Science.gov

Sample records for multiple gamma sources

  1. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from multiple volumetric gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2002-05-01

    Determination of absorbed dose distributions is very important in brachytherapy procedures. The typical computation involves superposition of absorbed dose distributions from a single seed to compute the combined absorbed dose distribution formed by multiple seeds. This approach does not account for the shadow effect caused by the metallic nature of volumetric radioactive seeds. Since this shadow effect will cause deviations from the targeted dose distribution, it may have important implications on the success of the procedures. We demonstrated accuracy of our deterministic algorithms for isotropic point sources in the past. We will show that we now have the capability of computing absorbed dose distributions from multiple volumetric seeds and demonstrate that our results are quite close to the results published in the literature.

  2. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2009-09-29

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  3. Gamma source for active interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2012-10-02

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  4. UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Tosti, G.; Gasparrini, D.

    2012-06-10

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  5. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  6. Multiple Scatters in Single Site Gamma Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, J. P.

    2016-09-16

    nEXO aims to reduce its gamma backgrounds by taking advantage of the fact that a large number of gammas that would otherwise be backgrounds will undergo multiple compton scattering in the TPC and produce spatially distinct signals. These multi-sited (MS) events can be excluded from the 0νββ search.

  7. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  8. Compact Electronic Gamma Source For Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.; Leung, K.-N.

    2011-06-01

    A compact mono-energetic gamma source is being developed to replace the radiological sources used in radiotherapy and other medical instruments. The electronic gamma source utilizes low-energy nuclear reactions to generate gammas in the 0.5 to 1.0 MeV energy range. Independent control of the ion current and energy is achieved by decoupling the RF-driven ion source and pyroelectric crystal-based acceleration systems The ions are accelerated to voltages above 100 keV and bombard a reaction target to produce gammas. Thermal management of the pyroelectric crystal-based accelerator is achieved by convective dielectric fluid flow around the crystal. This approach provides better temperature uniformity in the crystal and higher dielectric strength for suppressing voltage breakdown and enabling faster thermal cycling rates.

  9. Multiple gamma lines from semi-annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Eramo, Francesco; McCullough, Matthew; Thaler, Jesse

    2013-04-01

    Hints in the Fermi data for a 130 GeV gamma line from the galactic center have ignited interest in potential gamma line signatures of dark matter. Explanations of this line based on dark matter annihilation face a parametric tension since they often rely on large enhancements of loop-suppressed cross sections. In this paper, we pursue an alternative possibility that dark matter gamma lines could arise from ''semi-annihilation'' among multiple dark sector states. The semi-annihilation reaction ψiψj → ψkγ with a single final state photon is typically enhanced relative to ordinary annihilation ψibar psii → γγ into photon pairs. Semi-annihilation allows for a wide range of dark matter masses compared to the fixed mass value required by annihilation, opening the possibility to explain potential dark matter signatures at higher energies. The most striking prediction of semi-annihilation is the presence of multiple gamma lines, with as many as order N3 lines possible for N dark sector states, allowing for dark sector spectroscopy. A smoking gun signature arises in the simplest case of degenerate dark matter, where a strong semi-annihilation line at 130 GeV would be accompanied by a weaker annihilation line at 173 GeV. As a proof of principle, we construct two explicit models of dark matter semi-annihilation, one based on non-Abelian vector dark matter and the other based on retrofitting Rayleigh dark matter.

  10. Fission prompt gamma-ray multiplicity distribution measurements and simulations at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Ullmann, J; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Norman, E

    2010-08-24

    The nearly energy independence of the DANCE efficiency and multiplicity response to {gamma} rays makes it possible to measure the prompt {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution in fission. We demonstrate this unique capability of DANCE through the comparison of {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution between the measurement and numerical simulation for three radioactive sources {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 88}Y. The prospect for measuring the {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution for both spontaneous and neutron-induced fission is discussed.

  11. Multiple gamma lines from semi-annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    D'Eramo, Francesco; McCullough, Matthew; Thaler, Jesse E-mail: mccull@mit.edu

    2013-04-01

    Hints in the Fermi data for a 130 GeV gamma line from the galactic center have ignited interest in potential gamma line signatures of dark matter. Explanations of this line based on dark matter annihilation face a parametric tension since they often rely on large enhancements of loop-suppressed cross sections. In this paper, we pursue an alternative possibility that dark matter gamma lines could arise from ''semi-annihilation'' among multiple dark sector states. The semi-annihilation reaction ψ{sub i}ψ{sub j} → ψ{sub k}γ with a single final state photon is typically enhanced relative to ordinary annihilation ψ{sub i}ψ-bar {sub i} → γγ into photon pairs. Semi-annihilation allows for a wide range of dark matter masses compared to the fixed mass value required by annihilation, opening the possibility to explain potential dark matter signatures at higher energies. The most striking prediction of semi-annihilation is the presence of multiple gamma lines, with as many as order N{sup 3} lines possible for N dark sector states, allowing for dark sector spectroscopy. A smoking gun signature arises in the simplest case of degenerate dark matter, where a strong semi-annihilation line at 130 GeV would be accompanied by a weaker annihilation line at 173 GeV. As a proof of principle, we construct two explicit models of dark matter semi-annihilation, one based on non-Abelian vector dark matter and the other based on retrofitting Rayleigh dark matter.

  12. MULTIPLE THICKNESS TIMES DENSITY GAMMA GAGE

    DOEpatents

    Cherry, N.H.

    1962-07-24

    A device was developed for measuring simultaneously the thicknesses of two dissimilar materials superimposed on each other, such as coating of one material on another. The apparatus utilizes a double gamma radiation source producing radiation in two narrow band energy levels. The different materials attenuate the two bands of energy unequally with the result that a composite signal is received which can be analyzed to separate out the components due to the differing materials and indicate the thickness or densities of the two layers. (AEC)

  13. Unthermalized positrons in gamma ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkaczyk, W.; Karakula, S.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the broadening 0.511 MeV annihilation line produced by high temperatures was calculated in the case of unthermalized plasma; i.e., T sub e(+) is not = T sub e(-). The flattening in the spectrum of the annihilation lines for large differences of electron and positron temperatures is a strong indication that the observed features of the hard tailed spectrum of the gamma bursts can be well described by annihilation of unthermalized positrons. It is proposed that the charge separation occurring in Eddington limited accretion onto a neutron star or the one photon pair production in strong magnetic fields as a mechanism for the production of unthermalized positrons in the sources of gamma bursts. From the best fit of experimental spectra by the model, the parameters of sources for which the regions with different plasma temperatures can exist is evaluated.

  14. Gamma europium- and cobalt-sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klochkov, E.P.; Risovany, V.D.; Ponomarenko, B.V.

    1993-12-31

    The double-purpose control rods of nuclear reactors were made in which the inserts containing cobalt and europium oxide with natural {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu content were used as an absorbing core. The mass content of europium oxide is to exceed 15% to provide for a necessary reactivity. Cobalt and europium radionuclides were shown to be accumulated during the reactor operation allowing the inserts to be used as gamma sources after unloading of control rods at large commercial plants for radiation processing of different materials. Shape, geometry and composition of inserts were optimized allowing their specific activity to be obtained above 2 x 10 Bq/g (about 60 Ci/g). The spectral activity and radiation resistance of gamma sources were studied.

  15. Laser Electron Gamma Source. Biennial progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.; Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Miceli, L.; Thorn, C.E.; Hoblit, S.; Khandaker, M. |

    1994-06-01

    The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. With the start of ring operations at 2.8 GeV, LEGS {gamma}-ray energies now extend to 370 MeV. Considerable progress has been made in the development of a new laser system that will increase the beam energies to 470 MeV, and this system is expected to come into operation before the next biennial report. The total flux is administratively held at 6 {times} 10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}. The {gamma}-ray energy is determined, with a resolution of 5.5 MeV, by detecting the scattering electrons in a magnetic spectrometer. This spectrometer can `tag` all {gamma}-rays with energies from 185 MeV up to the Compton edge. The beam spot size at the target position is 8 mm (V) {times} 18 mm (H), FWHM. For a single laser wavelength, the linear polarization of the beam is 98% at the Compton edge and decreases to 50% at about 1/2 the energy of the edge. By choosing the laser wavelengths appropriately the polarization can be maintained above 85% throughout the tagging range. During the last two years, experimental running at LEGS occupied an average of 3000 hours annually. Highlights of some of the programs are discussed below.

  16. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  17. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  18. ASTRONOMY: A New Source of Gamma Rays.

    PubMed

    Fender, R P

    2000-06-30

    Relativistic outflows or "jets" are collimated streams of high-energy electrons that emit synchrotron radiation at radio wavelengths and have bulk velocities that are a substantial fraction of the speed of light. They trace the outflow of enormous amounts of energy and matter from a central supermassive black hole in distant radio galaxies. As Fender explains in this Perspective, much smaller, more local sources may also produce such jets. Data presented by Paredes et al. point toward association of one such source, a relatively faint x-ray binary, with a gamma-ray source. This and similar pairs may contribute substantially to the production of high-energy particles and photons within our galaxy.

  19. Laser Electron Gamma Source Facility biennial progress report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F. ); Hoblit, S. . Dept. of Physics); Whisnant, C.S. South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    This report briefly discusses the Laser Electron Gamma Source facility and the following experiments conducted here: polarization in D(gamma, p)n and N-N tensor forces for energies less than 225 Mev; constraints on the nuclear tensor force from D(gamma, p)n for energies less than 315 Mev; the p(gamma, neutral pion) reaction and the E2 excitation of delta resonance; quasi-two- and three-body absorption in helium 3(gamma, N-N); and the delta-nucleon interaction in D(gamma,p-negative pion)p and D(gamma, p-n)neutral pions. (LSP).

  20. Laser Electron Gamma Source Facility biennial progress report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Hoblit, S.; Whisnant, C.S. |

    1992-08-01

    This report briefly discusses the Laser Electron Gamma Source facility and the following experiments conducted here: polarization in D(gamma, p)n and N-N tensor forces for energies less than 225 Mev; constraints on the nuclear tensor force from D(gamma, p)n for energies less than 315 Mev; the p(gamma, neutral pion) reaction and the E2 excitation of delta resonance; quasi-two- and three-body absorption in helium 3(gamma, N-N); and the delta-nucleon interaction in D(gamma,p-negative pion)p and D(gamma, p-n)neutral pions. (LSP).

  1. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  2. Very High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics related to high-energy, gamma-ray astronomy (including cosmic radiation, gamma-ray detectors, high-energy gamma-ray sources, and others). Also considers motivation for the development of this field, the principal results to date, and future prospects. (JN)

  3. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  5. Gamma ray cosmology: The extra galactic gamma spectrum and methods to detect the underlying source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, David B.

    1990-01-01

    The possible sources of extragalactic gamma rays and methods to distinguish the different sources are discussed. The sources considered are early universe decays and annihilation of Particles, active galactic nuclei (AGN) sources, and baryon-antibaryon annihilation in a baryon symmetric cosmology. The energy spectrum and possible angular fluctuations due to these sources are described.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with catalogued objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. This two year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x-ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. This second year was devoted to studies of unidentified gamma-ray sources from the first EGRET catalog, similar to previous observations. Efforts have concentrated on the sources at low and intermediate Galactic latitudes, which are the most plausible pulsar candidates.

  7. The interpretation of gamma-ray enhancements in thunderstorms with and without avalanche multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanches (RREAs) are the acceleration and subsequent multiplication of relativistic electrons inside by electric field. Inside thunderstorms, RREA are thought to be involved in the creation of extraordinarily bright bursts of gamma rays, called Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), and long duration production of gamma rays (called gamma-ray glows or thunderstorm ground enhancements (TGEs)). However, Chilingarian has proposed that some electric fields inside thunderstorms may not be strong enough or have large enough spatial extent to result in significant avalanche multiplication by RREA to make a glow. High-energy electrons and gamma rays would still be present by a modification of the spectra (MOS) of cosmic-ray air showers. MOS and RREA glows have both been detected many times from the ground but distinguishing between the two is difficult since differing count rates can be the result of either these two distinct production models or attenuation due to various source distances. We will present GEANT4 models showing how these spectra differ as a function of source distance as well as discuss the differences in their gamma ray/electron signature in ground-based, gamma-ray detectors. These models will be compared to measurements made with instruments already in place in Mexico and Japan.

  8. GAMMA DOSE RATE NEAR A NEW (252)Cf BRACHYTHERAPY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fortune, Eugene C; Gauld, Ian C; Wang, C

    2011-01-01

    A new generation of medical grade (252)Cf sources was developed in 2002 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The combination of small size and large activity of (252)Cf makes the new source suitable to be used with the conventional high-dose-rate remote afterloading system for interstitial brachytherapy. A recent in-water calibration experiment showed that the measured gamma dose rates near the new source are slightly greater than the neutron dose rates, contradicting the well established neutron-to-gamma dose ratio of approximately 2:1 at locations near a (252)Cf brachytherapy source. Specifically, the MCNP-predicted gamma dose rate is a factor of two lower than the measured gamma dose rate at the distance of I cm, and the differences between the two results gradually diminish at distances farther away from the source. To resolve this discrepancy, we updated the source gamma spectrum by including in the ORIGEN-S data library the experimentally measured (252)Cf prompt gamma spectrum as well as the true (252)Cf spontaneous fission yield data to explicitly model delayed gamma emissions from fission products. We also investigated the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by the beta particles emitted from fission product decays. The results show that the discrepancy of gamma dose rates is mainly caused by the omission of the bremsstrahlung X-rays in the MCNP runs. By including the bremsstrahlung X-rays, the MCNP results show that the gamma dose rates near a new (252)Cf source agree well with the measured results and that the gamma dose rates are indeed greater than the neutron dose rates.

  9. High power lasers for gamma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Magali; Sangla, Damien; Trophème, Benoit; Sevillano, Pierre; Casanova, Alexis; Caillon, Laurianne; Courjaud, Antoine

    2017-02-01

    A high intensity Gamma source is required for Nuclear Spectroscopy, it will be delivered by the interaction between accelerated electron and intense laser beams. Those two interactions lasers are based on a multi-stage amplification scheme that ended with a second harmonics generation to deliver 200 mJ, 3.5 ps pulses at 515 nm and 100 Hz. A t-Pulse oscillator with slow and fast feedback loop implemented inside the oscillator cavity allows the possibility of synchronization to an optical reference. A temporal jitter of 120 fs rms is achieved, integrated from 10 Hz to 10 MHz. Then a regenerative amplifier, based on Yb:YAG technology, pumped by fiber-coupled QCW laser diodes, delivers pulses up to 30 mJ. The 1 nm bandwidth was compressed to 1.5 ps with a good spatial quality: M2 of 1.1. This amplifier is integrated in a compact sealed housing (750x500x150 cm), which allows a pulse-pulse stability of 0.1% rms, and a long-term stability of 1,9% over 100 hours (with +/-1°C environment). The main amplification stage uses a cryocooled Yb:YAG crystal in an active mirror configuration. The crystal is cooled at 130 K via a compact and low-vibration cryocooler, avoiding any additional phase noise contribution, 340 mJ in a six pass scheme was achieved, with 0.9 of Strehl ratio. The trade off to the gain of a cryogenic amplifier is the bandwidth reduction, however the 1030 nm pulse was compressed to 3.5 ps.

  10. A constrained tracking algorithm to optimize plug patterns in multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery planning

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kaile; Ma Lijun

    2005-10-15

    We developed a source blocking optimization algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery, which is based on tracking individual source contributions to arbitrarily shaped target and critical structure volumes. A scalar objective function and a direct search algorithm were used to produce near real-time calculation results. The algorithm allows the user to set and vary the total number of plugs for each shot to limit the total beam-on time. We implemented and tested the algorithm for several multiple-isocenter Gamma Knife cases. It was found that the use of limited number of plugs significantly lowered the integral dose to the critical structures such as an optical chiasm in pituitary adenoma cases. The main effect of the source blocking is the faster dose falloff in the junction area between the target and the critical structure. In summary, we demonstrated a useful source-plugging algorithm for improving complex multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatment planning cases.

  11. Source Localization using a Directional Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Shoaib

    Orphan radioactive sources pose a threat to safety and security and are a concern for various government institutions and the security agencies. It is becoming important to develop robust techniques to find and localise such sources. In the present work, two complementary methods to localize a source have been developed using a directional gamma survey spectrometer. The instrument used consists of four NaI(Tl) detectors oriented vertically in such a way that the crystals on one side shield the crystals on the other side of this arrangement. In the gross count method, the total counts from all four detectors were recorded and a fit was performed to reconstruct the source positions based on total counts versus position. For near sources (less than 15 m), the accuracy of this method is up to 1 m in the position along the road and in the distance from the road. For farther sources (from 22 m to 32 m), it provides accuracy up to 10 m on both. In the directional method, the relative counts in each crystal as a function of position can be used to measure the angle to the source by forming directional vectors. The survey then returns a field of these vectors, which may be fit to reconstruct the coordinates of the source position. For near sources (less than 15 m), this method gives an accuracy of up to 6 m in position along the road and 4 m in the distance from the road. For farther sources (from 22 m to 32 m), the accuracy in the position along the road is up to 5 m and in the distance from the road reduces up to 25 m. The gross count method provides more accurate and reliable source localization, but it does not provide directional information in real time. For this reason, the directional method is used to provide a direction to the source. Multiple truck-borne surveys were conducted using this instrument driving past Na-22 and Cs-137 sources at speeds of 20 km/h and 40 km/h. The surveys were repeated with the sources placed at different distances from the road. Here

  12. Low energy neutron physics research with a gamma multiplicity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Werner, C.J.; Moretti, B.E.; Burke, J.A.; Drindak, N.J.; Leinweber, G.

    1996-06-01

    A sixteen-segment NaI(Tl) multiplicity gamma ray detector is used at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gaerttner LINAC Laboratory for neutron cross section measurements. This detector consists of an annulus of NaI(Tl) divided into two sets of 8 pie-shaped segments, each segment optically isolated and viewed by a photomultiplier. The neutron beam passes along the axis of the detector and impinges upon a sample placed in the center. Time-of-flight data are taken as a function of the number of sections which detect a gamma and which is defined as the detected multiplicity. This detector can simultaneously acquire a neutron scattering, capture and fission data by placing suitable limits on the total detected gamma ray energy deposited in the detector. Scattering and capture measurements have been performed on samples of holmium, erbium, and tungsten and experimental results are presented. The experimental multiplicity for capture is analyzed by assuming the single particle model, stochastically calculating the gamma ray cascades from neutron capture, and transporting each gamma ray into the detector using the Monte Carlo method. The detection efficiency for neutron capture is over 90% and is relatively insensitive to different isotopes of the same element or different spins of the compound nuclear resonances. A status report on experimental and analytical activities at the Laboratory is presented.

  13. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  14. Possible X-ray counterparts of gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maraschi, L.; Markert, T.; Apparao, K. M. V.; Bradt, H.; Helmken, H.; Wheaton, W.; Baity, W. A.; Peterson, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of a survey regarding the X-ray source positions which fall within the error boxes of 10 unidentified gamma-ray sources observed with the aid of the COS-B satellite. In three cases, including CG 135-1, CG 312-1, and CG 327-0, an X-ray source was found within the gamma-ray error box. However, because of the large uncertainty regarding the gamma-ray source positions, the positional coincidence is not necessarily conclusive. It is, therefore, necessary to take into account additional information on the spectral or temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources. It is found that the X-ray source 4U 02416 plus 1 is a possible candidate as the X-ray-counterpart of CG 135 plus 1 in connection with both spectral hardness characteristics and positional coincidence.

  15. Multiwavelength observations of unidentified high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1993-01-01

    As was the case for COS B, the majority of high-energy (greater than 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET instrument on GRO are not immediately identifiable with cataloged objects at other wavelengths. These persistent gamma-ray sources are, next to the gamma-ray bursts, the least understood objects in the universe. Even a rudimentary understanding of their nature awaits identifications and follow-up work at other wavelengths to tell us what they are. The as yet unidentified sources are potentially the most interesting, since they may represent unrecognized new classes of astronomical objects, such as radio-quiet pulsars or new types of active galactic nuclei (AGN's). This two-year investigation is intended to support the analysis, correlation, and theoretical interpretation of data that we are obtaining at x ray, optical, and radio wavelengths in order to render the gamma-ray data interpretable. According to plan, in the first year concentration was on the identification and study of Geminga. The second year will be devoted to studies of similar unidentified gamma-ray sources which will become available in the first EGRET catalogs. The results obtained so far are presented in the two papers which are reproduced in the Appendix. In these papers, we discuss the pulse profiles of Geminga, the geometry and efficiency of the magnetospheric accelerator, the distance to Geminga, the implications for theories of polar cap heating, the effect of the magnetic field on the surface emission and environment of the neutron star, and possible interpretations of a radio-quiet Geminga. The implications of the other gamma-ray pulsars which were discovered to have high gamma-ray efficiency are also discussed, and the remaining unidentified COS B sources are attributed to a population of efficient gamma-ray sources, some of which may be radio quiet.

  16. Radio observations in the fields of COS-B gamma ray sources. IV - First quadrant sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.; Younis, S.

    1988-01-01

    The field of five COS-B gamma-ray sources in the first galactic quadrant have been mapped using the Effelsberg radio telescope at several frequencies. Candidate objects as potential radio counterparts of gamma-ray sources are discussed in the light of current observations; however, mostly being due to the crowded nature of the radio fields, no clear identification has been possible.

  17. Radio observations in the fields of COS-B gamma ray sources. IV - First quadrant sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.; Younis, S.

    1988-01-01

    The field of five COS-B gamma-ray sources in the first galactic quadrant have been mapped using the Effelsberg radio telescope at several frequencies. Candidate objects as potential radio counterparts of gamma-ray sources are discussed in the light of current observations; however, mostly being due to the crowded nature of the radio fields, no clear identification has been possible.

  18. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  19. Laser-Electron-Gamma-Source. Progress report, July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.; Giordano, G.; Kistner, OC.; Matone, G.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.; Ziegler, W.

    1986-07-01

    When completed, the Laser Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) is expected to provide intense beams of monochromatic and polarized (circular or linear) gamma rays with energies up to 500 MeV. The gamma-ray beams will be produced by Compton backscattering uv laser light from the electrons circulating in a storage ring. Progress with installation of the facility is described, particularly the Ar-ion laser and tagging spectrometer. Tests of the tagging spectrometer coponents is reported, and a second laser is described for higher energy operation. Estimates are given of expected beam parameters. Experimental equipment for the planned research projects to be carried out at the LEGS facility is discussed. (LEW)

  20. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  1. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  2. Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

  3. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  4. A combined neutron and gamma-ray multiplicity counter based on liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, Andreas; Flaska, Marek; Dolan, Jennifer L.; Chichester, David L.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2011-10-01

    Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray ( γ) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times compared with single-particle measurements. We present measurement results of n, γ, nn, nγ, γγ, nnn, nnγ, nγγ and γγγ multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples are discussed. Successful measurements of multiple rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

  5. A Combined Neutron and Gamma-Ray Multiplicity Counter Based on Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Jennifer Dolan; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2011-10-01

    Multiplicity counters for neutron assay have been extensively used in materials control and accountability for nonproliferation and nuclear safeguards. Typically, neutron coincidence counters are utilized in these fields. In this work, we present a measurement system that makes use not only of neutron (n) multiplicity counting but also of gamma-ray (g) multiplicity counting and the combined higher-order multiples containing both neutrons and gamma rays. The benefit of this approach is in using both particle types available from the sample, leading to a reduction in measurement times needed when using more measurables. We present measurement results of n, g, nn, ng, gg, nnn, nng, ngg, and ggg multiples emitted by Mixed-Oxide (MOX) samples measured at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The MOX measurement is compared to initial validation of the detection system done using a 252Cf source. The dual radiation measuring system proposed here uses extra measurables to improve the statistics when compared to a neutron-only system and allows for extended analysis and interpretation of sample parameters. New challenges such as the effect of very high intrinsic gamma-ray sources in the case of MOX samples is discussed. Successful measurements of multiples rates can be performed also when using high-Z shielding.

  6. Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter

    2004-01-01

    During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

  7. Physics of Gamma Ray Burst Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter

    2004-01-01

    During this grant period, the physics of gamma-ray bursts was investigated. A number of new results have emerged. The importance of pair formation in high compactness burst spectra may help explain x-ray flashes; a universal jet shape is a likely explanation for the distribution of jet break times; gravitational waves may be copiously produced both in short bursts from compact mergers and in long bursts arising from collapsars; x-ray iron lines are likely to be due to interaction with the stellar atmosphere of the progenitor; prompt optical flashes from reverse shocks will give diagnostics on the Lorentz factor and the environment; GeV and TeV emission from bursts may be expected in the external shock; etc. The group working with the PI included postdocs Dr. Bing Zhang (now assistant professor at University of Nevada); Dr. Shiho Kobayashi; graduate student Lijun Gou; collaborators Drs. Tim Kallman and Martin Rees. Meszaros shared with Rees and Dr. Bohan Paczynsky the AAS Rossi Prize in 2000 for their work on the theory of gamma ray bursts. The refereed publications and conference proceedings resulting from this research are summarized below. The PI gave a number of invited talks at major conferences, also listed.

  8. Near-infrared and gamma-ray monitoring of TANAMI gamma-ray bright sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nesci, R.; Tosti, G.; Pursimo, T.; Ojha, R.; Kadler, M.

    2013-06-18

    Context. We present that spectral energy distribution and its variability are basic tools for understanding the physical processes operating in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Aims. In this paper we report the results of a one-year near-infrared (NIR) and optical monitoring of a sample of 22 AGN known to be gamma-ray emitters, aimed at discovering correlations between optical and gamma-ray emission. Methods. We observed our objects with the Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope in J,H,K, and R bands nearly twice every month during their visibility window and derived light curves and spectral indexes. We also analyzed the gamma-ray data from the Fermi gamma-ray Space Telescope, making weekly averages. Results. Six sources were never detected during our monitoring, proving to be fainter than their historical Two micron all sky survey (2MASS) level. All of the sixteen detected sources showed marked flux density variability, while the spectral indexes remained unchanged within our sensitivity limits. Steeper sources showed, on average, a larger variability. From the NIR light curves we also computed a variability speed index for each detected source. Only one source (PKS 0208-512) underwent an NIR flare during our monitoring. Half of the sources showed a regular flux density trend on a one-year time scale, but do not show any other peculiar characteristic. The broadband spectral index αro appears to be a good proxy of the NIR spectral index only for BL Lac objects. No clear correlation between NIR and gamma-ray data is evident in our data, save for PKS 0537-441, PKS 0521-360, PKS 2155-304, and PKS 1424-418. In conclusion, the gamma-ray/NIR flux ratio showed a large spread, QSO being generally gamma-louder than BL Lac, with a marked correlation with the estimated peak frequency (νpeak) of the synchrotron emission.

  9. Near-infrared and gamma-ray monitoring of TANAMI gamma-ray bright sources

    DOE PAGES

    Nesci, R.; Tosti, G.; Pursimo, T.; ...

    2013-06-18

    Context. We present that spectral energy distribution and its variability are basic tools for understanding the physical processes operating in active galactic nuclei (AGN). Aims. In this paper we report the results of a one-year near-infrared (NIR) and optical monitoring of a sample of 22 AGN known to be gamma-ray emitters, aimed at discovering correlations between optical and gamma-ray emission. Methods. We observed our objects with the Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope in J,H,K, and R bands nearly twice every month during their visibility window and derived light curves and spectral indexes. We also analyzed the gamma-ray data from themore » Fermi gamma-ray Space Telescope, making weekly averages. Results. Six sources were never detected during our monitoring, proving to be fainter than their historical Two micron all sky survey (2MASS) level. All of the sixteen detected sources showed marked flux density variability, while the spectral indexes remained unchanged within our sensitivity limits. Steeper sources showed, on average, a larger variability. From the NIR light curves we also computed a variability speed index for each detected source. Only one source (PKS 0208-512) underwent an NIR flare during our monitoring. Half of the sources showed a regular flux density trend on a one-year time scale, but do not show any other peculiar characteristic. The broadband spectral index αro appears to be a good proxy of the NIR spectral index only for BL Lac objects. No clear correlation between NIR and gamma-ray data is evident in our data, save for PKS 0537-441, PKS 0521-360, PKS 2155-304, and PKS 1424-418. In conclusion, the gamma-ray/NIR flux ratio showed a large spread, QSO being generally gamma-louder than BL Lac, with a marked correlation with the estimated peak frequency (νpeak) of the synchrotron emission.« less

  10. GAMSOR: Gamma Source Preparation and DIF3D Flux Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.; Lee, C. H.; Hill, R. N.

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear reactors that rely upon the fission reaction have two modes of thermal energy deposition in the reactor system: neutron absorption and gamma absorption. The gamma rays are typically generated by neutron absorption reactions or during the fission process which means the primary driver of energy production is of course the neutron interaction. In conventional reactor physics methods, the gamma heating component is ignored such that the gamma absorption is forced to occur at the gamma emission site. For experimental reactor systems like EBR-II and FFTF, the placement of structural pins and assemblies internal to the core leads to problems with power heating predictions because there is no fission power source internal to the assembly to dictate a spatial distribution of the power. As part of the EBR-II support work in the 1980s, the GAMSOR code was developed to assist analysts in calculating the gamma heating. The GAMSOR code is a modified version of DIF3D and actually functions within a sequence of DIF3D calculations. The gamma flux in a conventional fission reactor system does not perturb the neutron flux and thus the gamma flux calculation can be cast as a fixed source problem given a solution to the steady state neutron flux equation. This leads to a sequence of DIF3D calculations, called the GAMSOR sequence, which involves solving the neutron flux, then the gamma flux, then combining the results to do a summary edit. In this manuscript, we go over the GAMSOR code and detail how it is put together and functions. We also discuss how to setup the GAMSOR sequence and input for each DIF3D calculation in the GAMSOR sequence. With the GAMSOR capability, users can take any valid steady state DIF3D calculation and compute the power distribution due to neutron and gamma heating. The MC2-3 code is the preferable companion code to use for generating neutron and gamma cross section data, but the GAMSOR code can accept cross section data from other sources. To further

  11. Compact Gamma-Beam Source for Nuclear Security Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkikh, P.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    A compact gamma-beam source dedicated to the development of the nuclear security technologies by use of the nuclear resonance fluorescence is described. Besides, such source is a very promising tool for novel technologies of the express cargoes inspection to prevent nuclear terrorism. Gamma-beam with the quanta energies from 0.3MeV to 7.2MeV is generated in the Compton scattering of the "green" laser photons on the electron beam with energies from 90MeV to 430MeV. The characteristic property of the proposed gammabeam source is a narrow spectrum (less than 1%) at high average gamma-yield (of 1013γ/s) due to special operation mode.

  12. QUASI-STAR JETS AS UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Czerny, Bozena; Sikora, Marek; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2012-08-10

    Gamma-ray catalogs contain a considerable amount of unidentified sources. Many of these are located out of the Galactic plane and therefore may have extragalactic origin. Here we assume that the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei proceeds through a quasi-star stage and consider the possibility of jet production by such objects. Those jets would be the sources of collimated synchrotron and Compton emission, extending from radio to gamma rays. The expected lifetimes of quasi-stars are of the order of million of years while the jet luminosities, somewhat smaller than that of quasar jets, are sufficient to account for the unidentified gamma-ray sources. The jet emission dominates over the thermal emission of a quasi-star in all energy bands, except when the jet is not directed toward an observer. The predicted synchrotron emission peaks in the IR band, with the flux close to the limits of the available IR all sky surveys. The ratio of the gamma-ray flux to the IR flux is found to be very large ({approx}60), much larger than in BL Lac objects but reached by some radio-loud quasars. On the other hand, radio-loud quasars show broad emission lines while no such lines are expected from quasi-stars. Therefore, the differentiation between various scenarios accounting for the unidentified gamma-ray sources will be possible at the basis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the IR/optical counterparts.

  13. Miniature accelerator-driven gamma source concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Chan, K. D.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Wood R. L.; Carlsten, B. E.; Kirbie, H. C.

    2003-01-01

    Recent developments in W-band (-100 GHz) traveling wave tube technology at Los Alarnos may lead to a compact high-power W-band RE source. A conceptual design of a compact 8-MeV electron linac that codd be powered by this source is presented, including electromagnetic structure calculations, proposed rnicrojbbrication and manufacturing methods, supporting calculations to estimate accelerator performance, and gumma production rates based on preliminary target geometries and expected output beam current.

  14. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  15. Energy-angle correlation of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an HEU source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, G.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-06-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) yield very unique fission signatures, namely correlated neutrons and gamma-rays. A major challenge is not only to detect, but also to rapidly identify and recognize SNM with certainty. Accounting for particle multiplicity and correlations is one of standard ways to detect SNM. However, many parameter data such as joint distributions of energy, angle, lifetime, and multiplicity of neutrons and gamma-rays can lead to better recognition of SNM signatures in the background radiation noise. These joint distributions are not well understood. The Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of neutrons and gamma-rays produced from spontaneous and interrogation-induced fission of SNM are carried out using the developed MONSOL computer code. The energy spectra of neutrons and gamma-rays from a bare Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) source are investigated. The energy spectrum of gamma-rays shows spectral lines by which HEU isotopes can be identified, while those of neutrons do not show any characteristic lines. The joint probability density function (JPDF) of the energy-angle association of neutrons and gamma-rays is constructed. Marginal probability density functions (MPDFs) of energy and angle are derived from JPDF. A probabilistic model is developed for the analysis of JPDF and MPDFs. This probabilistic model is used to evaluate mean values, standard deviations, covariance and correlation between the energy and angle of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from the HEU source. For both neutrons and gamma-rays, it is found that the energy-angle variables are only weakly correlated.

  16. Improved Multiple-Species Cyclotron Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, George A.; Nichols, Donald K.

    1990-01-01

    Use of pure isotope 86Kr instead of natural krypton in multiple-species ion source enables source to produce krypton ions separated from argon ions by tuning cylcotron with which source used. Addition of capability to produce and separate krypton ions at kinetic energies of 150 to 400 MeV necessary for simulation of worst-case ions occurring in outer space.

  17. An Optical Survey of Potential Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Lisa R.

    2006-12-01

    The EGRET instrument aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected 271 sources. Several objects were identified as "high-confidence" AGN, quasars, and low-confidence AGN. 170 sources remain unidentified (Hartman et al. 1999). Our project is to conduct an optical survey of unidentified sources, looking for evidence of blazar activity that may have been missed by the initial EGRET survey. The method of identifying sources used by the EGRET survey was to search for radio spectra peaking at 5 GHz. Such a spectrum is evidence of blazar-like activity. However, a study by Mattox et al. (1997); Mattox, Hartman & Reimer (2001) concluded that any gamma-ray source with a flux density less than 500 mJy at 5 GHz would be difficult to positively identify. The method described above neglects the possibility that blazar-like sources may be dim at such low frequencies and peak instead at higher frequencies (at least 200 Ghz). It has been hypothesized that sources that behave in this way could very well be counterparts to gamma-ray blazars (Tornikoski et al. 2002; Bloom et al. 1997, 2000). Our goal is to determine the magnitudes of objects in the optical wavelengths and check for evidence of blazar-like activity.

  18. New activity in the Dorado gamma-ray burst source

    SciTech Connect

    Golenetskii, S.V.; Mazets, E.P.; Aptekar, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    On 1981 December 1 and 1982 January 2 the Cone detectors aboard the Venera 13 and Venera 14 probes recorded ..gamma..-ray transients generated by the same source in Dorado as the notable sequence of events observed 1979 March 5, 6 and April 4, 24.

  19. A magnetoencephalographic study of face processing: M170, Gamma-band oscillations and source localization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zaifeng; Goldstein, Abraham; Harpaz, Yuval; Hansel, Myriam; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Bentin, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    EEG studies suggested that the N170 ERP and Gamma-band responses to faces reflect early and later stages of a multiple-level face-perception mechanism, respectively. However, these conclusions should be considered cautiously because EEG-recorded Gamma may be contaminated by non-cephalic activity such as microsaccades. Moreover, EEG studies of Gamma cannot easily reveal its intracranial sources. Here we recorded MEG rather than EEG, assessed the sources of the M170 and Gamma oscillations using beamformer, and explored the sensitivity of these neural manifestations to global, featural and configural information in faces. The M170 was larger in response to faces and face components than in response to watches. Scrambling the configuration of the inner components of the face even if presented without the face contour reduced and delayed the M170. The amplitude of MEG Gamma oscillations (30–70 Hz) was higher than baseline during an epoch between 230–570 ms from stimulus onset and was particularly sensitive to the configuration of the stimuli, regardless of their category. However, in the lower part of this frequency range (30–40 Hz) only physiognomic stimuli elevated the MEG above baseline. Both the M170 and Gamma were generated in a posterior-ventral network including the fusiform, inferior-occipital and lingual gyri, all in the right hemisphere. The generation of Gamma involved additional sources in the visual system, bilaterally. We suggest that the evoked M170 manifests a face-perception mechanism based on the global characteristics of face, whereas the induced Gamma oscillations are associated with the integration of visual input into a pre-existent coherent perceptual representation. PMID:22422432

  20. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-22

    Gamma-({gamma}{sup -}) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A {gamma}-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition {gamma}-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO{sub 2} laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of {gamma}-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO{sub 2}-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO{sub 2} laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO{sub 2} laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  1. Evaluation of Electroencephalography Source Localization Algorithms with Multiple Cortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Allison; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Jules; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Source localization algorithms often show multiple active cortical areas as the source of electroencephalography (EEG). Yet, there is little data quantifying the accuracy of these results. In this paper, the performance of current source density source localization algorithms for the detection of multiple cortical sources of EEG data has been characterized. Methods EEG data were generated by simulating multiple cortical sources (2–4) with the same strength or two sources with relative strength ratios of 1:1 to 4:1, and adding noise. These data were used to reconstruct the cortical sources using current source density (CSD) algorithms: sLORETA, MNLS, and LORETA using a p-norm with p equal to 1, 1.5 and 2. Precision (percentage of the reconstructed activity corresponding to simulated activity) and Recall (percentage of the simulated sources reconstructed) of each of the CSD algorithms were calculated. Results While sLORETA has the best performance when only one source is present, when two or more sources are present LORETA with p equal to 1.5 performs better. When the relative strength of one of the sources is decreased, all algorithms have more difficulty reconstructing that source. However, LORETA 1.5 continues to outperform other algorithms. If only the strongest source is of interest sLORETA is recommended, while LORETA with p equal to 1.5 is recommended if two or more of the cortical sources are of interest. These results provide guidance for choosing a CSD algorithm to locate multiple cortical sources of EEG and for interpreting the results of these algorithms. PMID:26809000

  2. Evaluation of Electroencephalography Source Localization Algorithms with Multiple Cortical Sources.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Allison; Yao, Jun; Dewald, Jules; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Source localization algorithms often show multiple active cortical areas as the source of electroencephalography (EEG). Yet, there is little data quantifying the accuracy of these results. In this paper, the performance of current source density source localization algorithms for the detection of multiple cortical sources of EEG data has been characterized. EEG data were generated by simulating multiple cortical sources (2-4) with the same strength or two sources with relative strength ratios of 1:1 to 4:1, and adding noise. These data were used to reconstruct the cortical sources using current source density (CSD) algorithms: sLORETA, MNLS, and LORETA using a p-norm with p equal to 1, 1.5 and 2. Precision (percentage of the reconstructed activity corresponding to simulated activity) and Recall (percentage of the simulated sources reconstructed) of each of the CSD algorithms were calculated. While sLORETA has the best performance when only one source is present, when two or more sources are present LORETA with p equal to 1.5 performs better. When the relative strength of one of the sources is decreased, all algorithms have more difficulty reconstructing that source. However, LORETA 1.5 continues to outperform other algorithms. If only the strongest source is of interest sLORETA is recommended, while LORETA with p equal to 1.5 is recommended if two or more of the cortical sources are of interest. These results provide guidance for choosing a CSD algorithm to locate multiple cortical sources of EEG and for interpreting the results of these algorithms.

  3. Multiple source ground heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belzile, P.; Lamarche, L.; Rousse, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Sharing geothermal borefields is usually done with each borehole having the same inlet conditions (flow rate, temperature and fluid). The objective of this research is to improve the energy efficiency of shared and hybrid geothermal borefields by segregating heat transfer sources. Two models are briefly presented: The first model allows the segregation of the inlet conditions for each borefields; the second model allows circuits to be defined independently for each leg of double U-tubes in a borehole. An application couples residential heat pumps and arrays of solar collectors. Independent circuits configuration gave the best energy savings in a symmetric configuration, the largest shank spacing and with solar collectors functioning all year long. The boreholes have been shortened from 300 m to 150 m in this configuration.

  4. Diffusion of Cosmic-Rays and Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pozo, E. D. C.; Torres, D. F.; Rodríguez Marrero, A. Y.

    It is commonly accepted that supernova remnants (SNR) are one of the most probable scenarios of leptonic and hadronic cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration. Such energetic CR can interact with interstellar gas to produce high-energy gamma rays, which can be detected through ground-based air Cherenkov detectors and space telescopes. Here we present a theoretical model that explains the high energy phenomenology of the neighborhood SNR IC 443, as observed with the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope and the Energetic Gamma-ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). We interpret MAGIC J0616 + 225 as delayed TeV emission of CR diffusing from IC 443, what naturally explains the displacement between EGRET and MAGIC sources.

  5. Observational evidence for extraterrestrial gamma-ray line sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, A. S.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Willett, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    During the 1974 balloon flight of a high spectral resolution gamma-ray telescope, observing in the energy range of about 50 keV to 10 Mev, evidences were gathered for two cosmic sources of gamma-ray lines. These are a 73 keV line feature superimposed on a power law continuum spectrum in the 55 to 300 keV range from the Crab nebula; and a flare-like event lasting about twenty minutes, during which four intense gamma-ray lines were measured at .41, 1.79, 2.22 and 5.95 MeV. The properties and operation of the detector used are described. The measured spectrum and count rate are discussed.

  6. Can Handheld Plastic Detectors Do Both Gamma and Neutron Isotopic Identification with Directional Source Location?

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-18

    This paper demonstrates, through MCNPX simulations, that a compact hexagonal array of detectors can be utilized to do both gamma isotopic identification (ID) along with neutron identification while simultaneously finding the direction of the source relative to the detector array. The detector array itself is composed of seven borated polyvinyl toluene (PVT) hexagonal light pipes approximately 4 inches long and with a 1.25 inch face-to-face thickness assembled in a tight configuration. The gamma ID capability is realized through judicious windowing algorithms as is the neutron spectral unfolding. By having multiple detectors in different relative positions, directional determination of the source can be realized. By further adding multiplicity counters to the neutron counts, fission events can be measured.

  7. Energy spectrum of extragalactic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of Monte Carlo electron photon cascade calculations for propagation of gamma rays through regions of extragalactic space containing no magnetic field are given. These calculations then provide upper limits to the expected flux from extragalactic sources. Since gamma rays in the 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV energy range are of interest, interactions of electrons and photons with the 3 K microwave background radiation are considered. To obtain an upper limit to the expected gamma ray flux from sources, the intergalactic field is assumed to be so low that it can be ignored. Interactions with photons of the near-infrared background radiation are not considered here although these will have important implications for gamma rays below 10 to the 14th power eV if the near infrared background radiation is universal. Interaction lengths of electrons and photons in the microwave background radiation at a temperature of 2.96 K were calculated and are given.

  8. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  9. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  10. Determination of the Absorption Coefficient and Cloudiness Multiplicity Attenuation During the Gamma-Radiation Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, K. N.; Borovikov, I. F.; Gaidamak, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents background value equivalent dose of gamma-radiation investigation in different weather: clear cloudy and overcast. The change of the dose rate of gamma radiation, depending on the weather and the ability cloudiness to shield gamma rays is shown. A new method for eliminating the consequences of accidents at nuclear power plants or plants using radioactive elements is proposed. A calculation method of cloudiness coefficient absorption and cloudiness gamma-radiation multiplicity attenuation is developed. The gamma- radiation multiplicity attenuation and the absorption coefficient of gamma radiation were calculated.

  11. A multiple-plate, multiple-pinhole camera for X-ray gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Plates with identical patterns of precisely aligned pinholes constitute lens system which, when rotated about optical axis, produces continuous high resolution image of small energy X-ray or gamma ray source. Camera has applications in radiation treatment and nuclear medicine.

  12. Monitoring TeV Gamma-ray Sources for Flaring States with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisher, Ian; Weisgarber, Thomas; HAWC Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The flux of many TeV gamma-ray emitters exhibits time variability. Detection of these flaring states across multiple wavelengths will lead to a better understanding of the acceleration processes occurring in the source. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is an extensive air-shower detector located near Pico de Orizaba in Mexico which is sensitive to TeV gamma rays. Designed as a survey instrument, the HAWC detector has a large field of view and nearly 100% uptime. This makes HAWC an ideal instrument to monitor sources for transient flaring states. We will present a method of monitoring sources using a Bayesian blocks algorithm to detect changes in the flux and report on the sensitivity of the method. We also discuss results from several bright AGN flares which occurred during the construction phase of HAWC.

  13. Single-View 3-D Reconstruction of Correlated Gamma-Neutron Sources

    DOE PAGES

    Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-07-01

    We describe a new method of 3D image reconstruc-tion of neutron sources that emit correlated gammas (e.g. Cf-252, Am-Be). This category includes a vast majority of neutron sources important in nuclear threat search, safeguards and non-proliferation. Rather than requiring multiple views of the source this technique relies on the source’s intrinsic property of coincidence gamma and neutron emission. As a result only a single-view measurement of the source is required to perform the 3D reconstruction. In principle, any scatter camera sensitive to gammas and neutrons with adequate timing and interaction location resolution can perform this reconstruction. Using a neutron doublemore » scatter technique, we can calculate a conical surface of possible source locations. By including the time to a correlated gamma we further constrain the source location in three-dimensions by solving for the source-to-detector distance along the surface of said cone. As a proof of concept we applied these reconstruction techniques on measurements taken with the the Mobile Imager of Neutrons for Emergency Responders (MINER). Two Cf-252 sources measured at 50 and 60 cm from the center of the detector were resolved in their varying depth with average radial distance relative resolution of 26%. To demonstrate the technique’s potential with an optimized system we simulated the measurement in MCNPX-PoliMi assuming timing resolution of 200 ps (from 2 ns in the current system) and source interaction location resolution of 5 mm (from 3 cm). These simulated improvements in scatter camera performance resulted in radial distance relative resolution decreasing to an average of 11%.« less

  14. Single-view 3D reconstruction of correlated gamma-neutron sources

    DOE PAGES

    Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-01-05

    We describe a new method of 3D image reconstruction of neutron sources that emit correlated gammas (e.g. Cf- 252, Am-Be). This category includes a vast majority of neutron sources important in nuclear threat search, safeguards and non-proliferation. Rather than requiring multiple views of the source this technique relies on the source’s intrinsic property of coincidence gamma and neutron emission. As a result only a single-view measurement of the source is required to perform the 3D reconstruction. In principle, any scatter camera sensitive to gammas and neutrons with adequate timing and interaction location resolution can perform this reconstruction. Using a neutronmore » double scatter technique, we can calculate a conical surface of possible source locations. By including the time to a correlated gamma we further constrain the source location in three-dimensions by solving for the source-to-detector distance along the surface of said cone. As a proof of concept we applied these reconstruction techniques on measurements taken with the the Mobile Imager of Neutrons for Emergency Responders (MINER). Two Cf-252 sources measured at 50 and 60 cm from the center of the detector were resolved in their varying depth with average radial distance relative resolution of 26%. To demonstrate the technique’s potential with an optimized system we simulated the measurement in MCNPX-PoliMi assuming timing resolution of 200 ps (from 2 ns in the current system) and source interaction location resolution of 5 mm (from 3 cm). Furthermore, these simulated improvements in scatter camera performance resulted in radial distance relative resolution decreasing to an average of 11%.« less

  15. A matrix-inversion method for gamma-source mapping from gamma-count data

    SciTech Connect

    Adsley, Ian; Burgess, Claire; Bull, Richard K

    2013-07-01

    In a previous paper it was proposed that a simple matrix inversion method could be used to extract source distributions from gamma-count maps, using simple models to calculate the response matrix. The method was tested using numerically generated count maps. In the present work a 100 kBq Co{sup 60} source has been placed on a gridded surface and the count rate measured using a NaI scintillation detector. The resulting map of gamma counts was used as input to the matrix inversion procedure and the source position recovered. A multi-source array was simulated by superposition of several single-source count maps and the source distribution was again recovered using matrix inversion. The measurements were performed for several detector heights. The effects of uncertainties in source-detector distances on the matrix inversion method are also examined. The results from this work give confidence in the application of the method to practical applications, such as the segregation of highly active objects amongst fuel-element debris. (authors)

  16. High-energy gamma radiation from extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Schlickeiser, R.; Mastichiadis, A.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the important relationship between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at over 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a kinematic focusing mechanism, based on Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet, that preferentially emits gamma rays in the superluminal direction.

  17. High-energy gamma radiation from extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Schlickeiser, R.; Mastichiadis, A.

    1992-01-01

    We propose that the important relationship between 3C 273 and 3C 279, the first two extragalactic sources detected at over 100 MeV energies, is their superluminal nature. In support of this conjecture, we propose a kinematic focusing mechanism, based on Compton scattering of accretion-disk photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons in the jet, that preferentially emits gamma rays in the superluminal direction.

  18. Compact Gamma-ray Source Technology Development Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Rusnak, B

    2009-09-25

    This study focuses on the applicability of current accelerator and laser technologies to the construction of compact, narrow bandwidth, gamma-ray sources for DHS missions in illicit materials detection. It also identifies research and development areas in which advancement will directly benefit these light sources. In particular, we review the physics of Compton scattering based light sources and emphasize the source properties most important to Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) applications of interest. The influences of laser and electron beam properties on the light source are examined in order to evaluate the utility of different technologies for this application. Applicable bulk and fiber-based laser systems and laser recirculation technologies are discussed and Radio Frequency (RF) Linear Accelerator (linac) technologies are examined to determine the optimal frequency and pulse formats achievable.

  19. Selective source blocking for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia based on analytical dose modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaile; Ma, Lijun

    2004-08-01

    We have developed an automatic critical region shielding (ACRS) algorithm for Gamma Knife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia. The algorithm selectively blocks 201 Gamma Knife sources to minimize the dose to the brainstem while irradiating the root entry area of the trigeminal nerve with 70-90 Gy. An independent dose model was developed to implement the algorithm. The accuracy of the dose model was tested and validated via comparison with the Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) calculations. Agreements of 3% or 3 mm in isodose distributions were found for both single-shot and multiple-shot treatment plans. After the optimized blocking patterns are obtained via the independent dose model, they are imported into the LGP for final dose calculations and treatment planning analyses. We found that the use of a moderate number of source plugs (30-50 plugs) significantly lowered (~40%) the dose to the brainstem for trigeminal neuralgia treatments. Considering the small effort involved in using these plugs, we recommend source blocking for all trigeminal neuralgia treatments with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

  20. Status of Identification of VHE Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan; /SLAC

    2006-09-28

    With the recent advances made by Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. the field of very high-energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray astronomy has recently entered a new era in which for the first time populations of Galactic sources such as e.g. Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) or Supernova remnants (SNRs) can be studied. However, while some of the new sources can be associated by positional coincidence as well as by consistent multi-wavelength data to a known counterpart at other wavelengths, most of the sources remain not finally identified. In the following, the population of Galactic H.E.S.S. sources will be used to demonstrate the status of the identifications, to classify them into categories according to this status and to point out outstanding problems.

  1. Round-robin multiple-source localization.

    PubMed

    Mantzel, William; Romberg, Justin; Sabra, Karim G

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a round-robin approach for multi-source localization based on matched-field processing. Each new source location is estimated from the ambiguity function after nulling from the data vector the current source location estimates using a robust projection matrix. This projection matrix effectively minimizes mean-square energy near current source location estimates subject to a rank constraint that prevents excessive interference with sources outside of these neighborhoods. Numerical simulations are presented for multiple sources transmitting through a fixed (and presumed known) generic Pekeris ocean waveguide in the single-frequency and broadband-coherent cases that illustrate the performance of the proposed approach which compares favorably against other previously published approaches. Furthermore, the efficacy with which randomized back-propagations may also be incorporated for computational advantage is also presented.

  2. Constraints on galactic distributions of gamma-ray burst sources from BATSE observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Meegan, Charles A.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Wilson, Robert B.; Paciesas, William S.; Brock, Martin N.; Horack, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The paradigm that gamma-ray bursts originate from Galactic sources is studied in detail using the angular and intensity distributions observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on NASA's Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). Monte Carlo models of gamma-ray burst spatial distributions and luminosity functions are used to simulate bursts, which are then folded through mathematical models of BATSE selection effects. The observed and computed angular intensity distributions are analyzed using modifications of standard statistical homogeneity and isotropy studies. Analysis of the BATSE angular and intensity distributions greatly constrains the origins and luminosities of burst sources. In particular, it appears that no single population of sources confined to a Galactic disk, halo, or localized spiral arm satisfactorily explains BATSE observations and that effects of the burst luminosity function are secondary when considering such models. One family of models that still satisfies BATSE observations comprises sources located in an extended spherical Galactic corona. Coronal models are limited to small ranges of burst luminosity and core radius, and the allowed parameter space for such models shrinks with each new burst BATSE observes. Multiple-population models of bursts are found to work only if (1) the primary population accounts for the general isotropy and inhomogeneity seen in the BATSE observations and (2) secondary populations either have characteristics similar to the primary population or contain numbers that are small relative to the primary population.

  3. Development of a Tool for the Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Multiple Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    HODGE, CHRISTOPHERA.

    2004-06-28

    Often multiple gamma spectra are acquired for the quantitative measurement of process holdup, filter banks, waste containers, D and D objects, or other such items. These spectra can represent data for single items, background data, and multiple assays of the same item or multiple areas representative of a single process area. The spectra are often collected under differing circumstances with regard to attenuating materials, distances, assay times, relative backgrounds, and many other such parameters. Quantitative results, and associated errors, are often dependent on multiple calibration constants, assays of varying isotopes, source geometries (point, line, or area), background averaging, Compton effects, and the accurate analysis, i.e. region of interest, of the raw gamma spectra. A tool has been developed to assist in this endeavor. The calculations have been quality checked so that the tool can readily be used with assurance that the calculations are consistent and correct. This tool allows for multiple spectra (up to 150) to be compared and manipulated. The tool has features for: dynamic average background subtraction; accounting for varying Compton effects; different calibration constants; up to three attenuating materials; any gamma energy; and variance in collection parameters such as distance, angle, assay times, and isotope. Selections of point, line, or area calculations are easily specified. The tool has a report writer that allows for averaging over multiple assays, graphing of activity (e.g., graphing activity in a sump allows the hot spots to be identified), and presentation of results with associated error components or MLDs. The resulting database allows for easy self-documentation and archiving.

  4. Strategies for Studying the Sources of Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Norris, J. P.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) has rapidly evolved in recent years with the discovery of their cosmological nature and with BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE and the IPN enabling a wide variety of associated . afterglow measurements. Multiwavelength observations ranging through the radio, optical, soft and hard x-ray, and gamma-ray regimes have exploded the field of GRB interpretation. Also, the Amanda, Milagro and LIGO experiments can search for related neutrino, cosmic-ray photon, and gravitational radiation events, even with the delayed alerts, such as from the IPN. The infrared region, where the optical emissions from sources at the extreme distances may be shifted, will become important but is undersubscribed. The soon-to-be launched Swift mission will greatly broaden the GRB discipline, and a strategy for associated ground-based measurements is outlined. The need for the improved global distribution of all instruments, in particular, robotic infrared detectors, is cited.

  5. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  6. Multiple Data Sources in Teacher Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furtwengler, Carol; And Others

    The Tennessee Career Ladder Program is a statewide evaluation system designed to pay teachers for teaching well. The system is based on a set of objectives called Domains of Competence, which are subdivided into Indicators. Early in the design of the system, it was decided to use multiple data sources, including a variety of instruments, to assess…

  7. A radioactive material monitoring system using multiple gamma spectroscopy detectors and centroid method.

    PubMed

    Song, Hankyeol; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Park, Chanwoo; Kim, Hyun-Il; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-10-01

    A radioactive material monitoring system, employing a passive detection technique with multiple gamma spectroscopy detectors and the centroid method for use in large areas, is presented. The system determines the location and the activity of radioisotopes. The proposed system was designed and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. In both simulation and experiment, calculated source locations were well distinguished and the location was determined within less than 1m range compared to the actual location. The calculated activity was matched to the actual activity within an error of 5%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Source mechanisms of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2008-05-01

    The source of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) has remained a mystery since their discovery in 1994. Recent Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations show that these intense bursts of MeV gamma rays likely originate much deeper in the atmosphere than previously inferred from Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) data, with the source altitude <21 km. Using existing measurements of the intensity and duration of BATSE and RHESSI TGFs, along with limits on the electric field set by the relativistic feedback mechanism involving backward propagating positrons and x-rays, it is found that TGFs cannot be produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches acting on natural background radiation or extensive cosmic-ray air showers alone, as has been assumed by many previous models. Instead, the energetic seed particle production most likely involves either relativistic feedback or runaway electron production in the strong electric fields associated with lightning leaders or streamers, similar to the energetic radiation observed on the ground from lightning.

  9. Laser System for Livermore's Mono Energetic Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D; Albert, F; Bayramian, A; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Ebbers, C; Hartemann, F

    2011-03-14

    A Mono-energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source, based on Compton scattering of a high-intensity laser beam off a highly relativistic electron beam, requires highly specialized laser systems. To minimize the bandwidth of the {gamma}-ray beam, the scattering laser must have minimal bandwidth, but also match the electron beam depth of focus in length. This requires a {approx}1 J, 10 ps, fourier-transform-limited laser system. Also required is a high-brightness electron beam, best provided by a photoinjector. This electron source requires a second laser system with stringent requirements on the beam including flat transverse and longitudinal profiles and fast rise times. Furthermore, these systems must be synchronized to each other with ps-scale accuracy. Using a novel hyper-dispersion compressor configuration and advanced fiber amplifiers and diode-pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers, we have designed laser systems that meet these challenges for the X-band photoinjector and Compton-scattering source being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Localization of inclusions in multiple prompt gamma ray analysis: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, A.; Festa, G.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using low energy gamma rays from neutron capture to localize slabs inside samples. A new system based on two gamma ray detectors with 2D collimators to be tested at the INES beamline at the pulsed neutron source ISIS (Oxford, UK) is described. The system provides a localization of slabs inside extended samples by using gamma ray self-absorption. Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of the beamline were carried out to model gamma spectra from test samples.

  11. COS-B gamma-ray sources and interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, A. M. T.; Bennett, K.; Bignami, G. F.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Buccheri, R.; Caraveo, P. A.; Hermsen, W.; Kanbach, G.; Lebrun, F.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Of the gamma-radiation observed above 100 MeV only a few percent is due to the catalogued sources which are viewed against intense background mission from the Galactic plane. There has been considerable recent success in modelling the Galactic plane emission as the interactions of cosmic rays with atomic and molecular interstellar gas; Bloemen, et al., demonstrate that large angular scale features of the observations are well reproduced in this way. By extending the analysis to small angular scales, which of the eCG sources might be due to conventional levels of cosmic rays within clumps of gas are shown and which cannot be so explained. With the use of a more sophisticated model the results presented improve and extend those of an earlier report. So far only the data above 300 MeV is used where the instrument's angular resolution is at its best.

  12. Initial results from a multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography system for nuclear security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Day, Buckley E.; Hartwig, Zachary S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Danagoulian, Areg

    2016-10-01

    The detection of assembled nuclear devices and concealed special nuclear materials (SNM) such as plutonium or uranium in commercial cargo traffic is a major challenge in mitigating the threat of nuclear terrorism. Currently available radiographic and active interrogation systems use ∼1-10 MeV bremsstrahlung photon beams. Although simple to build and operate, bremsstrahlung-based systems deliver high radiation doses to the cargo and to potential stowaways. To eliminate problematic issues of high dose, we are developing a novel technique known as multiple monoenergetic gamma radiography (MMGR). MMGR uses ion-induced nuclear reactions to produce two monoenergetic gammas for dual-energy radiography. This allows us to image the areal density and effective atomic number (Zeff) of scanned cargo. We present initial results from the proof-of-concept experiment, which was conducted at the MIT Bates Research and Engineering Center. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the capabilities of MMGR to measure areal density and Zeff of container cargo mockups. The experiment used a 3.0 MeV radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator to create sources of 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas from the 11B(d,nγ)12C reaction in a thick natural boron target; the gammas are detected by an array of NaI(Tl) detectors after transmission through cargo mockups . The measured fluxes of transmitted 4.44 MeV and 15.11 MeV gammas were used to assess the areal density and Zeff. Initial results show that MMGR is capable of discriminating the presence of high-Z materials concealed in up to 30 cm of iron shielding from low- and mid-Z materials present in the cargo mockup.

  13. Observational and theoretical study of the point sources of very high energy gamma-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babyk, Iurii

    2017-04-01

    The study of the sky using the most energetic photons plays a crucial role in detecting and exploring high-energy phenomena in the Universe. Observations conducted over recent years with new ground-based and space-borne gamma-ray instruments reveal that the universe is full of extreme accelerators, i.e., objects with surprisingly high efficiency for acceleration of electrons. In particular such an efficient acceleration is observed in gamma-ray-loud binary (GRLB) systems. GRLBs are a newly identified class of X-ray binaries in which interaction of an outflow from the compact object with the wind and radiation emitted by a companion star leads to the production of very-high-energy gamma-ray emission. Only five such systems have been firmly detected as persistent or regularly variable TeV gamma-ray emitters. All GRLBs detected in the TeV energy range contain a hot, young star and exhibit variable or periodic emission at multiple wavelengths across the electromagnetic spectrum. Details of the physical mechanism of the high-energy activity of GRLBs are not clear yet. Broad multi-wavelength observations are crucial to reveal the characteristic energies of the relativistic wind and better understanding of the nature of these sources. It looks quite possible that all these systems can be understood within the "hidden pulsar" model, and the observed differences are due to the different sizes of the system. In my work, I concentrate on the X-ray and gamma-ray emission observed from gamma-ray binaries PSR B1259-63 and LS I +61 303 with Suzaku, XMM-Newton, Swift, Chandra and Fermi observatories. In PSR B1259-63, the compact source is a young 48 ms radio pulsar orbiting Be-type star with period of 3.4 years. During my studies, I have been intensively involved in the analysis of the results of two multi-wavelength campaigns organized in 2010 and 2014 during the periastron passages in this system. These observations reveal complex spectral variability of the source as it passes

  14. Multiple source localization using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    McNay, D; Michielssen, E; Rogers, R L; Taylor, S A; Akhtari, M; Sutherling, W W

    1996-02-01

    We present a new procedure for localizing simultaneously active multiple brain sources that overlap in both space and time on EEG recordings. The source localization technique was based on a spatio-temporal model and a genetic algorithm search routine. The method was successfully applied to the localization of two dipole sources from several sets of simulated potentials with various signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). The different SNR values resembled evoked responses and epileptic spikes as commonly seen in the laboratory. Results of the simulation studies yielded localization accuracy ranging from 0.01 to 0.07 cm with an SNR of 10; from 0.02 to 0.26 cm with an SNR of 5; and from 0.06 to 0.73 cm when the SNR was equal to 2. Additionally, two sets of simulations were based on the dipole arrangements and time activities of data obtained during electrical stimulation of the median nerve in human subjects. These studies yielded localization accuracy within 0.1 cm. We also studied the localization accuracy of the algorithm using a physical model incorporating potential measurements of two current dipoles embedded in a sphere. In this situation the algorithm was successful in localizing the two simultaneously active sources to within 0.07-0.15 cm.

  15. Bisensory stimulation increases gamma-responses over multiple cortical regions.

    PubMed

    Sakowitz, O W; Quiroga, R Q; Schürmann, M; Başar, E

    2001-04-01

    In the framework of the discussion about gamma (approx. 40 Hz) oscillations as information carriers in the brain, we investigated the relationship between gamma responses in the EEG and intersensory association. Auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were compared with bisensory evoked potentials (BEPs; simultaneous auditory and visual stimulation) in 15 subjects. Gamma responses in AEPs, VEPs and BEPs were assessed by means of wavelet decomposition. Overall maximum gamma-components post-stimulus were highest in BEPs (P < 0.01). Bisensory evoked gamma-responses also showed significant central, parietal and occipital amplitude-increases (P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively; prestimulus interval as baseline). These were of greater magnitude when compared with the unisensory responses. As a correlate of the marked gamma responses to bimodal stimulation we suggest a process of 'intersensory association', i.e. one of the steps between sensory transmission and perception. Our data may be interpreted as a further example of function-related gamma responses in the EEG.

  16. Deductive Coordination of Multiple Geospatial Knowledge Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldinger, R.; Reddy, M.; Culy, C.; Hobbs, J.; Jarvis, P.; Dungan, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Deductive inference is applied to choreograph the cooperation of multiple knowledge sources to respond to geospatial queries. When no one source can provide an answer, the response may be deduced from pieces of the answer provided by many sources. Examples of sources include (1) The Alexandria Digital Library Gazetteer, a repository that gives the locations for almost six million place names, (2) The Cia World Factbook, an online almanac with basic information about more than 200 countries. (3) The SRI TerraVision 3D Terrain Visualization System, which displays a flight-simulator-like interactive display of geographic data held in a database, (4) The NASA GDACC WebGIS client for searching satellite and other geographic data available through OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Map Servers, and (5) The Northern Arizona University Latitude/Longitude Distance Calculator. Queries are phrased in English and are translated into logical theorems by the Gemini Natural Language Parser. The theorems are proved by SNARK, a first-order-logic theorem prover, in the context of an axiomatic geospatial theory. The theory embodies a representational scheme that takes into account the fact that the same place may have many names, and the same name may refer to many places. SNARK has built-in procedures (RCC8 and the Allen calculus, respectively) for reasoning about spatial and temporal concepts. External knowledge sources may be consulted by SNARK as the proof is in progress, so that most knowledge need not be stored axiomatically. The Open Agent Architecture (OAA) facilitates communication between sources that may be implemented on different machines in different computer languages. An answer to the query, in the form of text or an image, is extracted from the proof. Currently, three-dimensional images are displayed by TerraVision but other displays are possible. The combined system is called Geo-Logica. Some example queries that can be handled by Geo-Logica include: (1) show the

  17. Testing for Local Dependence in Rasch's Multiplicative Gamma Model for Speed Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Margo G. H.

    2007-01-01

    The author considers a latent trait model for the response time on a (set of) pure speed test(s), the multiplicative gamma model (MGM), which is based on the assumption that the test response times are approximately gamma distributed, with known index parameters and scale parameters depending on subject ability and test difficulty parameters. Like…

  18. Fission Multiplicity Detection with Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination from Higher-Order Time Correlation Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, Richard B.

    2002-10-01

    The current practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile materials using neutrons is dominated by the 3He detector. This has been the case since the mid 1980s when Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) was replaced with thermal well counters and neutron multiplicity counting (NMC). The thermal well counters detect neutrons by neutron capture in the 3He detector subsequent to moderation. The process of detection requires from 30 to 60 μs. As will be explained in Section 3.3 the rate of detecting correlated neutrons (signal) from the same fission are independent of this time but the rate of accidental correlations (noise) are proportional to this time. The well counters are at a distinct disadvantage when there is a large source of uncorrelated neutrons present from (α, n) reactions for example. Plastic scintillating detectors, as were used in FMD, require only about 20 ns to detect neutrons from fission. One thousandth as many accidental coincidences are therefore accumulated. The major problem with the use of fast-plastic scintillation detectors, however, is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable in these detectors. For this thesis, a new technique was developed to use higher-order time correlation statistics to distinguish combinations of neutron and gamma ray detections in fast-plastic scintillation detectors. A system of analysis to describe these correlations was developed based on simple physical principles. Other sources of correlations from non-fission events are identified and integrated into the analysis developed for fission events. A number of ratios and metric are identified to determine physical properties of the source from the correlations. It is possible to determine both the quantity being measured and detection efficiency from these ratios from a single measurement without a separate calibration. To account for detector dead-time, an alternative analytical technique

  19. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  20. Some neutron and gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium cermet fuel for isotopic power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, R. A.; Anderson, M. E.; Campbell, A. R.; Haas, F. X.

    1972-01-01

    Gamma and neutron measurements on various types of plutonium sources are presented in order to show the effects of O-17, O-18 F-19, Pu-236, age of the fuel, and size of the source on the gamma and neutron spectra. Analysis of the radiation measurements shows that fluorine is the main contributor to the neutron yields from present plutonium-molybdenum cermet fuel, while both fluorine and Pu-236 daughters contribute significantly to the gamma ray intensities.

  1. Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Stromswold, David C.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Hansen, Randy R.

    2006-01-31

    This paper presents methods of detecting and locating a concelaed nuclear gamma-ray source with a coded aperture mask. Energetic gamma rays readily penetrate moderate amounts of shielding material and can be detected at distances of many meters. The detection of high energy gamma-ray sources is vitally important to national security for several reasons, including nuclear materials smuggling interdiction, monitoring weapon components under treaties, and locating nuclear weapons and materials in the possession terrorist organizations.

  2. Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS B1251-713

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS B1251-713 with coordinates RA=193.7496721 deg, Dec=-71.6384544 deg (J2000; Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880).

  3. Multiple Detector Optimization for Hidden Radiation Source Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    This research validated a 2-D photon attenuation analytical transport model designed to determine optimal placement of multiple gamma detectors and...are electrical boxes. The yellow representing metal boxes (3), the green box representing column made of wood, the red square representing a graphite...correct type of detector (gamma, neutron , etc.) placed in the optimal location. This requirement dictates an accurate assessment of environmental

  4. Unfolding the fission prompt gamma-ray energy and multiplicity distribution measured by DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J; Laptev, A

    2010-10-16

    The nearly energy independence of the {gamma}-ray efficiency and multiplicity response for the DANCE array, the unusual characteristic elucidated in our early technical report (LLNL-TR-452298), gives one a unique opportunity to derive the true prompt {gamma}-ray energy and multiplicity distribution in fission from the measurement. This unfolding procedure for the experimental data will be described in details and examples will be given to demonstrate the feasibility of reconstruction of the true distribution.

  5. Angular dependence of multiple scattered photons and saturation thickness for certain elements by gamma scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, K. U.; Ravindraswami, K.; Eshwarappa, K. M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple scattering of gamma photons obtained from 0.215 GBq 137Cs source in both forward and backward hemisphere for 4 elements viz., carbon, aluminium, iron and copper are detected by a 76 mm ×76 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The variation of saturation thicknesses of 4 elements are studied experimentally at 60°, 80°, 90°, 100°, 120° and 135°. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulation of multiple scattering and variation in saturation thicknesses is carried out for 40°, 60°, 80°, 90°, 100°, 120°, 135°, 160° and 180° for four elements. The variation of the intensity of multiple scattered photons in different scattering angles is found to be different in forward and backward hemispheres. The intensity of multiple scattered photons is found to be minimum at around 90°. Saturation thicknesses for 40° and 60° are found to be less than saturation thicknesses for 80°, 90°, 100°, 120°, 135°, 160° and 180° in spite of the fact that the scattered energy is more for lower scattering angles. The behaviour of variation of saturation thicknesses as a function of scattering angles obtained from MCNP simulation agrees well with experimentally obtained values.

  6. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  7. Arcsec source location measurements in gamma-ray astronomy from a lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes typically used in the detection of high energy gamma-rays do not permit good angular resolution, which makes difficult the unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects emitting at other wavelengths. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For the purpose of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above about 20 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  8. X-band RF Photoinjector for Laser Compton X-ray and Gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R. A.; Anderson, G. G.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Barty, C. J.

    2015-05-06

    Extremely bright narrow bandwidth gamma-ray sources are expanding the application of accelerator technology and light sources in new directions. An X-band test station has been commissioned at LLNL to develop multi-bunch electron beams. This multi-bunch mode will have stringent requirements for the electron bunch properties including low emittance and energy spread, but across multiple bunches. The test station is a unique facility featuring a 200 MV/m 5.59 cell X-band photogun powered by a SLAC XL4 klystron driven by a Scandinova solid-state modulator. This paper focuses on its current status including the generation and initial characterization of first electron beam. Design and installation of the inverse-Compton scattering interaction region and upgrade paths will be discussed along with future applications.

  9. Optimal fingerprinting under multiple sources of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannart, Alexis; Ribes, Aurélien; Naveau, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Detection and attribution studies routinely use linear regression methods referred to as optimal fingerprinting. Within the latter methodological paradigm, it is usually recognized that multiple sources of uncertainty affect both the observations and the simulated climate responses used as regressors. These include for instance internal variability, climate model error, or observational error. When all errors share the same covariance, the statistical inference is usually performed with the so-called total least squares procedure, but to date no inference procedure is readily available in the climate literature to treat the general case where this assumption does not hold. Here we address this deficiency. After a brief outlook on the error-in-variable models literature, we describe an inference procedure based on likelihood maximization, inspired by a recent article dealing with a similar situation in geodesy. We evaluate the performance of our approach via an idealized test bed. We find the procedure to outperform existing procedures when the latter wrongly neglect some sources of uncertainty.

  10. Primary gamma-rays with E gamma or = to 10(15) eV: Evidence for ultrahigh energy particle acceleration in galactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Tukish, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    The recently observed primary ultra high energy gamma-rays (UHEGR) testify to the cosmic ray (CR) acceleration in the Galaxy. The available data may be interpreted as gamma-ray production due to photomeson production in CR sources.

  11. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Sarkissian, J.; Cromartie, H. T.; Johnston, S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Wolff, M. T.; Freire, P. C. C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Ferrara, E. C.; Keith, M.; Michelson, P. F.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Wood, K. S.

    2015-09-02

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported by Kerr et al. We did not detect radio pulsations from six other pulsars now known in these sources. We also describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets conducted to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. Furthermore, we present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903–7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in $\\gt 1$ day circular orbits with 0.2–0.3 ${M}_{\\odot }$ presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955–6150, in a 24 day orbit with a $\\approx 0.25$ ${M}_{\\odot }$ companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036–8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a $\\gt 0.14$ ${M}_{\\odot }$ companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946–5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a $\\gt 0.02$ ${M}_{\\odot }$ companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.

  12. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    DOE PAGES

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; ...

    2015-09-02

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported by Kerr et al. We did not detect radio pulsations from six other pulsars now known in these sources. We also describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets conducted to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. Furthermore, we present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903–7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are inmore » $$\\gt 1$$ day circular orbits with 0.2–0.3 $${M}_{\\odot }$$ presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955–6150, in a 24 day orbit with a $$\\approx 0.25$$ $${M}_{\\odot }$$ companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recently identified class of eccentric MSPs. PSR J1036–8317 is in an 8 hr binary with a $$\\gt 0.14$$ $${M}_{\\odot }$$ companion that is probably a white dwarf. PSR J1946–5403 is in a 3 hr orbit with a $$\\gt 0.02$$ $${M}_{\\odot }$$ companion with no evidence of radio eclipses.« less

  13. Laser Electron Gamma Source: Biennial progress report, June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sandorfi, A.M.

    1996-09-01

    The LEGS facility provides intense, polarized, monochromatic {gamma}-ray beams by Compton backscattering laser light from relativistic electrons circulating in the X-Ray storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven national Laboratory. Since 1990, experiments have concentrated on single polarization observables (polarized beams on unpolarized targets) in nuclear reactions involving the {Delta} resonance. Highlights of the last two years are given. An updated status of LEGS, and recent publications, is available on the WWW via http://WWW.LEGS.BNL.GOV/{approximately}LEGS/. In 1997 a new phase of operations will begin, focusing on double-polarization measurements with circularly polarized photon beams and longitudinally polarized nucleon targets. This work requires the development of (i) a new frozen-spin hydrogen-deuteride target that provides high polarizations for both nuclear species, and (ii) a new large acceptance detector array for measuring total reaction cross sections in both neutral and charged-particle channels. Progress on these instrumentation developments is an ongoing effort of the LEGS Spin Collaboration (LSC) and is discussed in the last section of this report.

  14. FERMI/LARGE AREA TELESCOPE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY SOURCE LIST

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Battelino, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bignami, G. F.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: jean.ballet@cea.fr E-mail: David.J.Thompson@nasa.gov

    2009-07-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  15. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  16. On the potential of atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays for resolving TeV gamma-ray sources in the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogi, L.; De Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Aharonian, F.

    2016-07-01

    The potential of an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to detect gamma-ray sources in complex regions has been investigated. The basic characteristics of the gamma-ray instrument have been parameterized using simple analytic representations. In addition to the ideal (Gaussian form) point spread function (PSF), the impact of more realistic non-Gaussian PSFs with tails has been considered. Simulations of isolated point-like and extended sources have been used as a benchmark to test and understand the response of the instrument. The capability of the instrument to resolve multiple sources has been analyzed and the corresponding instrument sensitivities calculated. The results are of particular interest for weak gamma-ray emitters located in crowded regions of the Galactic plane, where the chance of clustering of two or more gamma-ray sources within 1 deg is high.

  17. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma- (γ-) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A γ-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition γ-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO2 laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of γ-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO2-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO2 laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO2 laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  18. ATel draft: Fermi LAT detection of a new Gamma-ray Source PKS 2247-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed strong gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the radio source PKS 2247-131 with coordinates RA=342.4983854 deg, Dec=-12.8546736 deg (J2000; Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source is not in any published LAT catalog and was not detected by AGILE or EGRET.

  19. Precise source location of the anomalous 1979 March 5 gamma ray transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.

    1981-01-01

    Refinements in the source direction analysis of the observations of the unusual gamma ray transient are presented. The final results from the interplanetary gamma ray burst network produce a 0.1 arc sq. min. error box. It is nested inside the initially determined 2 arc sq min. source region. This smaller source location is within both the optical and X-ray contours of N49 although not positioned at either contour center.

  20. Asteroid Models from Multiple Data Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durech, J.; Carry, B.; Delbo, M.; Kaasalainen, M.; Viikinkoski, M.

    In the past decade, hundreds of asteroid shape models have been derived using the lightcurve inversion method. At the same time, a new framework of three-dimensional shape modeling based on the combined analysis of widely different data sources -- such as optical lightcurves, disk-resolved images, stellar occultation timings, mid-infrared thermal radiometry, optical interferometry, and radar delay-Doppler data -- has been developed. This multi-data approach allows the determination of most of the physical and surface properties of asteroids in a single, coherent inversion, with spectacular results. We review the main results of asteroid lightcurve inversion and also recent advances in multi-data modeling. We show that models based on remote sensing data were confirmed by spacecraft encounters with asteroids, and we discuss how the multiplication of highly detailed three-dimensional models will help to refine our general knowledge of the asteroid population. The physical and surface properties of asteroids, i.e., their spin, three-dimensional shape, density, thermal inertia, and surface roughness, are among the least known of all asteroid properties. Apart from the albedo and diameter, we have access to the whole picture for only a few hundreds of asteroids. These quantities are nevertheless very important to understand, as they affect the nongravitational Yarkovsky effect responsible for meteorite delivery to Earth, as well as the bulk composition and internal structure of asteroids.

  1. A Device for Search of Gamma-Radiation Intensive Sources at the Radiation Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Batiy, Valeriy; Klyuchnykov, A; Kochnev, N; Rudko, Vladimir; shcherbin, vladimir; Yegorov, V; Schmieman, Eric A.

    2005-08-08

    The procedure designed for measuring angular distributions of gamma radiation and for search of gamma radiation intensive sources is described. It is based on application of the original multidetector device ShD-1, for measuring an angular distribution in a complete solid angle (4 pi). The calibration results and data on the angular distributions of intensity of gamma radiation at the roof of Chornobyl NPP ''Shelter'' are presented.

  2. Spectral evolution of gamma-rays from adiabatically expanding sources in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The excess of antiprotons (P) observed in cosmic ray was attributed to their production in supernova (SN) envelopes expanding in dense clouds. While creating P, gamma rays are also produced and these clouds would shine as gamma-ray sources. The evolution of the gamma-ray spectrum is calculated for clouds of r sub H = 10.000 and 100.000/cu cm.

  3. Al-26: A galactic source of gamma ray line emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that Al26 is a very good candidate for producing a detectable gamma-ray line, and that this line is not only intense but also very narrow. By examining the chart of nuclides for other radioactive isotopes which could produce hiterto unnoticed gamma-ray lines following nucleosynthesis, it is found that for mass numbers less than 60, the isotopes Na22, Al26, K40, Ar42, Ti44, Sc46, Mn54, Co56, Co57, Co58, Co60 and Fe60 are the only ones with sufficiently long half lives (70) days to produce gamma rays in optically thin regions.

  4. Gamma-ray bursts during neutron star formation. Gamma-ray bursts and transient X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Desai, U. D.; Holt, S. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussions are presented of the associations between cosmic gamma ray bursts and transient X-ray sources, and the release of gravitational binding energy during the formation of neutron stars. The model for studying the associations is described along with the release of neutrinos during the collapse of white dwarfs.

  5. Towards new analysis of Gamma-Ray sources at HImalayan Gamma-Ray Observatory (HIGRO) in northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britto, R. J.; Acharya, B. S.; Anupama, G. C.; Bhatt, N.; Bhattacharjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chitnis, V. R.; Cowsik, R.; Dorji, N.; Duhan, S. K.; Gothe, K. S.; Kamath, P. U.; Koul, R.; Mahesh, P. K.; Mitra, A.; Nagesh, B. K.; Parmar, N. K.; Prabhu, T. P.; Rannot, R. C.; Rao, S. K.; Saha, L.; Saleem, F.; Saxena, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.; Shukla, A.; Singh, B. B.; Srinivasan, R.; Srinivasulu, G.; Sudersanan, P. V.; Tickoo, A. K.; Tsewang, D.; Upadhya, S. S.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yadav, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    The High Altitude GAmma-Ray (HAGAR) array is a wavefront sampling array of 7 telescopes, set-up at Hanle, at 4270 m a.s.l., in the Ladakh region of the Himalayas (North India). It constitutes the first phase of the HImalayan Gamma-Ray Observatory (HIGRO) project. HAGAR is the first array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes established at a so high altitude, and was designed to reach a relatively low threshold (currently around 200 GeV) with quite a low mirror area (31 m^2). Data are acquired using the On-source/Off-source tracking mode, and by comparing these sky regions the strength of the gamma-ray signal is estimated. Regular source observations are running since Sept. 2008 and preliminary results on Crab nebula were reported by 2009. Improvements of our analysis method are still going on, like estimation of arrival direction and estimation of night sky background. New softwares are under development for analysis of flash ADC modules, which provide more information from the incoming Cherenkov light wavefront. We report and discuss our new estimation of the systematics through dark region studies, and present new perspectives in the analysis of gamma-ray sources in this paper.

  6. Signal source separation and decomposition of the EGRET gamma ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Christian Parker

    2004-12-01

    In 1998, Dixon and collaborators discovered a statistically significant halo of gamma rays in the EGRET data from periods 1 through 4 that comprise observations of the gamma-ray sky from several distinct gamma-ray source distributions. An intensity map for the gamma-ray halo, however, could not be recovered with available statistical methods. Thus, the comparison and evaluation of, for example, dark matter models with the gamma-ray halo was limited. The dissertation argues that the morphology of gamma rays from a source distribution is distinguishable and can be used as a kind of spatial features signature for describing the source distribution. A new method, referred to as the analysis framework and based on capturing the spatial characteristics typical of gamma-ray source distributions, has been developed for the comparison of astrophysical models of gamma-ray sources with observational data. The method compensates for the difficulties and uncertainties of incorporating measurements into gamma-ray models by forming a model class from the output (e.g., a sky map) of an individual model that can be sampled to form a mean model. The output of the method is a mean model that is an average of typical members of a Besov space whose member functions all share the morphology of the gamma-ray model. The mean model can also be used in traditional hypothesis testing, like that of Mattox, et al. (1996), for the comparison and evaluation of gamma-ray models with the EGRET data. Results from extensive testing of the analysis framework with simulated data are presented. Results of the application of the analysis framework to the galactic diffuse emission model of Hunter, et al. (1997) are also presented .

  7. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis associated with an immunoglobulin gamma 3 restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Gaiser, C N; Johnson, M J; de Lange, G; Rassenti, L; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Steinman, L

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been linked to the immunoglobulin G (Gm) markers as well as HLA-DR genes. We have used a genomic Ig gamma 1 probe which detects polymorphisms in the gamma 1, gamma 2, gamma 3 and pseudogamma genes to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms associated with MS. A negative association was found between a 5.9-kilobase (kb) Bst EII gamma 3 fragment and MS. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of this fragment in 84 of 140 (60.0%) controls, but in only 17 of 59 (28.8%) MS patients. The frequency of the fragment in 47 myasthenia gravis and 16 Graves' disease patients was similar to that in controls, 60.0 and 62.5%, respectively.

  8. Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis associated with an immunoglobulin gamma 3 restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Gaiser, C N; Johnson, M J; de Lange, G; Rassenti, L; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Steinman, L

    1987-01-01

    Susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has been linked to the immunoglobulin G (Gm) markers as well as HLA-DR genes. We have used a genomic Ig gamma 1 probe which detects polymorphisms in the gamma 1, gamma 2, gamma 3 and pseudogamma genes to identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms associated with MS. A negative association was found between a 5.9-kilobase (kb) Bst EII gamma 3 fragment and MS. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of this fragment in 84 of 140 (60.0%) controls, but in only 17 of 59 (28.8%) MS patients. The frequency of the fragment in 47 myasthenia gravis and 16 Graves' disease patients was similar to that in controls, 60.0 and 62.5%, respectively. Images PMID:2878940

  9. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid therebetween; e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits.

  10. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Turner, T.D.

    1997-08-26

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; (b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; (c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; (d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid there between; (e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; (f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; (g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; (h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; (i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and (j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits. 6 figs.

  11. Application of a Multidimensional Wavelet Denoising Algorithm for the Detection and Characterization of Astrophysical Sources of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Digel, S.W.; Zhang, B.; Chiang, J.; Fadili, J.M.; Starck, J.-L.; /Saclay /Stanford U., Statistics Dept.

    2005-12-02

    Zhang, Fadili, & Starck have recently developed a denoising procedure for Poisson data that offers advantages over other methods of intensity estimation in multiple dimensions. Their procedure, which is nonparametric, is based on thresholding wavelet coefficients. The restoration algorithm applied after thresholding provides good conservation of source flux. We present an investigation of the procedure of Zhang et al. for the detection and characterization of astrophysical sources of high-energy gamma rays, using realistic simulated observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The LAT is to be launched in late 2007 on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope mission. Source detection in the LAT data is complicated by the low fluxes of point sources relative to the diffuse celestial background, the limited angular resolution, and the tremendous variation of that resolution with energy (from tens of degrees at {approx}30 MeV to 0.1{sup o} at 10 GeV). The algorithm is very fast relative to traditional likelihood model fitting, and permits immediate estimation of spectral properties. Astrophysical sources of gamma rays, especially active galaxies, are typically quite variable, and our current work may lead to a reliable method to quickly characterize the flaring properties of newly-detected sources.

  12. Non-association of a celestial gamma ray source with the new Milky Way satellite galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The newly discovered satellite galaxy located in the Milky Way galactic anti-center region is discussed along with the possibility that a nearby gamma ray source is associated with it. The factors which led to the conclusion that the gamma ray excess is not associated with the galaxy are considered.

  13. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  14. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  15. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  16. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  17. 46 CFR 111.10-5 - Multiple energy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multiple energy sources. 111.10-5 Section 111.10-5...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-5 Multiple energy sources. Failure of any single generating set energy source such as a boiler, diesel, gas turbine, or steam turbine must not cause all generating...

  18. Method and System for Gamma-Ray Localization Induced Spacecraft Navigation Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikh, Suneel I. (Inventor); Hisamoto, Chuck (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for spacecraft navigation using distant celestial gamma-ray bursts which offer detectable, bright, high-energy events that provide well-defined characteristics conducive to accurate time-alignment among spatially separated spacecraft. Utilizing assemblages of photons from distant gamma-ray bursts, relative range between two spacecraft can be accurately computed along the direction to each burst's source based upon the difference in arrival time of the burst emission at each spacecraft's location. Correlation methods used to time-align the high-energy burst profiles are provided. The spacecraft navigation may be carried out autonomously or in a central control mode of operation.

  19. Gamma-ray burst locations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, M. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) consists of eight anisotropic gamma-ray spectrometers at the corners of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE monitors the full sky from a fixed orientation and determines the direction of gamma-ray bursts with an accuracy appropriate for studying the bursts' celestial distribution. We describe the calculation of gamma-ray burst directions from measurements made by BATSE. We present a sample of calculated directions from BATSE's measurement of solar flaxes and compare the calculated directions with the solar direction. We describe the systematic errors apparent in these data and discuss ongoing efforts to correct them.

  20. Detection of embedded radiation sources using temporal variation of gamma spectral data.

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-09-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the isotopes present in a measurement. For low energy resolution detectors, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the isotopes present in the measurement. When many isotopes are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many trial solutions by highly skilled spectroscopists. This report investigates the potential of a new analysis method which uses spatial/temporal information from multiple low energy resolution measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other isotopes present. This method is referred to as targeted principal component analysis (TPCA). For radiation portal monitor applications, multiple measurements of gamma spectra are taken at equally spaced time increments as a vehicle passes through the portal and the TPCA method is directly applicable to this type of measurement. In this report we describe the method and investigate its application to the problem of detection of a radioactive localized source that is embedded in a distributed source in the presence of an ambient background. Examples using simulated spectral measurements indicate that this method works very well and has the potential for automated analysis for RPM applications. This method is also expected to work well for isotopic detection in the presence of spectrally and spatially varying backgrounds as a result of vehicle-induced background suppression. Further work is needed to include effects of shielding, to understand detection limits, setting of thresholds, and to estimate false positive probability.

  1. COS-B gamma ray sources beyond the predicted diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Simpson, G.

    1990-01-01

    COS-B data were reanalyzed using for background subtraction the modeled galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission based on HI- and CO-line surveys and the gamma-ray data itself. A methodology was developed for this purpose with the following three features: automatic generation of source catalogs using correlation analysis, simulation of trials to derive significance thresholds for source detection, and bootstrap sampling to drive error boxes and confidence intervals for source parameters. The analysis shows that about half of the 2CG sources are explained by concentrations in the distribution of molecular hydrogen. Indication for a few weak new sources is also obtained.

  2. Fermi Establishes Classical Novae as a Distinct Class of Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    A classical nova results from runaway thermonuclear explosions on the surface of a white dwarf that accretes matter from a low-mass main-sequence stellar companion. In 2012 and 2013, three novae were detected in gamma rays and stood in contrast to the first gamma-ray detected nova V407 Cygni 2010, which belongs to a rare class of symbiotic binary systems. Despite likely differences in the compositions and masses of their white dwarf progenitors, the three classical novae are similarly characterized as soft spectrum transient gamma-ray sources detected over 2-3 week durations. The gamma-ray detections point to unexpected high-energy particle acceleration processes linked to the mass ejection from thermonuclear explosions in an unanticipated class of Galactic gamma-ray sources.

  3. Radio observations of four anticenter 2CG gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oezel, M. E.; Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.

    1985-01-01

    The 2CG sources 218-00, 135+01, 121+04 and 95+04 have been observed at two radio frequencies and the flux values and spectra of the radio sources observed within the gamma-ray fields are catalogued down to a sensitivity of approx 30 mJy at lambda 11 cm. Possible gamma-ray counterpart candidate objects are briefly discussed.

  4. X-Ray Observations of Unidentified H.E.S.S. Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /SLAC

    2007-10-10

    In a survey of the inner part of the Galaxy, performed with the H.E.S.S. Instrument (High energy stereoscopic system) in 2004 and 2005, a large number of new unidentified very high energy (VHE) {gamma}-ray sources above an energy of 100 GeV was discovered. Often the {gamma}-ray spectra in these sources reach energies of up to {approx} 10 TeV. These are the highest energy particles ever attributed to single astrophysical objects. While a few of these sources can be identified at other wavebands, most of these sources remain unidentified so far. A positive identification of these new g-ray sources with a counterpart object at other wavebands requires (a) a positional coincidence between the two sources,( b) a viable {gamma}-ray emission mechanism and (c) a consistent multiwavelength behavior of the two sources. X-ray observations with satellites such as XMM-Newton, Chandra or Suzaku provide one of the best channels to studying these enigmatic {gamma}-ray sources at other wavebands, since they combine high angular resolution and sensitivity with the ability to access non-thermal electrons through their synchrotron emission. We therefore have started a dedicated program to investigate VHE {gamma}-ray sources with high-sensitivity X-ray instruments.

  5. Neutrino-Gamma Multi-Messenger Source Detection via the Astrophysical Multi-Messenger Observatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixelle, Josh; Miles, S.; AMON

    2014-01-01

    The idea of multi-messenger event detection has long been explored in the context of above-threshold analysis performed by the IceCube collaboration using Swift BAT and by the Amanda collaboration using BATSE. While these investigations produced null results, they left the event space of sub-threshold events untouched. This untapped event space, combined with the addition of new observatories for various bands and messenger types, provides the obvious niche for a GBN style network to exist: AMON. We consider Monte-carlo models of pair-wise detection between sub-threshold IceCube neutrino doublets, sub-threshold neutrino-gamma doublets with Swift BAT, and with sub-threshold higher multiplicity neutrino-gamma coincidences with Fermi LAT. Several detection methods were considered and compared to the status quo analyses of neutrino doublets by IceCube, demonstrating significant sensitivity gain. The MC model analysis was followed by an archival doublet analysis between IceCube-40 and Fermi LAT data within their co-temporal window of observation. Several methods for detecting statistical signal excess in the archival analysis were considered, providing an upper limit on source population parameters for the given analysis sensitivity.

  6. Identification of three FcR-positive T cell subsets (T gamma, T mu and T gamma mu) in the cerebrospinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, J E; Biberfeld, G; Landin, S; Sidén, A; Norrby, E

    1980-01-01

    Proportions of T cells and T cell subsets, as identified by their Fc receptors (FcR) for IgM and IgG (Tmu and T gamma), were determined in the peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocyte populations in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). On average, MS patients had 79% total T cells (62% of which were T gamma, 66% Tmu) in CSF lymphocytes compared to 66% total T cells (30% T gamma, 63% Tmu) in PBL. Normal age- and sex-matched controls PBL had 74% total T cells (20% T gamma, 54% Tmu). By direct observation using an indirect immunofluorescence assay, 41% of the CSF T gamma cells in MS patients bore receptors for IgM; these cells were designated T gamma mu and, according to the double-marker analysis, did not seem to correlate with disease stage. In MS PBL, 20% of T gamma cells were T gamma mu compared to 9% in the control PBL T gamma population. Thus, MS patients had a higher proportion of total T cells, T gamma cells and T gamma mu cells in their CSF than in their peripheral blood and than those populations found in normal control blood. The significance of this T gamma mu population for the continuing disease state in MS is discussed. PMID:6970641

  7. New Spherical Gamma-Ray and Neutron Emitting Sources for Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L.; Pibida, L.

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed new gamma-ray and neutron emitting sources for testing radiation detection systems. These radioactive sources were developed for testing of detection systems in maritime applications. This required special source characteristics. PMID:27504230

  8. Science of Compact X- and Gamma-ray Sources: MAXI and GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave

    2008-01-01

    MAXI and GLAST will be surveying the sky simultaneously. Compact objects that may show variability will be excellent targets for coordinated multiwavelength studies. Gamma-ray bursts (and afterglows), pulsars, high-mass X-ray binaries, microquasars, and active galactic nuclei are all objects whose X- and gamma-ray relationship can be explored by such observations. Of particular interest will be variable unidentified gamma-ray sources, whose contemporaneous observations by MAXI may prove decisive in identifying the source of the high-energy emission.

  9. Integrating multiple data sources for malware classification

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Blake Harrell; Storlie, Curtis B; Lane, Terran

    2015-04-28

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of tools and techniques for classifying programs. According to one exemplary technique, at least one graph representation of at least one dynamic data source of at least one program is generated. Also, at least one graph representation of at least one static data source of the at least one program is generated. Additionally, at least using the at least one graph representation of the at least one dynamic data source and the at least one graph representation of the at least one static data source, the at least one program is classified.

  10. Interferon-gamma-expressing cells are a major source of interleukin-21 in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Sarra, Massimiliano; Monteleone, Ivan; Stolfi, Carmine; Fantini, Massimo Claudio; Sileri, Pierpaolo; Sica, Giuseppe; Tersigni, Roberto; Macdonald, Thomas T; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2010-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) there is enhanced production of interleukin (IL)-21, a cytokine that activates multiple pathways that sustain mucosal inflammation. However, the phenotype of IL-21-producing cells in IBD, and the cytokine(s) they coproduce, is not known. We here characterized the cell source of IL-21 and determined which factors regulate IL-21 in the human gut. Cytokines were analyzed in CD4+ T intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes (T-LPL) isolated from IBD patients and controls by flow cytometry. Moreover, IL-21 was evaluated in mucosal T follicular cells (TFH). To assess the involvement of IL-12 and IL-23 in the production of IL-21, T-LPL were activated in the presence or absence of IL-12 or IL-23. The proportion of IL-21-producing CD4+ T-LPL was increased in IBD compared to controls. The majority of IL-21-producing T-LPL coexpressed interferon (IFN)-gamma, and to a lesser extent IL-4 or IL-17A. Activation of CD4+ T-LPL with IL-12 but not IL-23 enhanced the fraction of cells coexpressing IL-21 and IFN-gamma. TFH cells in LPL were identified by CXCR5 expression and expressed IL-21 both in IBD and controls; however, the fraction of IL-21-positive TFH cells was higher in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis and controls. Treatment of CD4+ T-LPL with IL-12 enhanced the frequency of CXCR5+ IL-21-producing TFH cells. These findings indicate that in IBD IL-21 is mostly produced by CD4+ T-LPL coexpressing IFN-gamma, reinforcing the concept that distinct subsets of T cells can produce IL-21.

  11. Spontaneous Sourcing among Students Reading Multiple Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromso, Helge I.; Braten, Ivar; Britt, M. Anne; Ferguson, Leila E.

    2013-01-01

    This study used think-aloud methodology to explore undergraduates' spontaneous attention to and use of source information while reading six documents that presented conflicting views on a controversial social scientific issue in a Google-like environment. Results showed that students explicitly and implicitly paid attention to sources of documents…

  12. Spontaneous Sourcing among Students Reading Multiple Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromso, Helge I.; Braten, Ivar; Britt, M. Anne; Ferguson, Leila E.

    2013-01-01

    This study used think-aloud methodology to explore undergraduates' spontaneous attention to and use of source information while reading six documents that presented conflicting views on a controversial social scientific issue in a Google-like environment. Results showed that students explicitly and implicitly paid attention to sources of documents…

  13. New source models to represent the irradiation process in panoramic gamma irradiator.

    PubMed

    Gual, Maritza R; Milian, Felix M; Mesquita, Amir Z; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-10-01

    The use of gamma irradiation technologies generates a number of complex scientific and technical problems; for example, the target is manually loaded onto turntables and is rotated during the entire irradiation process and the MCNPX three-dimensional geometry simulation is kept static. For this, it is necessary to introduce additional approaches. In this paper, two new methodologies are proposed for the simulation of irradiation process in panoramic gamma irradiator. The study was performed at the gamma irradiation facility at the Nuclear Technology Development Center of the National Nuclear Energy Commission, Brazil. The source can be reproduced with a homogenized geometry. Validation of MCNPX calculations of gamma doses were performed by thorough comparison with the experimental measurements. The contribution of this proposed source models has opened new lines of research. The results of this study showed that the proposed source models effectively represent the irradiation process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-energy neutron physics research with a gamma multiplicity detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Robert C.; Slovacek, R. E.; Werner, C. J.; Moretti, B. E.; Burke, J. A.; Drindak, N. J.; Leinweber, G.

    1997-02-01

    A sixteen-segment NaI(Tl) multiplicity gamma ray detector is used at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gaerttner LINAC Laboratory for neutron cross section measurements. This detector consists of an annulus of NaI(Tl) divided into two sets of 8 pie shaped segments, each segment optically isolate and viewed by a photomultiplier. The neutron beam passes along the axis of the detector and impinges upon a sample placed in the center. Time-of-flight data are taken as a function of the number of sections which detect a gamma and which is defined as the detected multiplicity. This detector can simultaneously acquire neutron scattering, capture and fission data by placing suitable limits on the total detected gamma ray energy deposited in the detector. Scattering and capture measurements have been performed on samples of holmium, erbium, and tungsten and experimental results are presented. The experimental multiplicity for capture is analyzed by assuming the single particle model, stochastically calculating the gamma ray cascades from neutron capture, and transporting each gamma ray into the detector using the Monte Carlo method. The detection efficiency for neutron capture is over 90 percent and is relatively insensitive to different isotopes of the same element or different spins of the compound nuclear resonances. A status report on experimental and analytical activities at the Laboratory is presented.

  15. Improvement in the practical implementation of neutron source strength calibration using prompt gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Khabaz, Rahim; Rene Vega-Carrillo, Hector

    2013-08-01

    In this study, the neutron emission rate from neutron sources using prompt gamma rays in hydrogen was determined, and several improvements were applied. Using Monte Carlo calculations, the best positions for the source, moderator and detector relative to each other were selected. For (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources, the sizes for polyethylene spheres with the highest efficiency were 12- and 10-inch, respectively. In addition, a new shielding cone was designed to account for scattered neutrons and gamma rays. The newly designed shielding cone, which is 45 cm in length, provided suitable attenuation for the source radiation.

  16. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  17. Focusing and imaging sharp line x-ray and gamma-ray sources using variable-metric diffraction crystals. [Gamma ray telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A new method has been devised for focusing and imaging the radiation from sharp-line sources of x-rays and gamma-rays, which makes use of variable-metric diffraction crystals. A variable-metric diffraction crystal is one in which the spacings between the crystalline planes is varied as a function of position in the crystal by either the application of a thermal gradient or by changing the composition of a two component or multiple component crystal. This change in planar spacing changes the Bragg diffraction angle for monochromatic radiation as a function of position in the crystal and makes it possible to obtain focusing and in some cases imaging of a sharp-line point source or parallel beam source. This new approach to focusing x-rays and gamma-rays is used to design a number of gamma ray telescopes suitable for focusing the 511 keV annihilation radiation from the strong source of the center of our galaxy. The new designs are surprisingly efficient with approximately 20% of the radiation incident on the variable-metric diffraction crystals being focused on the image spot. Crystals of Ge, Ge + Si, Si, and quartz are used with mosaic widths of 10 arc sec. The size of the telescope can be scaled up or down without affecting the angular resolution or the energy resolution. The largest model described is 50 m long and has 10 crystal diffraction ring assembles with radii between 71 and 200 cm. The total area of the diffraction crystal is 24,610 cm/sup 2/ and the effective area (total x diffraction coefficient x transmission) is 4745 cm/sup 2/. An example of a smaller telescope is also given that is only 12.5 m long and has an effective area of 297 cm/sup 2/.

  18. Effect of multiple strain-anneal cycles on the 1000 C creep behaviour of gamma/gamma prime-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Buzek, B. C.; Wirth, G.

    1986-01-01

    Various multiple strain-anneal cycles (1000 C) were imposed on specimens of the directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) alloy gamma/gamma prime-alpha to identify thermomechanical processing methods (TMP) which would improve the creep behavior. Specimens of the Ni-32.3Mo-6.3Al wt pct alloy were grown with a modified Bridgeman technique. Some of the cylindrical specimens were alternately heat-treated at 900 C, then strained, or heat-treated only, while other specimens were annealed at 900 C after swaging and then worked at ambient temperature. The specimens were all examined microstructurally using transmission electron microscopy, some before and after being exposed to constant-load compression tests at 1000 C. The creep strain increased for all TMP specimens for strain rates of at least 2 millionths per sec. Strain rates of about 2 ten millionths per sec were only improved with strain annealing with 13 percent work at ambient temperature. A slight improvement, compared to as-grown materials, was observed in the 1000 C creep behavior of materials annealed at 900 C. Strain-annealing was found to introduce three-dimensional dislocation networks into the gamma-prime matrix.

  19. Effect of multiple strain-anneal cycles on the 1000 C creep behaviour of gamma/gamma prime-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Buzek, B. C.; Wirth, G.

    1986-01-01

    Various multiple strain-anneal cycles (1000 C) were imposed on specimens of the directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) alloy gamma/gamma prime-alpha to identify thermomechanical processing methods (TMP) which would improve the creep behavior. Specimens of the Ni-32.3Mo-6.3Al wt pct alloy were grown with a modified Bridgeman technique. Some of the cylindrical specimens were alternately heat-treated at 900 C, then strained, or heat-treated only, while other specimens were annealed at 900 C after swaging and then worked at ambient temperature. The specimens were all examined microstructurally using transmission electron microscopy, some before and after being exposed to constant-load compression tests at 1000 C. The creep strain increased for all TMP specimens for strain rates of at least 2 millionths per sec. Strain rates of about 2 ten millionths per sec were only improved with strain annealing with 13 percent work at ambient temperature. A slight improvement, compared to as-grown materials, was observed in the 1000 C creep behavior of materials annealed at 900 C. Strain-annealing was found to introduce three-dimensional dislocation networks into the gamma-prime matrix.

  20. Rotating and static sources for gamma knife radiosurgery systems: Monte Carlo studies.

    PubMed

    Cheung, J Y C; Yu, K N

    2006-07-01

    Rotating gamma systems (RGSs), GammaART-6000, and its Chinese equivalents, such as OUR and MASEP, etc., are new radiosurgery systems that use rotating 60Co sources instead of the 201 static sources (Leksell gamma knife, LGK). The rotating sources of RGSs simulate an infinite number of beams and promote extremely high target to surface dose ratios. However, the results of Monte Carlo in this study shows that RGS variants (modeled as having the same latitude angles, source to focus distance, and the distance from the source to the end of the collimator as the LGK) have smaller beam profile penumbra in the z direction, while LGK has smaller penumbra in the x and y directions. The differences are more significant in using larger collimators.

  1. Rotating and static sources for gamma knife radiosurgery systems: Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J. Y. C.; Yu, K. N.

    2006-07-15

    Rotating gamma systems (RGSs), GammaART-6000{sup TM}, and its Chinese equivalents, such as OUR and MASEP, etc., are new radiosurgery systems that use rotating {sup 60}Co sources instead of the 201 static sources (Leksell gamma knife, LGK). The rotating sources of RGSs simulate an infinite number of beams and promote extremely high target to surface dose ratios. However, the results of Monte Carlo in this study shows that RGS variants (modeled as having the same latitude angles, source to focus distance, and the distance from the source to the end of the collimator as the LGK) have smaller beam profile penumbra in the z direction, while LGK has smaller penumbra in the x and y directions. The differences are more significant in using larger collimators.

  2. SEARCHING FOR {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE UNIDENTIFIED INTEGRAL SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.

    2012-05-10

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenges in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog. This method is based on the infrared colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this Letter, we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog. Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary Data Release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed Swift archival data available for 10 out of these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help us understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  3. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  4. Glutathione provides a source of cysteine essential for intracellular multiplication of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Alkhuder, Khaled; Meibom, Karin L; Dubail, Iharilalao; Dupuis, Marion; Charbit, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. Its ability to multiply and survive in macrophages is critical for its virulence. By screening a bank of HimarFT transposon mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) to isolate intracellular growth-deficient mutants, we selected one mutant in a gene encoding a putative gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). This gene (FTL_0766) was hence designated ggt. The mutant strain showed impaired intracellular multiplication and was strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. Here we present evidence that the GGT activity of F. tularensis allows utilization of glutathione (GSH, gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine) and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine dipeptide as cysteine sources to ensure intracellular growth. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of a nutrient acquisition system in the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. GSH is the most abundant source of cysteine in the host cytosol. Thus, the capacity this intracellular bacterial pathogen has evolved to utilize the available GSH, as a source of cysteine in the host cytosol, constitutes a paradigm of bacteria-host adaptation.

  5. Compact sources as the origin of the soft gamma-ray emission of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, F; Terrier, R; Bazzano, A; Bélanger, G; Bird, A; Bouchet, L; Dean, A; Del Santo, M; Goldwurm, A; Lund, N; Morand, H; Parmar, A; Paul, J; Roques, J-P; Schönfelder, V; Strong, A W; Ubertini, P; Walter, R; Winkler, C

    2004-03-18

    The Milky Way is known to be an abundant source of gamma-ray photons, now determined to be mainly diffuse in nature and resulting from interstellar processes. In the soft gamma-ray domain, point sources are expected to dominate, but the lack of sensitive high-resolution observations did not allow for a clear estimate of the contribution from such sources. Even the best imaging experiment revealed only a few point sources, accounting for about 50% of the total Galactic flux. Theoretical studies were unable to explain the remaining intense diffuse emission. Investigating the origin of the soft gamma-rays is therefore necessary to determine the dominant particle acceleration processes and to gain insights into the physical and chemical equilibrium of the interstellar medium. Here we report observations in the soft gamma-ray domain that reveal numerous compact sources. We show that these sources account for the entirety of the Milky Way's emission in soft gamma-rays, leaving at most a minor role for diffuse processes.

  6. POLARIZATION AND VARIATION OF NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT FROM FERMI/LAT {gamma}-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Ienaka, N.

    2012-10-01

    We present the results of our follow-up observation program of {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Twenty-six blazars and thirty-nine sources unidentified at other wavelengths were targeted at the Infrared Survey Facility 1.4 m telescope equipped with the SIRIUS/SIRPOL imager and polarimeter. H-band magnitudes of the blazars at the epoch of 2010 December-2011 February are presented, which reveal clear flux variation since the Two Micron All Sky Survey observations and can be useful data for variation analyses of these objects in longer periods. We also find that nearly half of the {gamma}-ray blazars are highly (>10%) polarized in near-infrared wavelengths. Combining the polarization and variation properties, most ({approx}90%) of the blazars are clearly distinguished from all other types of objects at high Galactic latitudes. On the other hand, we find only one highly polarized and/or variable object in the fields of unidentified sources. This object is a counterpart of the optical variable source PQV1 J131553.00-073302.0 and the radio source NVSS J131552-073301 and is a promising candidate of new {gamma}-ray blazars. From the measured polarization and variation statistics, we conclude that most of the Fermi/LAT unidentified sources are not likely similar types of objects to the known {gamma}-ray blazars.

  7. NuSTAR observations of Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles James; Gotthelf, Eric V.

    2017-08-01

    We present NuSTAR observations of five Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources. Given its broad 3-79 keV energy band and 2 msec timing resolution, NuSTAR telescope is optimal for probing X-ray emission mechanisms (e.g., Leptonic vs Hadronic scenario) of TeV gamma-ray sources and leading to source identification (e.g., pulsar wind nebula, supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds), combined with multi-wavelength data. Our targets include a rare TeV gamma-ray binary candidate HESS J1832-093, HESS J1834-0846 including the wind nebula around magnetar SWIFT J1834.9-0846, an enigmatic TeV gamma-ray source HESS J1507-622 located at 3.5 degree off the Galactic Plane and two HAWC sources (2HWC J1928+178 and DA495). Some of these TeV gamma-ray sources were observed as a part of the NuSTAR Galactic Legacy Survey in collaboration with the VERITAS and HAWC teams.

  8. Comparative performance study of one or multiple receivers schemes for FSO links over gamma-gamma turbulence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassinakis, Argyris N.; Nistazakis, Hector E.; Tombras, George S.

    2012-06-01

    Terrestrial free space optical telecommunication systems offer license-free very high bandwidth access characteristics with significantly low installation and operational cost. On the other hand, the performance of such a system depends strongly on the weather conditions in the area between the transmitter and the receiver due to the fact that the transmission media is the atmosphere. A very significant phenomenon which decreases a FSO links' performance is atmospheric turbulence. In order to counterbalance this reduction, in this work, we consider a free space optical system with a multiple receivers' scheme and diversity in space that operates under weak to strong atmospheric turbulence conditions modeled by the gamma-gamma distribution. We derive closed form mathematical expressions for the estimation of the outage probability and the average bit error rate of the multiple receivers' system. Additionally, we compare the performance capabilities of the single point to point link with those of the spatial diversity scheme under the assumption that the total aperture surface of the receivers of the latter is the same as the aperture surface of the single receiver of the former. Moreover, we demonstrate numerical results for a variety of common practical cases for both cases, with and without, spatial diversity.

  9. Profiling Students' Multiple Source Use by Question Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Alexandra; Grossnickle, Emily M.; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate students' multiple source use in response to two different types of academic questions, one discrete and one open-ended. Participants (N = 240) responded to two questions using a library of eight digital sources, varying in source type (e.g., newspaper article) and reliability (e.g., authors' credentials).…

  10. Profiling Students' Multiple Source Use by Question Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Alexandra; Grossnickle, Emily M.; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate students' multiple source use in response to two different types of academic questions, one discrete and one open-ended. Participants (N = 240) responded to two questions using a library of eight digital sources, varying in source type (e.g., newspaper article) and reliability (e.g., authors' credentials).…

  11. A search for gamma-ray point sources with the Carpet shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeenko, V. V.; Chudakov, A. E.; Khaerdinov, N. S.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Navarra, G.; Ozrokov, S. S.; Sklyarov, V. V.; Tizengauzen, V. A.

    1985-08-01

    An experiment aiming at search for super-high energy gamma-ray point sources has been put into operation at Baksan Valley, Northern Caucasus. The well known source Cyg X-3 was observed first and preliminary results of data analysis are presented. There is no positive excess of showers from the source region, but phase analysis discovers a small pulse at phase 0.6 which corresponds to the integral flux (6±3)×10-14cm-2sec-1 at E&gamma; > 3×1014eV.

  12. A search for gamma-ray point sources with the Carpet shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexeenko, V. V.; Chudakov, A. E.; Khaerdinov, N. S.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Navarra, G.; Ozrokov, S. S.; Sklyarov, V. V.; Tizengauzen, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    A search for super-high energy gamma-ray point sources has been carried out. The well known source Cyg X-3 was observed first and preliminary results of data analysis are presented. There is not positive excess of showers from the source region, but phase analysis discovers a small pulse at phase 0.6 which corresponds to the integral flux (6 + or - 3) X 10 to the minus 14th power cm-2 sec-1 at E sub gamma 3x10 to the 14th power eV.

  13. Multiwavelength Studies of the Peculiar Gamma-ray Source 3EG J1835+5918

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Brazier, K. T. S.; Carraminana, A.; Kanbach, G.; Nolan, P. L.; Thompson, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The source 3EG J1835+5918 was discovered early in the CGRO (Compton Gamma Ray Observatory) mission by EGRET as a bright unidentified gamma-ray source outside the galactic plane. Especially remarkable, it has not been possible to identify this object with any known counterpart in any other wavelengths band since then. Analyzing our recent ROSAT HRI observation, for the first time we are able to suggest X-ray counterparts of 3EG J1835+5918. The discovered X-ray sources were subject of deep optical investigations in order to reveal their nature and conclude on the possibility of being counterparts for this peculiar gamma-ray source.

  14. Demystifying an Unidentified EGRET Source by VHE gamma-ray Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Olaf; Funk, Stefan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-04-17

    In a novel approach in observational high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, observations carried out by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide necessary templates to pinpoint the nature of intriguing, yet unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources. Using GeV-photons detected by CGRO EGRET and taking advantage of high spatial resolution images from H.E.S.S. observations, we were able to shed new light on the EGRET observed gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex, whose previous coverage in the literature is some-what contradictory. 3EGJ1420-6038 very likely accounts for two GeV gamma-ray sources (E>1 GeV), both in positional coincidence with the recently reported pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) by HESS in the Kookaburra/Rabbit complex. PWN associations at VHE energies, supported by accumulating evidence from observations in the radio and X-ray band, are indicative for the PSR/plerionic origin of spatially coincident, but still unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources from EGRET. This not only supports the already suggested connection between variable, but unidentified low-latitude gamma-ray sources with pulsar wind nebulae (3EGJ1420-6038 has been suggested as PWN candidate previously), it also documents the ability of resolving apparently confused EGRET sources by connecting the GeV emission as measured from a large-aperture space-based gamma-ray instrument with narrow field-of-view but superior spatial resolution observations by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, a very promising identification technique for achieving convincing individual source identifications in the era of GLAST-LAT.

  15. Optimal Combination of Information from Multiple Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-31

    platforms in place on the continental shelf off the coast of Holland. How much can these cranes lift (in tandem)? (27) The fastest printer is the Radiation...Appendix 3B (1o0 o.oo6 Advice (dashed) and corrected advice (solid) of source B MooC o.oo- OOw O.002- oI 1V, .2 6h I . . -0 tr value - 179.9 a- I true

  16. Multiple Cosmic Sources for Meteorite Macromolecules?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jonathan S.; Meredith, William; Love, Gordon D.; Gilmour, Iain; Snape, Colin E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The major organic component in carbonaceous meteorites is an organic macromolecular material. The Murchison macromolecular material comprises aromatic units connected by aliphatic and heteroatom-containing linkages or occluded within the wider structure. The macromolecular material source environment remains elusive. Traditionally, attempts to determine source have strived to identify a single environment. Here, we apply a highly efficient hydrogenolysis method to liberate units from the macromolecular material and use mass spectrometric techniques to determine their chemical structures and individual stable carbon isotope ratios. We confirm that the macromolecular material comprises a labile fraction with small aromatic units enriched in 13C and a refractory fraction made up of large aromatic units depleted in 13C. Our findings suggest that the macromolecular material may be derived from at least two separate environments. Compound-specific carbon isotope trends for aromatic compounds with carbon number may reflect mixing of the two sources. The story of the quantitatively dominant macromolecular material in meteorites appears to be made up of more than one chapter. Key Words: Abiotic organic synthesis—Carbonaceous chondrite—Cosmochemistry—Meteorites. Astrobiology 15, 779–786. PMID:26418568

  17. Multiple Cosmic Sources for Meteorite Macromolecules?

    PubMed

    Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S; Meredith, William; Love, Gordon D; Gilmour, Iain; Snape, Colin E

    2015-10-01

    The major organic component in carbonaceous meteorites is an organic macromolecular material. The Murchison macromolecular material comprises aromatic units connected by aliphatic and heteroatom-containing linkages or occluded within the wider structure. The macromolecular material source environment remains elusive. Traditionally, attempts to determine source have strived to identify a single environment. Here, we apply a highly efficient hydrogenolysis method to liberate units from the macromolecular material and use mass spectrometric techniques to determine their chemical structures and individual stable carbon isotope ratios. We confirm that the macromolecular material comprises a labile fraction with small aromatic units enriched in (13)C and a refractory fraction made up of large aromatic units depleted in (13)C. Our findings suggest that the macromolecular material may be derived from at least two separate environments. Compound-specific carbon isotope trends for aromatic compounds with carbon number may reflect mixing of the two sources. The story of the quantitatively dominant macromolecular material in meteorites appears to be made up of more than one chapter.

  18. The Structure of the Strongly Lensed Gamma-Ray Source B2 0218+35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Zitrin, Adi

    2016-04-01

    Strong gravitational lensing is a powerful tool for resolving the high-energy universe. We combine the temporal resolution of Fermi-LAT, the angular resolution of radio telescopes, and the independently and precisely known Hubble constant from the analysis by the Planck collaboration, to resolve the spatial origin of gamma-ray flares in the strongly lensed source B2 0218+35. The lensing model achieves 1 mas spatial resolution of the source at gamma-ray energies. The data imply that the gamma-ray flaring sites are separate from the radio core: the bright gamma-ray flare (MJD: 56160-56280) occurred 51+/- 8 pc from the 15 GHz radio core, toward the central engine. This displacement is significant at the ˜ 3σ level, and is limited primarily by the precision of the Hubble constant. B2 0218+35 is the first source where the position of the gamma-ray emitting region relative to the radio core can be resolved. We discuss the potential of an ensemble of strongly lensed high-energy sources for elucidating the physics of distant variable sources based on data from Chandra and SKA.

  19. BALLERINA-Pirouettes in search of gamma burst sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels

    1999-12-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has now been established with reasonable certainty. Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large variability in properties, which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are proposing BALLERINA, a small satellite to provide accurate gamma burst positions at a rate an order of magnitude larger than from Beppo-SAX. On the experimental side, it remains a challenge to ensure the earliest detection of the X-ray afterglow. The mission proposed here allows for the first time systematic studies of the soft X-ray emission in the time interval from only a few minutes after the onset of the burst to a few hours later. In addition to positions of GRBs with accuracy better than 1'reported to the ground within a few minutes of the burst, essential for follow-up work, BALLERINA will on its own provide observations in an uncharted region of parameter space. Secondary objectives of the BALLERINA mission includes observations of the earliest phases of the outbursts of X-ray novae and other X-ray transients. BALLERINA is one of four missions currently under study for the Danish Small Satellite Program. The selection will be announced in 1999 for a planned launch in 2002-2003.

  20. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Niamh; Solanky, Bhavana S; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A E; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-09-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = -0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.792, -0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = -0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals -0.667, -0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in the

  1. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  2. Spin and Parity Assignment of Neutron Resonances using Gamma-ray Multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Dashdorj, D.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W. E.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    Decay gamma rays following neutron capture on various isotopes are collected by the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) array, which is located at flight path 14 at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The high segmentation (160 detectors) and close packing of the detector array enable gamma-ray multiplicity measurements. The calorimetric properties of the DANCE array coupled with the neutron time-of-flight technique enables one to gate on a specific resonance of a given isotope in the time-of-flight spectrum and obtain the summed energy spectrum for that isotope. The singles gamma-ray spectrum for each multiplicity can be separated by their DANCE cluster multiplicity. The multiplicity distribution contains the signatures of spin and parity of the capture state. Under suitable circumstances where the difference between spins of the initial (capture) and final (ground) state is large enough, the signatures in the multiplicity distribution can be used in improving the spin assignment of the initial state. The spin assignment is applied with varying degree of success to difference isotopes and description of this application for {sup 95}Mo, {sup 151,153}Eu, and {sup 155,157}Gd is reviewed briefly.

  3. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  4. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE PAGES

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; ...

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV fluxmore » and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  5. Development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray sources using ultrahigh power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hojbota, Calin; Jeon, Jong Ho; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seong Ku; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Pathak, Vishwa B.; Pae, Ki Hong; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Malka, Victor; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-05-01

    Short-pulse x-ray/gamma-ray sources have become indispensable light sources for investigating material science, bio technology, and photo-nuclear physics. In past decades, rapid advancement of high intensity laser technology led extensive progresses in the field of radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions - x-ray lasers, betatron radiation and Compton gamma-rays. Ever since the installation of a 100-TW laser in 2006, we have pursued the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiations, such as x-ray lasers, relativistic high-order harmonics, betatron radiation and all-optical Compton gamma-rays. With the construction of two PW Ti:Sapphire laser beamlines having peak powers of 1.0 PW and 1.5 PW in 2010 and 2012, respectively [1], we have investigated the generation of multi-GeV electron beams [2] and MeV betatron radiations. We plan to carry out the Compton backscattering to generate MeV gamma-rays from the interaction of a GeV electron beam and a PW laser beam. Here, we present the recent progress in the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiation sources based on laser plasma interactions and the plan for developing Compton gamma-ray sources driven by the PW lasers. In addition, we will present the applications of laser-plasma x-ray lasers to x-ray holography and coherent diffraction imaging. [references] 1. J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. J. Yu, T. M. Jeong, and J. Lee, Opt. Lett. 35, 3021 (2010). 2. H. T. Kim, K. H. Pae, H. J. Cha, I J. Kim, T. J. Yu, J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. M. Jeong, J. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165002 (2013).

  6. On the possibility of observing cosmic ray sources in high energy gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    If cosmic rays are accelerated by strong shocks, then cosmic ray sources should be characterized by spectra, dN/dE alpha E exp -(2.0-2.2), reflecting the strength of those shocks. This is expected from the 'standard leaky box' model of cosmic ray propagation in which the source spectra are harder than the observed spectra because higher energy particles have shorter residence times in the galactic magnetic fields. Furthermore, data on cosmic ray nucleons suggest that these sources might be surrounded by material. If the latter is true, such sources should be observable in gamma rays at energies beyond 1 GeV where the angular resolution of gamma-ray telescopes is optimized and the background is significantly reduced. For identified sources, the source location accuracy can be shown to improve with increasing energy in spite of the decreasing statistics, as long as the gamma-ray spectrum is harder than dN/dE alpha E exp -gamma. A Monte Carlo model is used to predict the photon spectra which would be expected from cosmic ray sources under varying assumptions about the strength of the shocks in the acceleration region.

  7. A Comprehensive Approach to Gamma-Ray Source Identification in the GLAST-LAT Era

    SciTech Connect

    Caraveo, Patrizia A.; Reimer, Olaf; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Unveiling the nature of a vast number of unidentified sources is the most compelling problem facing today's high-energy (MeV-to-GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. However, unidentified sources are not peculiar to high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, they have been an ever-present phenomenon in astronomy. Indeed, every time a new astronomical window was opened, astronomers found sources they were not able to identify, i.e. to associate with previously known objects. This can happen either because such sources belong to a genuinely new (thus unknown) class or because their positions are not known accurately enough to allow for an unambiguous association between the newly found emitter and a known object. Thus, the lack of identification is frequently ascribed to poor angular resolution. Being unidentified, however, is a 'temporary' status: sooner or later better tools will allow the source identification, i.e. either its classification within a given class of astronomical objects or its recognition as belonging to a new class. Owing to the intrinsic limitations of gamma-ray detection technique, however, the instruments' angular resolution has not yet reached the minimum level required to permit the transition from the unidentified limbo to the paradise of known objects, thus creating a continuing unidentified high-energy gamma-ray source problem. Different approaches towards source identification have been pursued in the past. Here we will review the state of the art as well as the strategies devised for the GLAST era.

  8. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  10. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  11. Can Astrophysical Gamma Ray Sources Mimic Dark Matter Annihilation in Galactic Satellites?

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Taylor, James E.; Wai, Lawrence L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-01

    The nature of the cosmic dark matter is unknown. The most compelling hypothesis is that dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the 100 GeV mass range. Such particles would annihilate in the galactic halo, producing high-energy gamma rays which might be detectable in gamma ray telescopes such as the GLAST satellite. We investigate the ability of GLAST to distinguish between the WIMP annihilation spectrum and the spectrum of known astrophysical source classes. Focusing on the emission from the galactic satellite halos predicted by the cold dark matter model, we find that the WIMP gamma-ray spectrum is unique; the separation from known source classes can be done in a convincing way. We discuss the follow-up of possible WIMP sources with Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes. Finally we discuss the impact that Large Hadron Collider data might have on the study of galactic dark matter.

  12. Statistical measurement of the gamma-ray source-count distribution as a function of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-07-29

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. Here, we employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ~50 GeV. Furthermore, the index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of ${2.2}_{-0.3}^{+0.7}$ in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain ${83}_{-13}^{+7}$% (${81}_{-19}^{+52}$%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). Our method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

  13. Statistical Measurement of the Gamma-Ray Source-count Distribution as a Function of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2016-08-01

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. We employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ˜50 GeV. The index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index of {2.2}-0.3+0.7 in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain {83}-13+7% ({81}-19+52%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). The method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.

  14. Supernova explosion in dense clouds in the galaxy and the COS-B gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    Supernova (SN) exploding in dense cloudlets produce large fluxes of gamma-rays. They would shine on gamma-ray sources, but their life time is small. Flux distribution of these sources in the Galaxy are calculated and compared with the COS-B catalogue of sources.

  15. Brazilian gamma-neutron dosemeter: response to 241AmBe and 252Cf neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Souto, E B; Campos, L L

    2011-03-01

    With the aim of improving the monitoring of workers potentially exposed to neutron radiation in Brazil, the IPEN/CNEN-SP in association with PRO-RAD designed and developed a passive individual gamma-neutron mixed-field dosemeter calibrated to be used to (241)AmBe sources. To verify the dosimetry system response to different neutron spectra, prototypes were irradiated with a (252)Cf source and evaluated using the dose-calculation algorithm developed for (241)AmBe sources.

  16. Photon-photon opacity constraints for relativistically expanding gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.; Harding, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Five bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) have also been detected at higher energies by EGRET. Four are consistent with power-law spectra extending to energies as high as, in the case of GRB930131, 1 GeV. The fifth, and most recent, GRB940217, has a more complex spectrum, with one photon detected at 18 GeV, the most energetic GRB photon detection to date. The optical depth to photon-photon pair production in these sources is extremely large for distances more than about 10pc away if the radiation is emitted isotropically in the observer's frame. This optical depth can be dramatically reduced if the source is moving with a relativstic bulk Lorentz factor Gamma, and recent calculations for this situation have been limited to cases of a beam with opening angle 1 Gamma, or expansions of infinitely thin spherical shells. This paper presents our extension of the pair production otpical depth calculation in relativistically expanding sources to more general geometries, including shells of finite thickness and arbitrary opening angle. We find that the minimum bulk Lorentz factors for the Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) sources to be optically thin, i.e. display no spectral attenuation, is only moderately dependent on the shell thickness and its opening solid angle; these new limits on required velocity for given geometries will aid in placing realistic constraints on GRB source models.

  17. Gamma ray sources based on resonant backscattering of laser beams with relativistic heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, E.G.; Kim, Kwang-Je

    1995-04-01

    Resonant backscattering of high-power laser beam with non-fully stripped, ultra-relativistic ion beams in storage rings is studied as a source for {gamma}-ray beams for elementary particle physics experiments. The laser frequency is chosen to be resonant with one of the transition frequencies of the moving ions, and the bandwidth is chosen to cover the full Doppler broadening of the ions in the beam. Due to the resonance, the scattering cross section is enhanced by a large factor compared to the Thomson cross section, of the order 10{sup 8} for some examples considered here. The performance of the LHC as a possible {gamma}-generator or a {gamma} {minus} {gamma} collider is estimated. We study the case where hydrogen-like Pb ions with 2.8 TeV per nucleon are scattered by a train of 1100 {Angstrom}, 20 mg laser pulses with the same pulse time format as the ion beam. A free electron laser can be designed satisfying the requirements. It is estimated that {gamma}-rays of maximum quantum energy of 0.4 give at an average rate of 0.67 10{sup 18} are generated in this scheme. The luminosity of the corresponding {gamma} {minus} {gamma} collider will be about 0.9 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}.

  18. A source for measurement of the absolute intensities of 226Ra gamma-radiation in equilibrium with decay products.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, I A; Rasko, M A; Sepman, S V; Terechtchenko, E E; Hejdelman, A M

    2002-01-01

    The design and production techniques of a gamma-ray spectrometric source of 226Ra in equilibrium with its daughter decay products have been developed. The radon emanation coefficient of the source did not exceed 0.1%. The 226Ra activity in the gamma-ray spectrometric source was measured relative to that in an alpha-particle spectrometric source by comparison of the intensities of the main gamma rays using a semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometer. The total uncertainty of the activity measurement results was 0.5% for a coverage factor of k = 2.

  19. A new population of very high energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Aye, K-M; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berge, D; Berghaus, P; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Bolz, O; Borgmeier, C; Braun, I; Breitling, F; Brown, A M; Gordo, J Bussons; Chadwick, P M; Chounet, L-M; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Degrange, B; Djannati-Ataï, A; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Ergin, T; Espigat, P; Feinstein, F; Fleury, P; Fontaine, G; Funk, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Gillessen, S; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Horns, D; de Jager, O C; Jung, I; Khélifi, B; Komin, Nu; Konopelko, A; Latham, I J; Le Gallou, R; Lemière, A; Lemoine, M; Leroy, N; Lohse, T; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; McComb, T J L; de Naurois, M; Nolan, S J; Noutsos, A; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ouchrif, M; Panter, M; Pelletier, G; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Raux, J; Rayner, S M; Redondo, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rolland, L; Rowell, G; Sahakian, V; Saugé, L; Schlenker, S; Schlickeiser, R; Schuster, C; Schwanke, U; Siewert, M; Sol, H; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Tavernet, J-P; Terrier, R; Théoret, C G; Tluczykont, M; van der Walt, D J; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vincent, P; Visser, B; Völk, H J; Wagner, S J

    2005-03-25

    Very high energy gamma-rays probe the long-standing mystery of the origin of cosmic rays. Produced in the interactions of accelerated particles in astrophysical objects, they can be used to image cosmic particle accelerators. A first sensitive survey of the inner part of the Milky Way with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) reveals a population of eight previously unknown firmly detected sources of very high energy gamma-rays. At least two have no known radio or x-ray counterpart and may be representative of a new class of "dark" nucleonic cosmic ray sources.

  20. Intense inverse compton {gamma}-ray source from Duke storage ring FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    We suggest using FEL intracavity power in the Duke storage ring fortrays production via Inverse Compton Backscattering (ICB). The OK-4 FEL driven by the Duke storage ring will tens of watts of average lasing power in the UV/VUV range. Average intracavity power will be in kilowatt range and can be used to pump ICB source. The {gamma}-rays with maximum energy from 40 MeV to 200 MeV with intensity of 0.1-5 10{sup 10}{gamma} per second can be generated. In this paper we present expected parameters of {gamma}-ray beam parameters including its intensity and distribution. We discuss influence of e-beam parameters on collimated {gamma}-rays spectrum and optimization of photon-electron interaction point.

  1. Resistive plate chamber neutron and gamma sensitivity measurement with a 252Cf source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Altieri, S.; Baratti, V.; Barnabà, O.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Colaleo, A.; DeVecchi, C.; Guida, R.; Iaselli, G.; Imbres, E.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Ratti, S.; Riccardi, C.; Romano, F.; Torre, P.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Volpe, F.

    2003-06-01

    A bakelite double gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC), operating in avalanche mode, has been exposed to the radiation emitted from a 252Cf source to measure its neutron and gamma sensitivity. One of the two gaps underwent the traditional electrodes surface coating with linseed oil. RPC signals were triggered by fission events detected using BaF 2 scintillators. A Monte Carlo code, inside the GEANT 3.21 framework with MICAP interface, has been used to identify the gamma and neutron contributions to the total number of collected RPC signals. A neutron sensitivity of (0 .63 ±0 .02) ×10 -3 (average energy 2 MeV) and a gamma sensitivity of (14 .0 ±0 .5) ×10 -3 (average energy 1.5 MeV) have been measured in double gap mode. Measurements done in single gap mode have shown that both neutron and gamma sensitivity are independent of the oiling treatment.

  2. Fermi-LAT detection of ongoing gamma-ray activity from the new gamma-ray source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    During the week between February 8 and 15, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a new transient source, Fermi J1654-1055.

  3. Observations of discrete gamma ray sources with SAS-2. [compact sources centered on Crab nebula and Vela X supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    Compact gamma ray sources centered on the Crab nebula and the Vela X supernova remnant are considered. An excess in the galactic radiation was observed in both regions. Data indicate that a large fraction of this flux is pulsed. The excess from the Vela region could reflect either a large-scale galactic feature, such as a superposition of spiral arm segments, or it could be associated with the Vela supernova remnant. Low-energy gamma ray bursts were observed in the SAS-2 anticoincidence shielding.

  4. Inverse Compton gamma-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications at the Duke FEL

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shea, P.G.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for the development new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-ray photons to high-energy physics with {gamma}{gamma} colliders. In this paper we discuss the possibilities for nuclear physics studies using polarized Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays from the Duke storage-ring-driven UV-FEL. There are currently a number of projects that produce polarized {gamma}-rays for nuclear physics studies. All of these facilities operate by scattering conventional laser-light against electrons circulating in a storage ring. In our scheme, intra-cavity scattering of the UV-FEL light will produce a {gamma}-flux enhancement of approximately 10{sup 3} over existing sources. The Duke ring can operate at energies up to 1.2 GeV and can produce FEL photons up to 12.5 eV. We plan to generate {gamma}-rays up to 200 MeV in energy with an average flux in excess of 10{sup 7} /s/MeV, using a modest scattering beam of 10-mA average stored current. The {gamma}-ray energy may be tuned by varying the FEL wavelength or by adjusting the stored electron beam energy. Because of the intense flux, we can eliminate the need for photon energy tagging by collimating of the {gamma}-ray beam. We will discuss the characteristics of the device and its research opportunities.

  5. Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. Preview of the BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Sahi, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been detecting and monitoring point sources in the high energy sky since 1991. Although BATSE is best known for gamma ray bursts, it also monitors the sky for longer-lived sources of radiation. Using the Earth occultation technique to extract flux information, a catalog is being prepared of about 150 sources potential emission in the large area detectors (20-1000 keV). The catalog will contain light curves, representative spectra, and parametric data for black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and super-nova remnants. In this preview, we present light curves for persistent and transient sources, and also show examples of what type of information can be obtained from the BATSE Earth occultation database. Options for making the data easily accessible as an "on line" WWW document are being explored.

  7. Preview of the BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; McCollough, M. L.; Robinson, C. R.; Sahi, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) has been detecting and monitoring point sources in the high energy sky since 1991. Although BATSE is best known for gamma ray bursts, it also monitors the sky for longer-lived sources of radiation. Using the Earth occultation technique to extract flux information, a catalog is being prepared of about 150 sources potential emission in the large area detectors (20-1000 keV). The catalog will contain light curves, representative spectra, and parametric data for black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and super-nova remnants. In this preview, we present light curves for persistent and transient sources, and also show examples of what type of information can be obtained from the BATSE Earth occultation database. Options for making the data easily accessible as an "on line" WWW document are being explored.

  8. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE MONITORING OF FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D.

    2013-08-15

    We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray ''sources of interest''.We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

  9. Swift X-Ray Telescope Monitoring of Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources of Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray "sources of interest." We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

  10. Development of fully Bayesian multiple-time-window source inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Hisahiko; Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka; Aoi, Shin

    2016-03-01

    In the estimation of spatiotemporal slip models, kinematic source inversions using Akaike's Bayesian Information Criterion (ABIC) and the multiple-time-window method have often been used. However, there are cases in which conventional ABIC-based source inversions do not work well in the determination of hyperparameters when a non-negative slip constraint is used. In order to overcome this problem, a new source inversion method was developed in this study. The new method introduces a fully Bayesian method into the kinematic multiple-time-window source inversion. The multiple-time-window method is one common way of parametrizing a source time function and is highly flexible in terms of the shape of the source time function. The probability distributions of model parameters and hyperparameters can be directly obtained by using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method. These probability distributions are useful for simply evaluating the uniqueness and reliability of the derived model, which is another advantage of a fully Bayesian method. This newly developed source inversion method was applied to the 2011 Ibaraki-oki, Japan, earthquake (Mw 7.9) to demonstrate its usefulness. It was demonstrated that the problem with using the conventional ABIC-based source inversion method for hyperparameter determination appeared in the spatiotemporal source inversion of this event and that the newly developed source inversion could overcome this problem.

  11. Some evidence for high energy gamma-ray sources at large galactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karakula, S.; Stamenov, J. N.; Tkaczyk, W.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of the gamma-quanta with energies of about 10 to 15th power eV which were registrated by Tien Shan experiment were compared with COS-B observations. On the basis of the Monte Carlo simulations it was shown with low probability that arrival directions of Tien Shan gamma-quanta initiated showers are not uniformly distributed. It is shown that in the region not seen by COS-B mission, the high energy gamma-ray sources should be located at position of 90 deg. 1 sup 11 130 deg and b sup 11 or = 50 deg. The integral intensity of these sources should be I ( 10 to the 15th power eV) = 4.8 + or - 1.7).10 to the 13th power/sq cm/s/str. There is no coincidence between the gamma-quanta registrated by Tien Shan experiment with Geminga intense COS-B gamma source. So it is shown that the integral photon spectrum of Geminga (I(e) approx E sup-Beta, where Beta = 0.8 for E 1 GeV) becomes steeper (Beta 1.2) in high energy region with probability 99.9.%.

  12. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  13. Spectral analysis of shielded gamma ray sources using precalculated library data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Thomas Wesley; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an approach has been developed for determining the intensity of a shielded source by first determining the thicknesses of three different shielding materials from a passively collected gamma-ray spectrum by making comparisons with predetermined shielded spectra. These evaluations are dependent on the accuracy and validity of the predetermined library spectra which were created by changing the thicknesses of the three chosen materials lead, aluminum and wood that are used to simulate any actual shielding. Each of the spectra produced was generated using MCNP5 with a sufficiently large number of histories to ensure a low relative error at each channel. The materials were held in the same respective order from source to detector, where each material consisted of three individual thicknesses and a null condition. This then produced two separate data sets of 27 total shielding material situations and subsequent predetermined libraries that were created for each radionuclide source used. The technique used to calculate the thicknesses of the materials implements a Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear search that employs a tri-linear interpolation with the respective predetermined libraries within each channel for the supplied input unknown spectrum. Given that the nonlinear parameters require an initial guess for the calculations, the approach demonstrates first that when the correct values are input, the correct thicknesses are found. It then demonstrates that when multiple trials of random values are input for each of the nonlinear parameters, the average of the calculated solutions that successfully converges also produced the correct thicknesses. Under situations with sufficient information known about the detection situation at hand, the method was shown to behave in a manner that produces reasonable results and can serve as a good preliminary solution. This technique has the capability to be used in a variety of full spectrum inverse analysis problems

  14. Content Integration across Multiple Documents Reduces Memory for Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braasch, Jason L. G.; McCabe, Rebecca M.; Daniel, Frances

    2016-01-01

    The current experiments systematically examined semantic content integration as a mechanism for explaining source inattention and forgetting when reading-to-remember multiple texts. For all 3 experiments, degree of semantic overlap was manipulated amongst messages provided by various information sources. In Experiment 1, readers' source…

  15. Content Integration across Multiple Documents Reduces Memory for Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braasch, Jason L. G.; McCabe, Rebecca M.; Daniel, Frances

    2016-01-01

    The current experiments systematically examined semantic content integration as a mechanism for explaining source inattention and forgetting when reading-to-remember multiple texts. For all 3 experiments, degree of semantic overlap was manipulated amongst messages provided by various information sources. In Experiment 1, readers' source…

  16. Feasibility study for the quantification of total protein content by multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Toh, Y; Murakami, Y; Furutaka, K; Kimura, A; Koizumi, M; Hara, K; Kin, T; Nakamura, S; Harada, H

    2012-06-01

    Protein is an important nutrient in foods. The classical nitrogen analysis method is the Kjeldahl technique, which is time-consuming and inconvenient. As a convenient method to quantify protein content in biological samples, the feasibility of application of multiple prompt gamma-ray analysis (MPGA) to the quantification was studied. Results for protein content are reported for several reference materials and prove the method to be reliable.

  17. The Fermi Large Area Telescope Thrid Gamma-ray Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Thomas E.; Ballet, Jean; Burnett, Toby; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Digel, Seth William; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV - 300 GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog (Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS 199, 31), the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. For approximately one-third of the sources we have not found counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. From source counts of Galactic sources we estimate the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission.

  18. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  19. Extended Source Gamma-Ray Emission from WIMP Annihilation in the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy (SULI paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Vasu-Devan, Vidya; /Columbia U. /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    The proximity of the dark matter dominated Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy (position (l,b) = 5.6{sup o}, -14{sup o}) allows it to act as an ideal laboratory for the exploration of extended gamma-ray emission from Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) annihilation processes in a dark matter-dominated system. Since the matter in our universe is predominantly dark, exploring such processes as WIMP annihilation will lead to a better understanding of cosmology. In order to study this gamma-ray emission, a model for the diffuse background gamma-radiation in the dwarf galaxy's region is extracted from the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) data. After validating this model and comparing it to the EGRET diffuse model, the background model is added to effective bleeding-contamination from external point sources and multiple models for the signal-above-background emission. Various models of this emission are tested: (a) no source located in region, (b) unidentified point source 3EG J1847-3219 from the Third EGRET Catalog responsible for the emission and (c) extended emission resulting from WIMP annihilation responsible for the signal above background. These models are created through the employment of Monte Carlo simulation methods, utilizing the response functions of the EGRET instrument to simulate the point spread function, energy dispersion and effects of variable effective area depending on angle of incidence. Energy spectra for point sources are generated from the best predictions of spectral indices listed in the Third EGRET Catalog and the spectrum for the extended dark matter source is generated from Pythia high energy annihilation simulations. Hypothesis testing is conducted to assess the goodness-of-fit of these models to the data taken by EGRET. Additionally, we hope to expand our analysis by employing the response functions of the imminent Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to our models. This extension should highlight the

  20. Fission Multiplicity Detection With Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination From Higher Order Time Correlation Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.

    2002-01-17

    The subject of this thesis is the nondestructive assay (NDA) of nuclear materials. NDA is made possible by the fact that fissile and fertile transuranic isotopes emit characteristic radiations. Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) is the name of the standard technique used in NDA of nuclear materials in the 1960s and 1970s. It was characterized by the use of fast plastic scintillating detectors. These systems were used in both active and passive mode. These FMD systems were eventually replaced by thermal well counters as the standard NDA technique. The thermal well counters use {sup 3}He detectors embedded in a moderator. Among the passive neutron assay techniques, neutron multiplicity counting (NMC) in a thermal well counter is the preferred technique for the determination of fissile mass when spontaneous fission yields are significant. it is used in conjunction with gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the isotopic composition of a sample. The major problem with the use of fast plastic detectors as used in FMD is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable. The disadvantages of this indistinguishability between neutron and gamma rays is explained further in the explanation of NMIS multiplicity in Section 2.5.

  1. Radionuclide neutron sources in calibration laboratory--neutron and gamma doses and their changes in time.

    PubMed

    Józefowicz, K; Golnik, N; Tulik, P; Zielczynski, M

    2007-01-01

    The calibration laboratory, having standard neutron fields of radionuclide sources, should perform regular measurements of fields' parameters in order to check their stability and to get knowledge of any changes. Usually, accompanying gamma radiation is not of serious concern, but some personal dosemeters, old neutron dose equivalent meters with scintillation detectors and the dose meters of mixed radiation require the determination of this component. In the Laboratory of Radiation Protection Measurements in the Institute of Atomic Energy, Poland, the fields of radionuclide neutron sources (252)Cf, (241)Am-Be and (239)Pu-Be were examined for nearly 20 y. A number of detectors and methods have been applied for the determination of neutron ambient dose equivalent rate and for the determination of neutron and gamma dose components. This paper presents the recent results of measurements of gamma and neutron dose and dose equivalent, compared with the results accumulated in nearly 20 y.

  2. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  3. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as Gamma-Ray Sources for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D.

    2005-01-28

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  4. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  5. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog and its supplement, this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  6. The Third EGRET Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Chen, A. W.; Deines-Jones, P.; Esposito, J. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Friedlander, D. P.; Hunter, S. D.; McDonald, L. M.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The third catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory includes data from 1991 April 22 to 1995 October 3 (Cycles 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the mission). In addition to including more data than the second EGRET catalog (Thompson et al. 1995) and its supplement (Thompson et al. 1996), this catalog uses completely reprocessed data (to correct a number of mostly minimal errors and problems). The 271 sources (E greater than 100 MeV) in the catalog include the single 1991 solar flare bright enough to be detected as a source, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one probable radio galaxy detection (Cen A), and 66 high-confidence identifications of blazars (BL Lac objects, flat-spectrum radio quasars, or unidentified flat-spectrum radio sources). In addition, 27 lower-confidence potential blazar identifications are noted. Finally, the catalog contains 170 sources not yet identified firmly with known objects, although potential identifications have been suggested for a number of those. A figure is presented that gives approximate upper limits for gamma-ray sources at any point in the sky, as well as information about sources listed in the second catalog and its supplement which do not appear in this catalog.

  7. High-mass microquasars and low-latitude gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch-Ramon, V.; Romero, G. E.; Paredes, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Population studies of unidentified EGRET sources suggest that there exist at least three different populations of galactic gamma-ray sources. One of these populations is formed by young objects distributed along the galactic plane with a strong concentration toward the inner spiral arms of the Galaxy. Variability, spectral and correlation analysis indicate that this population is not homogeneous. In particular, there is a subgroup of sources that display clear variability in their gamma-ray fluxes on timescales from days to months. Following the proposal by Kaufman Bernadó et al. (2002), we suggest that this group of sources might be high-mass microquasars, i.e. accreting black holes or neutron stars with relativistic jets and early-type stellar companions. We present detailed inhomogeneous models for the gamma-ray emission of these systems that include both external and synchrotron self-Compton interactions. We have included effects of interactions between the jet and all external photon fields to which it is exposed: companion star, accretion disk, and hot corona. We make broadband calculations to predict the spectral energy distribution of the emission produced in the inner jet of these objects up to GeV energies. The results and predictions can be tested by present and future gamma-ray instruments like INTEGRAL, AGILE, and GLAST.

  8. Measuring the activity of a 51Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 51Cr is presented.

  9. Advanced techniques for high resolution spectroscopic observations of cosmic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Pehl, R. H.; Hurley, K. C.; Vedrenne, G.; Sniel, M.; Durouchoux, P.

    1985-01-01

    An advanced gamma-ray spectrometer that is currently in development is described. It will obtain a sensitivity of 0.0001 ph/sq cm./sec in a 6 hour balloon observation and uses innovative techniques for background reduction and source imaging.

  10. An EAS experiment at mountain altitude for the detection of gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allkofer, O. C.; Samorski, M.; Stamm, W.

    1985-01-01

    The plan of an extensive air shower experiment 2.200 m above sea level for the detection of 10 to the 14th power eV to 10 to the 17th power eV gamma rays from sources in the declination band 0 deg to + 60 deg is described. The site selection, detector array and electronic layout are detailed.

  11. Hunting for Point Sources in the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra Sharma, Siddharth; Lisanti, Mariangela; Necib, Lina; Safdi, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, I will present an analysis of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The method takes advantage of photon-count statistics to determine the properties of resolved and unresolved gamma-ray sources that contribute to the EGB. I will present the source-count functions, as a function of energy, from 1.89 GeV to 2 TeV, as well as the energy spectra of the different contributing source components, and will discuss how the results are affected by a variety of systematic uncertainties. These results allow us to determine the fraction of point sources, predominantly AGN (blazars), that contribute to the unresolved portion of the EGB. I will also comment on the consequences of these results for future TeV observatories such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array.

  12. A Fieldable-Prototype Large-Area Gamma-ray Imager for Orphan Source Search

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Fabris, Lorenzo; Carr, Dennis; Collins, Jeff; Cunningham, Mark F; Habte Ghebretatios, Frezghi; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Marchant, William

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a unique instrument for use in the search for orphan sources. The system uses gamma-ray imaging to "see through" the natural background variations that effectively limit the search range of normal devices to ~10 m. The imager is mounted in a 4.9- m-long trailer and can be towed by a large personal vehicle. Source locations are determined both in range and along the direction of travel as the vehicle moves. A fully inertial platform coupled to a Global Positioning System receiver is used to map the gamma-ray images onto overhead geospatial imagery. The resulting images provide precise source locations, allowing rapid follow-up work. The instrument simultaneously searches both sides of the street to a distance of 50 m (100-m swath) for milliCurieclass sources with near-perfect performance.

  13. Bayesian multiple-source localization in an uncertain ocean environment.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E; Wilmut, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    This paper considers simultaneous localization of multiple acoustic sources when properties of the ocean environment (water column and seabed) are poorly known. A Bayesian formulation is developed in which the environmental parameters, noise statistics, and locations and complex strengths (amplitudes and phases) of multiple sources are considered to be unknown random variables constrained by acoustic data and prior information. Two approaches are considered for estimating source parameters. Focalization maximizes the posterior probability density (PPD) over all parameters using adaptive hybrid optimization. Marginalization integrates the PPD using efficient Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods to produce joint marginal probability distributions for source ranges and depths, from which source locations are obtained. This approach also provides quantitative uncertainty analysis for all parameters, which can aid in understanding of the inverse problem and may be of practical interest (e.g., source-strength probability distributions). In both approaches, closed-form maximum-likelihood expressions for source strengths and noise variance at each frequency allow these parameters to be sampled implicitly, substantially reducing the dimensionality and difficulty of the inversion. Examples are presented of both approaches applied to single- and multi-frequency localization of multiple sources in an uncertain shallow-water environment, and a Monte Carlo performance evaluation study is carried out.

  14. Unveiling the Nature of the Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources. IV. The Swift Catalog of Potential X-Ray Counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, A.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Smith, H. A.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2013-11-01

    A significant fraction (~30%) of the high-energy γ-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog are still of unknown origin, having not yet been associated with counterparts at lower energies. To investigate the nature of these enigmatic sources, we present an extensive search of X-ray sources lying in the positional uncertainty region of a selected sample of these unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) that makes use of all available observations performed by the Swift X-ray Telescope before 2013 March 31, available for 205 UGSs. To detect the fainter sources, we merged all the observations covering the Fermi LAT positional uncertainty region at a 95% level of confidence of each UGS. This yields a catalog of 357 X-ray sources, finding candidate X-ray counterparts for ~70% of the selected sample. In particular, 25% of the UGSs feature a single X-ray source within their positional uncertainty region, while 45% have multiple X-ray sources. For each X-ray source, we also looked in the corresponding Swift UVOT merged images for optical and ultraviolet counterparts, also performing source photometry. We found ultraviolet-optical correspondences for ~70% of the X-ray sources. We searched several major radio, infrared, optical, and ultraviolet surveys for possible counterparts within the positional error of the sources in the X-ray catalog to obtain additional information on their nature. Applying the kernel density estimation technique to infrared colors of Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer counterparts of our X-ray sources we select six γ-ray blazar candidates. In addition, comparing our results with previous analyses, we select 11 additional γ-ray blazar candidates.

  15. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. IV. THE SWIFT CATALOG OF POTENTIAL X-RAY COUNTERPARTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.; Tosti, G.

    2013-11-01

    A significant fraction (∼30%) of the high-energy γ-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog are still of unknown origin, having not yet been associated with counterparts at lower energies. To investigate the nature of these enigmatic sources, we present an extensive search of X-ray sources lying in the positional uncertainty region of a selected sample of these unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) that makes use of all available observations performed by the Swift X-ray Telescope before 2013 March 31, available for 205 UGSs. To detect the fainter sources, we merged all the observations covering the Fermi LAT positional uncertainty region at a 95% level of confidence of each UGS. This yields a catalog of 357 X-ray sources, finding candidate X-ray counterparts for ∼70% of the selected sample. In particular, 25% of the UGSs feature a single X-ray source within their positional uncertainty region, while 45% have multiple X-ray sources. For each X-ray source, we also looked in the corresponding Swift UVOT merged images for optical and ultraviolet counterparts, also performing source photometry. We found ultraviolet-optical correspondences for ∼70% of the X-ray sources. We searched several major radio, infrared, optical, and ultraviolet surveys for possible counterparts within the positional error of the sources in the X-ray catalog to obtain additional information on their nature. Applying the kernel density estimation technique to infrared colors of Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer counterparts of our X-ray sources we select six γ-ray blazar candidates. In addition, comparing our results with previous analyses, we select 11 additional γ-ray blazar candidates.

  16. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Latent Tuberculosis: What Are the Sources of Variability?

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rajiv L.; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are blood-based tests intended for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). IGRAs offer logistical advantages and are supposed to offer improved specificity over the tuberculin skin test (TST). However, recent serial testing studies of low-risk individuals have revealed higher false conversion rates with IGRAs than with TST. Reproducibility studies have identified various sources of variability that contribute to nonreproducible results. Sources of variability can be broadly classified as preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, manufacturing, and immunological. In this minireview, we summarize known sources of variability and their impact on IGRA results. We also provide recommendations on how to minimize sources of IGRA variability. PMID:26763969

  17. Fermi LAT Detection of a New Gamma-ray Source Associated with FSRQ CRATES J0944+6135

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioni, R.; Buson, S.; Cheung, C. C.; Bissaldi, E.

    2017-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the flat-spectrum radio source CRATES J0944+6135 (a.k.a.

  18. MEG sensor and source measures of visually induced gamma-band oscillations are highly reliable.

    PubMed

    Tan, H-R M; Gross, J; Uhlhaas, P J

    2016-08-15

    High frequency brain oscillations are associated with numerous cognitive and behavioral processes. Non-invasive measurements using electro-/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) have revealed that high frequency neural signals are heritable and manifest changes with age as well as in neuropsychiatric illnesses. Despite the extensive use of EEG/MEG-measured neural oscillations in basic and clinical research, studies demonstrating test-retest reliability of power and frequency measures of neural signals remain scarce. Here, we evaluated the test-retest reliability of visually induced gamma (30-100Hz) oscillations derived from sensor and source signals acquired over two MEG sessions. The study required participants (N=13) to detect the randomly occurring stimulus acceleration while viewing a moving concentric grating. Sensor and source MEG measures of gamma-band activity yielded comparably strong reliability (average intraclass correlation, ICC=0.861). Peak stimulus-induced gamma frequency (53-72Hz) yielded the highest measures of stability (ICCsensor=0.940; ICCsource=0.966) followed by spectral signal change (ICCsensor=0.890; ICCsource=0.893) and peak frequency bandwidth (ICCsensor=0.856; ICCsource=0.622). Furthermore, source-reconstruction significantly improved signal-to-noise for spectral amplitude of gamma activity compared to sensor estimates. Our assessments highlight that both sensor and source derived estimates of visually induced gamma-band oscillations from MEG signals are characterized by high test-retest reliability, with source derived oscillatory measures conferring an improvement in the stability of peak-frequency estimates. Importantly, our finding of high test-retest reliability supports the feasibility of pharma-MEG studies and longitudinal aging or clinical studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mapping Correlation of Two Point Sources in the Gamma-Ray Sky

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Alexander

    2015-08-20

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has been taking data on high energy photons or γ rays since June 11th, 2008, and people have been cataloging and profiling point sources of these γ rays ever since. After roughly one year of being in operation over 1400 sources were cataloged. Now, in 2015 we have 3033 sources cataloged. With the increasing amount of sources it’s important to think about the limitations of likelihood analysis for highly correlated sources. In this paper I will present the problems of using likelihood analysis for sources that are highly correlated as well as show under what circumstances sources can be considered highly correlated. Dark matter over densities may show up as a point source, so it is a necessary step to learn how the two signals will interact to allow for a proper search for dark matter.

  20. Dense molecular gas at 12 mm towards Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wilt, P.; Rowell, G.; Walsh, A. J.; Burton, M.; Rathborne, J.; Fukui, Y.; Kawamura, A.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-06-01

    The High Energy Stereoscopic System has revealed many TeV (1012 eV) gamma-ray sources along the Galactic plane, and around 30 per cent of these sources remain unidentified. The morphology and dynamics of dense gas coincident and surrounding the gamma-ray emission can provide clues about the nature of the TeV emission. The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS) undertaken with the Mopra radio telescope includes several dense gas tracers, such as NH3 (n,n) transitions and HC3N (3-2), star formation tracers including H2O masers and radio recombination lines that trace ionized gas. A search for dense gas, traced by NH3 (1,1) emission seen in HOPS and additional observations, towards Galactic TeV sources has been undertaken. Of the 49 Galactic TeV sources covered by 12 mm observations, NH3 (1,1) is detected towards or adjacent to 38 of them. Dense gas counterparts have been detected near several unidentified Galactic TeV sources that display morphology pointing to a hadronic origin to the TeV gamma-rays. The dense gas detected towards some TeV sources displays unusual emission characteristics, including very broad linewidths and enhanced ortho-to-para NH3 abundance ratios towards HESS J1745-303 and HESS J1801-233, which reflects previous shock activity within the gas.

  1. Transient visual evoked neuromagnetic responses: Identification of multiple sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Medvick, P.; Flynn, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Supek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements and associated modeling procedures must be able to resolve multiple sources in order to localize and accurately characterize the generators of visual evoked neuromagnetic activity. Workers have identified at least 11 areas in the macaque, throughout occipital, parietal, and temporal cortex, which are primarily or entirely visual in function. The surface area of the human occipital lobe is estimated to be 150--250cm. Primary visual cortex covers approximately 26cm/sup 2/ while secondary visual areas comprise the remaining area. For evoked response amplitudes typical of human MEG data, one report estimates that a two-dipole field may be statistically distinguishable from that of a single dipole when the separation is greater than 1--2 cm. Given the estimated expanse of cortex devoted to visual processes, along with this estimate of resolution limits it is likely that MEG can resolve sources associated with activity in multiple visual areas. Researchers have noted evidence for the existence of multiple sources when presenting visual stimuli in a half field; however, they did not attempt to localize them. We have examined numerous human MEG field patterns resulting from different visual field placements of a small sinusoidal grating which suggest the existence of multiple sources. The analyses we have utilized for resolving multiple sources in these studies differ depending on whether there was evidence of (1) synchronous activation of two spatially discrete sources or (2) two discrete asynchronous sources. In some cases we have observed field patterns which appear to be adequately explained by a single source changing its orientation and location across time. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Comptonization of diffuse ambient radiation by a relativistic jet: The source of gamma rays from blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of blazars have revealed strong, variable gamma-ray fluxes with no signatures of gamma-ray absorption by pair production. This radiation probably originates from the inner parts of relativistic jets which are aimed nearly toward us. On sub-parsec scales, the jet will be pervaded by radiation from the broad-line region, as well as by photons from the central continuum source (some of which will be scattered by thermal plasma). In a frame moving with the relativistic outflow, the energy of this ambient radiation would be enhanced. This radiation would be Comptonized by both cold and relativistic electrons in the jet, yielding (in the observer's frame) a collimated beam of X-rays and gamma rays. On the assumption that this process dominates self-Comptonization of synchrotron radiation, we develop a self-consistent model for variable gamma-ray emission, involving a single population of relativistic electrons accelerated by a disturbance in the jet. The spectral break between the X-ray and gamma-ray band, observed in 3C 279 and deduced for other blazars, results from inefficient radiative cooling of lower energy electrons. The existence of such a break strongly favors a model involving Comptonization of an external radiation field over a synchrotron self-Compton model. We derive constraints on such model parameters as the location and speed of the source, its dimensions and internal physical parameters, the maximum photon energies produced in the source, and the density and distribution of ambient radiation. Finally, we discuss how observations might discriminate between our model and alternative ones invoking Comptonization of ambient radiation.

  3. Comptonization of diffuse ambient radiation by a relativistic jet: The source of gamma rays from blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of blazars have revealed strong, variable gamma-ray fluxes with no signatures of gamma-ray absorption by pair production. This radiation probably originates from the inner parts of relativistic jets which are aimed nearly toward us. On sub-parsec scales, the jet will be pervaded by radiation from the broad-line region, as well as by photons from the central continuum source (some of which will be scattered by thermal plasma). In a frame moving with the relativistic outflow, the energy of this ambient radiation would be enhanced. This radiation would be Comptonized by both cold and relativistic electrons in the jet, yielding (in the observer's frame) a collimated beam of X-rays and gamma rays. On the assumption that this process dominates self-Comptonization of synchrotron radiation, we develop a self-consistent model for variable gamma-ray emission, involving a single population of relativistic electrons accelerated by a disturbance in the jet. The spectral break between the X-ray and gamma-ray band, observed in 3C 279 and deduced for other blazars, results from inefficient radiative cooling of lower energy electrons. The existence of such a break strongly favors a model involving Comptonization of an external radiation field over a synchrotron self-Compton model. We derive constraints on such model parameters as the location and speed of the source, its dimensions and internal physical parameters, the maximum photon energies produced in the source, and the density and distribution of ambient radiation. Finally, we discuss how observations might discriminate between our model and alternative ones invoking Comptonization of ambient radiation.

  4. An Analysis of Gamma-ray Burst Time Profiles from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requested funding to measure the durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the 4B catalog as well as to study the structure of GRB time profiles returned by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The duration (T90) was to be measured using the same techniques and algorithms developed by the principal investigator for the 3B data. The profile structure studies fall into the two categories of variability and fractal analyses.

  5. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  6. Constraining Very High-Energy Gamma Ray Sources Using IceCube Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Gregory; Feintzeig, J.; Karle, A.; IceCube Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Modern gamma ray astronomy has revealed the most violent, energetic objects in the known universe, from nearby supernova remnants to distant active galactic nuclei. In an effort to discover more about the fundamental nature of such objects, we present searches for astrophysical neutrinos in coincidence with known gamma ray sources. Searches were conducted using data from IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer neutrino detector that is sensitive to astrophysical particles with energies above 1 TeV. The detector is situated at the South Pole, and uses more than 5,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect Cherenkov light from the interactions of particles within the ice. Existing models of proton-proton interactions allow us to link gamma ray fluxes to the production of high-energy neutrinos, so neutrino data from IceCube can be used to constrain the mechanisms by which gamma ray sources create such energetic photons. For a few particularly bright sources, such as the blazar Markarian 421, IceCube is beginning to reach the point where actual constraints can be made. As more years of data are analyzed, the limits will improve and stronger constraints will become possible. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's REU Program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  7. Modulated Multiple Slit Camera for improved localization of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1982-01-01

    An instrument is described in which a cylindrical modulation collimator is added to one half of a Multiple Slit Camera (MSC) coded-aperture imaging system. The instrument provides gamma-ray burst positions from a single spacecraft that are as precise as the best positions from the long-baseline network of interplanetary spacecraft. The determination of fine positions is described, and the fine-position capability is shown to operate over about two-thirds of the MSC's nearly all-sky field of view. It is noted that the addition of the modulation collimator only slightly reduces the system's sensitivity and can improve the location precision for gamma-ray bursts and slower hard-X-ray transients to about 0.1 sq arcmin.

  8. Low Noise Double-Sided Silicon Strip Detector for Multiple-Compton Gamma-ray Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyasu

    2002-12-03

    A Semiconductor Multiple-Compton Telescope (SMCT) is being developed to explore the gamma-ray universe in an energy band 0.1-20 MeV, which is not well covered by the present or near-future gamma-ray telescopes. The key feature of the SMCT is the high energy resolution that is crucial for high angular resolution and high background rejection capability. We have developed prototype modules for a low noise Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) system which is an essential element of the SMCT. The geometry of the DSSD is optimized to achieve the lowest noise possible. A new front-end VLSI device optimized for low noise operation is also developed. We report on the design and test results of the prototype system. We have reached an energy resolution of 1.3 keV (FWHM) for 60 keV and 122 keV at 0 C.

  9. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Chuncheng; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.; DeSimone, D.J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C.F.; McKittrick, T.M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S.E.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  10. Statistical measurement of the gamma-ray source-count distribution as a function of energy

    DOE PAGES

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; ...

    2016-07-29

    Statistical properties of photon count maps have recently been proven as a new tool to study the composition of the gamma-ray sky with high precision. Here, we employ the 1-point probability distribution function of six years of Fermi-LAT data to measure the source-count distribution dN/dS and the diffuse components of the high-latitude gamma-ray sky as a function of energy. To that aim, we analyze the gamma-ray emission in five adjacent energy bands between 1 and 171 GeV. It is demonstrated that the source-count distribution as a function of flux is compatible with a broken power law up to energies of ~50 GeV. Furthermore, the index below the break is between 1.95 and 2.0. For higher energies, a simple power-law fits the data, with an index ofmore » $${2.2}_{-0.3}^{+0.7}$$ in the energy band between 50 and 171 GeV. Upper limits on further possible breaks as well as the angular power of unresolved sources are derived. We find that point-source populations probed by this method can explain $${83}_{-13}^{+7}$$% ($${81}_{-19}^{+52}$$%) of the extragalactic gamma-ray background between 1.04 and 1.99 GeV (50 and 171 GeV). Our method has excellent capabilities for constraining the gamma-ray luminosity function and the spectra of unresolved blazars.« less

  11. Search for GeV gamma-ray emission from ultraluminous X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Kenji; Mori, Masaki

    2012-12-01

    Ultraluminous X-ray (ULX) sources show X-ray luminosities above 1039 erg/s which correspond to Eddington luminosities of 20 ~ 200 solar-mass objects. They are found in arms of spiral galaxies and a catalog of 127 ULX objects has been issued by Swartz et al. (2011). None but M82 of these sources are known as gamma-ray emitters in the second Fermi-LAT catalog. We have searched for gamma-ray signal for 18 galaxies which include ULX sources with Fermi-LAT data collected during 2.5 years after launch. In this paper we report the result of this search and discuss its implication on ULX activies.

  12. Estimating significance in observations of variable and transient gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Ori M.; Humensky, T. B.; Mukherjee, Reshmi; Santander, Marcos

    2017-07-01

    The standard method for estimating the statistical significance of a gamma-ray source detection is that introduced by Li & Ma (1983), Eq. (17). In observing sources with time-dependent light curves, one can improve on this method by including approximate a priori knowledge of the source temporal behavior. A maximum-likelihood-based approach is suggested that provides an improvement in sensitivity with respect to the Li & Ma technique. The method is demonstrated by applying it to Monte Carlo simulations of gamma-ray burst observations with parameters chosen to reproduce the performance of current generation imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). One particular example of a simulated burst observation near the current-generation IACT detection threshold results in a sensitivity improvement of approximately 25% . It is also shown that this method can work with highly variable light curves without much computational complexity, and that the sensitivity gain is robust against uncertainties in the a priori-defined light curve.

  13. EGRET/COMPTEL Observations of an Unusual, Steep-Spectrum Gamma-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Hartman, R. C.; Collmar, W.; Johnson, W. N.

    1999-01-01

    During analysis of sources below the threshold of the third EGRET catalog, we have discovered a source, named GRO J1400-3956 based on the best position, with a remarkably steep spectrum. Archival analysis of COMPTEL data shows that the spectrum must have a strong turn-over in the energy range between COMPTEL and EGRET. The EGRET data show some evidence of time variability, suggesting an AGN, but the spectral change of slope is larger than that seen for most gamma-ray blazars. The sharp cutoff resembles the high-energy spectral breaks seen in some gamma-ray pulsars. There have as yet been no OSSE observations of this source.

  14. A Counterpart Search for a Source of 2.2 MeV Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnell, Mark L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to search for a counterpart to an apparent point source of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays that had been detected using data from the COMPTEL experiment on Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The source detected by Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) was of marginal significance (less than 4 sigma) and a further confirmation at low energies was highly desired. An observation of this region was Rossi X Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) performed on 04-Feb-1998. An analysis of the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) data from this observation yielded a negative result. Short discussions of the COMPTEL Source, RXTE Observations, RXTE Analysis results, other observations as well as future work are included.

  15. The source altitude, electric current, and intrinsic brightness of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Briggs, Michael S.; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Xiong, Shaolin; Connaughton, Valerie; Fishman, Gerald J.; Lu, Gaopeng; Lyu, Fanchao; Solanki, Rahulkumar

    2014-12-01

    Many details of how thunderstorms generate terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) and other forms of high-energy radiation remain uncertain, including the basic question of where they are produced. We exploit the association of distinct low-frequency radio emissions with generation of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) to directly measure for the first time the TGF source altitude. Analysis of two events reveals source altitudes of 11.8 ± 0.4 km and 11.9 ± 0.9 km. This places the source region in the interior of the thunderstorm between the two main charge layers and implies an intrinsic TGF brightness of approximately 1018 runaway electrons. The electric current in this nontraditional lightning process is found to be strong enough to drive nonlinear effects in the ionosphere, and in one case is comparable to the highest peak current lightning processes on the planet.

  16. Common source-multiple load vs. separate source-individual load photovoltaic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appelbaum, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    A comparison of system performance is made for two possible system setups: (1) individual loads powered by separate solar cell sources; and (2) multiple loads powered by a common solar cell source. A proof for resistive loads is given that shows the advantage of a common source over a separate source photovoltaic system for a large range of loads. For identical loads, both systems perform the same.

  17. Automatic Modulation Recognition of Mixed Multiple Source Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaobo; Zhang, Hang; Lu, Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, automatic modulation recognition of mixed multiple source signals is discussed. At first, the algorithm of equivariant adaptive source separation (EASI) is employed to separate signals from their mixed waveforms. Four features of five modulated signals are extracted and then two classifiers, decision tree and neutral network are used to complete modulation classification. The effects of symbol shaping on features extraction and validation of source separation are also investigated. Simulations show that the average probability of correct recognition of the classifiers is very depended on the performance of source separation. When SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) is larger than 15 dB and the number of mixed source signals is less than 4, the average probability of correct recognition is above 0.6 for decision tree classifier and 0.63 for neutral network classifier. Simulations and discussions about automatic modulation recognition for source signals surfed Rayleigh flat fading are also presented.

  18. A model-based multiple-pinhole synthetic imager for stand-off range gamma-emitting objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRego, Paul J.; Hecht, Adam A.; Dias da Cunha, Kenya M.; Baldez, Phoenix

    2016-09-01

    Pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors provide the opportunity to perform spectroscopic imaging for discriminating one radioactive material from another. Although Compton interactions provide a means for imaging high energy gamma sources, identification of materials emitting lower energy signatures are better suited to collimator imaging techniques. This paper specifically considers a multiple pinhole method for its simplicity of pinhole focusing combined with straightforward processing methods for incorporating multiple apertures to reduce photon collection time while retaining image resolution. Multiple pinhole image detections are combined using an iterative Maximum- Likelihood Expectation-Maximization (MLEM) synthetic imaging algorithm. To enable subsequent field operations, the imaging system matrix is computed using an imaging model with adjustable parameters rather than one experimentally acquired from point sources. The system model includes an object space, a multiple pinhole collimator plane, and a pixelated detection plane. The modeled object space is implemented in two dimensions to reduce image reconstruction burden since 3D imaging is not practical for single view stand-off imaging. Focusing is modeled by a function computing photon trajectory and passage through the pinhole patterned barrier plane. Results show that a MLEM processed image will achieve resolution approaching that of a single pinhole imaged onto the full detector. The multiple pinhole advantages of simple implementation with shorter focal lengths combined with the availability of portable CZT detectors would be useful in short stand-off applications. Work is currently in progress to experimentally quantify spatial resolution and imaging timelines using an eV Products D-Matrix 4x4 array of pixelated CZT modules.

  19. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  20. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Giroletti, M.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.; Nori, M.

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  1. Mapping correlation of a simulated dark matter source and a point source in the gamma-ray sky - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Alexander

    2015-08-23

    In my research, I analyzed how two gamma-ray source models interact with one another when optimizing to fit data. This is important because it becomes hard to distinguish between the two point sources when they are close together or looking at low energy photons. The reason for the first is obvious, the reason why they become harder to distinguish at lower photon energies is the resolving power of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope gets worse at lower energies. When the two point sources are highly correlated (hard to distinguish between), we need to change our method of statistical analysis. What I did was show that highly correlated sources have larger uncertainties associated with them, caused by an optimizer not knowing which point source’s parameters to optimize. I also mapped out where their is high correlation for 2 different theoretical mass dark matter point sources so that people analyzing them in the future knew where they had to use more sophisticated statistical analysis.

  2. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (approx. 20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (approx. 92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and Supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection.

  3. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (approx. 20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (approx. 92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and Supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection.

  4. Imaging with INTEGRAL. [instrument for fine spectroscopy of celestial gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The INTEGRAL mission was proposed in response to the ESA M2 call for proposals and is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy and imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV. Cosmic gamma-rays are emitted on a wide range of angular scales and structures for a diverse population of astronomical objects. The emission, which includes discrete spectral lines and continuum radiation is derived from point sources, localized regions, as well as a diffuse band along the Galactic plane. Much of the gamma-ray sky is composed from transient phenomena which range from the few second timescale associated with gamma-ray bursts to larger lived events lasting some days or more. These class of events pose the challenge of firstly identification and secondly that of precise positional location of 'random' short lived events which arrive isotropically. In this article the imaging requirements are evaluated in light of current observational astronomical data and practical solutions for the INTEGRAL telescope are discussed. Some of the key problems are highlighted.

  5. Measurements of gamma-ray dose from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Griffith, R.V.; Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1983-06-01

    The gamma-ray dose fraction from a moderated /sup 252/Cf source was determined by using three types of dosimetry systems. Measurements were carried out in air at a distance of 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere (50 cm from the source which is at the center of the sphere) to the geometrical center of each detector. The moderating sphere is 0.8-mm-thick stainless steel shell filled with D/sub 2/O and covered with 0.5 mm of cadmium. Measurements were also carried out with instruments and dosimeters positioned at the surface of a 40 cm x 40 cm x 15 cm plexiglass irradiation phantom whose front surface was also 35 cm from the surface of the moderating sphere. A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic ionization chambers and a TE proportional counter (TEPC) were used to measure tissue dose, from which the neutron dose equivalent was computed. The ratio of gamma-ray dose to the neutron dose equivalent was determined by using a relatively neutron-insensitive Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, the event-size spectrum measured by the TEPC was also used to compute the gamma-ray dose fraction. The average value for the ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.18 with an uncertainty of about +-18%.

  6. Detection of multiple terrestrial gamma-ray flashes from thunderstorm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursi, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Tavani, M.; Casella, D.; Sanò, P.; Dietrich, S.

    2016-11-01

    Since their discovery, Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs) exhibited an evident correlation with thunderstorms and lightning activity. The fleeting nature of these events and the heavy absorption of gamma rays in the lowest atmospheric layers severely hamper the observation of this phenomenon, making us reveal just a small fraction of a probably much wider population. As each thunderstorm produces a large amount of lightning discharges during its lifetime, it is reasonable that even a large amount of TGFs are produced during the same event. However, detection of multiple TGFs coming from the same storm is difficult to perform, as it requires the constant monitoring of a spatially limited geographic region: this is not an easy task to perform for satellites on high-inclination orbits that make them experience nonnegligible latitudinal shifts at each orbital passage over a certain region, preventing the monitoring of a limited geographic region throughout successive overpasses. In this perspective, the quasi-equatorial (2.5°) orbit of the Astrorivelatore Gamma ad Immagini LEggero (AGILE) satellite ensures a minimal latitudinal shift when flying over the same region at successive passages, allowing for the follow-up of thunderstorms in time. We exploit this feature of the AGILE satellite to search for multiple TGFs coming from the same geographic region and, in particular, from the same thunderstorm. We carry out this search on the AGILE TGF database (2009-2016), ending up with a sample of 79 systems producing more than one TGF, both during the same overpass and up to four overpasses after. Data acquired by geostationary meteorological satellites and cross correlation with radio sferics detected by World Wide Lightning Location Network are used to support this investigation. The AGILE satellite for the first time clearly establishes the multiple occurrences of TGFs from convective thunderstorms, both on timescales of minutes to several hours.

  7. Coordinating a Large, Amalgamated REU Program with Multiple Funding Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorini, Eugene; Myers, Kellen; Naqvi, Yusra

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the challenges of organizing a large REU program amalgamated from multiple funding sources, including diverse participants, mentors, and research projects. We detail the program's structure, activities, and recruitment, and we hope to demonstrate that the organization of this REU is not only beneficial to its…

  8. Method and system of integrating information from multiple sources

    DOEpatents

    Alford, Francine A.; Brinkerhoff, David L.

    2006-08-15

    A system and method of integrating information from multiple sources in a document centric application system. A plurality of application systems are connected through an object request broker to a central repository. The information may then be posted on a webpage. An example of an implementation of the method and system is an online procurement system.

  9. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  10. A south pole facility to observe very high energy gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert

    1990-04-01

    We plan to construct an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (ACT) at the south pole to study pulsars and other possible sources of very high energy gamma rays. It is believed that a modest number of such sources may account for the bulk of the cosmic radiation. The ACT is the instrument of choice for gamma ray study in the very high-energy (VHE) range of (1011 < E < 1014 eV). A prototype instrument is scheduled for installation at the pole during the 1989-90 austral summer. The south pole is an ideal location in several respects: (i) the long polar night permits almost continuous observation of a source, up to 400 hours per month, and up to 1700 hours/year; (ii) there is a particularly large concentration of interesting candidate sources at high southern declinations, including the remnant of supernova SN1987a; (iii) the circumpolarity of the sky simplifies data analysis; and (iv) the ACT would also operate in conjunction with the South Polar Air Shower Experiment (SPASE) to provide a comprehensive cosmic gamma ray facility. Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53706, USA

  11. Overview of Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray Sources and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Fred; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Bayramian, Andy; Chu, Tak Sum; Cross, R.; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; McNabb, Dennis; Messerly, Michael; Shverdin, Miroslav; Siders, Craig; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Semenov, Vladimir; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-06-25

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGaray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence.

  12. Nonthermal processes around collapsed objects: High energy gamma ray sources in the radio sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.; Ruderman, Malvin; Applegate, James H.; Becker, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    In our proposal responding to the initial Guest Observer NRA for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, 'Nonthermal Processes Around Collapsed Objects: High Energy Gamma Ray Sources in the Radio Sky', we stated that 'At high energies - the identity of the principal Galactic source population remains unknown' although the 'one certain source of high energy emission is young radio pulsars'. These two statements remain true, although at this writing, eighteen months after the beginning of the Compton allsky survey, much of the gamma-ray data required to greatly extend our knowledge of the Galaxy's high energy emission has been collected. The thrust of the program supported by our grant was to collect and analyze a complementary set of data on the Milky Way at radio wavelengths in order to help identify the dominant Pop 1 component of the Galaxy's gamma ray sources, and to pursue theoretical investigations on the origins and emission mechanisms of young pulsars, the one component of this population identified to date. We summarize here our accomplishments under the grant. In Section 2, we describe our VLA surveys of the Galactic Plane along with the current status of the radio source catalogs derived therefrom; unfortunately, owing to the TDRSS antenna problem and subsequent extension of the Sky Survey, we were not able to carry out a comparison with the EGRET data directly, although everything is now in place to do so as soon as it becomes available. In Section 2, we summarize our progress on the theoretical side, including the substantial completion of a dissertation on pulsar origins and work on the high energy emission mechanisms of isolated pulsars. We list the personnel supported by the grant in section 4 and provide a complete bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part by the grant in the final section.

  13. Detection and localization of multiple wideband intermittent acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, R. E.; Yao, K.; Hedley, R.; Taylor, C. E.

    2017-05-01

    We have been interested in the analytical and experimental study of real-life bird song sources for several years. Bird sources are characterized by either a single or multiple bird vocalizations independent of each other or in response to others. The sources may be physically-stationary or exhibit movements and the signals are wide-band in frequency and often intermittent with pauses and possibly restarting with repeating previously used songs or with new songs. Thus, the detection, classification, and 2D or 3D localization of these birds pose challenging signal and array problems. Due to the fact that some birds can mimic other birds, time-domain waveform characterization may not be sufficient for determining the number of birds. Similarly, due to the intermittent nature of the vocalizations, data collected over a long period cannot be used naively. Thus, it is necessary to use short-time Fourier transform (STFT) to fully exploit the intricate natures of the time and frequency properties of these sources and displayed on a spectrogram. Various dominant spectral data over the relevant frames are used to form sample covariance matrices. Eigenvectors associated with the decompositions of these matrices for these spectral indices can be used to provide 2D/3D DOA estimations of the sources over different frames for intermittent sources. Proper cluttering of these data can be used to perform enhanced detection, classification, and localization of multiple bird sources. Two sets of collected bird data will be used to demonstrate these claims.

  14. Safety and efficacy of outpatient gamma knife radiosurgery for multiple cerebral metastases.

    PubMed

    Wowra, Berndt; Muacevic, Alexander; Jess-Hempen, Anja; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2004-07-01

    This review highlights the experience of a single institution using the Leksell gamma knife for 8 years. More than 500 patients with multiple cerebral metastases received outpatient radiosurgery. The results prove that there is a high efficacy and attractively low morbidity of modern outpatient radiosurgery. When compared with whole brain radiation therapy, radiosurgery improved survival in patients with cerebral metastases. Most importantly, the number of brain metastases had no prognostic impact in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell cancer, malignant melanoma and gastrointestinal cancer.

  15. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; WilsonHodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4, as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (> 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

  16. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 1984), as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (greater than 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) for public use.

  17. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE),aboard the COmptOn Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 19841, as well as new transient sources discovered with RATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (>lO mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

  18. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE),aboard the COmptOn Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 19841, as well as new transient sources discovered with RATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (>lO mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

  19. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; WilsonHodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W.

    2002-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4, as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (> 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the HEASARC for public use.

  20. The BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog of Low Energy Gamma Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Zhang, S. N.; Finger, M. H.; Connaughton, V.; Koshut, T. M.; Henze, W.; McCollough, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma ray sky between April 1991 and June 2000. During that time, a catalog of known sources was derived from existing catalogs such as HEAO A-4 (Levine et al. 1984), as well as new transient sources discovered with BATSE and other X-ray monitors operating in the CGRO era. The Earth Occultation Technique (Harmon et al. 2001, astro-ph/0109069) was used to monitor a combination of these sources, mostly galactic, totaling to about 175 objects. The catalog will present the global properties of these sources and their probability of detection (greater than 10 mCrab, 20-100 keV) with BATSE. Systematic errors due to unknown sources or background components are included. Cursory analyses to search for new transients (35-80 mCrab in the 20-100 keV band) and super-orbital periods in known binary sources are also presented. Whole mission light curves and associated data production/analysis tools are being delivered to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) for public use.

  1. Illumination Decomposition for Photograph With Multiple Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yan, Qingan; Liu, Zheng; Zou, Hua; Xiao, Chunxia

    2017-09-01

    Illumination decomposition for a single photograph is an important and challenging problem in image editing operation. In this paper, we present a novel coarse-to-fine strategy to perform illumination decomposition for photograph with multiple light sources. We first reconstruct the lighting environment of the image using the estimated geometry structure of the scene. With the position of lights, we detect the shadow regions as well as the highlights in the projected image for each light. Then, using the illumination cues from shadows, we estimate the coarse illumination decomposed image emitted by each light source. Finally, we present a light-aware illumination optimization model, which efficiently produces the finer illumination decomposition results, as well as recover the texture detail under the shadow. We validate our approach on a number of examples, and our method effectively decomposes the input image into multiple components corresponding to different light sources.

  2. Shot sequencing based on biological equivalent dose considerations for multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Lee, Letitia; Barani, Igor; Hwang, Andrew; Fogh, Shannon; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Larson, David A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2011-11-21

    Rapid delivery of multiple shots or isocenters is one of the hallmarks of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether the temporal order of shots delivered with Gamma Knife Perfexion would significantly influence the biological equivalent dose for complex multi-isocenter treatments. Twenty single-target cases were selected for analysis. For each case, 3D dose matrices of individual shots were extracted and single-fraction equivalent uniform dose (sEUD) values were determined for all possible shot delivery sequences, corresponding to different patterns of temporal dose delivery within the target. We found significant variations in the sEUD values among these sequences exceeding 15% for certain cases. However, the sequences for the actual treatment delivery were found to agree (<3%) and to correlate (R² = 0.98) excellently with the sequences yielding the maximum sEUD values for all studied cases. This result is applicable for both fast and slow growing tumors with α/β values of 2 to 20 according to the linear-quadratic model. In conclusion, despite large potential variations in different shot sequences for multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatments, current clinical delivery sequences exhibited consistent biological target dosing that approached that maximally achievable for all studied cases.

  3. Gamma Knife rhizotomy-induced histopathology in multiple sclerosis-related trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, David B; Del Bigio, Marc R; Kaufmann, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    In this report, the authors describe the pathological changes in the human trigeminal nerve after Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Three trigeminal nerves of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS)-related trigeminal neuralgia (MSTN) after Gamma Knife radiosurgery and other ablative procedures were examined by a neuropathologist. These cases were compared with 3 patients with typical TN who underwent partial surgical rhizotomy following recurrent symptoms after gasserian injury procedures, as well as with autopsy specimens from patients with and without MSTN. The three irradiated MS-TN specimens exhibited axon loss, demyelination, myelin debris, and fibrosis. Mild lymphocytic infiltrate was present in all 3 samples from MS-TN patients. The nonirradiated trigeminal nerve samples were generally well myelinated with rare degenerating axons. The microscopic findings in trigeminal nerve autopsy specimens were normal in patients without TN, with MS but not TN, and MS-TN. The inflammation observed in MS-TN specimens collected following Gamma Knife radiosurgery has not previously been described in the literature. These data provide new insight into the changes that occur in trigeminal nerve following stereotactic radiosurgery.

  4. Shot sequencing based on biological equivalent dose considerations for multiple isocenter Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lijun; Lee, Letitia; Barani, Igor; Hwang, Andrew; Fogh, Shannon; Nakamura, Jean; McDermott, Michael; Sneed, Penny; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    Rapid delivery of multiple shots or isocenters is one of the hallmarks of Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this study, we investigated whether the temporal order of shots delivered with Gamma Knife Perfexion would significantly influence the biological equivalent dose for complex multi-isocenter treatments. Twenty single-target cases were selected for analysis. For each case, 3D dose matrices of individual shots were extracted and single-fraction equivalent uniform dose (sEUD) values were determined for all possible shot delivery sequences, corresponding to different patterns of temporal dose delivery within the target. We found significant variations in the sEUD values among these sequences exceeding 15% for certain cases. However, the sequences for the actual treatment delivery were found to agree (<3%) and to correlate (R2 = 0.98) excellently with the sequences yielding the maximum sEUD values for all studied cases. This result is applicable for both fast and slow growing tumors with α/β values of 2 to 20 according to the linear-quadratic model. In conclusion, despite large potential variations in different shot sequences for multi-isocenter Gamma Knife treatments, current clinical delivery sequences exhibited consistent biological target dosing that approached that maximally achievable for all studied cases.

  5. Development of a compact 20 MeV gamma-ray source for energy calibration at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, A.W.P.; Browne, M.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Waltham, C.E.; Kherani, N.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a real-time neutrino detector under construction near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. SNO collaboration is developing various calibration sources in order to determine the detector response completely. This paper describes briefly the calibration sources being developed by the collaboration. One of these, a compact {sup 3}H(p,{gamma}){sup 4}He source, which produces 20-MeV {gamma}-rays, is described.

  6. Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Froula, D. H.; Hartemann, F. V.; Joshi, C.

    2010-04-13

    We propose to demonstrate a novel x-ray and gamma-ray light source based on laser-plasma electron acceleration and Compton scattering at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. This will provide a new versatile and compact light source capability at the laboratory with very broad scientific applications that are of interest to many disciplines. The source’s synchronization with the seed laser system at a femtosecond time scale (i-e, at which chemical reactions occur) will allow scientists to perform pump-probe experiments with x-ray and gamma-ray beams. Across the laboratory, this will be a new tool for nuclear science, high energy density physics, chemistry, biology, or weapons studies.

  7. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  8. HAWC sensitivity to Galactic TeV gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Michelle

    2013-04-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a second generation detector of TeV gamma rays based on the water Cherenkov technique. It will comprise an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors. It is an all-sky surveying instrument with greater than 90% duty cycle, a field of view of 2 sr, and angular resolution of 0.1 degrees for energies above 10 TeV. The HAWC Observatory is currently under construction in Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The site is at a latitude of 19 degrees North, and an altitude of 4100 m. Ten percent of the array started data taking in September, 2012, and one third of the full array will be operational by Summer 2013. I will present the sensitivity of the HAWC Observatory to known Galactic gamma-ray sources, including the complex Cygnus region, and regions with unidentified source associations.

  9. An unidentified variable gamma-ray source near the galactic plane detected by COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.

    2002-12-01

    We report the detection of an unidentified gamma -ray source near the Galactic plane by the COMPTEL experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The source is detected at a significance level of ~ 7.2sigma in the energy range 1-3 MeV and at ~ 4.6sigma in the lower 0.75-1 MeV band in the time period March to July 1995. At energies above 3 MeV are only marginal hints or upper limits obtained. The MeV spectrum has a soft shape. Strong flux variability is found within one year at energies below 3 MeV. Possible counterparts of galactic and extragalactic nature are discussed.

  10. Correlative studies of astrophysical sources of very high and ultra high energy gamma-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this contract, June 1, 1991 to November 14, 1992, the major results of our research effort have come from the Whipple air shower experiment in Tucson, AZ. The most notable development has been the discovery of TeV photons from the BL Lac object, Markarian 421. This result depended critically on the identification of Mrk 421 by the EGRET team as a source of GeV gamma rays.

  11. NIR flaring of the Gamma ray source [HB89] 0754+100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Mayya, D., Y.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.

    2010-03-01

    We call attention on our recent observation of the Gamma Ray source [HB89] 0754+100 with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. We found this BLLac type object, to show fluxes about 2 magnitudes brighter than our previous observation 30 days earlier. Below, we list our photometric results in the H Band for this period.

  12. The Third Fermi LAT Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David J.; Ballet, J.; Burnett, T.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been gathering science data since August 2008, surveying the full sky every three hours. The second source catalog (2FGL, Nolan et al 2012, ApJS 199, 31) was based on 2 years of data. We are preparing a third source catalog (3FGL) based on 4 years of reprocessed data. The reprocessing introduced a more accurate description of the instrument, which resulted in a narrower point spread function. Both the localization and the detection threshold for hard-spectrum sources have been improved. The new catalog also relies on a refined model of Galactic diffuse emission, particularly important for low-latitude soft-spectrum sources. The process for associating LAT sources with those at other wavelengths has also improved, thanks to dedicated multiwavelength follow-up, new surveys and better ways to extract sources likely to be gamma-ray counterparts. We describe the construction of this new catalog, its characteristics, and its remaining limitations.

  13. The Third Fermi-LAT Catalog of High-Energy Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Toby

    2014-03-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been gathering science data since August 2008, surveying the full sky every three hours. The second source catalog (2FGL, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS 199, 31) was based on 2 years of data. We are preparing a third source catalog (3FGL) based on 4 years of reprocessed data. The reprocessing introduced a more accurate description of the instrument, which resulted in a narrower point spread function. Both the localization and the detection threshold for hard-spectrum sources have been improved. The new catalog also relies on a refined model of Galactic diffuse emission, particularly important for low-latitude soft-spectrum sources. The process for associating LAT sources with those at other wavelengths has also improved, thanks to dedicated multiwavelength follow-up, new surveys and better ways to extract sources likely to be gamma-ray counterparts. We describe the construction of this new catalog, its characteristics, and its remaining limitations.

  14. Aberrant gamma band cortical sources and functional connectivity in adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Shreekantiah; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Goyal, Nishant; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Nizamie, Shamshul Haque

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) resemble epileptic seizures, but lack clinically evident abnormal electrical activity in the brain. We aimed to assess resting gamma spectral power, current source distribution and functional connectivity in adolescents with PNES. Interictal, 32 channels electroencephalographic recording of 15 adolescents with PNES was compared with 10 matched healthy controls. Spectral power, current source distribution and lagged linear coherence were assessed. Statistically significant gamma spectral power, cortical sources and connectivity pattern was found in some brain areas. Region specific aberrant gamma activity and its relationship to psychopathology are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Apportioning Sources of Riverine Nitrogen at Multiple Watershed Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Alexander, R. B.; Sebestyen, S. D.

    2005-05-01

    Loadings of reactive nitrogen (N) entering terrestrial landscapes have increased in recent decades due to anthropogenic activities associated with food and energy production. In the northeastern USA, this enhanced supply of N has been linked to many environmental concerns in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, such as forest decline, lake and stream acidification, human respiratory problems, and coastal eutrophication. Thus N is a priority pollutant with regard to a whole host of air, land, and water quality issues, highlighting the need for methods to identify and quantify various N sources. Further, understanding precursor sources of N is critical to current and proposed public policies targeted at the reduction of N inputs to the terrestrial landscape and receiving waters. We present results from published and ongoing studies using multiple approaches to fingerprint sources of N in the northeastern USA, at watershed scales ranging from the headwaters to the coastal zone. The approaches include: 1) a mass balance model with a nitrogen-budgeting approach for analyses of large watersheds; 2) a spatially-referenced regression model with an empirical modeling approach for analyses of water quality at regional scales; and 3) a meta-analysis of monitoring data with a chemical tracer approach, utilizing concentrations of multiple elements and isotopic composition of N from water samples collected in the streams and rivers. We discuss the successes and limitations of these various approaches for apportioning contributions of N from multiple sources to receiving waters at regional scales.

  16. REVISITING THE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 2FGL J1823.8+4312

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.

    2013-02-20

    One of the great challenges of gamma-ray astronomy is identifying the lower energy counterparts to these high-energy sources. Recently, in this journal, Massaro et al. attempted to find the counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) of uncertain type from the Second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog. After considering mid-infrared data in the field from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), those authors conclude that the preferred identification of 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is WISE J182352.33+431452.5, despite the fact that the mid-infrared source is undetected at radio energies. They claim that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 constitutes the discovery of a new class of extragalactic X-ray source, either a radio-faint blazar or the prototype of a new class of active galaxy with an enigmatic spectral energy distribution. This conclusion is claimed to be independent of whether or not the WISE source is the actual counterpart to 2FGL J1823.8+4312. Based on a re-analysis of public data in this field and new spectroscopy from Palomar, we conclude that WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is a dust-reddened quasar at z = 0.560, a representative example of a very common extragalactic AGN class. Were WISE J182352.33+431452.5 to be associated with the gamma-ray emission, this would be an unusual and exciting discovery. However, we argue that 2FGL J1823.8+4312 is more likely associated with either WISE J182409.25+431404.7 or, more likely, WISE J182419.04+430949.6, two radio-loud sources in the field. The former is a radio-loud quasar and the latter is an optically variable source with a featureless blue spectrum.

  17. Graphical model based multivariate analysis (GAMMA): an open-source, cross-platform neuroimaging data analysis software package.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H

    2012-04-01

    The GAMMA suite is an open-source, cross-platform data-mining software package designed to analyze neuroimaging data. Analyzing brain image volumes is a very challenging problem, due to undersampling and the potential for multivariate nonlinear interactions among variables. The GAMMA suite provides a set of tools to facilitate the analysis of neuroimaging data.

  18. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  19. Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Source at a Beamline (BL1) in NewSUBARU

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Sho; Horikawa, Ken; Miyamoto, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu

    2010-06-23

    We have developed a laser-Compton gamma-ray source at beamline (BL1) in NewSUBARU, an electron storage ring operating at electron energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV. Initially, we generated 17-37 MeV gamma rays using a Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser operating at 1.06 {mu}m and 0.53 {mu}m, achieving a luminosity of 6000 photons/(W{center_dot}mA{center_dot}s) and a flux of 5x10{sup 6} photons/s with a laser power of 4 W and a beam current of 200 mA. We then installed a CO{sub 2} laser operating at 10.6 {mu}m, and generated gamma rays in the energy range of 1-4 MeV. In this range, the gamma-ray luminosity is 7300 photons/(W{center_dot}mA{center_dot}s) and the flux is 5.6x10{sup 6} photons/s when operating the laser at 4 W and 200 mA. These performances are in good agreement with calculations. We will next add a Tm-fiber laser operating at 2 {mu}m to generate gamma rays in the energy range of 4-21 MeV, using a laser-focusing design to generate the maximum flux. The luminosity of this stage is calculated to be 6400 photons/(W{center_dot}mA{center_dot}s). Nd:YVO{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and Tm-fiber laser are all capable of operating in a high-power regime and can generate kW-level output power. At present, the maximum gamma-ray flux is limited only by the laser power. When operating the laser at 1 kW of output power with a beam current of 200 mA, we expect a flux of up to {approx}10{sup 9} photons/s. At NewSUBARU, up to several dozen MeV gamma-ray sources are capable of generating such high power.

  20. Multiple sparse volumetric priors for distributed EEG source reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Strobbe, Gregor; van Mierlo, Pieter; De Vos, Maarten; Mijović, Bogdan; Hallez, Hans; Van Huffel, Sabine; López, José David; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2014-10-15

    We revisit the multiple sparse priors (MSP) algorithm implemented in the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM) for distributed EEG source reconstruction (Friston et al., 2008). In the present implementation, multiple cortical patches are introduced as source priors based on a dipole source space restricted to a cortical surface mesh. In this note, we present a technique to construct volumetric cortical regions to introduce as source priors by restricting the dipole source space to a segmented gray matter layer and using a region growing approach. This extension allows to reconstruct brain structures besides the cortical surface and facilitates the use of more realistic volumetric head models including more layers, such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), compared to the standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models. We illustrated the technique with ERP data and anatomical MR images in 12 subjects. Based on the segmented gray matter for each of the subjects, cortical regions were created and introduced as source priors for MSP-inversion assuming two types of head models. The standard 3-layered scalp-skull-brain head models and extended 4-layered head models including CSF. We compared these models with the current implementation by assessing the free energy corresponding with each of the reconstructions using Bayesian model selection for group studies. Strong evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP approach compared to the MSP approach based on cortical patches for both types of head models. Overall, the strongest evidence was found in favor of the volumetric MSP reconstructions based on the extended head models including CSF. These results were verified by comparing the reconstructed activity. The use of volumetric cortical regions as source priors is a useful complement to the present implementation as it allows to introduce more complex head models and volumetric source priors in future studies.

  1. NIR flaring of the Gamma ray source PKS1550-242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Mayya, D. Y.; Escobedo, G.

    2010-07-01

    We call attention on our recent observation of the Gamma Ray source 1FGLJ1553.4-2425 also known as PKS1550-242 with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. On June 16th, 2010 (JD24555363.741), we found this blazar to be in outburst. It showed fluxes about 1.6 magnitudes brighter than our previous NIR photometry. On this date the source was found to have a flux corresponding to H = 14.615 ± 0.04.

  2. Another NIR flare of the Gamma ray source PKS1550-242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carraminana, A.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Escobedo, G.

    2011-05-01

    We call attention on our recent observation of the Gamma Ray source 1FGLJ1553.4-2425 also known as PKS1550-242 with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofisico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. On April 26th, 2011 (JD24555677.877), we found this blazar to be in outburst. It showed fluxes about 4.2 magnitudes brighter than our previous NIR photometry. On this date the source was found to have a flux corresponding to H = 14.527 ± 0.05.

  3. Fermi/Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-Ray Source List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Luca, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Dormody, M.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hartman, R. C.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kocian, M. L.; Komin, N.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Marelli, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Poupard, L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Starck, J.-L.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Van Etten, A.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Watters, K.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2009-07-01

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the γ-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than ~10σ) γ-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) γ-ray sources in the early mission data.

  4. Doses from radon progeny as a source of external beta and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Markovic, V M; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Stevanovic, N

    2012-11-01

    Great deal of work has been devoted to determine doses from alpha particles emitted by (222)Rn and its progeny. In contrast, contribution of beta particles and following gamma radiation to total dose has mostly been neglected so far. The present work describes a study of the detriment of (222)Rn progeny for humans due to external exposure. Doses and dose conversion factors (DCFs) were determined for beta and gamma radiation in main organs and remainder tissue of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantom, taking into account (222)Rn progeny (214)Pb and (214)Bi distributed in the middle of a standard or typical room with dimensions 4 m × 5 m × 2.8 m. The DCF was found to be 7.37 μSv/WLM. Skin and muscle tissue from remainder tissue receives largest dose. Beta and gamma radiation doses from external exposure were compared with alpha, beta, and gamma doses from internal exposure where the source of radioactivity was the lungs. Total doses received in all main organs and remainder tissues were obtained by summing up the doses from external and internal exposure and the corresponding DCF was found to be 20.67 μSv/WLM.

  5. Spectral properties of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.; Papathanassiou, H.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of blast-wave models of gamma-ray burst sources, for various assumptions about the magnetic field density and the relativistic particle acceleration efficiency. For a range of physically plausible models we find that the radiation efficiency is high and leads to nonthermal spectra with breaks at various energies comparable to those observed in the gamma-ray range. Radiation is also predicted at other wavebands, in particular at X-ray, optical/UV, and GeV/TeV energies. We discuss the spectra as a function of duration for three basic types of models, and for cosmological, halo, and galactic disk distances. We also evaluate the gamma-ray fluences and the spectral characteristics for a range of external densities. Impulsive burst models at cosmological distances can satisfy the conventional X-ray paucity constraint S(sub x)/S(sub gamma)less than a few percent over a wide range of durations, but galactic models can do so only for bursts shorter than a few seconds, unless additional assumptions are made. The emissivity is generally larger for bursts in a denser external environment, with the efficiency increasing up to the point where all the energy input is radiated away.

  6. PROBING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED TeV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE HESS J0632+057 WITH SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, A. D.; Stroh, M.; Grube, J.; Hinton, J.; Skilton, J.; Holder, J.; Maier, G.; Mukherjee, R.

    2010-01-01

    New generation TeV gamma-ray telescopes have discovered many new sources, including several enigmatic unidentified TeV objects. HESS J0632+057 is a particularly interesting unidentified TeV source since: it is a point source, it has a possible hard-spectrum X-ray counterpart and a positionally consistent Be star, it has evidence of long-term very high energy gamma-ray flux variability, and it is postulated to be a newly detected TeV/X-ray binary. We have obtained Swift X-ray telescope observations of this source from MJD 54857 to 54965, in an attempt to ascertain its nature and to investigate the hypothesis that it is a previously unknown X-ray/TeV binary. Variability and spectral properties similar to those of the other three known X-ray/TeV binaries have been observed, with measured flux increases by factors of {approx}3. X-ray variability is present on multiple timescales including days to months; however, no clear signature of periodicity is present on the timescales probed by these data. If binary modulation is present and dominating the measured variability, then the period of the orbit is likely to be {>=}54 days (half of this campaign), or it has a shorter period with a variable degree of flux modulation on successive high states. If the two high states measured to date are due to binary modulation, then the favored period is approximately 35-40 days. More observations are required to determine if this object is truly a binary system and to determine the extent that the measured variability is due to inter-orbit flaring effects or periodic binary modulation.

  7. Constrained Source Space MR Spectroscopy: Multiple Voxels, No Gradient Readout.

    PubMed

    Landheer, K; Sahgal, A; Das, S; Graham, S J

    2015-08-01

    Our goal was to develop a novel technique for measuring a small number of localized spectra simultaneously and in a time-efficient manner. Using appropriate radiofrequency pulses, the magnetization from multiple voxels is excited simultaneously and then separated (reconstructed) by using the individual coil-sensitivity profiles from a multichannel receiver coil. Because no gradients are used for k-space encoding, constrained source space MR spectroscopy provides a time advantage over conventional spectroscopic imaging and an improved signal-to-noise ratio per square root of unit time over single-voxel spectroscopy applied at each successive location. In the present work, we considered prototype application of constrained source space MR spectroscopy for 2 voxels. Experimental data from healthy volunteers and simulation results showed that constrained source space MR spectroscopy is effective at extracting 2 independent spectra even in the challenging scenario of the voxels being closely spaced. Also, from 6 patients with various types of brain cancer we obtained 2-voxel constrained source space MR spectroscopy data, which showed spectra of clinical quality in half the time required to perform successive single-voxel MR spectroscopy. Constrained source space MR spectroscopy provides clinical quality spectra and could be used to probe multiple voxels simultaneously in combination with Hadamard encoding for further scan-time reductions. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. Six New Millisecond Pulsars From Arecibo Searches Of Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cromartie, H. T.; Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Deneva, J. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Michelson, P. F.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-02-25

    We have discovered six radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a search with the Arecibo telescope of 34 unidentified gamma-ray sources from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) 4-year point source catalog. Among the 34 sources, we also detected two MSPs previously discovered elsewhere. Each source was observed at a center frequency of 327 MHz, typically at three epochs with individual integration times of 15 minutes. The new MSP spin periods range from 1.99 to 4.66 ms. Five of the six pulsars are in interacting compact binaries (period ≤ 8.1 hr), while the sixth is a more typical neutron star-white dwarf binary with an 83-day orbital period. This is a higher proportion of interacting binaries than for equivalent Fermi-LAT searches elsewhere. The reason is that Arecibo’s large gain afforded us the opportunity to limit integration times to 15 minutes, which significantly increased our sensitivity to these highly accelerated systems. Seventeen of the remaining 26 gamma-ray sources are still categorized as strong MSP candidates, and will be re-searched.

  9. Six New Millisecond Pulsars From Arecibo Searches Of Fermi Gamma-Ray Sources

    DOE PAGES

    Cromartie, H. T.; Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; ...

    2016-02-25

    We have discovered six radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a search with the Arecibo telescope of 34 unidentified gamma-ray sources from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) 4-year point source catalog. Among the 34 sources, we also detected two MSPs previously discovered elsewhere. Each source was observed at a center frequency of 327 MHz, typically at three epochs with individual integration times of 15 minutes. The new MSP spin periods range from 1.99 to 4.66 ms. Five of the six pulsars are in interacting compact binaries (period ≤ 8.1 hr), while the sixth is a more typical neutron star-white dwarfmore » binary with an 83-day orbital period. This is a higher proportion of interacting binaries than for equivalent Fermi-LAT searches elsewhere. The reason is that Arecibo’s large gain afforded us the opportunity to limit integration times to 15 minutes, which significantly increased our sensitivity to these highly accelerated systems. Seventeen of the remaining 26 gamma-ray sources are still categorized as strong MSP candidates, and will be re-searched.« less

  10. Detection of a flaring low-energy gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipen; Owens, Alan

    1994-01-01

    We report the detection of a flaring gamma-ray source by the University of New Hampshire (UNH) balloon-borne coded aperture gamma-ray telescope (DGT) on 1984 October 2. The source was detected at the significance level of 7.2 sigma over the energy range 160-2000 keV. The intensity in the range (160-200) keV was 1.1 Crab. The best-fit position of the source is given by R.A. = 3h 25.8m and Decl. = 67 deg 653 min and is located in the constellation of Camelopardia. The source was visible within the Field of View (FOV) of the telescope for approximately = 2 hr and exhibited signs of flaring. The derived photon spectrum can be equally fitted by an optically thin bremsstrahlung distribution of kT approximately = 52 keV or a power law of the form, dN(E)/dE = 3.7 x 10(exp -6) (E/400)(exp -4.5) photons/sq cm/keV. We compare its spectral characteristics ad energy output to various types of fast X-ray transients. No measurable flux could be detected from CG 135+1, the COS B source which was in the FOV and therefore, we present 2 sigma upper flux limits on its spectral emission over the energy range 160 keV to 9.3 MeV.

  11. SIX NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM ARECIBO SEARCHES OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Cromartie, H. T.; Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Deneva, J. S.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Michelson, P. F.

    2016-03-01

    We have discovered six radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a search with the Arecibo telescope of 34 unidentified gamma-ray sources from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) four year point source catalog. Among the 34 sources, we also detected two MSPs previously discovered elsewhere. Each source was observed at a center frequency of 327 MHz, typically at three epochs with individual integration times of 15 minutes. The new MSP spin periods range from 1.99 to 4.66 ms. Five of the six pulsars are in interacting compact binaries (period ≤ 8.1 hr), while the sixth is a more typical neutron star-white dwarf binary with an 83 day orbital period. This is a higher proportion of interacting binaries than for equivalent Fermi-LAT searches elsewhere. The reason is that Arecibo's large gain afforded us the opportunity to limit integration times to 15 minutes, which significantly increased our sensitivity to these highly accelerated systems. Seventeen of the remaining 26 gamma-ray sources are still categorized as strong MSP candidates, and will be re-searched.

  12. Superluminal cascade spectra of TeV {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaschitz, Roman . E-mail: tom@geminga.org

    2007-03-15

    Astrophysical radiation sources are scrutinized in search of superluminal {gamma}-rays. The tachyonic spectral densities generated by ultra-relativistic electrons in uniform motion are fitted to the high-energy spectra of Galactic supernova remnants, such as RX J0852.0-4622 and the pulsar wind nebulae in G0.9+0.1 and MSH 15-52. The superluminal spectral maps of the unidentified TeV {gamma}-ray sources HESS J1303-631, TeV J2032+4130 and HESS J1825-137 are inferred from EGRET, HEGRA and HESS data. Tachyonic cascade spectra are quite capable of generating the spectral curvature seen in double-logarithmic plots, as well as the extended spectral plateaus defined by EGRET flux points in the GeV band. The curvature of the TeV spectra is intrinsic, caused by the Boltzmann factor in the source densities. The spectral averaging with thermal and exponentially cut power-law electron densities can be done in closed form, and systematic high- and low-temperature expansions of the superluminal spectral densities are derived. Estimates on the electron/proton populations generating the tachyon flux are obtained from the spectral fits, such as power-law indices, temperature and source counts. The cutoff temperatures of the source densities suggest ultra-high-energy protons in MSH 15-52, HESS J1825-137 and TeV J2032+4130.

  13. Efficient quantum transmission in multiple-source networks.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Xu, Gang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-04-02

    A difficult problem in quantum network communications is how to efficiently transmit quantum information over large-scale networks with common channels. We propose a solution by developing a quantum encoding approach. Different quantum states are encoded into a coherent superposition state using quantum linear optics. The transmission congestion in the common channel may be avoided by transmitting the superposition state. For further decoding and continued transmission, special phase transformations are applied to incoming quantum states using phase shifters such that decoders can distinguish outgoing quantum states. These phase shifters may be precisely controlled using classical chaos synchronization via additional classical channels. Based on this design and the reduction of multiple-source network under the assumption of restricted maximum-flow, the optimal scheme is proposed for specially quantized multiple-source network. In comparison with previous schemes, our scheme can greatly increase the transmission efficiency.

  14. Efficient Quantum Transmission in Multiple-Source Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Xu, Gang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    A difficult problem in quantum network communications is how to efficiently transmit quantum information over large-scale networks with common channels. We propose a solution by developing a quantum encoding approach. Different quantum states are encoded into a coherent superposition state using quantum linear optics. The transmission congestion in the common channel may be avoided by transmitting the superposition state. For further decoding and continued transmission, special phase transformations are applied to incoming quantum states using phase shifters such that decoders can distinguish outgoing quantum states. These phase shifters may be precisely controlled using classical chaos synchronization via additional classical channels. Based on this design and the reduction of multiple-source network under the assumption of restricted maximum-flow, the optimal scheme is proposed for specially quantized multiple-source network. In comparison with previous schemes, our scheme can greatly increase the transmission efficiency. PMID:24691590

  15. How to support learning from multiple hypertext sources.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Anja B; Wechsung, Ina; Krems, Josef F

    2009-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated three factors that were assumed to have a significant influence on the success of learning from multiple hypertexts, and on the construction of a documents model in particular. These factors were task (argumentative vs. narrative), available text material (with vs. without primary sources), and presentation format (active vs. static). The study was conducted with the help of the combination of three tools (DEWEX, Chemnitz LogAnalyzer, and SummTool) developed for Web-based experimenting. The results show that the task is the most important factor for successful learning from multiple hypertexts. Depending on the task, the participants were either able or unable to apply adequate strategies, such as considering the source information. It was also observed that argumentative tasks were supported by an active hypertext presentation format, whereas performance on narrative tasks increased with a passive presentation format. No effect was shown for the type of texts available.

  16. Search on extraterrestrial gamma-ray lines from Southern Hemisphere sources with high energy resolution gamma-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacosta, J. M.; Jardim, J. O. D.; Gonzalez-Blanco, F.; Nordemann, D. J. R.; Martin, I. M.; Dutra, S. L. G.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G.; Boclet, D.; Durouchoux, P.

    1981-07-01

    The scope of the GEL 1 and 2 balloon-borne gamma ray telescope experiments is described. The gamma ray spectrometer to be used on GEL 1 is described. It is designed to study the nature of the Galactic center positron annihilation 511 KeV line. The telescope effect is achieved through the aperture angle formed by the gamma ray spectrometer anticoincidence crystals. The balloon gondola and onboard instrumentation of the balloon are described.

  17. Unveiling the Gamma-Ray Source Count Distribution Below the Fermi Detection Limit with Photon Statistics

    DOE PAGES

    Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Cuoco, Alessandro; Donato, Fiorenza; ...

    2016-07-26

    The source-count distribution as a function of their flux, dN/dS, is one of the main quantities characterizing gamma-ray source populations. In this paper, we employ statistical properties of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) photon counts map to measure the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray sky at high latitudes (|b| greater-than or slanted equal to 30°) between 1 and 10 GeV. We present a new method, generalizing the use of standard pixel-count statistics, to decompose the total observed gamma-ray emission into (a) point-source contributions, (b) the Galactic foreground contribution, and (c) a truly diffuse isotropic background contribution. Using the 6more » yr Fermi-LAT data set (P7REP), we show that the dN/dS distribution in the regime of so far undetected point sources can be consistently described with a power law with an index between 1.9 and 2.0. We measure dN/dS down to an integral flux of ~2 x 10-11cm-2s-1, improving beyond the 3FGL catalog detection limit by about one order of magnitude. The overall dN/dS distribution is consistent with a broken power law, with a break at 2.1+1.0-1.3 x 10-8cm-2s-1. The power-law index n1 = 3.1+0.7-0.5 for bright sources above the break hardens to n2 = 1.97 ± 0.03 for fainter sources below the break. A possible second break of the dN/dS distribution is constrained to be at fluxes below 6.4 x 10-11cm-2s-1 at 95% confidence level. Finally, the high-latitude gamma-ray sky between 1 and 10 GeV is shown to be composed of ~25% point sources, ~69.3% diffuse Galactic foreground emission, and ~6% isotropic diffuse background.« less

  18. How Far Away Are the Sources of IceCube Neutrinos? Constraints from the Diffuse Teraelectronvolt Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Chuan; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    The nearly isotropic distribution of teraelectronvolt to petaelectronvolt neutrinos recently detected by the IceCube Collaboration suggests that they come from sources at a distance beyond our Galaxy, but how far away they are is largely unknown because of a lack of any associations with known sources. In this paper, we propose that the cumulative TeV gamma-ray emission accompanying the production of neutrinos can be used to constrain the distance of these neutrino sources, since the opacity of TeV gamma rays due to absorption by the extragalactic background light depends on the distance these TeV gamma rays have traveled. As the diffuse extragalactic TeV background measured by Fermi is much weaker than the expected cumulative flux associated with IceCube neutrinos, the majority of IceCube neutrinos, if their sources are transparent to TeV gamma rays, must come from distances larger than the horizon of TeV gamma rays. We find that above 80% of the IceCube neutrinos should come from sources at redshift z > 0.5. Thus, the chance of finding nearby sources correlated with IceCube neutrinos would be small. We also find that, to explain the flux of neutrinos under the TeV gamma-ray emission constraint, the redshift evolution of neutrino source density must be at least as fast as the cosmic star formation rate.

  19. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  20. Time correlations between low and high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    Activities covered the following areas: (1) continuing analysis of the Cygnus Experiment data on the shadowing of cosmic rays by the moon and sun, which led to a direct confirmation of the angular resolution of the CYGNUS EAS array; and (2) development of analysis methods for the daily search overlapping with EGRET targets. To date, no steady emission of ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma rays from any source has been detected by the Cygnus Experiment, but some evidence for sporadic emission had been found. Upper limits on steady fluxes from 49 sources in the northern hemisphere have been published. In addition, a daily search of 51 possible sources over the interval April 1986 to June 1992 found no evidence for emission. From these source lists, four candidates were selected for comparison with EGRET data.

  1. Biological Evolution on the Earth Influenced by Astronomical Objects: Especially Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponert, J.; Príhoda, P.

    2009-12-01

    Taking in to account 20,000 explosions of intragalactic supernovae per million years, the sources estimated at 1056 - 1057 MeV producing the high intensity of gamma- and xray-radiation even after its reduction through the Earth atmosphere, may have a significant mutagenic action. During the time period of the last 4 billion years not less than one hundred explosions up to the mean distance 126 pc from the Earth. All such explosions were able to evoke a genetic revolution among most taxonomic groups of terrestrial organisms. For mountain organisms, the more frequent supernova explosions in distance up to 400-900 pc are of importance, maritime organisms could be influenced mainly by secondary radiation products, rather than directly by the gamma and X-rays from the supernovae. The mechanisms of macroevolution depending on supernovae is elucidated. Smaller genetical revolutions in the macroevolutional process (formation of genera) took place on the average once every 10 millions or more years, fundamental genetic revolutions once in 100 millions or more years. Also other newly discovered astronomical gamma-ray sources have to be taken in account.

  2. Photo-nuclear astrophysics in NewSUBARU {gamma}-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Takehito

    2010-08-12

    A laser Compton scattering (LCS){gamma}-ray source has been installed at an electron storage ring NewSUBARU at SPring-8. We have studied the nuclear physics using this LCS g-ray source. The half-lives of unstable isotopes, {sup 184}Re and {sup 164}Ho{sup m}, produced by photo-induced reactions have been measured. These half-lives are shorter than previous recommended values by 7% and 3%, respectively. These changes of the half-lives affects to evaluation of cross-sections using the activation method. We have discussed a problem of the residual ratio of an isomer in {sup 180}Ta in supernova explosions. The unstable ground state and the metastable isomer are linked by ({gamma}, {gamma}') reactions. We have developed a new time-dependent model to calculate the isomer ratio in supernovae. The solar abundance of {sup 180}Ta is reproduced by the supernova neutrino process with the present calculated isomer ratio.

  3. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Di Mitri, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Penn, G.

    2017-05-01

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. The same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10-20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10-15 eV range, in a 4×22 m2 footprint system.

  4. Compact FEL-driven inverse compton scattering gamma-ray source

    DOE PAGES

    Placidi, M.; Di Mitri, Simone; Pellegrini, C.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Many research and applications areas require photon sources capable of producing gamma-ray beams in the multi-MeV energy range with reasonably high fluxes and compact footprints. Besides industrial, nuclear physics and security applications, a considerable interest comes from the possibility to assess the state of conservation of cultural assets like statues, columns etc., via visualization and analysis techniques using high energy photon beams. Computed Tomography scans, widely adopted in medicine at lower photon energies, presently provide high quality three-dimensional imaging in industry and museums. We explore the feasibility of a compact source of quasi-monochromatic, multi-MeV gamma-rays based on Inverse Compton Scatteringmore » (ICS) from a high intensity ultra-violet (UV) beam generated in a free-electron laser by the electron beam itself. This scheme introduces a stronger relationship between the energy of the scattered photons and that of the electron beam, resulting in a device much more compact than a classic ICS for a given scattered energy. As a result, the same electron beam is used to produce gamma-rays in the 10–20 MeV range and UV radiation in the 10–15 eV range, in a ~4 × 22 m2 footprint system.« less

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery of the brain using the first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, L.D.; Flickinger, J.; Lindner, G.; Maitz, A.

    1989-02-01

    The first United States 201 cobalt-60 source gamma knife for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors and arteriovenous malformations became operational at the University of Pittsburgh on August 14, 1987. Four and one-half years of intensive planning, regulatory agency review, and analysis of published results preceded the first radiosurgical procedure. Installation of this 18,000-kg device and loading of the 201 cobalt-60 sources posed major challenges in engineering, architecture, and radiophysics. In the first 4 months of operation, we treated 52 patients (29 with arteriovenous malformations, 19 with extra-axial neoplasms of the skull base, and 4 with intra-axial malignant tumors). Most patients either had lesions considered inoperable or had residual lesions after attempted surgical resection. Neither surgical mortality nor significant morbidity was associated with gamma knife radiosurgery. As compared with treatment by conventional intracranial surgery (craniotomy), the average length of stay for radiosurgery was reduced by 4 to 14 days, and hospital charges were reduced by as much as 65%. Based on both the previously published results of treatment of more than 2,000 patients worldwide and on our initial clinical experience, we believe that gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery is a therapeutically effective and economically sound alternative to more conventional neurosurgical procedures, in selected cases.

  6. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in photon...

  7. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in photon...

  8. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in photon...

  9. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in photon...

  10. 10 CFR 35.600 - Use of a sealed source in a remote afterloader unit, teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and..., teletherapy unit, or gamma stereotactic radiosurgery unit. A licensee shall use sealed sources in photon...

  11. Design support of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, E.A. Jr.

    1986-09-01

    Engineering design specifications and development of the large area detector and photomultiplier tube assemblies for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission are examined.

  12. Abstracts of papers to be presented at the fifth symposium on x- and gamma-ray sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The program and abstracts of papers are presented. Topics include radiation sources, radiation detectors, mathematical models and data analysis, gamma-ray spectroscopy, instrumentation, applications of x-ray fluorescence, PIXE, and x-ray absorption. (ACR)

  13. Spectral constraints on unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources from COMPTEL MeV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Hermsen, W.; Schönfelder, V.

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the MeV properties of 173 unidentified or tentatively identified EGRET sources listed in the third EGRET catalogue by analyzing the simultaneously collected COMPTEL MeV data for each individual source. The sources can be divided into 4 groups. In this paper we focus on one of these, a group of 22 EGRET sources for which we can provide additional constraining information: their spectral extrapolations from the energy range above 100 MeV towards lower energies overshoot the fluxes or upper limits derived simultaneously at MeV energies. This means that for these sources a spectral turnover/break between 1 MeV and 100 MeV is required. At least two of these sources, but most likely the majority of this sample, have the maxima of their gamma-ray luminosities in this energy band. The sources have rather soft EGRET spectra (average photon index = 2.72+0.08-0.11), and seem to spatially cluster in the inner Galaxy. Variability analyses revealed 11 out of the 22 sources to be significantly variable. Object classes proposed as possible counterparts for the unidentified EGRET sources are discussed in the light of these additional constraints.

  14. Discovery of new X-ray sources near the unidentified gamma-ray source HESS J1841-055

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, K. K.; Nobukawa, M.; Tsuru, T. G.; Koyama, K.

    2015-06-01

    HESS J1841-055 is a diffuse unidentified gamma-ray source with the size of ∼1°.3 × 1°. No conclusive counterpart in other wavelengths has so far detected. To search for X-rays responsible for the TeV emission, the Suzaku observations were conducted, which covered a half region of the HESS source. In the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV), we discovered a diffuse emission, Suzaku J1840.2-0552, with the size of ∼10‧ . Since its spectrum was fitted by an optically thin thermal plasma model, Suzaku J1840.2-0552 is likely to be a supernova remnant. We also discovered an extended source, Suzaku J1840.2-0544, in the hard band (2.0-8.0 keV) with an emission line at 6.1 keV. From the spectral feature and large interstellar absorption, this source is likely to be a cluster of galaxies behind the Galactic plane at the red-shift of ∼0.09. The other diffuse source spatially overlaps with the SNR candidate G26.6-0.2, which shows a non-thermal dominant spectrum. Since no other candidate is found in the hard X-ray band, we infer that these largely extended sources could be possible counterparts of HESS J1841-055.

  15. A new class of galactic discrete gamma ray sources: Chaotic winds of massive stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wan; White, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    We propose a new class of galactic discrete gamma-ray sources, the chaotic, high mass-loss-rate winds from luminous early-type stars. Early-type stellar winds are highly unstable due to intrinsic line-driven instabilities, and so are permeated by numerous strong shocks. These shocks can accelerate a small fraction of thermal electrons and ions to relativistic energies via the first-order Fermi mechanism. A power-law-like photon spectrum extending from keV to above 10 MeV energies is produced by inverse Compton scattering of the extremely abundant stellar UV photons by the relativistic electrons. In addition, a typical pi(sup 0)-decay gamma-ray spectrum is generated by proton-ion interactions in the densest part of the winds.

  16. MAGIC gamma-ray telescopes hunting for neutrinos and their sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.; Satalecka, K.; Noda, K.; Manganaro, M.; López, M.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The discovery of an astrophysical flux of high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube Collaboration marks a major breakthrough in the ongoing search for the origin of cosmic rays. Presumably, the neutrinos, together with gamma rays, result from pion decay, following hadronic interactions of protons accelerated in astrophysical objects to ultra-relativistic energies. So far, the neutrino sky map shows no significant indication of astrophysical sources. Here, we report first results from follow-up observations, of sky regions where IceCube has detected muon tracks from energetic neutrinos, using the MAGIC telescopes which are sensitive to gamma rays at TeV energies. Furthermore, we show that MAGIC has the potential to distinguish air showers induced by tau neutrinos from the background of hadronic showers in the PeV-EeV energy range, employing a novel analysis method to the data obtained with high-zenith angle observations.

  17. Distance limit for a class of model gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1978-01-01

    It is pointed out that MeV photons have actually been observed in bursts. These observations imply that the nonrelativistic sources cannot be further away than a few kpc from the sun and, therefore, must be galactic. The 27 April 1972 event observed by Apollo 16 shows at higher energies a power law spectrum with a possible line feature around 4 MeV. The optical depth of a homogeneous, isotropic radiation field is estimated with the aid of formulae used by Nikishov (1962) and Jauch and Rohrlich (1955). On the basis of an investigation of the various factors involved, it is tentatively suggested that the gamma-ray bursts which have been detected are galactic, but are in the majority of the cases not connected with unique irreversible star transformation. It appears also unlikely that the gamma-ray bursts are connected with galactic novae.

  18. Advanced Laser-Compton Gamma-Ray Sources for Nuclear Materials Detection, Assay and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barty, C. P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Highly-collimated, polarized, mono-energetic beams of tunable gamma-rays may be created via the optimized Compton scattering of pulsed lasers off of ultra-bright, relativistic electron beams. Above 2 MeV, the peak brilliance of such sources can exceed that of the world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude and can enable for the first time the efficient pursuit of nuclear science and applications with photon beams, i.e. Nuclear Photonics. Potential applications are numerous and include isotope-specific nuclear materials management, element-specific medical radiography and radiology, non-destructive, isotope-specific, material assay and imaging, precision spectroscopy of nuclear resonances and photon-induced fission. This review covers activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory related to the design and optimization of mono-energetic, laser-Compton gamma-ray systems and introduces isotope-specific nuclear materials detection and assay applications enabled by them.

  19. Pipe corrosion and deposit study using neutron- and gamma- radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaskó, Márton; Sváb, Erzsébet; Kuba, Attila; Kiss, Zoltán; Rodek, Lajos; Nagy, Antal

    2005-04-01

    The problems of corrosion and deposit are crucial issues in the pipelines of the chemical, nuclear and petrochemical industries. Radiography (neutron, gamma, X-ray) has long been used as a technique for pipe inspection and corrosion monitoring. The 10 MW Budapest research reactor site is a source of various energy neutron (thermal and epithermal) and gamma radiation. The detector system was a Peltier-cooled LLL CCD camera controlled by a PC with Image ProLite software and imaging plate equipment with a BAS 2500 scanner that used AIDA software. The objects inspected were corroded tubes and various kinds of test specimens with a large wall thickness (25 mm) inside and outside steps. In the evaluation part we used tomographic algorithms. A software simulation study was made as well. Fan-beam projections were computed of the given software phantoms and a new discrete tomography method was used to reconstruct the unknown objects from these projections.

  20. Search for discrete gamma-ray sources emitting at energies greater than 10/sup 15/ eV

    SciTech Connect

    Samorski, M.; Stamm, W.

    1984-02-15

    The data of the extensive air shower experiment at Kiel have been scanned systematically for possible discrete ..gamma..-ray sources in the energy range E>10/sup 15/ eV and in the declination band delta = 25/sup 0/-75/sup 0/. Photon fluxes for celestial positions with the statistically most significant excesses of showers and 3 sigma upper limit photon fluxes for COS B ..gamma..-ray sources visible to the extensive air shower experiment at Kiel are presented.

  1. AGILE confirmation of the new gamma-ray flaring source J0109+6134 near the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Striani, E.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Piano, G.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Pacciani, L.; Del Monte, E.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Evangelista, Y.; de Paris, G.; Lapshov, I.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Caraveo, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Vercellone, S.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Picozza, P.; Morselli, A.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Salotti, L.

    2010-02-01

    AGILE confirms the detection of the new flaring gamma-ray source J0109+6134 near the Galactic plane as reported by Fermi-LAT in ATel#2414. Integrating during the period 2010-01-31 08:20 UT to 2010-02-02 19:48 UT AGILE detected gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with J0109+6134.

  2. Discovery of a transient MeV range gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD)/MIT hard X-ray and gamma-ray instrument on the HEAO 1 surveyed the region near the Galactic center 3 times during its lifetime in 1977-1979. During the 1977 September-October scan, a gamma-ray source was detected south of the Galactic center. The source was below the threshold sensitivity in the spring and fall of 1978. The source was detected with the medium energy phoswich scintillation counters which operated over the 80 keV-2 MeV range, had an area of 42 sq cm each, and a 17 deg FWHM aperture. The error box for the source is centered on l = 2.4 deg, b = -12.2 deg, with a 90% confidence error circle of approximately 3.5 deg radius. The flux in the 333-635 keV range was (1.89 +/- 0.29) x 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s keV) and was constant within statistics during the 1 month period the source was in the field of view. The spectrum can be characterized as a Gaussian in the range 300 less than or = E less than or = 650 keV, with a FWHM of 249 +/- 51 keV centered on 461 +/- 22 keV. The flux of this broad Gaussian is (6.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) photons/(sq cm s). The source is tentatively identified with the 5.57 hr period low-mass X-ray-emitting binary system 1H 1822-371. Assuming this is correct, the ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity during the outburst was about 5; at a distance of 8 kpc, the gamma ray luminosity is 4 x 10(exp 37) ergs. The emission may be interpreted as a positron-pair plasma ejected from a compact object, possibly a black hole, and annihilating in a thick accretion disk surrounding the object.

  3. Discovery of a transient MeV range gamma-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD)/MIT hard X-ray and gamma-ray instrument on the HEAO 1 surveyed the region near the Galactic center 3 times during its lifetime in 1977-1979. During the 1977 September-October scan, a gamma-ray source was detected south of the Galactic center. The source was below the threshold sensitivity in the spring and fall of 1978. The source was detected with the medium energy phoswich scintillation counters which operated over the 80 keV-2 MeV range, had an area of 42 sq cm each, and a 17 deg FWHM aperture. The error box for the source is centered on l = 2.4 deg, b = -12.2 deg, with a 90% confidence error circle of approximately 3.5 deg radius. The flux in the 333-635 keV range was (1.89 +/- 0.29) x 10(exp -5) photons/(sq cm s keV) and was constant within statistics during the 1 month period the source was in the field of view. The spectrum can be characterized as a Gaussian in the range 300 less than or = E less than or = 650 keV, with a FWHM of 249 +/- 51 keV centered on 461 +/- 22 keV. The flux of this broad Gaussian is (6.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(exp -3) photons/(sq cm s). The source is tentatively identified with the 5.57 hr period low-mass X-ray-emitting binary system 1H 1822-371. Assuming this is correct, the ratio of gamma-ray to X-ray luminosity during the outburst was about 5; at a distance of 8 kpc, the gamma ray luminosity is 4 x 10(exp 37) ergs. The emission may be interpreted as a positron-pair plasma ejected from a compact object, possibly a black hole, and annihilating in a thick accretion disk surrounding the object.

  4. Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Neave, Matthew; Luter, Heidi; Padovan, Anna; Townsend, Simon; Schobben, Xavier; Gibb, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial source tracking is an area of research in which multiple approaches are used to identify the sources of elevated bacterial concentrations in recreational lakes and beaches. At our study location in Darwin, northern Australia, water quality in the harbor is generally good, however dry-season beach closures due to elevated Escherichia coli and enterococci counts are a cause for concern. The sources of these high bacteria counts are currently unknown. To address this, we sampled sewage outfalls, other potential inputs, such as urban rivers and drains, and surrounding beaches, and used genetic fingerprints from E. coli and enterococci communities, fecal markers and 454 pyrosequencing to track contamination sources. A sewage effluent outfall (Larrakeyah discharge) was a source of bacteria, including fecal bacteria that impacted nearby beaches. Two other treated effluent discharges did not appear to influence sites other than those directly adjacent. Several beaches contained fecal indicator bacteria that likely originated from urban rivers and creeks within the catchment. Generally, connectivity between the sites was observed within distinct geographical locations and it appeared that most of the bacterial contamination on Darwin beaches was confined to local sources. PMID:25224738

  5. Multiple approaches to microbial source tracking in tropical northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Neave, Matthew; Luter, Heidi; Padovan, Anna; Townsend, Simon; Schobben, Xavier; Gibb, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Microbial source tracking is an area of research in which multiple approaches are used to identify the sources of elevated bacterial concentrations in recreational lakes and beaches. At our study location in Darwin, northern Australia, water quality in the harbor is generally good, however dry-season beach closures due to elevated Escherichia coli and enterococci counts are a cause for concern. The sources of these high bacteria counts are currently unknown. To address this, we sampled sewage outfalls, other potential inputs, such as urban rivers and drains, and surrounding beaches, and used genetic fingerprints from E. coli and enterococci communities, fecal markers and 454 pyrosequencing to track contamination sources. A sewage effluent outfall (Larrakeyah discharge) was a source of bacteria, including fecal bacteria that impacted nearby beaches. Two other treated effluent discharges did not appear to influence sites other than those directly adjacent. Several beaches contained fecal indicator bacteria that likely originated from urban rivers and creeks within the catchment. Generally, connectivity between the sites was observed within distinct geographical locations and it appeared that most of the bacterial contamination on Darwin beaches was confined to local sources.

  6. Is the Stellar System WR 11 a Gamma-Ray Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Many early-type stars are in systems; some of them have been indicated as putative high-energy emitters. The radiation would be produced at the region where two stellar winds collide. Compelling evidence of such emission was found only for the colliding-wind binary (CWB) Eta Car, which was associated to a GeV source. Very recently, the closest CWB, WR 11, was proposed as a counterpart of a 6σ emission excess, measured with the Fermi LAT satellite. We sought evidence to support or reject the hypothesis that WR 11 is responsible of the gamma-ray excess. Archive radio interferometric data at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array along 16 dates were reduced. The sizes of the field-of-view at 2.5 GHz and of the central region of the Fermi LAT excess are alike. We analysed the emission of the WR 11 field, characterised the radio sources detected and derived their spectral indices, to investigate their nature. Eight sources with fluxes above 10 mJy were detected at both frequencies. All but one (WR 11) showed negative spectral indices. Four of them were identified with known objects, including WR 11. A fifth source, labeled here S6, is a promising candidate to produce gamma-ray emission, besides the CWB WR 11.

  7. Point-source calibration of a segmented gamma-ray scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, G.A.; Piquette, E.C.

    1994-08-01

    For a conventional segmented gamma-ray scanner (SGS) in which the sample is rotated continuously within a fixed detector field of view, the data will not support alternatives to the assumption that the gamma-emitting nuclides and the matrix in which they reside are uniformly distributed. This homogeneity assumption permits the geometry of samples and calibration standards to be approximated by that of a non attenuating line source on the axis of rotation. Other common SGS assumptions are that the detector is perfectly collimated, that its response is flat over its field of view, and that it can be approximated adequately by a line. All of these assumption have led to a preference for homogeneous calibration standards. Preparation and certification of such calibration standards are usually difficult and expensive. Storage and transportation of SGS standards can be inconvenient or even quite troublesome. The authors have proposed and tested an alternative method of SGS calibration that only requires a point-source standard. The proposed technique relies on the empirical determination of a normalized two-dimensional detector response and the measurement of the count rate from a point-source standard located at the response apex. With these data, the system`s response to a distributed, homogeneous samples can be predicted using numerical integration. Typical biases measured using a commercially available SGS calibrated with a point source have been less than 2%.

  8. Evaluating Critical Brain Radiation Doses in the Treatment of Multiple Brain Lesions with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hatiboglu, Mustafa Aziz; Akdur, Kerime

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases has shifted to stereotactic radiosurgery, withholding whole-brain (WB) radiation therapy. However, radiation toxicity to the brain is a concern when treating multiple brain lesions with single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the changes in brain radiation doses when treating various numbers of targets and lesion volumes. We simulated different treatment plans with different combinations of varying tumor volumes including 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5 cm3, and tumor numbers including 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25. Treatment planning was performed for all combinations in a computerized tomography of the head of a patient, using Leksell GammaPlan version 10.1.1 (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). Two different dosing strategies were used. In the lower-prescription dosing schedule, a marginal dose was given to the 50% isodose line, and 20 Gy were used when the number of lesions was less than 15 and 18 Gy were applied when the number of lesions was equal to or more than 15. In the higher-prescription dosing schedule, a marginal dose of 24 Gy was used for lesions of less than 5 cm3 and 20 Gy were applied for lesions equal to 5cm3. The mean WB dose, the WB integral dose, and the volume of brain receiving 12 Gy (V12 Gy) were calculated for each scenario. Also, the beam-on time of the Gamma Knife 4C unit was reported for all treatment scenarios. Regression analysis showed that the total tumor volume was a more significant predictor of V12 Gy than the number of lesions, and a linear correlation between the total tumor volume and V12 Gy was found. We also found that the total tumor volume was a more significant predictor of the mean WB dose and the WB integral dose compared to the number of lesions. Our results suggest that multiple small to mid-sized lesions could be safely treated with a single-fraction gamma knife. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Distinguishing mechanisms of gamma frequency oscillations in human current source signals using a computational model of a laminar neocortical network

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shane; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma frequency rhythms have been implicated in numerous studies for their role in healthy and abnormal brain function. The frequency band has been described to encompass as broad a range as 30–150 Hz. Crucial to understanding the role of gamma in brain function is an identification of the underlying neural mechanisms, which is particularly difficult in the absence of invasive recordings in macroscopic human signals such as those from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG). Here, we studied features of current dipole (CD) signals from two distinct mechanisms of gamma generation, using a computational model of a laminar cortical circuit designed specifically to simulate CDs in a biophysically principled manner (Jones et al., 2007, 2009). We simulated spiking pyramidal interneuronal gamma (PING) whose period is regulated by the decay time constant of GABAA-mediated synaptic inhibition and also subthreshold gamma driven by gamma-periodic exogenous excitatory synaptic drive. Our model predicts distinguishable CD features created by spiking PING compared to subthreshold driven gamma that can help to disambiguate mechanisms of gamma oscillations in human signals. We found that gamma rhythms in neocortical layer 5 can obscure a simultaneous, independent gamma in layer 2/3. Further, we arrived at a novel interpretation of the origin of high gamma frequency rhythms (100–150 Hz), showing that they emerged from a specific temporal feature of CDs associated with single cycles of PING activity and did not reflect a separate rhythmic process. Last we show that the emergence of observable subthreshold gamma required highly coherent exogenous drive. Our results are the first to demonstrate features of gamma oscillations in human current source signals that distinguish cellular and circuit level mechanisms of these rhythms and may help to guide understanding of their functional role. PMID:24385958

  10. Clonal expansions of activated gamma/delta T cells in recent-onset multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shimonkevitz, R; Colburn, C; Burnham, J A; Murray, R S; Kotzin, B L

    1993-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease characterized by focal demyelination of the white matter of the brain and spinal cord. Central nervous system damage appears to be mediated by infiltrating T lymphocytes and macrophages, and a central role for autoreactive CD4+ T cells has been proposed. However, the initial immune events that lead to the chronic process of MS remain unidentified. We now present evidence that a subset of T lymphocytes bearing gamma/delta T-cell antigen receptors has been activated in patients with recent-onset disease. Cells recovered from the cerebrospinal fluid of subjects with MS were cultured for short periods of time in medium supplemented with T-cell growth factors. Expansions of V delta 1 and V delta 2 T-cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes were found only in cell populations obtained from subjects with recent-onset disease. Similar populations were not expanded in subjects with chronic MS or other neurological diseases. Junctional region sequencing showed the expanded gamma/delta T cells to be oligoclonal in nature, suggestive of specific stimulation by antigen. These results reveal a fundamental difference in the immunopathogenesis of acute vs. chronic disease and provide additional insight into the autoimmune nature of MS. PMID:8430106

  11. The GeV-TeV Connection in Galactic gamma-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Reimer, O.; Torres, Diego F.; Hinton, J.A.; /Leeds U.

    2007-09-28

    Recent observations by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. and MAGIC have revealed a large number of new sources of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-rays above 100 GeV, mostly concentrated along the Galactic plane. At lower energies (100 MeV - 10 GeV) the satellite-based instrument EGRET revealed a population of sources clustering along the Galactic Plane. Given their adjacent energy bands a systematic correlation study between the two source classes seems appropriate. While only a few of the sources connect, both in terms of positional coincidence and spectral consistency, most of the detections occur only in one or the other energy domain. In these cases, for the first time consistent upper limits in the other energy band have been derived. Here, the populations of Galactic sources in both energy domains are characterized on observational as well as on theoretical grounds, followed by an interpretation on their similarities and differences. The observational data at this stage suggest rather different major source populations at GeV and TeV energies. With regards to preparations for the upcoming GLAST mission that will cover the energy range bridging GeV and TeV instruments this paper investigates the connection between the population of sources in these bands and concludes with predictions for commonly observable sources for GLAST-LAT detections.

  12. Neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple internal shocks in gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mauricio; Baerwald, Philipp; Murase, Kohta; Winter, Walter

    2015-04-10

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short-lived, luminous explosions at cosmological distances, thought to originate from relativistic jets launched at the deaths of massive stars. They are among the prime candidates to produce the observed cosmic rays at the highest energies. Recent neutrino data have, however, started to constrain this possibility in the simplest models with only one emission zone. In the classical theory of GRBs, it is expected that particles are accelerated at mildly relativistic shocks generated by the collisions of material ejected from a central engine. Here we consider neutrino and cosmic-ray emission from multiple emission regions since these internal collisions must occur at very different radii, from below the photosphere all the way out to the circumburst medium, as a consequence of the efficient dissipation of kinetic energy. We demonstrate that the different messengers originate from different collision radii, which means that multi-messenger observations open windows for revealing the evolving GRB outflows.

  13. Gamma-ray pulse height spectrum analysis on systems with multiple Ge detectors using spectrum summing

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, E.W.

    1997-11-01

    A technique has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to sum high resolution gamma-ray pulse spectra from systems with multiple Ge detectors. Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company operates a multi-detector spectrometer configuration at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant facility which is used to characterize the radionuclide contents in waste drums destined for shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This summing technique was developed to increase the sensitivity of the system, reduce the count times required to properly quantify the radio-nuclides and provide a more consistent methodology for combining data collected from multiple detectors. In spectrometer systems with multiple detectors looking at non homogeneous waste forms it is often difficult to combine individual spectrum analysis results from each detector to obtain a meaningful result for the total waste container. This is particularly true when the counting statistics in each individual spectrum are poor. The spectrum summing technique adds the spectra collected by each detector into a single spectrum which has better counting statistics than each individual spectrum. A normal spectral analysis program can then be used to analyze the sum spectrum to obtain radio-nuclide values which have smaller errors and do not have to be further manipulated to obtain results for the total waste container. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor P.

    2012-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed from satellites and associated with lightning activity. Comparison between calculations based on the model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREA) in large-scale weak electric field in thunderstorms and satellite measurements usually shows that the photon spectrum is consistent with source altitudes around 15 km. However, recent observations have located intra-cloud lightning (IC) discharges responsible for TGFs much deeper in the atmosphere (at altitudes ˜10 km). In the present work, we show that the TGF spectrum as produced by acceleration of electrons in the strong electric field of stepping IC leaders is consistent with the lower altitudes recently discovered. This study reconciles observations and measurements by setting new altitudes for the TGF sources based on mechanism of direct acceleration of electrons in the lightning leader field. Moreover, the photon source beaming geometry is consistently determined from the geometry of electric field lines produced by the lightning leader.

  15. Design of a 2 MeV Compton scattering gamma-ray source for DNDO missions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F

    2009-08-24

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence-based isotope-specific detection and imaging is a powerful new technology that can enable access to new mission spaces for DNDO. Within this context, the development of advanced mono-energetic gamma ray sources plays an important role in the DNDO R&D portfolio, as it offers a faster, more precise, and safer alternative to conventional Bremsstrahlung sources. In this report, a specific design strategy is presented, along with a series of theoretical and computational tools, with the goal of optimizing source parameters for DNDO applications. In parallel, key technologies are outlined, along with discussions justifying specific choices and contrasting those with other alternatives. Finally, a complete conceptual design is described, and machine parameters are presented in detail.

  16. Einstein observations of the 1978 November 19 gamma ray burst source field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzichini, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Mushotzky, R.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that several years after the discovery of cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRB) their sources have not yet been identified, although searches have been conducted in optical, X-ray, and radio wavelengths. The three smallest error boxes are now related to the events of Mar. 5, 1979, Apr. 6, 1979, and Nov. 19, 1978. X-ray observations, with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) of the Einstein Observatory, were made for all three locations. A description is presented of the results of the 8200 second IPC observation of the Nov. 19, 1978 GRB, made on July 1 and 2, 1980. Three sources were detected. However, two of them were outside the GRB error box. The third source is located well inside the burst error box.

  17. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Source 2FGL J1823.8 4312: The Discovery of a New Class of Extragalactic X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, Francesco

    2012-08-03

    One of the unsolved mysteries of gamma-ray astronomy concerns the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Recently, using the Second Fermi LAT source catalog (2FGL) and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) archive, we discovered that the WISE counterparts of gamma-ray blazars, a class of active galactic nuclei, delineate a region (the WISE Gamma-ray Strip) in the 3-dimensional infrared color space well separated from the locus of the other astronomical objects. Based on this result, we built an association procedure to recognize if there areWISE blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty region of the unidentified gamma-ray sources. Here we report on our analysis of 2FGL J1823.8+4312, a gamma-ray active galactic nucleus of uncertain type associated with the X-ray source 1RXS J182418.7+430954 according to the 2FGL, to verify whether it is a blazar. Applying our association method we found two sources with IR colors typical of gamma-ray blazars, located within the 99.9% confidence region of 2FGL J1823.8+4312: WISE J182352.33+431452.5 and WISE J182409.25+431404.7. Then we searched in the Chandra, NVSS and SDSS archival observations for their counterparts. We discovered that WISE J182352.33+431452.5, our preferred gamma-ray blazar candidate according to our WISE association procedure, is detected in the optical and in the X-rays but not in the radio, making it extremely unusual if it is a blazar. Given its enigmatic spectral energy distribution, we considered the possibility that it is a 'radio faint blazar' or the prototype of a new class of extragalactic sources, our conclusion is independent of whether WISE J182352.33+431452.5 is the actual counterpart of 2FGL J1823.8+4312.

  18. Gamma interferon activates a previously undescribed Ca2+ influx in T lymphocytes from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Martino, G; Clementi, E; Brambilla, E; Moiola, L; Comi, G; Meldolesi, J; Grimaldi, L M

    1994-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The etiology of the disease is still unknown. Activated T lymphocytes are considered essential in mediating the inflammatory process leading to demyelination in MS. They operate through a complex network of cytokines among which gamma interferon (gamma-IFN) plays a key role. Here we report that exposure to gamma-IFN of T lymphocytes from patients with MS activates, by a protein kinase C-mediated pathway, a previously undescribed gamma-IFN-activated Ca2+ influx, functionally coupled to the gamma-IFN receptor. The influx mainly expressed by CD4+ T lymphocytes, was found in 12 of 15 (80%) patients with clinically active MS and in 14 of 30 (46%) patients with stable MS. The influx was found in only 3 of 24 (12%) control patients and in none of the 15 healthy subjects studied. Our results document the appearance in MS lymphocytes of a gamma-IFN-activated, protein kinase C-dependent, Ca2+ influx that might be due to the expression of a new cation-specific plasmalemma channel. This finding suggests that at least part of gamma-IFN's contribution to the pathogenesis of MS is exerted through a Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte activity. PMID:8197142

  19. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. I. A NEW METHOD FOR THE ASSOCIATION OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method for identifying blazar candidates by examining the locus, i.e., the region occupied by the Fermi {gamma}-ray blazars in the three-dimensional color space defined by the WISE infrared colors. This method is a refinement of our previous approach that made use of the two-dimensional projection of the distribution of WISE {gamma}-ray-emitting blazars (the Strip) in the three WISE color-color planes. In this paper, we define the three-dimensional locus by means of a principal component analysis of the color distribution of a large sample of blazars composed of all the ROMA-BZCAT sources with counterparts in the WISE All-Sky Catalog associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL; the WISE Fermi blazars sample, WFB). Our new procedure yields a total completeness of c {sub tot} {approx} 81% and a total efficiency of e {sub tot} {approx} 97%. We also obtain local estimates of the efficiency and completeness as functions of the WISE colors and galactic coordinates of the candidate blazars. The catalog of all WISE candidate blazars associated with the WFB sample is also presented, complemented by archival multi-frequency information for the alternative associations. Finally, we apply the new association procedure to all {gamma}-ray blazars in the 2FGL and provide a catalog containing all the {gamma}-ray candidate blazars selected according to our procedure.

  20. An upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of individual sources from gamma-ray observations

    SciTech Connect

    Supanitsky, A.D.; Souza, V. de E-mail: vitor@ifsc.usp.br

    2013-12-01

    Different types of extragalactic objects are known to produce TeV gamma-rays. Some of these objects are the most probable candidates to accelerate cosmic rays up to 10{sup 20} eV. It is very well known that gamma-rays can be produced as a result of the cosmic ray propagation through the intergalactic medium. These gamma-rays contribute to the total flux observed in the direction of the source. In this paper we propose a new method to derive an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of an individual source based on the measured upper limit on the integral flux of GeV-TeV gamma-rays. We show how it is possible to calculate an upper limit on the cosmic-ray luminosity of a particular source and we explore the parameter space in which the current GeV-TeV gamma-ray measurements can offer a useful determination. We study in detail two particular sources, Pictor A and NGC 7469, and we calculate the upper limit on the proton luminosity of each source based on the upper limit on the integral gamma-ray flux measured by the H.E.S.S. telescopes.

  1. Discovery of a new TeV gamma-ray source: VER J0521+211

    DOE PAGES

    Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; ...

    2013-09-27

    Here, we report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13stat ± 0.78sys) × 10–11 cm–2 s–1 above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with amore » peak flux corresponding to ~0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.« less

  2. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell GammaKnife tested with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Lallena, Antonio M; Vilches, Manuel

    2004-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations using the code PENELOPE have been performed to test a simplified model of the source channel geometry of the Leksell GammaKnife. The characteristics of the radiation passing through the treatment helmets are analysed in detail. We have found that only primary particles emitted from the source with polar angles smaller than 3 degrees with respect to the beam axis are relevant for the dosimetry of the Gamma Knife. The photon trajectories reaching the output helmet collimators at (x, v, z = 236 mm) show strong correlations between rho = (x2 + y2)(1/2) and their polar angle theta, on one side, and between tan(-1)(y/x) and their azimuthal angle phi, on the other. This enables us to propose a simplified model which treats the full source channel as a mathematical collimator. This simplified model produces doses in good agreement with those found for the full geometry. In the region of maximal dose, the relative differences between both calculations are within 3%, for the 18 and 14 mm helmets, and 10%, for the 8 and 4 mm ones. Besides, the simplified model permits a strong reduction (larger than a factor 15) in the computational time.

  3. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  4. DISCOVERY OF A NEW TeV GAMMA-RAY SOURCE: VER J0521+211

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Federici, S.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A. E-mail: errando@astro.columbia.edu E-mail: sfegan@llr.in2p3.fr; Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13{sub stat} ± 0.78{sub sys}) × 10{sup –11} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with a peak flux corresponding to ∼0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.

  5. Discovery of a new TeV gamma-ray source: VER J0521+211

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Khassen, Y.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Saxon, D. B.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; Böttcher, M.; Fegan, S. J.; Fortin, P.; Halpern, J. P.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Lister, M. L.; Liu, J.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Smith, P. S.

    2013-09-27

    Here, we report the detection of a new TeV gamma-ray source, VER J0521+211, based on observations made with the VERITAS imaging atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope Array. These observations were motivated by the discovery of a cluster of >30 GeV photons in the first year of Fermi Large Area Telescope observations. VER J0521+211 is relatively bright at TeV energies, with a mean photon flux of (1.93 ± 0.13stat ± 0.78sys) × 10–11 cm–2 s–1 above 0.2 TeV during the period of the VERITAS observations. The source is strongly variable on a daily timescale across all wavebands, from optical to TeV, with a peak flux corresponding to ~0.3 times the steady Crab Nebula flux at TeV energies. Follow-up observations in the optical and X-ray bands classify the newly discovered TeV source as a BL Lac-type blazar with uncertain redshift, although recent measurements suggest z = 0.108. VER J0521+211 exhibits all the defining properties of blazars in radio, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths.

  6. Inference of Dim Gamma-Ray Point Sources Using Probabilistic Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2016-07-01

    Poisson regression of the Fermi-LAT data in the inner Milky Way reveals an extended gamma-ray excess. The anomalous emission falls steeply away from the galactic center and has an energy spectrum that peaks at 1-2 GeV. An important question is whether the signal is coming from a collection of unresolved point sources, possibly recycled pulsars, or constitutes a truly diffuse emission component. Previous analyses have relied on non-Poissonian template fits or wavelet decomposition of the Fermi-LAT data, which find evidence for a population of dim point sources just below the 3FGL flux limit. In order to draw conclusions about a potentially dim population, we propose to sample from the catalog space of point sources, where the model dimensionality, i.e., the number of sources, is unknown. Although being a computationally expensive sampling problem, this approach allows us to infer the number, flux and radial distribution of the point sources consistent with the observed count data. Probabilistic cataloging is specifically useful in the crowded field limit, such as in the galactic disk, where the typical separation between point sources is comparable to the PSF. Using this approach, we recover the results of the deterministic Fermi-LAT 3FGL catalog, as well as sub-detection threshold information and fold the point source parameter degeneracies into the model-choice problem of whether an emission is coming from unresolved MSPs or dark matter annihilation.

  7. The spectroscopy of individual terrestrial gamma-ray flashes: Constraining the source properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Cramer, E. S.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Stanbro, M.; Connaughton, V.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the spectral analysis of individual terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The large GBM TGF sample provides 46 events suitable for individual spectral analysis: sufficiently bright, localized by ground-based radio, and with the gamma rays reaching a detector unobstructed. These TGFs exhibit diverse spectral characteristics that are hidden when using summed analysis methods. We account for the low counts in individual TGFs by using Poisson likelihood, and we also consider instrumental effects. The data are fit with models obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the large-scale Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) model, including propagation through the atmosphere. Source altitudes ranging from 11.6 to 20.2 km are simulated. Two beaming geometries were considered: In one, the photons retain the intrinsic distribution from scattering (narrow), and in the other, the photons are smeared into a wider beam (wide). Several TGFs are well fit only by narrow-beam models, while others favor wide-beam models. Large-scale RREA models can accommodate both narrow and wide beams, with narrow beams suggest large-scale RREA in organized electric fields while wide beams may imply converging or diverging electric fields. Wide beams are also consistent with acceleration in the electric fields of lightning leaders, but the TGFs that favor narrow-beam models appear inconsistent with some lightning leader models.

  8. Gamma-ray constraints on maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes and UHECR source evolution models

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Kalashev, Oleg; Semikoz, Dmitri V. E-mail: kalashev@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2012-01-01

    The dip model assumes that the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 10{sup 18} eV consist exclusively of protons and is consistent with the spectrum and composition measure by HiRes. Here we present the range of cosmogenic neutrino fluxes in the dip-model which are compatible with a recent determination of the extragalactic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray diffuse background derived from 2.5 years of Fermi/LAT data. We show that the largest fluxes predicted in the dip model would be detectable by IceCube in about 10 years of observation and are within the reach of a few years of observation with the ARA project. In the incomplete UHECR model in which protons are assumed to dominate only above 10{sup 19} eV, the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes could be a factor of 2 or 3 larger. Any fraction of heavier nuclei in the UHECR at these energies would reduce the maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. We also consider here special evolution models in which the UHECR sources are assumed to have the same evolution of either the star formation rate (SFR), or the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate, or the active galactic nuclei (AGN) rate in the Universe and found that the last two are disfavored (and in the dip model rejected) by the new VHE gamma-ray background.

  9. Choked Jets and Low-Luminosity Gamma-Ray Bursts as Hidden Neutrino Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-03-01

    I will discuss choked gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets as possible sources of very high-energy (VHE) cosmic neutrinos. The jet propagation physics and radiation constraints are taken into account. We find that efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays inside a high density stellar environment is possible for sufficiently low-powered jets and/or jets buried in an extended optically think envelope. Such conditions are favorable also for the GRB jets to become stalled. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic SNe or low-luminosity GRBs by launching quasi-spherical shocks that breakout in the optically thick wind. Focusing on this possibility, we calculate the resulting diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results of the local llGRB rate and luminosity function. We confirm that llGRBs can potentially give a significant contribution to the measured neutrino flux. The results are compatible with the IceCube (IC) data around 10-100 TeV without contradicting other IC limits on classical GRBs. Choked and llGRBs are dark in GeV-TeV gamma rays, and do not contribute significantly to the Fermi diffuse gamma-ray background. Precursor TeV neutrinos emerging prior to the shock breakout emission can be used as smoking gun evidence for a choked jet model for llGRBs.

  10. Gamma-ray constraints on maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes and UHECR source evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Kalashev, Oleg; Semikoz, Dmitri V.

    2012-01-01

    The dip model assumes that the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 1018 eV consist exclusively of protons and is consistent with the spectrum and composition measure by HiRes. Here we present the range of cosmogenic neutrino fluxes in the dip-model which are compatible with a recent determination of the extragalactic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray diffuse background derived from 2.5 years of Fermi/LAT data. We show that the largest fluxes predicted in the dip model would be detectable by IceCube in about 10 years of observation and are within the reach of a few years of observation with the ARA project. In the incomplete UHECR model in which protons are assumed to dominate only above 1019 eV, the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes could be a factor of 2 or 3 larger. Any fraction of heavier nuclei in the UHECR at these energies would reduce the maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. We also consider here special evolution models in which the UHECR sources are assumed to have the same evolution of either the star formation rate (SFR), or the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate, or the active galactic nuclei (AGN) rate in the Universe and found that the last two are disfavored (and in the dip model rejected) by the new VHE gamma-ray background.

  11. Dynamic knowledge management from multiple sources in crowdsourcing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mucheol; Rho, Seungmin

    2015-10-01

    Due to the spread of smart devices and the development of network technology, a large number of people can now easily utilize the web for acquiring information and various services. Further, collective intelligence has emerged as a core player in the evolution of technology in web 2.0 generation. It means that people who are interested in a specific domain of knowledge can not only make use of the information, but they can also participate in the knowledge production processes. Since a large volume of knowledge is produced by multiple contributors, it is important to integrate and manage knowledge efficiently. In this paper, we propose a social tagging-based dynamic knowledge management system in crowdsourcing environments. The approach here is to categorize and package knowledge from multiple sources, in such a way that it easily links to target knowledge.

  12. Verification of source and collimator configuration for Gamma Knife Perfexion using panoramic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Young-Bin; Prooijen, Monique van; Jaffray, David A.; Islam, Mohammad K.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: The new model of stereotactic radiosurgery system, Gamma Knife Perfexion, allows automatic selection of built-in collimation, eliminating the need for the time consuming manual collimator installation required with previous models. However, the configuration of sources and collimators inside the system does not permit easy access for the verification of the selected collimation. While the conventional method of exposing a film at the isocenter is useful for obtaining composite dose information, it is difficult to interpret the data in terms of the integrity of each individual source and corresponding collimation. The primary aim of this study was to develop a method of verifying the geometric configuration of the sources and collimator modules of the Gamma Knife Perfexion. In addition, the method was extended to make dose measurements and verify the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by the mathematical formalism used in the treatment planning system, Leksell Gamma Plan. Methods: A panoramic view of all of 192 cobalt sources was simultaneously acquired by exposing a radiochromic film wrapped around the surface of a cylindrical phantom. The center of the phantom was mounted at the isocenter with its axis aligned along the longitudinal axis of the couch. The sizes and shapes of the source images projected on the phantom surface were compared to those calculated based on the manufacturer's design specifications. The measured dose at various points on the film was also compared to calculations using the algorithm of the planning system. Results: The panoramic images allowed clear identification of each of the 192 sources, verifying source integrity and selected collimator sizes. Dose on the film surface is due to the primary beam as well as phantom scatter and leakage contributions. Therefore, the dose at a point away from the isocenter cannot be determined simply based on the proportionality of collimator output factors; the use of a dose computation

  13. A biotechnological project with a gamma radiation source of 100,000 Ci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, J. H.; Smolko, E. E.

    A project for the production of radiovaccines and other bio-medical products is presented which includes a radiation facility provided with a gamma ray source equivalent to 100,000 Ci of Co-60. The whole process incorporates novel basic features in virus production and inactivation steps. The former is carried out in animals previously subjected to immunodepression through electromagnetic radiation. The later is obtained at low temperatures by using either electromagnetic or particle radiations. A vaccine manufacture process is shown to illustrate the utilization of ionizing radiations to obtain a foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine with good antigenic quality and low cost.

  14. A new array for the study of ultra high energy gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, G.; Lambert, A.; Ogden, P. A.; Patel, M.; Ferrett, J. C.; Reid, R. J. O.; Watson, A. A.; West, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and operation of a 32 x 1 10 to the 15th power sq m array of scintillation detectors for the detection of 10 to the 15th power eV cosmic rays is described with an expected angular resolution of 1 deg, thus improving the present signal/background ratio for gamma ray sources. Data are recorded on a hybrid CAMAC, an in-house system which uses a laser and Pockel-Cell arrangement to routinely calibrate the timing stability of the detectors.

  15. Online Analysis of {gamma}-ray Sources with H.E.S.S

    SciTech Connect

    Fuessling, M.; Dalton, M.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Schwanke, U.; Jung, I.; Stegmann, C.

    2008-12-24

    Some of the {gamma}-ray sources detected by the H.E.S.S. experiment display irregular, often flare-like emission behaviour. A method to detect these outbursts as fast as possible is highly desirable. At H.E.S.S., first results from an offline analysis of pre-calibrated data can be obtained on-site approximately one hour after run end. We present a development and implementation of online analysis software that performs calibration and analysis of data at the time they are being taken allowing for a fast confirmation of observational results and appropriate reaction by the on-site shift crew.

  16. Infrared flaring of the gamma-ray source GB6 B1310+4844

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Carramiñana, A.

    2009-11-01

    We call attention on our recent observation of the source GB6 B1312+4810 with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. We found this quasar to show fluxes at least 2 magnitudes brighter than 2MASS values, of epoch 1999. Our recent observation on 2009-11-22, UT13:05:30 yields: H = 15.875 ± 0.06 on JD 2455158.044252 The object has been recently reported as an on going Gamma Ray Flaring; ATels 2306 and 2310.

  17. Imaging performance of the ASIM/MXGS gamma-ray imager using Co57 sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Paul; Kuvvetl, Irfan

    2017-04-01

    In August/September 2017 the MXGS gamma-ray location imager of the ASIM mission to the ISS, due for launch in late 2017, was exposed to Co57 point and diffuse sources at various locations in the MXGS field of view to test its data acquisition and angular location accuracy. We present here an overview of the test program, the MXGS coded mask geometry and its imaging characteristics, the mathematical imaging methods used, along with location scatter plots and radial error estimates.

  18. Measurement of gamma-ray total absorption cross sections using a [sup 56]Co source

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    We have used a 150 MBq [sup 56]Co source to perform gamma-ray total absorption cross section measurements with very high precision. The use of [sup 56]Co allowed us to simultaneously measure the total cross section at 15 energies ranging from 0.847 MeV to 3.451 MeV. Seven sample materials were measured: Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U. In general, the measurement precision is better than 0.5% and in all cases better than 1.3%.

  19. Physical basis for signal separation for remote sensing of multiple high energy radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, J.; Jain, V. K.

    2015-08-01

    In `radiation remote sensing' multiple unknown high energy sources are generally involved. The detectors, upon sensing the corresponding mixed signals, must separate their contributions blindly for further analysis. A practical way to perform this separation could be through the Independent Component Analysis algorithm. However, the challenge faced is that theoretically there is no correlation among events, even those arising from the same source - thereby disabling meaningful ICA analysis. We overcome this hurdle by use of a thin barrier and by providing wide detector pulses. The radiation events that interact with the barrier take a longer time to reach the detector due to their increased path length. They also lose some energy, which makes them increasingly prone to capture in the barrier once they have scattered. These observations are confirmed through Monte-Carlo simulations upon Gamma-ray sources. Normalized crosscovariance up to 0.22 was found, but is actually controllable through appropriate selection of the detector shaping-pulse width. Experiments on a physical setup confirm these findings. Finally, the application of the ICA approach is demonstrated to demix, or separate, the individual contributions of the sources to the observed detector signals.

  20. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheymits, Maxim; Leonov, Alexey

    The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be realized by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Search for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, study of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution nearby 1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods, developed to reconstruct the direction of incident gamma photon, are presented in this paper. The main point concerns with the space topology of high energy gamma photon interaction in the matter of GAMMA-400. Multiple secondary particles, generated inside gamma-ray telescope, produce significant problems to restore the direction of initial gamma photon. Also back-splash particles, i.e., charged particles and gamma photons generated in calorimeter and moved upward, mask the initial tracks of electron/positron pair from conversion of incident gamma photon. The processed methods allow us to reconstruct the direction of electromagnetic shower axis and extract the electron/positron trace. As a result, the direction of incident gamma photon with the energy of 100 GeV is calculated with an accuracy of more than 0.02 deg.

  1. Study of low multiplicity electron source LEETECH with diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubytskyi, V.; Krylov, V.; Bambade, P.; Cabouat, B.; Wicek, F.; Bogard, F.; Barsuk, S.; Rodin, V.; Burmistrov, L.; Bezshyyko, O.; Attie, D.; Colas, P.; Fedorchuk, O.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.; Lopez, R.; Monard, H.; Cayla, J.-N.; Sukhonos, D.; Titov, M.; Tomassini, D.; Variola, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present experimental and numerical studies of the calibration of low-multiplicity electron source using signals from electrons incident on a diamond detector. The experiments were performed at the newly commissioned versatile LEETECH platform at the PHIL photoinjector facility at LAL. We show that with a single crystal CVD diamonds of 500 micrometers thickness, the energy losses from the first three electrons of 2.5–3 MeV are clearly resolved. The described technique can be used as a complementary approach for calibration of diamond detectors as well as for diagnostics of accelerated beam halos in a regime down to a few particles.

  2. Collaborative mining of graph patterns from multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, Georgiy; Colonna-Romanoa, John

    2016-05-01

    Intelligence analysts require automated tools to mine multi-source data, including answering queries, learning patterns of life, and discovering malicious or anomalous activities. Graph mining algorithms have recently attracted significant attention in intelligence community, because the text-derived knowledge can be efficiently represented as graphs of entities and relationships. However, graph mining models are limited to use-cases involving collocated data, and often make restrictive assumptions about the types of patterns that need to be discovered, the relationships between individual sources, and availability of accurate data segmentation. In this paper we present a model to learn the graph patterns from multiple relational data sources, when each source might have only a fragment (or subgraph) of the knowledge that needs to be discovered, and segmentation of data into training or testing instances is not available. Our model is based on distributed collaborative graph learning, and is effective in situations when the data is kept locally and cannot be moved to a centralized location. Our experiments show that proposed collaborative learning achieves learning quality better than aggregated centralized graph learning, and has learning time comparable to traditional distributed learning in which a knowledge of data segmentation is needed.

  3. A MUSIC (multiple signal classification) algorithm for specifying azimuth, elevation, and range of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    2006-05-01

    The MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm uses the phase difference at different antenna elements of a receiving antenna array to determine the azimuth and elevation angles of a source. This algorithm can be extended to determine the range of multiple sources as well as their azimuth and elevation angles. In this report a generalized MUSIC algorithm is presented that accomplishes this task when the receiving antenna consists of a planar, rectangular, array of receiving elements. Greater range accuracies can be achieved by increasing the signal to noise ratio, increasing the number of PRIs per CPI, and searching for a solution over range space with a finer mesh. The mesh employed in this study had a range gate size that was 10% of the range space searched. An increase in range accuracy gained by the latter two methods comes at the price of increased processing time.

  4. Mood and multiple source characteristics: mood congruency of source consensus status and source trustworthiness as determinants of message scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Rene; Diehl, Michael

    2011-08-01

    This research deals with the interplay of mood and multiple source characteristics in regard to persuasion processes and attitudes. In a four-factorial experiment, mood (positive vs. negative), source consensus status (majority vs. minority), source trustworthiness (high vs. low), and message strength (strong vs. weak) were manipulated. Results were in line with predictions of a mood-congruent expectancies perspective rather than competing predictions of a mood-as-information perspective. Specifically, individuals in both moods evinced higher message scrutiny given mood-incongruent (vs. mood-congruent) source characteristics. That is, across source trustworthiness, positive (negative) mood led to higher message scrutiny given a minority (majority) versus a majority (minority) source. Furthermore, across source consensus, positive (negative) mood led to higher message scrutiny given an untrustworthy (trustworthy) versus a trustworthy (untrustworthy) source. Additional analyses revealed that processing effort increased from doubly mood-congruent source combinations (low effort) over mixed-source combinations (intermediate effort) to doubly mood-incongruent combinations (high effort). Implications are discussed.

  5. Application of blind source separation to gamma ray spectra acquired by GRaND around Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizzon, H.; Toplis, M. J.; Forni, O.; Prettyman, T. H.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    The bismuth germinate (BGO) scintillator is one of the sensors of the gamma ray and neutron detector (GRaND)1 on board the Dawn spacecraft, that has spent just over one year in orbit around the asteroid 4-Vesta. The BGO detector is excited by energetic gamma-rays produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or energetic solar particles interacting either with Vesta and/or the Dawn spacecraft. In detail, during periods of quiet solar activity, gamma ray spectra produced by the scintillator can be considered as consisting of three signals: i) a contribution of gamma-rays from Vesta produced by GCR interactions at the asteroid's surface, ii) a contribution from the spacecraft excited by neutrons coming from Vesta, and iii) a contribution of the spacecraft excited by local interaction with galactic cosmic rays. While the first two contributions should be positive functions of the solid angle of Vesta in the field of view during acquisition, the last one should have a negative dependence because Vesta partly shields the spacecraft from GCR. This theoretical mix can be written formally as: S=aΩSV+bΩSSCNV+c(4π-Ω)SSCGCR (1) where S is the series of recorded spectra, Ω is the solid angle, SV is the contribution of gamma rays coming from Vesta, SSCNV is the contribution of gamma rays coming from the spacecraft excited by the neutron coming from Vesta and SSCGCR is the contribution of gamma rays coming from the spacecraft excited by GCR. A blind source separation method called independent component analysis enables separating additive subcomponents supposing the mutual statistical independence of the non-Gaussian source signals2. Applying this method to BGO spectra acquired during the first three months of the low-altitude measurement orbit (LAMO) reveals two main independent components. The first one is dominated by the positron electron annihilation peak and is positively correlated to the solid angle. The second is negatively correlated to the solid angle and displays peaks

  6. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) as a marine functional source of gamma-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Menoyo, David; Sanz-Bayón, Carmen; Nessa, Anna Hesby; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Faizan, Mohammad; Pallauf, Kathrin; De Diego, Nuria; Wagner, Anika Eva; Ipharraguerre, Ignacio; Stubhaug, Ingunn; Rimbach, Gerald

    2014-12-09

    Gamma tocopherol (gT) exhibits beneficial cardiovascular effects partly due to its anti-inflammatory activity. Important sources of gT are vegetable oils. However, little is known to what extent gT can be transferred into marine animal species such as Atlantic salmon by feeding. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the transfer of dietary gT into salmon. To this end, fish were fed a diet supplemented with 170 ppm gT for 16 weeks whereby alpha tocopherol levels were adjusted to 190 ppm in this and the control diet. Feeding gT-rich diets resulted in a three-fold increase in gT concentrations in the liver and fillet compared to non-gT-supplemented controls. Tissue alpha tocopherol levels were not decreased indicating no antagonistic interaction between gamma- and alpha tocopherol in salmon. The concentration of total omega 3 fatty acids slightly increased in response to dietary gT. Furthermore, dietary gT significantly decreased malondialdehyde in the fillet, determined as a biomarker of lipid peroxidation. In the liver of gT fed salmon we observed an overall down-regulation of genes involved in lipid homeostasis. Additionally, gT improved the antioxidant capacity by up-regulating Gpx4a gene expression in the pyloric caeca. We suggest that Atlantic salmon may provide a marine functional source capable of enriching gT for human consumption.

  7. Electron Linac design to drive bright Compton back-scattering gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacci, A.; Alesini, D.; Antici, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boni, R.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curatolo, C.; Di Pirro, G.; Esposito, A.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Pompili, R.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Spataro, B.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2013-05-01

    The technological development in the field of high brightness linear accelerators and high energy/high quality lasers enables today designing high brilliance Compton-X and Gamma-photon beams suitable for a wide range of applications in the innovative field of nuclear photonics. The challenging requirements of this kind of source comprise: tunable energy (1-20 MeV), very narrow bandwidth (0.3%), and high spectral density (104 photons/s/eV). We present here a study focused on the design and the optimization of an electron Linac aimed to meet the source specifications of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure—Nuclear Physics project, currently funded and seeking for an innovative machine design in order to outperform state-of-the-art facilities. We show that the phase space density of the electron beam, at the collision point against the laser pulse, is the main quality factor characterizing the Linac.

  8. Optimal Design of a Tunable Thomson-Scattering Based Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Hartemann, F V; Jovanovic, I; McNabb, D P; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; Tremaine, A M; Barty, C J

    2007-06-07

    Thomson-Scattering based systems offer a path to high-brightness high-energy (> 1 MeV) x-ray and {gamma}-ray sources due to their favorable scaling with electron energy. LLNL is currently engaged in an effort to optimize such a device, dubbed the ''Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-Ray'' (T-REX) source, targeting up to 680 keV photon energy. Such a system requires precise design of the interaction between a high-intensity laser pulse and a high-brightness electron beam. Presented here are the optimal design parameters for such an interaction, including factors such as the collision angle, focal spot size, optimal bunch charge, and laser energy. These parameters were chosen based on extensive modeling using PARMELA and in-house, well-benchmarked scattering simulation codes.

  9. Contribution of Point Sources to the Soft Gamma-Ray Galactic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrier, R.; Lebrun, F.; Bélanger, G.; Goldwurm, A.; Strong, A. W.; Schoenfelder, V.; Bouchet, L.; Roques, J. P.; Parmar, A.

    2004-10-01

    The nature of the soft gamma-ray (20-200 keV) Galactic emission has been a matter of debate for a long time. Previous experiments have tried to sep- arate the point source contribution from the real in- terstellar emission, but with a rather poor spatial res- olution, they concluded that the interstellar emission could be a large fraction of the total Galactic emis- sion. INTEGRAL, having both high resolution and high sensitivity, is well suited to reassess more pre- cisely this problem. Using the INTEGRAL core pro- gram Galactic Center Deep Exposure (GCDE), we estimate the contribution of detected point sources to the total Galactic flux. Key words: Interstellar emission; INTEGRAL; IBIS/ISGRI.

  10. Source-Search Sensitivity of a Large-Area, Coded-Aperture, Gamma-Ray Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, K P; Collins, J W; Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Lanza, R C; Gallagher, S; Horn, B P; Madden, N W; Smith, E; Woodring, M L

    2004-10-27

    We have recently completed a large-area, coded-aperture, gamma-ray imager for use in searching for radiation sources. The instrument was constructed to verify that weak point sources can be detected at considerable distances if one uses imaging to overcome fluctuations in the natural background. The instrument uses a rank-19, one-dimensional coded aperture to cast shadow patterns onto a 0.57 m{sup 2} NaI(Tl) detector composed of 57 individual cubes each 10 cm on a side. These are arranged in a 19 x 3 array. The mask is composed of four-centimeter thick, one-meter high, 10-cm wide lead blocks. The instrument is mounted in the back of a small truck from which images are obtained as one drives through a region. Results of first measurements obtained with the system are presented.

  11. Intense {gamma}-Ray Source in the Giant-Dipole-Resonance Range Driven by 10-TW Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Marques, J. R.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz, S.; D'Oliveira, P.; Monot, P.; Popescu, H.; Reau, F.; Martin, P.; Galy, J.; Hamilton, D. J.; Giulietti, D.

    2008-09-05

    A {gamma}-ray source with an intense component around the giant dipole resonance for photonuclear absorption has been obtained via bremsstrahlung of electron bunches driven by a 10-TW tabletop laser. 3D particle-in-cell simulation proves the achievement of a nonlinear regime leading to efficient acceleration of several sequential electron bunches per each laser pulse. The rate of the {gamma}-ray yield in the giant dipole resonance region (8gamma}}<17.5 MeV) was measured, through the radio activation of a gold sample, to be 4x10{sup 8} photons per joule of laser energy. This novel all-optical, compact, and efficient electron-{gamma} source is suitable for photonuclear studies and medical uses.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A PRECISION TUNABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE DRIVEN BY A COMPACT X-BAND LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Messerly, M J; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G

    2009-04-30

    A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  13. Development of a Watt-level gamma-ray source based on high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-07-01

    A high-brilliance (∼1022 photon s-1 mm-2 mrad-2/0.1%) gamma-ray source experiment is currently being planned at Fermilab (Eγ ≃ 1.1 MeV). The source implements a high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering by colliding electron bunches formed in a ∼300-MeV superconducting linac with a high-intensity laser pulse. This paper describes the design rationale along with some of technical challenges associated to producing high-repetition-rate collision. The expected performances of the gamma-ray source are also presented.

  14. DESIGN OF A GAMMA-RAY SOURCE BASED ON INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING AT THE FAST SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2016-10-10

    A watt-level average-power gamma-ray source is currently under development at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility. The source is based on the Inverse Compton Scattering of a high-brightness 300-MeV beam against a high-power laser beam circulating in an optical cavity. The back scattered gamma rays are expected to have photon energies up to 1.5 MeV. This paper discusses the optimization of the source, its performances, and the main challenges ahead.

  15. High energy X-ray observations of COS-B gamma-ray sources from OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Caraveo, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    During the three years between satellite launch in June 1975 and turn-off in October 1978, the high energy X-ray spectrometer on board OSO-8 observed nearly all of the COS-B gamma-ray source positions given in the 2CG catalog (Swanenburg et al., 1981). An X-ray source was detected at energies above 20 keV at the 6-sigma level of significance in the gamma-ray error box containing 2CG342 - 02 and at the 3-sigma level of significance in the error boxes containing 2CG065 + 00, 2CG195 + 04, and 2CG311 - 01. No definite association between the X-ray and gamma-ray sources can be made from these data alone. Upper limits are given for the 2CG sources from which no X-ray flux was detected above 20 keV.

  16. Experimental study of the possibility of 3D localization of the compact gamma-sources in soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikova, A. K.; Belyaev, V. N.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Kantserov, V. A.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    To determine the depth of the area of radiopharmaceutical accumulation a method of simultaneous recording of two lines of gamma rays of different energies and quantitative comparison of the intensity of these lines on the surface of the patient's body is provided. Since the coefficient of linear absorption of gamma radiation in the medium depends not only on the characteristics of the medium, but also on the gamma radiation energy, the intensity of gammas of different energies is attenuated differently after passing through the same absorber layer (soft tissues). Thus, the quantitative comparison of the relative intensities of gamma lines on the surface of the patient's body allows to determine the depth of area of the accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical. The result is achieved by analyzing the energy spectrum of the source, obtained with a semiconductor spectrometer, by measuring the ratio of areas of the absorption peaks of the radioisotope and defining the depth of gamma source using the calibration dependence between the areas ratio and the medium layer thickness. The most widely used medical radioisotope technetium-99m has two gamma-lines - 140 keV and 18.5keV, which allows one to apply the proposed method to search for the sentinel lymph nodes and non-palpable malignant tumors in the soft tissues.

  17. Cortical Source Estimates of Gamma Band Amplitude and Phase are Different in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Teale, Peter; Collins, Dan; Maharajh, Keeran; Rojas, Donald C.; Kronberg, Eugene; Reite, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Reductions in gamma band phase synchrony and evoked power have been reported in schizophrenic subjects in response to auditory stimuli. These results have been observed in the EEG at one or two electrode sites. We wished to extend these results using magnetic field data to estimate the responses at the neural generators themselves in each hemisphere. Whole head magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings were used to estimate the phase and amplitude behavior of sources in primary auditory cortex in both hemispheres of schizophrenic and comparison subjects. Both ipsi- and contra-lateral cases were evaluated using a driving (40 Hz modulated 1 kHz carrier) and a non-driving (1 kHz tone) stimulus. We used source space projection (SSP) to collapse the magnetic field data into estimates of the time course of source strengths in individual trials. Complex wavelet based time-frequency decomposition was used to compute inter-trial phase locking factor (PLF), and mean evoked and induced amplitude for each cortical generator. Schizophrenic subjects showed reduced SSP PLF and evoked source strength for contra-lateral generators responding to the driving stimulus in both hemispheres. For the pure tone stimulus, only the left hemisphere PLF’s in the transient window were reduced. In contrast, subjects with schizophrenia exhibited higher induced 40 Hz power to both stimulus types, consistent with the reduced PLF findings. The method of SSP combined with wavelet based complex demodulation produces a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and directly estimates the activity of the cortical generators responsible for gamma band auditory MEG evoked fields. Schizophrenic subjects exhibit significant impairment of generation and phase locking of this activity in auditory cortex, suggesting an impairment of GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuronal modulation of pyramidal cell activity. PMID:18634887

  18. Cortical source estimates of gamma band amplitude and phase are different in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Teale, Peter; Collins, Dan; Maharajh, Keeran; Rojas, Donald C; Kronberg, Eugene; Reite, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Reductions in gamma band phase synchrony and evoked power have been reported in schizophrenic subjects in response to auditory stimuli. These results have been observed in the EEG at one or two electrode sites. We wished to extend these results using magnetic field data to estimate the responses at the neural generators themselves in each hemisphere. Whole head magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings were used to estimate the phase and amplitude behavior of sources in primary auditory cortex in both hemispheres of schizophrenic and comparison subjects. Both ipsi- and contralateral cases were evaluated using a driving (40 Hz modulated 1 kHz carrier) and a non-driving (1 kHz tone) stimulus. We used source space projection (SSP) to collapse the magnetic field data into estimates of the time course of source strengths in individual trials. Complex wavelet based time-frequency decomposition was used to compute inter-trial phase locking factor (PLF), and mean evoked and induced amplitude for each cortical generator. Schizophrenic subjects showed reduced SSP PLF and evoked source strength for contralateral generators responding to the driving stimulus in both hemispheres. For the pure tone stimulus, only the left hemisphere PLF's in the transient window were reduced. In contrast, subjects with schizophrenia exhibited higher induced 40 Hz power to both stimulus types, consistent with the reduced PLF findings. The method of SSP combined with wavelet based complex demodulation produces a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, and directly estimates the activity of the cortical generators responsible for gamma band auditory MEG evoked fields. Schizophrenic subjects exhibit significant impairment of generation and phase locking of this activity in auditory cortex, suggesting an impairment of GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuronal modulation of pyramidal cell activity.

  19. Fermi and Swift observations of the new unidentified gamma-ray point source Fermi J1418+3541

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, Michael; Ojha, Roopesh; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Sokolovsky, Kirill

    2012-12-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray flux from an unidentified source whose preliminary location is RA: 214.63 DEC: 35.69 (14:18:31 +35:41:23, J2000), with an error circle of 0.07 degrees (4.2') radius, with 95% confidence level. The daily averaged gamma ray flux peaked at a flux of (0.5+/-0.2) e-6 ph/cm^2/sec in the 100 MeV - 300 GeV energy range on November 20, 2012.

  20. NIR photometry of the Gamma-Ray source Fermi J1654-1055 and 3FGLJ1037.5-2821

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Leon-Tavares, J.

    2016-03-01

    Following the reports of flaring in Gamma-rays (Atel #8721 and Atel #8740) of the sources 3FGLJ10378.5-2821 identified with the high redshift (z=1.066) quasar PKSB1035-28 and FermiJ1654-1055 tentatively identified with the radio source PMNJ1632-1052.

  1. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-01

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between 137Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61-0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational efficiency

  2. A method for the quantitative gamma spectroscopic analysis of an unusually shaped unknown source.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Dewey, Steven C

    2009-02-01

    An unmarked cylindrical device, identified as a ceramic high voltage capacitor, needed its radioactivity assessed so that proper disposal and shipping requirements could be met. Using a high purity germanium detector, naturally occurring 232Th was identified as the source of radioactivity. A series of point source measurements was made along the length of the item's axis using 60Co, having a gamma ray of nearly the same energy as one of the primary 232Th progeny photopeaks. These measurements were then numerically integrated to determine the response of the detector to a line source. A correction for the self shielding of the item was estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. The item was found to contain approximately 1.85 x 10(5) Bq of uniformly distributed 232Th. The overall method has application to any unusually shaped source, with point source measurements performed using an appropriate radionuclide used to establish an overall sensitivity of the detector, including its dead layer, to the radioactivity in a simple geometric representation of the object. An estimation of self shielding from Monte Carlo is then applied to that result.

  3. Tests and consequences of disk plus halo models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst observations made by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and by previous experiments are still consistent with a combined Galactic disk (or Galactic spiral arm) plus extended Galactic halo model. Testable predictions and consequences of the disk plus halo model are discussed here; tests performed on the expanded BATSE database in the future will constrain the allowed model parameters and may eventually rule out the disk plus halo model. Using examples, it is shown that if the halo has an appropriate edge, BATSE will never detect an anisotropic signal from the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. A prediction of the disk plus halo model is that the fraction of the bursts observed to be in the 'disk' population rises as the detector sensitivity improves. A careful reexamination of the numbers of bursts in the two populations for the pre-BATSE databases could rule out this class of models. Similarly, it is predicted that different satellites will observe different relative numbers of bursts in the two classes for any model in which there are two different spatial distribiutions of the sources, or for models in which there is one spatial distribution of the sources that is sampled to different depths for the two classes. An important consequence of the disk plus halo model is that for the birthrate of the halo sources to be small compared to the birthrate of the disk sources, it is necessary for the halo sources to release many orders of magnitude more energy over their bursting lifetime than the disk sources. The halo bursts must also be much more luminous than the disk bursts; if this disk-halo model is correct, it is necessary to explain why the disk sources do not produce halo-type bursts.

  4. Tests and consequences of disk plus halo models of gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. A.

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst observations made by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and by previous experiments are still consistent with a combined Galactic disk (or Galactic spiral arm) plus extended Galactic halo model. Testable predictions and consequences of the disk plus halo model are discussed here; tests performed on the expanded BATSE database in the future will constrain the allowed model parameters and may eventually rule out the disk plus halo model. Using examples, it is shown that if the halo has an appropriate edge, BATSE will never detect an anisotropic signal from the halo of the Andromeda galaxy. A prediction of the disk plus halo model is that the fraction of the bursts observed to be in the 'disk' population rises as the detector sensitivity improves. A careful reexamination of the numbers of bursts in the two populations for the pre-BATSE databases could rule out this class of models. Similarly, it is predicted that different satellites will observe different relative numbers of bursts in the two classes for any model in which there are two different spatial distribiutions of the sources, or for models in which there is one spatial distribution of the sources that is sampled to different depths for the two classes. An important consequence of the disk plus halo model is that for the birthrate of the halo sources to be small compared to the birthrate of the disk sources, it is necessary for the halo sources to release many orders of magnitude more energy over their bursting lifetime than the disk sources. The halo bursts must also be much more luminous than the disk bursts; if this disk-halo model is correct, it is necessary to explain why the disk sources do not produce halo-type bursts.

  5. Choked jets and low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts as hidden neutrino sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We consider gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets that are choked by extended material as sources of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. We take into account the jet propagation physics both inside the progenitor star and the surrounding dense medium. Radiation constraints, which are relevant for high-energy neutrino production, are considered as well. Efficient shock acceleration of cosmic rays is possible for sufficiently low-power jets and/or jets buried in a dense, extended wind or outer envelope. Such conditions also favor GRB jets to become stalled, and the necessary conditions for stalling are explicitly derived. Such choked jets may explain transrelativistic supernovae (SNe) and low-luminosity (LL) GRBs, giving a unified picture of GRBs and GRB-SNe. Focusing on this unified scenario for GRBs, we calculate the resulting neutrino spectra from choked jets, including the relevant microphysical processes such as multipion production in p p and p γ interactions, as well as the energy losses of mesons and muons. We obtain diffuse neutrino spectra using the latest results for the luminosity function of LL GRBs. Although uncertainties are large, we confirm that LL GRBs can potentially give a significant contribution to the diffuse neutrino flux. Our results are consistent with the present IceCube data and do not violate the stacking limits on classical high-luminosity GRBs. We find that high-energy neutrino production in choked jets is dominated by p γ interactions. These sources are dark in GeV-TeV gamma rays and do not contribute significantly to the Fermi diffuse gamma-ray background. Assuming stalled jets can launch a quasispherical shock in the dense medium, "precursor" TeV neutrinos emerging prior to the shock breakout gamma-ray emission can be used as smoking-gun evidence for a choked jet model for LL GRBs. Our results strengthen the relevance of wide field-of-view sky monitors with better sensitivities in the 1-100 keV range.

  6. Interstellar medium around supernova remnants associated with gamma-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvidovich, L.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Dubner, G.

    2017-07-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are potential sources of gamma-rays, either through inverse Compton scattering of electrons off ambient photons or through the decay of neutral pions created by the collision of energetic protons with dense ambient gas. The SNRs G298.6-0.0 and G298.5-0.3 are proposed to be associated to the gamma-ray sources 3FGL J1214.0-6236 and 3FGL J1212.2-6251, respectively. They are located in a complex portion of the Galactic plane, also containing sources of powerful stellar winds such as the star Wolf Rayet HD104994 and the HII regions G298.559-00.114, G298.868-00.432 and G298.228-00.331 with ongoing star formation. We present a study of the neutral hydrogen distribution towards the mentioned SNRs. We found a structure with ellipsoidal morphology that encloses a region containing G298.5-0.3, G298.6-0.0, HD104994, G298.559-00.114 and G298.228-00.331. This HI feature is detected in the velocity range 89-100 km s-1. We propose that the neutral gas would be the accelerated portion (which would explain its high radial velocity) of a gas shell swept up by a series of expansive and explosive events. The rest of this shell (at radial velocities compatible with the systemic velocity of the objects) is not visible because of confusion with galactic emission. We also inspected the distribution of the 12CO gas and found a dense molecular cloud at the systemic velocity of ˜ 22 km s-1 corresponding to the kinematical distance of ˜ 10.4 kpc, compatible with the distance to the SNR G298.6-0.0. This molecular cloud is in spatial coincidence, projected in the sky plane, with the very high energy source associated with the remnant. This fact, suggesting a possible hadronic origin for the gamma-rays emission. Regarding to the SNR G298.5-0.3, smaller and fainter than the previous one, the angular resolution of the molecular data is insufficient to draw meaningful conclusions.

  7. In Silico Gene Prioritization by Integrating Multiple Data Sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingyao; Shields, Robert; Chanda, Sumit K.; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is crucial to the understanding of disease pathogenesis, and to the improvement of disease diagnosis and treatment. In recent years, many researchers have proposed approaches to prioritize candidate genes by considering the relationship of candidate genes and existing known disease genes, reflected in other data sources. In this paper, we propose an expandable framework for gene prioritization that can integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources by taking advantage of a unified graphic representation. Gene-gene relationships and gene-disease relationships are then defined based on the overall topology of each network using a diffusion kernel measure. These relationship measures are in turn normalized to derive an overall measure across all networks, which is utilized to rank all candidate genes. Based on the informativeness of available data sources with respect to each specific disease, we also propose an adaptive threshold score to select a small subset of candidate genes for further validation studies. We performed large scale cross-validation analysis on 110 disease families using three data sources. Results have shown that our approach consistently outperforms other two state of the art programs. A case study using Parkinson disease (PD) has identified four candidate genes (UBB, SEPT5, GPR37 and TH) that ranked higher than our adaptive threshold, all of which are involved in the PD pathway. In particular, a very recent study has observed a deletion of TH in a patient with PD, which supports the importance of the TH gene in PD pathogenesis. A web tool has been implemented to assist scientists in their genetic studies. PMID:21731658

  8. Feature extraction from multiple data sources using genetic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanski, J. J.; Brumby, Steven P.; Pope, P. A.; Eads, D. R.; Galassi, M. C.; Harvey, N. R.; Perkins, S. J.; Porter, R. B.; Theiler, J. P.; Young, A. C.; Bloch, J. J.; David, N. A.; Esch-Mosher, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Feature extration from imagery is an important and long-standing problem in remote sensing. In this paper, we report on work using genetic programming to perform feature extraction simultaneously from multispectral and digital elevation model (DEM) data. The tool used is the GENetic Imagery Exploitation (GENIE) software, which produces image-processing software that inherently combines spatial and spectral processing. GENIE is particularly useful in exploratory studies of imagery, such as one often does in combining data from multiple sources. The user trains the software by painting the feature of interest with a simple graphical user interface. GENIE then uses genetic programming techniques to produce an image-processing pipeline. Here, we demonstrate evolution of image processing algorithms that extract a range of land-cover features including towns, grasslands, wild fire burn scars, and several types of forest. We use imagery from the DOE/NNSA Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) spacecraft, fused with USGS 1:24000 scale DEM data.

  9. Luminescence sensors on the basis of quartz glasses with localization of gamma-radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanukovich, Tatjana P.; Poliakov, Alexander V.

    2006-04-01

    Optical fibers as detectors of radiation have a lot of advantages: big length, little diameter, no electrical interference, and an opportunity to measure radiation from the spread source. Optical characteristics of pure silica glasses as a material for optical fibers are very important. Luminescence spectra of high-purity silica glasses made by sol-gel technology have been investigated. Silica glasses are very stable and their characteristics are changed in narrow range. Sol-gel technology was chosen because it allows obtaining samples with different properties during changing technology. In other technologies, uncontrolled admixtures presence leads to big number of luminescence bands appearance. Their analysis is difficult. Luminescence band with energy of 1,9 eV appeared during exposition of glasses to gamma-irradiation. Luminescence intensity dependence on irradiation dose is analyzed. Appearance reasons are investigated. Absorption band with energy 2,0 eV appears in glasses during irradiation due to nonbridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC:identical to Si- 0upward arrow). The same centers are responsible for luminescence with 1,9 eV. Energetic diagram is proposed. Principle scheme of gamma-irradiation optical fiber sensor is proposed on the basis of optical fiber made by sol-gel technology. Optical fiber is illuminated from the lightsource with energy of 2,0 eV. Luminescence appears at those portions of optical fiber, which are exposed to gamma irradiation. Such luminescence pulses are registered from both sides of optical fiber. Travel time is proportional to the distance from the end of fiber to irradiated portion. Length of pulse is proportional to the length of portion. Thermal annealing of optical fiber is discussed.

  10. Regional characterization of land cover using multiple sources of data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogelmann, J.E.; Sohl, T.; Howard, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many organizations require accurate intermediate-scale land-cover information for many applications, including modeling nutrient and pesticide runoff, understanding spatial patterns of biodiversity, land-use planning, and policy development. While many techniques have been successfully used to classify land cover in relatively small regions, there are substantial obstacles in applying these methods to large, multiscene regions. The purpose of this study was to generate and evaluate a large region land-cover classification product using a multiple-layer land-characteristics database approach. To derive land-cover information, mosaicked Landsat thematic mapper (TM) scenes were analyzed in conjunction with digital elevation data (and derived slope, aspect, and shaded relief), population census information, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program city lights data, prior land-use and land-cover data, digital line graph data, and National Wetlands Inventory data. Both leaf-on and leaf-off TM data sets were analyzed. The study area was U.S. Federal Region III, which includes the states of Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and West Virginia. The general procedure involved (1) generating mosaics of multiple scenes of leaves-on TM data using histogram equalization methods; (2) clustering mosaics into 100 spectral classes using unsupervised classification; (3) interpreting and labeling spectral classes into approximately 15 land-cover categories (analogous to Anderson Level 1 and 2 classes) using aerial photographs; (4) developing decision-making rules and models using from one to several ancillary data layers to resolve confusion in spectral classes that represented two or more targeted land-cover categories; and (5) incorporating data from other sources (for example, leaf-off TM data and National Wetlands Inventory data) to yield a final land-cover product. Although standard accuracy assessments were not done, a series of consistency checks using available

  11. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Patel, N. P.; Majumdar, B.; Vijayan, V.

    2010-01-01

    The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM) Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm) and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°). The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (Λ), radial dose function gL(r) and anisotropy function F(r, θ) of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study. PMID:20927220

  12. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahakyan, N.

    2016-07-01

    The recent results from ground based γ-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic γ-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the γ-rays and ν-s are produced from decays of neutral and charged pions, the flux of TeV γ-rays can be used to estimate the upper limit of ν flux and vice versa; the detectability of ν flux implies a minimum flux of the accompanying γ-rays (assuming the internal and the external absorption of γ-rays is negligible). Using this minimum flux, it is possible to find the sources which can be detected with cubic-kilometer telescopes. I will discuss the possibility to detect HE neutrinos from powerful galactic accelerators, such as Supernova Remnants (SNRs) and Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) and show that likely only RX J1713.7-3946, RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela X can be detected by current generation of instruments (IceCube and Km3Net). It will be shown also, that galactic binary systems could be promising sources of HE ν-s. In particular, ν-s and γ-rays from Cygnus X-3 will be discussed during recent gamma-ray activity, showing that in the future such kind of activities could produce detectable flux of HE ν-s.

  13. 42 CFR 447.514 - Upper limits for multiple source drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limits for multiple source drugs. (a) Establishment and issuance of a listing. (1) CMS will establish and issue listings that identify and set upper limits for multiple source drugs that meet the following... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Upper limits for multiple source drugs....

  14. Limits on MeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Active Galaxies and Other Unidentified High-Latitude Gamma-Ray Sources Observed with COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J. G.; Collmar, W.; Strong, A.; Schonfelder, V.; Carraminana, A.

    We have established cumulative flux limits in the COMPTEL energy range (0.75-30 MeV) for a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) of general interest. Our target list consists of both known and unidentified gamma-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes. Limits to the time-averaged MeV-emission measured with COMPTEL are derived from all-sky maximum-likelihood and flux maps produced using the full COMPTEL dataset spanning the entire nine-year period of the CGRO mission (April 1991-June 2000). The flux limits described here will be used to assess the contribution of AGN to the diffuse gamma-ray background measured in the MeV regime, and may serve to constrain the emission processes operative in high-energy cosmic sources.

  15. Multiple-Beam Detection of Fast Transient Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been designed for using multiple independent stations to discriminate fast transient radio sources from local anomalies, such as antenna noise or radio frequency interference (RFI). This can improve the sensitivity of incoherent detection for geographically separated stations such as the very long baseline array (VLBA), the future square kilometer array (SKA), or any other coincident observations by multiple separated receivers. The transients are short, broadband pulses of radio energy, often just a few milliseconds long, emitted by a variety of exotic astronomical phenomena. They generally represent rare, high-energy events making them of great scientific value. For RFI-robust adaptive detection of transients, using multiple stations, a family of algorithms has been developed. The technique exploits the fact that the separated stations constitute statistically independent samples of the target. This can be used to adaptively ignore RFI events for superior sensitivity. If the antenna signals are independent and identically distributed (IID), then RFI events are simply outlier data points that can be removed through robust estimation such as a trimmed or Winsorized estimator. The alternative "trimmed" estimator is considered, which excises the strongest n signals from the list of short-beamed intensities. Because local RFI is independent at each antenna, this interference is unlikely to occur at many antennas on the same step. Trimming the strongest signals provides robustness to RFI that can theoretically outperform even the detection performance of the same number of antennas at a single site. This algorithm requires sorting the signals at each time step and dispersion measure, an operation that is computationally tractable for existing array sizes. An alternative uses the various stations to form an ensemble estimate of the conditional density function (CDF) evaluated at each time step. Both methods outperform standard detection strategies on a test

  16. Response-surface models for deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {beta}/{gamma} -emitting sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Individuals who work at nuclear reactor facilities can be at risk for deterministic effects in the skin from exposure to discrete {Beta}- and {gamma}-emitting ({Beta}{gamma}E) sources (e.g., {Beta}{gamma}E hot particles) on the skin or clothing. Deterministic effects are non-cancer effects that have a threshold and increase in severity as dose increases (e.g., ulcer in skin). Hot {Beta}{gamma}E particles are {sup 60}Co- or nuclear fuel-derived particles with diameters > 10 {mu}m and < 3 mm and contain at least 3.7 kBq (0.1 {mu}Ci) of radioactivity. For such {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin, it is the beta component of the dose that is most important. To develop exposure limitation systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for systems that adequately control exposure of workers to discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources, models are needed for evaluating the risk of deterministic effects of localized {Beta} irradiation of the skin. The purpose of this study was to develop dose-rate and irradiated-area dependent, response-surface models for evaluating risks of significant deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin by discrete {Beta}{gamma}E sources and to use modeling results to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure to such sources. The significance of the research results as follows: (1) response-surface models are now available for evaluating the risk of specific deterministic effects of localized irradiation of the skin; (2) modeling results have been used to recommend approaches to limiting occupational exposure of workers to {Beta} radiation from {Beta}{gamma}E sources on the skin or on clothing; and (3) the generic irradiated-volume, weighting-factor approach to limiting exposure can be applied to other organs including the eye, the ear, and organs of the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract and can be used for both deterministic and stochastic effects.

  17. Discovery of a new population of high-energy gamma-ray sources in the Milky Way

    PubMed

    Gehrels; Macomb; Bertsch; Thompson; Hartman

    2000-03-23

    One of the great mysteries of the high-energy gamma-ray sky is the group of approximately 170 unidentified point sources found along the Galactic plane. They are more numerous than all other high-energy gamma-ray sources combined and, despite 20 years of effort, no clear counterparts have been found at other wavelengths. Here we report a new population of such objects. A cluster of approximately 20 faint sources appears north of the Galactic Centre, which is part of a broader class of faint objects at mid-latitudes. In addition, we show in a model-independent way that the mid-latitude sources are distinct from the population of bright unidentified sources along the Galactic plane. The distribution on the sky indicates that the faint mid-latitude sources are associated with the Gould belt of massive stars and gas clouds at approximately 600 light years distance, as has been previously suggested.

  18. Observations of the radio emission field around the gamma -ray source 2EG J1834-2138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, J. A.; Romero, G. E.

    1998-03-01

    We present results of a study of the radio emission field around the best estimate position of the low-latitude EGRET source 2EG J1834-2138. The identification of this gamma -ray source with the gravitational lensed AGN PKS 1830-211 has been recently proposed by \\cite[Mattox et al. (1997)]{ma97}. Additional support for this identification is provided here. Contamination produced by the diffuse disk emission has been removed from new radio images of the surrounding region of 2EG J1834-2138 allowing a determination of the fine radio structure. Several previously unnoticed supernova remnants have been found within a few degrees from the gamma -ray source. However, the only strong radio source within the 95% source location confidence contour of 2EG J1834-2138 is PKS 1830-211. In addition, both spectrum and variability analysis of the EGRET data support the identification of both sources.

  19. Relative effectiveness of structures as protection from gamma radiation from cloud and fallout sources as a function of source energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fingerlos, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    In the event of a release of radioactive material, it is necessary to know the doses the public could receive in order to make decisions that minimize the public's risk. In order to determine what doses the public might receive if they try to evacuate or seek shelter, it is necessary to know how much protection structures such as homes and vehicles provide. This information is well known only for a few gamma ray spectra, such as that from weapon fallout. The research reported here transfers the knowledge gained from the previous weapon-fallout shielding work to realistic protection factors for possible accidental releases whatever the released spectrum might be. Point kernel models were developed for both the fallout and cloud sources. That development included a method of accurately combining buildup factors in multi-region problems over wide ranges of energy and photon mean free path. A generalized method for calculating the effect of ground roughness on the attentuation factor for fallout sources was also developed. The results were reported for the 1-hr weapon fallout, and TMI-2 cloud and fallout spectra, as well as for discrete energies from 15 KeV to 15 MeV. The structures given as examples include small wood frame and large brick houses.

  20. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N.

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  1. The strongest ever gamma-ray source in the sky: the December 2009 flare of 3C 454.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacciani, Luigi; Vittorini, Valerio; Sakamoto, Takanori; Elena, Pian; Fiocchi, Mariateresa; Raiteri, Claudia Maria; Villata, Massimo; Striani, Edoardo; Vercellone, Stefano; D'Ammando, Filippo; Fugazza, Dino; Tiengo, Andrea; Tavani, Marco; Trispec BLAZAR Team; AGILE Collaboration; Swift Collaboration; Gasp-Webt Collaboration; Fabiani, Sergio

    In December 2009 the instruments aboard AGILE satellite detected a giant gamma-ray flare from the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 454.3, reaching a peak flux of 2000.E-8 ph/cm2/s (E > 100M eV ) for one day, and showing a flux in excess of 800.E-8 ph/cm2/s for almost two weeks. AGILE observed spectral hardening of the source during the major flare. Before, during and after the giant flare, the source were monitored in radio, optical, x-ray, as well as in gamma-ray. The gamma-ray activity is not accompanied by a comparable increase in optical flux, as instead observed in the previous high activity periods of the source. The x-ray flux increased as expected, but started to fade one week earlier than the gamma-ray. We report the measurements obtained with kanata, the GASP-WEBT, REM, GRT, Swift, Rossi, and AGILE. Based the observed variability and spectra, we will discuss on the nature of the high gamma-ray activity, and on the jet physics, focusing on the giant flare, and on the similarities and differences with respect to the high activity periods observed in the last two years for the source.

  2. Is the gamma interferon assay in cattle influenced by multiple tuberculin injections?

    PubMed

    Rangen, Sheila A; Surujballi, Om P; Lutze-Wallace, Cyril; Lees, V Wayne

    2009-03-01

    Along with other developed countries, Canada is interested in adopting the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) assay to test for bovine tuberculosis (TB). This study compared results of using the IFN-gamma assay in a large number of field-tested cattle in Manitoba, some previously tested with a caudal fold test (CFT) only, and others injected with tuberculins for both a CFT and a comparative cervical test (CCT). Parallel testing further compared the IFN-gamma assay and CCT results with the confirmed TB status of the animal (culture, histopathologic examination, polymerase chain reaction). Results from IFN-gamma assays did not differ following the CFT versus CFT and CCT injections. Parallel testing demonstrated an apparent higher prevalence of tuberculosis for the IFN-gamma assay versus CCT, which will assist in earlier removal of exposed animals and, ultimately, prevent populations from becoming infected.

  3. LASER TECHNOLOGY FOR PRECISION MONOENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCE R&D AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Bayramian, A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Prantil, M; Wu, S; Ebbers, C; Scarpetti, R D; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Bonanno, R E; Barty, C P

    2010-04-20

    Generation of mono-energetic, high brightness gamma-rays requires state of the art lasers to both produce a low emittance electron beam in the linac and high intensity, narrow linewidth laser photons for scattering with the relativistic electrons. Here, we overview the laser systems for the 3rd generation Monoenergetic Gamma-ray Source (MEGa-ray) currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). We also describe a method for increasing the efficiency of laser Compton scattering through laser pulse recirculation. The fiber-based photoinjector laser will produce 50 {micro}J temporally and spatially shaped UV pulses at 120 Hz to generate a low emittance electron beam in the X-band RF photoinjector. The interaction laser generates high intensity photons that focus into the interaction region and scatter off the accelerated electrons. This system utilizes chirped pulse amplification and commercial diode pumped solid state Nd:YAG amplifiers to produce 0.5 J, 10 ps, 120 Hz pulses at 1064 nm and up to 0.2 J after frequency doubling. A single passively mode-locked Ytterbium fiber oscillator seeds both laser systems and provides a timing synch with the linac.

  4. Simulating feedback from nuclear clusters: the impact of multiple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Power, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NCs) are found to exist in the centres of many galaxies and appear to follow scaling relations similar to those of supermassive black holes. Previous analytical work has suggested that such relations are a consequence of feedback-regulated growth. We explore this idea using high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the validity of the simplifying assumptions made in analytical models. In particular, we investigate feedback emanating from multiple stellar sources rather than from a single source, as is usually assumed, and show that collisions between shells of gas swept up by feedback leads to momentum cancellation and the formation of high-density clumps and filaments. This high-density material is resistant both to expulsion from the galaxy potential and to disruption by feedback; if it falls back on to the NC, we expect the gas to be available for further star formation or for feeding a central black hole. We also note that our results may have implications for the evolution of globular clusters and stellar clusters in high-redshift dark matter haloes.

  5. Repeated gamma knife surgery for multiple brain metastases from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wowra, Berndt; Siebels, Michael; Muacevic, Alexander; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm; Mack, Andreas; Hofstetter, Alfons

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic profile of repeated gamma knife surgery (GKS) for renal cell carcinoma that has metastasized to the brain on multiple occasions. Data from this study were culled from a single institution and cover a 6-year period of outpatient radiosurgery. A standard protocol for indication, dose planning, and follow up was established. In cases of distant or local recurrences, radiosurgery was undertaken repeatedly (up to six times in one individual). Seventy-five patients harboring 350 cerebral metastases were treated. Relief from pretreatment neurological symptoms occurred in 72% of patients within a few days or a few weeks after the procedure. The actuarial local tumor control rate after the initial GKS was 95%. In patients free from relapse of intracranial metastases after repeated radiosurgery, long-term survival was 91% after 4 years; median survival was 11.1+/-3.2 months after radiosurgery and 4.5+/-1.1 years after diagnosis of the primary kidney cancer. Survival following radiosurgery was independent of patient age and sex, side of the renal cell carcinoma, pretreatment of the cerebrum by using radiotherapy or surgery, number of brain metastases and their synchronization with the primary renal cell carcinoma, and the frequency of radiosurgical procedures. In contrast, survival was dependent on the patient's clinical performance score and the extracranial tumor status. Tumor bleeding was observed in seven patients (9%) and late radiation toxicity (LRT) in 15 patients (20%). Treatment-related morbidity was moderate and mostly transient. Late radiation toxicity was encountered predominantly in long-term survivors. Outpatient repeated radiosurgery is an effective and only minimally invasive treatment for multiple brain metastases from renal cell cancer and is recommended as being the method of choice to control intracranial disease, especially in selected patients with limited extracranial disease. Physicians dealing with

  6. Genetic mixture of multiple source populations accelerates invasive range expansion.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Natalie K; Ochocki, Brad M; Crawford, Kerri M; Compagnoni, Aldo; Miller, Tom E X

    2017-01-01

    A wealth of population genetic studies have documented that many successful biological invasions stem from multiple introductions from genetically distinct source populations. Yet, mechanistic understanding of whether and how genetic mixture promotes invasiveness has lagged behind documentation that such mixture commonly occurs. We conducted a laboratory experiment to test the influence of genetic mixture on the velocity of invasive range expansion. The mechanistic basis for effects of genetic mixture could include evolutionary responses (mixed invasions may harbour greater genetic diversity and thus elevated evolutionary potential) and/or fitness advantages of between-population mating (heterosis). If driven by evolution, positive effects of source population mixture should increase through time, as selection sculpts genetic variation. If driven by heterosis, effects of mixture should peak following first reproductive contact and then dissipate. Using a laboratory model system (beetles spreading through artificial landscapes), we quantified the velocity of range expansion for invasions initiated with one, two, four or six genetic sources over six generations. Our experiment was designed to test predictions corresponding to the evolutionary and heterosis mechanisms, asking whether any effects of genetic mixture occurred in early or later generations of range expansion. We also quantified demography and dispersal for each experimental treatment, since any effects of mixture should be manifest in one or both of these traits. Over six generations, invasions with any amount of genetic mixture (two, four and six sources) spread farther than single-source invasions. Our data suggest that heterosis provided a 'catapult effect', leaving a lasting signature on range expansion even though the benefits of outcrossing were transient. Individual-level trait data indicated that genetic mixture had positive effects on local demography (reduced extinction risk and enhanced

  7. Is the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 a dark matter subhalo?

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-05-23

    In a previous study, we pointed out that the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 shows evidence of being spatially extended. If a gamma-ray source without detectable emission at other wavelengths were unambiguously determined to be spatially extended, it could not be explained by known astrophysics, and would constitute a smoking gun for dark matter particles annihilating in a nearby subhalo. With this prospect in mind, we scrutinize the gamma-ray emission from this source, finding that it prefers a spatially extended profile over that of a single point-like source with 5.1σ statistical significance. We also use a large sample of active galactic nuclei and other known gamma-rays sources as a control group, confirming, as expected, that statistically significant extension is rare among such objects. We argue that the most likely (non-dark matter) explanation for this apparent extension is a pair of bright gamma-ray sources that serendipitously lie very close to each other, and estimate that there is a chance probability of ~2% that such a pair would exist somewhere on the sky. In the case of 3FGL J2212.5+0703, we test an alternative model that includes a second gamma-ray point source at the position of the radio source BZQ J2212+0646, and find that the addition of this source alongside a point source at the position of 3FGL J2212.5+0703 yields a fit of comparable quality to that obtained for a single extended source. If 3FGL J2212.5+0703 is a dark matter subhalo, it would imply that dark matter particles have a mass of ~18–33 GeV and an annihilation cross section on the order of σv ~ 10–26 cm(3)/s (for the representative case of annihilations to $b\\bar{b}$), similar to the values required to generate the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess.

  8. Is the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 a dark matter subhalo?

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-05-23

    In a previous study, we pointed out that the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 shows evidence of being spatially extended. If a gamma-ray source without detectable emission at other wavelengths were unambiguously determined to be spatially extended, it could not be explained by known astrophysics, and would constitute a smoking gun for dark matter particles annihilating in a nearby subhalo. With this prospect in mind, we scrutinize the gamma-ray emission from this source, finding that it prefers a spatially extended profile over that of a single point-like source with 5.1σ statistical significance. We also use a large sample of active galactic nuclei and other known gamma-rays sources as a control group, confirming, as expected, that statistically significant extension is rare among such objects. We argue that the most likely (non-dark matter) explanation for this apparent extension is a pair of bright gamma-ray sources that serendipitously lie very close to each other, and estimate that there is a chance probability of ~2% that such a pair would exist somewhere on the sky. In the case of 3FGL J2212.5+0703, we test an alternative model that includes a second gamma-ray point source at the position of the radio source BZQ J2212+0646, and find that the addition of this source alongside a point source at the position of 3FGL J2212.5+0703 yields a fit of comparable quality to that obtained for a single extended source. If 3FGL J2212.5+0703 is a dark matter subhalo, it would imply that dark matter particles have a mass of ~18–33 GeV and an annihilation cross section on the order of σv ~ 10–26 cm(3)/s (for the representative case of annihilations to $b\\bar{b}$), similar to the values required to generate the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess.

  9. Is the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 a dark matter subhalo?

    DOE PAGES

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-05-23

    In a previous study, we pointed out that the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 shows evidence of being spatially extended. If a gamma-ray source without detectable emission at other wavelengths were unambiguously determined to be spatially extended, it could not be explained by known astrophysics, and would constitute a smoking gun for dark matter particles annihilating in a nearby subhalo. With this prospect in mind, we scrutinize the gamma-ray emission from this source, finding that it prefers a spatially extended profile over that of a single point-like source with 5.1σ statistical significance. We also use a large sample of active galactic nuclei and other known gamma-rays sources as a control group, confirming, as expected, that statistically significant extension is rare among such objects. We argue that the most likely (non-dark matter) explanation for this apparent extension is a pair of bright gamma-ray sources that serendipitously lie very close to each other, and estimate that there is a chance probability of ~2% that such a pair would exist somewhere on the sky. In the case of 3FGL J2212.5+0703, we test an alternative model that includes a second gamma-ray point source at the position of the radio source BZQ J2212+0646, and find that the addition of this source alongside a point source at the position of 3FGL J2212.5+0703 yields a fit of comparable quality to that obtained for a single extended source. If 3FGL J2212.5+0703 is a dark matter subhalo, it would imply that dark matter particles have a mass of ~18–33 GeV and an annihilation cross section on the order of σv ~ 10–26 cm(3)/s (for the representative case of annihilations tomore » $$b\\bar{b}$$), similar to the values required to generate the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess.« less

  10. Is the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+0703 a dark matter subhalo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Bridget; Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim

    2016-05-01

    In a previous paper, we pointed out that the gamma-ray source 3FGL J2212.5+\\linebreak 0703 shows evidence of being spatially extended. If a gamma-ray source without detectable emission at other wavelengths were unambiguously determined to be spatially extended, it could not be explained by known astrophysics, and would constitute a smoking gun for dark matter particles annihilating in a nearby subhalo. With this prospect in mind, we scrutinize the gamma-ray emission from this source, finding that it prefers a spatially extended profile over that of a single point-like source with 5.1σ statistical significance. We also use a large sample of active galactic nuclei and other known gamma-rays sources as a control group, confirming, as expected, that statistically significant extension is rare among such objects. We argue that the most likely (non-dark matter) explanation for this apparent extension is a pair of bright gamma-ray sources that serendipitously lie very close to each other, and estimate that there is a chance probability of ~2% that such a pair would exist somewhere on the sky. In the case of 3FGL J2212.5+0703, we test an alternative model that includes a second gamma-ray point source at the position of the radio source BZQ J2212+0646, and find that the addition of this source alongside a point source at the position of 3FGL J2212.5+0703 yields a fit of comparable quality to that obtained for a single extended source. If 3FGL J2212.5+0703 is a dark matter subhalo, it would imply that dark matter particles have a mass of ~18-33 GeV and an annihilation cross section on the order of σ v ~ 10-26 cm3/s (for the representative case of annihilations to bbar b), similar to the values required to generate the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess.

  11. A figure of merit for blazar-like source identification in the gamma-ray energy band

    SciTech Connect

    Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Pittori, Carlotta; Giommi, Paolo; Colafrancesco, Sergio

    2007-07-12

    The microwave to gamma-ray slope {alpha}{mu}{gamma} can be used as a viable figure of merit for blazar-like source identification in gamma-rays. Taking into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background, one can estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of low energy peaked (LBL) blazars, in order to be detectable for the nominal sensitivity values of AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. This work is based on the results of a recently derived blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys. We present our estimates of duty cycle constraints applied on a sample composed by 146 high latitude and 74 medium latitude LBL blazars from the new WMAP3 yr catalog. Our results can be used as an indicator to identify good gamma-ray blazar candidates: sources with high values of duty cycle can in principle be detectable also in a ''steady'' state by AGILE and GLAST without over-predicting the extragalactic background.

  12. Extraction of Point Source Gamma Signals from Aerial Survey Data Taken over a Las Vegas Nevada Residential Area

    SciTech Connect

    Thane J. Hendricks

    2007-05-01

    Detection of point-source gamma signals from aerial measurements is complicated by widely varying terrestrial gamma backgrounds, since these variations frequently resemble signals from point-sources. Spectral stripping techniques have been very useful in separating man-made and natural radiation contributions which exist on Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) plant sites and other like facilities. However, these facilities are generally situated in desert areas or otherwise flat terrain with few man-made structures to disturb the natural background. It is of great interest to determine if the stripping technique can be successfully applied in populated areas where numerous man-made disturbances (houses, streets, yards, vehicles, etc.) exist.

  13. Design and Operation of a tunable MeV-level Compton-scattering-based (gamma-ray) source

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D J; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Betts, S M; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P

    2009-07-07

    A mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source based on Compton-scattering, targeting nuclear physics applications such as nuclear resonance fluorescence, has been constructed and commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In this paper, the overall architecture of the system, as well as some of the critical design decisions made in the development of the source, are discussed. The performances of the two laser systems (one for electron production, one for scattering), the electron photoinjector, and the linear accelerator are also detailed, and initial {gamma}-ray results are presented.

  14. MRI-based polymer gel dosimetry for validating plans with multiple matrices in Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Gopishankar, N; Watanabe, Yoichi; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan

    2011-01-31

    One of treatment planning techniques with Leksell GammaPlan (LGP) for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) uses multiple matrices with multiple dose prescriptions. Computational complexity increases when shots are placed in multiple matrices with different grid sizes. Hence, the experimental validation of LGP calculated dose distributions is needed for those cases. For the current study, we used BANG3 polymer gel contained in a head-sized glass bottle to simulate the entire treatment process of GKSRS. A treatment plan with three 18 mm shots and one 8 mm shot in separate matrices was created with LGP. The prescribed maximum dose was 8 Gy to three shots and 16 Gy to one of the 18 mm shots. The 3D dose distribution recorded in the gel dosimeter was read using a Siemens 3T MRI scanner. The scanning parameters of a CPMG pulse sequence with 32 equidistant echoes were as follows: TR = 7 s, echo step = 13.6 ms, field-of-view = 256 mm × 256 mm, and pixel size = 1 mm × 1 mm. Interleaved acquisition mode was used to obtain 15 to 45 2-mm-thick slices. Using a calibration relationship between absorbed dose and the spin-spin relaxation rate (R2), we converted R2 images to dose images. MATLAB-based in-house programs were used for R2 estimation and dose comparison. Gamma-index analysis for the 3D data showed gamma values less than unity for 86% of the voxels. Through this study we accomplished the first application of polymer gel dosimetry for a true comparison between measured 3D dose distributions and LGP calculations for plans using multiple matrices for multiple targets.

  15. Development and operation of a computerized source controller for a gamma calibration well

    SciTech Connect

    Halliburton, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    In the 1950s, the need for an accurately reproducible, real-time gamma calibration facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was met with a manually operated radium source housed in a calibration well. This arrangement was quite satisfactory in the early days but was not able to keep pace with the increasing number of instruments necessary to support an expanding health physics program. Consequently, the hand crank was replaced by an electric motor in the early 1960s. This improvement made it possible to move the source at speeds up to 7 cm/s, resulting in a major increase in efficiency. This configuration served reliably for two decades but, by the 1980s, component aging and the growing scarcity of replacement parts led to the development of a third-generation source controller. The electric motor and vacuum-tube-driven power supply were replaced with a solid state power supply and a stepper motor interfaced to a microcomputer. The software written to operate the system is menu-driven, user-friendly, and provides the greatest flexibility and ease of use while minimizing learning time. The development and use of this control system will be discussed.

  16. Goddard contributions to the Los Alamos Conference on Transient Cosmic Gamma and X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Conference papers, covering the orgin and instrumentation for measuring the position of cosmic gamma ray bursts, are presented. Summaries cover gamma ray detectors, energy speectra, and the stellar super flare hypothesis.

  17. Runaway breakdown in strong electric field as a source of terrestrial gamma flashes and gamma bursts in lightning leader steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Zybin, K. P.; Medvedev, Yu. V.

    2007-01-01

    The new model of lightning step leader is proposed. It includes three main processes developing simultaneously in a strong electric field: conventional breakdown, effect of runaway electrons and runaway breakdown (RB). The theory of RB in strong electric field is developed. Comparison with the existing observational data shows that the model can serve as a background for the explanation of gamma bursts in step leader and TGF.

  18. TOWARD IDENTIFYING THE UNASSOCIATED GAMMA-RAY SOURCE 1FGL J1311.7-3429 WITH X-RAY AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K.; Yatsu, Y.; Kawai, N.; Urata, Y.; Tsai, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Totani, T.; Makiya, R.; Hanayama, H.; Miyaji, T.

    2012-10-01

    We present deep optical and X-ray follow-up observations of the bright unassociated Fermi-LAT gamma-ray source 1FGL J1311.7-3429. The source was already known as an unidentified EGRET source (3EG J1314-3431, EGR J1314-3417), hence its nature has remained uncertain for the past two decades. For the putative counterpart, we detected a quasi-sinusoidal optical modulation of {Delta}m {approx} 2 mag with a period of {approx_equal}1.5 hr in the Rc, r', and g' bands. Moreover, we found that the amplitude of the modulation and peak intensity changed by {approx}>1 mag and {approx}0.5 mag, respectively, over our total six nights of observations from 2012 March to May. Combined with Swift UVOT data, the optical-UV spectrum is consistent with a blackbody temperature, kT {approx_equal} 1 eV and the emission volume radius R{sub bb} {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} d{sub kpc} km (d{sub kpc} is the distance to the source in units of 1 kpc). In contrast, deep Suzaku observations conducted in 2009 and 2011 revealed strong X-ray flares with a light curve characterized with a power spectrum density of P(f) {proportional_to} f {sup -2.0{+-}0.4}, but the folded X-ray light curves suggest an orbital modulation also in X-rays. Together with the non-detection of a radio counterpart, and significant curved spectrum and non-detection of variability in gamma-rays, the source may be the second 'radio-quiet' gamma-ray emitting millisecond pulsar candidate after 1FGL J2339.7-0531, although the origin of flaring X-ray and optical variability remains an open question.

  19. Possible Nuclear Safeguards Applications: Workshop on Next-Generation Laser Compton Gamma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J. Matthew

    2016-11-17

    These are a set of slides for the development of a next-generation photon source white paper. The following topics are covered in these slides: Nuclear Safeguards; The Nuclear Fuel Cycle; Precise isotopic determination via NRF; UF6 Enrichment Assay; and Non-Destructive Assay of Spent Nuclear Fuel. In summary: A way to non-destructively measure precise isotopics of ~kg and larger samples has multiple uses in nuclear safeguards; Ideally this is a compact, fieldable device that can be used by international inspectors. Must be rugged and reliable; A next-generation source can be used as a testing ground for these techniques as technology develops.

  20. Multiple sources of passive stress relaxation in muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Linke, Wolfgang A; Leake, Mark C

    2004-08-21

    The forces developed during stretch of nonactivated muscle consist of velocity-sensitive (viscous/viscoelastic) and velocity-insensitive (elastic) components. At the myofibrillar level, the elastic-force component has been described in terms of the entropic-spring properties of the giant protein titin, but entropic elasticity cannot account for viscoelastic properties, such as stress relaxation. Here we examine the contribution of titin to passive stress relaxation of isolated rat-cardiac myofibrils depleted of actin by gelsolin treatment. Monte Carlo simulations show that, up to approximately 5 s after a stretch, the time course of stress relaxation can be described assuming unfolding of 1-2 immunoglobulin domains per titin molecule. For extended periods of stress relaxation, the simulations failed to correctly describe the myofibril data, suggesting that in situ, titin-Ig domains may be more stable than predicted in earlier single-molecule atomic-force-microscopy studies. The reasons behind this finding remain unknown; simply assuming a reduced unfolding probability of domains--an effect found here by AFM force spectroscopy on titin-Ig domains in the presence of a chaperone, alpha-B-crystallin--did not help correctly simulate the time course of stress relaxation. We conclude that myofibrillar stress relaxation likely has multiple sources. Evidence is provided that in intact myofibrils, an initial, rapid phase of stress relaxation results from viscous resistance due to the presence of actin filaments.

  1. Multiple sources of passive stress relaxation in muscle fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linke, Wolfgang A.; Leake, Mark C.

    2004-08-01

    The forces developed during stretch of nonactivated muscle consist of velocity-sensitive (viscous/viscoelastic) and velocity-insensitive (elastic) components. At the myofibrillar level, the elastic-force component has been described in terms of the entropic-spring properties of the giant protein titin, but entropic elasticity cannot account for viscoelastic properties, such as stress relaxation. Here we examine the contribution of titin to passive stress relaxation of isolated rat-cardiac myofibrils depleted of actin by gelsolin treatment. Monte Carlo simulations show that, up to ~5 s after a stretch, the time course of stress relaxation can be described assuming unfolding of 1-2 immunoglobulin domains per titin molecule. For extended periods of stress relaxation, the simulations failed to correctly describe the myofibril data, suggesting that in situ, titin-Ig domains may be more stable than predicted in earlier single-molecule atomic-force-microscopy studies. The reasons behind this finding remain unknown; simply assuming a reduced unfolding probability of domains—an effect found here by AFM force spectroscopy on titin-Ig domains in the presence of a chaperone, alpha-B-crystallin—did not help correctly simulate the time course of stress relaxation. We conclude that myofibrillar stress relaxation likely has multiple sources. Evidence is provided that in intact myofibrils, an initial, rapid phase of stress relaxation results from viscous resistance due to the presence of actin filaments.

  2. AGILE detection of an unidentified gamma-ray source at low Galactic latitude, AGLJ2251+6454

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Fioretti, V.; Piano, G.; Verrecchia, F.; Vercellone, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Striani, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Trois, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2015-03-01

    AGILE is detecting intense gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from an unidentified source, AGLJ2251+6454, at Galactic coordinates (l,b)=(110.63, 4.90) +/- 0.6 deg (95% stat.) +/- 0.1 deg (syst.) (R.A., Dec.= 342.86, 64.87 deg, J2000).

  3. Measuring the activity of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. V. Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of {sup 51}Cr is presented.

  4. VERITAS 2008-2009 MONITORING OF THE VARIABLE GAMMA-RAY SOURCE M 87

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Chow, Y. C.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Duke, C.

    2010-06-10

    M 87 is a nearby radio galaxy that is detected at energies ranging from radio to very high energy (VHE) gamma rays. Its proximity and its jet, misaligned from our line of sight, enable detailed morphological studies and extensive modeling at radio, optical, and X-ray energies. Flaring activity was observed at all energies, and multi-wavelength correlations would help clarify the origin of the VHE emission. In this paper, we describe a detailed temporal and spectral analysis of the VERITAS VHE gamma-ray observations of M 87 in 2008 and 2009. In the 2008 observing season, VERITAS detected an excess with a statistical significance of 7.2 standard deviations ({sigma}) from M 87 during a joint multi-wavelength monitoring campaign conducted by three major VHE experiments along with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. In 2008 February, VERITAS observed a VHE flare from M 87 occurring over a 4 day timespan. The peak nightly flux above 250 GeV was (1.14 {+-} 0.26) x 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which corresponded to 7.7% of the Crab Nebula flux. M 87 was marginally detected before this 4 day flare period, and was not detected afterward. Spectral analysis of the VERITAS observations showed no significant change in the photon index between the flare and pre-flare states. Shortly after the VHE flare seen by VERITAS, the Chandra X-ray Observatory detected the flux from the core of M 87 at a historical maximum, while the flux from the nearby knot HST-1 remained quiescent. Acciari et al. presented the 2008 contemporaneous VHE gamma-ray, Chandra X-ray, and Very Long Baseline Array radio observations which suggest the core as the most likely source of VHE emission, in contrast to the 2005 VHE flare that was simultaneous with an X-ray flare in the HST-1 knot. In 2009, VERITAS continued its monitoring of M 87 and marginally detected a 4.2{sigma} excess corresponding to a flux of {approx}1% of the Crab Nebula. No VHE flaring activity was observed in 2009.

  5. Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

    2012-05-14

    This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

  6. Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) seed oil is a rich source of gamma-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, R; Fernández, J; Pineda, M; Aguilar, M

    2007-04-01

    The antioxidant potential of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) extracts was studied. Different plant organs, including seeds, stems, leaves, and sepals, were analyzed with respect to their water-soluble antioxidant capacity, lipid-soluble antioxidant capacity, and tocopherol content, revealing that roselle seeds are a good source of lipid-soluble antioxidants, particularly gamma-tocopherol. Roselle seed oil was extracted and characterized, and its physicochemical parameters are summarized: acidity, 2.24%; peroxide index, 8.63 meq/kg; extinction coefficients at 232 (k(232)) and 270 nm (k(270)), 3.19 and 1.46, respectively; oxidative stability, 15.53 h; refractive index, 1.477; density, 0.92 kg/L; and viscosity, 15.9 cP. Roselle seed oil belongs to the linoleic/oleic category, its most abundant fatty acids being C18:2 (40.1%), C18:1 (28%), C16:0 (20%), C18:0 (5.3%), and C19:1 (1.7%). Sterols include beta-sitosterol (71.9%), campesterol (13.6%), Delta-5-avenasterol (5.9%), cholesterol (1.35%), and clerosterol (0.6%). Total tocopherols were detected at an average concentration of 2000 mg/kg, including alpha-tocopherol (25%), gamma-tocopherol (74.5%), and delta-tocopherol (0.5%). The global characteristics of roselle seed oil suggest that it could have important industrial applications, adding to the traditional use of roselle sepals in the elaboration of karkade tea.

  7. Timing and Fermi LAT Analysis of Four Millisecond Pulsars Discovered in Parkes Radio Searches of Gamma-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Paul S.; Ransom, Scott M.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Kerr, Matthew; Reynolds, John; Sarkissian, John; Freire, Paulo; Thankful Cromartie, H.; Barr, Ewan D.

    2016-01-01

    We present phase-connected timing solutions for four binary millisecond pulsars discovered in searches of Fermi LAT gamma-ray sources using the Parkes radio telescope. Follow-up timing observations of PSRs J0955-6150, J1012-4235, J1036-8317, and J1946-5403 have yielded timing models with precise orbital and astrometric parameters. For each pulsar, we also did a gamma-ray spectral analysis using LAT Pass 8 data and generated photon probabilities for use in a weighted H-test pulsation test. In all 4 cases, we detect significant gamma-ray pulsations, confirming the identification with the gamma-ray source originally targeted in the discovery observations. We describe the results of the pulse timing and gamma-ray spectral and timing analysis and the characteristics of each of the systems. The Fermi-LAT Collaboration acknowledges support for LAT development, operation and data analysis from NASA and DOE (United States), CEA/Irfu and IN2P3/CNRS (France), ASI and INFN (Italy), MEXT, KEK, and JAXA (Japan), and the K.A. Wallenberg Foundation, the Swedish Research Council and the National Space Board (Sweden). Science analysis support in the operations phase from INAF (Italy) and CNES (France) is also gratefully acknowledged. NRL participation was funded by NASA.

  8. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  9. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Hessels, J.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Sarkissian, J. E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  10. Regression models for the analysis of longitudinal Gaussian data from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Liam M; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2005-06-15

    We present a regression model for the joint analysis of longitudinal multiple source Gaussian data. Longitudinal multiple source data arise when repeated measurements are taken from two or more sources, and each source provides a measure of the same underlying variable and on the same scale. This type of data generally produces a relatively large number of observations per subject; thus estimation of an unstructured covariance matrix often may not be possible. We consider two methods by which parsimonious models for the covariance can be obtained for longitudinal multiple source data. The methods are illustrated with an example of multiple informant data arising from a longitudinal interventional trial in psychiatry.

  11. Radio measurements in the fields of gamma-ray sources. III - The star formation region Rho-Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Sieber, W.; Harwit, M.; Ozel, M. E.; Younis, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    The star-forming region Rho-Ophiuchi, which has been detected as a COS-B gamma-ray source, 2CG 353+16, is observed in the radio continuum at wavelengths between 1.3 cm and 21 cm. Various known and new radio sources are identified. Time variability on scales of weeks to years for two sources can be assessed with high confidence levels. The H II region origin for Oph 1, Oph 6, Oph 9 and Oph 10 is ruled out. Five new radio sources are proposed as H II region candidates on the basis of their flat frequency spectrum.

  12. Medicaid program; withdrawal of determination of average manufacturer prices, multiple source drug definition, and upper limits for multiple source drugs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-11-15

    This final rule withdraws two provisions from the "Medicaid Program; Prescription Drugs'' final rule (referred to hereafter as "AMP final rule") published in the July 17, 2007 Federal Register. The provisions we are withdrawing are as follows: The determination of average manufacturer price, and the Federal upper limits for multiple source drugs. We are also withdrawing the definition of "multiple source drug" as it was revised in the ``Medicaid Program; Multiple Source Drug Definition'' final rule published in the October 7, 2008 Federal Register.

  13. Performance evaluation of a multiple-scattering Compton imager for distribution of prompt gamma-rays in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Younghak; Lee, Wonho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate the performance of a multiple-scattering Compton imager (MSCI) to measure prompt gamma-rays emitted during proton therapy. Because prompt gamma-rays are generated simultaneously during the proton beam delivery, the falloff position of the Bragg peak of the proton beam can be determined from the distribution of prompt gamma-rays. The detection system was designed using three CdZnTe detector layers that can track radiation of unknown energy on the basis of effective Compton scattering events. The simple back-projection, filtered back-projection, and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithms were applied for the reconstructed Compton images. The falloff positions of the Bragg peaks determined from individual MSCIs were compared with the theoretical values calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. Moreover, the performance of the MSCI was compared with that of a previously developed system based on a slit collimator gamma camera. In summary, the MSCI with the MLEM reconstruction algorithm was better than the other reconstruction methods in terms of the falloff position of the Bragg peak, the angular resolution, and the signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; D'Ammando, F.; Berdyugin, A.; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Raiteri, C. M.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reinthal, R.; Richards, J. L.; Verrecchia, F.; Villata, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes observed the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9σ. The integral flux above 150 GeV is estimated to be (2.0 ± 0.5) per cent of the Crab nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100 MeV < E < 100 GeV) γ-ray observations from Fermi-Large Area Telescope to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34 ± 0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ˜3 × 1014-1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.

  15. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.

    1997-03-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO2 laser may be used for prototype LSS demonstration. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 Å) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ˜1019photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 1022 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO2 laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact "table-top" LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  16. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-03-28

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes ob- served the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskap- sakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9 σ. The integral flux above 150GeV is estimated to be (2.0±0.5) per cent of the Crab Nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energy (HE, 100MeV < E < 100GeV) γ-ray observations from Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34±0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the OVRO (Owens Valley Radio Observatory) telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ~ 3×1014-1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.

  17. Investigating the peculiar emission from the new VHE gamma-ray source H1722+119

    DOE PAGES

    Ahnen, M. L.

    2016-03-28

    The Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes ob- served the BL Lac object H1722+119 (redshift unknown) for six consecutive nights between 2013 May 17 and 22, for a total of 12.5 h. The observations were triggered by high activity in the optical band measured by the KVA (Kungliga Vetenskap- sakademien) telescope. The source was for the first time detected in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) γ-ray band with a statistical significance of 5.9 σ. The integral flux above 150GeV is estimated to be (2.0±0.5) per cent of the Crab Nebula flux. We used contemporaneous high energymore » (HE, 100MeV < E < 100GeV) γ-ray observations from Fermi-LAT (Large Area Telescope) to estimate the redshift of the source. Within the framework of the current extragalactic background light models, we estimate the redshift to be z = 0.34±0.15. Additionally, we used contemporaneous X-ray to radio data collected by the instruments on board the Swift satellite, the KVA, and the OVRO (Owens Valley Radio Observatory) telescope to study multifrequency characteristics of the source. We found no significant temporal variability of the flux in the HE and VHE bands. The flux in the optical and radio wavebands, on the other hand, did vary with different patterns. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of H1722+119 shows surprising behaviour in the ~ 3×1014-1018 Hz frequency range. It can be modelled using an inhomogeneous helical jet synchrotron self-Compton model.« less

  18. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1996-11-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power CO{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps CO{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 {angstrom}) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately} 10{sup 19} photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to the e-beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 10{sup 22} photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO{sub 2} laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact ``table-top`` LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  19. Prospects for compact high-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray and gamma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1997-01-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high- brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the laser synchrotron source (LSS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high- brightness electron beam and the high-power C0{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10 GW, 100 ps C0{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10 ps, 0.5 nC, 50 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of collimated 4.7 keV (2.6 A) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately}10{sup 19} photons/sec, will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectra is tunable proportionally to the e- beam energy. A rational short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to the 10{sup 22} photon/sec level, after the ongoing ATF C0{sub 2} laser upgrade to 5 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps is realized. In the future, exploiting the promising approach of a high-gradient laser wake field accelerator, a compact ``table- top`` LSS of monochromatic gamma radiation may become feasible.

  20. OBSERVATION OF TeV GAMMA RAYS FROM THE UNIDENTIFIED SOURCE HESS J1841-055 WITH THE ARGO-YBJ EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, B.; Catalanotti, S.; Bernardini, P.; D'Amone, A.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, Y.; Bolognino, I.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Calabrese Melcarne, A. K.; Cardarelli, R.; Cattaneo, C.; Chen, T. L.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Ali Staiti, G.; Collaboration: ARGO-YBJ Collaboration; and others

    2013-04-20

    We report the observation of a very high energy {gamma}-ray source whose position is coincident with HESS J1841-055. This source has been observed for 4.5 years by the ARGO-YBJ experiment from 2007 November to 2012 July. Its emission is detected with a statistical significance of 5.3 standard deviations. Parameterizing the source shape with a two-dimensional Gaussian function, we estimate an extension {sigma}=(0.40{sup +0.32}{sub -0.22}){sup o}, which is consistent with the HESS measurement. The observed energy spectrum is dN/dE = (9.0 {+-} 1.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13}(E/5 TeV){sup -2.32{+-}0.23} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1}, in the energy range 0.9-50 TeV. The integral {gamma}-ray flux above 1 TeV is 1.3 {+-} 0.4 Crab, which is 3.2 {+-} 1.0 times the flux derived by HESS. The differences in the flux determination between HESS and ARGO-YBJ and possible counterparts at other wavelengths are discussed.

  1. A search for sources of ultra high energy gamma rays at air shower energies with Ooty EAS array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonwar, S. C.; Gopalakrishnan, N. V.; Sreekantan, B. V.

    1985-01-01

    A 24 detector extensive air shower array is being operated at Ootacamund (2200 m altitude, 11.4 deg N latitude) in southern India to search for sources of Cosmic gamma rays of energies greater then 5 x 10 to the 13th power eV. The angular resolution of the array has been experimentally estimated to be better than about 2 deg. Since June '84, nearly 2.5 million showers have been collected and their arrival directions determined. These showers are being studied to search for very high energy gamma ray emission from interesting astrophysical objects such as Cygnus X-3, Crab pulsar and Geminga.

  2. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Horack, John M.; Lestrade, John Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described.

  3. Fermi-LAT detection of a gamma-ray flaring source in the vicinity of PKS 0507+17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Orienti, M.

    2013-04-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed an increasing gamma-ray flux from a source positionally consistent with PKS 0507+17 (also known as 2FGL J0509.9+1802, Nolan et al. 2012, ApJS, 199, 31; R.A.= 05h10m02.3691s, Dec.= +18d00m41.582s, J2000.0, Johnston et al. 1995, AJ, 110, 880), a flat spectrum radio quasar at redshift z = 0.416 (Perlman et al.

  4. SU-E-I-79: Source Geometry Dependence of Gamma Well-Counter Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Belanger, A; Kijewski, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of liquid sample volume and geometry on counting efficiency in a gamma well-counter, and to assess the relative contributions of sample geometry and self-attenuation. Gamma wellcounters are standard equipment in clinical and preclinical studies, for measuring patient blood radioactivity and quantifying animal tissue uptake for tracer development and other purposes. Accurate measurements are crucial. Methods: Count rates were measured for aqueous solutions of 99m- Tc at four liquid volume values in a 1-cm-diam tube and at six volume values in a 2.2-cm-diam vial. Total activity was constant for all volumes, and data were corrected for decay. Count rates from a point source in air, supported by a filter paper, were measured at seven heights between 1.3 and 5.7 cm from the bottom of a tube. Results: Sample volume effects were larger for the tube than for the vial. For the tube, count efficiency relative to a 1-cc volume ranged from 1.05 at 0.05 cc to 0.84 at 3 cc. For the vial, relative count efficiency ranged from 1.02 at 0.05 cc to 0.87 at 15 cc. For the point source, count efficiency relative to 1.3 cm from the tube bottom ranged from 0.98 at 1.8 cm to 0.34 at 5.7 cm. The relative efficiency of a 3-cc liquid sample in a tube compared to a 1-cc sample is 0.84; the average relative efficiency for the solid sample in air between heights in the tube corresponding to the surfaces of those volumes (1.3 and 4.8 cm) is 0.81, implying that the major contribution to efficiency loss is geometry, rather than attenuation. Conclusion: Volume-dependent correction factors should be used for accurate quantitation radioactive of liquid samples. Solid samples should be positioned at the bottom of the tube for maximum count efficiency.

  5. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell Gamma Knife: testing multisource configurations with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Al-Dweri, Feras M O; Lallena, Antonio M

    2004-08-07

    A simplification of the source channel geometry of the Leksell Gamma Knife (GK), recently proposed by the authors and checked for a single source configuration (Al-Dweri F M O, Lallena A M and Vilches M 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2687-703), has been used to calculate the dose distributions along the x, y and z axes in a water phantom with a diameter of 160 mm, for different configurations of the Gamma Knife, including 201, 150 and 102 unplugged sources. The code PENELOPE (v. 2001) has been used to perform the Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the output factors for the 14, 8 and 4 mm helmets have been calculated. The results found for the dose profiles show a qualitatively good agreement with previous ones obtained with EGS4 and PENELOPE (v. 2000) codes and with the predictions of GammaPlan. The output factors obtained with our model agree within the statistical uncertainties with those calculated with the same Monte Carlo codes and with those measured with different techniques. Owing to the accuracy of the results obtained and to the reduction in the computational time with respect to full geometry simulations (larger than a factor 15), this simplified model opens the possibility of using Monte Carlo tools for planning purposes in the Gamma Knife.

  6. A simplified model of the source channel of the Leksell Gamma Knife®: testing multisource configurations with PENELOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Dweri, Feras M. O.; Lallena, Antonio M.

    2004-08-01

    A simplification of the source channel geometry of the Leksell Gamma Knife® (GK), recently proposed by the authors and checked for a single source configuration (Al-Dweri F M O, Lallena A M and Vilches M 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 2687-703), has been used to calculate the dose distributions along the x, y and z axes in a water phantom with a diameter of 160 mm, for different configurations of the Gamma Knife, including 201, 150 and 102 unplugged sources. The code PENELOPE (v. 2001) has been used to perform the Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the output factors for the 14, 8 and 4 mm helmets have been calculated. The results found for the dose profiles show a qualitatively good agreement with previous ones obtained with EGS4 and PENELOPE (v. 2000) codes and with the predictions of GammaPlan®. The output factors obtained with our model agree within the statistical uncertainties with those calculated with the same Monte Carlo codes and with those measured with different techniques. Owing to the accuracy of the results obtained and to the reduction in the computational time with respect to full geometry simulations (larger than a factor 15), this simplified model opens the possibility of using Monte Carlo tools for planning purposes in the Gamma Knife®.

  7. GammaProteobacteria as a potential bioindicator of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Niepceron, Maïté; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Crampon, Marc; Portet-Koltalo, Florence; Akpa-Vinceslas, Marthe; Legras, Marc; Bru, David; Bureau, Fabrice; Bodilis, Josselin

    2013-09-01

    The impact of a multiple contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was studied on permanent grassland soil, historically presenting low contamination (i.e. less than 1 mg kg(-1)). Soil microcosms were spiked at 300 mg kg(-1) with either single or a mixture of seven PAHs. While total dissipation of the phenanthrene was reached in under 90 days, only 60% of the PAH mixture were dissipated after 90 days. Interestingly, after 30 days, the abundance of the GammaProteobacteria class (assessed by qPCR) become significantly higher in microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. In addition, the specific abundance of the cultivable Pseudomonas spp., which belong to the GammaProteobacteria class, increased earlier and transiently (after 8 days) in the microcosms spiked with the PAH mixture. Consequently, we propose to use the GammaProteobacteria as a bioindicator to detect the impact on the bacterial community of a multiple contamination by PAHs in agricultural soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of EEG and MEG in source localization of induced human gamma-band oscillations during visual stimulus.

    PubMed

    Mideksa, K G; Hoogenboom, N; Hellriegel, H; Krause, H; Schnitzler, A; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2015-08-01

    High frequency gamma oscillations are indications of information processing in cortical neuronal networks. Recently, non-invasive detection of these oscillations have become one of the main research areas in magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies. The aim of this study, which is a continuation of our previous MEG study, is to compare the capability of the two modalities (EEG and MEG) in localizing the source of the induced gamma activity due to a visual stimulus, using a spatial filtering technique known as dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS). To do this, the brain activity was recorded using simultaneous MEG and EEG measurement and the data were analyzed with respect to time, frequency, and location of the strongest response. The spherical head modeling technique, such as, the three-shell concentric spheres and an overlapping sphere (local sphere) have been used as a forward model to calculate the external electromagnetic potentials and fields recorded by the EEG and MEG, respectively. Our results from the time-frequency analysis, at the sensor level, revealed that the parieto-occipital electrodes and sensors from both modalities showed a clear and sustained gamma-band activity throughout the post-stimulus duration and that both modalities showed similar strongest gamma-band peaks. It was difficult to interpret the spatial pattern of the gamma-band oscillatory response on the scalp, at the sensor level, for both modalities. However, the source analysis result revealed that MEG3 sensor type, which measure the derivative along the longitude, showed the source more focally and close to the visual cortex (cuneus) as compared to that of the EEG.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Unidentified gamma-ray sources. IV. X-ray (Paggi+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, A.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Smith, H. A.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.; Tosti, G.; Funk, S.

    2013-11-01

    The initial sample considered in our analysis is constituted by the 299 unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) in the 2FGL catalog that do not present any γ-ray analysis flag (Nolan et al. 2012, Cat. J/ApJS/199/31). After Fermi was launched, the Swift XRT Survey of Fermi Unassociated Sources was started in order to perform follow-up observations of the unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs) in an attempt to find their potential X-ray counterparts (PI: A. Falcone). We analyze all data collected between the beginning of the follow-up program until 2013 March 31. We note that 203 of the 205 UGSs that constitute our sample have been also observed in the optical and UV by UVOT. We then produced for each X-ray observation the corresponding merged UVOT event files, adopting standard procedures. (6 data files).

  10. Open-source hardware and software and web application for gamma dose rate network operation.

    PubMed

    Luff, R; Zähringer, M; Harms, W; Bleher, M; Prommer, B; Stöhlker, U

    2014-08-01

    The German Federal Office for Radiation Protection operates a network of about 1800 gamma dose rate stations as a part of the national emergency preparedness plan. Each of the six network centres is capable of operating the network alone. Most of the used hardware and software have been developed in-house under open-source license. Short development cycles and close cooperation between developers and users ensure robustness, transparency and fast maintenance procedures, thus avoiding unnecessary complex solutions. This also reduces the overall costs of the network operation. An easy-to-expand web interface has been developed to make the complete system available to other interested network operators in order to increase cooperation between different countries. The interface is also regularly in use for education during scholarships of trainees supported, e.g. by the 'International Atomic Energy Agency' to operate a local area dose rate monitoring test network. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  12. Possible Class of Nearby Gamma-Ray Burst/Gravitational Wave Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    A possible subclass of gamma-ray bursts - those with few, wide pulses, spectral lags of order one to several seconds, and soft spectra - has been identified. Their Log[N]-Log[Fp] distribution approximates a -3/2 power-law, suggesting homogeneity and relatively nearby sources. These mostly dim bursts account for approximately 50% of the BATSE sample of long bursts near that instrument s trigger threshold, suggesting that this subluminous class constitutes a more common variety than the more familiar burst sources which lie at truly cosmological distances. Theoretical scenarios predicted such a class, motivated by their exemplar GRB 980425 (SN 1998bw) lying at a distance of approximately 38 Mpc. The observations are explained by invoking off-axis viewing of the GRB jet and/or bulk Lorentz factors of order a few. Long-lag bursts show a tendency to concentrate near the Supergalactic Plane with a quadrupole moment of -0.10 plus or minus 0.04, similar to that for SNe type Ib/c within the same volume. The rate of the observed subluminous bursts is of order 1/4 that of SNe Ib/c. Evidence for a sequential relationship between SNe Ib/c and GRBs is critiqued for two cases, as simultaneity of the SN and GRB events may be important for detection of the expected gravitational wave signal; at most, SN to GRB delays appear to be a few days. SN asymmetries and ultrarelativistic GRB jets suggest the possibility of rapid rotation in the pre-collapse objects, a primary condition required for highly nonaxisymmetric SN collapse to produce strong gravitational waves.

  13. Multiple myeloma and multiple plasmacytomas associated with free gamma heavy chain, free kappa light chain and IgGk paraproteins: an unusual triple gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Deighan, William I; O'Kane, Maurice J; McNicholl, Feargal P; Keren, David F

    2016-11-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia that is becoming more prevalent in an increasingly ageing population. It is a complex disease with clinical phases ranging from the premalignant monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to asymptomatic (smouldering) myeloma and then symptomatic myeloma; the latter occasionally terminating in the clonal proliferation of plasma cells outside the bone marrow. We present a patient whose clonally evolved disease from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to multiple myeloma demonstrated the presence of an unusual combination of monoclonal immunoproteins. Capillary electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of three paraproteins in the gamma region (γ-region), two of which were additional to the IgGk paraprotein which migrated in the slow γ-region at initial diagnosis. Subsequent isotypic identification of the new paraproteins was not possible by immunotyping and initial immunofixation studies failed to definitively characterize the monoclonal proteins. After reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol, two paraproteins were detected by both capillary and gel electrophoresis. However, only immunofixation was able to resolve three distinct monoclonal bands, confirming the presence of free monoclonal kappa light chains in the mid-gamma region and free monoclonal heavy chains in the fast gamma region. Triple gammopathies in themselves are uncommon; this case presents a very unusual combination of paraproteins which required various electrophoretical and immunochemical techniques to identify and characterize them. The change of electrophoretic signature from the monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance phase to the diagnosis of multiple myeloma suggested that a number of genetically distinct subclones were present in the pretreatment clonal evolution of the disease.

  14. Simulations of a spectral gamma-ray logging tool response to a surface source distribution on the borehole wall

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.; Conaway, J.G.

    1991-12-01

    We have developed Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates simulation models for the large-detector spectral gamma-ray (SGR) logging tool in use at the Nevada Test Site. Application of the simulation models produced spectra for source layers on the borehole wall, either from potassium-bearing mudcakes or from plate-out of radon daughter products. Simulations show that the shape and magnitude of gamma-ray spectra from sources distributed on the borehole wall depend on radial position with in the air-filled borehole as well as on hole diameter. No such dependence is observed for sources uniformly distributed in the formation. In addition, sources on the borehole wall produce anisotropic angular fluxes at the higher scattered energies and at the source energy. These differences in borehole effects and in angular flux are important to the process of correcting SGR logs for the presence of potassium mudcakes; they also suggest a technique for distinguishing between spectral contributions from formation sources and sources on the borehole wall. These results imply the existence of a standoff effect not present for spectra measured in air-filled boreholes from formation sources. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  15. VERITAS and Fermi-LAT observations of new TeV gamma-ray sources discovered by HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John W.; Holder, Jamie; Park, Nahee; Taboada, Ignacio F.

    2017-08-01

    The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) observatory recently published their second source catalog (2HWC) with over a year of observations at full sensitivity to gamma rays with energies between hundreds of GeV and tens of TeV. Sixteen of the 39 HAWC sources were found to be at least one degree away from any previously known TeV source, representing exciting targets for further study. Here we report on 12 of these unassociated HAWC sources using observations at higher spatial resolution with both VERITAS and Fermi-LAT. We use 8 years of LAT data at energies above 10 GeV and varying exposures with VERITAS. In the case of 2HWC J1953+294, VERITAS finds weak gamma-ray emission from the region and there is no LAT detection. This new TeV source is associated with the supernova remnant DA 495. For the other unassociated HAWC sources no VERITAS or LAT counterpart is found, but the upper limits from our observations can help to constrain the spectrum and spatial extension of the HAWC sources. Additionally, we studied 2HWC J1930+188 for which VERITAS had previously detected a TeV counterpart associated with the remnant G54.1+0.3. Our updated Fermi-LAT analysis also detects emission from this region, consistent with previous models of a pulsar wind nebula origin. Future multi-instrument studies of new HAWC sources promise to uncover the origins of additional cosmic accelerators.

  16. 40 CFR 63.1356 - Sources with multiple emission limits or monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry Other § 63.1356 Sources with multiple emission limits or monitoring...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1356 - Sources with multiple emission limits or monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From the Portland Cement Manufacturing Industry Other § 63.1356 Sources with multiple emission limits or monitoring...

  18. High-entropy fireballs and jets in gamma-ray burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two mechanisms whereby compact coalescing binaries can produce relatively 'clean' fireballs via neutrino-antineutrino annihilation are proposed. Preejected mass due to tidal heating will collimate the fireball into jets. The resulting anisotropic gamma-ray emission can be efficient and intense enough to provide an acceptable model for gamma-ray bursts, if these originate at cosmological distances.

  19. 3D position of radiation sources using an automated gamma camera and ML algorithm with energy-dependent response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonho; Wehe, David

    2004-09-01

    Portable γ-ray imaging systems operating from 100keV to 3MeV are used in nuclear medicine, astrophysics and industrial applications. 2D images of γ-rays are common in many fields using radiation-detection systems (Appl. Opt. 17 (3) (1978) 337; IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. Ns- 31 (1984) 771; IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS- 44 (3) (1997) 911). In this work, the 3D position of a radiation source is determined by a portable gamma-ray imaging system. 2D gamma-ray images were obtained from different positions of the gamma camera and the third dimension, the distance between the detector and the radiation source, was calculated using triangulation. The imaging system consists of a 4×4 array of CsI(Tl) detectors coupled to photodiode detectors that are mounted on an automated table which can precisely position the angular axis of the camera. Lead shields the detector array from the background radiation. Additionally, a CCD camera is attached to the top of the gamma camera and provides coincident 2D visual information. The inferred distances from the center of the two measurement points and a radiation source had less than a 3% error within a range of 3m. The radiation image from the gamma camera and the visual image from CCD camera are superimposed into one combined image using a maximum-likelihood (ML) algorithm to make the image more precise. The response functions for the ML algorithm depend on the energy of incident radiation, and are obtained from both experiments and simulations. The energy-dependent response functions are shown to yield better imaging performance compared with the fixed energy response function commonly used previously.

  20. Human Health Risk Implications of Multiple Sources of Faecal Indicator Bacteria in a Recreational Waterbody

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluate the influence of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrat...

  1. Human Health Risk Implications of Multiple Sources of Faecal Indicator Bacteria in a Recreational Waterbody

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluate the influence of multiple sources of faecal indicator bacteria in recreational water bodies on potential human health risk by considering waters impacted by human and animal sources, human and non-pathogenic sources, and animal and non-pathogenic sources. We illustrat...

  2. Development of a Monte Carlo multiple source model for inclusion in a dose calculation auditing tool.

    PubMed

    Faught, Austin M; Davidson, Scott E; Fontenot, Jonas; Kry, Stephen F; Etzel, Carol; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Followill, David S

    2017-09-01

    The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) (formerly the Radiological Physics Center) has reported varying levels of agreement in their anthropomorphic phantom audits. There is reason to believe one source of error in this observed disagreement is the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithms and heterogeneity corrections used. To audit this component of the radiotherapy treatment process, an independent dose calculation tool is needed. Monte Carlo multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beams were commissioned based on measurement of central axis depth dose data for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field size and dose profiles for a 40 × 40 cm(2) field size. The models were validated against open field measurements consisting of depth dose data and dose profiles for field sizes ranging from 3 × 3 cm(2) to 30 × 30 cm(2) . The models were then benchmarked against measurements in IROC-H's anthropomorphic head and neck and lung phantoms. Validation results showed 97.9% and 96.8% of depth dose data passed a ±2% Van Dyk criterion for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Dose profile comparisons showed an average agreement using a ±2%/2 mm criterion of 98.0% and 99.0% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Phantom plan comparisons were evaluated using ±3%/2 mm gamma criterion, and averaged passing rates between Monte Carlo and measurements were 87.4% and 89.9% for 6 MV and 10 MV models respectively. Accurate multiple source models for Elekta 6 MV and 10 MV x-ray beams have been developed for inclusion in an independent dose calculation tool for use in clinical trial audits. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  3. Chandra X-Ray Observations of the Two Brightest Unidentified High Galactic Latitude Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, C. C.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Giroletti, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present Chandra ACIS-I X-ray observations of 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, the two brightest high Galactic latitude (absolute value (beta) >10 deg) gamma-ray sources from the three-month Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) bright source list that are still unidentified. Both were also detected previously by EGRET, and despite dedicated multi-wavelength follow-up, they are still not associated with established classes of gamma-ray emitters like pulsars or radio-loud active galactic nuclei. X-ray sources found in the ACIS-I fields of view are cataloged, and their basic properties are determined. These are discussed as candidate counterparts to 0FGL J1311.9-3419 and 0FGL J1653.4-0200, with particular emphasis on the brightest of the 9 and 13 Chandra sources detected within the respective Fermi-LAT 95% confidence regions. Further follow-up studies, including optical photometric and spectroscopic observations, are necessary to identify these X-ray candidate counterparts in order to ultimately reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray objects.

  4. The design of a source to simulate the gamma-ray spectrum emitted by a radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reier, M.

    1972-01-01

    A simulated source was designed to duplicate the gamma spectrum of a uniform cylindrical 2200-watt Pu02 radioisotope thermoelectric generator containing 81% Pu-238 and 1.2 ppm Pu-236. Gamma rays from the decay of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and the 0-18(alpha,n)Ne-21 reaction were catalogued in broad energy groups. Two 46- and one 22-mc Th-228 sources provided simulation at various times in the life of the fuel capsule up to 18 years, which covers the time span of an outer planet mission. Emission from Th-228 represents the overwhelming contribution of the gamma spectrum after the first few years. The sources, in the form of 13-inch rods, were placed in a concentric hole in a cylinder of depleted uranium, which provided shielding equivalent to the self-shielding of the fuel capsule. The thickness of the U-238 cylinder (0.55cm) was determined by Monte Carlo calculations to insure that the spectrum emerging from the simulated source matched that of the fuel capsule.

  5. The Second Catalog of Flaring Gamma-Ray Sources from the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, S.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Conrad, J.; Costantin, D.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desai, A.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Donaggio, B.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giomi, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, L.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-09-01

    We present the second catalog of flaring gamma-ray sources (2FAV) detected with the Fermi All-sky Variability Analysis (FAVA), a tool that blindly searches for transients over the entire sky observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. With respect to the first FAVA catalog, this catalog benefits from a larger data set, the latest LAT data release (Pass 8), as well as from an improved analysis that includes likelihood techniques for a more precise localization of the transients. Applying this analysis to the first 7.4 years of Fermi observations, and in two separate energy bands 0.1–0.8 GeV and 0.8–300 GeV, a total of 4547 flares were detected with significance greater than 6σ (before trials), on the timescale of one week. Through spatial clustering of these flares, 518 variable gamma-ray sources were identified. Based on positional coincidence, likely counterparts have been found for 441 sources, mostly among the blazar class of active galactic nuclei. For 77 2FAV sources, no likely gamma-ray counterpart has been found. For each source in the catalog, we provide the time, location, and spectrum of each flaring episode. Studying the spectra of the flares, we observe a harder-when-brighter behavior for flares associated with blazars, with the exception of BL Lac flares detected in the low-energy band. The photon indexes of the flares are never significantly smaller than 1.5. For a leptonic model, and under the assumption of isotropy, this limit suggests that the spectrum of freshly accelerated electrons is never harder than p∼ 2.

  6. CLASSIFICATION AND RANKING OF FERMI LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES FROM THE 3FGL CATALOG USING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H.; Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M.; Falcone, A. D.

    2016-03-20

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies.

  7. Classification and Ranking of Fermi LAT Gamma-ray Sources from the 3FGL Catalog using Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Xu, H.; Yu, P. L. H.; Salvetti, D.; Marelli, M.; Falcone, A. D.

    2016-03-01

    We apply a number of statistical and machine learning techniques to classify and rank gamma-ray sources from the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Source Catalog (3FGL), according to their likelihood of falling into the two major classes of gamma-ray emitters: pulsars (PSR) or active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Using 1904 3FGL sources that have been identified/associated with AGNs (1738) and PSR (166), we train (using 70% of our sample) and test (using 30%) our algorithms and find that the best overall accuracy (>96%) is obtained with the Random Forest (RF) technique, while using a logistic regression (LR) algorithm results in only marginally lower accuracy. We apply the same techniques on a subsample of 142 known gamma-ray pulsars to classify them into two major subcategories: young (YNG) and millisecond pulsars (MSP). Once more, the RF algorithm has the best overall accuracy (∼90%), while a boosted LR analysis comes a close second. We apply our two best models (RF and LR) to the entire 3FGL catalog, providing predictions on the likely nature of unassociated sources, including the likely type of pulsar (YNG or MSP). We also use our predictions to shed light on the possible nature of some gamma-ray sources with known associations (e.g., binaries, supernova remnants/pulsar wind nebulae). Finally, we provide a list of plausible X-ray counterparts for some pulsar candidates, obtained using Swift, Chandra, and XMM. The results of our study will be of interest both for in-depth follow-up searches (e.g., pulsar) at various wavelengths and for broader population studies.

  8. Search for TeV gamma-ray sources in the galactic plane with the HAWC observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao

    Cosmic rays, with an energy density of ˜ 1eVcm--3, play an important role in the evolution of our Galaxy. Very high energy (TeV) gamma rays provide unique information about the acceleration sites of Galactic cosmic rays. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is an all-sky surveying instrument sensitive to gamma rays from 100,GeV to 100,TeV with a 2steradian instantaneous field of view and a duty cycle of >95%. The array is located in Sierra Negra, Mexico at an elevation of 4,100m and was inaugurated in March 2015. Thanks to its modular design, science operation began in Summer 2013 with one third of the array. Using this data, a survey of the inner Galaxy region of Galactic longitude l ∈ [+15°, +50°] and latitude b ∈ [--4°, +4°] is performed. To address the ambiguities arising from unresolved sources in the data, a maximum likelihood technique is used to identify point source candidates. Ten sources and candidate sources are identified in this analysis. Eight of these are associated with known TeV sources but not all have differential fluxes compatible with previous measurements. Three sources are detected with significances >5sigma after accounting for statistical trials, and are associated with known TeV sources. With data taken with the full array and improved reconstruction algorithms, the significance on the Crab nebula increases from 3.1sigma√day to 5.5sigma√day, which allows more sensitive sky surveys and more precise spectral and morphological analyses on individual sources.

  9. The Tropical Cyclones as the Possible Sources of Gamma Emission in the Earth's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, S. I.; Sharkov, E. A.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    [*S. I. Klimov*] (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-1100; Fax: +7 (495) 333-1248; e-mail: sklimov@iki.rssi.ru)): E. A. Sharkov (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-1366; Fax: +7 (495) 333-1248; e-mail: e.sharkov@mail.ru): L. M. Zelenyi (Space Research Institute [IKI] of RAS; Profsoyuznaya 84/32, 117997 GSP-7 Moscow, Russia; Tel: +7 (495) 333-2588; Fax: +7 (495) 333-3311; e-mail: lzelenyi@iki.rssi.ru ): The tropical cyclones (TC) are the strongest sources of thunderstorm activity (and, correspondingly, electromagnetic activity in the wide frequency range) in the Earth's atmosphere. The area dimensions of active region comprise to 1000 km and they achieve vertical development to 16-20 km with speeds of the displacement of the charged drops of water of up to 30 m/s. In the work are evaluated the physical mechanisms of the possibility of generation by TC of gamma emission (TCGE), which can be fixed from the low-orbital spacecraft of the type of the potential Russian micro-satellite Chibis-M (MS) [Zelenyi, et al, Walter de Gruter, Berlin, New York, p. 443-451, 2005]. The study of the new physical mechanisms of the electrical discharges in the atmosphere is basic scientific task Chibis- M [Angarov et al. Wissenschaft und Technik Verlag, Berlin, 2009, p. 69-72]. Complex of scientific instruments of the Chibis-M (overall mass of 12,5 kg) including the instruments: - X-ray - gamma detector (range of X-ray and gamma emission - 50-500 keV), - UV detector (range UV - emission - 300-450 nm), - radiofrequency analyzer (20 - 50 MHz). - digital camber of optical range (spatial resolution 300 m). - plasma-wave complex (0.1-40 kHz), it can be used also for the TCGE study. Delivery Chibis-M into orbit, close to the ISS orbit is intended to carry out in second-half 2010. Micro-satellite "Chibis-M" now designed in IKI. Total mass "Chibis

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 8yr INTEGRAL/IBIS soft gamma-ray source obs. (Bird+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; Fiocchi, M.; Sguera, V.; Bassani, L.; Hill, A. B.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    2016-04-01

    Here we report an all-sky soft gamma-ray source catalog based on IBIS observations performed during the first 1000 orbits of INTEGRAL. The database for the construction of the source list consists of all good-quality data available, from the launch in 2002, up to the end of 2010. This corresponds to ~110Ms of scientific public observations, with a concentrated coverage on the Galactic Plane and extragalactic deep exposures. This new catalog includes 939 sources above a 4.5σ significance threshold detected in the 17-100keV energy band, of which 120 sources represent previously undiscovered soft gamma-ray emitters. The source positions are determined, mean fluxes are provided in two main energy bands, and these are both reported together with the overall source exposure. Indicative levels of variability are provided, and outburst times and durations are given for transient sources. A comparison is made with previous IBIS catalogs and catalogs from other similar missions. (2 data files).

  11. A localization model to localize multiple sources using Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Joshua Rolv

    Accurate localization of a sound source in a room setting is important in both psychoacoustics and architectural acoustics. Binaural models have been proposed to explain how the brain processes and utilizes the interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) of sound waves arriving at the ears of a listener in determining source location. Recent work shows that applying Bayesian methods to this problem is proving fruitful. In this thesis, pink noise samples are convolved with head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) and compared to combinations of one and two anechoic speech signals convolved with different HRTFs or binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) to simulate room positions. Through exhaustive calculation of Bayesian posterior probabilities and using a maximal likelihood approach, model selection will determine the number of sources present, and parameter estimation will result in azimuthal direction of the source(s).

  12. Sediment source attribution from multiple land use systems with CSIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, C.; Birkholz, A.; Meusburger, K.; Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Mabit, L.

    2015-08-01

    As sediment loads impact freshwater systems and infrastructure, their origin in complex landscape systems is of crucial importance for optimization of catchment management. We differentiated sediment source contribution to a lowland river in Central Switzerland in using compound specific stable isotopes analysis (CSIA). We found a clear distinction of sediment sources originating from forest and agricultural land use. We suggest to generally reduce uncertainty of sediment source attribution, in (i) aiming for approaches with least possible data complexity to reduce analytical effort as well as refraining from undetected source attribution and/or tracer degradation obscured by complex high data demanding modelling approaches, (ii) to use compound content (in our case long chain fatty acid (FA)) rather than soil organic matter content when converting isotopic signature to soil contribution and (iii) to restrict evaluation to the long-chain FAs (C22:0 to C30:0) not to introduce errors due to aquatic contributions from algae and microorganisms. Results showed unambiguously that during base flow agricultural land contributed up to 65 % of the suspended sediments, while forest was the dominant sediment source during high flow, which indicates that during base and high flow conditions connectivity of sediment source areas with the river change. Our findings are the first results highlighting significant differences in compound specific stable isotope (CSSI) signature and quantification of sediment sources from land uses dominated by C3 plant cultivation.

  13. Modeling water demand when households have multiple sources of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulibaly, Lassina; Jakus, Paul M.; Keith, John E.

    2014-07-01

    A significant portion of the world's population lives in areas where public water delivery systems are unreliable and/or deliver poor quality water. In response, people have developed important alternatives to publicly supplied water. To date, most water demand research has been based on single-equation models for a single source of water, with very few studies that have examined water demand from two sources of water (where all nonpublic system water sources have been aggregated into a single demand). This modeling approach leads to two outcomes. First, the demand models do not capture the full range of alternatives, so the true economic relationship among the alternatives is obscured. Second, and more seriously, economic theory predicts that demand for a good becomes more price-elastic as the number of close substitutes increases. If researchers artificially limit the number of alternatives studied to something less than the true number, the price elasticity estimate may be biased downward. This paper examines water demand in a region with near universal access to piped water, but where system reliability and quality is such that many alternative sources of water exist. In extending the demand analysis to four sources of water, we are able to (i) demonstrate why households choose the water sources they do, (ii) provide a richer description of the demand relationships among sources, and (iii) calculate own-price elasticity estimates that are more elastic than those generally found in the literature.

  14. High Energy Gamma Rays and Neutrinos from Star-forming Activities in the Galactic and Extragalactic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the IceCube astrophysical neutrinos is an outstanding question. Star-forming activities which can accelerate particles to very high energies have been suggested as possible origin of these neutrinos. I will present a scenario where a subset of the neutrino events originate from the Galactic center region and Fermi Bubbles, resulting from star-forming activities. Multi-messenger signal in high energy gamma rays and neutrinos can probe this scenario. I will also present an analysis of the statistical association of the star-forming sources in our Galaxy and outside, with astrophysical neutrinos, as well as expected neutrino signal from these sources by fitting gamma-ray data.

  15. Registration and Fusion of Multiple Source Remotely Sensed Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Earth and Space Science often involve the comparison, fusion, and integration of multiple types of remotely sensed data at various temporal, radiometric, and spatial resolutions. Results of this integration may be utilized for global change analysis, global coverage of an area at multiple resolutions, map updating or validation of new instruments, as well as integration of data provided by multiple instruments carried on multiple platforms, e.g. in spacecraft constellations or fleets of planetary rovers. Our focus is on developing methods to perform fast, accurate and automatic image registration and fusion. General methods for automatic image registration are being reviewed and evaluated. Various choices for feature extraction, feature matching and similarity measurements are being compared, including wavelet-based algorithms, mutual information and statistically robust techniques. Our work also involves studies related to image fusion and investigates dimension reduction and co-kriging for application-dependent fusion. All methods are being tested using several multi-sensor datasets, acquired at EOS Core Sites, and including multiple sensors such as IKONOS, Landsat-7/ETM+, EO1/ALI and Hyperion, MODIS, and SeaWIFS instruments. Issues related to the coregistration of data from the same platform (i.e., AIRS and MODIS from Aqua) or from several platforms of the A-train (i.e., MLS, HIRDLS, OMI from Aura with AIRS and MODIS from Terra and Aqua) will also be considered.

  16. Registration and Fusion of Multiple Source Remotely Sensed Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline

    2004-01-01

    Earth and Space Science often involve the comparison, fusion, and integration of multiple types of remotely sensed data at various temporal, radiometric, and spatial resolutions. Results of this integration may be utilized for global change analysis, global coverage of an area at multiple resolutions, map updating or validation of new instruments, as well as integration of data provided by multiple instruments carried on multiple platforms, e.g. in spacecraft constellations or fleets of planetary rovers. Our focus is on developing methods to perform fast, accurate and automatic image registration and fusion. General methods for automatic image registration are being reviewed and evaluated. Various choices for feature extraction, feature matching and similarity measurements are being compared, including wavelet-based algorithms, mutual information and statistically robust techniques. Our work also involves studies related to image fusion and investigates dimension reduction and co-kriging for application-dependent fusion. All methods are being tested using several multi-sensor datasets, acquired at EOS Core Sites, and including multiple sensors such as IKONOS, Landsat-7/ETM+, EO1/ALI and Hyperion, MODIS, and SeaWIFS instruments. Issues related to the coregistration of data from the same platform (i.e., AIRS and MODIS from Aqua) or from several platforms of the A-train (i.e., MLS, HIRDLS, OMI from Aura with AIRS and MODIS from Terra and Aqua) will also be considered.

  17. Interactions Between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma on Neuroinflammation, Demyelination, and Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Alexandre; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Guillevin, Rémy; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2017-09-13

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is marked by neuroinflammation and demyelination with loss of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. The immune response is regulated by WNT/beta-catenin pathway in MS. Activated NF-kappaB, a major effector of neuroinflammation, and upregulated canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway positively regulate each other. Demyelinating events present an upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, whereas proper myelinating phases show a downregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway essential for the promotion of oligodendrocytes precursors cells proliferation and differentiation. The activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway results in differentiation failure and impairment in remyelination. However, PI3K/Akt pathway and TCF7L2, two downstream targets of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, are upregulated and promote proper remyelination. The interactions of these signaling pathways remain unclear. PPAR gamma activation can inhibit NF-kappaB, and can also downregulate the WNT/beta-catenin pathway. PPAR gamma and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway act in an opposite manner. PPAR gamma agonists appear as a promising treatment for the inhibition of demyelination and the promotion of proper remyelination through the control of both NF-kappaB activity and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway.

  18. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the management of single and multiple brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Greto, D; Scoccianti, S; Compagnucci, A; Arilli, C; Casati, M; Francolini, G; Cecchini, S; Loi, M; Desideri, I; Bordi, L; Bono, P; Bonomo, P; Meattini, I; Detti, B; Livi, L

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of single and multiple brain metastases. From October 2012 to June 2014 106 patients were treated with Radiosurgery (RS) for brain metastases at University of Florence. 77 out of 106 patients had a radiological follow up and their data were analyzed. The target was defined as the enhancing lesion. The prescription dose was defined depending on tumor volume and tumor location. Each patient performed an MRI one month after GKRS for the first three months and every 3 months thereafter. Overall survival was calculated from the day of RS until death. Local recurrence (LR) was defined as radiologic growth of the irradiated lesion, while distant brain recurrence (DBR) was the evidence of brain lesion outside the previous irradiated field. Both the LR and DBR were calculated from the RS till the day of radiological evidence of relapse. The correlations within patient and disease characteristics and the outcomes of survival and disease control were analyzed. Mean follow up was 7.2 ± 4.8 months (range: 2.4-22.8 months). At the time of analysis 21 patients (27.3%) were dead. The overall survival (OS) at 1 year was 74%. On univariate Cox Regression analysis female gender (p=0.043, HR: 0.391, 95% CI: 0.157-0.972) and age >65 years (p=0.003 HR: 4.623, 95% CI: 1.687-12.663) were predictive for survival. On multivariate analysis, age older than 65 years (p=0.005HR: 4.254, 95% CI: 1.544-11.721) was confirmed as associated with worsened overall survival. 19 patients (24.7%) had recurrence in the radiosurgery field. The median time to local failure was 4.8 ± 2.0 months (range: 1.8-9.4 months) from GKRS. On Cox Regression univariate analysis, the only factor associated with higher risk of local failure was a number of treated lesions more than 4 (p=0.015, HR: 3.813, 95% CI: 1.298-11.202), no significant parameters were found at the multivariate analysis. The median time to develop distant brain

  19. Experimental results on gamma-ray sources at E sub 0 = 10(13) - 10(14) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Periale, L.; Vallania, P.

    1985-01-01

    The detection of very high energy gamma ray sources has been reported in the last few years by means of extensive air shower observations. The Plateau Rosa array for the registration of the arrival directions of extensive air showers has been operating since 1980 and first results on Cygnus X-3 have been reported. Here, the status of observations of Cygnus X-3 and of the Crab Pulsar are reported.

  20. Source-circuit design with multiple photovoltaic manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R.

    1983-01-01

    The problems associated with source circuit design for use in photovoltaic (PV) hardware of different manufacturers or processes are discussed. The varying performance of dissimilar materials is examined and the need for standardization of equipment and performance output is investigated.