogenesis. For decades, visualizing these rapid and complex multidimensional events has relied on projection images and thin section reconstructions. While much insight has been gained, fixed tissue specimens offer limited information on dynamic processes that are essential for tissue assembly and organ patterning. Quantitative imaging is required to unlock the important basic science and clinically relevant secrets that remain hidden. Recent advances in live imaging technology have enabled quantitative longitudinal analysis of embryonic morphogenesis at multiple length and time scales. Four different imaging modalities are currently being used to monitor embryonic morphogenesis: optical, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Each has its advantages and limitations with respect to spatial resolution, depth of field, scanning speed, and tissue contrast. In addition, new processing tools have been developed to enhance live imaging capabilities. In this review, we analyze each type of imaging source and its use in quantitative study of embryonic morphogenesis in small animal models. We describe the physics behind their function, identify some examples in which the modality has revealed new quantitative insights, and then conclude with a discussion of new research directions with live imaging. PMID:22695188

  12. Transgenerational Epigenetic Programming of the Embryonic Testis Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Anway, Matthew D.; Rekow, Stephen S.; Skinner, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic exposure to the endocrine disruptor vinclozolin during gonadal sex determination appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that is associated with transgenerational adult onset disease states. Transgenerational effects on the embryonic day 16 (E16) testis demonstrated reproducible changes in the testis transcriptome for multiple generations (F1-F3). The expression of 196 genes were found to be influenced, with the majority of gene expression being decreased or silenced. Dramatic changes in the gene expression of methyltransferases during gonadal sex determination were observed in the F1 and F2 vinclozolin generation (E16) embryonic testis, but the majority returned to control generation levels by the F3 generation. The most dramatic effects were on the germ-line associated Dnmt3A and Dnmt3L isoforms. Observations demonstrate that an embryonic exposure to vinclozolin appears to promote an epigenetic reprogramming of the male germ-line that correlates with transgenerational alterations in the testis transcriptome in subsequent generations. PMID:18042343

  13. Quantitative in vivo imaging of embryonic development: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Chelsea L; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2012-07-01

    Animal models are critically important for a mechanistic understanding of embryonic morphogenesis. For decades, visualizing these rapid and complex multidimensional events has relied on projection images and thin section reconstructions. While much insight has been gained, fixed tissue specimens offer limited information on dynamic processes that are essential for tissue assembly and organ patterning. Quantitative imaging is required to unlock the important basic science and clinically relevant secrets that remain hidden. Recent advances in live imaging technology have enabled quantitative longitudinal analysis of embryonic morphogenesis at multiple length and time scales. Four different imaging modalities are currently being used to monitor embryonic morphogenesis: optical, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Each has its advantages and limitations with respect to spatial resolution, depth of field, scanning speed, and tissue contrast. In addition, new processing tools have been developed to enhance live imaging capabilities. In this review, we analyze each type of imaging source and its use in quantitative study of embryonic morphogenesis in small animal models. We describe the physics behind their function, identify some examples in which the modality has revealed new quantitative insights, and then conclude with a discussion of new research directions with live imaging. PMID:22695188

  14. End-point Region of the Electron Spectrum in Inclusive Semileptonic Heavy Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, Nathan

    1992-01-01

    I examine the relationship between the inclusive and sum-over-exclusive-resonances pictures for the electron spectrum of semileptonic heavy quark decay. The analysis shown to that obtained from a free-quark-decay-type model with an endpoint adjusted to the physical endpoint. This conclusion removes the need for nonresonant contributions in the endpoint region and is consistent with arguments that free-quark-decay-type models are, in principle,

  15. Anatomy of an experimental two-link flexible manipulator under end-point control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, Celia M.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The design and experimental implementation of an end-point controller for two-link flexible manipulators are presented. The end-point controller is based on linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory and is shown to exhibit significant improvements in trajectory tracking over a conventional controller design. To understand the behavior of the manipulator structure under end-point control, a strobe sequence illustrating the link deflections during a typical slew maneuver is included.

  16. 78 FR 49530 - Gastroenterology Regulatory Endpoints and the Advancement of Therapeutics; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, Inc., the North American Society for Pediatric... endpoints and clinical trial design for ulcerative colitis registration trials. Strategies and methods...

  17. Nonparametric Discrete Survival Function Estimation with Uncertain Endpoints Using an Internal Validation Subsample

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Jarcy; Xie, Sharon X.

    2015-01-01

    Summary When a true survival endpoint cannot be assessed for some subjects, an alternative endpoint that measures the true endpoint with error may be collected, which often occurs when obtaining the true endpoint is too invasive or costly. We develop an estimated likelihood function for the situation where we have both uncertain endpoints for all participants and true endpoints for only a subset of participants. We propose a nonparametric maximum estimated likelihood estimator of the discrete survival function of time to the true endpoint. We show that the proposed estimator is consistent and asymptotically normal. We demonstrate through extensive simulations that the proposed estimator has little bias compared to the naïve Kaplan-Meier survival function estimator, which uses only uncertain endpoints, and more efficient with moderate missingness compared to the complete-case Kaplan-Meier survival function estimator, which uses only available true endpoints. Finally, we apply the proposed method to a dataset for estimating the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. PMID:25916510

  18. Leveraging Data Fusion Strategies in Multireceptor Lead Optimization MM/GBSA End-Point Methods.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jennifer L; Krilov, Goran; Borrelli, Kenneth W; Williams, Joshua; Gunn, John R; Clowes, Alec; Cheng, Luciano; Friesner, Richard A; Abel, Robert

    2014-08-12

    Accurate and efficient affinity calculations are critical to enhancing the contribution of in silico modeling during the lead optimization phase of a drug discovery campaign. Here, we present a large-scale study of the efficacy of data fusion strategies to leverage results from end-point MM/GBSA calculations in multiple receptors to identify potent inhibitors among an ensemble of congeneric ligands. The retrospective analysis of 13 congeneric ligand series curated from publicly available data across seven biological targets demonstrates that in 90% of the individual receptor structures MM/GBSA scores successfully identify subsets of inhibitors that are more potent than a random selection, and data fusion strategies that combine MM/GBSA scores from each of the receptors significantly increase the robustness of the predictions. Among nine different data fusion metrics based on consensus scores or receptor rankings, the SumZScore (i.e., converting MM/GBSA scores into standardized Z-Scores within a receptor and computing the sum of the Z-Scores for a given ligand across the ensemble of receptors) is found to be a robust and physically meaningful metric for combining results across multiple receptors. Perhaps most surprisingly, even with relatively low to modest overall correlations between SumZScore and experimental binding affinities, SumZScore tends to reliably prioritize subsets of inhibitors that are at least as potent as those that are prioritized from a "best" single receptor identified from known compounds within the congeneric series. PMID:26588291

  19. Contemporary phase III clinical trial endpoints in advanced ovarian cancer: assessing the pros and cons of objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Tate Thigpen, J

    2015-01-01

    Among gynecologic cancers, ovarian cancer provides the greatest challenge because 75% to 80% of patients present with stage III/IV disease. Over the last 40 years, a series of large trials conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group and other cooperative groups has produced striking improvements in patient outcome; but the majority still dies of their disease. Further research in both the laboratory and the clinic is essential to continued improvement in patient management. Clinical trials, however, have become a major challenge because of issues with trial endpoints. Historically, overall survival (OS) has been regarded as the "gold standard" of endpoints. Lack of effective treatment for patients who progressed on or recurred after front-line therapy allowed trials to avoid obfuscation of OS by post-progression therapy. More recently, studies have identified over 20 agents active against ovarian cancer. Reasonable evidence shows that effective post-progression therapy with multiple lines of active agents can render the survival endpoint uninterpretable. Two other endpoints avoid this problem. The objective response rate, assessed by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), is an accepted endpoint for accelerated approval in ovarian cancer. More importantly, progression-free survival (PFS), measured from study entry to progression of disease, avoids post-progression therapy completely. Without effective post-progression therapy (prior to 1990), data show that PFS is a surrogate for OS. Recent experience with 4 large trials of bevacizumab shows that PFS can be accurately assessed if progression is clearly defined and if timing of assessments is consistent in all study arms. Acceptance of PFS as the optimal endpoint for ovarian cancer trials by investigators and regulatory agencies is crucial to further advances in management because effective post-progression therapy has rendered differences in OS virtually impossible to assess reliably.

  20. A generalized analytic solution to the win ratio to analyze a composite endpoint considering the clinical importance order among components.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Li, Di; Ballerstedt, Steffen; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-09-01

    A composite endpoint consists of multiple endpoints combined in one outcome. It is frequently used as the primary endpoint in randomized clinical trials. There are two main disadvantages associated with the use of composite endpoints: a) in conventional analyses, all components are treated equally important; and b) in time-to-event analyses, the first event considered may not be the most important component. Recently Pocock et al. (2012) introduced the win ratio method to address these disadvantages. This method has two alternative approaches: the matched pair approach and the unmatched pair approach. In the unmatched pair approach, the confidence interval is constructed based on bootstrap resampling, and the hypothesis testing is based on the non-parametric method by Finkelstein and Schoenfeld (1999). Luo et al. (2015) developed a close-form variance estimator of the win ratio for the unmatched pair approach, based on a composite endpoint with two components and a specific algorithm determining winners, losers and ties. We extend the unmatched pair approach to provide a generalized analytical solution to both hypothesis testing and confidence interval construction for the win ratio, based on its logarithmic asymptotic distribution. This asymptotic distribution is derived via U-statistics following Wei and Johnson (1985). We perform simulations assessing the confidence intervals constructed based on our approach versus those per the bootstrap resampling and per Luo et al. We have also applied our approach to a liver transplant Phase III study. This application and the simulation studies show that the win ratio can be a better statistical measure than the odds ratio when the importance order among components matters; and the method per our approach and that by Luo et al., although derived based on large sample theory, are not limited to a large sample, but are also good for relatively small sample sizes. Different from Pocock et al. and Luo et al., our approach is a

  1. A generalized analytic solution to the win ratio to analyze a composite endpoint considering the clinical importance order among components.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Li, Di; Ballerstedt, Steffen; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-09-01

    A composite endpoint consists of multiple endpoints combined in one outcome. It is frequently used as the primary endpoint in randomized clinical trials. There are two main disadvantages associated with the use of composite endpoints: a) in conventional analyses, all components are treated equally important; and b) in time-to-event analyses, the first event considered may not be the most important component. Recently Pocock et al. (2012) introduced the win ratio method to address these disadvantages. This method has two alternative approaches: the matched pair approach and the unmatched pair approach. In the unmatched pair approach, the confidence interval is constructed based on bootstrap resampling, and the hypothesis testing is based on the non-parametric method by Finkelstein and Schoenfeld (1999). Luo et al. (2015) developed a close-form variance estimator of the win ratio for the unmatched pair approach, based on a composite endpoint with two components and a specific algorithm determining winners, losers and ties. We extend the unmatched pair approach to provide a generalized analytical solution to both hypothesis testing and confidence interval construction for the win ratio, based on its logarithmic asymptotic distribution. This asymptotic distribution is derived via U-statistics following Wei and Johnson (1985). We perform simulations assessing the confidence intervals constructed based on our approach versus those per the bootstrap resampling and per Luo et al. We have also applied our approach to a liver transplant Phase III study. This application and the simulation studies show that the win ratio can be a better statistical measure than the odds ratio when the importance order among components matters; and the method per our approach and that by Luo et al., although derived based on large sample theory, are not limited to a large sample, but are also good for relatively small sample sizes. Different from Pocock et al. and Luo et al., our approach is a

  2. Integrative analysis of the mouse embryonic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring global gene expression provides insight into how genes and regulatory signals work together to guide embryo development. The fields of developmental biology and teratology are now confronted with the need for automated access to a reference library of gene-expression signatures that benchmark programmed (genetic) and adaptive (environmental) regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. Such a library must be constructed from highly-distributed microarray data. Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM), an open access knowledge management system, provides custom software to mine public microarray data focused on developmental health and disease. The present study describes tools for seamless data integration in the BDSM library (MetaSample, MetaChip, CIAeasy) using the QueryBDSM module. A field test of the prototype was run using published microarray data series derived from a variety of laboratories, experiments, microarray platforms, organ systems, and developmental stages. The datasets focused on several developing systems in the mouse embryo, including preimplantation stages, heart and nerve development, testis and ovary development, and craniofacial development. Using BDSM data integration tools, a gene-expression signature for 346 genes was resolved that accurately classified samples by organ system and developmental sequence. The module builds a potential for the BDSM approach to decipher a large number developmental processes through comparative bioinformatics analysis of embryological systems at-risk for specific defects, using multiple scenarios to define the range of probabilities leading from molecular phenotype to clinical phenotype. We conclude that an integrative analysis of global gene-expression of the developing embryo can form the foundation for constructing a reference library of signaling pathways and networks for normal and abnormal regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. These tools are available free of charge from the web-site http

  3. Integrative analysis of the mouse embryonic transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar V; Knudsen, Kenneth B; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring global gene expression provides insight into how genes and regulatory signals work together to guide embryo development. The fields of developmental biology and teratology are now confronted with the need for automated access to a reference library of gene-expression signatures that benchmark programmed (genetic) and adaptive (environmental) regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. Such a library must be constructed from highly-distributed microarray data. Birth Defects Systems Manager (BDSM), an open access knowledge management system, provides custom software to mine public microarray data focused on developmental health and disease. The present study describes tools for seamless data integration in the BDSM library (MetaSample, MetaChip, CIAeasy) using the QueryBDSM module. A field test of the prototype was run using published microarray data series derived from a variety of laboratories, experiments, microarray platforms, organ systems, and developmental stages. The datasets focused on several developing systems in the mouse embryo, including preimplantation stages, heart and nerve development, testis and ovary development, and craniofacial development. Using BDSM data integration tools, a gene-expression signature for 346 genes was resolved that accurately classified samples by organ system and developmental sequence. The module builds a potential for the BDSM approach to decipher a large number developmental processes through comparative bioinformatics analysis of embryological systems at-risk for specific defects, using multiple scenarios to define the range of probabilities leading from molecular phenotype to clinical phenotype. We conclude that an integrative analysis of global gene-expression of the developing embryo can form the foundation for constructing a reference library of signaling pathways and networks for normal and abnormal regulation of the embryonic transcriptome. These tools are available free of charge from the web-site http

  4. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity testing with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Brunson, E.B.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ehrhardt, E.A.; Hardesty, D.K.; Haverland, P.S.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    ASTM and EPA standard methods for sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca typically recommend use of lethality as the endpoint in a 10-d exposure. However, data from 10- to 28-d exposures with amphipods indicate sublethal endpoints (i.e., growth, sexual maturation, or reproduction) identify additional samples as toxic. The authors compared the frequency that lethal and sublethal endpoints identified a sediment sample as toxic in 14- and 28-d amphipod exposures. In the 14-d amphipod exposures, lethality identified 20% of the samples as toxic, and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 16% of the samples as toxic using sublethal endpoints only. Similarly, in the 28-d exposures, lethality identified 14% of the samples as toxic and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 18% of the samples as toxic. The authors are also currently evaluating Sediment Effect Concentrations (SECs) relative to both lethal and sublethal endpoints in H. azteca exposures. These SECs will be used to evaluate reliability in estimating toxicity of samples. Potential factors which may confound interpretation of sublethal endpoints in sediment tests include: (1) changes in sediment chemistry resulting from long-term storage or feeding (2) the influence of physical characteristics of sediment (grain size), and (3) effects of ammonia or hydrogen sulfide.

  5. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Standards for Clinical Trial Imaging Endpoints; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Standards for Clinical Trial... entitled ``Standards for Clinical Trial Imaging Endpoints.'' The purpose of this draft guidance is to assist sponsors in the use of imaging endpoints in clinical trials of therapeutic drugs and...

  6. 77 FR 49447 - Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Endpoints for Clinical Trials in Kidney Transplantation... evaluate patient and allograft outcome in clinical trials of kidney transplantation. The meeting will... discussion and may serve to inform recommendations on potential endpoints in clinical trials of...

  7. Combining progression-free survival and overall survival as a novel composite endpoint for glioblastoma trials

    PubMed Central

    Trippa, Lorenzo; Wen, Patrick Y.; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Berry, Donald A.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of auxiliary endpoints may provide efficiencies for clinical trial design, but such endpoints may not have intrinsic clinical relevance or clear linkage to more meaningful endpoints. The purpose of this study was to generate a novel endpoint that considers both overall survival (OS) and earlier events such as progression-free survival (PFS) and determine whether such an endpoint could increase efficiency in the design of glioblastoma clinical trials. Methods Recognizing that the association between PFS and OS varies depending on therapy and tumor type, we developed a statistical model to predict OS based on PFS as the trial progresses. We then evaluated the efficiency of our model using simulations of adaptively randomized trials incorporating PFS and OS distributions from prior published trials in neuro-oncology. Results When treatment effects on PFS and OS are concordant, our proposed approach results in efficiency gains compared with randomization based on OS alone while sacrificing minimal efficiency compared with using PFS as the primary endpoint. When treatment effects are limited to PFS, our approach provides randomization probabilities that are close to those based on OS alone. Conclusion Use of OS as the primary endpoint, combined with statistical modeling of the relationship between OS and PFS during the course of the trial, results in more robust and efficient trial designs than using either endpoint alone. PMID:25568226

  8. 78 FR 46351 - Trial Designs and Endpoints for Liver Disease Secondary to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... discuss trial design, including endpoints for clinical trials in NAFLD, to promote efficient drug... forum to discuss the key issues in the design of clinical trials of drugs for the treatment of liver... selection of endpoints and assessment methodologies in clinical trials. Trial design strategies and...

  9. Attention to Endpoints: A Cross-Linguistic Constraint on Spatial Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regier, Terry; Zheng, Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a possible universal constraint on spatial meaning. It has been proposed that people attend preferentially to the endpoints of spatial motion events, and that languages may therefore make finer semantic distinctions at event endpoints than at event beginnings. We test this proposal. In Experiment 1, we show that people discriminate…

  10. Proto-oncogene mRNA levels and activities of multiple transcription factors in C3H 10T 1/2 murine embryonic fibroblasts exposed to 835.62 and 847.74 MHz cellular phone communication frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Goswami, P C; Albee, L D; Parsian, A J; Baty, J D; Moros, E G; Pickard, W F; Roti Roti, J L; Hunt, C R

    1999-03-01

    This study was designed to determine whether two differently modulated radiofrequencies of the type generally used in cellular phone communications could elicit a general stress response in a biological system. The two modulations and frequencies studied were a frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) with a carrier frequency of 835.62 MHz and a code division multiple-access (CDMA) modulation centered on 847.74 MHz. Changes in proto-oncogene expression, determined by measuring Fos, Jun, and Myc mRNA levels as well as by the DNA-binding activity of the AP1, AP2 and NF-kappaB transcription factors, were used as indicators of a general stress response. The effect of radiofrequency exposure on proto-oncogene expression was assessed (1) in exponentially growing C3H 10T 1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts during their transition to plateau phase and (2) during transition of serum-deprived cells to the proliferation cycle after serum stimulation. Exposure of serum-deprived cells to 835.62 MHz FMCW or 847.74 MHz CDMA microwaves (at an average specific absorption rate, SAR, of 0.6 W/kg) did not significantly change the kinetics of proto-oncogene expression after serum stimulation. Similarly, these exposures did not affect either the Jun and Myc mRNA levels or the DNA-binding activity of AP1, AP2 and NF-kappaB in exponential cells during transit to plateau-phase growth. Therefore, these results suggest that the radiofrequency exposure is unlikely to elicit a general stress response in cells of this cell line under these conditions. However, statistically significant increases (approximately 2-fold, P = 0.001) in Fos mRNA levels were detected in exponential cells in transit to the plateau phase and in plateau-phase cells exposed to 835.62 MHz FMCW microwaves. For 847.74 MHz CDMA exposure, the increase was 1.4-fold (P = 0.04). This increase in Fos expression suggests that expression of specific genes could be affected by radiofrequency exposure. PMID:10073668

  11. Embryonic stem cell test: stem cell use in predicting developmental cardiotoxicity and osteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuske, Béatrice; Pulyanina, Polina Y; zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent birth defects, toxicology programs have been designed to identify toxicities that may potentially be encountered in human embryos. With appropriate toxicity data sets, acceptable exposure levels and actual safety of prescription and nonprescription drugs as well as environmental chemicals could be established for individuals that are more vulnerable to chemical exposure, such as pregnant women and their unborn children. The gathering of such embryotoxicity data is currently performed in animal models. To reduce the spending of live animals, an assortment of in vitro assays has been proposed.In this chapter, the embryonic stem cell test (EST) is reviewed as an alternative model for testing embryotoxicity. In contrast to most in vitro toxicity assays, the EST uses two permanent cell lines: murine 3T3 fibroblasts and murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). To establish developmental toxicity, the difference in sensitivity towards the cytotoxic potential of a given test compound between the adult and the embryonic cells is compared with an MTT assay. In addition, the EST contrasts the inhibition of development that a test compound may cause utilizing the in vitro differentiation potential of the ESCs.We describe here protocols to culture both cell lines as well as the differentiation of the ESCs into cardiomyocytes. Classically, the EST assesses developmental toxicity through counting of contracting cardiomyocyte agglomerates, which will be described as one endpoint. Although this classic EST has been validated in an EU-wide study, tremendous problems exist with the choice of endpoints, the EST's predictivity, and the associated costs. We therefore also give details on the more recently introduced molecular analysis of cardiomyocyte-specific mRNAs, which already has been used to successfully predict developmental toxicity. Moreover, this chapter will explain a method to evaluate developmental bone toxicity and hencewith an experimental setup to

  12. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: defining endpoints that are important to patients.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish

    2004-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) seek treatment to obtain relief of their symptoms. Symptoms are important to patients because they interfere with activities of daily living and impair quality of life. Clinical trials in GERD have traditionally focused on the healing of erosive esophagitis, and symptom endpoints have been relegated to a secondary role. In primary care, however, patients typically are treated empirically without definition of the presence or absence of esophagitis. Patient-centered endpoints such as complete symptom resolution, patient satisfaction, and improvement in quality of life therefore provide more meaningful results in the broad population of patients with GERD, provided they are coupled with objective data on mucosal healing. This article reviews the importance of patient-centered endpoints in the assessment of the treatment of GERD and concludes that complete resolution of symptoms is the most rigorous endpoint in clinical trials and provides a meaningful endpoint for therapy in clinical practice.

  13. A Few Endpoint Geodesic Restriction Estimates for Eigenfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuehua; Sogge, Christopher D.

    2014-07-01

    We prove a couple of new endpoint geodesic restriction estimates for eigenfunctions. In the case of general 3-dimensional compact manifolds, after a TT* argument, simply by using the L 2-boundedness of the Hilbert transform on , we are able to improve the corresponding L 2-restriction bounds of Burq, Gérard and Tzvetkov (Duke Math J 138:445-486, 2007) and Hu (Forum Math 6:1021-1052, 2009). Also, in the case of 2-dimensional compact manifolds with nonpositive curvature, we obtain improved L 4-estimates for restrictions to geodesics, which, by Hölder's inequality and interpolation, implies improved L p -bounds for all exponents p ≥ 2. We do this by using oscillatory integral theorems of Hörmander (Ark Mat 11:1-11, 1973), Greenleaf and Seeger (J Reine Angew Math 455:35-56, 1994) and Phong and Stein (Int Math Res Notices 4:49-60, 1991), along with a simple geometric lemma (Lemma 3.2) about properties of the mixed-Hessian of the Riemannian distance function restricted to pairs of geodesics in Riemannian surfaces. We are also able to get further improvements beyond our new results in three dimensions under the assumption of constant nonpositive curvature by exploiting the fact that, in this case, there are many totally geodesic submanifolds.

  14. STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE TYPES OF OUTCOMES IN NONLINEAR THRESHOLD MODELS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple outcomes are often measured on each experimental unit in toxicology experiments. These multiple observations typically imply the existence of correlation between endpoints, and a statistical analysis that incorporates it may result in improved inference. When both disc...

  15. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  16. Genotoxic and teratogenic effect of freshwater sediment samples from the Rhine and Elbe River (Germany) in zebrafish embryo using a multi-endpoint testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Käufer, M; Gartiser, S; Hafner, C; Schiwy, S; Keiter, S; Gründemann, C; Hollert, H

    2015-11-01

    The embryotoxic potential of three model sediment samples with a distinct and well-characterized pollutant burden from the main German river basins Rhine and Elbe was investigated. The Fish Embryo Contact Test (FECT) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) was applied and submitted to further development to allow for a comprehensive risk assessment of such complex environmental samples. As particulate pollutants are constructive constituents of sediments, they underlay episodic source-sink dynamics, becoming available to benthic organisms. As bioavailability of xenobiotics is a crucial factor for ecotoxicological hazard, we focused on the direct particle-exposure pathway, evaluating throughput-capable endpoints and considering toxicokinetics. Fish embryo and larvae were exposed toward reconstituted (freeze-dried) sediment samples on a microcosm-scale experimental approach. A range of different developmental embryonic stages were considered to gain knowledge of potential correlations with metabolic competence during the early embryogenesis. Morphological, physiological, and molecular endpoints were investigated to elucidate induced adverse effects, placing particular emphasis on genomic instability, assessed by the in vivo comet assay. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the extent of induced cell death, since cytotoxicity can lead to confounding effects. The implementation of relative toxicity indices further provides inter-comparability between samples and related studies. All of the investigated sediments represent a significant ecotoxicological hazard by disrupting embryogenesis in zebrafish. Beside the induction of acute toxicity, morphological and physiological embryotoxic effects could be identified in a concentration-response manner. Increased DNA strand break frequency was detected after sediment contact in characteristic non-monotonic dose-response behavior due to overlapping cytotoxic effects. The embryonic zebrafish toxicity model along with the in vivo comet

  17. [Epigenetic influence on embryonic development].

    PubMed

    Donkin, Ida; Barrès, Romain; Pinborg, Anja

    2016-09-12

    The epigenome is sensitive to environmental changes and can sustainably alter gene expression, notably during embryonic development. New research indicates that epigenetic factors are heritable, which is why paternal lifestyle may affect fetal development and risk of disease. Children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (ART) have an increased risk of peri- and postnatal complications, and as specific ART protocols associate with specific risk profiles, the procedures themselves may cause epigenetic changes contributing to the altered outcomes of the 5,000 Danish children annually conceived by ART. PMID:27649584

  18. Meta-analysis of differentiating mouse embryonic stem cell gene expression kinetics reveals early change of a small gene set.

    PubMed

    Glover, Clive H; Marin, Michael; Eaves, Connie J; Helgason, Cheryl D; Piret, James M; Bryan, Jennifer

    2006-11-24

    Stem cell differentiation involves critical changes in gene expression. Identification of these should provide endpoints useful for optimizing stem cell propagation as well as potential clues about mechanisms governing stem cell maintenance. Here we describe the results of a new meta-analysis methodology applied to multiple gene expression datasets from three mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines obtained at specific time points during the course of their differentiation into various lineages. We developed methods to identify genes with expression changes that correlated with the altered frequency of functionally defined, undifferentiated ESC in culture. In each dataset, we computed a novel statistical confidence measure for every gene which captured the certainty that a particular gene exhibited an expression pattern of interest within that dataset. This permitted a joint analysis of the datasets, despite the different experimental designs. Using a ranking scheme that favored genes exhibiting patterns of interest, we focused on the top 88 genes whose expression was consistently changed when ESC were induced to differentiate. Seven of these (103728_at, 8430410A17Rik, Klf2, Nr0b1, Sox2, Tcl1, and Zfp42) showed a rapid decrease in expression concurrent with a decrease in frequency of undifferentiated cells and remained predictive when evaluated in additional maintenance and differentiating protocols. Through a novel meta-analysis, this study identifies a small set of genes whose expression is useful for identifying changes in stem cell frequencies in cultures of mouse ESC. The methods and findings have broader applicability to understanding the regulation of self-renewal of other stem cell types.

  19. Relevance weighting of tier 1 endocrine screening endpoints by rank order.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Stuchal, Leah D; Mihaich, Ellen M; Becker, Richard A; Bentley, Karin S; Brausch, John M; Coady, Katie; Geter, David R; Gordon, Elliot; Guiney, Patrick D; Hess, Frederick; Holmes, Catherine M; LeBaron, Matthew J; Levine, Steve; Marty, Sue; Mukhi, Sandeep; Neal, Barbara H; Ortego, Lisa S; Saltmiras, David A; Snajdr, Suzanne; Staveley, Jane; Tobia, Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Weight of evidence (WoE) approaches are recommended for interpreting various toxicological data, but few systematic and transparent procedures exist. A hypothesis-based WoE framework was recently published focusing on the U.S. EPA's Tier 1 Endocrine Screening Battery (ESB) as an example. The framework recommends weighting each experimental endpoint according to its relevance for deciding eight hypotheses addressed by the ESB. Here we present detailed rationale for weighting the ESB endpoints according to three rank ordered categories and an interpretive process for using the rankings to reach WoE determinations. Rank 1 was assigned to in vivo endpoints that characterize the fundamental physiological actions for androgen, estrogen, and thyroid activities. Rank 1 endpoints are specific and sensitive for the hypothesis, interpretable without ancillary data, and rarely confounded by artifacts or nonspecific activity. Rank 2 endpoints are specific and interpretable for the hypothesis but less informative than Rank 1, often due to oversensitivity, inclusion of narrowly context-dependent components of the hormonal system (e.g., in vitro endpoints), or confounding by nonspecific activity. Rank 3 endpoints are relevant for the hypothesis but only corroborative of Ranks 1 and 2 endpoints. Rank 3 includes many apical in vivo endpoints that can be affected by systemic toxicity and nonhormonal activity. Although these relevance weight rankings (WREL ) necessarily involve professional judgment, their a priori derivation enhances transparency and renders WoE determinations amenable to methodological scrutiny according to basic scientific premises, characteristics that cannot be assured by processes in which the rationale for decisions is provided post hoc. PMID:24510745

  20. Reliability of a Manual Procedure for Marking the EZ Endpoint Location in Patients with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithambara; X. Cai, Cindy; Lee, Dongwon; C. Epstein, Benjamin; Locke, Kirsten G.; G. Birch, David; C. Hood, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We developed and evaluated a training procedure for marking the endpoints of the ellipsoid zone (EZ), also known as the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) border, on frequency domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) scans from patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods A manual for marking EZ endpoints was developed and used to train 2 inexperienced graders. After training, an experienced grader and the 2 trained graders marked the endpoints on fdOCT horizontal line scans through the macula from 45 patients with RP. They marked the endpoints on these same scans again 1 month later. Results Intragrader agreement was excellent. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.99, the average difference of endpoint locations (19.6 μm) was close to 0 μm, and the 95% limits were between −284 and 323 μm, approximately ±1.1°. Intergrader agreement also was excellent. The ICC values were 0.98 (time 1) and 0.97 (time 2), the average difference among graders was close to zero, and the 95% limits of these differences was less than 350 μm, approximately 1.2°, for both test times. Conclusions While automated algorithms are becoming increasingly accurate, EZ endpoints still have to be verified manually and corrected when necessary. With training, the inter- and intragrader agreement of manually marked endpoints is excellent. Translational Relevance For clinical studies, the EZ endpoints can be marked by hand if a training procedure, including a manual, is used. The endpoint confidence intervals, well under ±2.0°, are considerably smaller than the 6° spacing for the typically used static visual field. PMID:27226930

  1. ETS transcription factors in embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael P; Sumanas, Saulius

    2016-07-01

    At least thirteen ETS-domain transcription factors are expressed during embryonic hematopoietic or vascular development and potentially function in the formation and maintenance of the embryonic vasculature or blood lineages. This review summarizes our current understanding of the specific roles played by ETS factors in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and the implications of functional redundancies between them.

  2. Systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary hypertension: why disease-specific composite endpoints are needed

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious complication of systemic sclerosis (SSc). In clinical trials PAH-SSc has been grouped with other forms, including idiopathic PAH. The primary endpoint for most pivotal studies was improvement in exercise capacity. However, composite clinical endpoints that better reflect long-term outcome may be more meaningful. We discuss potential endpoints and consider why the same measures may not be appropriate for both idiopathic PAH and PAH-SSc due to inherent differences in clinical outcome and management strategies of these two forms of PAH. Failure to take this into account may compromise progress in managing PAH in SSc. PMID:21699746

  3. Determination of infectious bursal disease virus titration and neutralization endpoints using fluorogenic staining.

    PubMed

    Bayyari, G R; Skeeles, J K; Story, J D; Slavik, M F

    1991-01-01

    An automated method for determining infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) titration and neutralization endpoints is described. The method employs the fluorogenic ester carboxyfluorescein-diacetate (CFDA) to stain cell monolayers in 96-well plates and a fluorescence-concentration analyzer. Titration results are compared with immunofluorescence and plaque assay titers. Virus-neutralization endpoint determination is objective, and the endpoints of replicate tests were equivalent or within one dilution of variability. Tests can be automatically screened as any percentage of a positive control or any standard deviation from a negative control.

  4. Spontaneous embryonic motility: an enduring legacy.

    PubMed

    Bekoff, A

    2001-04-01

    This chapter addresses the influential contributions Viktor Hamburger has made to our understanding of embryonic motor behavior. With his classic review, published in 1963, Viktor Hamburger opened up the field of embryonic motor behavior, which had lain almost completely dormant for many years. He focused his observations and experimental studies on the spontaneously generated embryonic movements rather than on reflex responses. As a result, he and his colleagues firmly established the central generation of embryonic motility as a basic component of embryonic behavior in chicks. These studies were also extended to rat fetuses, showing that similar principles apply to mammalian fetuses. All of us who have followed after him owe Viktor Hamburger an enormous debt of gratitude for his pioneering work. PMID:11255029

  5. Avian embryonic development in hyperdynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, U. K.; Smith, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Embryos which developed for 24 hours in the oviduct of hens maintained at 2 G and which were subsequently incubated at Earth gravity had a 14% reduction in hatchability. Increased mortality during the first 4 days, and an increase in embryonic abnormalities were of the types usually found during the first mortality peak (2-3 days). Embryos in eggs that were produced at Earth gravity and continued their development on the centrifuge at fields of 2 G or less did not appear to be greatly affected by the treatment. At 4 G, 91% of the embryos died, mostly on the first and second days of incubation. Abnormalities prominent in the centrifuged eggs include: (a) a failure of the primitive streak to develop; (b) interference with the development of the axial skeleton; (c) multiple hemorrhages, mostly petechial which is consistent with capillary fragility; and (d) retardation of embryo growth, possibly caused by an interference with gaseous diffusion, the result of an acceleration-induced increase in gas density in the centrifuging incubator.

  6. Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Cañamero, Marta; Maraver, Antonio; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Contreras, Julio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Ruberte, Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-11-21

    Cellular senescence disables proliferation in damaged cells, and it is relevant for cancer and aging. Here, we show that senescence occurs during mammalian embryonic development at multiple locations, including the mesonephros and the endolymphatic sac of the inner ear, which we have analyzed in detail. Mechanistically, senescence in both structures is strictly dependent on p21, but independent of DNA damage, p53, or other cell-cycle inhibitors, and it is regulated by the TGF-β/SMAD and PI3K/FOXO pathways. Developmentally programmed senescence is followed by macrophage infiltration, clearance of senescent cells, and tissue remodeling. Loss of senescence due to the absence of p21 is partially compensated by apoptosis but still results in detectable developmental abnormalities. Importantly, the mesonephros and endolymphatic sac of human embryos also show evidence of senescence. We conclude that the role of developmentally programmed senescence is to promote tissue remodeling and propose that this is the evolutionary origin of damage-induced senescence.

  7. Embryonic blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier formation and function

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, David; Parvas, Maryam; Hermelo, Ismaïl; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development and adult life, brain cavities and ventricles are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF has attracted interest as an active signaling medium that regulates brain development, homeostasis and disease. CSF is a complex protein-rich fluid containing growth factors and signaling molecules that regulate multiple cell functions in the central nervous system (CNS). The composition and substance concentrations of CSF are tightly controlled. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that embryonic CSF (eCSF) has a key function as a fluid pathway for delivering diffusible signals to the developing brain, thus contributing to the proliferation, differentiation and survival of neural progenitor cells, and to the expansion and patterning of the brain. From fetal stages through to adult life, CSF is primarily produced by the choroid plexus. The development and functional activities of the choroid plexus and other blood–brain barrier (BBB) systems in adults and fetuses have been extensively analyzed. However, eCSF production and control of its homeostasis in embryos, from the closure of the anterior neuropore when the brain cavities become physiologically sealed, to the formation of the functional fetal choroid plexus, has not been studied in as much depth and remains open to debate. This review brings together the existing literature, some of which is based on experiments conducted by our research group, concerning the formation and function of a temporary embryonic blood–CSF barrier in the context of the crucial roles played by the molecules in eCSF. PMID:25389383

  8. In Vitro Pancreas Organogenesis from Dispersed Mouse Embryonic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells 1. The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development 2-4. These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  9. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-07-19

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity.

  10. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  11. A risk-based probabilistic framework to estimate the endpoint of remediation: Concentration rebound by rate-limited mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, F. P. J.; Fernã Ndez-Garcia, D.; Bolster, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2013-04-01

    Aquifer remediation is a challenging problem with environmental, social, and economic implications. As a general rule, pumping proceeds until the concentration of the target substance within the pumped water lies below a prespecified value. In this paper we estimate the a priori potential failure of the endpoint of remediation due to a rebound of concentrations driven by back diffusion. In many cases, it has been observed that once pumping ceases, a rebound in the concentration at the well takes place. For this reason, administrative approaches are rather conservative, and pumping is forced to last much longer than initially expected. While a number of physical and chemical processes might account for the presence of rebounding, we focus here on diffusion from low water mobility into high mobility zones. In this work we look specifically at the concentration rebound when pumping is discontinued while accounting for multiple mass transfer processes occurring at different time scales and parametric uncertainty. We aim to develop a risk-based optimal operation methodology that is capable of estimating the endpoint of remediation based on aquifer parameters characterizing the heterogeneous medium as well as pumping rate and initial size of the polluted area.

  12. Infrared inhibition of embryonic hearts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yves T.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Infrared control is a new technique that uses pulsed infrared lasers to thermally alter electrical activity. Originally developed for nerves, we have applied this technology to embryonic hearts using a quail model, previously demonstrating infrared stimulation and, here, infrared inhibition. Infrared inhibition enables repeatable and reversible block, stopping cardiac contractions for several seconds. Normal beating resumes after the laser is turned off. The block can be spatially specific, affecting propagation on the ventricle or initiation on the atrium. Optical mapping showed that the block affects action potentials and not just calcium or contraction. Increased resting intracellular calcium was observed after a 30-s exposure to the inhibition laser, which likely resulted in reduced mechanical function. Further optimization of the laser illumination should reduce potential damage. Stopping cardiac contractions by disrupting electrical activity with infrared inhibition has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying the developing heart.

  13. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  14. Endpoint behavior of the pion distribution amplitude in QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, S. V.; Pimikov, A. V.; Stefanis, N. G.

    2010-09-01

    Starting from the QCD sum rules with nonlocal condensates for the pion distribution amplitude, we derive another sum rule for its derivative and its ''integral derivatives''--defined in this work. We use this new sum rule to analyze the fine details of the pion distribution amplitude in the endpoint region x{approx}0. The results for endpoint-suppressed and flattop (or flatlike) pion distribution amplitudes are compared with those we obtained with differential sum rules by employing two different models for the distribution of vacuum-quark virtualities. We determine the range of values of the derivatives of the pion distribution amplitude and show that endpoint-suppressed distribution amplitudes lie within this range, while those with endpoint enhancement--flat-type or Chernyak-Zhitnitsky like--yield values outside this range.

  15. Autonomous Sub-Pixel Satellite Track Endpoint Determination for Space Based Images

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, L M

    2011-03-07

    An algorithm for determining satellite track endpoints with sub-pixel resolution in spaced-based images is presented. The algorithm allows for significant curvature in the imaged track due to rotation of the spacecraft capturing the image. The motivation behind the subpixel endpoint determination is first presented, followed by a description of the methodology used. Results from running the algorithm on real ground-based and simulated spaced-based images are shown to highlight its effectiveness.

  16. 21 CFR 314.510 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE APPLICATIONS FOR FDA APPROVAL TO MARKET A NEW DRUG Accelerated Approval of New Drugs for... for a new drug product on the basis of adequate and well-controlled clinical trials establishing that... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on...

  17. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  18. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  19. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  20. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  1. 21 CFR 601.41 - Approval based on a surrogate endpoint or on an effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effect on a clinical endpoint other than survival or irreversible morbidity. 601.41 Section 601.41 Food... irreversible morbidity. FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product on the basis of adequate and... survival or irreversible morbidity. Approval under this section will be subject to the requirement that...

  2. Evaluation of three soil toxicity tests used to monitor acceptable endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, M.; Stroo, H.; Leuschner, A.; Leuteritz, D.; Stromberg, M.; Brourman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three terrestrial toxicity tests were used to evaluate the efficacy of biological treatment of creosote and pentachlorophenol impacted soils at a Superfund site. Microtox, 5-day lettuce seed, and 14-day earthworm toxicity tests were performed on 10 soil samples at the beginning and end of 3 months of land treatment. Secondary endpoints of root length and earthworm weight loss were also evaluated. EC50 and LC50 values were calculated using a Trimmed Logit Statistical Program and compared to toxicity of 10 background samples collected from the site. Results for initial soils demonstrated toxicity with three of the five endpoints. End treatment results showed no measurable toxicity using all endpoints. Toxicity testing results are critical for obtaining regulatory approval for the full-scale treatment system. Post treatment closure requirements for the site will be based on bioassay results. Evaluation of the three tests used showed the Microtox test to be the most sensitive to this type of toxicity. Lettuce seed germination results were the least sensitive of the three primary endpoints chosen. Of the secondary endpoint criteria, root length demonstrated reliable EC50 values and showed toxicity trends similar to Microtox and earthworm tests. The earthworm weight loss endpoint was not a useful toxicity measurement at 14 days.

  3. Physiological and lavage fluid cytological and biochemical endpoints of toxicity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to toxic materials can result in a variety of physiologic disturbances that can serve as endpoints of toxicity. In addition to a brief review of commonly assessed physiologic endpoints, attention is given in the first component of this report to the use of both nose breathing and mouth'' breathing rats in toxicity studies that involve measurements of ventilatory functional changes in response to test atmospheres. Additionally, the usefulness of maximum oxygen consumption, or VO[sub 2max], as a physiologic endpoint of toxicity that uses exercising rats after exposure to test atmospheres is described, along with an introduction to post-exposure exercise as an important behavioral activity that can markedly impact on the severity of acute lung injury caused by pneumoedematogenic materials. The second component of this report focuses on bronchoalveolar lavage and cytological and biochemical endpoints that can be assessed in investigations of the toxicities of test materials. As will be shown herein, some of the biochemical endpoints of toxicity, especially, can sensitively detect subtle injury to the lower respiratory tract that may escape detection by changes in some other conventional endpoints of toxicity, including lung gravimetric increases and histopathological alterations.

  4. Physiological and lavage fluid cytological and biochemical endpoints of toxicity in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.

    1992-12-31

    Exposure of the respiratory tract to toxic materials can result in a variety of physiologic disturbances that can serve as endpoints of toxicity. In addition to a brief review of commonly assessed physiologic endpoints, attention is given in the first component of this report to the use of both nose breathing and ``mouth`` breathing rats in toxicity studies that involve measurements of ventilatory functional changes in response to test atmospheres. Additionally, the usefulness of maximum oxygen consumption, or VO{sub 2max}, as a physiologic endpoint of toxicity that uses exercising rats after exposure to test atmospheres is described, along with an introduction to post-exposure exercise as an important behavioral activity that can markedly impact on the severity of acute lung injury caused by pneumoedematogenic materials. The second component of this report focuses on bronchoalveolar lavage and cytological and biochemical endpoints that can be assessed in investigations of the toxicities of test materials. As will be shown herein, some of the biochemical endpoints of toxicity, especially, can sensitively detect subtle injury to the lower respiratory tract that may escape detection by changes in some other conventional endpoints of toxicity, including lung gravimetric increases and histopathological alterations.

  5. Pharmacogenetic Association Study of Warfarin Safety Endpoints in Puerto Ricans

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, Isa I.; Rivera, Giselle; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Cruz, Iadelisse; Renta, Jessica Y.; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Feliu, Juan F.; Seip, Richard L.; Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was intended to determine the incidence rate of warfarin-related adverse events (e.g., bleeding) in Puerto Ricans and whether a genetic association between warfarin pharmacogenes and any of these adverse events was observed over the initiation period (i.e., the first 90 days of therapy). Methods We conducted an observational, retrospective cohort study of pharmacogenetic association in 122 warfarin-treated, male, Puerto Rican patients (69.9 ±9.6 years) from the Veterans Affair Caribbean Healthcare System (VACHS) who consented to participate. Genotyping was performed using the CYP2C9 and VKORC 1 assays by Luminex. Event-free survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and analyzed by log-rank test. Cox regression models were constructed and hazard ratios (HR) calculated. Results Carriers of functional CYP2C9 and VKORC1 polymorphisms demonstrated a higher incidence rate of multiple adverse events (i.e., 5.2 vs. 1.0 cases per 100 patient-months; RR = 4.8, p = 0.12) than did wild types. A significant association was observed between multiple adverse events and carrier status (HR = 2.5; 95% CI : 1.0–6.3, p = 0.04). However, no significant associations between genotypes and individual outcomes over the first 90 days of therapy were found. Conclusion The association of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotypes and risks for adverse events due to exposure to warfarin was examined for the first time in Puerto Ricans. Despite a lack of association with individual events in this study population, our findings revealed a potential utility of genotyping for the prevention of multiple adverse events during warfarin therapy. PMID:25244877

  6. Generation of the Dimensional Embryology Application (App) for Visualization of Early Chick and Frog Embryonic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Rebecca L.; Bilitski, James; Zerbee, Alyssa; Symans, Alexandra; Chop, Alexandra; Seitz, Brianne; Tran, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    The study of embryonic development of multiple organisms, including model organisms such as frogs and chicks, is included in many undergraduate biology programs, as well as in a variety of graduate programs. As our knowledge of biological systems increases and the amount of material to be taught expands, the time spent instructing students about…

  7. Role of microglia in embryonic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chih Kong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia begin colonizing the developing brain as early as embryonic day 9, prior to the emergence of neurons and other glia. Their ontogeny is also distinct from other central nervous system cells, as they derive from yolk sac hematopoietic progenitors and not neural progenitors. In this review, we feature these unique characteristics of microglia and assess the spatiotemporal similarities between microglia colonization of the central nervous system and embryonic neurogenesis. We also infer to existing evidence for microglia function from embryonic through to postnatal neurodevelopment to postulate roles for microglia in neurogenesis. PMID:27555616

  8. Role of microglia in embryonic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chih Kong; Vidyadaran, Sharmili

    2016-09-01

    Microglia begin colonizing the developing brain as early as embryonic day 9, prior to the emergence of neurons and other glia. Their ontogeny is also distinct from other central nervous system cells, as they derive from yolk sac hematopoietic progenitors and not neural progenitors. In this review, we feature these unique characteristics of microglia and assess the spatiotemporal similarities between microglia colonization of the central nervous system and embryonic neurogenesis. We also infer to existing evidence for microglia function from embryonic through to postnatal neurodevelopment to postulate roles for microglia in neurogenesis. PMID:27555616

  9. Exploring the relationship between the causal-inference and meta-analytic paradigms for the evaluation of surrogate endpoints.

    PubMed

    Van der Elst, Wim; Molenberghs, Geert; Alonso, Ariel

    2016-04-15

    Nowadays, two main frameworks for the evaluation of surrogate endpoints, based on causal-inference and meta-analysis, dominate the scene. Earlier work showed that the metrics of surrogacy introduced in both paradigms are related, although in a complex way that is difficult to study analytically. In the present work, this relationship is further examined using simulations and the analysis of a case study. The results indicate that the extent to which both paradigms lead to similar conclusions regarding the validity of the surrogate, depends on a complex interplay between multiple factors like the ratio of the between and within trial variability and the unidentifiable correlations between the potential outcomes. All the analyses were carried out using the newly developed R package Surrogate, which is freely available via CRAN. PMID:26612787

  10. Sensitivity to censored-at-random assumption in the analysis of time-to-event endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lipkovich, Ilya; Ratitch, Bohdana; O'Kelly, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, significant progress has been made in developing statistically rigorous methods to implement clinically interpretable sensitivity analyses for assumptions about the missingness mechanism in clinical trials for continuous and (to a lesser extent) for binary or categorical endpoints. Studies with time-to-event outcomes have received much less attention. However, such studies can be similarly challenged with respect to the robustness and integrity of primary analysis conclusions when a substantial number of subjects withdraw from treatment prematurely prior to experiencing an event of interest. We discuss how the methods that are widely used for primary analyses of time-to-event outcomes could be extended in a clinically meaningful and interpretable way to stress-test the assumption of ignorable censoring. We focus on a 'tipping point' approach, the objective of which is to postulate sensitivity parameters with a clear clinical interpretation and to identify a setting of these parameters unfavorable enough towards the experimental treatment to nullify a conclusion that was favorable to that treatment. Robustness of primary analysis results can then be assessed based on clinical plausibility of the scenario represented by the tipping point. We study several approaches for conducting such analyses based on multiple imputation using parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric imputation models and evaluate their operating characteristics via simulation. We argue that these methods are valuable tools for sensitivity analyses of time-to-event data and conclude that the method based on piecewise exponential imputation model of survival has some advantages over other methods studied here. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Sensitivity to censored-at-random assumption in the analysis of time-to-event endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lipkovich, Ilya; Ratitch, Bohdana; O'Kelly, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, significant progress has been made in developing statistically rigorous methods to implement clinically interpretable sensitivity analyses for assumptions about the missingness mechanism in clinical trials for continuous and (to a lesser extent) for binary or categorical endpoints. Studies with time-to-event outcomes have received much less attention. However, such studies can be similarly challenged with respect to the robustness and integrity of primary analysis conclusions when a substantial number of subjects withdraw from treatment prematurely prior to experiencing an event of interest. We discuss how the methods that are widely used for primary analyses of time-to-event outcomes could be extended in a clinically meaningful and interpretable way to stress-test the assumption of ignorable censoring. We focus on a 'tipping point' approach, the objective of which is to postulate sensitivity parameters with a clear clinical interpretation and to identify a setting of these parameters unfavorable enough towards the experimental treatment to nullify a conclusion that was favorable to that treatment. Robustness of primary analysis results can then be assessed based on clinical plausibility of the scenario represented by the tipping point. We study several approaches for conducting such analyses based on multiple imputation using parametric, semi-parametric, and non-parametric imputation models and evaluate their operating characteristics via simulation. We argue that these methods are valuable tools for sensitivity analyses of time-to-event data and conclude that the method based on piecewise exponential imputation model of survival has some advantages over other methods studied here. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26997353

  12. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma: A rare oral tumor

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sila; Ray, Jay Gopal; Deb, Tushar; Patsa, Santanu

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the malignant neoplasm of striated muscle and a relatively uncommon tumor of the oral cavity. Embryonal variety is the most common subtype, observed in children below 10 years of age but occasionally seen in adolescents and young adults. The present report describes a case of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in the left posterior buccal mucosa, with extension in the adjacent alveolus, soft palate, oropharynx and nasopharynx of a 17-year-old female. PMID:27721622

  13. Direct measurement of local material properties within living embryonic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serwane, Friedhelm; Mongera, Alessandro; Rowghanian, Payam; Kealhofer, David; Lucio, Adam; Hockenbery, Zachary; Campàs, Otger

    The shaping of biological matter requires the control of its mechanical properties across multiple scales, ranging from single molecules to cells and tissues. Despite their relevance, measurements of the mechanical properties of sub-cellular, cellular and supra-cellular structures within living embryos pose severe challenges to existing techniques. We have developed a technique that uses magnetic droplets to measure the mechanical properties of complex fluids, including in situ and in vivo measurements within living embryos ,across multiple length and time scales. By actuating the droplets with magnetic fields and recording their deformation we probe the local mechanical properties, at any length scale we choose by varying the droplets' diameter. We use the technique to determine the subcellular mechanics of individual blastomeres of zebrafish embryos, and bridge the gap to the tissue scale by measuring the local viscosity and elasticity of zebrafish embryonic tissues. Using this technique, we show that embryonic zebrafish tissues are viscoelastic with a fluid-like behavior at long time scales. This technique will enable mechanobiology and mechano-transduction studies in vivo, including the study of diseases correlated with tissue stiffness, such as cancer.

  14. In ovo electroporation in embryonic chick retina.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Doh, Sung Tae; Cai, Li

    2012-02-05

    Chicken embryonic retina is an excellent tool to study retinal development in higher vertebrates. Because of large size and external development, it is comparatively very easy to manipulate the chick embryonic retina using recombinant DNA/RNA technology. Electroporation of DNA/RNA constructs into the embryonic retina have a great advantage to study gene regulation in retinal stem/progenitor cells during retinal development. Different type of assays such as reporter gene assay, gene over-expression, gene knock down (shRNA) etc. can be performed using the electroporation technique. This video demonstrates targeted retinal injection and in ovo electroporation into the embryonic chick retina at the Hamburger and Hamilton stage 22-23, which is about embryonic day 4 (E4). Here we show a rapid and convenient in ovo electroporation technique whereby a plasmid DNA that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a marker is directly delivered into the chick embryonic subretinal space and followed by electric pulses to facilitate DNA uptake by retinal stem/progenitor cells. The new method of retinal injection and electroporation at E4 allows the visualization of all retinal cell types, including the late-born neurons(1), which has been difficult with the conventional method of injection and electroporation at E1.5(2).

  15. Arsenate (As V) in water: quantitative sensitivity relationships among biomarker, ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Silva, Valéria C; Almeida, Sônia M; Resgalla, Charrid; Masfaraud, Jean-François; Cotelle, Sylvie; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-06-01

    It is useful to test ecotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints in the environmental impact assessment. Here, we compare and discuss ecotoxicity and genotoxicity effects in organisms in response to exposure to arsenate (As V) in solution. Eco(geno)toxicity responses in Aliivibrio fischeri, Lytechinus variegatus, Daphnia magna, Skeletonema costatum and Vicia faba were analyzed by assessing different endpoints: biomass growth, peroxidase activity, mitotic index, micronucleus frequency, and lethality in accordance with the international protocols. Quantitative sensitivity relationships (QSR) between these endpoints were established in order to rank endpoint sensitivity. The results for the QSR values based on the lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) ratios varied from 2 (for ratio of root peroxidase activity to leaf peroxidase activity) to 2286 (for ratio of higher plant biomass growth to root peroxidase activity). The QSR values allowed the following sensitivity ranking to be established: higher plant enzymatic activity>daphnids≈echinoderms>bacteria≈algae>higher plant biomass growth. The LOEC values for the mitotic index and micronucleus frequency (LOEC=0.25mgAsL(-1)) were similar to the lowest LOEC values observed in aquatic organisms. This approach to the QSR of different endpoints could form the basis for monitoring and predicting early effects of pollutants before they give rise to significant changes in natural community structures. PMID:23597676

  16. The Dirac form factor predicts the Pauli form factor in the Endpoint Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagaonkar, Sumeet K.; Jain, Pankaj; Ralston, John P.

    2016-07-01

    We compute the momentum-transfer dependence of the proton Pauli form factor F2 in the Endpoint overlap Model. We find the model correctly reproduces the scaling of the ratio of F2 with the Dirac form factor F1 observed at the Jefferson Laboratory. The calculation uses the leading-power, leading-twist Dirac structure of the quark light-cone wave function and the same endpoint dependence previously determined from the Dirac form factor F1. There are no parameters and no adjustable functions in the Endpoint Model's prediction for the scaling behavior of F2. The model's predicted momentum dependence of the ratio F2(Q2)/F1(Q2) is quite insensitive to the endpoint wave function, which explains why the observed ratio scales like 1 / Q down to rather low momentum transfers. We also fit the magnitude of this ratio by adjusting the parameters of the wave function. The Endpoint Model appears to be the only comprehensive model consistent with all form factor information as well as reproducing fixed-angle proton-proton scattering at large momentum transfer. Any one of the processes is capable of predicting the others.

  17. Pollutant threshold concentration determination in marine ecosystems using an ecological interaction endpoint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changyou; Liang, Shengkang; Guo, Wenting; Yu, Hua; Xing, Wenhui

    2015-09-01

    The threshold concentrations of pollutants are determined by extrapolating single-species effect data to community-level effects. This assumes the most sensitive endpoint of the life cycle of individuals and the species sensitivity distribution from single-species toxic effect tests, thus, ignoring the ecological interactions. The uncertainties due to this extrapolation can be partially overcome using the equilibrium point of a customized ecosystem. This method incorporates ecological interactions and integrates the effects on growth, survival, and ingestion into a single effect measure, the equilibrium point excursion in the customized ecosystem, in order to describe the toxic effects on plankton. A case study showed that the threshold concentration of copper calculated with the endpoint of the equilibrium point was 10 μg L(-1), which is significantly different from the threshold calculated with a single-species endpoint. The endpoint calculated using this method provides a more relevant measure of the ecological impact than any single individual-level endpoint. PMID:25982547

  18. A new proportion measure of the treatment effect captured by candidate surrogate endpoints.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Kuroki, Manabu

    2014-08-30

    The use of surrogate endpoints is expected to play an important role in the development of new drugs, as they can be used to reduce the sample size and/or duration of randomized clinical trials. Biostatistical researchers and practitioners have proposed various surrogacy measures; however, (i) most of these surrogacy measures often fall outside the range [0,1] without any assumptions, (ii) these surrogacy measures do not provide a cut-off value for judging a surrogacy level of candidate surrogate endpoints, and (iii) most surrogacy measures are highly variable; thus, the confidence intervals are often unacceptably wide. In order to solve problems (i) and (ii), we propose a new surrogacy measure, a proportion of the treatment effect captured by candidate surrogate endpoints (PCS), on the basis of the decomposition of the treatment effect into parts captured and non-captured by the candidate surrogate endpoints. In order to solve problem (iii), we propose an estimation method based on the half-range mode method with the bootstrap distribution of the estimated surrogacy measures. Finally, through numerical experiments and two empirical examples, we show that the PCS with the proposed estimation method overcomes these difficulties. The results of this paper contribute to the reliable evaluation of how much of the treatment effect is captured by candidate surrogate endpoints. PMID:24782344

  19. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads. PMID:26482735

  20. Human arm posture prediction in response to isometric endpoint forces.

    PubMed

    Davoudabadi Farahani, Saeed; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark; Rasmussen, John

    2015-11-26

    The ability to predict the musculoskeletal response to external loads has multiple applications for the design of machines with a human interface and for the prediction of outcomes of musculoskeletal interventions. In this study, we applied an inverse-inverse dynamics technique to investigate its ability to predict arm posture in response to isometric hand forces. For each subject, we made a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model using the AnyBody Modelling System (AMS). Then, we had each subject-specific model hold a weight anteriorly to the right shoulder joint at a distance of half of the arm length. We selected the glenohumeral abduction angle (GHAA) as the only free parameter. Subsequently, we used inverse-inverse dynamics to find the optimal GHAA that minimised a performance criterion with physiological constraints. In this study, we investigated the performance of two different objective functions: summation of squared muscle activity (SSMA) and summation of squared normalised joint torques (SSNJT). To validate the simulation results, arm posture responses to different isometric downward hand forces were measured for six healthy male subjects. Five trials were performed for each loading condition. The results showed that, with an increase in hand load, there was a reduced GHAA in all subjects. Another interesting finding was that self-selected postures for lighter tasks varied more than postures for heavier tasks for all subjects. To understand this, we investigated the curvature of the objective function as a function of the load and observed an increased curvature with increased load. This may explain the reduced intra-subject variations observed for increasing loads.

  1. Endpoints for Neural Connectivity Including Neurite Outgrowth, Synapse Formation, and Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strategy for alternative methods for developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) focuses on assessment of chemical effects on conserved neurodevelopmental processes. The development of the brain is an integrated series of steps from the commitment of embryonic cells to become neu...

  2. Evaluation of novel high-throughput embryonic stem cell tests with new molecular markers for screening embryotoxic chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Ando, Satoshi; Yamashita, Norihisa; Horie, Nobuyuki; Saito, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a validated in vitro alternative test for prediction of embryotoxicity with inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation under the microscope as beating areas at day 10 as an endpoint. However, improvements are necessary for regulatory acceptance and application to high-throughput screening. We have previously reported that heart and neural crest derivatives expressed transcript 1 (Hand1), a transcription factor essential for mammalian heart development, and cardiomyopathy associated 1 (Cmya1), an intercalated disk protein implicated in cardiac morphogenesis, are quantitative and objective molecular endpoints for predicting embryotoxicity, detected at day 6 when mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into cardiomyocytes. In established stable transgenic ES cells with Hand1 or Cmya1 promoters upstream of luciferase reporter gene, changes in each gene expression were found to be coincident with those in luciferase activities during cardiomyocyte differentiation, suggesting that monitoring might be possible by chemiluminescent determination. In our novel EST, differentiation toxicity and cytotoxicity of test chemicals were here analyzed using ES cells and 3T3 fibroblasts by this approach in 96-microwell plates. Extensive investigations were performed to explore predictive power and validity by comparing a set of 24 well-known test chemicals. The novel EST offers high predictability and accuracy with a reduced test duration and manpower compared with the original EST protocol, thus providing a new rapid and sensitive in vitro method for screening embryotoxicants.

  3. Cervical spinal cord injury: tailoring clinical trial endpoints to reflect meaningful functional improvements

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; McKerracher, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) results in partial to full paralysis of the upper and lower extremities. Traditional primary endpoints for acute SCI clinical trials are too broad to assess functional recovery in cervical subjects, raising the possibility of false positive outcomes in trials for cervical SCI. Endpoints focused on the recovery of hand and arm control (e.g., upper extremity motor score, motor level change) show the most potential for use as primary outcomes in upcoming trials of cervical SCI. As the field moves forward, the most reliable way to ensure meaningful clinical testing in cervical subjects may be the development of a composite primary endpoint that measures both neurological recovery and functional improvement. PMID:25317162

  4. Swimming speed alteration in the early developmental stages of Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin as ecotoxicological endpoint.

    PubMed

    Morgana, Silvia; Gambardella, Chiara; Falugi, Carla; Pronzato, Roberto; Garaventa, Francesca; Faimali, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Behavioral endpoints have been used for decades to assess chemical impacts at concentrations unlikely to cause mortality. With recently developed techniques, it is possible to investigate the swimming behavior of several organisms under laboratory conditions. The aims of this study were: i) assessing for the first time the feasibility of swimming speed analysis of the early developmental stage sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus by an automatic recording system ii) investigating any Swimming Speed Alteration (SSA) on P. lividus early stages exposed to a chemical reference; iii) identifying the most suitable stage for SSA test. Results show that the swimming speed of all the developmental stages was easily recorded. The swimming speed was inhibited as a function of toxicant concentration. Pluteus were the most appropriate stage for evaluating SSA in P. lividus as ecotoxicological endpoint. Finally, swimming of sea urchin early stages represents a sensitive endpoint to be considered in ecotoxicological investigations.

  5. The Feynman trajectories: determining the path of a protein using fixed-endpoint assays.

    PubMed

    Ketteler, Robin

    2010-03-01

    Richard Feynman postulated in 1948 that the path of an electron can be best described by the sum or functional integral of all possible trajectories rather than by the notion of a single, unique trajectory. As a consequence, the position of an electron does not harbor any information about the paths that contributed to this position. This observation constitutes a classical endpoint observation. The endpoint assay is the desired type of experiment for high-throughput screening applications, mainly because of limitations in data acquisition and handling. Quite contrary to electrons, it is possible to extract information about the path of a protein using endpoint assays, and these types of applications are reviewed in this article.

  6. Automatic end-point detection of spray etching in application to mask making

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, F.; Kato, M.; Koizumi, T.; Mori, K.; Sagawara, K.; Takehana, Y.

    1985-06-01

    The development of high performance LSI's has increased the requirement for precise control of mask making in addition to that of wafer processing. One method for obtaining precise control is ''in-process'' end-point detection. End-point detection methods have previously been devised for thin film formation, such as thickness control of SOS (silicon-on-sapphire) epitaxial layers (1), homoepitaxial layers (2), and for plasma etching (3). In mask making, ''wet etching'' has been used due to thin Cr film deposited on mask blanks and to flat surface in comparison with the wafer fabrication. In this note, a novel method of the end-point detection used for the mask making will be reported; it is quite different from that used for the ''dry etching.''

  7. Amplification of endpoint structure for new particle mass measurement at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Won Sang; Kim, Jihn E.; Kim, Ji-Hun

    2010-05-01

    We introduce a new collider variable, M{sub CT2}, named as constransverse mass. It is a mixture of 'stransverse mass (M{sub T2})' and 'contransverse mass (M{sub CT})' variables, where the usual endpoint structure of M{sub T2} distribution can be amplified in the M{sub CT2} basis by a large Jacobian factor which is controlled by a trial missing particle mass. Thus, the M{sub CT2} projection of events increases our observability to measure several important endpoints from new particle decays, which are usually expected to be buried by irreducible backgrounds with various systematic uncertainties at the LHC. In this paper we explain the phenomenology of endpoint amplification in M{sub CT2} projection, and describe how one may employ this variable to measure several meaningful mass constraints of new particles.

  8. Deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint in soft-collinear effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul

    2007-01-01

    We apply the soft-collinear effective theory to deep inelastic scattering near the endpoint region. The forward scattering amplitude and the structure functions are shown to factorize as a convolution of the Wilson coefficients, the jet functions, and the parton distribution functions. The behavior of the parton distribution functions near the endpoint region is considered. It turns out that it evolves with the Altarelli-Parisi kernel even in the endpoint region, and the parton distribution function can be factorized further into a collinear part and the soft Wilson line. The factorized form for the structure functions is obtained by the two-step matching, and the radiative corrections or the evolution for each factorized part can be computed in perturbation theory. We present the radiative corrections of each factorized part to leading order in {alpha}{sub s}, including the zero-bin subtraction for the collinear part.

  9. Update of OECD DART guidelines with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints: Practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Beekhuijzen, Manon; van Otterdijk, Francois; Wieland, Willemien; van Tuyl, Miranda; Rijcken, Robert Pels; Peter, Birgit; Emmen, Harry

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, the OECD initiated a high-priority project aimed at revising existing test guidelines and developing new test guidelines for screening of potential endocrine disruptors. In 2011, OECD 443 was adopted, and in 2015 OECD 421 and OECD 422 were updated with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints. A feasibility study for the enhancement of OECD 414 with endocrine disruptor relevant endpoints is currently ongoing. The addition of these endpoints is considered crucial for gaining more information on endocrine disruptor potency of tested chemicals, however it should be noted that these additions have a major impact on the study designs and give rise to several practical challenges. The aim of this review is to discuss important aspects of these challenging study designs and to share our knowledge on their implementation in our laboratory. Together, this review can be used as guidance for other laboratories, study monitors and registration officers. PMID:27063183

  10. Effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints for environmental research.

    PubMed

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  11. Effect of Pre-Fixation Delay and Freezing on Mink Testicular Endpoints for Environmental Research

    PubMed Central

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  12. Evaluation of suitable endpoints for assessing the impacts of toxicants at the community level.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Kouchi

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of ecological impacts of toxicants relies currently on extrapolation of effects observed at organismal or population levels. The uncertainty inherent to such extrapolations, together with the impossibility of predicting ecological effects of chemical mixtures, can only be resolved by adopting approaches that consider toxicological endpoints at a community or ecological level. Experimental data from micro- and mesocosms provide estimates of community effect levels, which can then be used to confirm or correct the extrapolations from theoretical methods such as species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) or others. When assessing impacts, the choice of sensitive community endpoints is important. Four community endpoints (species richness, abundance, diversity and similarity indices) were evaluated in their ability to assess impacts of two insecticides, imidacloprid and etofenprox, and their mixture on aquatic and benthic communities from artificial rice paddies. Proportional changes of each community endpoint were expressed by ratios between their values in the treatment and control paddies. Regression lines fitted to the endpoint ratios against the time series of chemical concentrations were used to predict percentile impacts in the communities. The abundance endpoint appears to be the most sensitive indicator of the communities' response, but the Czekanowski similarity index described best the structural changes that occur in all communities. Aquatic arthropods were more sensitive to the mixture of both insecticides than zooplankton and benthic communities. Estimated protective levels for 95% of aquatic species exposed to imidacloprid (<0.01-1.0 μg l(-1)) were slightly lower than predicted by SSD, whereas for etofenprox the protective concentrations in water (<0.01-0.58 μg l(-1)) were an order of magnitude lower than SSD's predictions. PMID:22120543

  13. Quantifying Variability in Four U.S. Streams Using a Long-Term Dataset: Patterns in Biotic Endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flinders, Camille A.; McLaughlin, Douglas B.; Ragsdale, Renee L.

    2015-08-01

    Effective water resources assessment and management requires quantitative information on the variability of ambient and biological conditions in aquatic communities. Although it is understood that natural systems are variable, robust estimates of long-term variation in community-based structure and function metrics are rare in U.S. waters. We used a multi-year, seasonally sampled dataset from multiple sites ( n = 5-6) in four streams (Codorus Creek, PA; Leaf River, MS; McKenzie and Willamette Rivers, OR) to examine spatial and temporal variation in periphyton chlorophyll a, and fish and macroinvertebrate metrics commonly used in bioassessment programs. Within-site variation of macroinvertebrate metrics and benthic chlorophyll a concentration showed coefficient of variation ranging from 16 to 136 %. Scale-specific variability patterns (stream-wide, season, site, and site-season patterns) in standardized biotic endpoints showed that within-site variability patterns extended across sites with variability greatest in chlorophyll a and lowest in Hilsenhoff's Biotic Index. Across streams, variance components models showed that variance attributed to the interaction of space and time and sample variance accounted for the majority of variation in macroinvertebrate metrics and chlorophyll a, while most variation in fish metrics was attributed to sample variance. Clear temporal patterns in measured endpoints were rare and not specific to any one stream or assemblage, while apparent shifts in metric variability related to point source discharges were seen only in McKenzie River macroinvertebrate metrics in the fall. Results from this study demonstrate the need to consider and understand spatial, seasonal, and longer term variability in the development of bioassessment programs and subsequent decisions.

  14. Quantifying Variability in Four U.S. Streams Using a Long-Term Dataset: Patterns in Biotic Endpoints.

    PubMed

    Flinders, Camille A; McLaughlin, Douglas B; Ragsdale, Renee L

    2015-08-01

    Effective water resources assessment and management requires quantitative information on the variability of ambient and biological conditions in aquatic communities. Although it is understood that natural systems are variable, robust estimates of long-term variation in community-based structure and function metrics are rare in U.S. waters. We used a multi-year, seasonally sampled dataset from multiple sites (n = 5-6) in four streams (Codorus Creek, PA; Leaf River, MS; McKenzie and Willamette Rivers, OR) to examine spatial and temporal variation in periphyton chlorophyll a, and fish and macroinvertebrate metrics commonly used in bioassessment programs. Within-site variation of macroinvertebrate metrics and benthic chlorophyll a concentration showed coefficient of variation ranging from 16 to 136%. Scale-specific variability patterns (stream-wide, season, site, and site-season patterns) in standardized biotic endpoints showed that within-site variability patterns extended across sites with variability greatest in chlorophyll a and lowest in Hilsenhoff's Biotic Index. Across streams, variance components models showed that variance attributed to the interaction of space and time and sample variance accounted for the majority of variation in macroinvertebrate metrics and chlorophyll a, while most variation in fish metrics was attributed to sample variance. Clear temporal patterns in measured endpoints were rare and not specific to any one stream or assemblage, while apparent shifts in metric variability related to point source discharges were seen only in McKenzie River macroinvertebrate metrics in the fall. Results from this study demonstrate the need to consider and understand spatial, seasonal, and longer term variability in the development of bioassessment programs and subsequent decisions.

  15. Comparison of methods for accurate end-point detection of potentiometric titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villela, R. L. A.; Borges, P. P.; Vyskočil, L.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the end point in potentiometric titrations has wide application on experiments that demand very low measurement uncertainties mainly for certifying reference materials. Simulations of experimental coulometric titration data and consequential error analysis of the end-point values were conducted using a programming code. These simulations revealed that the Levenberg-Marquardt method is in general more accurate than the traditional second derivative technique used currently as end-point detection for potentiometric titrations. Performance of the methods will be compared and presented in this paper.

  16. A numerical method of finding potentiometric titration end-points by use of approximative spline functions.

    PubMed

    Ren, K

    1990-07-01

    A new numerical method of determining potentiometric titration end-points is presented. It consists in calculating the coefficients of approximative spline functions describing the experimental data (e.m.f., volume of titrant added). The end-point (the inflection point of the curve) is determined by calculating zero points of the second derivative of the approximative spline function. This spline function, unlike rational spline functions, is free from oscillations and its course is largely independent of random errors in e.m.f. measurements. The proposed method is useful for direct analysis of titration data and especially as a basis for construction of microcomputer-controlled automatic titrators. PMID:18964999

  17. Verifying Elimination Programs with a Special Emphasis on Cysticercosis Endpoints and Postelimination Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Handali, Sukwan; Pawitan, Yudi

    2012-01-01

    Methods are needed for determining program endpoints or postprogram surveillance for any elimination program. Cysticercosis has the necessary effective strategies and diagnostic tools for establishing an elimination program; however, tools to verify program endpoints have not been determined. Using a statistical approach, the present study proposed that taeniasis and porcine cysticercosis antibody assays could be used to determine with a high statistical confidence whether an area is free of disease. Confidence would be improved by using secondary tests such as the taeniasis coproantigen assay and necropsy of the sentinel pigs. PMID:23213490

  18. Calculation of a velocity distribution from particle trajectory end-points.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Lowell A.

    1983-01-01

    The longitudinal component of the velocity of a particle at or near a glacier surface is considered, its position as a function of time being termed its trajectory. Functional relationships are derived for obtaining the trajectory from the spatial distribution of velocity and for obtaining the velocity distribution from the trajectory. It is established that the trajectory end-points impose only an integral condition on the velocity distribution and that no individual point on the velocity distribution can be determined if only the end-points are known.-from Author

  19. Order of the Roberge-Weiss endpoint (finite size transition) in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    We consider the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss (RW) first order transition line present for imaginary baryon chemical potentials. We remark that it coincides with the finite size transition relevant in the context of large N{sub c} QCD and study its order in the theory with two degenerate flavors. The RW endpoint is first order in the limit of large and small quark masses, while it weakens for intermediate masses where it is likely in the Ising 3D universality class. Phenomenological implications and further speculations about the QCD phase diagram are discuss0008.

  20. Shortening and Improving the Embryonic Stem Cell Test through the Use of Gene Biomarkers of Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Andrea C.; Vilanova, Eugenio; Sogorb, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    The embryonic Stem cell Test (EST) is a validated assay for testing embryotoxicity in vitro. The total duration of this protocol is 10 days, and its main end-point is based on histological determinations. It is suggested that improvements on EST must be focused toward molecular end-points and, if possible, to reduce the total assay duration. Five days of exposure of D3 cells in monolayers under spontaneous differentiation to 50 ng/mL of the strong embryotoxic 5-fluorouracil or to 75 μg/mL of the weak embryotoxic 5,5-diphenylhydeantoin caused between 20 and 74% of reductions in the expression of the following genes: Pnpla6, Afp, Hdac7, Vegfa, and Nes. The exposure to 1 mg/mL of nonembryotoxic saccharin only caused statistically significant reductions in the expression of Nes. These exposures reduced cell viability of D3 cells by 15, 28, and 34%. We applied these records to the mathematical discriminating function of the EST method to find that this approach is able to correctly predict the embryotoxicity of all three above-mentioned chemicals. Therefore, this work proposes the possibility of improve EST by reducing its total duration and by introducing gene expression as biomarker of differentiation, which might be very interesting for in vitro risk assessment embryotoxicity. PMID:21876691

  1. Uncoupled Embryonic and Extra-Embryonic Tissues Compromise Blastocyst Development after Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Degrelle, Séverine A.; Jaffrezic, Florence; Campion, Evelyne; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Le Bourhis, Daniel; Richard, Christophe; Rodde, Nathalie; Fleurot, Renaud; Everts, Robin E.; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Heyman, Yvan; Vignon, Xavier; Tian, Xiuchun C.; Lewin, Harris A.; Renard, Jean-Paul; Hue, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is the most efficient cell reprogramming technique available, especially when working with bovine species. Although SCNT blastocysts performed equally well or better than controls in the weeks following embryo transfer at Day 7, elongation and gastrulation defects were observed prior to implantation. To understand the developmental implications of embryonic/extra-embryonic interactions, the morphological and molecular features of elongating and gastrulating tissues were analysed. At Day 18, 30 SCNT conceptuses were compared to 20 controls (AI and IVP: 10 conceptuses each); one-half of the SCNT conceptuses appeared normal while the other half showed signs of atypical elongation and gastrulation. SCNT was also associated with a high incidence of discordance in embryonic and extra-embryonic patterns, as evidenced by morphological and molecular “uncoupling”. Elongation appeared to be secondarily affected; only 3 of 30 conceptuses had abnormally elongated shapes and there were very few differences in gene expression when they were compared to the controls. However, some of these differences could be linked to defects in microvilli formation or extracellular matrix composition and could thus impact extra-embryonic functions. In contrast to elongation, gastrulation stages included embryonic defects that likely affected the hypoblast, the epiblast, or the early stages of their differentiation. When taking into account SCNT conceptus somatic origin, i.e. the reprogramming efficiency of each bovine ear fibroblast (Low: 0029, Med: 7711, High: 5538), we found that embryonic abnormalities or severe embryonic/extra-embryonic uncoupling were more tightly correlated to embryo loss at implantation than were elongation defects. Alternatively, extra-embryonic differences between SCNT and control conceptuses at Day 18 were related to molecular plasticity (high efficiency/high plasticity) and subsequent pregnancy loss. Finally, because it alters

  2. Measuring the micromechanical properties of embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Gazguez, Elodie; Dufour, Sylvie; Fleury, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    Local mechanical properties play an important role in directing embryogenesis, both at the cell (differentiation, migration) and tissue level (force transmission, organ formation, morphogenesis). Measuring them is a challenge as embryonic tissues are small (μm to mm) and soft (0.1-10 kPa). We describe here how glass fiber cantilevers can be fabricated, calibrated and used to apply small forces (0.1-10 μN), measure contractile activity and assess the bulk tensile elasticity of embryonic tissue. We outline how pressure (hydrostatic or osmotic) can be applied to embryonic tissue to quantify stiffness anisotropy. These techniques can be assembled at low cost and with a minimal amount of equipment. We then present a protocol to prepare tissue sections for local elasticity and adhesion measurements using the atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare AFM nanoindentation maps of native and formaldehyde fixed embryonic tissue sections and discuss how the local elastic modulus obtained by AFM compares to that obtained with other bulk measurement methods. We illustrate all of the techniques presented on the specific example of the chick embryonic digestive tract, emphasizing technical issues and common pitfalls. The main purpose of this report is to make these micromechanical measurement techniques accessible to a wide community of biologists and biophysicists.

  3. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a CMP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xu; Dongming, Guo; Zhuji, Jin; Renke, Kang

    2010-12-01

    A signal processing method for the friction-based endpoint detection system of a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process is presented. The signal process method uses the wavelet threshold denoising method to reduce the noise contained in the measured original signal, extracts the Kalman filter innovation from the denoised signal as the feature signal, and judges the CMP endpoint based on the feature of the Kalman filter innovation sequence during the CMP process. Applying the signal processing method, the endpoint detection experiments of the Cu CMP process were carried out. The results show that the signal processing method can judge the endpoint of the Cu CMP process.

  4. Scaffolding for Three-Dimensional Embryonic Vasculogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P.; Aday, Sezin; Ferreira, Lino S.

    Biomaterial scaffolds have great potential to support efficient vascular differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Vascular cell fate-specific biochemical and biophysical cues have been identified and incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) biomaterials to efficiently direct embryonic vasculogenesis. The resulting vascular-like tissue can be used for regenerative medicine applications, further elucidation of biophysical and biochemical cues governing vasculogenesis, and drug discovery. In this chapter, we give an overview on the following: (1) developmental cues for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into vascular cells, (2) 3D vascular differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs), (3) preparation of 3D scaffolds for the vascular differentiation of hESCs, and (4) the most significant studies combining scaffolding and hESCs for development of vascular-like tissue.

  5. The effects of nonylphenol and octylphenol on embryonic development of sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Arslan, O Cakal; Parlak, H; Oral, R; Katalay, S

    2007-08-01

    In this study, embryotoxic and genotoxic effects of nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP), which are the derivates of alkylphenol (APs), were evaluated using the gametes and embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The sperm and eggs of sea urchins were exposed to increasing concentrations of NP (0.937-18.74 microg/L) and OP (5-160 microg/L) under static conditions. The endpoints were sperm fertilization success, quantitative and morphologic changes in mitotic activity, larval malformations, developmental arrest, and embryonic/larval mortality. A dose-response-related reduction (approximately 20%) was observed in fertilization success and significant increases in the number of larvae with skeleton malformations at the pluteus stage of the contaminated sperms. The spermiotoxic and embryotoxic concentrations were determined as 0.937 microg/L for NP and 4.685 microg/L for OP for this species. The embryotoxicity of NP and OP is concentration dependent, and significant growth reduction at the early life stages and an increase in larval malformations as skeleton deformities at the pluteus stage were observed. Cytogenetic analysis of embryos showed a decreasing curve in mitotic indexes (number of mitosis per embryo) with increasing concentrations of NP and OP. It can be concluded that NP and OP adversely affect the reproduction and embryonic developmental stages of the P. lividus and this is of great ecological importance because of the hazard at the population level. PMID:17587143

  6. Effects of bisphenol A on the embryonic development of sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Ozlem, Cakal Arslan; Hatice, Parlak

    2008-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is one of the most important industrial chemicals synthesized for diverse applications. In this study, tests for embryotoxic and spermiotoxic effects of BPA were utilized in the sperms and embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. The sperm and eggs of sea urchins were exposed to increasing concentrations of BPA (300-3500 microg/L) under static conditions. The endpoints were successful sperm fertilization, larval malformations, developmental arrest, and embryonic/larval mortality. BPA concentration (300 microg/L) had spermiotoxic and embryotoxic effects on this species. A dose-response related reduction was observed in fertilization success and significant increases in the number of larvae with skeleton malformations at the pluteus stage when the sperms were exposed BPA. The embryotoxicity of BPA is concentration-dependent and significant growth reduction at the early life stages and an increase in larval malformations as skeleton deformities at the pluteus stage were observed. It can be concluded that BPA adversely affects the reproduction and embryonic developmental stages of the P. lividus and this is of great ecological importance due to the hazard at the population level. PMID:18214894

  7. Fate of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to X-rays or carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Luft, S; Pignalosa, D; Nasonova, E; Arrizabalaga, O; Helm, A; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2014-01-15

    The risk of radiation exposure during embryonic development is still a major problem in radiotoxicology. In this study we investigated the response of the murine embryonic stem cell (mESC) line D3 to two radiation qualities: sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions. We analyzed clonogenic cell survival, proliferation, induction of chromosome aberrations as well as the capability of cells to differentiate to beating cardiomyocytes up to 3 days after exposure. Our results show that, for all endpoints investigated, carbon ions are more effective than X-rays at the same radiation dose. Additionally, in long term studies (≥8 days post-irradiation) chromosomal damage and the pluripotency state were investigated. These studies reveal that pluripotency markers are present in the progeny of cells surviving the exposure to both radiation types. However, only in the progeny of X-ray exposed cells the aberration frequency was comparable to that of the control population, while the progeny of carbon ion irradiated cells harbored significantly more aberrations than the control, generally translocations. We conclude that cells surviving the radiation exposure maintain pluripotency but may carry stable chromosomal rearrangements after densely ionizing radiation.

  8. Recycling selectable markers in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Abuin, A; Bradley, A

    1996-01-01

    As a result of gene targeting, selectable markers are usually permanently introduced into the mammalian genome. Multiple gene targeting events in the same cell line can therefore exhaust the pool of markers available and limit subsequent manipulations or genetic analysis. In this study, we describe the combined use of homologous and CRE-loxP-mediated recombination to generate mouse embryonic stem cell lines carrying up to four targeted mutations and devoid of exogenous selectable markers. A cassette that contains both positive and negative selectable markers flanked by loxP sites, rendering it excisable by the CRE protein, was constructed. Homologous recombination and positive selection were used to disrupt the Rep-3 locus, a gene homologous to members of the mutS family of DNA mismatch repair genes. CRE-loxP-mediated recombination and negative selection were then used to recover clones in which the cassette had been excised. The remaining allele of Rep-3 was then subjected to a second round of targeting and excision with the same construct to generate homozygous, marker-free cell lines. Subsequently, both alleles of mMsh2, another mutS homolog, were disrupted in the same fashion to obtain cell lines homozygous for targeted mutations at both the Rep-3 and mMsh2 loci and devoid of selectable markers. Thus, embryonic stem cell lines obtained in this fashion are suitable for further manipulation and analysis involving the use of selectable markers. PMID:8657161

  9. Selecting surrogate endpoints for estimating pesticide effects on avian reproductive success

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) has been developed for projecting the effects of a specific pesticide-use scenario on the annual reproductive success of avian species of concern. A critical element in MCnest is the use of surrogate endpoints, defined as measured ...

  10. Shape and Steepness of Toxicological Dose-Response Relationships of Continuous Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    A re-analysis of a large number of historical dose-response data for continuous endpoints indicates that an exponential or a Hill model with four parameters both adequately describe toxicological dose-responses. The four parameters relate to the background response, the potency o...

  11. Recent Developments in Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations: Innovations in Manipulations and Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) methods were developed primarily in the late 1990s and early 2000s in research programs dedicated to developing manipulations and endpoints to characterize and identify causes of toxicity to benthic freshwater and marine org...

  12. Developing ecosystem services-based assessment endpoints for determining ecological risks to estuarine environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current U.S. EPA ecological risk assessment (ERA) guidance defines an assessment endpoint (AE) as an explicit expression of the environmental value that is to be protected, and recommends that AEs are selected based on ecological relevance, susceptibility to known or potential st...

  13. Coulometric Titration of Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) with Spectrophotometric Endpoint Detection: An Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Young, Vaneica Y.; Killian, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is commonly used as an anticoagulant in blood-collection procedures. In this experiment for the instrumental analysis laboratory, students determine the quantity of EDTA in commercial collection tubes by coulometric titration with electrolytically generated Cu[superscript 2+]. The endpoint is detected…

  14. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25483685

  15. Alternate Endpoints for Deep Vadose Zone Environments: Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

    2013-02-24

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical to achieve. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provide a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable establishing a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

  16. Alternate Endpoints for Deep Vadose Zone Environments: Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress - 13036

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, M. Hope

    2013-07-01

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical to achieve. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provide a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable establishing a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches. (authors)

  17. Deep Vadose Zone Remediation: Technical and Policy Challenges, Opportunities, and Progress in Achieving Cleanup Endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.; Lee, Michelle H.

    2013-02-24

    Current requirements for site remediation and closure are standards-based and are often overly conservative, costly, and in some cases, technically impractical. Use of risk-informed alternate endpoints provides a means to achieve remediation goals that are permitted by regulations and are protective of human health and the environment. Alternate endpoints enable the establishment of a path for cleanup that may include intermediate remedial milestones and transition points and/or regulatory alternatives to standards-based remediation. A framework is presented that is centered around developing and refining conceptual models in conjunction with assessing risks and potential endpoints as part of a system-based assessment that integrates site data with scientific understanding of processes that control the distribution and transport of contaminants in the subsurface and pathways to receptors. This system-based assessment and subsequent implementation of the remediation strategy with appropriate monitoring are targeted at providing a holistic approach to addressing risks to human health and the environment. This holistic approach also enables effective predictive analysis of contaminant behavior to provide defensible criteria and data for making long-term decisions. Developing and implementing an alternate endpoint-based approach for remediation and waste site closure presents a number of challenges and opportunities. Categories of these challenges include scientific and technical, regulatory, institutional, and budget and resource allocation issues. Opportunities exist for developing and implementing systems-based approaches with respect to supportive characterization, monitoring, predictive modeling, and remediation approaches.

  18. Automatic detection of exogenous respiration end-point using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Bisschops, I; Spanjers, H; Keesman, K

    2006-01-01

    When aerobic bacteria receive a biodegradable material such as wastewater, then respiration changes from endogenous to exogenous. The reverse occurs when biodegradation is complete. When using respirometry a respirogram is recorded showing those changes in respiration, and for an expert it is not difficult to point the moments at which they occur. The area corresponding to the exogenous respiration phase is a measure of the easily biodegradable fraction of material, also called the short-term BOD or BOD(ST). That value, in combination with a value for COD, can be used to determine the treatability of wastewater. Respirometry can also be applied on-line, e.g. for on-line monitoring of wastewater. However, automatic detection of the end-point of exogenous respiration is difficult. The first step towards on-line monitoring of wastewater treatability is to make automatic detection of this end-point possible. In this study the use of a neural network for detection of this end-point was investigated. Results are promising; after training the neural network is able to detect the correct end-point in the majority of the studied cases.

  19. 78 FR 73199 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Bioequivalence Studies With Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... Pharmacokinetic Endpoints for Drugs Submitted Under an Abbreviated New Drug Application; Availability AGENCY: Food... applicants planning to include bioequivalence (BE) information in abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs... Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002....

  20. EFFECTS OF COPPER ON COMMUNITY, FUNCTIONAL, AND BEHAVIORAL ENDPOINTS IN AN ARTIFICIAL STREAM STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the effects of copper on biota and behavioral endpoints was carried out at the U.S. EPA's Experimental Stream Facility (ESF), Milford OH. The objective of the study was to identify relationships between structural (macrobenthos and periphyton indices), functional (inte...

  1. Rational study endpoints in anti-neoplastic agent regulatory approval trials in the gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Markman, Maurie

    2016-07-01

    A discussion of rational endpoints in clinical trials seeking regulatory approval for new anti-neoplastic agents involving the three major gynecologic malignancies, cancers of the ovary, cervix, and endometrial, is particularly interesting as (in the opinion of this commentator) the conclusion will be different in the individual cancers. PMID:27638892

  2. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP SUMMARY - MIDPOINTS VERSUS ENDPOINTS: THE SACRIFICES AND BENEFITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On 5/25-26/2000 in Brighton, England, the third international workshop was held under the umbrella of UNEP addressing issues in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). The workshop provided a forum for experts to discuss midpoint vs. endpoint modeling. Midpoints are considered to be...

  3. Detecting Blending End-Point Using Mean Squares Successive Difference Test and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Bertelsen, Poul; Van Den Berg, Frans; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    An algorithm based on mean squares successive difference test applied to near-infrared and principal component analysis scores was developed to monitor and determine the blending profile and to assess the end-point in the statistical stabile phase. Model formulations consisting of an active compound (acetylsalicylic acid), together with microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of calcium carbonate with dramatically different particle shapes, were prepared. The formulation comprising angular-shaped calcium carbonate reached blending end-point slower when compared with the formulation comprising equant-shaped calcium carbonate. Utilizing the ring shear test, this distinction in end-point could be related to the difference in flowability of the formulations. On the basis of the two model formulations, a design of experiments was conducted to characterize the blending process by studying the effect of CaCO3 grades and fill level of the bin on blending end-point. Calcium carbonate grades, fill level, and their interaction were shown to have a significant impact on the blending process. PMID:26094601

  4. QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP (QSAR) MODELS TO PREDICT CHEMICAL TOXICITY FOR VARIOUS HEALTH ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although ranking schemes based on exposure and toxicity have been developed to aid in the prioritization of research funds for identifying chemicals of regulatory concern, there are significant gaps in the availability of experimental toxicity data for most health endpoints. Pred...

  5. Predictive Signatures from ToxCast Data for Chronic, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast program is using in vitro assay data and chemical descriptors to build predictive models for in vivo toxicity endpoints. In vitro assays measure activity of chemicals against molecular targets such as enzymes and receptors (measured in cell-free and cell-based sys...

  6. Group-Sequential Strategies in Clinical Trials with Multiple Co-Primary Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Asakura, Koko; Evans, Scott R; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Sozu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the decision-making frameworks for clinical trials with multiple co-primary endpoints in a group-sequential setting. The decision-making frameworks can account for flexibilities such as a varying number of analyses, equally or unequally spaced increments of information and fixed or adaptive Type I error allocation among endpoints. The frameworks can provide efficiency, i.e., potentially fewer trial participants, than the fixed sample size designs. We investigate the operating characteristics of the decision-making frameworks and provide guidance on constructing efficient group-sequential strategies in clinical trials with multiple co-primary endpoints. PMID:25844122

  7. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  8. Population modelling to compare chronic external radiotoxicity between individual and population endpoints in four taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Frédéric; Hertel-Aas, Turid; Real, Almudena; Lance, Emilie; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Bradshaw, Clare; Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Oughton, Deborah H; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we modelled population responses to chronic external gamma radiation in 12 laboratory species (including aquatic and soil invertebrates, fish and terrestrial mammals). Our aim was to compare radiosensitivity between individual and population endpoints and to examine how internationally proposed benchmarks for environmental radioprotection protected species against various risks at the population level. To do so, we used population matrix models, combining life history and chronic radiotoxicity data (derived from laboratory experiments and described in the literature and the FREDERICA database) to simulate changes in population endpoints (net reproductive rate R0, asymptotic population growth rate λ, equilibrium population size Neq) for a range of dose rates. Elasticity analyses of models showed that population responses differed depending on the affected individual endpoint (juvenile or adult survival, delay in maturity or reduction in fecundity), the considered population endpoint (R0, λ or Neq) and the life history of the studied species. Among population endpoints, net reproductive rate R0 showed the lowest EDR10 (effective dose rate inducing 10% effect) in all species, with values ranging from 26 μGy h(-1) in the mouse Mus musculus to 38,000 μGy h(-1) in the fish Oryzias latipes. For several species, EDR10 for population endpoints were lower than the lowest EDR10 for individual endpoints. Various population level risks, differing in severity for the population, were investigated. Population extinction (predicted when radiation effects caused population growth rate λ to decrease below 1, indicating that no population growth in the long term) was predicted for dose rates ranging from 2700 μGy h(-1) in fish to 12,000 μGy h(-1) in soil invertebrates. A milder risk, that population growth rate λ will be reduced by 10% of the reduction causing extinction, was predicted for dose rates ranging from 24 μGy h(-1) in mammals to 1800 μGy h(-1) in

  9. Population modelling to compare chronic external radiotoxicity between individual and population endpoints in four taxonomic groups.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, Frédéric; Hertel-Aas, Turid; Real, Almudena; Lance, Emilie; Garcia-Sanchez, Laurent; Bradshaw, Clare; Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Oughton, Deborah H; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we modelled population responses to chronic external gamma radiation in 12 laboratory species (including aquatic and soil invertebrates, fish and terrestrial mammals). Our aim was to compare radiosensitivity between individual and population endpoints and to examine how internationally proposed benchmarks for environmental radioprotection protected species against various risks at the population level. To do so, we used population matrix models, combining life history and chronic radiotoxicity data (derived from laboratory experiments and described in the literature and the FREDERICA database) to simulate changes in population endpoints (net reproductive rate R0, asymptotic population growth rate λ, equilibrium population size Neq) for a range of dose rates. Elasticity analyses of models showed that population responses differed depending on the affected individual endpoint (juvenile or adult survival, delay in maturity or reduction in fecundity), the considered population endpoint (R0, λ or Neq) and the life history of the studied species. Among population endpoints, net reproductive rate R0 showed the lowest EDR10 (effective dose rate inducing 10% effect) in all species, with values ranging from 26 μGy h(-1) in the mouse Mus musculus to 38,000 μGy h(-1) in the fish Oryzias latipes. For several species, EDR10 for population endpoints were lower than the lowest EDR10 for individual endpoints. Various population level risks, differing in severity for the population, were investigated. Population extinction (predicted when radiation effects caused population growth rate λ to decrease below 1, indicating that no population growth in the long term) was predicted for dose rates ranging from 2700 μGy h(-1) in fish to 12,000 μGy h(-1) in soil invertebrates. A milder risk, that population growth rate λ will be reduced by 10% of the reduction causing extinction, was predicted for dose rates ranging from 24 μGy h(-1) in mammals to 1800 μGy h(-1) in

  10. Alternative Endpoints and Approaches Selected for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, R. A.; Hawley, E.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies for groundwater remediation under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs, including technical impracticability (TI) and other Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirement (ARAR) waivers, state and local designations such as groundwater management zones, Alternate Concentration Limits (ACLs), use of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) over long timeframes, and more. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate alternative endpoints for groundwater remediation at complex sites. A statistical analysis of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites receiving TI waivers will be presented as well as case studies of other types of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies to illustrate the variety of approaches used at complex sites and the technical analyses used to predict and document cost, timeframe, and potential remedial effectiveness. Case studies provide examples of the flexible, site-specific, application of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies that have been used in the past to manage and remediate groundwater contamination at complex sites. For example, at least 13 states consider some designation for groundwater containment in their corrective action policies, such as groundwater management zones, containment zones, and groundwater classification exemption areas. These designations typically indicate that groundwater contamination is present above permissible levels. Soil and groundwater within these zones are managed to protect human health and the environment. Lesson learned for the analyses

  11. General Information about Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... System Embryonal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors Go ... in patients with a high-risk tumor. The information from tests and procedures done to detect (find) ...

  12. ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saladi, Srinivas Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can self renew or be induced to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, and thus have the potential to be utilized in regenerative medicine. Key pluripotency specific factors (Oct 4/Sox2/Nanog/Klf4) maintain the pluripotent state by activating expression of pluripotency specific genes and by inhibiting the expression of developmental regulators. Pluripotent ES cells are distinguished from differentiated cells by a specialized chromatin state that is required to epigenetically regulate the ES cell phenotype. Recent studies show that in addition to pluripotency specific factors, chromatin remodeling enzymes play an important role in regulating ES cell chromatin and the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate. Here we review recent studies that delineate the role of ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in regulating ES cell chromatin structure. PMID:20148317

  13. Embryonic stem cells: protein interaction networks*

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Patricia Miang-Lon; Lufkin, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into nearly all cell types. However, the molecular mechanism of its pluripotency is still unclear. Oct3/4, Sox2 and Nanog are important factors of pluripotency. Oct3/4 (hereafter referred to as Oct4), in particular, has been an irreplaceable factor in the induction of pluripotency in adult cells. Proteins interacting with Oct4 and Nanog have been identified via affinity purification and mass spectrometry. These data, together with iterative purifications of interacting proteins allowed a protein interaction network to be constructed. The network currently includes 77 transcription factors, all of which are interconnected in one network. In-depth studies of some of these transcription factors show that they all recruit the NuRD complex. Hence, transcription factor clustering and chromosomal remodeling are key mechanism used by embryonic stem cells. Studies using RNA interference suggest that more pluripotency genes are yet to be discovered via protein-protein interactions. More work is required to complete and curate the embryonic stem cell protein interaction network. Analysis of a saturated protein interaction network by system biology tools can greatly aid in the understanding of the embryonic stem cell pluripotency network. PMID:22639699

  14. [Dermatoglyphics in children with embryonic tumors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gutjahr, P; Wolffram, T; Emmrich, P

    1975-08-11

    Dermatoglyphics were analyzed in 60 children with embryonic tumors. In comparison with normal children, several differences were found. Thus, the embryonal origin of the different tumors is underlined and the hypothesis of embryonic tumors as malformations is sustained. These tumors seem to be the clinically most important manifestation of a much more comprehensive malformation syndrome, which is not yet known in all its details.

  15. Sourcing human embryos for embryonic stem cell lines: Problems & perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rajvi H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to successfully derive human embryonic stem cells (hESC) lines from human embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) opened up a plethora of potential applications of this technique. These cell lines could have been successfully used to increase our understanding of human developmental biology, transplantation medicine and the emerging science of regenerative medicine. The main source for human embryos has been ‘discarded’ or ‘spare’ fresh or frozen human embryos following IVF. It is a common practice to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing any of the assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and retrieve multiple oocytes which subsequently lead to multiple embryos. Of these, only two or maximum of three embryos are transferred while the rest are cryopreserved as per the decision of the couple. In case a couple does not desire to ‘cryopreserve’ their embryos then all the embryos remaining following embryo transfer can be considered ‘spare’ or if a couple is no longer in need of the ‘cryopreserved’ embryos then these also can be considered as ‘spare’. But, the question raised by the ethicists is, “what about ‘slightly’ over-stimulating a woman to get a few extra eggs and embryos? The decision becomes more difficult when it comes to ‘discarded’ embryos. As of today, the quality of the embryos is primarily assessed based on morphology and the rate of development mainly judged by single point assessment. Despite many criteria described in the literature, the quality assessment is purely subjective. The question that arises is on the decision of ‘discarding’ embryos. What would be the criteria for discarding embryos and the potential ‘use’ of ESC derived from the ‘abnormal appearing’ embryos? This paper discusses some of the newer methods to procure embryos for the derivation of embryonic stem cell lines which will respect the ethical concerns but still provide the source material. PMID:25673530

  16. Challenges with using chronic disease endpoints in setting dietary reference intakes.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Paula R

    2008-08-01

    Since 1941, the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) in the United States have been based on the goal of maintaining health in the country's population. There has been a growing body of evidence to support the role of diet in reducing the risk of chronic diseases. For this reason, there has been recent emphasis on considering data on chronic disease endpoints for setting dietary reference intakes (DRIs). Despite this emphasis, none of the RDAs set during the DRI review were based on chronic disease risk. However, chronic disease risk was considered for determining adequate intakes and even some acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges. This article discusses the application of and challenges associated with using chronic disease endpoints in setting DRIs.

  17. The calorimetric spectrum of the electron-capture decay of 163Ho. The spectral endpoint region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rújula, A.; Lusignoli, M.

    2016-05-01

    The electron-neutrino mass (or masses and mixing angles) may be directly measurable in weak electron-capture decays. The favoured experimental technique is "calorimetric". The optimal nuclide is 163Ho, and several experiments (ECHo, HOLMES and NuMECS) are currently studying its decay. The most relevant range of the calorimetric-energy spectrum extends for the last few hundred eV below its endpoint. It has not yet been well measured. We explore the theory, mainly in the cited range, of electron capture in 163Ho decay. A so far neglected process turns out to be most relevant: electron-capture accompanied by the shake-off of a second electron. Our two main conclusions are very encouraging: the counting rate close to the endpoint may be more than an order of magnitude larger than previously expected; the "pile-up" problem may be significantly reduced.

  18. Roberge-Weiss endpoint in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Claudio; Cossu, Guido; D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    We present the results of extensive simulations regarding the critical behavior at the endpoint of the Roberge-Weiss transition for N{sub f}=2 QCD. We confirm early evidence, presented in Ref. [M. D'Elia and F. Sanfilippo, Phys. Rev. D 80, 111501(R) (2009).], according to which the Roberge-Weiss endpoint is first order in the limit of large or small quark masses, and second order for intermediate masses. A systematic study of the transition strength as a function of the quark mass in the first order regions, permits us to estimate the tricritical values of the quark mass separating the second order region from the first order ones.

  19. Multiple gastrointestinal atresias in two consecutive siblings.

    PubMed

    Gahukamble, D B; Gahukamble, L D

    2002-03-01

    Two consecutive female siblings with multiple gastrointestinal atresias are described. The history of consanguinity in the parents and the presence of extensive typical pathological lesions suggest a genetically-induced developmental fault in the alimentary tract during the early embryonic period.

  20. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Joshua M.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies—correlated muscle activations—to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption—when available—can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the

  1. Muscle Synergies Heavily Influence the Neural Control of Arm Endpoint Stiffness and Energy Consumption.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Joshua M; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Much debate has arisen from research on muscle synergies with respect to both limb impedance control and energy consumption. Studies of limb impedance control in the context of reaching movements and postural tasks have produced divergent findings, and this study explores whether the use of synergies by the central nervous system (CNS) can resolve these findings and also provide insights on mechanisms of energy consumption. In this study, we phrase these debates at the conceptual level of interactions between neural degrees of freedom and tasks constraints. This allows us to examine the ability of experimentally-observed synergies--correlated muscle activations--to control both energy consumption and the stiffness component of limb endpoint impedance. In our nominal 6-muscle planar arm model, muscle synergies and the desired size, shape, and orientation of endpoint stiffness ellipses, are expressed as linear constraints that define the set of feasible muscle activation patterns. Quadratic programming allows us to predict whether and how energy consumption can be minimized throughout the workspace of the limb given those linear constraints. We show that the presence of synergies drastically decreases the ability of the CNS to vary the properties of the endpoint stiffness and can even preclude the ability to minimize energy. Furthermore, the capacity to minimize energy consumption--when available--can be greatly affected by arm posture. Our computational approach helps reconcile divergent findings and conclusions about task-specific regulation of endpoint stiffness and energy consumption in the context of synergies. But more generally, these results provide further evidence that the benefits and disadvantages of muscle synergies go hand-in-hand with the structure of feasible muscle activation patterns afforded by the mechanics of the limb and task constraints. These insights will help design experiments to elucidate the interplay between synergies and the mechanisms

  2. Differential effects of copper and cadmium exposure on toxicity endpoints and gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Tasha L; Shafer, Martin M; Armstrong, David E

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms is well known, but the mechanisms of toxicity are not as clearly understood. In the present study, Cd bioassay experiments incorporating both traditional endpoints and novel thiol-based endpoints were conducted with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results were compared with results from previous bioassay experiments to probe the apparent contrasting biochemical mechanisms of toxicity of copper and cadmium as expressed in cellular glutathione and the glutathione cycle. Total glutathione and reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) measurements were remarkably different in Cd- compared with Cu-exposed cells. Whereas total glutathione in cells decreased with increasing Cu concentration, Cd caused dramatic increases. Total glutathione increased by 4.5-fold with 80 nM Cd treatment over concentrations in Cd-free controls. Glutathione reductase (GR) enzyme activity was positively correlated (r(2) (Cu) = 0.96, r(2) (Cd) = 0.85) with glutathione concentrations for both metals. Measurements of mRNA for GR were increased 2-fold in response to Cd exposure (80 nM) and correlated well with GR enzyme activity. Glutathione concentrations and GR enzyme activity are useful endpoints for both Cu and Cd toxicity in algae, even though the metals elicit opposing responses. We conclude that Cu decreases glutathione concentrations by inhibiting GR enzyme activity. In contrast, Cd stimulates GR enzyme activity and increases glutathione concentrations as cells respond to Cd-induced stress by producing increased antioxidant capacity. The present study demonstrates that determining the glutathione response in cells is important for understanding the metal-specific mechanisms of toxicity and that these associated novel endpoints may be useful metrics for accurately predicting toxicity.

  3. Kinetic titration with differential thermometric determination of the end-point.

    PubMed

    Sajó, I

    1968-06-01

    A method has been described for the determination of concentrations below 10(-4)M by applying catalytic reactions and using thermometric end-point determination. A reference solution, identical with the sample solution except for catalyst, is titrated with catalyst solution until the rates of reaction become the same, as shown by a null deflection on a galvanometer connected via bridge circuits to two opposed thermistors placed in the solutions. PMID:18960338

  4. Energy metabolism and biotransformation as endpoints to pre-screen hepatotoxicity using a liver spheroid model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jinsheng . E-mail: jinsheng.xu@uwe.ac.uk; Purcell, Wendy M.

    2006-10-15

    The current study investigated liver spheroid culture as an in vitro model to evaluate the endpoints relevant to the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test toxicants. Mature rat liver spheroids were exposed to diclofenac, galactosamine, isoniazid, paracetamol, m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB) and 3-nitroaniline (3-NA) for 24 h. Pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion were evaluated after exposure. The results showed that pyruvate uptake and lactate release by mature liver spheroids in culture were maintained at a relatively stable level. These endpoints, together with glucose secretion and galactose biotransformation, were related to and could reflect the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation in hepatocytes. After exposure, all of the test agents significantly reduced glucose secretion, which was shown to be the most sensitive endpoint of those evaluated. Diclofenac, isoniazid, paracetamol and galactosamine reduced lactate release (P < 0.01), but m-DNB increased lactate release (P < 0.01). Diclofenac, isoniazid and paracetamol also reduced pyruvate uptake (P < 0.01), while galactosamine had little discernible effect. Diclofenac, galactosamine, paracetamol and m-DNB also reduced galactose biotransformation (P < 0.01), by contrast, isoniazid did not. The metabolite of m-DNB, 3-NA, which served as a negative control, did not cause significant changes in lactate release, pyruvate uptake or galactose biotransformation. It is concluded that pyruvate uptake, galactose biotransformation, lactate release and glucose secretion can be used as endpoints for evaluating the status of energy metabolism and biotransformation after exposure to test agents using the liver spheroid model to pre-screen hepatotoxicity.

  5. Feasibility of Using Distal Endpoints for In-room PET Range Verification of Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Winey, Brian; Bortfeld, Thomas; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to verify the dose delivery in proton therapy, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans have been employed to measure the distribution of β+ radioactivity produced from nuclear reactions of the protons with native nuclei. Because the dose and PET distributions are difficult to compare directly, the range verification is currently carried out by comparing measured and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation predicted PET distributions. In order to reduce the reliance on MC, simulated PET (simPET) and dose distal endpoints were compared to explore the feasibility of using distal endpoints for in-room PET range verification. MC simulations were generated for six head and neck patients with corrections for radiological decay, biological washout, and PET resolution. One-dimensional profiles of the dose and simPET were examined along the direction of the beam and covering the cross section of the beam. The chosen endpoints of the simPET (x-intercept of the linear fit to the distal falloff) and planned dose (20–50% of maximum dose) correspond to where most of the protons are below the threshold energy for the nuclear reactions. The difference in endpoint range between the distal surfaces of the dose and MC-PET were compared and the spread of range differences were assessed. Among the six patients, the mean difference between MC-PET and dose depth was found to be −1.6 mm to +0.5 mm between patients, with a standard deviation of 1.1 to 4.0 mm across the individual beams. In clinical practice, regions with deviations beyond the safety margin need to be examined more closely and can potentially lead to adjustments to the treatment plan. PMID:24464031

  6. Clinical usefulness and relevance of intermediate endpoints for cytotoxic neoadjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Caterina; Loibl, Sibylle; von Minckwitz, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Intermediate endpoints are surrogate markers of treatment efficacy assessed earlier than the true outcome of interest. Tumor response after systemic neoadjuvant therapy is considered a suitable intermediate endpoint, especially for specific breast cancer subtypes. Response can be evaluated either after only 1 cycle of treatment by clinical evaluation or at the end of the planned neoadjuvant treatment by histomorphologic examination of all surgically removed tissues from the breast and regional nodes. Although several meta-analyses showed a lower risk of death among patients who attain a pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with patients with residual tumor in breast and/or lymph nodes after neoadjuvant therapy, a statistically significant linkage between increased pCR rate by a specific treatment and improvement of survival by the same treatment has not been demonstrated yet. Therefore, formal surrogacy of pCR is not established. Moreover, the better definition of pCR is still an open issue: a large pooled analysis demonstrated that patients who attained ypT0 ypN0 (no invasive or non-invasive residual cancer in breast and nodes) experienced longer DFS (p < 0.001) compared with patients who attained ypTis ypN0 (no invasive residual in breast and nodes irrespective of residual non-invasive disease). Nevertheless, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently allowed using pCR as a surrogate endpoint for accelerated approval process. Several meta-analyses demonstrated the greatest prognostic value of pCR in more aggressive breast cancer subtypes (i.e. triple-negative, HER2-positive, or high grade breast cancer). Usefulness of an earlier intermediate endpoints was prospectively demonstrated in the GeparTrio trial in which patients showing an early response achieved 4-times more frequently a pCR than those without early response. PMID:26279131

  7. Probabilistic neural networks modeling of the 48-h LC50 acute toxicity endpoint to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, S P; Lewis, M A; Tigner, J

    2008-01-01

    Two modeling experiments based on the maximum likelihood estimation paradigm and targeting prediction of the Daphnia magna 48-h LC50 acute toxicity endpoint for both organic and inorganic compounds are reported. The resulting models computational algorithms are implemented as basic probabilistic neural networks with Gaussian kernel (statistical corrections included). The first experiment uses strictly D. magna information for 971 structures as training/learning data and the resulting model targets practical applications. The second experiment uses the same training/learning information plus additional data on another 29 compounds whose endpoint information is originating from D. pulex and Ceriodaphnia dubia. It only targets investigation of the effect of mixing strictly D. magna 48-h LC50 modeling information with small amounts of similar information estimated from related species, and this is done as part of the validation process. A complementary 81 compounds dataset (involving only strictly D. magna information) is used to perform external testing. On this external test set, the Gaussian character of the distribution of the residuals is confirmed for both models. This allows the use of traditional statistical methodology to implement computation of confidence intervals for the unknown measured values based on the models predictions. Examples are provided for the model targeting practical applications. For the same model, a comparison with other existing models targeting the same endpoint is performed.

  8. Implementation of cellulomonas cholesterol oxidase for total serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method.

    PubMed

    Srisawasdi, Pornpen; Chaichanajarernkul, Upsorn; Teerakranjana, Narumon; Kroll, Martin H

    2008-01-01

    Cellulomonas has been shown to be a good source of cholesterol oxidase in addition to Streptomyces for serum cholesterol determination by the endpoint method, inexpensive in cost, and showing excellent performance. For clinical use, we have assessed the reliability of Cellulomonas reagent for cholesterol determination. We constructed the user-defined endpoint methods on three automated analyzers. The analytical performances (linearity, precision, recovery, interference, stability, and comparison with the standardized method) of Cellulomonas cholesterol reagents were evaluated and compared to those of Streptomyces reagents. Linearity (18.1-23.3 mmol/L) and stability of reagents (6-11 weeks) depended on the analyzers being used. The average within-run and between-day % coefficients of variation (CVs) ranged from 1.44 to 2.45 and 1.98 to 2.99, respectively, and were within National Cholesterol Education Program analytical criteria (endpoint method. Its analytical performance is equivalent to Streptomyces enzymes and meets the analytical goals. It has an advantage over the other enzymes in that it does not ship in the frozen state.

  9. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance. PMID:25148680

  10. Resummation of Large Endpoint Corrections to Color-Octet J/psi Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Fleming; Adam K. Leibovich; Thomas Mehen

    2006-07-27

    An unresolved problem in J/{psi} phenomenology is a systematic understanding of the differential photoproduction cross section, d{sigma}/dz [{gamma} + p {yields} J/{psi} + X], where z = E{sub {psi}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the proton rest frame. In the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism, fixed-order perturbative calculations of color-octet mechanisms suffer from large perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that grow rapidly in the endpoint region, z {yields} 1. In this paper, NRQCD and soft collinear effective theory are combined to resum these large corrections to the color-octet photoproduction cross section. We derive a factorization theorem for the endpoint differential cross section involving the parton distribution function and the color-octet J/{psi} shape functions. A one loop matching calculation explicitly confirms our factorization theorem at next-to-leading order. Large perturbative corrections are resummed using the renormalization group. The calculation of the color-octet contribution to d{sigma}/dz is in qualitative agreement with data. Quantitative tests of the universality of color-octet matrix elements require improved knowledge of shape functions entering these calculations as well as resummation of the color-singlet contribution which accounts for much of the total cross section and also peaks near the endpoint.

  11. Effects of the polycyclic musk HHCB on individual- and population-level endpoints in Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Signe; Selck, Henriette; Salvito, Daniel; Forbes, Valery

    2009-05-01

    Although the polycyclic musk 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta[gamma]-2-benzopyran (HHCB) is frequently detected in aquatic sediments, very little is known about its effects on sediment-feeding organisms. Effects of sediment-associated HHCB on growth, feeding rate, survival and reproduction in the gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum were measured in the laboratory. Snails were exposed to six nominal HHCB concentrations: 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 30 and 100microg g(-1) dry weight (dw) sediment. Adult survival and growth were not affected by HHCB. However, juvenile growth and survival, reproduction, time to first reproduction and adult feeding rate were more sensitive endpoints and declined with increasing HHCB concentration. Individual-level endpoints for P. antipodarum were integrated into a population model to investigate the effects of HHCB on population growth rate. Under otherwise favorable laboratory conditions, population growth rate was slightly (by ca. 2%), but not significantly, reduced with increasing HHCB exposure concentration. Model simulations were performed to explore the consequences of HHCB exposure under more ecologically realistic conditions (i.e., survival and reproduction of unexposed snails were markedly reduced relative to the laboratory). The results suggest that despite detectable effects of HHCB on individual-level endpoints measured in the laboratory, impacts on population dynamics of this deposit feeder are not likely to occur at environmentally relevant exposure concentrations.

  12. End-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands and robotic assistance with directional damping.

    PubMed

    Erden, Mustafa Suphi; Billard, Aude

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to perform end-point impedance measurements across dominant and nondominant hands while doing airbrush painting and to use the results for developing a robotic assistance scheme. We study airbrush painting because it resembles in many ways manual welding, a standard industrial task. The experiments are performed with the 7 degrees of freedom KUKA lightweight robot arm. The robot is controlled in admittance using a force sensor attached at the end-point, so as to act as a free-mass and be passively guided by the human. For impedance measurements, a set of nine subjects perform 12 repetitions of airbrush painting, drawing a straight-line on a cartoon horizontally placed on a table, while passively moving the airbrush mounted on the robot's end-point. We measure hand impedance during the painting task by generating sudden and brief external forces with the robot. The results show that on average the dominant hand displays larger impedance than the nondominant in the directions perpendicular to the painting line. We find the most significant difference in the damping values in these directions. Based on this observation, we develop a "directional damping" scheme for robotic assistance and conduct a pilot study with 12 subjects to contrast airbrush painting with and without robotic assistance. Results show significant improvement in precision with both dominant and nondominant hands when using robotic assistance.

  13. Resummation of large endpoint corrections to color-octet J/{psi} photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Sean; Leibovich, Adam K.; Mehen, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    An unresolved problem in J/{psi} phenomenology is a systematic understanding of the differential photoproduction cross section, d{sigma}/dz[{gamma}+p{yields}J/{psi}+X], where z=E{sub {psi}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the proton rest frame. In the nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism, fixed-order perturbative calculations of color-octet mechanisms suffer from large perturbative and nonperturbative corrections that grow rapidly in the endpoint region, z{yields}1. In this paper, NRQCD and soft collinear effective theory are combined to resum these large corrections to the color-octet photoproduction cross section. We derive a factorization theorem for the endpoint differential cross section involving the parton distribution function and the color-octet J/{psi} shape functions. A one-loop matching calculation explicitly confirms our factorization theorem at next-to-leading order. Large perturbative corrections are resummed using the renormalization group. The calculation of the color-octet contribution to d{sigma}/dz is in qualitative agreement with data. Quantitative tests of the universality of color-octet matrix elements require improved knowledge of shape functions entering these calculations as well as resummation of the color-singlet contribution which accounts for much of the total cross section and also peaks near the endpoint.

  14. mRNA profiling for body fluid identification by reverse transcription endpoint PCR and realtime PCR.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Klesser, B; Maake, C; Bär, W; Kratzer, A

    2009-03-01

    mRNA profiling is a promising new method for the identification of body fluids from biological stains. Major advantages of mRNA profiling are the possibility of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction and of simultaneously isolating DNA without loss of material. A reverse transcription endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and a realtime PCR assay were established for the identification of blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, and were compared to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests. The results for specificity, sensitivity and suitability to biological stains were satisfying and mRNA stability was demonstrated for up to 2-year-old stains. Two novel multiplex assays were created with the endpoint PCR primers: multiplex 1 amplifies two markers for each of the above mentioned body fluids and is suited for screening; multiplex 2 was designed for the detection of blood, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood. The results demonstrate that both endpoint PCR and realtime PCR are suitable for the identification of body fluids in forensic stains and represent an effective alternative to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests.

  15. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives.

  16. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26170468

  17. Role of patient-reported outcomes and other efficacy endpoints in the drug approval process in Europe (2008-2012).

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Bhagat, Anil; Schifano, Fabrizio; Gudala, Kapil

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed at systematically reviewing the role and extent of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) usage within the package of scientific evidence considered for marketing authorization (MA). All regulatory information published by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for products authorized between January 2008 and December 2012 and appearing in the European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) database was examined for efficacy endpoints. The endpoints here considered included: PROs, clinician reported outcomes (CROs), and laboratory reported outcomes (LROs). LROs were the most frequently reported endpoints. Out of the 180 products here selected, 99 (55%), 67 (37%), and 30 (17%), respectively, used LROs, CROs and PROs as primary endpoints (PEs). PROs as any endpoints were used in 82 (46%) products. Out of these, PROs were documented as PE in 30 (37%), with 27 (33%) products having used PROs both as primary and non-PEs. PRO usage was most frequently identified with nervous system and antineoplastic agents. During the study period, the use of all the three types of endpoints appeared to be static. Both the regulatory bodies and the industry should ensure complete and clear reporting of all endpoints used, including PROs, to improve transparency. PMID:26031612

  18. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  19. Progress with nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Pau, K-Y Francis; Lester, Linda

    2004-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells hold potential in the fields of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, tissue regeneration, disease pathogenicity, and drug discovery. Embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are now available in primates, including man, rhesus, and cynomologous monkeys. Monkey ES cells serve as invaluable clinically relevant models for studies that can't be conducted in humans because of practical or ethical limitations, or in rodents because of differences in physiology and anatomy. Here, we review the current status of nonhuman primate research with ES cells, beginning with a description of their isolation, characterization, and availability. Substantial limitations still plague the use of primate ES cells, such as their required growth on feeder layers, poor cloning efficiency, and restricted availability. The ability to produce homogenous populations of both undifferentiated as well as differentiated phenotypes is an important challenge, and genetic approaches to achieving these objectives are discussed. Finally, safety, efficiency, and feasibility issues relating to the transplantation of ES-derived cells are considered.

  20. OCT guided microinjections for mouse embryonic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Syed, Saba H.; Coughlin, Andrew J.; Wang, Shang; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larina, Irina V.

    2013-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is gaining popularity as live imaging tool for embryonic research in animal models. Recently we have demonstrated that OCT can be used for live imaging of cultured early mouse embryos (E7.5-E10) as well as later stage mouse embryos in utero (E12.5 to the end of gestation). Targeted delivery of signaling molecules, drugs, and cells is a powerful approach to study normal and abnormal development, and image guidance is highly important for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate that OCT can be used to guide microinjections of gold nanoshell suspensions in live mouse embryos. This approach can potentially be used for variety of applications such as guided injections of contrast agents, signaling molecules, pharmacological agents, cell transplantation and extraction, as well as other image-guided micromanipulations. Our studies also reveal novel potential for gold nanoshells in embryonic research.

  1. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is revealed by considering embryonic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Thomas E.; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-01-01

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account. PMID:21227978

  2. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is concealed by embryonic temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Thomas E.; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-01-01

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account.

  3. A trade-off between embryonic development rate and immune function of avian offspring is revealed by considering embryonic temperature.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas E; Arriero, Elena; Majewska, Ania

    2011-06-23

    Long embryonic periods are assumed to reflect slower intrinsic development that are thought to trade off to allow enhanced physiological systems, such as immune function. Yet, the relatively rare studies of this trade-off in avian offspring have not found the expected trade-off. Theory and tests have not taken into account the strong extrinsic effects of temperature on embryonic periods of birds. Here, we show that length of the embryonic period did not explain variation in two measures of immune function when temperature was ignored, based on studies of 34 Passerine species in tropical Venezuela (23 species) and north temperate Arizona (11 species). Variation in immune function was explained when embryonic periods were corrected for average embryonic temperature, in order to better estimate intrinsic rates of development. Immune function of offspring trades off with intrinsic rates of embryonic development once the extrinsic effects of embryonic temperatures are taken into account.

  4. The use of multiple endpoints to assess cellular responses to environmental contaminants in the interstitial marine ciliate Euplotes crassus.

    PubMed

    Gomiero, A; Sforzini, S; Dagnino, A; Nasci, C; Viarengo, A

    2012-06-15

    This paper presents the results of investigations on the suitability of Euplotes crassus, an interstitial marine ciliate, to be used as model organism in ecotoxicology and thereafter to evaluate the toxicity of estuarine and coastal sediments upon laboratory exposure. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have resulted in accumulation of metals and organic pollutants in the environment as well as in the food chain hence leading to serious ecological and human health problems. This may pose a risk to benthic and epibenthic organisms and it is crucial to discover toxicity tests that will identify adverse effects of sediment-associated chemicals on benthic organisms. Due to their nature as a eukaryotic cell/organism and their position in the food web, ciliated protozoa are suitable models for evaluating the effects of pollution on aquatic communities. Lethal and sublethal effects of exposure to inorganic and organic pollutants were tested on the cell mortality, replication rate, lysosomal membrane stability and endocytosis rate of E. crassus. Increasing nominal concentrations of individual and mixtures of mercury, copper, and benzo(a)pyrene were investigated in this study as they might be bioavailable in naturally occurring polluted sites. A significant decrease in the mean replication rate (p<0.05) was found after 24h exposures to m/μM concentrations of all tested pollutants. At the same time, significant decreases of lysosomal membrane stability (p<0.05) were observed for Cu (5 μM), Hg (10 nM), and B(a)P (200 nM). Among the entire suite of tests, endocytosis rate test demonstrated the highest sensitivity. Exposures to binary mixtures of all studied pollutants were performed showing both inorganic-organic and inorganic-inorganic additive and/or antagonist effects. Moreover, medium salinity was also varied to mimic estuarine-like environmental conditions linking biological response to ionic strengths. Under these conditions significant increases of both endocytosis rate and lysosomal membrane stability were observed and related to the increment of some Hg- and Cu-related toxic complexes. The studied biomarkers were always able to discriminate between the effects of organic and inorganic pollutants. Together with the short time and simplicity of the test procedures, results obtained in this study indicate that E. crassus is a promising and convenient bioindicator for evaluating the toxicity of different environmental matrixes like pore water, sediments and wastewaters--polluted by metals and organic pollutants. PMID:22459342

  5. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24605024

  6. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  7. Hedgehog Signalling in the Embryonic Mouse Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, José Ignacio; Crompton, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    T cells develop in the thymus, which provides an essential environment for T cell fate specification, and for the differentiation of multipotent progenitor cells into major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted, non-autoreactive T cells. Here we review the role of the Hedgehog signalling pathway in T cell development, thymic epithelial cell (TEC) development, and thymocyte–TEC cross-talk in the embryonic mouse thymus during the last week of gestation. PMID:27504268

  8. Embryonic development of Pelteobagrus fulvidraco (Richardson, 1846)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weimin; Abbas, Khalid; Yan, Ansheng

    2006-12-01

    For production enhancement and procedure upgrade, the developmental phases of laboratory-reared eggs of catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco were investigated. Twenty mature females and 10 males were collected from Dadongmen wholesale fisheries market in Wuhan City on May 8, 2003. Zygotes were stripped from mature fish after hormone-induced ovulation, fertilized, and incubated through whole embryonic development. The fertilized eggs were stocked in density of 100 eggs/L in white square tanks of 10 L. Incubation water was dechlorinated tap water with continuous aeration. The tanks were lit directly with 60 W fluorescent bulbs with a 12 light: 12 dark photoperiod. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen and pH were 29.0±0.5°C, 6.7±0.4 mg/L and 7.4±2, respectively. The results showed that the eggs of P. fulvidraco were yellow, sticky and contained much yolk. The mean diameter of fertilized eggs was 2.03 mm. At the water temperature of 29.0±0.5°C, the ontogenesis spent about 33 h after fertilization. From fertilization to hatching, the embryonic development can be divided into 30 40 phases, which varies in the emphasis and direction of development. The detailed embryonic movement was also described.

  9. Mechanical signaling coordinates the embryonic heartbeat.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Kevin K; Rocks, Jason W; Chen, Christina Yingxian; Cho, Sangkyun; Merkus, Koen E; Rajaratnam, Anjali; Robison, Patrick; Tewari, Manorama; Vogel, Kenneth; Majkut, Stephanie F; Prosser, Benjamin L; Discher, Dennis E; Liu, Andrea J

    2016-08-01

    In the beating heart, cardiac myocytes (CMs) contract in a coordinated fashion, generating contractile wave fronts that propagate through the heart with each beat. Coordinating this wave front requires fast and robust signaling mechanisms between CMs. The primary signaling mechanism has long been identified as electrical: gap junctions conduct ions between CMs, triggering membrane depolarization, intracellular calcium release, and actomyosin contraction. In contrast, we propose here that, in the early embryonic heart tube, the signaling mechanism coordinating beats is mechanical rather than electrical. We present a simple biophysical model in which CMs are mechanically excitable inclusions embedded within the extracellular matrix (ECM), modeled as an elastic-fluid biphasic material. Our model predicts strong stiffness dependence in both the heartbeat velocity and strain in isolated hearts, as well as the strain for a hydrogel-cultured CM, in quantitative agreement with recent experiments. We challenge our model with experiments disrupting electrical conduction by perfusing intact adult and embryonic hearts with a gap junction blocker, β-glycyrrhetinic acid (BGA). We find this treatment causes rapid failure in adult hearts but not embryonic hearts-consistent with our hypothesis. Last, our model predicts a minimum matrix stiffness necessary to propagate a mechanically coordinated wave front. The predicted value is in accord with our stiffness measurements at the onset of beating, suggesting that mechanical signaling may initiate the very first heartbeats. PMID:27457951

  10. [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, W-H

    2008-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells can give rise to all somatic cells, making them an attractive cell source for tissue engineering applications. The propensity of cells to form tissue-like structures in a culture dish has been well documented. We and others made use of this intrinsic property to generate bioartificial heart muscle. First proof-of-concept studies involved immature heart cells mainly from fetal chicken, neonatal rats and mice. They eventually provided evidence that force-generating heart muscle can be engineered in vitro. Recently, the focus shifted to the application of stem cells to eventually enable the generation of human heart muscle and reach following long-term goals: (1) development of a simplified in vitro model of heart muscle development; (2) generation of a human test-bed for drug screening and development; (3) allocation of surrogate heart tissue to myocardial repair applications. This overview will provide the background for cell-based myocardial repair, introduce the main myocardial tissue engineering concepts, discuss the use of embryonic and non-embryonic stem cells, and lays out the potential direct and indirect therapeutic use of human tissue engineered myocardium.

  11. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  12. Disruption of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic development after full life-cycle parental exposure to low levels of ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Soares, J; Coimbra, A M; Reis-Henriques, M A; Monteiro, N M; Vieira, M N; Oliveira, J M A; Guedes-Dias, P; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Parra, S Silva; Carvalho, A P; Castro, L Filipe C; Santos, M M

    2009-12-13

    Exposure of fish to the synthetic estrogen ethinylestradiol (EE2) has been shown to induce a large set of deleterious effects. In addition to the negative impact of EE2 in reproductive endpoints, concern has recently increased on the potential effects of EE2 in fish embryonic development. Therefore, the present study aimed at examining the effects of EE2 on the full embryonic development of zebrafish in order to identify the actual phases where EE2 disrupts this process. Hence, zebrafish were exposed to environmentally relevant low levels of EE2, 0.5, 1 and 2ng/L (actual concentrations of 0.19, 0.24 and 1ng/L, respectively) from egg up to eight months of age (F(1)), and the survival as well as the occurrence of abnormalities in their offsprings (F(2)), per stage of embryonic development, was investigated. A thorough evaluation of reproductive endpoints and transcription of vtg1 gene in the parental generation (F(1)) at adulthood, was performed. No significant differences could be observed for the two lowest EE2 treatments, in comparison with controls, whereas vtg1 transcripts were significantly elevated (40-fold) in the 2ng/L EE2 treatment. In contrast to the findings in the F(1) generation,a significant concentration-dependent increase in egg mortality between 8 and 24hours post-fertilization (hpf) was observed for all EE2 treatments, when compared with controls. The screening of egg and embryo development showed a significant increase in the percentage of abnormalities at 8 hpf for the highest EE2 concentration, a fact that might explain the increased embryo mortality at the 24 hpf time-point observation. Taken together, these findings indicate that the two lowest tested EE2 concentations impact late gastrulation and/or early organogenesis, whereas exposure to 2ng/L EE2 also disrupts development in the blastula phase. After early organogenesis has been completed (24 hpf), no further mortality was observed. These results show that increased embryo mortality occurs

  13. Specialized mouse embryonic stem cells for studying vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Drew E; Burns, Andrew B; Hatano, Rachel; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Fan, Yuhong; McCloskey, Kara E

    2014-01-01

    Vascular progenitor cells are desirable in a variety of therapeutic strategies; however, the lineage commitment of endothelial and smooth muscle cell from a common progenitor is not well-understood. Here, we report the generation of the first dual reporter mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) lines designed to facilitate the study of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle development in vitro. These mESC lines express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the endothelial promoter, Tie-2, and Discomsoma sp. red fluorescent protein (RFP) under the promoter for alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). The lines were then characterized for morphology, marker expression, and pluripotency. The mESC colonies were found to exhibit dome-shaped morphology, alkaline phosphotase activity, as well as expression of Oct 3/4 and stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. The mESC colonies were also found to display normal karyotypes and are able to generate cells from all three germ layers, verifying pluripotency. Tissue staining confirmed the coexpression of VE (vascular endothelial)-cadherin with the Tie-2 GFP+ expression on endothelial structures and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain with the α-SMA RFP+ smooth muscle cells. Lastly, it was verified that the developing mESC do express Tie-2 GFP+ and α-SMA RFP+ cells during differentiation and that the GFP+ cells colocalize with the vascular-like structures surrounded by α-SMA-RFP cells. These dual reporter vascular-specific mESC permit visualization and cell tracking of individual endothelial and smooth muscle cells over time and in multiple dimensions, a powerful new tool for studying vascular development in real time. PMID:25328412

  14. Comparison of an automated pattern analysis machine vision time-lapse system with traditional endpoint measurements in the analysis of cell growth and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Toimela, Tarja; Tähti, Hanna; Ylikomi, Timo

    2008-07-01

    Machine vision is an application of computer vision. It both collects visual information and interprets the images. Although the machine obviously does not 'see' in the same sense that humans do, it is possible to acquire visual information and to create programmes to identify relevant image features in an effective and consistent manner. Machine vision is widely applied in industrial automation, but here we describe how we have used it to monitor and interpret data from cell cultures. The machine vision system used (Cell-IQ) consisted of an inbuilt atmosphere-controlled incubator, where cell culture plates were placed during the test. Artificial intelligence (AI) software, which uses machine vision technology, took care of the follow-up analysis of cellular morphological changes. Basic endpoint and staining methods to evaluate the condition of the cells, were conducted in parallel to the machine vision analysis. The results showed that the automated system for pattern analysis of morphological changes yielded comparable results to those obtained by conventional methods. The inbuilt software analysis offers a promising way of evaluating cell growth and various cell phases. The continuous follow-up and label-free analysis, as well as the possibility of measuring multiple parameters simultaneously from the same cell population, were major advantages of this system, as compared to conventional endpoint measurement methodology.

  15. A back translation of pregabalin and carbamazepine against evoked and non-evoked endpoints in the rat spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lau, W; Dykstra, C; Thevarkunnel, S; Silenieks, L B; de Lannoy, I A M; Lee, D K H; Higgins, G A

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. First to characterize endpoints distinct to the reflexive responses to sensory stimuli typically used in neuropathic pain models. A second aim was to evaluate two clinically approved drugs carbamazepine (Tegretol) and pregabalin (Lyrica) against these endpoints with the purpose to backtranslate from the clinical to preclinical setting. The selected neuropathic pain model was the spared nerve injury (SNI) model and the endpoints were burrowing and measures of paw posture in Sprague Dawley rats. As previously described, SNI surgery produced a robust heightened sensitivity to tactile and thermal (cold) stimuli. SNI surgery also produced robust decreases in burrowing and affected multiple measures of paw position. There was no correlation between magnitude of change in burrowing and sensory allodynia within SNI operated rats. Pregabalin (10-30 mg/kg IP) produced a reliable reversal of both tactile and cold allodynia and also the burrowing deficit, with minimal effect on neurological function evaluated using rotorod, beam walking and open field activity. Pregabalin did not affect any measure of paw position. Pharmacokinetic studies conducted in satellite animals identified plasma levels of pregabalin at the 10 mg/kg IP dose to be equivalent to clinically efficacious levels recorded in neuropathic patients (3-6 μg/ml). In contrast carbamazepine (10-60 mg/kg IP) had only a very modest effect against a reflexive (tactile) measure, and no effect against the burrowing deficit. Carbamazepine also affected various measures of neurological function, complicating interpretation of the reflexive measure. Measurement of burrowing appears to detect a behavioural deficit associated with the SNI model, that may be attenuated by pregabalin but not carbamazepine. Overall the present findings support an advantage of pregabalin over carbamazepine in terms of both efficacy and tolerability which is consistent with clinical experience. The

  16. Multiple-input, multiple-output system identification for characterization of limb stiffness dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perreault, E J; Kirsch, R F; Acosta, A M

    1999-05-01

    This study presents time-domain and frequency-domain, multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) linear system identification techniques that can be used to estimate the dynamic endpoint stiffness of a multijoint limb. The stiffness of a joint or limb arises from a number of physiological mechanisms and is thought to play a fundamental role in the control of posture and movement. Estimates of endpoint stiffness can therefore be used to characterize its modulation during physiological tasks and may provide insight into how the nervous system normally controls motor behavior. Previous MIMO stiffness estimates have focused upon the static stiffness components only or assumed simple parametric models with elastic, viscous, and inertial components. The method presented here captures the full stiffness dynamics during a relatively short experimental trial while assuming only that the system is linear for small perturbations. Simulation studies were performed to investigate the performance of this approach under typical experimental conditions. It was found that a linear MIMO description of endpoint stiffness dynamics was sufficient to describe the displacement responses to small stochastic force perturbations. Distortion of these linear estimates by nonlinear centripetal and Coriolis forces was virtually undetectable for these perturbations. The system identification techniques were also found to be robust in the presence of significant output measurement noise and input coupling. These results indicate that the approach described here will allow the estimation of endpoint stiffness dynamics in an experimentally efficient manner with minimal assumptions about the specific form of these properties. PMID:10365425

  17. What is Normal? A Characterization of the Values and Variabilty in Reproductive Endpoints of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jensen et al. investigated aspects of the normal reproductive biology of the fathead minnow (FHM, P. promelas), and subsequent studies have generated a large amount of additional reproductive data for endpoints such as plasma steroid hormone and vitellogenin concentrations, spa...

  18. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part I: intra- and inter-laboratory variability in test endpoints.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Valery E; Selck, Henriette; Palmqvist, Annemette; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; Pounds, Nadine; Thompson, Roy; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    It has been claimed that bisphenol A (BPA) induces superfeminization in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. To explore the reproducibility of prior work, here we present results from a three-laboratory study, the objectives of which were to determine the mean and variability in test endpoints (i.e., adult fecundity, egg hatchability, and juvenile growth) under baseline conditions and to identify the sources of variability. A major source of variability for all of the measured endpoints was due to differences within and among individuals. With few exceptions, variability among laboratories and among replicate tanks within laboratories contributed little to the observed variability in endpoints. The results highlight the importance of obtaining basic knowledge of husbandry requirements and baseline information on life-history traits of potential test species prior to designing toxicity test protocols. Understanding of the levels and sources of endpoint variability is essential so that statistically robust and ecologically relevant tests of chemicals can be conducted.

  19. Transcriptomics-based identification of developmental toxicants through their interference with cardiomyocyte differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dartel, Dorien A.M. van; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Schooten, Frederik J. van; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2010-03-15

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) predicts developmental toxicity based on the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC). The subjective endpoint, the long culture duration together with the undefined applicability domain and related predictivity need further improvement to facilitate implementation of the EST into regulatory strategies. These aspects may be improved by studying gene expression changes in the ESC differentiation cultures and their modulation by compound exposure using transcriptomics. Here, we tested the developmental toxicants monobutyl phthalate and 6-aminonicotinamide. ESC were allowed to differentiated, and cardiomyocyte differentiation was assessed after 10 days of culture. RNA of solvent controls was collected after 0, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of exposure, and RNA of developmental-toxicant-exposed cultures was collected after 24 and 96 h. Samples were hybridized to DNA microarrays, and 1355 genes were found differentially expressed among the unexposed experimental groups. These regulated genes were involved in differentiation-related processes, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on these genes showed that the unexposed experimental groups appeared in chronological order in the PCA, which can therefore be regarded as a continuous representation of the differentiation track. The developmental-toxicant-exposed cultures appeared to deviate significantly from this differentiation track, which confirms the compound-modulating effects on the differentiation process. The incorporation of transcriptomics in the EST is expected to provide a more informative and improved endpoint in the EST as compared with morphology, allowing early detection of differentiation modulation. Furthermore, this approach may improve the definition of the applicability domain and predictivity of the EST.

  20. Alternative Endpoints and Approaches for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites - 13426

    SciTech Connect

    Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elisabeth L.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE)'s environmental remediation programs is to restore groundwater to beneficial use, similar to many other Federal and state environmental cleanup programs. Based on past experience, groundwater remediation to pre-contamination conditions (i.e., drinking water standards or non-detectable concentrations) can be successfully achieved at many sites. At a subset of the most complex sites, however, complete restoration is not likely achievable within the next 50 to 100 years using today's technology. This presentation describes several approaches used at complex sites in the face of these technical challenges. Many complex sites adopted a long-term management approach, whereby contamination was contained within a specified area using active or passive remediation techniques. Consistent with the requirements of their respective environmental cleanup programs, several complex sites selected land use restrictions and used risk management approaches to accordingly adopt alternative cleanup goals (alternative endpoints). Several sites used long-term management designations and approaches in conjunction with the alternative endpoints. Examples include various state designations for groundwater management zones, technical impracticability (TI) waivers or greater risk waivers at Superfund sites, and the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or other passive long-term management approaches over long time frames. This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and approaches for groundwater remediation at complex sites under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate

  1. [Microglial cells and development of the embryonic central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Legendre, Pascal; Le Corronc, Hervé

    2014-02-01

    Microglia cells are the macrophages of the central nervous system with a crucial function in the homeostasis of the adult brain. However, recent studies showed that microglial cells may also have important functions during early embryonic central nervous system development. In this review we summarize recent works on the extra embryonic origin of microglia, their progenitor niche, the pattern of their invasion of the embryonic central nervous system and on interactions between embryonic microglia and their local environment during invasion. We describe microglial functions during development of embryonic neuronal networks, including their roles in neurogenesis, in angiogenesis and developmental cell death. These recent discoveries open a new field of research on the functions of neural-microglial interactions during the development of the embryonic central nervous system.

  2. RDH10 is the primary enzyme responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A metabolism and retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Krysten M; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Nikolaeva, Olga; Sandell, Lisa L; Trainor, Paul A; Ma, Jian-xing

    2011-09-15

    Retinoic acid (atRA) signaling is essential for regulating embryonic development, and atRA levels must be tightly controlled in order to prevent congenital abnormalities and fetal death which can result from both excessive and insufficient atRA signaling. Cellular enzymes synthesize atRA from Vitamin A, which is obtained from dietary sources. Embryos express multiple enzymes that are biochemically capable of catalyzing the initial step of Vitamin A oxidation, but the precise contribution of these enzymes to embryonic atRA synthesis remains unknown. Using Rdh10(trex)-mutant embryos, dietary supplementation of retinaldehyde, and retinol dehydrogenase (RDH) activity assays, we demonstrate that RDH10 is the primary RDH responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A oxidation. Moreover, we show that this initial step of atRA synthesis occurs predominantly in a membrane-bound cellular compartment, which prevents inhibition by the cytosolic cellular retinol-binding protein (RBP1). These studies reveal that widely expressed cytosolic enzymes with RDH activity play a very limited role in embryonic atRA synthesis under normal dietary conditions. This provides a breakthrough in understanding the precise cellular mechanisms that regulate Vitamin A metabolism and the synthesis of the essential embryonic regulatory molecule atRA.

  3. End-point dilution and plaque assay methods for titration of cricket paralysis virus in cultured Drosophila cells.

    PubMed

    Scotti, P D

    1977-05-01

    Cricket paralysis virus, an insect picorna-like virus, caused a distinct c.p.e. in cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells, allowing the development of titration methods based on end-point dilution or plaque assay methods. The end-point dilution (TCD50) method is more sensitive and economical than plaque assays and is easily scored. The data indicate a minimum infectivity/particle ratio of about 1/2000.

  4. Determination of Endpoint Energy and Bremsstrahlung Spectra for High-Energy Radiation-Therapy Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Danny Joe

    Few attempts have been made to experimentally determine thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra of megavoltage therapy beams. For spectral studies using the Compton scattering technique, sodium iodine (NaI) detectors with relatively poor energy resolution have been used. Other experimental techniques for determining spectra are generally not suited for a clinical environment with the inherent time and space constraints. To gather more spectral information than previously obtained in the region near the endpoint energy, the use of a high-resolution intrinsic-germanium (Ge) detector was proposed. A response function matrix was determined from experimentally obtained pulse height distributions on the multichannel analyzer. The distributions were for nine various monoenergetic sources between 280 adn 1525 keV. The response function was used to convert the measured pulse height distributions to photon flux spectra using an iterative approximation technique with a computer. Photon flux spectra from the Sagittaire Linear Accelerator were obtained at average-electron endpoint energies of 15, 20, and 25 MeV. Two spectra were measured at the 25 MeV setting; one spectrum was measured along the central axis and one spectrum at 4(DEGREES) off axis. Photon spectra were also obtained for a Van de Graaff generator at the nominal endpoint energies of 2.2, 2.35, and 2.5 MeV. The results for both the linac and the Van de Graaff generator were compared with theoretical spectra and previously measured spectra where available. Also, photon spectra from a Theratron-80 (('60)Co) unit were determined for three field sizes and for a 10 x 10 cm. field with a lucite tray or a 45(DEGREES) wedge in the beam. The resulting spectra were compared to previously measured ('60)Co spectra.

  5. End-Point Titration-PCR for Quantitation of Cytomegalovirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Kulski, J K

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important qualitative procedure in the routine microbiology laboratory for detecting the presence or absence of potentially harmful microorganisms in clinical specimens (1,2). The use of PCR to quantify an infectious agent in a clinical specimen (e.g., viral or bacterial load) is advantageous for monitoring disease progression and efficacy of treatment, for differentiating between asymptomatic and symptomatic infection, or for quality control of false positive samples. End-point titration-PCR (ET-PCR) is a simple method for differentiating between the presence of low, medium, or high amounts of viral, fungal, or bacterial DNA in a test sample. Basically, the qualitative PCR method (3) is used in an ET-PCR to amplify a specific target sequence in serial dilutions of a DNA sample (4). The limit of detection of the amplified product, which is the end-point dilution or titer, is the quantitative index for the DNA target in the sample. End-point titers obtained by ET-PCR have been shown to increase proportionally with increasing amounts of standard DNA (4). The result of an ET-PCR can be presented as a titer, dilution, DNA copy number, or amount of a specific DNA sequence relative to an external standard or as relative differences between samples. On this basis, ET-PCR has been used to quantitate the presence of viral and bacterial DNA in clinical specimens (4-10). The ET-PCR method described here is for the quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in leukocytes (4).

  6. Use of behavioral endpoints to determine protective concentrations of the insecticide fonofos for bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Little, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    This research compared the results of laboratory and mesocosm studies to determine the effectiveness of using behavioral measures of sublethal exposure to define environmental concentration ranges that are protective of free-ranging populations of bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) exposed to the organophophate insecticide fonofos. Thirty-day laboratory chronic studies were conducted to determine the relative sensitivity of standard (e.g. survival and growth) and non-standard behavioral (e.g. swimming capacity, feeding efficiency, and aggression) endpoints in predicting concentrations of fonofos protective of bluegill growth and survival. The lowest observable effect concentration (LOECs) for the standard measures of survival and growth was 5.6 ??g/L. Two behavioral endpoints were of similar sensitivity to the standard measures: swimming capacity, LOEC of 5.6 ??g/L; and prey strike frequency, LOEC of 5.6 ??g/L. However, aggressive interactions were ten-fold more sensitive than swimming or feeding behavior with a LOEC occurring at 0.6 ??g/L. Lab results were compared to an aquatic mesocosm study which exposed adult and juvenile bluegill to a 9.41 ??g/L concentration of fonofos. The dissipation half-life of fonofos was 5 days in 0.1 hectare aquatic mesocosms. Significant mortality among caged bluegill occurred within 4 days of exposure at 9.41 ??g/L. However, the 9.41 ??g/L concentration of fonofos had no statistically significant effects on survival, growth, reproduction, or total biomass of free-ranging populations of bluegill. We conclude from these studies that laboratory data can accurately estimate concentrations that are lethal in the field and that the use of behavioral endpoints can provide ecologically relevant, yet conservative estimates of concentrations that are protective of field populations.

  7. The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) Trial: Rationale, Ethics, Design, and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Antic, Nick A.; Heeley, Emma; Anderson, Craig S.; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Jiguang; Neal, Bruce; Grunstein, Ron; Barbe, Ferran; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Huang, Shaoguang; Redline, Susan; Zhong, Nanshan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2015-01-01

    The Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study is an ongoing investigator-initiated and conducted, international, multicenter, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trial that was designed to determine whether treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) can reduce the risk of serious cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with established CV disease (clinical trial registration NCT00738179). The results of this study will have important implications for the provision of health care to patients with sleep apnea around the world. The SAVE study has brought together respiratory, sleep, CV and stroke clinicians-scientists in an interdisciplinary collaboration with industry and government sponsorship to conduct an ambitious clinical trial. Following its launch in Australia and China in late 2008, the recruitment network expanded across 89 sites that included New Zealand, India, Spain, USA, and Brazil for a total of 2,717 patients randomized by December 2013. These patients are being followed until December 2015 so that the average length of follow-up of the cohort will be over 4 y. This article describes the rationale for the SAVE study, considerations given to the design including how various cultural and ethical challenges were addressed, and progress in establishing and maintaining the recruitment network, patient follow-up, and adherence to CPAP and procedures. The assumptions underlying the original trial sample size calculation and why this was revised downward in 2012 are also discussed. Clinical Trials Registration Number: NCT00738179. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12608000409370. Citation: Antic NA, Heeley E, Anderson CS, Luo Y, Wang J, Neal B, Grunstein R, Barbe F, Lorenzi-Filho G, Huang S, Redline S, Zhong N, McEvoy RD. The sleep apnea cardiovascular endpoints (SAVE) trial: rationale, ethics, design, and progress. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1247–1257. PMID:25669180

  8. Comparing toxicity endpoints on Lecane quadridentata (Rotifera: Monogononta) exposed to two anticholinesterases pesticides.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Legaspi, Ignacio Alejandro; Quintanar, J Luis; Rico-Martínez, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Toxicity tests were performed on the freshwater rotifer Lecane quadridentata exposed to the pesticides carbaryl and methyl parathion (lethal, sublethal, and chronic) to compare the sensitivity between different endpoints: (a) 48-h mortality; (b) 30-min in vivo inhibition of esterase activity; (c) 5-day inhibition of the instantaneous growth rate. The emphasis of this work was to find the most appropriate endpoint to evaluate the toxicity of these pesticides in view of their sensitivity, duration, and ecological relevance. The comparison between the three toxicity tests show that the 5-day chronic tests have the lowest EC50 (2.22 and 6.6 mg/L), lowest-observed-effect concentration (2.5 and 2.5 mg/L), and no-observed-effect concentration (1.0 and 1.2 mg/L) values for carbaryl and methyl parathion, respectively. This indicates that the estimate of the instantaneous rate of natural increase r is the most sensitive endpoint regarding the toxicity of these pesticides. This sensitivity might be due to the effect on reducing the growth potential form the first generation on. Lethal and sublethal tests are closely related, suggesting that the immediate effect after inhibition of esterases is death. In general, the sensitivity of L. quadridentata is similar to other species of rotifers exposed to methyl parathion. Therefore, the 5-day chronic toxicity test with the freshwater rotifer L. quadridentata should be considered a good candidate to evaluate the effect of anticholinesterase pesticides, due to its high sensitivity and ecological relevance.

  9. The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance: updated case definitions of oral disease endpoints.

    PubMed

    Shiboski, C H; Patton, L L; Webster-Cyriaque, J Y; Greenspan, D; Traboulsi, R S; Ghannoum, M; Jurevic, R; Phelan, J A; Reznik, D; Greenspan, J S

    2009-07-01

    The Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (OHARA) is part of the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest HIV clinical trials organization in the world. Its main objective is to investigate oral complications associated with HIV/AIDS as the epidemic is evolving, in particular, the effects of antiretrovirals on oral mucosal lesion development and associated fungal and viral pathogens. The OHARA infrastructure comprises: the Epidemiologic Research Unit (at the University of California San Francisco), the Medical Mycology Unit (at Case Western Reserve University) and the Virology/Specimen Banking Unit (at the University of North Carolina). The team includes dentists, physicians, virologists, mycologists, immunologists, epidemiologists and statisticians. Observational studies and clinical trials are being implemented at ACTG-affiliated sites in the US and resource-poor countries. Many studies have shared end-points, which include oral diseases known to be associated with HIV/AIDS measured by trained and calibrated ACTG study nurses. In preparation for future protocols, we have updated existing diagnostic criteria of the oral manifestations of HIV published in 1992 and 1993. The proposed case definitions are designed to be used in large-scale epidemiologic studies and clinical trials, in both US and resource-poor settings, where diagnoses may be made by non-dental healthcare providers. The objective of this article is to present updated case definitions for HIV-related oral diseases that will be used to measure standardized clinical end-points in OHARA studies, and that can be used by any investigator outside of OHARA/ACTG conducting clinical research that pertains to these end-points. PMID:19594839

  10. Early analysis of surrogate endpoints for metastatic melanoma in immune checkpoint inhibitor trials

    PubMed Central

    Petrelli, Fausto; Coinu, Andrea; Cabiddu, Mary; Borgonovo, Karen; Ghilardi, Mara; Lonati, Veronica; Barni, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent major phase III trials led to the approval of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ipilimumab, pembrolizumab, and nivolumab) in metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). We aim to assess whether median progression-free survival, and 1 and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates are reliable surrogate endpoints for median OS through a meta-analysis of published trials involving immunotherapy. A systematic literature search in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and SCOPUS of published phase II to III trials with immunotherapy as the treatment for MM was conducted. Adjusted weighted linear regression was used to calculate Pearson correlations (R) between surrogates and median OS, and between treatment effects on surrogates and median OS. A total of 13 studies involving 3373 patients with MM were identified. The correlation of progression-free survival with OS was not significant (R = 0.45, P = .11). Conversely, the correlation between 1-year OS and median OS was very strong (R = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P < .00001), as was the correlation between 2-year OS and OS (R = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51–0.91, P = .0001). The correlation between the treatment effects on 1-year OS and OS was also significant (R = −0.86, 95% CI −0.3 to 0.97, P = .01). Similar results were obtained for 2-year OS. According to the available study data, 1-year OS rate could be regarded as a potential surrogate for median OS in novel immunotherapy trials of metastatic MM. Waiting for ongoing studies (e.g., pembrolizumab), we suggest that this intermediate endpoint could be considered as a potential primary endpoint in future clinical trials. PMID:27368007

  11. Improved design of prodromal Alzheimer's disease trials through cohort enrichment and surrogate endpoints.

    PubMed

    Macklin, Eric A; Blacker, Deborah; Hyman, Bradley T; Betensky, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) trials initiated during or before the prodrome are costly and lengthy because patients are enrolled long before clinical symptoms are apparent, when disease progression is slow. We hypothesized that design of such trials could be improved by: 1) selecting individuals at moderate near-term risk of progression to AD dementia (the current clinical standard) and 2) by using short-term surrogate endpoints that predict progression to AD dementia. We used a longitudinal cohort of older, initially non-demented, community-dwelling participants (n = 358) to derive selection criteria and surrogate endpoints and tested them in an independent national data set (n = 6,243). To identify a "mid-risk" subgroup, we applied conditional tree-based survival models to Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale scores and common neuropsychological tests. In the validation cohort, a time-to-AD dementia trial applying these mid-risk selection criteria to a pool of all non-demented individuals could achieve equivalent power with 47% fewer participants than enrolling at random from that pool. We evaluated surrogate endpoints measureable over two years of follow-up based on cross-validated concordance between predictions from Cox models and observed time to AD dementia. The best performing surrogate, rate of change in CDR sum-of-boxes, did not reduce the trial duration required for equivalent power using estimates from the validation cohort, but alternative surrogates with better ability to predict time to AD dementia should be able to do so. The approach tested here might improve efficiency of prodromal AD trials using other potential measures and could be generalized to other diseases with long prodromal phases. PMID:23629586

  12. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  13. Adverse effect of agroecosystem pond water on biological endpoints of common toad (Rhinella arenarum) tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Babini, María Selene; Bionda, Clarisa de Lourdes; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2016-08-01

    Chemical prroducts used in farming and wastes from livestock can contaminate pond water in agroecosystems due to runoff. Amphibians using these ponds for breeding are probably exposed to pollutants, and serious consequences might be observed afterward at the population level. Assessment biological endpoints of anuran to water quality give a realistic estimate of the probability of occurrence of adverse effects and provide an early warning signal. In this study, the ecotoxicity of agroecosystem ponds from the south of Córdoba province, Argentina, was investigated. Ponds in four sites with different degrees of human disturbance were selected: three agroecosystems (A1, A2, A3) and a site without crops or livestock (SM). The effect of pond water quality on the biological endpoint of Rhinella arenarum tadpoles was examined using microcosms with pond water from sites. Biological endpoints assessed were as follows: mortality, growth, development, morphological abnormalities (in body shape, gut, and labial tooth row formula), behavior, and blood cell parameters (micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities). Results indicated that water from agroecosystems has adverse effect on early life stage of R. arenarum. High mortality and fewer metamorphs were recorded in the A1 and A3 treatments. Tadpoles and metamorphs from A1 and A2 treatments had lower body condition. Tadpoles from A1 and A3 showed the highest prevalence of morphological abnormalities. The lowest amount of tadpoles feeding and the highest percentage of tadpoles swimming on the surface were observed in treatments with agroecosystem pond water. The higher frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities were recorded in tadpoles from A1, A2, and A3 treatments. We check the sensitivity of the biological endpoints of R. arenarum tadpoles like early warning indicators of water quality. We found that the poor water quality of agroecosystem ponds has impact on the health of the tadpoles, and this could affect the

  14. Sensitivity, variability, and recovery of functional and structural endpoints of an aquatic community exposed to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Hommen, Udo

    2012-04-01

    A mesocosm study with three photosystem-II inhibitors and an equipotent mixture was performed to address the value of functional and structural endpoints in evaluating the impact of herbicides on aquatic systems. The herbicides atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon were dosed in the ratio of their relative potencies as HC30 for the single substance treatments and as 1/3 HC30 for the mixture treatment to obtain comparable effect concentrations. To investigate the effects of the three herbicides and their mixture on photosynthesis of the whole system, the physical-chemical parameters pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were monitored. To address effects on photosynthesis more specifically, the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton and three submersed macrophytes (Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Potamogeton lucens) were investigated applying in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator for their activity. As a structural endpoint, the species abundance and community structure of the phytoplankton community was determined. Effects were continuously monitored over a five week period of constant exposure, and during a 3 month post-exposure period. The sensitivity, expressed as maximum effect during constant exposure, was higher for the structural parameters (total and single species abundances and PRC) than for the functional parameters. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the physical-chemical parameters was below 10%, for the photosynthesis measurement of the phytoplankton and macrophytes below 10 and 30%, respectively. Structural parameters, however, yielded higher variability with mean CVs for phytoplankton abundance data and single sensitive species reaching up to 96%. Effects on the phytoplankton photosynthesis measured via in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were constant during the exposure period; whereas macrophytes recovered quickly from photosynthesis inhibition despite constant exposure. Effects on total system photosynthesis

  15. Adverse effect of agroecosystem pond water on biological endpoints of common toad (Rhinella arenarum) tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Babini, María Selene; Bionda, Clarisa de Lourdes; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2016-08-01

    Chemical prroducts used in farming and wastes from livestock can contaminate pond water in agroecosystems due to runoff. Amphibians using these ponds for breeding are probably exposed to pollutants, and serious consequences might be observed afterward at the population level. Assessment biological endpoints of anuran to water quality give a realistic estimate of the probability of occurrence of adverse effects and provide an early warning signal. In this study, the ecotoxicity of agroecosystem ponds from the south of Córdoba province, Argentina, was investigated. Ponds in four sites with different degrees of human disturbance were selected: three agroecosystems (A1, A2, A3) and a site without crops or livestock (SM). The effect of pond water quality on the biological endpoint of Rhinella arenarum tadpoles was examined using microcosms with pond water from sites. Biological endpoints assessed were as follows: mortality, growth, development, morphological abnormalities (in body shape, gut, and labial tooth row formula), behavior, and blood cell parameters (micronucleus and nuclear abnormalities). Results indicated that water from agroecosystems has adverse effect on early life stage of R. arenarum. High mortality and fewer metamorphs were recorded in the A1 and A3 treatments. Tadpoles and metamorphs from A1 and A2 treatments had lower body condition. Tadpoles from A1 and A3 showed the highest prevalence of morphological abnormalities. The lowest amount of tadpoles feeding and the highest percentage of tadpoles swimming on the surface were observed in treatments with agroecosystem pond water. The higher frequencies of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities were recorded in tadpoles from A1, A2, and A3 treatments. We check the sensitivity of the biological endpoints of R. arenarum tadpoles like early warning indicators of water quality. We found that the poor water quality of agroecosystem ponds has impact on the health of the tadpoles, and this could affect the

  16. Sensitivity, variability, and recovery of functional and structural endpoints of an aquatic community exposed to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Knauer, Katja; Hommen, Udo

    2012-04-01

    A mesocosm study with three photosystem-II inhibitors and an equipotent mixture was performed to address the value of functional and structural endpoints in evaluating the impact of herbicides on aquatic systems. The herbicides atrazine, diuron, and isoproturon were dosed in the ratio of their relative potencies as HC30 for the single substance treatments and as 1/3 HC30 for the mixture treatment to obtain comparable effect concentrations. To investigate the effects of the three herbicides and their mixture on photosynthesis of the whole system, the physical-chemical parameters pH, dissolved oxygen, and conductivity were monitored. To address effects on photosynthesis more specifically, the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton and three submersed macrophytes (Elodea canadensis, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Potamogeton lucens) were investigated applying in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence as an indicator for their activity. As a structural endpoint, the species abundance and community structure of the phytoplankton community was determined. Effects were continuously monitored over a five week period of constant exposure, and during a 3 month post-exposure period. The sensitivity, expressed as maximum effect during constant exposure, was higher for the structural parameters (total and single species abundances and PRC) than for the functional parameters. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the physical-chemical parameters was below 10%, for the photosynthesis measurement of the phytoplankton and macrophytes below 10 and 30%, respectively. Structural parameters, however, yielded higher variability with mean CVs for phytoplankton abundance data and single sensitive species reaching up to 96%. Effects on the phytoplankton photosynthesis measured via in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence were constant during the exposure period; whereas macrophytes recovered quickly from photosynthesis inhibition despite constant exposure. Effects on total system photosynthesis

  17. Application of molecular endpoints in early life stage salmonid environmental biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Marlatt, Vicki L; Sherrard, Ryan; Kennedy, Chris J; Elphick, James R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-04-01

    Molecular endpoints can enhance existing whole animal bioassays by more fully characterizing the biological impacts of aquatic pollutants. Laboratory and field studies were used to examine the utility of adopting molecular endpoints for a well-developed in situ early life stage (eyed embryo to onset of swim-up fry) salmonid bioassay to improve diagnostic assessments of water quality in the field. Coastal cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki clarki) were exposed in the laboratory to the model metal (zinc, 40μg/L) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pyrene, 100μg/L) in water to examine the resulting early life stage salmonid responses. In situ field exposures and bioassays were conducted in parallel to evaluate the water quality of three urban streams in British Columbia (two sites with anthropogenic inputs and one reference site). The endpoints measured in swim-up fry included survival, deformities, growth (weight and length), vitellogenin (vtg) and metallothionein (Mt) protein levels, and hepatic gene expression (e.g., metallothioneins [mta and mtb], endocrine biomarkers [vtg and estrogen receptors, esr] and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes [cytochrome P450 1A3, cyp1a3 and glutathione transferases, gstk]). No effects were observed in the zinc treatment, however exposure of swim-up fry to pyrene resulted in decreased survival, deformities and increased estrogen receptor alpha (er1) mRNA levels. In the field exposures, xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (cyp1a3, gstk) and zinc transporter (zntBigM103) mRNA were significantly increased in swim-up fry deployed at the sites with more anthropogenic inputs compared to the reference site. Cluster analysis revealed that gene expression profiles in individuals from the streams receiving anthropogenic inputs were more similar to each other than to the reference site. Collectively, the results obtained in this study suggest that molecular endpoints may be useful, and potentially more sensitive, indicators of site

  18. Adjustment on the Type I Error Rate for a Clinical Trial Monitoring for both Intermediate and Primary Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In many clinical trials, a single endpoint is used to answer the primary question and forms the basis for monitoring the experimental therapy. Many trials are lengthy in duration and investigators are interested in using an intermediate endpoint for an accelerated approval, but will rely on the primary endpoint (such as, overall survival) for the full approval of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration. We have designed a clinical trial where both intermediate (progression-free survival, (PFS)) and primary endpoints (overall survival, (OS)) are used for monitoring the trial so the overall type I error rate is preserved at the pre-specified alpha level of 0.05. A two-stage procedure is used. In the first stage, the Bonferroni correction was used where the global type I error rate was allocated to each of the endpoints. In the next stage, the O’Brien-Fleming approach was used to design the boundary for the interim and final analysis for each endpoint. Data were generated assuming several parametric copulas with exponential marginals. Different degrees of dependence, as measured by Kendall’s τ, between OS and PFS were assumed: 0 (independence) 0.3, 0.5 and 0.70. This approach is applied to an example in a prostate cancer trial. PMID:24466469

  19. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shao-Fei; Liu, Xin-Yan; Cheng, Yun-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yi; Ou, Jie; Wang, Wei; Li, Feng-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy. The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest. Methods: Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group). Results: Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups. The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group. Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45), and none was detected in the artificial abortion group. M. luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test). In addition, no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest. Conclusions: M. luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors. PMID:27270541

  20. Monolayer cultivation of osteoprogenitors shortens duration of the embryonic stem cell test while reliably predicting developmental osteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    zur Nieden, Nicole I; Davis, Lesley A; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2010-11-01

    Osteotoxic compounds administered during pregnancy can initiate skeletal congenital anomalies in the embryo. In vitro, developmental osteotoxicity of a compound can be predicted with the embryonic stem cell test (EST), the only in vitro embryotoxicity model identified to date that entirely abrogates the use of animals. Although the previously identified endpoint osteocalcin mRNA expression robustly predicts developmental osteotoxicity, it can only be assayed after 5 weeks of in vitro culture with existing embryoid body (EB)-based differentiation protocols. Therefore, the goal of this study was to characterize novel earlier endpoints of developmental osteotoxicity for the EST. The currently used EB-based differentiation protocol was modified so that a monolayer culture of pre-differentiated cells was inoculated. The expression profile of five bone-specific mRNAs, including osteocalcin, over the course of 30 differentiation days suggested an acceleration of pre-osteoblast specification in the monolayer over the EB-based protocol. Similarly, calcification was already visible after 14 days of culture in monolayer cultures. Employing image and absorption-based techniques to measure the degree of mineralization in these cells after compound treatment, the three compounds Penicillin G, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and all-trans retinoic acid (RA) were then tested after 14 days in monolayer cultures and compared to embryoid body-based differentiations at day 30. By modifying the culture the three test substances were classified correctly into non- or strong osteotoxic. Moreover, we were successful in shortening the assay duration from 30 to 14 days.

  1. Effects of androstenedione exposure on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    DeQuattro, Zachary A; Hemming, Jocelyn D C; Barry, Terence P

    2015-11-01

    High concentrations (300 ng/L) of androstenedione (A4) were identified in snowmelt runoff from fields fertilized with manure from livestock feeding operations in Wisconsin, USA. In fishes, A4 is an active androgen and substrate for biosynthesis of functional androgens (e.g., testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) and estrogens (e.g., estradiol-17β). Thus, A4 has the potential to be a powerful endocrine disruptor. This hypothesis was tested by exposing reproductively mature fathead minnows to 0.0 ng/L, 4.5 ng/L, 74 ng/L, and 700 ng/L A4 for 26 d in a flow-through system. Various reproductive endpoints were measured including fecundity, fertilization success, secondary sexual characteristics, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and hepatic vitellogenin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. In addition, fertilized embryos from the reproduction assay were used in an embryonic development assay to assess A4 effects on development and hatchability. In males, A4 significantly increased Vtg mRNA expression (estrogenic effect), significantly reduced GSI, and had no effect on tubercle expression (p = 0.067). In females, A4 induced tubercle development (androgenic effect) with no effects on GSI. Fecundity was not significantly impacted. Exposure to A4 had no effect on fertilization, embryonic development, or hatchability. These data indicate that exogenous A4, at environmentally relevant concentrations, can significantly modulate the reproductive physiology of the fathead minnows in a sex-specific manner and that A4 should be monitored as an endocrine disruptor. PMID:26053090

  2. Human embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation as parameters to evaluate developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rajarshi; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Das, Anjan Kumar; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2011-06-01

    In vitro models based on embryonic stem cells (ESC) are highly promising for improvement of predictive toxicology screening in humans. After the successful validation of embryonic stem cell test (EST) in 2001; concerns have been raised on the usage of mouse ESC and also the morphological evaluation of beating cell clusters. This requires specialized skill-sets and is highly prone to misjudgement and false positive results. To overcome these limitations, we undertook the present study incorporating improvisations over the conventional EST. Here, we explored the potential of a human ESC (hESC)-based assay to evaluate the potential toxicity of penicillin-G, caffeine, and hydroxyurea. Drug treatment inhibited hESC adhesion and substantially altered the morphology and viability (∼ 50%) of embryoid bodies (EBs). Flow cytometry analysis not only showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells in the highest doses but also induced a diverse pattern in DNA content and cell cycle distribution relative to control. Both semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR studies revealed a selective down regulation of markers associated with stemness (Nanog, Rex1, SOX-2, and hTERT); cardiac mesoderm (Cripto1, MEF-2C, and Brachyury); hepatic endoderm (AFP, HNF-3β, HNF-4α, GATA-4, and SOX-17); and neuroectoderm (Nestin, SOX-1, NURR1, NEFH, Synaptophysin, TH, and Olig2) in a drug as well as dose dependent manner indicating abnormal differentiation. Furthermore, a decrease in the expression of AFP and GFAP proteins followed by a dose-dependent reduction in the levels of hCG-β, progesterone-II, and estradiol hormones was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and ECLIA, respectively. This new and unique approach comprising of DNA cell cycle analysis, germ layer-specific marker expression and hormone levels as endpoints might offer a clinically relevant and commercially viable alternative for predicting in vivo developmental toxicity. PMID:20945368

  3. Effects of androstenedione exposure on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    DeQuattro, Zachary A; Hemming, Jocelyn D C; Barry, Terence P

    2015-11-01

    High concentrations (300 ng/L) of androstenedione (A4) were identified in snowmelt runoff from fields fertilized with manure from livestock feeding operations in Wisconsin, USA. In fishes, A4 is an active androgen and substrate for biosynthesis of functional androgens (e.g., testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) and estrogens (e.g., estradiol-17β). Thus, A4 has the potential to be a powerful endocrine disruptor. This hypothesis was tested by exposing reproductively mature fathead minnows to 0.0 ng/L, 4.5 ng/L, 74 ng/L, and 700 ng/L A4 for 26 d in a flow-through system. Various reproductive endpoints were measured including fecundity, fertilization success, secondary sexual characteristics, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and hepatic vitellogenin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. In addition, fertilized embryos from the reproduction assay were used in an embryonic development assay to assess A4 effects on development and hatchability. In males, A4 significantly increased Vtg mRNA expression (estrogenic effect), significantly reduced GSI, and had no effect on tubercle expression (p = 0.067). In females, A4 induced tubercle development (androgenic effect) with no effects on GSI. Fecundity was not significantly impacted. Exposure to A4 had no effect on fertilization, embryonic development, or hatchability. These data indicate that exogenous A4, at environmentally relevant concentrations, can significantly modulate the reproductive physiology of the fathead minnows in a sex-specific manner and that A4 should be monitored as an endocrine disruptor.

  4. BMP Signaling Dynamics in Embryonic Orofacial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    MUKHOPADHYAY, PARTHA; WEBB, CYNTHIA L.; WARNER, DENNIS R.; GREENE, ROBERT M.; PISANO, M. MICHELE

    2009-01-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family represents a class of signaling molecules, that plays key roles in morphogenesis, cell proliferation, survival and differentiation during normal development. Members of this family are essential for the development of the mammalian orofacial region where they regulate cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, and cellular differentiation. Perturbation of any of these processes results in orofacial clefting. Embryonic orofacial tissue expresses BMP mRNAs, their cognate proteins, and BMP-specific receptors in unique temporo-spatial patterns, suggesting functional roles in orofacial development. However, specific genes that function as downstream mediators of BMP action during orofacial ontogenesis have not been well defined. In the current study, elements of the Smad component of the BMP intracellular signaling system were identified and characterized in embryonic orofacial tissue and functional activation of the Smad pathway by BMP2 and BMP4 was demonstrated. BMP2 and BMP4-initiated Smad signaling in cells derived from embryonic orofacial tissue was found to result in: (1) phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5; (2) nuclear translocation of Smads 1, 4, and 5; (3) binding of Smads 1, 4, and 5 to a consensus Smad binding element (SBE)-containing oligonucleotide; (4) transactivation of transfected reporter constructs, containing BMP-inducible Smad response elements; and (5) increased expression at transcriptional as well as translational levels of Id3 (endogenous gene containing BMP receptor-specific Smad response elements). Collectively, these data document the existence of a functional Smad-mediated BMP signaling system in cells of the developing murine orofacial region. PMID:18446813

  5. Molecular characterization of Rhodnius prolixus' embryonic cuticle.

    PubMed

    Souza-Ferreira, Paula S; Moreira, Mônica F; Atella, Geórgia C; Oliveira-Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Eizemberg, Roberto; Majerowicz, David; Melo, Ana C A; Zingali, Russolina B; Masuda, Hatisaburo

    2014-08-01

    The embryonic cuticle (EC) of Rhodnius prolixus envelopes the entire body of the embryo during hatching and provides physical protection, allowing the embryo to pass through a narrow chorionic border. Most of the knowledge about the EC of insects is derived from studies on ultrastructure and secretion processes during embryonic development, and little is known about the molecular composition of this structure. We performed a comprehensive molecular characterization of the major components extracted from the EC of R. prolixus, and we discuss the role of the different molecules that were identified during the eclosion process. The results showed that, similar to the post-embryonic cuticles of insects, the EC of R. prolixus is primarily composed of carbohydrates (57%), lipids (19%), and proteins (8%). Considering only the carbohydrates, chitin is by far the major component (approximately 70%), and it is found primarily along the body of the EC. It is scarce or absent in its prolongations, which are composed of glycosaminoglycans. In addition to chitin, we also identified amino (15%), neutral (12%) and acidic (3%) carbohydrates in the EC of R. prolixus. In addition carbohydrates, we also identified neutral lipids (64.12%) and phospholipids (35.88%). Proteomic analysis detected 68 proteins (55 were identified and 13 are hypothetical proteins) using the sequences in the R. prolixus genome (http://www.vectorbase.org). Among these proteins, 8 out of 15 are associated with cuticle metabolism. These proteins are unequivocally cuticle proteins, and they have been described in other insects. Approximately 35% of the total proteins identified were classified as having a structural function. Chitin-binding protein, amino peptidase, amino acid oxidase, oxidoreductase, catalase and peroxidase are all proteins associated with cuticle metabolism. Proteins known to be cuticle constituents may be related to the function of the EC in assisting the insect during eclosion. To our

  6. Sample Size Considerations in Clinical Trials when Comparing Two Interventions using Multiple Co-Primary Binary Relative Risk Contrasts

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Yuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R.; Asakura, Koko; Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Sozu, Takashi; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    The effects of interventions are multi-dimensional. Use of more than one primary endpoint offers an attractive design feature in clinical trials as they capture more complete characterization of the effects of an intervention and provide more informative intervention comparisons. For these reasons, multiple primary endpoints have become a common design feature in many disease areas such as oncology, infectious disease, and cardiovascular disease. More specifically in medical product development, multiple endpoints are utilized as co-primary to evaluate the effect of the new interventions. Although methodologies to address continuous co-primary endpoints are well-developed, methodologies for binary endpoints are limited. In this paper, we describe power and sample size determination for clinical trials with multiple correlated binary endpoints, when relative risks are evaluated as co-primary. We consider a scenario where the objective is to evaluate evidence for superiority of a test intervention compared with a control intervention, for all of the relative risks. We discuss the normal approximation methods for power and sample size calculations and evaluate how the required sample size, power and Type I error vary as a function of the correlations among the endpoints. Also we discuss a simple, but conservative procedure for appropriate sample size calculation. We then extend the methods allowing for interim monitoring using group-sequential methods. PMID:26167243

  7. Embryonic skulls of titanosaur sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Chiappe, L M; Salgado, L; Coria, R A

    2001-09-28

    Little is known about the cranial anatomy of the taxonomically diverse and geographically widespread titanosaurs, a paucity that has hindered inferences about the genealogical history and evolutionary development of the latest sauropod dinosaurs. Newly discovered fossil eggs containing embryonic remains from the Late Cretaceous of Argentina provide the first articulated skulls of titanosaur dinosaurs. The nearly complete fetal skulls shed light on the evolution of some of the most notable cranial features of sauropod dinosaurs, including the retraction of the external nares, the forward rotation of the braincase, and the abbreviation of the infraorbital region. PMID:11577234

  8. Automated maintenance of embryonic stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Terstegge, Stefanie; Laufenberg, Iris; Pochert, Jörg; Schenk, Sabine; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Endl, Elmar; Brüstle, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) technology provides attractive perspectives for generating unlimited numbers of somatic cells for disease modeling and compound screening. A key prerequisite for these industrial applications are standardized and automated systems suitable for stem cell processing. Here we demonstrate that mouse and human ESC propagated by automated culture maintain their mean specific growth rates, their capacity for multi-germlayer differentiation, and the expression of the pluripotency-associated markers SSEA-1/Oct-4 and Tra-1-60/Tra-1-81/Oct-4, respectively. The feasibility of ESC culture automation may greatly facilitate the use of this versatile cell source for a variety of biomedical applications.

  9. Dynamic Proteomic Profiling of Extra-Embryonic Endoderm Differentiation in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Claire M; Schröter, Christian; Gatto, Laurent; Dikicioglu, Duygu; Fidaner, Isik Baris; Christoforou, Andy; Deery, Michael J; Cho, Lily T Y; Niakan, Kathy K; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2015-09-01

    During mammalian preimplantation development, the cells of the blastocyst's inner cell mass differentiate into the epiblast and primitive endoderm lineages, which give rise to the fetus and extra-embryonic tissues, respectively. Extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN) differentiation can be modeled in vitro by induced expression of GATA transcription factors in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, we use this GATA-inducible system to quantitatively monitor the dynamics of global proteomic changes during the early stages of this differentiation event and also investigate the fully differentiated phenotype, as represented by embryo-derived XEN cells. Using mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic profiling with multivariate data analysis tools, we reproducibly quantified 2,336 proteins across three biological replicates and have identified clusters of proteins characterized by distinct, dynamic temporal abundance profiles. We first used this approach to highlight novel marker candidates of the pluripotent state and XEN differentiation. Through functional annotation enrichment analysis, we have shown that the downregulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, the reorganization of membrane trafficking machinery, and the breakdown of cell-cell adhesion are successive steps of the extra-embryonic differentiation process. Thus, applying a range of sophisticated clustering approaches to a time-resolved proteomic dataset has allowed the elucidation of complex biological processes which characterize stem cell differentiation and could establish a general paradigm for the investigation of these processes.

  10. Polarographic indication of the end-point in chelometric titrations with triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Kopanica, M; Stará, V

    1974-10-01

    The application of d.c. and square-wave polarographic measurements for the indication of the end-point in titrations with triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid (TTHA) has been studied. TTHA has ten co-ordinating groups and forms complexes with metal to ligand ratios of either 1:1 or 2:1, depending on the metal and experimental conditions. The shape of the titration curves, determined by the dependence of the limiting current (peak current of the square-wave polarographic curve) or of the half-wave potential (peak potential) on the amount of TTHA added indicates the composition of the complex formed in the titration. The composition of this complex as determined from the studied titration curves agrees with that predicted by theory. Titrations with polarographic indication of the end-point were also applied for direct titrations of binary mixtures of metal ions. The resulting titration curves indicated the existence of mixed dinuclear complexes and also the kinetic factors involved in the reactions between two different metal ions and TTHA.

  11. Effects of developmental stage, salts, and food presence on aquatic toxicological endpoints using Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Donkin, S.G.; Williams, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study was to standardize the testing protocol for aquatic toxicity tests with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Several variables which may be important in determining the test outcome were investigated in a randomized block design. Concentration-response data were obtained on nematodes of various developmental stages exposed to four metals (Cd, Pb, Cu, and Hg) and a water-soluble organic toxicant, sodium Pentachlorophenate (PCP), under conditions of varied solvent medium (with or without salts and with or without a bacterial food source). The endpoints measured were 24 and 96-h mortality, as well as development of larval stages to adulthood and evidence of reproduction. The results suggest that nematodes of various ages respond similarly to a given toxicant for all endpoints measured, although adults cultured from eggs appeared more sensitive than adults cultured from dauer larvae. The most important environmental variable in determining toxicity was the medium in which the tests were conducted. The presence of potassium and sodium salts in the medium significantly (p<0.05) reduced the toxicity of many test samples. The presence of bacteria had little effect on 24-h tests with salts, but was important in 96-h survival and development. Based on sensitivity and ease of handling, adults cultured from eggs are recommended in both 24-h and 96-h mortality (LC50 value) tests, as well as 96-h reproduction tests.

  12. General description of electromagnetic radiation processes based on instantaneous charge acceleration in ''endpoints''

    SciTech Connect

    James, Clancy W.; Falcke, Heino; Huege, Tim; Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-11-15

    We present a methodology for calculating the electromagnetic radiation from accelerated charged particles. Our formulation - the 'endpoint formulation' - combines numerous results developed in the literature in relation to radiation arising from particle acceleration using a complete, and completely general, treatment. We do this by describing particle motion via a series of discrete, instantaneous acceleration events, or 'endpoints', with each such event being treated as a source of emission. This method implicitly allows for particle creation and destruction, and is suited to direct numerical implementation in either the time or frequency domains. In this paper we demonstrate the complete generality of our method for calculating the radiated field from charged particle acceleration, and show how it reduces to the classical named radiation processes such as synchrotron, Tamm's description of Vavilov-Cherenkov, and transition radiation under appropriate limits. Using this formulation, we are immediately able to answer outstanding questions regarding the phenomenology of radio emission from ultra-high-energy particle interactions in both the earth's atmosphere and the moon. In particular, our formulation makes it apparent that the dominant emission component of the Askaryan effect (coherent radio-wave radiation from high-energy particle cascades in dense media) comes from coherent 'bremsstrahlung' from particle acceleration, rather than coherent Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation.

  13. Rapid and reproducible infectivity end-point titration of virulent phage in a microplate system.

    PubMed

    Fridholm, Helena; Everitt, Einar

    2005-09-01

    The standard method for measuring the number of infectious phages in solution has traditionally been the plaque forming assay. An alternative method is described where the number of lytic, infectious phages is determined in an endpoint titration assay adapted for a microplate system. In this model system, susceptible Escherichia coli B6 at a density of 4 x 10(7) cells/ml, were mixed with an equal volume (100 microl) of PhiX174 diluted serially in a microtest plate. After 3h of incubation on a microplate shaker the endpoint was determined spectrophotometrically and calculated according to the method of Reed and Muench. A well was considered positive for infection if the OD630-value was < or = 10% compared to the OD630-value of the negative control of uninfected cells. ID50-titers were 2.5x higher than the PFU-titers (CV 15%) and the intra assay reproducibility revealed a CV of 9%. The method has several advantages as compared with the conventional PFU-titration. It is less time and material consuming with the possibility to assess several samples at the same time.

  14. Contaminant effect endpoints in terrestrial vertebrates at and above the individual level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Cohen, J.B.; Golden, N.H.; Albers, P.H.; Heinz, G.H.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Use of biochemical, physiological, anatomical, reproductive and behavioral characteristics of wild terrestrial vertebrates to assess contaminant exposure and effects has become commonplace over the past 3 decades. At the level of the individual organism, response patterns have been associated with and sometimes causally linked to contaminant exposure. However, such responses at the organismal level are rarely associated with or causally linked to effects at the population level. Although the ultimate goal of ecotoxicology is the protection of populations, communities, and ecosystems, most of the existing science and regulatory legislation focus on the level of the individual. Consequently, much of this overview concentrates on contaminant effects at the organismal level, with some extrapolation to higher-level effects. In this chapter, we review the state of the science for the evaluation of biotic end-points used to assess contaminant exposure and effects at or above the level of the individual. In addition, we describe extant contaminant concentration thresholds, guidelines, or standards (toxicant criteria) in environmental matrices (e.g., water, soil, sediment, foods) that have been developed to protect wild terrestrial vertebrates. Suggestions are provided to develop and embellish the use and value of such endpoints and criteria for extrapolation of effects to higher levels of biological organization. Increasing focus on populations, communities, and ecosystems is needed to develop biologically meaningful regulatory guidelines that will protect natural resources.

  15. Phenotypic variability in childhood TB: implications for diagnostic endpoints in tuberculosis vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Humphrey; Moyo, Sizulu; Workman, Lesley; Hawkridge, Tony; Verver, Suzanne; Tameris, Michele; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hanekom, Willem; Mahomed, Hassan; Hussey, Gregory; Hatherill, Mark

    2011-06-10

    The endpoint definition for infant tuberculosis (TB) vaccine trials should match the TB disease phenotype expected in the control arm of the study population. Our aim was to analyse selected combinations of the clinical, radiological, and microbiological features of pulmonary TB among children investigated under vaccine trial conditions, in order to estimate case frequency for a range of expected TB phenotypes. Two thousand one hundred and eighty five South African children were investigated over a nine-year period (2001-2009). Evidence of TB exposure and classical symptoms were several times more common than chest radiography (CXR) compatible with TB, or positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. Discordance between clinical, radiological, and microbiological features was common in individual children. Up to one third of children with compatible CXR, and up to half the children who were M. tuberculosis culture positive, were asymptomatic. The culture positive rate fell over time, although rates of TB exposure and compatible chest radiography increased. Consequently, the annual incidence of diagnostic combinations that included M. tuberculosis culture fell to <0.2%. However, in this study population (children <2 years of age), annual incidence of the TB disease phenotype that included the triad of TB exposure, symptoms, and compatible CXR, approached 1% (n=848 per 100,000). These findings allow modelling of expected TB case frequency in multi-centre infant TB vaccine trials, based upon benchmarking of diagnostic data against the key indicator variables that constitute the building blocks of a trial endpoint. PMID:21527304

  16. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  17. UST-ID robotics: Wireless communication and minimum conductor technology, and end-point tracking technology surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a technology review of the current state-of-the-art in two technologies applicable to the Underground Storage Tank (UST) program at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The first review is of wireless and minimal conductor technologies for in-tank communications. The second review is of advanced concepts for independent tool-point tracking. This study addresses the need to provide wireless transmission media or minimum conductor technology for in-tank communications and robot control. At present, signals are conducted via contacting transmission media, i.e., cables. Replacing wires with radio frequencies or invisible light are commonplace in the communication industry. This technology will be evaluated for its applicability to the needs of robotics. Some of these options are radio signals, leaky coax, infrared, microwave, and optical fiber systems. Although optical fiber systems are contacting transmission media, they will be considered because of their ability to reduce the number of conductors. In this report we will identify, evaluate, and recommend the requirements for wireless and minimum conductor technology to replace the present cable system. The second section is a technology survey of concepts for independent end-point tracking (tracking the position of robot end effectors). The position of the end effector in current industrial robots is determined by computing that position from joint information, which is basically a problem of locating a point in three-dimensional space. Several approaches are presently being used in industrial robotics, including: stereo-triangulation with a theodolite network and electrocamera system, photogrammetry, and multiple-length measurement with laser interferometry and wires. The techniques that will be evaluated in this survey are advanced applications of the aforementioned approaches. These include laser tracking (3-D and 5-D), ultrasonic tracking, vision-guided servoing, and adaptive robotic visual tracking.

  18. Comparison of osteoblast and cardiomyocyte differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test for predicting embryotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Esther; van Beek, Lianne; Piersma, Aldert H

    2014-09-01

    One of the most studied alternative embryotoxicity assays is the embryonic stem cell test, in which the effect of compounds on cardiomyocyte differentiation is evaluated (subsequently termed the ESTc). This single differentiation endpoint may limit the predictive value of the assay. We recently published a novel embryonic stem cell based osteoblast differentiation assay (subsequently termed the ESTo), in which we studied the effect of six embryotoxic compounds. Differentiation is monitored via the differential expression of three genes related to osteogenesis (Runx2, SPARC and collagen type I). In the current study, we evaluated the effect of 14 additional compounds in the ESTo, to assess its added value as compared to the ESTc. To this end, we compared the effects of the compounds in the ESTo to their effects in the ESTc and to their published in vivo developmental toxicity profiles. The results show that there is a high overall correlation between compound potencies as regards inhibition of osteoblast and cardiomyocyte differentiation. Moreover, the results in both the ESTo and ESTc showed a significant correlation to in vivo developmental toxicity potency ranking of compounds tested. Interestingly, the embryotoxic effect of TCDD could only be detected using the ESTo, which can be explained based on its mechanism of action and its known inhibitory effect on osteogenesis. The results of TCDD suggest that incorporating the ESTo into a testing battery together with the ESTc could improve the overall predictive value of the battery.

  19. Mechanical signaling coordinates the embryonic heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Kevin; Rocks, Jason; Prosser, Benjamin; Discher, Dennis; Liu, Andrea

    The heart is an active material which relies on robust signaling mechanisms between cells in order to produce well-timed, coordinated beats. Heart tissue is composed primarily of active heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) embedded in a passive extracellular matrix. During a heartbeat, cardiomyocyte contractions are coordinated across the heart to form a wavefront that propagates through the tissue to pump blood. In the adult heart, this contractile wave is coordinated via intercellular electrical signaling.Here we present theoretical and experimental evidence for mechanical coordination of embryonic heartbeats. We model cardiomyocytes as mechanically excitable Eshelby inclusions embedded in an overdamped elastic-fluid biphasic medium. For physiological parameters, this model replicates recent experimental measurements of the contractile wavefront which are not captured by electrical signaling models. We additionally challenge our model by pharmacologically blocking gap junctions, inhibiting electrical signaling between myocytes. We find that while adult hearts stop beating almost immediately after gap junctions are blocked, embryonic hearts continue beating even at significantly higher concentrations, providing strong support for a mechanical signaling mechanism.

  20. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  1. Pluripotent states of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Lai, Dongmei

    2015-02-01

    Since human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were first isolated and successfully cultured in vitro, the pluripotent potential of hESCs has been underestimated. The pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be categorized as naïve and primed, depending on their corresponding in vivo developing phases. mESC morphology differs at distinct pluripotent states, which differ in signaling dependence, gene expression, epigenetic features, and developmental potential. hESCs resemble mouse stem cells at primed pluripotency, and consequently are believed to correspond to a later developmental stage in vivo than mESCs. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that a naïve state of pluripotency may exist in hESCs, and the pluripotency of hESCs also can be enhanced by genetic modification or optimized culture systems. These findings provide novel insight into the properties and differentiation potential of hESCs. Here, we review the recent advances in characterization of ESC states and investigate the mechanisms regulating hESC pluripotency. PMID:25393391

  2. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Maria; Ebner, Thomas; Puchner, Manuela; Mayer, Richard Bernhard; Shebl, Omar; Oppelt, Peter; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF) technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting. PMID:26644858

  3. Disseminated Cerebrospinal Embryonal Tumor in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Armocida, Daniele; Caporlingua, Federico; Lapadula, Gennaro; Elefante, Grazia Maria; Antonelli, Manila; Salvati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. According to the 2016 World Health Organization classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System, the term Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor has been replaced by the term Embryonal Tumor (ET). We present a case of disseminated cerebrospinal ET presenting in an adult patient. Illustrative Case. A 49-year-old male presenting with low back pain, dysuria, and hypoesthesia of the lower extremities referred to our emergency department. Brain and whole spine contrast-enhanced MRI documented a diffusively disseminated heterogeneous neoplasm with intradural extra- and intramedullary involvement of the cervicothoracic tract and cauda equina. A primary biopsy of the lumbosacral localization was performed through L5 bilateral laminectomy. Histologic diagnosis was Embryonal Tumor Not Otherwise Specified. The patient underwent chemotherapy with postoperative adjuvant alternating Vincristine-Doxorubicin-Ifosfamide (VAI) and Ifosfamide-Etoposide (IE). Discussion. Spinal ETs are exceedingly rare especially when presenting in the adult patient. Neurosurgical and oncologic management is still unclear. When feasible, surgical removal should always be performed to obtain a histologic diagnosis. Postoperative adjuvant therapy might entail both chemo- and radiotherapy; however a consensus on this matter is still lacking.

  4. Muscle short-range stiffness can be used to estimate the endpoint stiffness of the human arm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Murray, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the human arm are regulated to maintain stability across many tasks. The static mechanics of the arm can be characterized by estimates of endpoint stiffness, considered especially relevant for the maintenance of posture. At a fixed posture, endpoint stiffness can be regulated by changes in muscle activation, but which activation-dependent muscle properties contribute to this global measure of limb mechanics remains unclear. We evaluated the role of muscle properties in the regulation of endpoint stiffness by incorporating scalable models of muscle stiffness into a three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the human arm. Two classes of muscle models were tested: one characterizing short-range stiffness and two estimating stiffness from the slope of the force-length curve. All models were compared with previously collected experimental data describing how endpoint stiffness varies with changes in voluntary force. Importantly, muscle properties were not fit to the experimental data but scaled only by the geometry of individual muscles in the model. We found that force-dependent variations in endpoint stiffness were accurately described by the short-range stiffness of active arm muscles. Over the wide range of evaluated arm postures and voluntary forces, the musculoskeletal model incorporating short-range stiffness accounted for 98 ± 2, 91 ± 4, and 82 ± 12% of the variance in stiffness orientation, shape, and area, respectively, across all simulated subjects. In contrast, estimates based on muscle force-length curves were less accurate in all measures, especially stiffness area. These results suggest that muscle short-range stiffness is a major contributor to endpoint stiffness of the human arm. Furthermore, the developed model provides an important tool for assessing how the nervous system may regulate endpoint stiffness via changes in muscle activation. PMID:21289133

  5. Root length of aquatic plant, Lemna minor L., as an optimal toxicity endpoint for biomonitoring of mining effluents.

    PubMed

    Gopalapillai, Yamini; Vigneault, Bernard; Hale, Beverley A

    2014-10-01

    Lemna minor, a free-floating macrophyte, is used for biomonitoring of mine effluent quality under the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) of the Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program in Canada and is known to be sensitive to trace metals commonly discharged in mine effluents such as Ni. Environment Canada's standard toxicity testing protocol recommends frond count (FC) and dry weight (DW) as the 2 required toxicity endpoints-this is similar to other major protocols such as those by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-that both require frond growth or biomass endpoints. However, we suggest that similar to terrestrial plants, average root length (RL) of aquatic plants will be an optimal and relevant endpoint. As expected, results demonstrate that RL is the ideal endpoint based on the 3 criteria: accuracy (i.e., toxicological sensitivity to contaminant), precision (i.e., lowest variance), and ecological relevance (metal mining effluents). Roots are known to play a major role in nutrient uptake in conditions of low nutrient conditions-thus having ecological relevance to freshwater from mining regions. Root length was the most sensitive and precise endpoint in this study where water chemistry varied greatly (pH and varying concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, K, dissolved organic carbon, and an anthropogenic organic contaminant, sodium isopropyl xanthates) to match mining effluent ranges. Although frond count was a close second, dry weight proved to be an unreliable endpoint. We conclude that toxicity testing for the floating macrophyte should require average RL measurement as a primary endpoint. PMID:25045146

  6. Root length of aquatic plant, Lemna minor L., as an optimal toxicity endpoint for biomonitoring of mining effluents.

    PubMed

    Gopalapillai, Yamini; Vigneault, Bernard; Hale, Beverley A

    2014-10-01

    Lemna minor, a free-floating macrophyte, is used for biomonitoring of mine effluent quality under the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations (MMER) of the Environmental Effects Monitoring (EEM) program in Canada and is known to be sensitive to trace metals commonly discharged in mine effluents such as Ni. Environment Canada's standard toxicity testing protocol recommends frond count (FC) and dry weight (DW) as the 2 required toxicity endpoints-this is similar to other major protocols such as those by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-that both require frond growth or biomass endpoints. However, we suggest that similar to terrestrial plants, average root length (RL) of aquatic plants will be an optimal and relevant endpoint. As expected, results demonstrate that RL is the ideal endpoint based on the 3 criteria: accuracy (i.e., toxicological sensitivity to contaminant), precision (i.e., lowest variance), and ecological relevance (metal mining effluents). Roots are known to play a major role in nutrient uptake in conditions of low nutrient conditions-thus having ecological relevance to freshwater from mining regions. Root length was the most sensitive and precise endpoint in this study where water chemistry varied greatly (pH and varying concentrations of Ca, Mg, Na, K, dissolved organic carbon, and an anthropogenic organic contaminant, sodium isopropyl xanthates) to match mining effluent ranges. Although frond count was a close second, dry weight proved to be an unreliable endpoint. We conclude that toxicity testing for the floating macrophyte should require average RL measurement as a primary endpoint.

  7. In vitro embryotoxicity testing of metals for dental use by differentiation of embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Imai, Koichi; Nakamura, Masaaki

    2006-03-01

    We examined embryotoxicity using the embryonic stem cell test (EST) protocol. Tests were conducted using standard reagents for the atomic absorption measurement of 11 metal ions, silver, cobalt, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, palladium, antimony, tin, vanadium, and zinc from among metals comprising dental alloys. In addition, for four metals like silver, cobalt, chromium, and nickel, the tests were also conducted using a test solution extracted from powder in the cell culture medium. The embryotoxic potential was obtained from a biostatistics-based prediction model, which was calculated from three endpoints, the ID50, IC50ES and IC(50)3T3. Data with the standard reagents showed that chromium and mercury ions corresponded to class 3, that is, having a strong embryotoxicity, while antimony, tin, and vanadium ions exhibited a weak embryotoxicity. The other metal ions demonstrated no embryotoxicity. On the other hand, when extracts of metal powder in cell culture solutions were used, silver exhibited a weak embryotoxicity while all other metals exhibited no embryotoxicity. In the future, it will be important to clarify the embryotoxicity of the many dental materials that are in use today. In addition, it is necessary to develop substances to ensure they have no toxicity before use in dental applications.

  8. 4D embryonic cardiography using gated optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Rothenberg, F.; Roy, D.; Nikolski, V. P.; Hu, Z.; Watanabe, M.; Wilson, D. L.; Efimov, I. R.; Rollins, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of very early embryonic heart structure and function has technical limitations of spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a gated technique using optical coherence tomography (OCT) that can rapidly image beating embryonic hearts in four-dimensions (4D), at high spatial resolution (10-15 μm), and with a depth penetration of 1.5 - 2.0 mm that is suitable for the study of early embryonic hearts. We acquired data from paced, excised, embryonic chicken and mouse hearts using gated sampling and employed image processing techniques to visualize the hearts in 4D and measure physiologic parameters such as cardiac volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness. This technique is being developed to longitudinally investigate the physiology of intact embryonic hearts and events that lead to congenital heart defects.

  9. The New Federalism: State Policies Regarding Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Nefi D; Golub, Sidney H

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell policy in the United States is an amalgam of federal and state policies. The scientific development of human pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) triggered a contentious national stem cell policy debate during the administration of President George W. Bush. The Bush "compromise" that allowed federal funding to study only a very limited number of ESC derived cell lines did not satisfy either the researchers or the patient advocates who saw great medical potential being stifled. Neither more restrictive legislation nor expansion of federal funding proved politically possible and the federal impasse opened the door for a variety of state-based experiments. In 2004, California became the largest and most influential state venture into stem cell research by passing "Prop 71," a voter initiative that created a new stem cell agency and funded it with $3 billion. Several states followed suit with similar programs to protect the right of investigators to do stem cell research and in some cases to invest state funding in such projects. Other states devised legislation to restrict stem cell research and in five states, criminal penalties were included. Thus, the US stem cell policy is a patchwork of multiple, often conflicting, state and federal policies. PMID:27587447

  10. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. PMID:27475848

  11. The New Federalism: State Policies Regarding Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Nefi D; Golub, Sidney H

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell policy in the United States is an amalgam of federal and state policies. The scientific development of human pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) triggered a contentious national stem cell policy debate during the administration of President George W. Bush. The Bush "compromise" that allowed federal funding to study only a very limited number of ESC derived cell lines did not satisfy either the researchers or the patient advocates who saw great medical potential being stifled. Neither more restrictive legislation nor expansion of federal funding proved politically possible and the federal impasse opened the door for a variety of state-based experiments. In 2004, California became the largest and most influential state venture into stem cell research by passing "Prop 71," a voter initiative that created a new stem cell agency and funded it with $3 billion. Several states followed suit with similar programs to protect the right of investigators to do stem cell research and in some cases to invest state funding in such projects. Other states devised legislation to restrict stem cell research and in five states, criminal penalties were included. Thus, the US stem cell policy is a patchwork of multiple, often conflicting, state and federal policies.

  12. Using endophenotypes to examine molecules related to candidate genes as novel therapeutics: The "endophenotype-associated surrogate endpoint (EASE)" concept.

    PubMed

    Yamasue, Hidenori

    2015-10-01

    In this article, a new concept of an "endophenotype-associated surrogate endpoint (EASE)" is proposed. To examine effect of a novel therapeutic molecule on a target phenotype of a genotype associated with the molecule, state-dependent aspect of an endophenotype can be used as a surrogate endpoint. Desired characteristics for EASE are (1) a close relationship to the endophenotype associated with therapeutics, (2) longitudinal changes in illness severity, while the original "endophenotype" is primarily state independent, (3) a physical sign or laboratory measurement that occurs in association with a pathological process and has putative diagnostic and/or prognostic utility, and (4) serves as a substitute for a clinically meaningful endpoint. Advantages are expected for both surrogate endpoints in drug development and endophenotypes in uncovering pathogenesis. EASE are closer to molecules than clinically meaningful endpoints and can respond to administration of the molecule in a more direct manner. Therefore, a statistically significant effect is likely to be observed in clinical trials with smaller sample sizes and shorter durations. As with endophenotypes, reduced heterogeneity might be expected especially in heterogeneous syndromes such as psychiatric disorders. Potential interactions (e.g., elucidating biological mechanisms underlying novel treatments) can be further expected.

  13. Early Benefit Assessments in Oncology in Germany: How Can a Clinically Relevant Endpoint Not Be Relevant to Patients?

    PubMed

    Ruof, Jörg; Flückiger, Olivier; Andre, Niko

    2015-09-01

    After 4 years of early benefit assessment (EBA) in Germany, it is becoming evident that the Federal Joint Committee (FJC) frequently considers well-established clinical endpoints as not being relevant to patients. Focusing on assessments of oncology medicines, we analysed the FJC's view on primary endpoints and compared it with the approach used by regulatory authorities. Mortality data were accepted by both stakeholders. Whereas regulatory authorities accepted primary morbidity endpoints such as progression-free survival and response rates, the FJC mostly excluded these from its assessments. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data have been poorly reflected in the approval process; for EBAs, those data have rarely impacted on benefit ratings. We argue that agreement between regulatory authorities and the FJC is required regarding primary study endpoints that are relevant to patients, and that clarification of acceptable endpoints by the FJC, especially in the morbidity domain, has to be provided. Moreover, in order to fully acknowledge the benefit of a new medicinal product, mortality, morbidity and HRQoL should be weighted differentially, according to the condition. PMID:26286202

  14. Traditional and new composite endpoints in heart failure clinical trials: facilitating comprehensive efficacy assessments and improving trial efficiency.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Schroeder, Stefan; Atar, Dan; Bax, Jeroen J; Ceconi, Claudio; Cowie, Martin R; Crisp, Adam; Dominjon, Fabienne; Ford, Ian; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Gropper, Savion; Hindricks, Gerhard; Hlatky, Mark A; Holcomb, Richard; Honarpour, Narimon; Jukema, J Wouter; Kim, Albert M; Kunz, Michael; Lefkowitz, Martin; Le Floch, Chantal; Landmesser, Ulf; McDonagh, Theresa A; McMurray, John J; Merkely, Bela; Packer, Milton; Prasad, Krishna; Revkin, James; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Somaratne, Ransi; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Voors, Adriaan A; Ruschitzka, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Composite endpoints are commonly used as the primary measure of efficacy in heart failure clinical trials to assess the overall treatment effect and to increase the efficiency of trials. Clinical trials still must enrol large numbers of patients to accrue a sufficient number of outcome events and have adequate power to draw conclusions about the efficacy and safety of new treatments for heart failure. Additionally, the societal and health system perspectives on heart failure have raised interest in ascertaining the effects of therapy on outcomes such as repeat hospitalization and the patient's burden of disease. Thus, novel methods for using composite endpoints in clinical trials (e.g. clinical status composite endpoints, recurrent event analyses) are being applied in current and planned trials. Endpoints that measure functional status or reflect the patient experience are important but used cautiously because heart failure treatments may improve function yet have adverse effects on mortality. This paper discusses the use of traditional and new composite endpoints, identifies qualities of robust composites, and outlines opportunities for future research. PMID:27071916

  15. The zinc finger transcription factor 191 is required for early embryonic development and cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianzhong; Chen Xia; Yang Hua; Wang Shuiliang; Guo Baoyu; Yu Long; Wang Zhugang; Fu Jiliang . E-mail: fu825@mail.tongji.edu.cn

    2006-12-10

    Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191/ZNF24) was cloned and characterized as a SCAN family member, which shows 94% identity to its mouse homologue zinc finger protein 191 (Zfp191). ZNF191 can specifically interact with an intronic polymorphic TCAT repeat (HUMTH01) in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene. Allelic variations of HUMTH01 have been stated to have a quantitative silencing effect on TH gene expression and to correlate with quantitative and qualitative changes in the binding by ZNF191. Zfp191 is widely expressed during embryonic development and in multiple tissues and organs in adult. To investigate the functions of Zfp191 in vivo, we have used homologous recombination to generate mice that are deficient in Zfp191. Heterozygous Zfp191 {sup +/-} mice are normal and fertile. Homozygous Zfp191 {sup -/-} embryos are severely retarded in development and die at approximately 7.5 days post-fertilization. Unexpectedly, in Zfp191 {sup -/-} and Zfp191 {sup +/-} embryos, TH gene expression is not affected. Blastocyst outgrowth experiments and the RNA interference-mediated knockdown of ZNF191 in cultured cells revealed an essential role for Zfp191 in cell proliferation. In further agreement with this function, no viable Zfp191 {sup -/-} cell lines were obtained by derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells from blastocysts of Zfp191 {sup +/-} intercrosses or by forced homogenotization of heterozygous ES cells at high concentrations of G418. These data show that Zfp191 is indispensable for early embryonic development and cell proliferation.

  16. Adrenergic DNA damage of embryonic pluripotent cells via β2 receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan; Ding, Xu-Ping; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Yang, Xin-Jie; Teng, Lin; Zhang, Chun; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotent cells are sensitive to genotoxicity though they need more stringent genome integrity to avoid compromising multiple cell lineages and subsequent generations. However it remains unknown whether the cells are susceptible to adrenergic stress which can induce somatic cell genome lesion. We have revealed that adrenergic stress mediators cause DNA damage of the cells through the β2 adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signalling pathway involving an induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The adrenergic stress agonists adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline caused DNA damage and apoptosis of embryonic stem (ES) cells and embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The effects were mimicked by β2 receptor-coupled signalling molecules and abrogated by selective blockade of β2 receptors and inhibition of the receptor signalling pathway. RNA interference targeting β2 receptors of ES cells conferred the cells the ability to resist the DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition, adrenergic stimulation caused a consistent accumulation of ROS in the cells and the effect was abrogated by β2 receptor blockade; quenching of ROS reversed the induced DNA damage. This finding will improve the understanding of the stem cell regulatory physiology/pathophysiology in an adrenergic receptor subtype signalling mechanism. PMID:26516061

  17. The Roles of Parathyroid Hormone-Like Hormone during Mouse Preimplantation Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lei; Qi, Shu-Tao; Miao, De-Qiang; Liang, Xing-Wei; Li, Hui; Ou, Xiang-Hong; Huang, Xin; Yang, Cai-Rong; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Han, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-like hormone (PTHLH) was first identified as a parathyroid hormone (PTH)-like factor responsible for humoral hypercalcemia in malignancies in the 1980s. Previous studies demonstrated that PTHLH is expressed in multiple tissues and is an important regulator of cellular and organ growth, development, migration, differentiation, and survival. However, there is a lack of data on the expression and function of PTHLH during preimplantation embryonic development. In this study, we investigated the expression characteristics and functions of PTHLH during mouse preimplantation embryonic development. The results show that Pthlh is expressed in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos at all developmental stages, with the highest expression at the MII stage of the oocytes and the lowest expression at the blastocyst stage of the preimplantation embryos. The siRNA-mediated depletion of Pthlh at the MII stage oocytes or the 1-cell stage embryos significantly decreased the blastocyst formation rate, while this effect could be corrected by culturing the Pthlh depleted embryos in the medium containing PTHLH protein. Moreover, expression of the pluripotency-related genes Nanog and Pou5f1 was significantly reduced in Pthlh-depleted embryos at the morula stage. Additionally, histone acetylation patterns were altered by Pthlh depletion. These results suggest that PTHLH plays important roles during mouse preimplantation embryonic development. PMID:22808183

  18. Early embryonic intra-cardiac flow fields at three idealized ventricular morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Kerem; Jamaly, Mohammad; Kara, Burak; Keller, Bradley; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2009-11-01

    Pulsatile 3D multiple inlet/outlet flow within tiny (100-300μm dia) embryonic ventricles feature distinct intra-cardiac flow streams whose role in regulating the morphogenesis of spiral aorto-pulmonary septum has long been debated. The low Re number flow regimes limit mixing of these streams as replicated in our flow-visualization experiments with chick embryos. A state-of-the art high-resolution immersed boundary CFD solver which was developed for complex patient-specific cardiovascular internal flow problems is applied and optimized for this problem. Idealized tubular ventricles at 3 major embryonic stages (straight, C- and D- loops) are created by our sketch-based anatomical editing tool. CFD results are validated with PIV measurements acquired from a micro-fabricated C-loop stage replica and in vivo flow vis data from confocal microscopy. This model provided the inlet velocity profile for arterial models and flow fields at the inner curvature of embryonic hearts for different ventricular topologies are compared for off-design modes.

  19. Adrenergic DNA damage of embryonic pluripotent cells via β2 receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fan; Ding, Xu-Ping; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Yang, Xin-Jie; Teng, Lin; Zhang, Chun; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotent cells are sensitive to genotoxicity though they need more stringent genome integrity to avoid compromising multiple cell lineages and subsequent generations. However it remains unknown whether the cells are susceptible to adrenergic stress which can induce somatic cell genome lesion. We have revealed that adrenergic stress mediators cause DNA damage of the cells through the β2 adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signalling pathway involving an induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The adrenergic stress agonists adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline caused DNA damage and apoptosis of embryonic stem (ES) cells and embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The effects were mimicked by β2 receptor-coupled signalling molecules and abrogated by selective blockade of β2 receptors and inhibition of the receptor signalling pathway. RNA interference targeting β2 receptors of ES cells conferred the cells the ability to resist the DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition, adrenergic stimulation caused a consistent accumulation of ROS in the cells and the effect was abrogated by β2 receptor blockade; quenching of ROS reversed the induced DNA damage. This finding will improve the understanding of the stem cell regulatory physiology/pathophysiology in an adrenergic receptor subtype signalling mechanism. PMID:26516061

  20. Cadherin expression by embryonic divisions and derived gray matter structures in the telencephalon of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Redies, C; Medina, L; Puelles, L

    2001-09-24

    The expression of three cadherins (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was studied by immunohistochemistry in the telencephalon of chicken embryos at intermediate stages of development (11 and 15 days of incubation). Expression patterns were related to cytoarchitecture and to previously published data on functional connections and on the expression of gene regulatory proteins. Our results indicate that, like in other regions of the embryonic chicken brain, the expression of each cadherin is restricted to parts of embryonic divisions as well as to particular nuclei, areas or their subdivisions. The expression patterns are largely complementary with partial overlap. The regional expression of the cadherins respects the boundary between the pallium and the subpallium as well as between various pallial and subpallial subdivisions. Novel subdivisions were found in several telencephalic areas. For example, subjacent to the hyperstriatum, the neostriatum contains multiple islands of cells with a profile of cadherin expression that differs from the surrounding matrix ("island fields"). Moreover, the expression of each cadherin is apparently associated with parts of intratelencephalic neural circuits and of thalamopallial and basal ganglia pathways. These results support a role for cadherins in the aggregation and differentiation of gray matter structures within embryonic brain divisions. The cadherin immunostaining patterns are interpreted in the context of a recently proposed divisional scheme of the avian pallium that postulates medial, dorsal, lateral, and ventral divisions as complete radial histogenetic units (Puelles et al. [2000]).

  1. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcome Assessments as Endpoints in Studies in Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Powers, John H; Howard, Kellee; Saretsky, Todd; Clifford, Sarah; Hoffmann, Steve; Llorens, Lily; Talbot, George

    2016-08-15

    The goal of administering medical interventions is to help patients live longer or live better. In keeping with this goal, there has been increasing interest in taking the "voice" of the patient into account during the development process, specifically in the evaluation of treatment benefits of medical interventions, and use of patient-centered outcome data to justify reimbursement. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are outcome assessments (OAs) used to define endpoints that can provide direct evidence of treatment benefit on how patients feel or function. When PROs are appropriately developed, they can increase the efficiency and clinical relevance of clinical trials. Several PROs have been developed for OA in specific infectious diseases indications, and more are under development. PROs also hold promise for use in evaluating adherence, adverse effects, satisfaction with care, and routine clinical practice. PMID:27481954

  3. Probing electroweak physics for all B{yields}XM decays in the endpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Chay, Junegone; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.; Zupan, Jure

    2007-11-01

    Using soft-collinear effective theory we describe at leading order in 1/m{sub b} all the semi-inclusive hadronic B{yields}XM decays near the endpoint, where an energetic light meson M recoils against an inclusive jet X. Here we extend to the decays in which spectator quarks go into the jet X, and also include the decays involving {eta}, {eta}{sup '} mesons that receive additional contributions from gluonic operators. The predicted branching ratios and CP asymmetries depend on fewer hadronic parameters than the corresponding two-body B decays. This makes semi-inclusive hadronic B{yields}XM decays a powerful probe of the potential nonperturbative nature of charming penguins as well as a useful probe of new physics effects in electroweak flavor changing transitions. A comparison with B{yields}KX data from BABAR points to an enhanced charming penguin, albeit with large experimental errors.

  4. Elastic collisions of classical point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.

    2006-03-01

    Repeated elastic collisions of point particles on a finite frictionless linear track with perfectly reflecting endpoints are considered. The problem is analysed by means of an elementary linear algebra approach. It is found that, starting with a state consisting of a projectile particle in motion at constant velocity and a target particle at rest in a fixed known position, the points at which collisions occur on track, when plotted versus progressive numerals, corresponding to the collisions themselves, show periodic patterns for a rather large choice of values of the initial position x(0) and on the mass ratio r. For certain values of these parameters, however, only regular behaviour over a large number of collisions is detected.

  5. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  6. An information-theoretic approach for the evaluation of surrogate endpoints based on causal inference.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ariel; Van der Elst, Wim; Molenberghs, Geert; Buyse, Marc; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    In this work a new metric of surrogacy, the so-called individual causal association (ICA), is introduced using information-theoretic concepts and a causal inference model for a binary surrogate and true endpoint. The ICA has a simple and appealing interpretation in terms of uncertainty reduction and, in some scenarios, it seems to provide a more coherent assessment of the validity of a surrogate than existing measures. The identifiability issues are tackled using a two-step procedure. In the first step, the region of the parametric space of the distribution of the potential outcomes, compatible with the data at hand, is geometrically characterized. Further, in a second step, a Monte Carlo approach is proposed to study the behavior of the ICA on the previous region. The method is illustrated using data from the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study. A newly developed and user-friendly R package Surrogate is provided to carry out the evaluation exercise. PMID:26864244

  7. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies. PMID:27579862

  8. Endpoint Refinement for Total Body Irradiation of C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nunamaker, Elizabeth A; Artwohl, James E; Anderson, Robert J; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome is a life-threatening condition that has the potential to affect large populations of humans. Although several animal models of this syndrome are available, the total-body–irradiated mouse has emerged as an important tool to evaluate the efficacy of prospective prophylaxis, mitigation, and treatment compounds. Despite the widespread use of this model, humane endpoints have not been clearly identified. To address this issue, we developed a cageside observation-based scoring system specifically for total-body–irradiated mice to assess the progression of clinical signs associated with acute radiation syndrome. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 175; age, 8 to 9 wk) received an anticipated LD50 dose of radiation and were observed for progression of clinical signs of acute radiation syndrome for 30 d. All mice were scored individually through cageside observation of their body posture (score, 0 to 3), eye appearance (0 to 3), and activity level (0 to 3). Retrospective analysis of the score data indicated that death could be predicted accurately by using increasing cumulative scores (0 to 9). Total scores of 6, 7, 8, and 9 were associated with mortality rates of 78.6%, 86.4%, 93.3%, and 100%, respectively. Furthermore, scores of 6, 7, and 8 predicted death within 3, 1.5, and 0.5 d, respectively. The use of this scoring system provides investigators and IACUCs with predictive humane, surrogate endpoints for total-body–irradiated mice. This system allows preemptive euthanasia of mice before they become moribund, thereby minimizing pain and distress associated with acute radiation syndrome and improving animal welfare. PMID:23561934

  9. Multilevel ecotoxicity assessment of polycyclic musk in the earthworm Eisenia fetida using traditional and molecular endpoints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Xue, Shengguo; Zhou, Qixing; Xie, Xiujie

    2011-11-01

    The ecotoxicity assessment of galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) was investigated in the earthworm Eisenia fetida using traditional and novel molecular endpoints. The median lethal concentration (LC(50)) for 7-day and 14-day exposures was 573.2 and 436.3 μg g(-1) for AHTN, and 489.0 and 392.4 μg g(-1) for HHCB, respectively. There was no observed significant effect on the growth rate of E. fetida after a 28-day exposure except that at the highest concentration (100 μg g(-1)) of AHTN and HHCB, whereas a significant decrease of cocoon production was found in earthworms exposed to 50 and 100 μg g(-1). To assess molecular-level effect, the expression of encoding antioxidant enzymes and stress protein genes were investigated upon sublethal exposures using the quantitative real time PCR assay. The expression level of SOD, CAT and calreticulin genes was up-regulated significantly, while the level of annetocin (ANN) and Hsp70 gene expression was down-regulated in E. fetida. Importantly, the level of ANN expression had a significant positive correlation with the reproduction rate of earthworms. Furthermore, the lowest observed effect concentration (LOECs) of ANN expression level was 3 μg g(-1) for AHTN and 10 μg g(-1) for HHCB, suggesting that ANN gene expression can serve as a more sensitive indicator of exposure to AHTN and HHCB than traditional endpoints such as cocoon production. The transcriptional responses of these genes may provide early warning molecular biomarkers for identifying contaminant exposure, and the data obtained from this study will contribute to better understand the toxicological effect of AHTN and HHCB.

  10. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Amory; Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6-14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2-4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies.

  11. Endpoints for therapeutic interventions in faecal incontinence: small step or game changer.

    PubMed

    Rao, S S C

    2016-08-01

    Faecal incontinence (FI) is common and its pathophysiology and treatments continue to evolve. However, a standard measure(s) for assessing its clinical outcome has been elusive. Consequently, over 100 measures and scoring systems, each with intrinsic biases have been reported. These include adequate relief or global satisfaction, ≥50% reduction in episodes or days without FI, quality of life (QOL), FI severity scales and composite indices. Earlier scales relied on the frequency and type of solid, liquid or flatus incontinence and effects on life style whereas newer scales have incorporated urgency, use of pads, antidiarrhoeals and amount of leakage, using prospective daily stool diaries or retrospective weekly or single point assessments. Such a plethora of measures have negatively impacted the assessment and outcome of clinical trials, and have made comparisons difficult. So, how does one sort out the grain from the chaff? In a provocative, post-hoc analysis published in this issue, the minimal clinically important difference, i.e. the smallest change detected by an instrument that is associated with a clinically meaningful change was used to assess FI endpoint. Based on this a ≥50% reduction in FI episodes is recommended as a clinically meaningful outcome measure when assessed by prospective stool diary, and it correlates with symptoms and severity. However, this requires further validation in multi-centre, longer duration and therapeutically effective clinical trial(s). Simultaneous assessment of coping strategies, QOL and psychosocial domains can provide further insights regarding the overall impact of treatments. This mini-review discusses the advances and controversies in defining meaningful FI endpoints.

  12. Predictors of Long‐term Clinical Endpoints in Patients With Refractory Angina

    PubMed Central

    Povsic, Thomas J.; Broderick, Samuel; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Shaw, Linda K.; Ohman, E. Magnus; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Smith, Peter K.; Alexander, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical outcomes in patients with refractory angina (RA) are poorly characterized and variably described. Using the Duke Database for Cardiovascular Disease (DDCD), we explored characteristics that drive clinical endpoints in patients with class II to IV angina stabilized on medical therapy. Methods and Results We explored clinical endpoints and associated costs of patients who underwent catheterization at Duke University Medical Center from 1997 to 2010 for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and were found to have advanced CAD ineligible for additional revascularization, and were clinically stable for a minimum of 60 days. Of 77 257 cardiac catheterizations performed, 1908 patients met entry criteria. The 3‐year incidence of death; cardiac rehospitalization; and a composite of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac rehospitalization, and revascularization were 13.0%, 43.5%, and 52.2%, respectively. Predictors of mortality included age, ejection fraction (EF), low body mass index, multivessel CAD, low heart rate, diabetes, diastolic blood pressure, history of coronary artery bypass graft surgery, cigarette smoking, history of congestive heart failure (CHF), and race. Multivessel CAD, EF<45%, and history of CHF increased risk of mortality; angina class and prior revascularization did not. Total rehospitalization costs over a 3‐year period per patient were $10 185 (95% CI 8458, 11912) in 2012 US dollars. Conclusions Clinically stable patients with RA who are medically managed have a modest mortality, but a high incidence of hospitalization and resource use over 3 years. These findings point to the need for novel therapies aimed at symptom mitigation in this population and their potential impact on health care utilization and costs. PMID:25637344

  13. Different damping responses explain vertical endpoint error differences between visual conditions.

    PubMed

    Hondzinski, Jan M; Soebbing, Chelsea M; French, Allyson E; Winges, Sara A

    2016-06-01

    Upright people making goal-directed movements in dark environments often vertically undershoot remembered target locations when compared to performances in illuminated environments. In this study, we wanted to determine whether influences of the gravitational pull and/or type of muscle activation could explain differences in vertical endpoint precision between movements to visually remembered target locations with and without allocentric cues available. We also used a simple damping model for movement trajectories to describe potential differences in behavior between visual conditions. Subjects performed straight arm pointing movements to REAL target locations or remembered target locations in darkness (DARK) or normal room lighting (LIGHT). Performances were made from UPRIGHT and INVERTED (upside down) body orientations. Starting arm position (UP by the ear; DOWN on the thigh) also varied so that eccentric or concentric muscle contractions for arm flexion or extension movements occurred primarily along the earth-fixed vertical either with or against the gravitational pull. Effects of visual condition (LIGHT, DARK), body orientation (UPRIGHT, INVERTED), starting arm position (UP, DOWN), and target level (Near, Middle, Far) on elevation endpoint errors revealed that subject's errors in the DARK were more negative than those in the LIGHT. Errors correlated well with movement displacement to reveal the common vertical undershooting bias in darkness exacerbated by inverting the body or requiring greater movement excursions. Although influences of gravitational pull and muscle activation type could not explain differences between visual conditions, modeling revealed critically damped behavior in the DARK and under-damped behavior in the LIGHT to indicate muscle energy dissipation without vision. PMID:26821319

  14. Toward early safety alert endpoints: exploring biomarkers suggestive of microbicide failure.

    PubMed

    Mauck, Christine K; Lai, Jaim Jou; Weiner, Debra H; Chandra, Neelima; Fichorova, Raina N; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Hillier, Sharon L; Archer, David F; Creinin, Mitchell D; Schwartz, Jill L; Callahan, Marianne M; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-11-01

    Several microbicides, including nonoxynol-9 (N-9) and cellulose sulfate (CS), looked promising during early trials but failed in efficacy trials. We aimed to identify Phase I mucosal safety endpoints that might explain that failure. In a blinded, randomized, parallel trial, 60 healthy premenopausal sexually abstinent women applied Universal HEC placebo, 6% CS or 4% N-9 gel twice daily for 13½ days. Endpoints included immune biomarkers in cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) and endocervical cytobrushes, inflammatory infiltrates in vaginal biopsies, epithelial integrity by naked eye, colposcopy, and histology, CVL anti-HIV activity, vaginal microflora, pH, and adverse events. Twenty women enrolled per group. Soluble/cellular markers were similar with CS and placebo, except secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) levels decreased in CVL, and CD3(+) and CD45(+) cells increased in biopsies after CS use. Increases in interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1, IL-1RA, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreases in SLPI were significant with N-9. CVL anti-HIV activity was significantly higher during CS use compared to N-9 or placebo. CS users tended to have a higher prevalence of intermediate Nugent score, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus and fewer gram-negative rods. Most Nugent scores diagnostic for bacterial vaginosis were in N-9 users. All cases of histological inflammation or deep epithelial disruption occurred in N-9 users. While the surfactant N-9 showed obvious biochemical and histological signs of inflammation, more subtle changes, including depression of SLPI, tissue influx of CD45(+) and CD3(+) cells, and subclinical microflora shifts were associated with CS use and may help to explain the clinical failure of nonsurfactant microbicides. PMID:23885658

  15. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  16. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Brunson, E.L.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Kemble, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    Short-term sediment toxicity tests that only measure effects on survival can be used to identify high levels of contamination but may not be able to identify marginally contaminated sediments. The objective of the present study was to develop a method for determining the potential sublethal effects of contaminants associated with sediment on the amphipod Hyalella azteca (e.g., reproduction). Exposures to sediment were started with 7- to 8-d-old amphipods. On day 28, amphipods were isolated from the sediment and placed in water-only chambers where reproduction was measured on day 35 and 42. Typically, amphipods were first in amplexus at about day 21 to 28 with release of the first brood between day 28 to 42. Endpoints measured included survival (day 28, 35, and 42), growth (as length and weight on day 28 and 42), and reproduction (number of young/female produced from day 28 to 42). This method was used to evaluate a formulated sediment and field-collected sediments with low to moderate concentrations of contaminants. Survival of amphipods in these sediments was typically >85% after the 28-d sediment exposures and the 14-d holding period in water to measure reproduction. Reproduction was more variable than growth; hence, more replicates might be needed to establish statistical differences among treatments. Previous studies have demonstrated that growth of H. azteca in sediment tests often provides unique information that can be used to discriminate toxic effects of exposure to contaminants. Either length or weight can be measured in sediment tests with H. azteca. However, additional statistical options are available if length is measured on individual amphipods, such as nested analysis of variance that can account for variance in length within replicates. Ongoing water-only studies testing select contaminants will provide additional data on the relative sensitivity and variability of sublethal endpoints in toxicity tests with H. azteca.

  17. Establishment of Early Endpoints in Mouse Total-Body Irradiation Model

    PubMed Central

    Gulani, Jatinder; King, Gregory; Hieber, Kevin; Chappell, Mark; Ossetrova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness (ARS) following exposure to ionizing irradiation is characterized by radiation-induced multiorgan dysfunction/failure that refers to progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems, the etiological agent being radiation damage to cells and tissues over time. Radiation sensitivity data on humans and animals has made it possible to describe the signs associated with ARS. A mouse model of total-body irradiation (TBI) has previously been developed that represents the likely scenario of exposure in the human population. Herein, we present the Mouse Intervention Scoring System (MISS) developed at the Veterinary Sciences Department (VSD) of the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) to identify moribund mice and decrease the numbers of mice found dead, which is therefore a more humane refinement to death as the endpoint. Survival rates were compared to changes in body weights and temperatures in the mouse (CD2F1 male) TBI model (6–14 Gy, 60Co γ-rays at 0.6 Gy min-1), which informed improvements to the Scoring System. Individual tracking of animals via implanted microchips allowed for assessment of criteria based on individuals rather than by group averages. From a total of 132 mice (92 irradiated), 51 mice were euthanized versus only four mice that were found dead (7% of non-survivors). In this case, all four mice were found dead after overnight periods between observations. Weight loss alone was indicative of imminent succumbing to radiation injury, however mice did not always become moribund within 24 hours while having weight loss >30%. Only one survivor had a weight loss of greater than 30%. Temperature significantly dropped only 2–4 days before death/euthanasia in 10 and 14 Gy animals. The score system demonstrates a significant refinement as compared to using subjective assessment of morbidity or death as the endpoint for these survival studies. PMID:27579862

  18. Syndecan-4 modulates the proliferation of neural cells and the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ning; Li, Hongda; Xiang, Bo; Qiao, Liangjun; He, Jiao; Ji, Yi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Siying; Lu, Ran; Li, Yu; Meng, Wentong; Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Mo, Xianming

    2016-01-01

    Syndecan-4 (Syn4), a single-pass transmembrane heparin sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG), plays significant role in the formation of focal adhesions and interacts with many growth factors to regulate cell migration and neural induction. Here, we show the new roles of syndecan-4(syn4) in zebrafish embryonic neurogenesis. Syn4 is broadly and dynamically expressed throughout the early stages of embryonic development. Knockdown of syn4 increases the expression of the marker genes of multiple types of neural cells. The increased expression of the marker genes is resulted from excessive proliferation of the neural cells. In addition, disrupting syn4 expression results in truncated and multiple aberrant branching of caudal primary (CaP) axons. Collectively, these data indicate that Syn4 suppresses the cellular proliferation during neurogenesis and is crucial for the formation of CaP axons during zebrafish embryogenesis. PMID:27143125

  19. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  20. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be. PMID:20579256

  1. Controlled, scalable embryonic stem cell differentiation culture.

    PubMed

    Dang, Stephen M; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Chen, Jinny; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Zandstra, Peter W

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are of significant interest as a renewable source of therapeutically useful cells. ES cell aggregation is important for both human and mouse embryoid body (EB) formation and the subsequent generation of ES cell derivatives. Aggregation between EBs (agglomeration), however, inhibits cell growth and differentiation in stirred or high-cell-density static cultures. We demonstrate that the agglomeration of two EBs is initiated by E-cadherin-mediated cell attachment and followed by active cell migration. We report the development of a technology capable of controlling cell-cell interactions in scalable culture by the mass encapsulation of ES cells in size-specified agarose capsules. When placed in stirred-suspension bioreactors, encapsulated ES cells can be used to produce scalable quantities of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a controlled environment.

  2. Compatibility of embryonic stem cells with biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Handschel, Jörg; Berr, Karin; Depprich, Rita; Naujoks, Christian; Kübler, Norbert R; Meyer, Ulrich; Ommerborn, Michelle; Lammers, Lydia

    2009-05-01

    Periodontal bone defects and atrophy of the jaws in an aging population are of special concern. Tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and biomaterials may offer new therapeutic options. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the compatibility of ESCs with biomaterials and the influence of biomaterials on the osteogenic gene expression profile.Therefore, ESCs are cultured with various biomaterials. The cytocompatibility of murine ESCs is measured regarding the proliferation of the cells on the materials by CyQUANT assay, the morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and the influence on the gene expression by real time PCR.The results show that insoluble collagenous bone matrix, followed by beta-tricalciumphosphate, is most suitable for bone tissue engineering regarding cell proliferation, and phenotype. The gene expression analysis indicates that biomaterials do influence the gene expression of ESCs.Our results provide new insight into the cytocompatibility of ESCs on different scaffolds.

  3. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Brignier, Anne C; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-02-01

    There are many types of stem cells. All share the characteristics of being able to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated progeny. Over the last decades, great excitement has been generated by the prospect of being able to exploit these properties for the repair, improvement, and/or replacement of damaged organs. However, many hurdles, both scientific and ethical, remain in the path of using human embryonic stem cells for tissue-engineering purposes. In this report we review current strategies for isolating, enriching, and, most recently, inducing the development of human pluripotent stem cells. In so doing, we discuss the scientific and ethical issues associated with this endeavor. Finally, progress in the use of stem cells as therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and various neurologic and immunohematologic disorders, and as vehicles for the delivery of gene therapy, is briefly discussed. PMID:20061008

  4. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be.

  5. Embryonic stem cell neurogenesis and neural specification.

    PubMed

    Germain, Noélle; Banda, Erin; Grabel, Laura

    2010-10-15

    The prospect of using embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived neural progenitors and neurons to treat neurological disorders has led to great interest in defining the conditions that guide the differentiation of ESCs, and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), into neural stem cells (NSCs) and a variety of neuronal and glial subtypes. Over the past decade, researchers have looked to the embryo to guide these studies, applying what we know about the signaling events that direct neural specification during development. This has led to the design of a number of protocols that successfully promote ESC neurogenesis, terminating with the production of neurons and glia with diverse regional addresses and functional properties. These protocols demonstrate that ESCs undergo neural specification in two, three, and four dimensions, mimicking the cell-cell interactions, patterning, and timing that characterizes the in vivo process. We therefore propose that these in vitro systems can be used to examine the molecular regulation of neural specification.

  6. Deciding on human embryonic stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Eileen

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines the influences that congressional staff people viewed as important in shaping legislators' voting decisions on the human embryonic stem (ES) cell research bill in the 109th Congress, the first legislation vetoed by President George W. Bush. The analysis illuminates factors that impact congressional decision making on a salient issue with a strong moral component. Constituent concerns, ideology, and a desire to make good public policy all centrally affected members' choices; however, moral overtones permeated considerations relevant to the human ES cell research question. In addition, at least three influences that directly reflect or relate to members' moral claims - religious convictions, personal connections to potential beneficiaries of human ES cell research, and moral pressure from outside interests - were important also. The analysis draws on data gathered from interviews with congressional aides.

  7. Functional analysis of Scr during embryonic and post-embryonic development in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hrycaj, Steven; Chesebro, John; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2010-05-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana represents a basal insect lineage that undergoes the ancestral hemimetabolous mode of development. Here, we examine the embryonic and post-embryonic functions of the hox gene Scr in Periplaneta as a way of better understanding the roles of this gene in the evolution of insect body plans. During embryogenesis, Scr function is strictly limited to the head with no role in the prothorax. This indicates that the ancestral embryonic function of Scr was likely restricted to the head, and that the posterior expansion of expression in the T1 legs may have preceded any apparent gain of function during evolution. In addition, Scr plays a pivotal role in the formation of the dorsal ridge, a structure that separates the head and thorax in all insects. This is evidenced by the presence of a supernumerary segment that occurs between the labial and T1 segments of RNAiScr first nymphs and is attributed to an alteration in engrailed (en) expression. The fact that similar Scr phenotypes are observed in Tribolium but not in Drosophila or Oncopeltus reveals the presence of lineage-specific variation in the genetic architecture that controls the formation of the dorsal ridge. In direct contrast to the embryonic roles, Scr has no function in the head region during post-embryogenesis in Periplaneta, and instead, strictly acts to provide identity to the T1 segment. Furthermore, the strongest Periplaneta RNAiScr phenotypes develop ectopic wing-like tissue that originates from the posterior region of the prothoracic segment. This finding provides a novel insight into the current debate on the morphological origin of insect wings.

  8. An assay for permeability of the zebrafish embryonic neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica T; Sive, Hazel

    2012-10-24

    The brain ventricular system is conserved among vertebrates and is composed of a series of interconnected cavities called brain ventricles, which form during the earliest stages of brain development and are maintained throughout the animal's life. The brain ventricular system is found in vertebrates, and the ventricles develop after neural tube formation, when the central lumen fills with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (1,2). CSF is a protein rich fluid that is essential for normal brain development and function(3-6). In zebrafish, brain ventricle inflation begins at approximately 18 hr post fertilization (hpf), after the neural tube is closed. Multiple processes are associated with brain ventricle formation, including formation of a neuroepithelium, tight junction formation that regulates permeability and CSF production. We showed that the Na,K-ATPase is required for brain ventricle inflation, impacting all these processes (7,8), while claudin 5a is necessary for tight junction formation (9). Additionally, we showed that "relaxation" of the embryonic neuroepithelium, via inhibition of myosin, is associated with brain ventricle inflation. To investigate the regulation of permeability during zebrafish brain ventricle inflation, we developed a ventricular dye retention assay. This method uses brain ventricle injection in a living zebrafish embryo, a technique previously developed in our lab(10), to fluorescently label the cerebrospinal fluid. Embryos are then imaged over time as the fluorescent dye moves through the brain ventricles and neuroepithelium. The distance the dye front moves away from the basal (non-luminal) side of the neuroepithelium over time is quantified and is a measure of neuroepithelial permeability (Figure 1). We observe that dyes 70 kDa and smaller will move through the neuroepithelium and can be detected outside the embryonic zebrafish brain at 24 hpf (Figure 2). This dye retention assay can be used to analyze neuroepithelial permeability in a

  9. [Microenvironment effect of APA microcapsule on embryonic stem cell].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Wei; Ma, Juan; Guo, Xin; Yu, Xing-Ju; Qiu, Ze-Wen; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2005-12-25

    We undertook a series of studies to evaluate the role of microenvironment during embryonic stem cell (ESC) proliferation and differentiation. In this paper, cell microencapsulation technology was employed, which allows the free exchange of nutrients, oxygen and biologically active products between the entrapped cell and culture medium. We analyzed the feasibility of mouse ESCs in microcapsules and evaluated the growth, metabolic activity and differentiation of ESCs once enclosed in alginate-Ca(2+) microbead, solid or liquefied core alginate-poly-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsule, respectively. We found that ESCs grew gradually in both types of microcapsules, but the appearance of cells was distinctive for each type of capsule. In the case of unliquefied microcapsules, cells created multiple spherical or lens-shaped aggregates. In contrast, the liquefied alginate core allowed the enclosed ESCs to grow together in a clump at the periphery of the capsule. Combined with cell viability and activity of glucose/lactic acid metabolism, the liquefied core of APA might provide more suitable culture conditions for the ESC growth in comparison with the unliquefied type or alginate-Ca(2+). For better evaluating the nature of ESC growth in APA microcapsules in vitro (that is whether or not encapsulated ESCs maintained undifferentiated state while they kept the ability for proliferation), the expression of the typical markers for undifferentiated, dividing ESCs, such as the stage specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1) and alkaline phosphatase (AP), was detected by immunochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. The results showed that cell aggregates formed in the microcapsule still expressed the marker proteins at a higher level on day 22 in vitro. The expression of gene Oct-4, a transcription factor necessary for maintaining ESCs in an undifferentiated state, was also detected when RT-PCR assay was employed (on day 22 in vitro). In addition, cell aggregates were released from

  10. Embryonic development of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Donoughe, Seth; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-03-01

    Extensive research into Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis has improved our understanding of insect developmental mechanisms. However, Drosophila development is thought to be highly divergent from that of the ancestral insect and arthropod in many respects. We therefore need alternative models for arthopod development that are likely to be more representative of basally-branching clades. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is such a model, and currently has the most sophisticated functional genetic toolkit of any hemimetabolous insect. The existing cricket embryonic staging system is fragmentary, and it is based on morphological landmarks that are not easily visible on a live, undissected egg. To address this problem, here we present a complementary set of "egg stages" that serve as a guide for identifying the developmental progress of a cricket embryo from fertilization to hatching, based solely on the external appearance of the egg. These stages were characterized using a combination of brightfield timelapse microscopy, timed brightfield micrographs, confocal microscopy, and measurements of egg dimensions. These egg stages are particularly useful in experiments that involve egg injection (including RNA interference, targeted genome modification, and transgenesis), as injection can alter the speed of development, even in control treatments. We also use 3D reconstructions of fixed embryo preparations to provide a comprehensive description of the morphogenesis and anatomy of the cricket embryo during embryonic rudiment assembly, germ band formation, elongation, segmentation, and appendage formation. Finally, we aggregate and schematize a variety of published developmental gene expression patterns. This work will facilitate further studies on G. bimaculatus development, and serve as a useful point of reference for other studies of wild type and experimentally manipulated insect development in fields from evo-devo to disease vector and pest management. PMID:25907229

  11. A logrank test-based method for sizing clinical trials with two co-primary time-to-event endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Tomoyuki; Sozu, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss sample size determination for clinical trials evaluating the joint effects of an intervention on two potentially correlated co-primary time-to-event endpoints. For illustration, we consider the most common case, a comparison of two randomized groups, and use typical copula families to model the bivariate endpoints. A correlation structure of the bivariate logrank statistic is specified to account for the correlation among the endpoints, although the between-group comparison is performed using the univariate logrank statistic. We propose methods to calculate the required sample size to compare the two groups and evaluate the performance of the methods and the behavior of required sample sizes via simulation. PMID:23307913

  12. Titration of human-bovine rotavirus reassortants using a tetrazolium-based colorimetric end-point dilution assay.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, D J; Gould, S L; Munshi, S; Robinson, D K

    1995-10-01

    A colorimetric end-point dilution assay was developed for the titration of rotavirus-containing samples that uses commercially available tetrazolium dyes as an indicator of virus infection. This assay offers several advantages over both plaque assays and traditional end-point dilution methods. The latter assays require manual counting of plaques or the scoring of wells for the presence of virus based on observed cytopathic effects. The colorimetric end-point dilution assay enables the scoring of wells based upon absorbance readings alone, thereby eliminating time-consuming and subjective manual screenings. This method also has the potential for automating the analysis of large numbers of samples. Virus titers of human-bovine rotavirus reassortants obtained using this method are comparable to those determined by plaque assay. The scoring of wells based on absorbance readings was also found to agree with manual scoring of cytopathic effects and with the production of viral antigen.

  13. Human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells have overlapping and distinct metabolic signatures.

    PubMed

    Abu Dawud, Raed; Schreiber, Kerstin; Schomburg, Dietmar; Adjaye, James

    2012-01-01

    While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) have been studied extensively at the levels of the genome, transcriptome, proteome and epigenome our knowledge of their corresponding metabolomes is limited. Here, we present the metabolic signatures of hESCs and hESCs obtained by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Whilst some metabolites are common to both cell types, representing the self-renewal and house-keeping signatures, others were either higher (e.g., octadecenoic acid, glycerol-3-phosphate, 4-hydroxyproline) or lower (e.g., glutamic acid, mannitol, malic acid, GABA) in hESCs (H9) compared to hECCs (NTERA2), these represent cell type specific signatures. Further, our combined results of GC-MS and microarray based gene expression profiling of undifferentiated and OCT4-depleted hESCs are consistent with the Warburg effect which is increased glycolysis in embryonic cells and tumor cells in the presence of O(2) while oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is impaired or even shut down. RNAi-based OCT4 knock down mediated differentiation resulted in the activation of the poised OXPHOS machinery by expressing missing key proteins such as NDUFC1, UQCRB and COX, increase in TCA cycle activity and decreased lactate metabolism. These results shed light on the metabolite layer of pluripotent stem cells and could potentially establish novel metabolic markers of self renewal and pluripotency. PMID:22768158

  14. Human embryonic stem cells and embryonal carcinoma cells have overlapping and distinct metabolic signatures.

    PubMed

    Abu Dawud, Raed; Schreiber, Kerstin; Schomburg, Dietmar; Adjaye, James

    2012-01-01

    While human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human embryonal carcinoma cells (hECCs) have been studied extensively at the levels of the genome, transcriptome, proteome and epigenome our knowledge of their corresponding metabolomes is limited. Here, we present the metabolic signatures of hESCs and hESCs obtained by untargeted gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Whilst some metabolites are common to both cell types, representing the self-renewal and house-keeping signatures, others were either higher (e.g., octadecenoic acid, glycerol-3-phosphate, 4-hydroxyproline) or lower (e.g., glutamic acid, mannitol, malic acid, GABA) in hESCs (H9) compared to hECCs (NTERA2), these represent cell type specific signatures. Further, our combined results of GC-MS and microarray based gene expression profiling of undifferentiated and OCT4-depleted hESCs are consistent with the Warburg effect which is increased glycolysis in embryonic cells and tumor cells in the presence of O(2) while oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is impaired or even shut down. RNAi-based OCT4 knock down mediated differentiation resulted in the activation of the poised OXPHOS machinery by expressing missing key proteins such as NDUFC1, UQCRB and COX, increase in TCA cycle activity and decreased lactate metabolism. These results shed light on the metabolite layer of pluripotent stem cells and could potentially establish novel metabolic markers of self renewal and pluripotency.

  15. Motor adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements: endpoint but not trajectory adaptation transfers to the nonexposed arm.

    PubMed

    Dizio, P; Lackner, J R

    1995-10-01

    1. Reaching movements made in a rotating room generate Coriolis forces that are directly proportional to the cross product of the room's angular velocity and the arm's linear velocity. Such Coriolis forces are inertial forces not involving mechanical contact with the arm. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished at the onset of each reach. Prerotation subjects pointed with both the right and left arms in alternating sets of eight movements. During rotation at 10 rpm, the subjects reached only with the right arm. Postrotation, the subjects pointed with the left and right arms, starting with the left, in alternating sets of eight movements. 3. The initial perrotary reaching movements of the right arm were highly deviated both in movement path and endpoint relative to the prerotation reaches of the right arm. With additional movements, subjects rapidly regained straight movement paths and accurate endpoints despite the absence of visual or tactile feedback about reaching accuracy. The initial postrotation reaches of the left arm followed straight paths to the wrong endpoint. The initial postrotation reaches of the right arm had paths with mirror image curvature to the initial perrotation reaches of the right arm but went to the correct endpoint. 4. These observations are inconsistent with current equilibrium point models of movement control. Such theories predict accurate reaches under our experimental conditions. Our observations further show independent implementation of movement and posture, as evidenced by transfer of endpoint adaptation to the nonexposed arm without transfer of path adaptation. Endpoint control may occur at a relatively central stage that represents general constraints such as gravitoinertial force background or egocentric direction relative to both arms, and control of path may occur at a more peripheral stage that represents moments of inertia and muscle dynamics unique to each

  16. Motor adaptation to Coriolis force perturbations of reaching movements: endpoint but not trajectory adaptation transfers to the nonexposed arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. Reaching movements made in a rotating room generate Coriolis forces that are directly proportional to the cross product of the room's angular velocity and the arm's linear velocity. Such Coriolis forces are inertial forces not involving mechanical contact with the arm. 2. We measured the trajectories of arm movements made in darkness to a visual target that was extinguished at the onset of each reach. Prerotation subjects pointed with both the right and left arms in alternating sets of eight movements. During rotation at 10 rpm, the subjects reached only with the right arm. Postrotation, the subjects pointed with the left and right arms, starting with the left, in alternating sets of eight movements. 3. The initial perrotary reaching movements of the right arm were highly deviated both in movement path and endpoint relative to the prerotation reaches of the right arm. With additional movements, subjects rapidly regained straight movement paths and accurate endpoints despite the absence of visual or tactile feedback about reaching accuracy. The initial postrotation reaches of the left arm followed straight paths to the wrong endpoint. The initial postrotation reaches of the right arm had paths with mirror image curvature to the initial perrotation reaches of the right arm but went to the correct endpoint. 4. These observations are inconsistent with current equilibrium point models of movement control. Such theories predict accurate reaches under our experimental conditions. Our observations further show independent implementation of movement and posture, as evidenced by transfer of endpoint adaptation to the nonexposed arm without transfer of path adaptation. Endpoint control may occur at a relatively central stage that represents general constraints such as gravitoinertial force background or egocentric direction relative to both arms, and control of path may occur at a more peripheral stage that represents moments of inertia and muscle dynamics unique to each

  17. Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Cernohous, Bob R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-11-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a PAMI of a parallel computer is disclosed. The PAMI is composed of data communications endpoints, each including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications through the PAMI. The parallel application establishes a data communications geometry specifying a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI by associating with the geometry a list of collective algorithms valid for use with the endpoints of the geometry; registering in each endpoint in the geometry a dispatch callback function for a collective operation; and executing without blocking, through a single one of the endpoints in the geometry, an instruction for the collective operation.

  18. Hermes III endpoint energy calculation from photonuclear activation of 197Au and 58Ni foils

    SciTech Connect

    Parzyck, Christopher Thomas

    2014-09-01

    A new process has been developed to characterize the endpoint energy of HERMES III on a shot-to-shot basis using standard dosimetry tools from the Sandia Radiation Measurements Laboratory. Photonuclear activation readings from nickel and gold foils are used in conjunction with calcium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters to derive estimated electron endpoint energies for a series of HERMES shots. The results are reasonably consistent with the expected endpoint voltages on those shots.

  19. Screening of nanoparticle embryotoxicity using embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campagnolo, Luisa; Fenoglio, Ivana; Massimiani, Micol; Magrini, Andrea; Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles in many consumer products, rapid and economic tests for evaluating possible adverse effects on human health are urgently needed. In the present chapter the use of mouse embryonic stem cells as a valuable tool to in vitro screen nanoparticle toxicity on embryonic tissues is described. This in vitro method is a modification of the embryonic stem cell test, which has been widely used to screen soluble chemical compounds for their embryotoxic potential. The test offers an alternative to animal experimentation, reducing experimental costs and ethical issues.

  20. Ephrin-Eph signaling in embryonic tissue separation

    PubMed Central

    Fagotto, Francois; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Rohani, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    The physical separation of the embryonic regions that give rise to the tissues and organs of multicellular organisms is a fundamental aspect of morphogenesis. Pioneer experiments by Holtfreter had shown that embryonic cells can sort based on “tissue affinities,” which have long been considered to rely on differences in cell-cell adhesion. However, vertebrate embryonic tissues also express a variety of cell surface cues, in particular ephrins and Eph receptors, and there is now firm evidence that these molecules are systematically used to induce local repulsion at contacts between different cell types, efficiently preventing mixing of adjacent cell populations. PMID:25482630

  1. Cannabinoid Receptor-2 Regulates Embryonic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Development via Prostaglandin E2 and P-Selectin Activity.

    PubMed

    Esain, Virginie; Kwan, Wanda; Carroll, Kelli J; Cortes, Mauricio; Liu, Sarah Y; Frechette, Gregory M; Sheward, Lea M V; Nissim, Sahar; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E

    2015-08-01

    Cannabinoids (CB) modulate adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPCs) function, however, impact on the production, expansion, or migration of embryonic HSCs is currently uncharacterized. Here, using chemical and genetic approaches targeting CB-signaling in zebrafish, we show that CB receptor (CNR) 2, but not CNR1, regulates embryonic HSC development. During HSC specification in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, CNR2 stimulation by AM1241 increased runx1;cmyb(+) HSPCs, through heightened proliferation, whereas CNR2 antagonism decreased HSPC number; FACS analysis and absolute HSC counts confirmed and quantified these effects. Epistatic investigations showed AM1241 significantly upregulated PGE2 synthesis in a Ptgs2-dependent manner to increase AGM HSCs. During the phases of HSC production and colonization of secondary niches, AM1241 accelerated migration to the caudal hematopoietic tissue (CHT), the site of embryonic HSC expansion, and the thymus; however these effects occurred independently of PGE2. Using a candidate approach for HSC migration and retention factors, P-selectin was identified as the functional target of CNR2 regulation. Epistatic analyses confirmed migration of HSCs into the CHT and thymus was dependent on CNR2-regulated P-selectin activity. Together, these data suggest CNR2-signaling optimizes the production, expansion, and migration of embryonic HSCs by modulating multiple downstream signaling pathways.

  2. Thyroid Hormone-Otx2 Signaling Is Required for Embryonic Ventral Midbrain Neural Stem Cells Differentiated into Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhai; Ma, Qinglong; Chen, Xiaowei; Zhong, Min; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhiqi; Zhang, Kuan; Guo, Lu; Wang, Liting; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons are essential for maintaining multiple brain functions. These neurons have also been implicated in relation with diverse neurological disorders. However, how these neurons are developed from neuronal stem cells (NSCs) remains largely unknown. In this study, we provide both in vivo and in vitro evidence that the thyroid hormone, an important physiological factor for brain development, promotes DA neuron differentiation from embryonic ventral midbrain (VM) NSCs. We find that thyroid hormone deficiency during development reduces the midbrain DA neuron number, downregulates the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and the dopamine transporter (DAT), and impairs the DA neuron-dependent motor behavior. In addition, thyroid hormone treatment during VM NSC differentiation in vitro increases the production of DA neurons and upregulates the expression of TH and DAT. We also found that the thyroid hormone enhances the expression of Otx2, an important determinant of DA neurogenesis, during DA neuron differentiation. Our in vitro gene silencing experiments indicate that Otx2 is required for thyroid hormone-dependent DA neuron differentiation from embryonic VM NSCs. Finally, we revealed both in vivo and in vitro that the thyroid hormone receptor alpha 1 is expressed in embryonic VM NSCs. Furthermore, it participates in the effects of thyroid hormone-induced Otx2 upregulation and DA neuron differentiation. These data demonstrate the role and molecular mechanisms of how the thyroid hormone regulates DA neuron differentiation from embryonic VM NSCs, particularly providing new mechanisms and a potential strategy for generating dopamine neurons from NSCs.

  3. Nutrient reference value: non-communicable disease endpoints--a conference report.

    PubMed

    Lupton, J R; Blumberg, J B; L'Abbe, M; LeDoux, M; Rice, H B; von Schacky, C; Yaktine, A; Griffiths, J C

    2016-03-01

    scientific evidence does exist to confirm a relationship between the intake of a specific bioactive constituent and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of a chronic disease. Further, research on the putative mechanisms of action of various classes of bioactives is supported by national and pan-national government agencies, and academic institutions, as well as functional food and dietary supplement manufacturers. Consumers are becoming educated and are seeking to purchase products containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects or to avoid exceeding the upper level (UL). When one lacks an essential nutrient, overt deficiency with concomitant physiological determents and eventually death are expected. The absence of bioactive substances from the diet results in suboptimal health, e.g., poor cellular and/or physiological function, which is relative and not absolute. Regrettably at this time, there is no DRI process to evaluate bioactives, although a recent workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health (Options for Consideration of Chronic Disease Endpoints for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs); March 10-11, 2015; http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dri/ ) did explore the process to develop DVs for nutrients, the lack of which result in increased risk of chronic disease (non-communicable disease) endpoints. A final report is expected soon. This conference (CRN-International Scientific Symposium; "Nutrient Reference Value-Non-Communicable Disease (NRV-NCD) Endpoints," 20 November in Kronberg, Germany; http://www.crn-i.ch/2015symposium/ ) explores concepts related to the Codex NRV process, the public health opportunities in setting NRVs for bioactive constituents, and further research and details on the specific class of bioactives, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (also termed omega-3 fatty

  4. Nutrient reference value: non-communicable disease endpoints--a conference report.

    PubMed

    Lupton, J R; Blumberg, J B; L'Abbe, M; LeDoux, M; Rice, H B; von Schacky, C; Yaktine, A; Griffiths, J C

    2016-03-01

    scientific evidence does exist to confirm a relationship between the intake of a specific bioactive constituent and enhanced health conditions or reduced risk of a chronic disease. Further, research on the putative mechanisms of action of various classes of bioactives is supported by national and pan-national government agencies, and academic institutions, as well as functional food and dietary supplement manufacturers. Consumers are becoming educated and are seeking to purchase products containing bioactives, yet there is no evaluative process in place to let the public know how strong the science is behind the benefits or the quantitative amounts needed to achieve these beneficial health effects or to avoid exceeding the upper level (UL). When one lacks an essential nutrient, overt deficiency with concomitant physiological determents and eventually death are expected. The absence of bioactive substances from the diet results in suboptimal health, e.g., poor cellular and/or physiological function, which is relative and not absolute. Regrettably at this time, there is no DRI process to evaluate bioactives, although a recent workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health (Options for Consideration of Chronic Disease Endpoints for Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs); March 10-11, 2015; http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dri/ ) did explore the process to develop DVs for nutrients, the lack of which result in increased risk of chronic disease (non-communicable disease) endpoints. A final report is expected soon. This conference (CRN-International Scientific Symposium; "Nutrient Reference Value-Non-Communicable Disease (NRV-NCD) Endpoints," 20 November in Kronberg, Germany; http://www.crn-i.ch/2015symposium/ ) explores concepts related to the Codex NRV process, the public health opportunities in setting NRVs for bioactive constituents, and further research and details on the specific class of bioactives, n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (also termed omega-3 fatty

  5. Acute effects of a prooxidant herbicide on the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Screening cytotoxicity and genotoxicity endpoints.

    PubMed

    Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles; Herrero, Concepción; Rioboo, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Since recent evidence has demonstrated that many types of chemicals exhibit oxidative and/or genotoxic potential on living organisms, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and DNA damage are currently the best accepted paradigms to assess the potential hazardous biological effects of a wide range of contaminants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of different cytotoxicity and genotoxicity responses on the model microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to the prooxidant herbicide paraquat. In addition to the growth endpoint, cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed as potential markers of cytotoxicity using flow cytometry (FCM). To study the effects of paraquat on C. reinhardtii DNA, several genotoxicity approaches were implemented for the first time in an ecotoxicological study on microalgae. Oxidative DNA base damage was analysed by measuring the oxidative DNA lesion 8-OHdG by FCM. DNA fragmentation was analysed by different methods: comet assay, and cell cycle analysis by FCM, with a particular focus on the presence of subG1-nuclei. Finally, effects on morphology of nuclei were monitored through DAPI staining. The evaluation of these endpoints showed that several physiological and biochemical parameters reacted to oxidative stress disturbances with greater sensitivity than integrative parameters such as growth rates or cell viability. The experiments revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity (ROS formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane), genotoxicity (oxidative DNA damage, DNA strand breakage, alterations in nuclear morphology), and cell cycle disturbances (subG1-nuclei, decrease of 4N population) in paraquat-treated cells. Overall, the genotoxicity results indicate that the production of ROS caused by exposure to paraquat induces oxidative DNA damage followed by DNA single- and double-strand breaks and cell cycle alterations, possibly leading to apoptosis

  6. Timing of prenatal phthalate exposure in relation to genital endpoints in male newborns.

    PubMed

    Martino-Andrade, A J; Liu, F; Sathyanarayana, S; Barrett, E S; Redmon, J B; Nguyen, R H N; Levine, H; Swan, S H

    2016-07-01

    Prior studies report that penile size and male anogenital distance (AGD), sensitive markers of androgen action in utero, may be shortened by prenatal exposure to certain phthalates, including diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), but no human study has investigated the importance of exposure timing in these associations. The aim of this study was to examine the significance of exposure timing on the action of prenatal phthalates in particular DEHP, on male infant penile size and AGD. In The Infant Development and the Environment Study (TIDES) we measured penile width (PW) as well as anoscrotal distance (AGDAS ) and anopenile distance (AGPAP ) in newborn males. We modeled these endpoints in relation to phthalate metabolite concentrations in maternal urine samples collected in each trimester (T1, T2, and T3) in a subset of TIDES mothers (N = 168). PW was inversely associated with T2 oxidized DEHP metabolites, mono-2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl (MEOHP, β=-0.48; 95% confidence interval, -0.93, -0.02), MEHHP (-0.48; -0.92, -0.05), mono-2-ethyl-5-carboxypentyl (MECPP, -0.51; -1.01, -0.004), although no appreciable associations were seen between PW and T1 and T3 DEHP metabolite concentrations in this subset. Concentrations of DEHP metabolites in T1 urine samples were inversely related to male AGD. For example, in T1 samples in this subset of women mono-2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl (MEHHP) was inversely associated with male AGDAP (β = -1.73; 95% confidence interval, -3.45, 0.0004). However, no appreciable associations were seen between AGD measures and any DEHP metabolite in T2 and T3 samples. These data suggest that DEHP exposure is inversely associated with AGD and PW, with PW primarily associated with T2 exposure and AGD associations seen only for T1 exposure, but no associations were found between T3 DEHP metabolites and any of these genital endpoints. These findings are consistent with data on critical windows in rodent studies, supporting the biological plausibility of these

  7. A1 demonstrates restricted tissue distribution during embryonic development and functions to protect against cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Carrió, R.; López-Hoyos, M.; Jimeno, J.; Benedict, M. A.; Merino, R.; Benito, A.; Fernández-Luna, J. L.; Núñez, G.; García-Porrero, J. A.; Merino, J.

    1996-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 gene family are essential regulators of cell survival in a wide range of biological processes. A1, a member of the family, is known to be expressed in certain adult tissues. However, the precise tissue distribution and function of A1 remains poorly understood. We show here that A1 is expressed in multiple tissues during murine embryonic development. In the embryo, A1 was detected first at embryonic day 11.5 in liver, brain, and limbs. At day 13.5 of gestation, A1 expression was observed in the central nervous system, liver, perichondrium, and digital zones of developing limbs in a pattern different from that of bcl-X. In the central nervous system of 15.5-day embryos, A1 was expressed at high levels in the ventricular zone and cortical plate of brain cortex. Significantly, the interdigital zones of limbs and the intermediate region of the developing brain cortex, two sites associated with extensive cell death, were devoid of A1 and bcl-X. The expression of A1 was retained in many adult tissues. To assess the ability of A1 to modulate cell death, stable transfectants expressing different amounts of A1 protein were generated in K562 cells. Expression of A1 was associated with retardation of apoptotic cell death induced by actinomycin D and cycloheximide as well as by okadaic acid. Confocal microscopy showed that the A1 protein was localized to the cytoplasm in a pattern similar to that of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that the expression of A1 is wider than previously reported in adult tissues. Furthermore, its distribution in multiple tissues of the embryo suggests that A1 plays a role in the regulation of physiological cell death during embryonic development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8952545

  8. Sertad1 encodes a novel transcriptional co-activator of SMAD1 in mouse embryonic hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yin; Zhao, Shaomin; Song, Langying; Wang, Manyuan; Jiao, Kai

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •SERTAD1 interacts with SMAD1. •Sertad1 is expressed in mouse embryonic hearts. •SERTAD1 is localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. •SERTAD1 enhances expression of BMP target cardiogenic genes as a SMAD1 co-activator. -- Abstract: Despite considerable advances in surgical repairing procedures, congenital heart diseases (CHDs) remain the leading noninfectious cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the molecular/genetic mechanisms underlying normal cardiogenesis will provide essential information for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against CHDs. BMP signaling plays complex roles in multiple cardiogenic processes in mammals. SMAD1 is a canonical nuclear mediator of BMP signaling, the activity of which is critically regulated through its interaction partners. We screened a mouse embryonic heart yeast two-hybrid library using Smad1 as bait and identified SERTAD1 as a novel interaction partner of SMAD1. SERTAD1 contains multiple potential functional domains, including two partially overlapping transactivation domains at the C terminus. The SERTAD1-SMAD1 interaction in vitro and in mammalian cells was further confirmed through biochemical assays. The expression of Sertad1 in developing hearts was demonstrated using RT-PCR, western blotting and in situ hybridization analyses. We also showed that SERTAD1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of immortalized cardiomyocytes and primary embryonic cardiomyocyte cultures. The overexpression of SERTAD1 in cardiomyocytes not only enhanced the activity of two BMP reporters in a dose-dependent manner but also increased the expression of several known BMP/SMAD regulatory targets. Therefore, these data suggest that SERTAD1 acts as a SMAD1 transcriptional co-activator to promote the expression of BMP target genes during mouse cardiogenesis.

  9. Embryonic testicular regression sequence: A part of the clinical spectrum of 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Marcantonio, S.M.; Fechner, P.Y.; Migeon, C.J.; Perlman, E.J.; Berkovitz, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on a group of 9 subjects who had a 46,XY karyotype, ambiguous genitalia, abnormalities of sexual duct formation, and lack of gonadal tissue on one or both sides. This is sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}embryonic testicular regression.{close_quotes} Previous investigators have suggested that this condition results from loss of testes at a critical stage in development. The authors examined the possibility that embryonic testicular regression is part of the clinical spectrum of 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. Four subjects totally lacked gonadal tissue, three of them having ambiguous genitalia, and one a micropenis. The development of incongruous sexual ducts (presence of Muellerian ducts in the subject with micropenis, and absence of Muellerian and Wolffian ducts in two subjects with ambiguous genitalia) suggests that the embryonic gonads were intrinsically functionally abnormal before their disappearance. Five subjects had unilateral gonadal tissue, ambiguous genitalia, and a mix of Wolffian and Muellerian structures. The development of incongruous sexual ducts in 3 of them, the presence of ambiguous external genitalia in 5, and the presence of abnormal gonadal histology in 2 patients all indicate an underlying abnormality of gonadal differentiation in these subjects. The occurrence of testicular regression in several subjects in the family of one patient suggests a genetic basis for the condition. The presence of multiple congenital anomalies in other subjects in the study suggests either a mutation in a single gene that functions in several developmental pathways, or a defect of multiple genes that might be the result of a chromosome deletion. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was sequenced in five subjects and was normal in all of them, suggesting that the underlying genetic abnormality in these subjects is located in one of several genes that function subsequent to SRY in the early stages of testis differentiation. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called multiple pregnancy . If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each ... fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This ...

  11. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  12. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  13. 76 FR 35450 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Clinical Trial Endpoints for the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... the Approval of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... Cell Lung Cancer Drugs and Biologics.'' This draft guidance provides recommendations to applicants on... draft guidance for industry entitled ``Clinical Trial Endpoints for the Approval of Non-Small Cell...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS) TO PREDICT TOXICITY FOR A VARIETY OF HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A web accessible software tool is being developed to predict the toxicity of unknown chemicals for a wide variety of endpoints. The tool will enable a user to easily predict the toxicity of a query compound by simply entering its structure in a 2-dimensional (2-D) chemical sketc...

  15. Designing quantitative structure activity relationships to predict specific toxic endpoints for polybrominated diphenyl ethers in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Rawat, S; Bruce, E D

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are known as effective flame retardants and have vast industrial application in products like plastics, building materials and textiles. They are found to be structurally similar to thyroid hormones that are responsible for regulating metabolism in the body. Structural similarity with the hormones poses a threat to human health because, once in the system, PBDEs have the potential to affect thyroid hormone transport and metabolism. This study was aimed at designing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting toxic endpoints, namely cell viability and apoptosis, elicited by PBDEs in mammalian cells. Cell viability was evaluated quantitatively using a general cytotoxicity bioassay using Janus Green dye and apoptosis was evaluated using a caspase assay. This study has thus modelled the overall cytotoxic influence of PBDEs at an early and a late endpoint by the Genetic Function Approximation method. This research was a twofold process including running in vitro bioassays to collect data on the toxic endpoints and modeling the evaluated endpoints using QSARs. Cell viability and apoptosis responses for Hep G2 cells exposed to PBDEs were successfully modelled with an r(2) of 0.97 and 0.94, respectively. PMID:24738916

  16. A vision-based end-point control for a two-link flexible manipulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obergfell, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    The measurement and control of the end-effector position of a large two-link flexible manipulator are investigated. The system implementation is described and an initial algorithm for static end-point positioning is discussed. Most existing robots are controlled through independent joint controllers, while the end-effector position is estimated from the joint positions using a kinematic relation. End-point position feedback can be used to compensate for uncertainty and structural deflections. Such feedback is especially important for flexible robots. Computer vision is utilized to obtain end-point position measurements. A look-and-move control structure alleviates the disadvantages of the slow and variable computer vision sampling frequency. This control structure consists of an inner joint-based loop and an outer vision-based loop. A static positioning algorithm was implemented and experimentally verified. This algorithm utilizes the manipulator Jacobian to transform a tip position error to a joint error. The joint error is then used to give a new reference input to the joint controller. The convergence of the algorithm is demonstrated experimentally under payload variation. A Landmark Tracking System (Dickerson, et al 1990) is used for vision-based end-point measurements. This system was modified and tested. A real-time control system was implemented on a PC and interfaced with the vision system and the robot.

  17. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simanihuruk, Mudin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplication facts are difficult to teach. Therefore many researchers have put a great deal of effort into finding multiplication strategies. Sherin and Fuson (2005) provided a good survey paper on the multiplication strategies research area. Kolpas (2002), Rendtorff (1908), Dabell (2001), Musser (1966) and Markarian (2009) proposed the finger…

  18. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  19. Probing Embryonic Stem Cell Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling Using Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybyla, Laralynne; Voldman, Joel

    2012-07-01

    Although stem cell fate is traditionally manipulated by exogenously altering the cells' extracellular signaling environment, the endogenous autocrine and paracrine signals produced by the cells also contribute to their two essential processes: self-renewal and differentiation. Autocrine and/or paracrine signals are fundamental to both embryonic stem cell self-renewal and early embryonic development, but the nature and contributions of these signals are often difficult to fully define using conventional methods. Microfluidic techniques have been used to explore the effects of cell-secreted signals by controlling cell organization or by providing precise control over the spatial and temporal cellular microenvironment. Here we review how such techniques have begun to be adapted for use with embryonic stem cells, and we illustrate how many remaining questions in embryonic stem cell biology could be addressed using microfluidic technologies.

  20. Improved Oocyte Isolation and Embryonic Development of Outbred Deer Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Kyu; He, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the protocol for isolating cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from the outbred deer mice by using only one hormone (instead of the widely used combination of two hormones) with reduced dose. Moreover, we identified that significantly more metaphase II (MII) oocytes could be obtained by supplementing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and leukemia inhibition factor (LIF) into the previously established medium for in vitro maturation (IVM) of the COCs. Furthermore, we overcame the major challenge of two-cell block during embryonic development of deer mice after either in vitro fertilization (IVF) or parthenogenetic activation (PA) of the MII oocytes, by culturing the two-cell stage embryos on the feeder layer of inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in the medium of mouse embryonic stem cells. Collectively, this work represents a major step forward in using deer mice as an outbred animal model for biomedical research on reproduction and early embryonic development. PMID:26184014

  1. Preparation of embryonic retinal explants to study CNS neurite growth.

    PubMed

    Hanea, Sonia T; Shanmugalingam, Ushananthini; Fournier, Alyson E; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-05-01

    This protocol outlines the preparation of embryonic mouse retinal explants, which provides an effective technique to analyze neurite outgrowth in central nervous system (CNS) neurons. This validated ex vivo system, which displays limited neuronal death, is highly reproducible and particularly amenable to manipulation. Our previously published studies involving embryonic chick or adult mouse retinal explants were instrumental in the preparation of this protocol; aspects of these previous techniques were combined, adopted and optimized. This protocol thus permits more efficient analysis of neurite growth. Briefly, the retina is dissected from the embryonic mouse eye using precise techniques that take into account the small size of the embryonic eye. The approach applied ensures that the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer faces the adhesion substrate on coated cover slips. Neurite growth is clear, well-delineated and readily quantifiable. These retinal explants can therefore be used to examine the neurite growth effects elicited by potential therapeutic agents. PMID:27072342

  2. A toolbox to explore the mechanics of living embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Campàs, Otger

    2016-07-01

    The sculpting of embryonic tissues and organs into their functional morphologies involves the spatial and temporal regulation of mechanics at cell and tissue scales. Decades of in vitro work, complemented by some in vivo studies, have shown the relevance of mechanical cues in the control of cell behaviors that are central to developmental processes, but the lack of methodologies enabling precise, quantitative measurements of mechanical cues in vivo have hindered our understanding of the role of mechanics in embryonic development. Several methodologies are starting to enable quantitative studies of mechanics in vivo and in situ, opening new avenues to explore how mechanics contributes to shaping embryonic tissues and how it affects cell behavior within developing embryos. Here we review the present methodologies to study the role of mechanics in living embryonic tissues, considering their strengths and drawbacks as well as the conditions in which they are most suitable.

  3. Adult embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the ethmoid: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Rohaizam, J; Doris, E J Y H; Tang, P I; Lee, S C; Uchang, J

    2010-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is an exceedingly rare tumor in adult. We report an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the ethmoid in a 59-year-old Iban lady who presented with proptosis and complete ptosis of her left eye for two months. Imaging investigations showed left ethmoidal and left orbital soft tissue mass with extradura and dura involvement. The patient was planned for chemotherapy. Unfortunately, in such an advanced disease, she succumbed before treatment. PMID:23756807

  4. Human embryonic stem cell research: ethical and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    2001-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells to replace damaged cells and tissues promises future hope for the treatment of many diseases. However, many countries now face complex ethical and legal questions as a result of the research needed to develop these cell-replacement therapies. The challenge that must be met is how to permit research on human embryonic tissue to occur while maintaining respect for human life generally.

  5. Analysis of In-Situ Vibration Monitoring for End-Point Detection of CMP Planarization Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hetherington, Dale L.; Lauffer, James P.; Shingledecker, David M.; Stein, David J.; Wyckoff, Edward E.

    1999-05-14

    This paper details the analysis of vibration monitoring for end-point control in oxide CMP processes. Two piezoelectric accelerometers were integrated onto the backside of a stainless steel polishing head of an IPEC 472 polisher. One sensor was placed perpendicular to the carrier plate (vertical) and the other parallel to the plate (horizontal). Wafers patterned with metal and coated with oxide material were polished at different speeds and pressures. Our results show that it is possible to sense a change in the vibration signal over time during planarization of oxide material on patterned wafers. The horizontal accelerometer showed more sensitivity to change in vibration amplitude compared to the vertical accelerometer for a given polish condition. At low carrier and platen rotation rates, the change in vibration signal over time at fixed frequencies decreased approximately ½ - 1 order of magnitude (over the 2 to 10 psi polish pressure ranges). At high rotation speeds, the vibration signal remained essentially constant indicating that other factors dominated the vibration signaL These results show that while it is possible to sense changes in acceleration during polishing, more robust hardware and signal processing algorithms are required to ensure its use over a wide range of process conditions.

  6. Characterization of Kinetic Binding Properties of Unlabeled Ligands via a Preincubation Endpoint Binding Approach.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Nakayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-01

    The dissociation rates of unlabeled drugs have been well studied by kinetic binding analyses. Since kinetic assays are laborious, we developed a simple method to determine the kinetic binding parameters of unlabeled competitors by a preincubation endpoint assay. The probe binding after preincubation of a competitor can be described by a single equation as a function of time. Simulations using the equation revealed the degree of IC50 change induced by preincubation of a competitor depended on the dissociation rate koff of the competitor but not on the association rate kon To validate the model, an in vitro binding assay was performed using a smoothened receptor (SMO) and [(3)H]TAK-441, a SMO antagonist. The equilibrium dissociation constants (KI) and koff of SMO antagonists determined by globally fitting the model to the concentration-response curves obtained with and without 24 h preincubation correlated well with those determined by other methods. This approach could be useful for early-stage optimization of drug candidates by enabling determination of binding kinetics in a high-throughput manner because it does not require kinetic measurements, an intermediate washout step during the reaction, or prior determination of competitors' KI values. PMID:27270099

  7. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward; Hoskin, Peter; Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang; Lutz, Stephen; Roos, Daniel; Hahn, Carol; Linden, Yvette van der; Hartsell, William; Kumar, Eshwar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  8. Augmented case-only designs for randomized clinical trials with failure time endpoints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Under suitable assumptions and by exploiting the independence between inherited genetic susceptibility and treatment assignment, the case-only design yields efficient estimates for subgroup treatment effects and gene-treatment interaction in a Cox model. However it cannot provide estimates of the genetic main effect and baseline hazards, that are necessary to compute the absolute disease risk. For two-arm, placebo-controlled trials with rare failure time endpoints, we consider augmenting the case-only design with random samples of controls from both arms, as in the classical case-cohort sampling scheme, or with a random sample of controls from the active treatment arm only. The latter design is motivated by vaccine trials for cost-effective use of resources and specimens so that host genetics and vaccine-induced immune responses can be studied simultaneously in a bigger set of participants. We show that these designs can identify all parameters in a Cox model and that the efficient case-only estimator can be incorporated in a two-step plug-in procedure. Results in simulations and a data example suggest that incorporating case-only estimators in the classical case-cohort design improves the precision of all estimated parameters; sampling controls only in the active treatment arm attains a similar level of efficiency. PMID:26347982

  9. Sample preparation and characterization for a study of environmentally acceptable endpoints for hydrocarbon-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kreitinger, J.P.; Finn, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, the interdisciplinary research effort required to investigate the acceptable cleanup endpoints for hydrocarbon-impacted soils has been limited by the lack of standardized soils for testing. To support the efforts of the various researchers participating in the EAE research initiative, soil samples were collected from ten sites representing hydrocarbon-impacted soils typical of exploration/production, refinery, and bulk storage terminal operations. The hydrocarbons in the standard soils include crude oil, mixed refinery products, diesel, gasoline, and jet fuel. Physical characterization included analysis of soil texture, water retention, particle density, nanoporosity, pH, electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, buffer capacity, organic carbon, sodium adsorption ratio, and clay mineralogy. Chemical characterization included analysis of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons, total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds and metals, and TCLP for metals and organics. An analysis of the aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions was performed on each soil to support the use of various models for assessing soil toxicity. Screening-level toxicity tests were conducted using Microtox{trademark}, plant seed germination and growth, and earthworm mortality and growth. Biodegradability screening tests were performed in slurry shake flasks to estimate the availability of hydrocarbon fractions to soil microorganisms.

  10. Natural Gas Residual Fluids: Sources, Endpoints, and Organic Chemical Composition after Centralized Waste Treatment in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Getzinger, Gordon J; O'Connor, Megan P; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Drollette, Brian D; Karatum, Osman; Deshusses, Marc A; Ferguson, P Lee; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-07-21

    Volumes of natural gas extraction-derived wastewaters have increased sharply over the past decade, but the ultimate fate of those waste streams is poorly characterized. Here, we sought to (a) quantify natural gas residual fluid sources and endpoints to bound the scope of potential waste stream impacts and (b) describe the organic pollutants discharged to surface waters following treatment, a route of likely ecological exposure. Our findings indicate that centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTF) received 9.5% (8.5 × 10(8) L) of natural gas residual fluids in 2013, with some facilities discharging all effluent to surface waters. In dry months, discharged water volumes were on the order of the receiving body flows for some plants, indicating that surface waters can become waste-dominated in summer. As disclosed organic compounds used in high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) vary greatly in physicochemical properties, we deployed a suite of analytical techniques to characterize CWTF effluents, covering 90.5% of disclosed compounds. Results revealed that, of nearly 1000 disclosed organic compounds used in HVHF, only petroleum distillates and alcohol polyethoxylates were present. Few analytes targeted by regulatory agencies (e.g., benzene or toluene) were observed, highlighting the need for expanded and improved monitoring efforts at CWTFs.

  11. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  13. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna; Pacelli, Fabio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Ingrosso, Marcello; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  14. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for oilfield produced water treatment with environmentally acceptable endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zaib, Qammer; Aina, Oluwajinmi Daniel; Ahmad, Farrukh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were employed to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from low and high salinity water pre-equilibrated with crude oil. The treatment endpoint of crude oil-contaminated water is often controlled by BTEX compounds owing to their higher aqueous solubility and human-health toxicity compared to other hydrocarbons. The MWNT sorbent was extensively characterized and the depletion of the organic sorbate from the produced water was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses. The equilibrium sorptive removal of BTEX followed the order: ethylbenzene/o-xylene > m-xylene > toluene > benzene in the presence of other competing organics in produced water. Sorption mechanisms were explored through the application of a variety of kinetics and equilibrium models. Pseudo 2(nd) order kinetics and Freundlich equilibrium models were the best at describing BTEX removal from produced water. Hydrophobic interactions between the MWNTs and BTEX, as well as the physical characteristics of the sorbate molecules, were regarded as primary factors responsible for regulating competitive adsorption. Salinity played a critical role in limiting sorptive removal, with BTEX and total organic carbon (TOC) removal falling by 27% and 25%, respectively, upon the introduction of saline conditions. Results suggest that MWNTs are effective in removing risk-driving BTEX compounds from low-salinity oilfield produced water.

  15. Effects of male sexual maturity of reproductive endpoints relevant to DART studies in Wistar Hannover rats.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Ikuro; Creasy, Dianne M; Yokoi, Ryohei; Terashima, Yukari; Onozato, Tomoya; Maruyama, Yoshimasa; Chino, Tomonobu; Tahara, Toru; Tamura, Toru; Kuroda, Junji; Kusama, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Wistar Hannover rats have been utilized as one of major strains in regulatory toxicology studies. This study was performed to verify the appropriate age of male sexual maturity in the development and reproductive toxicity (DART) study in Wistar Hannover rats (RccHan:WIST) by comparing reproductive endpoints between 8, 10 and 12 weeks of ages. Although fertility showed a tendency toward decrease in 8-week-old males, copulation index was not different among three ages. Testis weights reached a plateau at 10 weeks of age, whereas weights of other reproductive organs developed until 12 weeks of age. Indices of spermatogenesis (sperm motility, number of sperm in the epididymis and testis and contents of morphologically abnormal sperm) showed age-related progress and did not fully develop except for 12-week-old. For histology, epididymal tubules in 8-week-old animals showed immaturity with tall epithelium. At cesarean section, dams mated with 8-week-old males showed high incidence of preimplantation loss and the number of live fetuses was less than 10. In conclusion, although reproductive performance attained maturity by age of 10 weeks, spermatogenesis was not fully established at 10-week-old, which could result in a low fertility index. Therefore, we recommend that Wistar Hannover male rats at 12-week-old or older are used to conduct DART study properly and evaluate any adverse effects on dams and embryo-fetal development. PMID:24646708

  16. Rethinking end-points for bone-targeted therapy in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez García, Susana; Clemons, Mark; Amir, Eitan

    2016-08-01

    The principal objective for any medical therapy is to improve either the duration of life and/or its quality. Metastases in bone can lead to clinically defined events termed skeletal-related events (SREs) which are a quantifiable measure of skeletal morbidity. Avoidance and/or delay of SREs have become the principal objective in trials exploring the efficacy of bone-targeted therapy in patients with skeletal metastases. Despite reductions in the frequency or rate of SRE occurrence, trials of bone-targeted therapy have failed to show any effect on either progression-free or overall survival when compared with placebo or other bone-targeting agents. Similarly, trials of bone-targeted therapy have not shown consistent effects on quality of life. The validity of SRE-based primary outcome measures in cancer clinical trials is therefore, questionable. More novel end-point selection for trials of bone-targeted therapy seems warranted. Composite measures comprising occurrence of symptomatic skeletal events and patient reported outcomes may be an effective solution and warrants further investigation. PMID:27299662

  17. Endpoints for sediment toxicity tests with the freshwater bivalve Sphaerium corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Looise, B.A.S.; Holwerda, D.A.; Foekema, E.M.

    1994-12-31

    Being a participant in the EU project `Sediment toxicity tests for poorly water soluble substances` the authors examined toxicological endpoints with the freshwater bivalve Sphaerium corneum. These included induction of two biotransformation enzymes, glutathione S-transferase and catalase, and survival time under anoxic stress. Animals were taken from the field and exposed to sediments spiked with contaminants or to contaminants in a water-only system. Also a field sediment from a contaminated area was included. Spiking substances were lindane, dieldrin, benzo[a]pyrene, and PCB. After 1--5 weeks of exposure to contaminated sediments or water, animals were examined for induction of the biotransformation enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase. GST activity in whole body soft tissue was measured spectrophotometrically by the amount of conjugate formed, using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate and glutathione as a co-substrate. Catalase activity was also measured spectrophotometrically by the transformation rate of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide. None of the treatments resulted in a significant increase of GST or catalase activities. After 2--5 weeks of exposure to contaminated sediment, the animals were transferred to individual 10-mL bottles. Results show significant decrease of survival times of animals exposed to contaminated sediments.

  18. Augmented case-only designs for randomized clinical trials with failure time endpoints.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Zhang, Xinyi Cindy; Wang, Ching-Yun; Kooperberg, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Under suitable assumptions and by exploiting the independence between inherited genetic susceptibility and treatment assignment, the case-only design yields efficient estimates for subgroup treatment effects and gene-treatment interaction in a Cox model. However it cannot provide estimates of the genetic main effect and baseline hazards, that are necessary to compute the absolute disease risk. For two-arm, placebo-controlled trials with rare failure time endpoints, we consider augmenting the case-only design with random samples of controls from both arms, as in the classical case-cohort sampling scheme, or with a random sample of controls from the active treatment arm only. The latter design is motivated by vaccine trials for cost-effective use of resources and specimens so that host genetics and vaccine-induced immune responses can be studied simultaneously in a bigger set of participants. We show that these designs can identify all parameters in a Cox model and that the efficient case-only estimator can be incorporated in a two-step plug-in procedure. Results in simulations and a data example suggest that incorporating case-only estimators in the classical case-cohort design improves the precision of all estimated parameters; sampling controls only in the active treatment arm attains a similar level of efficiency.

  19. Phagocytosis in earthworms: An environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess immunotoxic potential of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Giggleman, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Goven, A.J.; Venables, B.J.; Callahan, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Phagocytosis, a host-defense mechanism phylogenetically conserved throughout the animal kingdom, by earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) coelomocytes has potential as a surrogate for vertebrates to be used as an environmentally acceptable endpoint to assess sublethal immunotoxic risks of contaminated soils to environmental (eg. higher wildlife) and public health. Coelomocytes can be exposed in vivo to complex contaminated parent soils by placing earthworms in situ at hazardous waste sites (HWS) or into soil samples and their dilutions with artificial soil (AS) in the laboratory, or in vitro to soil extracts and their fractionations. Here the authors report on phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils from a wood treatment HWS, PCP-spiked AS and PCP treated filter paper (FP). HWS soil was diluted to 25% with AS to a sublethal concentration (ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1}) and earthworms exposed for 14d at 10 C under light conditions. AS was spiked at ca. 125 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP and earthworms were similarly exposed. Controls for both consisted of earthworms exposed to 100% AS. Earthworms were exposed to FP treated with a sublethal PCP concentration (15 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2}) at 10 C under dark conditions for 96H. Controls were similarly exposed without PCP. Phagocytosis by coelomocytes in earthworms exposed to HWS soil, spiked AS and treated FP was suppressed 37, 41 and 29%, respectively. Results are discussed in terms of PCP body burdens and exposure protocols.

  20. Biomarker driven population enrichment for adaptive oncology trials with time to event endpoints.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Cyrus; Schäfer, Helmut; Daniel, Hanna; Irle, Sebastian

    2014-11-20

    The development of molecularly targeted therapies for certain types of cancers has led to the consideration of population enrichment designs that explicitly factor in the possibility that the experimental compound might differentially benefit different biomarker subgroups. In such designs, enrollment would initially be open to a broad patient population with the option to restrict future enrollment, following an interim analysis, to only those biomarker subgroups that appeared to be benefiting from the experimental therapy. While this strategy could greatly improve the chances of success for the trial, it poses several statistical and logistical design challenges. Because late-stage oncology trials are typically event driven, one faces a complex trade-off between power, sample size, number of events, and study duration. This trade-off is further compounded by the importance of maintaining statistical independence of the data before and after the interim analysis and of optimizing the timing of the interim analysis. This paper presents statistical methodology that ensures strong control of type 1 error for such population enrichment designs, based on generalizations of the conditional error rate approach. The special difficulties encountered with time-to-event endpoints are addressed by our methods. The crucial role of simulation for guiding the choice of design parameters is emphasized. Although motivated by oncology, the methods are applicable as well to population enrichment designs in other therapeutic areas.

  1. Ozonation of diesel-fuel contaminated sand and the implications for remediation end-points.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; Cao, Xingtao; Wu, Guozhong; Temple, Tracey; Coulon, Frédéric; Sui, Hong

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we investigate specifically the influence of soil grain size and water content on the degradation of n-alkane fractions and the formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acid during ozonation. 15 g of quartz sand spiked with diesel (25 g kg(-1)) were exposed to ozone for 20 h at concentrations of 10, 30 and 50 mg L(-1), respectively. Results indicated that ozonation of the n-alkanes in fine grain size sand (0.15-0.25 mm) was 1.2 times faster than coarse sand due to higher surface contact area between O3 and sand particles. Soil moisture below 18% w/w did not influence the ozonation efficiency. In contrast the ozonation led to an increase of acidity of the sand samples (pH=3.0) after 20 h treatment. This was due to the formation of carboxylic acid. Formaldehyde, one of the key by-products of ozonation, was always <13 mg kg(-1) after the treatment which is below the industrial soil clean-up target level. While the aldehydes and carboxylic acid further reacted with O3 and their ozonation rate were slower than those of the alkanes suggesting that the hydroxylated by-products accumulated in the sand during the process. Overall the findings demonstrated that not only the alkanes but also aldehydes and carboxylic acid should be considered when defining remediation end-points.

  2. Natural Gas Residual Fluids: Sources, Endpoints, and Organic Chemical Composition after Centralized Waste Treatment in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Getzinger, Gordon J; O'Connor, Megan P; Hoelzer, Kathrin; Drollette, Brian D; Karatum, Osman; Deshusses, Marc A; Ferguson, P Lee; Elsner, Martin; Plata, Desiree L

    2015-07-21

    Volumes of natural gas extraction-derived wastewaters have increased sharply over the past decade, but the ultimate fate of those waste streams is poorly characterized. Here, we sought to (a) quantify natural gas residual fluid sources and endpoints to bound the scope of potential waste stream impacts and (b) describe the organic pollutants discharged to surface waters following treatment, a route of likely ecological exposure. Our findings indicate that centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTF) received 9.5% (8.5 × 10(8) L) of natural gas residual fluids in 2013, with some facilities discharging all effluent to surface waters. In dry months, discharged water volumes were on the order of the receiving body flows for some plants, indicating that surface waters can become waste-dominated in summer. As disclosed organic compounds used in high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) vary greatly in physicochemical properties, we deployed a suite of analytical techniques to characterize CWTF effluents, covering 90.5% of disclosed compounds. Results revealed that, of nearly 1000 disclosed organic compounds used in HVHF, only petroleum distillates and alcohol polyethoxylates were present. Few analytes targeted by regulatory agencies (e.g., benzene or toluene) were observed, highlighting the need for expanded and improved monitoring efforts at CWTFs. PMID:26147419

  3. Characterization of gene expression endpoints during postembryonic development of the northern green frog (Rana clamitans melanota).

    PubMed

    Hammond, S Austin; Veldhoen, Nik; Kobylarz, Marek; Webber, Nicholas R; Jordan, Jameson; Rehaume, Vicki; Boone, Michelle D; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-05-01

    Postembryonic development of a larval tadpole into a juvenile frog involves the coordinated action of thyroid hormone (TH) across a diversity of tissues. Changes in the frog transcriptome represent a highly sensitive endpoint in the detection of developmental progression, and for the identification of environmental chemical contaminants that possess endocrine disruptive properties. Unfortunately, in contrast with their vital role as sentinels of environmental change, few gene expression tools currently exist for the majority of native North American frog species. We have isolated seven expressed gene sequences from the Northern green frog (Rana clamitans melanota) that encode proteins associated with TH-mediated postembryonic development and global stress response, and established a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay. We also obtained three additional species-specific gene sequences that functioned in the normalization of the expression data. Alterations in mRNA abundance profiles were identified in up to eight tissues during R. clamitans postembryonic development, and following exogenous administration of TH to premetamorphic tadpoles. Our results characterize tissue distribution and sensitivity to TH of select mRNA of a common North American frog species and support the potential use of this qPCR assay in identification of the presence of chemical agents in aquatic environments that modulate TH action. PMID:23647014

  4. Clinical Trial Risk in Hepatitis C: Endpoint Selection and Drug Action

    PubMed Central

    Tillie, Nicole A.; Parker, Jayson L.; Feld, Jordan J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study analyzed the risk of clinical trial failure of new drugs for hepatitis C between January 1998 and January 2015. Methods. Hepatitis C drug development trials that were in phases I–III of clinical trial testing were obtained from the publicly accessible clinical trial repository and other publicly available databases. Drug compounds were excluded from the study if they began their phase I testing before 1998, if they were not industry sponsored, or if they treated secondary complications of hepatitis C. Clinical trial success rates were analyzed in comparison to industry expectations. Further analysis was conducted on the molecule classifications, the mechanisms of action, and the trial endpoints. Results. One hundred and twenty-three unique drug compounds were found to fulfill the inclusion criteria, eight of which had FDA approval. The overall cumulative pass rate for hepatitis C drugs was 20%, which is double the industry expectation rate. Viral inhibitor small molecule drugs significantly reduced the risk of drug failure during clinical trials compared to other mechanisms of action. Conclusion. On average, one in every five drugs that began clinical testing will be approved for market. Viral inhibitor small molecule drugs are the most promising and hold the least risk. PMID:27446855

  5. Prediction of organ toxicity endpoints by QSAR modeling based on precise chemical-histopathology annotations.

    PubMed

    Myshkin, Eugene; Brennan, Richard; Khasanova, Tatiana; Sitnik, Tatiana; Serebriyskaya, Tatiana; Litvinova, Elena; Guryanov, Alexey; Nikolsky, Yuri; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Bureeva, Svetlana

    2012-09-01

    The ability to accurately predict the toxicity of drug candidates from their chemical structure is critical for guiding experimental drug discovery toward safer medicines. Under the guidance of the MetaTox consortium (Thomson Reuters, CA, USA), which comprised toxicologists from the pharmaceutical industry and government agencies, we created a comprehensive ontology of toxic pathologies for 19 organs, classifying pathology terms by pathology type and functional organ substructure. By manual annotation of full-text research articles, the ontology was populated with chemical compounds causing specific histopathologies. Annotated compound-toxicity associations defined histologically from rat and mouse experiments were used to build quantitative structure-activity relationship models predicting subcategories of liver and kidney toxicity: liver necrosis, liver relative weight gain, liver lipid accumulation, nephron injury, kidney relative weight gain, and kidney necrosis. All models were validated using two independent test sets and demonstrated overall good performance: initial validation showed 0.80-0.96 sensitivity (correctly predicted toxic compounds) and 0.85-1.00 specificity (correctly predicted non-toxic compounds). Later validation against a test set of compounds newly added to the database in the 2 years following initial model generation showed 75-87% sensitivity and 60-78% specificity. General hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity models were less accurate, as expected for more complex endpoints.

  6. Phase transition in the vortex liquid and the critical endpoint in YBa2Cu3Oy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kenji; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Sasaki, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Norio

    2002-12-01

    The vortex phase diagram of optimally doped untwinned YBa2Cu3Oy is studied. We find a first-order transition TL(H) in the vortex liquid above the terminal point Hmcp (≃7 T) of both the vortex glass line Tg(H) and the field-driven disordering transition line H*(T). The obtained small entropy change (˜0.02 kB/vortex/layer) and the critical endpoint Hcep (≃11 T) of the TL(H) line indicate that the vortex liquid undergoes the vortex slush regime before the solidification into the vortex glass phase. Below Hmcp, the vortex liquid phase shows the first-order melting transition into the Bragg glass phase. We also study the oxygen content y dependence of the vortex phase diagram and find that the vortex slush regime is located in the borderline (i.e., 6.90⩽y⩽6.92) below which the vortex lattice melting transition disappears. The result indicates that the point disorder with the intermediate strength plays an important role in the vortex slush regime.

  7. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) for oilfield produced water treatment with environmentally acceptable endpoints.

    PubMed

    Zaib, Qammer; Aina, Oluwajinmi Daniel; Ahmad, Farrukh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were employed to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from low and high salinity water pre-equilibrated with crude oil. The treatment endpoint of crude oil-contaminated water is often controlled by BTEX compounds owing to their higher aqueous solubility and human-health toxicity compared to other hydrocarbons. The MWNT sorbent was extensively characterized and the depletion of the organic sorbate from the produced water was monitored by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and total organic carbon (TOC) analyses. The equilibrium sorptive removal of BTEX followed the order: ethylbenzene/o-xylene > m-xylene > toluene > benzene in the presence of other competing organics in produced water. Sorption mechanisms were explored through the application of a variety of kinetics and equilibrium models. Pseudo 2(nd) order kinetics and Freundlich equilibrium models were the best at describing BTEX removal from produced water. Hydrophobic interactions between the MWNTs and BTEX, as well as the physical characteristics of the sorbate molecules, were regarded as primary factors responsible for regulating competitive adsorption. Salinity played a critical role in limiting sorptive removal, with BTEX and total organic carbon (TOC) removal falling by 27% and 25%, respectively, upon the introduction of saline conditions. Results suggest that MWNTs are effective in removing risk-driving BTEX compounds from low-salinity oilfield produced water. PMID:24975808

  8. Existence of the critical endpoint in the vector meson extended linear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, P.; Szép, Zs.; Wolf, Gy.

    2016-06-01

    The chiral phase transition of the strongly interacting matter is investigated at nonzero temperature and baryon chemical potential (μB) within an extended (2 +1 ) flavor Polyakov constituent quark-meson model that incorporates the effect of the vector and axial vector mesons. The effect of the fermionic vacuum and thermal fluctuations computed from the grand potential of the model is taken into account in the curvature masses of the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons. The parameters of the model are determined by comparing masses and tree-level decay widths with experimental values in a χ2-minimization procedure that selects between various possible assignments of scalar nonet states to physical particles. We examine the restoration of the chiral symmetry by monitoring the temperature evolution of condensates and the chiral partners' masses and of the mixing angles for the pseudoscalar η -η' and the corresponding scalar complex. We calculate the pressure and various thermodynamical observables derived from it and compare them to the continuum extrapolated lattice results of the Wuppertal-Budapest collaboration. We study the T -μB phase diagram of the model and find that a critical endpoint exists for parameters of the model, which give acceptable values of χ2.

  9. Six proteins regulate the activation of Myf5 expression in embryonic mouse limbs

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Julien; Bajard, Lola; Demignon, Josiane; Daubas, Philippe; Buckingham, Margaret; Maire, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Myf5, a member of the myogenic regulatory factor family, plays a major role in determining myogenic cell fate at the onset of skeletal muscle formation in the embryo. Spatiotemporal control of its expression during development requires multiple enhancer elements spread over >100 kb at the Myf5 locus. Transcription in embryonic limbs is regulated by a 145-bp element located at −57.5 kb from the Myf5 gene. In the present study we show that Myf5 expression is severely impaired in the limb buds of Six1−/− and Six1−/−Six4−/+ mouse mutants despite the presence of myogenic progenitor cells. The 145-bp regulatory element contains a sequence that binds Six1 and Six4 in electromobility shift assays in vitro and in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with embryonic extracts. We further show that Six1 is able to transactivate a reporter gene under the control of this sequence. In vivo functionality of the Six binding site is demonstrated by transgenic analysis. Mutation of this site impairs reporter gene expression in the limbs and in mature somites where the 145-bp regulatory element is also active. Six1/4 therefore regulate Myf5 transcription, together with Pax3, which was previously shown to be required for the activity of the 145-bp element. Six homeoproteins, which also directly regulate the myogenic differentiation gene Myogenin and lie genetically upstream of Pax3, thus control hypaxial myogenesis at multiple levels. PMID:17592144

  10. Transcriptional profiling of regenerating embryonic mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Magarin, Manuela; Schulz, Herbert; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef

    2016-09-01

    The postnatal mammalian heart is considered a terminally differentiated organ unable to efficiently regenerate after injury. In contrast, we have recently shown a remarkable regenerative capacity of the prenatal heart using myocardial tissue mosaicism for mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. This model is based on inactivation of the X-linked gene encoding holocytochrome c synthase (Hccs) specifically in the developing heart. Loss of HCCS activity results in respiratory chain dysfunction, disturbed cardiomyocyte differentiation and reduced cell cycle activity. The Hccs gene is subjected to X chromosome inactivation, such that in females heterozygous for the heart conditional Hccs knockout approximately 50% of cardiac cells keep the defective X chromosome active and develop mitochondrial dysfunction while the other 50% remain healthy. During heart development the contribution of HCCS deficient cells to the cardiac tissue decreases from 50% at mid-gestation to 10% at birth. This regeneration of the prenatal heart is mediated by increased proliferation of the healthy cardiac cell population, which compensates for the defective cells allowing the formation of a fully functional heart by birth. Here we performed microarray RNA expression analyses on 13.5 dpc control and heterozygous Hccs knockout hearts to identify molecular mechanisms that drive embryonic heart regeneration. Array data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE72054. PMID:27583204

  11. Reproductive technologies and the porcine embryonic transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Dyck, M K; Zhou, C; Tsoi, S; Grant, J; Dixon, W T; Foxcroft, G R

    2014-09-01

    The domestic pig is not only an economically-important livestock species, but also an increasingly recognized biomedical animal model due to its physiological similarities with humans. As a result, there is a strong interest in the factors that affect the efficient production of viable embryos and offspring in the pig using either in vivo or in vitro production methods. The application of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has the potential to increase reproductive efficiency in livestock. These technologies include, but are not limited to: artificial insemination (AI), fixed-time AI, embryo transfer, cryopreservation of sperm/oocytes/embryos, in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning). However, the application of ART is much less efficient in the pig than in many other mammalian species such as cattle. Until recently, the underlying causes of these inefficiencies have been difficult to study, but advances in molecular biology techniques for studying gene expression have resulted in the availability of a variety of options for gene expression profiling such as microarrays, and next generation sequencing technologies. Capitalizing on these technologies the effects of various ARTs on the porcine embryonic transcriptome has been determined and the impact on the related biological pathways and functions been evaluated. The implications of these results on the efficiency of ARTs in swine, as well potential consequences for the developing embryo and resulting offspring, are reviewed.

  12. Embryonic Diapause Is Conserved across Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Ptak, Grazyna E.; Tacconi, Emanuela; Czernik, Marta; Toschi, Paola; Modlinski, Jacek A.; Loi, Pasqualino

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic diapause (ED) is a temporary arrest of embryo development and is characterized by delayed implantation in the uterus. ED occurs in blastocysts of less than 2% of mammalian species, including the mouse (Mus musculus). If ED were an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon, then it should be inducible in blastocysts of normally non-diapausing mammals, such as domestic species. To prove this hypothesis, we examined whether blastocysts from domestic sheep (Ovis aries) could enter into diapause following their transfer into mouse uteri in which diapause conditions were induced. Sheep blastocysts entered into diapause, as demonstrated by growth arrest, viability maintenance and their ED-specific pattern of gene expression. Seven days after transfer, diapausing ovine blastocysts were able to resume growth in vitro and, after transfer to surrogate ewe recipients, to develop into normal lambs. The finding that non-diapausing ovine embryos can enter into diapause implies that this phenomenon is phylogenetically conserved and not secondarily acquired by embryos of diapausing species. Our study questions the current model of independent evolution of ED in different mammalian orders. PMID:22427933

  13. The epigenomics of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kraushaar, Daniel C; Zhao, Keji

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) possess an open and highly dynamic chromatin landscape, which underlies their plasticity and ultimately maintains ESC pluripotency. The ESC epigenome must not only maintain the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes but must also, through gene priming, facilitate rapid and cell type-specific activation of developmental genes upon lineage commitment. Trans-generational inheritance ensures that the ESC chromatin state is stably transmitted from one generation to the next; yet at the same time, epigenetic marks are highly dynamic, reversible and responsive to extracellular cues. Once committed to differentiation, the ESC epigenome is remodeled and resolves into a more compact chromatin state. A thorough understanding of the role of chromatin modifiers in ESC fate and differentiation will be important if they are to be used for therapeutic purposes. Recent technical advances, particularly in next-generation sequencing technologies, have provided a genome-scale view of epigenetic marks and chromatin modifiers. More affordable and faster sequencing platforms have led to a comprehensive characterization of the ESC epigenome and epigenomes of differentiated cell types. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone modifications, histone variants, DNA methylation and chromatin modifiers in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate. We provide a detailed and comprehensive discussion of genome-wide studies that are pertinent to our understanding of mammalian development.

  14. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  15. Patz1 regulates embryonic stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ow, Jin Rong; Ma, Hui; Jean, Angela; Goh, Ziyi; Lee, Yun Hwa; Chong, Yew Mei; Soong, Richie; Fu, Xin-Yuan; Yang, Henry; Wu, Qiang

    2014-05-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of blastocysts are pluripotent. Pluripotency is maintained by a transcriptional network in which Oct4 and Nanog are master regulators. Notably, several zinc finger transcription factors have important roles in this network. Patz1, a BTB/POZ-domain-containing zinc finger protein, is expressed at higher levels in the ICM relative to the trophectoderm. However, its function in pluripotency has been poorly studied. Here, we show that Patz1 is an important regulator of pluripotency in ESCs. Patz1 RNAi, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and reporter assays indicate that Patz1 directly regulates Pou5f1 and Nanog. Global transcriptome changes upon Patz1 knockdown largely involve upregulation of apoptotic genes and downregulation of cell cycle and cellular metabolism genes. Patz1 ChIP sequencing further identified more than 5,000 binding sites of Patz1 in mouse genome, from which two binding motifs were extracted. Further, gene ontology analysis of genes associated with the binding sites displays enrichment for proximity to developmental genes. In addition, embryoid body assays suggest that Patz1 represses developmental genes. Together, these results propose that Patz1 is important for ESC pluripotency. PMID:24380431

  16. Embryonic stem cell neurogenesis and neural specification.

    PubMed

    Germain, Noélle; Banda, Erin; Grabel, Laura

    2010-10-15

    The prospect of using embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived neural progenitors and neurons to treat neurological disorders has led to great interest in defining the conditions that guide the differentiation of ESCs, and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), into neural stem cells (NSCs) and a variety of neuronal and glial subtypes. Over the past decade, researchers have looked to the embryo to guide these studies, applying what we know about the signaling events that direct neural specification during development. This has led to the design of a number of protocols that successfully promote ESC neurogenesis, terminating with the production of neurons and glia with diverse regional addresses and functional properties. These protocols demonstrate that ESCs undergo neural specification in two, three, and four dimensions, mimicking the cell-cell interactions, patterning, and timing that characterizes the in vivo process. We therefore propose that these in vitro systems can be used to examine the molecular regulation of neural specification. PMID:20589755

  17. Embryonic origin of amphibian taste buds.

    PubMed

    Barlow, L A; Northcutt, R G

    1995-05-01

    Despite numerous descriptive studies, the embryonic origin of vertebrate taste buds has never been experimentally determined. A number of different alternatives have been suggested for taste bud origins, including epibranchial placodes, the neural crest, and the local epithelium of the oropharyngeal cavity. The role of a series of epibranchial placodes and the cephalic neural crest, which together give rise to the cranial nerves innervating taste buds, was examined with regard to the development of oropharyngeal taste buds in an ambystomatid salamander, the axolotl. When pigmented placodal ectoderm or neural folds were grafted isotopically and isochronically into nonpigmented host embryos, known derivatives of each tissue contained pigmented cells, but labeled taste buds were never encountered. Thus, neither epibranchial placodes nor neural crest contribute cells to taste buds during embryogenesis. The majority of the oropharyngeal cavity of ambystomatid salamanders is lined by an endodermal epithelium. In order to demonstrate conclusively that taste buds arise from this local epithelium, the presumptive cephalic endoderm of early axolotl gastrulae was microinjected with the lipophilic dye, DiI. In the oropharyngeal epithelium of all larvae examined, both taste buds and general epithelial cells were labeled with DiI, indicating their common endodermal origin. Our findings are novel in that this is the first experimental demonstration of the endodermal origin of a vertebrate sensory receptor cell class. PMID:7750643

  18. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  19. Electroporation of cynomolgus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Masataka; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Mizutani, Ken-Ichi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2003-12-01

    Efficient genetic modification of primate embryonic stem (ES) cells is essential for the application for both basic and preclinical research. The transfection efficiency of primate ES cells is reportedly lower than that of mouse ES cells. Cynomolgus monkey ES cells provide a powerful model for understanding human development and disease. We evaluated electroporation as a method to introduce foreign genes into cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Our examination has allowed us to establish a protocol producing about 100 stably transfected clones from 10(7) cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Differences in efficiency, however, were observed for other ES cell lines. We compared the transcriptional activities of the PGK-1, CMV, and SV40 promoters in cynomolgus monkey ES cells generating efficient G418 selection. Although the PGK-1 and SV40 promoters efficiently drove neo gene expression, the CMV promoter was significantly less transcriptionally active in cynomolgus monkey ES cells. Using this electroporation method, we established fluorescent cynomolgus monkey ES cell lines. These cells may be useful tools for tracing grafted cells in transplantation studies using a variety of functional cells derived from cynomolgus monkey ES cells.

  20. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals.

  1. QSAR analysis and specific endpoints for classifying the physiological modes of action of biocides in synchronous green algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Junghans, Marion; Koller, Mirjam; Escher, Beate I

    2008-10-20

    We propose the use of additional physiological endpoints in the 24h growth inhibition test with synchronous cultures of Scenedesmus vacuolatus for the classification of physiological modes of toxic action of chemicals in green algae. The classification scheme is illustrated on the example of one baseline toxicant (3-nitroaniline) and five biocides (irgarol, diuron, Sea-Nine, tributyltin (TBT) and norflurazon). The well-established endpoint of inhibition of reproduction is used for an analysis of the degree of specificity of toxicity by comparing the experimental data with predictions from a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for baseline toxicity (narcosis). For those compounds with a toxic ratio greater than 10, i.e. a 10 times higher effect in reproduction than predicted by baseline toxicity, additionally the physiological endpoints inhibition of photosynthesis, cell division and cell volume growth were experimentally assessed. Depending on the relative sensitivity of the different endpoints the chemicals were classified into five different classes of modes of toxic action using a flow chart that was developed in the present study. The advantage of the novel classification scheme is the simplicity of the experimental approach. For the determination of the inhibition of reproduction, the cell size and numbers are quantified with a particle analyzer. This information can be used to derive also the physiological endpoints of cell volume growth and inhibition of cell division. The only additional measurement is the inhibition of the photosynthesis efficiency, which can be easily performed using the non-invasive saturation pulse method and pulse-modulated chlorophyll fluorometry with the Tox-Y-PAM instrument. This mechanistic approach offers a great future potential in ecotoxicology for the physiological mode of action classification of chemicals in algae, which should be a crucial step considered in the risk assessment of chemicals. PMID:18789546

  2. Ecological risk assessment of bisphenol A in surface waters of China based on both traditional and reproductive endpoints.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, Zhengyan; Gao, Pei; Hu, Hong; Gibson, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) occurs widely in natural waters with both traditional and reproductive toxicity to various aquatic species. The water quality criteria (WQC), however, have not been established in China, which hinders the ecological risk assessment for the pollutant. This study therefore aims to derive the water quality criteria for BPA based on both acute and chronic toxicity endpoints and to assess the ecological risk in surface waters of China. A total of 15 acute toxicity values tested with aquatic species resident in China were found in published literature, which were simulated with the species sensitivity distribution (SSD) model for the derivation of criterion maximum concentration (CMC). 18 chronic toxicity values with traditional endpoints were simulated for the derivation of traditional criterion continuous concentration (CCC) and 12 chronic toxicity values with reproductive endpoints were for reproductive CCC. Based on the derived WQC, the ecological risk of BPA in surface waters of China was assessed with risk quotient (RQ) method. The results showed that the CMC, traditional CCC and reproductive CCC were 1518μgL(-1), 2.19μgL(-1) and 0.86μgL(-1), respectively. The acute risk of BPA was negligible with RQ values much lower than 0.1. The chronic risk was however much higher with RQ values of between 0.01-3.76 and 0.03-9.57 based on traditional and reproductive CCC, respectively. The chronic RQ values on reproductive endpoints were about threefold as high as those on traditional endpoints, indicating that ecological risk assessment based on traditional effects may not guarantee the safety of aquatic biota. PMID:26081577

  3. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  4. Ornithine-δ-Aminotransferase Inhibits Neurogenesis During Xenopus Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Cooper, Sandra K.; Li, Yi; Mei, Jay M.; Qiu, Shuwei; Borchert, Gregory L.; Donald, Steven P.; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Phang, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In humans, deficiency of ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT) results in progressive degeneration of the neural retina (gyrate atrophy) with blindness in the fourth decade. In this study, we used the Xenopus embryonic developmental model to study functions of the OAT gene on embryonic development. Methods. We cloned and sequenced full-length OAT cDNA from Xenopus oocytes (X-OAT) and determined X-OAT expression in various developmental stages of Xenopus embryos and in a variety of adult tissues. The phenotype, gene expression of neural developmental markers, and enzymatic activity were detected by gain-of-function and loss-of-function manipulations. Results. We showed that X-OAT is essential for Xenopus embryonic development, and overexpression of X-OAT produces a ventralized phenotype characterized by a small head, lack of axial structure, and defective expression of neural developmental markers. Using X-OAT mutants based on mutations identified in humans, we found that substitution of both Arg 180 and Leu 402 abrogated both X-OAT enzymatic activity and ability to modulate the developmental phenotype. Neurogenesis is inhibited by X-OAT during Xenopus embryonic development. Conclusions. Neurogenesis is inhibited by X-OAT during Xenopus embryonic development, but it is essential for Xenopus embryonic development. The Arg 180 and Leu 402 are crucial for these effects of the OAT molecule in development. PMID:25783604

  5. Potential of embryonic and adult stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Jaroslaw; Wiese, Cornelia; Rolletschek, Alexandra; Blyszczuk, Przemyslaw; Cross, Michael; Wobus, Anna M

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stem cell research indicate their enormous potential as a source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The success of such applications will depend on the precise properties and potentials of stem cells isolated either from embryonic, fetal or adult tissues. Embryonic stem cells established from the inner cell mass of early mouse embryos are characterized by nearly unlimited proliferation, and the capacity to differentiate into derivatives of essentially all lineages. The recent isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cell lines presents new opportunities for reconstructive medicine. However, important problems remain; first, the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from in vitro fertilized blastocysts creates ethical problems, and second, the current techniques for the directed differentiation into somatic cell populations yield impure products with tumorigenic potential. Recent studies have also suggested an unexpectedly wide developmental potential of adult tissue-specific stem cells. Here too, many questions remain concerning the nature and status of adult stem cells both in vivo and in vitro and their proliferation and differentiation/transdifferentiation capacity. This review focuses on those issues of embryonic and adult stem cell biology most relevant to their in vitro propagation and differentiation. Questions and problems related to the use of human embryonic and adult stem cells in tissue regeneration and transplantation are discussed.

  6. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  7. Induced Wnt5a expression perturbs embryonic outgrowth and intestinal elongation, but is well-tolerated in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Elvira R M; Raghoebir, Lalini; Franken, Patrick F; Helvensteijn, Werner; van Gurp, Léon; Meijlink, Frits; van der Valk, Martin A; Rottier, Robbert J; Kuipers, Ernst J; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2012-09-01

    Wnt5a is essential during embryonic development, as indicated by mouse Wnt5a knockout embryos displaying outgrowth defects of multiple structures including the gut. The dynamics of Wnt5a involvement in these processes is unclear, and perinatal lethality of Wnt5a knockout embryos has hampered investigation of Wnt5a during postnatal stages in vivo. Although in vitro studies have suggested a relevant role for Wnt5a postnatally, solid evidence for a significant impact of Wnt5a within the complexity of an adult organism is lacking. We generated a tightly-regulated inducible Wnt5a transgenic mouse model and investigated the effects of Wnt5a induction during different time-frames of embryonic development and in adult mice, focusing on the gastrointestinal tract. When induced in embryos from 10.5 dpc onwards, Wnt5a expression led to severe outgrowth defects affecting the gastrointestinal tracts, limbs, facial structures and tails, closely resembling the defects observed in Wnt5a knockout mice. However, Wnt5a induction from 13.5 dpc onwards did not cause this phenotype, indicating that the most critical period for Wnt5a in embryonic development is prior to 13.5 dpc. In adult mice, induced Wnt5a expression did not reveal abnormalities, providing the first in vivo evidence that Wnt5a has no major impact on mouse intestinal homeostasis postnatally. Protein expression of Wnt5a receptor Ror2 was strongly reduced in adult intestine compared to embryonic stages. Moreover, we uncovered a regulatory process where induction of Wnt5a causes downregulation of its receptor Ror2. Taken together, our results indicate a role for Wnt5a during a restricted time-frame of embryonic development, but suggest no impact during homeostatic postnatal stages.

  8. Expression of biomarker genes of differentiation in D3 mouse embryonic stem cells after exposure to different embryotoxicant and non-embryotoxicant model chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Andrea C.; del Río, Eva; Vilanova, Eugenio; Sogorb, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a necessity to develop in vitro methods for testing embryotoxicity (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. We studied the progress of D3 mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation exposed to model embryotoxicants and non-embryotoxicants chemicals through the expression of biomarker genes. We studied a set of 16 different genes biomarkers of general cellular processes (Cdk1, Myc, Jun, Mixl, Cer and Wnt3), ectoderm formation (Nrcam, Nes, Shh and Pnpla6), mesoderm formation (Mesp1, Vegfa, Myo1e and Hdac7) and endoderm formation (Flk1 and Afp). We offer dose response in order to derive the concentration causing either 50% or 200% of expression of the biomarker gene. These records revealed to be a valuable end-point to predict in vitro the embryotoxicity of chemicals (Romero et al., 2015) [1]. PMID:26568980

  9. Differential expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit mRNAs in the developing nervous system and receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase in embryonic neurons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stella C; Steiger, Janine L; Gravielle, María Clara; Lyons, Helen R; Russek, Shelley J; Farb, David H

    2004-05-17

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) mediate both slow inhibitory synaptic activity in the adult nervous system and motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells. Previous papers have described the expression of GABA(B)Rs in the adult brain, but the expression and functional significance of these gene products in the embryo are largely unknown. Here we examine GABA(B)R expression from rat embryonic day 10 (E10) to E18 compared with adult and ask whether embryonic cortical neurons contain functional GABA(B)R. GABA(B)R1 transcript levels greatly exceed GABA(B)R2 levels in the developing neural tube at E11, and olfactory bulb and striatum at E17 but equalize in most regions of adult nervous tissue, except for the glomerular and granule cell layers of the main olfactory bulb and the striatum. Consistent with expression differences, the binding affinity of GABA for GABA(B)Rs is significantly lower in adult striatum compared with cerebellum. Multiple lines of evidence from in situ hybridization, RNase protection, and real-time PCR demonstrate that GABA(B)R1a, GABA(B)R1b, GABA(B)R1h (a subunit subtype, lacking a sushi domain, that we have identified in embryonic rat brain), GABA(B)R2, and GABA(B)L transcript levels are not coordinately regulated. Despite the functional requirement for a heterodimer of GABA(B)R subunits, the expression of each subunit mRNA is under independent control during embryonic development, and, by E18, GABA(B)Rs are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in neocortical neurons. The presence of embryonic GABA(B)R transcripts and protein and functional receptor coupling indicates potentially important roles for GABA(B)Rs in modulation of synaptic transmission in the developing embryonic nervous system.

  10. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  11. Analysis of the prognostic risk factors of idiopathic membranous nephropathy using a new surrogate end-point

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, BO; CHENG, MING; YANG, MING; HAN, SHUAI; ZHANG, YING-HUI; SHI, HONG-GUANG; ZHU, LIANG; ZHAO, XUE-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) is one of the most common causes of nephrotic syndrome (NS) in adults. The latest study of the chronic kidney disease-prognosis consortium showed that a 30% decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) within 2 years could cover more patients and showed a better correlation with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), as compared with serum creatinine (SCr). The aim of the present study was to analyze prognostic factors of ESRD using a 30% decrease in eGFR within 2 years as the end-point. The medical records of patients who were diagnosed as having IMN by clinical pathology between February 2011 and August 2012 and had been followed up for ≥24 months were analyzed retrospectively. A 30% decrease in eGFR or the occurrence of ESRD were the end-points. Factors affecting the prognosis were analyzed by the χ2 test and multivariate logistic regression analysis, and the cumulative risk of risk factors was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curve. A total of 73 patients with IMN were confirmed by clinical pathology. Blood pressure, tubulointerstitial injury area (TIA), glomerular sclerosis ratio, SCr, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin C, serum albumin and 24-h urine protein. In total, 28 patients (38.4%) reached the observation end-point. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only age ≥60 years, serum albumin <25 g/l and TIA >25% were independent risk factors for predicting the occurrence of end-point events in the two groups (P<0.05), which increased the risk of the occurrence of end-point events in IMN patients by 3.471-, 3.195- and 6.724-fold, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that the occurrence of end-point events within 2 years was significantly higher in IMN patients whose age was ≥60 years, serum albumin <25 g/l and TIA >25% (log-rank P=0.004, P=0.024 and P=0.001). The results of the present study revealed that age ≥60 years, low serum albumin concentrations and severe tubulointerstitial injury are

  12. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects.

    PubMed

    DiZio, P; Lackner, J R

    2001-02-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  13. Coriolis-force-induced trajectory and endpoint deviations in the reaching movements of labyrinthine-defective subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiZio, P.; Lackner, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    When reaching movements are made during passive constant velocity body rotation, inertial Coriolis accelerations are generated that displace both movement paths and endpoints in their direction. These findings directly contradict equilibrium point theories of movement control. However, it has been argued that these movement errors relate to subjects sensing their body rotation through continuing vestibular activity and making corrective movements. In the present study, we evaluated the reaching movements of five labyrinthine-defective subjects (lacking both semicircular canal and otolith function) who cannot sense passive body rotation in the dark and five age-matched, normal control subjects. Each pointed 40 times in complete darkness to the location of a just extinguished visual target before, during, and after constant velocity rotation at 10 rpm in the center of a fully enclosed slow rotation room. All subjects, including the normal controls, always felt completely stationary when making their movements. During rotation, both groups initially showed large deviations of their movement paths and endpoints in the direction of the transient Coriolis forces generated by their movements. With additional per-rotation movements, both groups showed complete adaptation of movement curvature (restoration of straight-line reaches) during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects, however, failed to regain fully accurate movement endpoints after 40 reaches, unlike the control subjects who did so within 11 reaches. Postrotation, both groups' movements initially had mirror image curvatures to their initial per-rotation reaches; the endpoint aftereffects were significantly different from prerotation baseline for the control subjects but not for the labyrinthine-defective subjects reflecting the smaller amount of endpoint adaptation they achieved during rotation. The labyrinthine-defective subjects' movements had significantly lower peak velocity, higher peak elevation

  14. Endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Cernohous, Bob R; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-11-18

    Methods, apparatuses, and computer program products for endpoint-based parallel data processing with non-blocking collective instructions in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer are provided. Embodiments include establishing by a parallel application a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI, including associating with the geometry a list of collective algorithms valid for use with the endpoints of the geometry. Embodiments also include registering in each endpoint in the geometry a dispatch callback function for a collective operation and executing without blocking, through a single one of the endpoints in the geometry, an instruction for the collective operation.

  15. The significance of growth in Chironomus tentans sediment toxicity tests: Relationship to reproduction and demographic endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, P.K.; Benoit, D.A.; Ankley, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    This study assessed the biological relevance of growth, as used in sediment toxicity bioassessment, through evaluation of the relationship between growth and reproduction in the midge C. tentans. Newly-hatched larvae were fed one of six food levels (3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0 mg Tetrafin fish food) on a daily basis for one complete generation. Larvae were exposed in 300 ml beakers containing 100 ml of 75/{micro}m sand housed within an intermittent water renewal system. Food supply had no effect on larval (65--82%), pupal (93--95%), or adult (90--98%) survivorship. Larval growth and adult weight decreased significantly (p{<=}0.05) with decreasing food supply (r{sup 2} = 0.92, 0.91 respectively). The data suggest that a threshold larval dry weight of approximately 0.6 mg must be obtained for emergence to occur. This value also corresponded to the approximate minimum adult weight observed in this study. Emergence rate and total emergence were delayed at lower feeding levels; however, total emergence was not less than 60% for any treatment. Egg mass production, oviposition rate, and mean number of eggs produced per female declined significantly with reduced food supply. Larval growth and adult weight were significantly correlated with age-specific fecundity (r{sup 2} = 0.96). Application of the reproductive data in a demographic model showed that the expected number of offspring recruited to subsequent generations declined significantly with a decrease in food supply. The results of this study demonstrate a direct relationship between growth and reproduction in C. tentans and clearly emphasize the biological and ecological relevance of the growth endpoint in sediment toxicity bioassessment.

  16. A vector-integration-to-endpoint model for performance of viapoint movements.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Daniel; Bongers, Raoul M.; Lankhorst, Marnix; Beek, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Viapoint (VP) movements are movements to a desired point that are constrained to pass through an intermediate point. Studies have shown that VP movements possess properties, such as smooth curvature around the VP, that are not explicable by treating VP movements as strict concatenations of simpler point-to-point (PTP) movements. Such properties have led some theorists to propose whole-trajectory optimization models, which imply that the entire trajectory is precomputed before movement initiation. This paper reports new experiments conducted to systematically compare VP with PTP trajectories. Analyses revealed a statistically significant early directional deviation in VP movements but no associated curvature change. An explanation of this effect is offered by extending the vector-integration-to-endpoint (VITE) model (Bullock, D., & Grossberg, S. (1988a). Neural dynamics of planned arm movements: Emergent invariants and speed-accuracy properties during trajectory formation. Psychological Review, 95, 49-90; Bullock, D., & Grossberg, S. (1988b). The VITE model: A neural command circuit for generating arm and articulator trajectories. In J.A.S. Kelso, A.J. Mandell & M.F. Schlesinger (Eds.), Dynamic patterns in complex systems (pp. 305-326). Singapore: World Scientific Publishers.), which postulates that voluntary movement trajectories emerge as internal gating signals control the integration of continuously computed vector commands based on the evolving, perceptible difference between desired and actual position variables. The model explains the observed trajectories of VP and PTP movements as emergent properties of a dynamical system that does not precompute entire trajectories before movement initiation. The new model includes a working memory and a stage sensitive to time-to-contact information. These cooperate to control serial performance. The structural and functional relationships proposed in the model are consistent with available data on forebrain physiology

  17. Application of cytogenetic endpoints and Comet assay on human lymphocytes treated with vincristine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopjar, N; Garaj-Vrhovac, V

    2000-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of vincristine is assessed on human peripheral blood lymphocytes following administration of the drug at a dose 0.0875 microg/ml by use of single cell gel electrophoresis - Comet assay (SCGE), analysis of structural chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus assay (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. In vitro treatment of human lymphocytes with vincristine was performed on cells in G0 phase, as well on lymphocyte cultures 24 hours after stimulation with mitogen phytohemagglutinine. For the Comet assay at 24, 48 and 72 h the treated cells were embedded in agarose on slides, lysed with alkaline lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. DNA migrated within the agarose and formed comets whose length depends on the amount of DNA damage. For the analysis of structural CA cells were grown on F-10 medium for 48 hours, and for MN and SCE analysis for 72 hours. The results on SCGE showed an increase in tail length compared to control both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. The amount of DNA damage was higher in cells treated with vincristine 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Administered concentration of drug caused total inhibition of lymphocytes growth in 72-h cultures for MN and SCE analysis indicating strong microtubule distruptive effects of vincristine. Analysis of structural CA reveals chromatid breaks and acentric fragments as the main aberration types both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Number of these aberrations was higher in cells treated in G0 phase. Results obtained in this study by use of different cytogenetic endpoints confirmed that vincristine exhibits both aneugenic and clastogenic effects on human lymphocytes. PMID:11043839

  18. Neuroimaging as a Selection Tool and Endpoint in Clinical and Pre-clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Muir, Keith W; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2016-10-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke enables the exclusion of non-stroke structural CNS lesions and cerebral haemorrhage from clinical and pre-clinical ischaemic stroke trials. In this review, the potential benefit of imaging (e.g., angiography and penumbral imaging) as a translational tool for trial recruitment and the use of imaging endpoints are discussed for both clinical and pre-clinical stroke research. The addition of advanced imaging to identify a "responder" population leads to reduced sample size for any given effect size in phase 2 trials and is a potentially cost-efficient means of testing interventions. In pre-clinical studies, technical failures (failed or incomplete vessel occlusion, cerebral haemorrhage) can be excluded early and continuous multimodal imaging of the animal from stroke onset is feasible. Pre- and post-intervention repeat scans provide real time assessment of the intervention over the first 4-6 h. Negative aspects of advanced imaging in animal studies include increased time under general anaesthesia, and, as in clinical studies, a delay in starting the intervention. In clinical phase 3 trial designs, the negative aspects of advanced imaging in patient selection include higher exclusion rates, slower recruitment, overestimated effect size and longer acquisition times. Imaging may identify biological effects with smaller sample size and at earlier time points, compared to standard clinical assessments, and can be adjusted for baseline parameters. Mechanistic insights can be obtained. Pre-clinically, multimodal imaging can non-invasively generate data on a range of parameters, allowing the animal to be recovered for subsequent behavioural testing and/or the brain taken for further molecular or histological analysis. PMID:27543177

  19. Predictive validity of endpoints used in electrophysiological modelling of migraine in the trigeminovascular system.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Bence; Kardos, Péter; Orosz, Szabolcs; Tarnawa, István; Csekő, Csongor; Lévay, György; Farkas, Sándor; Lendvai, Balázs; Kovács, Péter

    2015-11-01

    The trigeminovascular system has a pivotal role in the pathomechanism of migraine. The aim of the present study was to further develop existing models of migraine making them more suitable for testing the effects of compounds with presumed antimigraine activity in anaesthetised rats. Simultaneous recording of ongoing activity of spontaneously active neurons in the trigeminocervical complex as well as their discharges evoked by electrical stimulation of the dura mater via activation of A- and C-sensory fibres were carried out. Effects of sumatriptan, propranolol and topiramate were evaluated prior to and after application of a mixture containing inflammatory mediators on the dura. Propranolol (10 mg/kg s.c) and topiramate (30 mg/kg s.c.) resulted in a tendency to decrease the level of both spontaneous and evoked activity, while sumatriptan (1 mg/kg s.c.) did not exhibit any effect on recorded parameters. Application of an inflammatory soup to the dura mater boosted up spontaneous activity, which could be significantly attenuated by propranolol and topiramate but not by sumatriptan. In addition, all compounds prevented the delayed increase of spontaneous firing. In contrast to the ongoing activity, evoked responses were not augmented by inflammatory mediators. Nevertheless, inhibitory effect of propranolol and topiramate was evident when considering A- or C-fibre responses. Findings do not support the view that electrically evoked responses are useful for the measurement of trigeminal sensitization. It is proposed however, that inhibition of enhanced firing (immediate and/or delayed) evoked by inflammatory mediators as an endpoint have higher predictive validity regarding the clinical effectiveness of compounds.

  20. SU-F-BRD-11: Prediction of Dosimetric Endpoints From Patient Geometry Using Neural Nets

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D; Chow, P; Agazaryan, N; Jani, S; Low, D; Lamb, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The previously-published overlap volume histogram (OVH) technique lends itself naturally to prediction of the dose received by a given volume of tissue (e.g. D90) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans. Here we extend the OVH technique using artificial neural networks in order to predict the volume of tissue receiving a given dose (e.g. V90) in both prostate IMRT and conventional breast radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-nine prostate treatment plans and forty-three breast treatment plans were analyzed. The spatial relationships between the prostate and rectum and between the breast and ipsilateral lung were characterized using OVHs. The OVH is a cumulative histogram representing the fractional volume of the risk organ overlapped by a series of isotropic expansions of the planning target volume (PTV). Seven cases were identified as outliers and replanned. OVH points were used as inputs to a one hidden layer feed forward artificial neural network with quality parameters of the corresponding plan, such as the rectum V50, as targets. A 3-fold cross-validation was used to estimate the prediction error. Results: The root mean square (RMS) error between the predicted rectum V50s and the planned values was 2.3, which was 35% of the standard deviation of V50 for the twenty-nine plans. The RMS error of prediction of V20 of the ipsilateral lung in breast cases was 3.9, which was 90% of the standard deviation of the V20 values in the breast plan database. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that artificial neural nets can be used to extend the OVH technique to predict dosimetric endpoints taking the form of a volume receiving a given dose, rather than the minimum dose received by a given volume. Prediction of ipsilateral lung dose in breast radiotherapy using the OVH technique remains a work in progress.