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Sample records for multiple gene involvement

  1. Sesterterpene ophiobolin biosynthesis involving multiple gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hangzhen; Yin, Ru; Liu, Yongfeng; Meng, Huiying; Zhou, Xianqiang; Zhou, Guolin; Bi, Xupeng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Tonghan; Zhu, Weiming; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are the most diverse and abundant natural products among which sesterterpenes account for less than 2%, with very few reports on their biosynthesis. Ophiobolins are tricyclic 5–8–5 ring sesterterpenes with potential pharmaceutical application. Aspergillus ustus 094102 from mangrove rizhosphere produces ophiobolin and other terpenes. We obtained five gene cluster knockout mutants, with altered ophiobolin yield using genome sequencing and in silico analysis, combined with in vivo genetic manipulation. Involvement of the five gene clusters in ophiobolin synthesis was confirmed by investigation of the five key terpene synthesis relevant enzymes in each gene cluster, either by gene deletion and complementation or in vitro verification of protein function. The results demonstrate that ophiobolin skeleton biosynthesis involves five gene clusters, which are responsible for C15, C20, C25, and C30 terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27273151

  2. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system.

  3. Identification of gene expression patterns crucially involved in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Martin M.; Barth, Silvia; Greve, Bernhard; Schumann, Kathrin M.; Bartels, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After encounter with a central nervous system (CNS)-derived autoantigen, lymphocytes leave the lymph nodes and enter the CNS. This event leads only rarely to subsequent tissue damage. Genes relevant to CNS pathology after cell infiltration are largely undefined. Myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in disability. To assess genes that are involved in encephalitogenicity and subsequent tissue damage mediated by CNS-infiltrating cells, we performed a DNA microarray analysis from cells derived from lymph nodes and eluted from CNS in LEW.1AV1 (RT1av1) rats immunized with MOG 91-108. The data was compared to immunizations with adjuvant alone or naive rats and to immunizations with the immunogenic but not encephalitogenic MOG 73-90 peptide. Here, we show involvement of Cd38, Cxcr4 and Akt and confirm these findings by the use of Cd38-knockout (B6.129P2-Cd38tm1Lnd/J) mice, S1P-receptor modulation during EAE and quantitative expression analysis in individuals with MS. The hereby-defined underlying pathways indicate cellular activation and migration pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors as crucial events in CNS tissue damage. These pathways can be further explored for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27519689

  4. Multiple Vibrio fischeri genes are involved in biofilm formation and host colonization

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Hogan, David; Gorman, Clayton; Quintanal-Villalonga, Alvaro; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are increasingly recognized as the predominant form for survival in the environment for most bacteria. The successful colonization of Vibrio fischeri in its squid host Euprymna tasmanica, involves complex microbe-host interactions mediated by specific genes that are essential for biofilm formation and colonization. In the present investigation, structural and regulatory genes were selected to study their role in biofilm formation and host colonization. We have mutated several genes (pilT, pilU, flgF, motY, ibpA and mifB) by an insertional inactivation strategy. Results demonstrate that structural genes responsible for synthesis of type IV pili and flagella are crucial for biofilm formation and host infection. Moreover, regulatory genes affect colony aggregation by various mechanisms including alteration of synthesis of transcriptional factors and regulation of extracellular polysaccharide production. These results reflect the significance of how genetic alterations influence communal behavior, which is important in understanding symbiotic relationships. PMID:22486781

  5. Identification of three microsatellites at the human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) locus, a gene potentially involved in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, N.; Dolbois, L.; Coppin, H.

    1994-09-01

    The gene encoding MOG is located on the short arm of chromosome 6, less than 120 kb telomeric to HLA-F. We have cloned the MOG gene from a cosmid library. Using tandemly repeated dinucleotides, we probed the genomic region containing the human MOG gene in order to identify and localize polymorphic markers: three microsatellites were characterized in that region. Using a polymerase chain reaction-based technique, we studied length variability for these three markers among 173 healthy individuals and 167 multiple sclerosis patients. Heterozygosity varied from 50% to 60% according to the marker. Pairwise studies showed significant linkage disequilibrium between some alleles. Multiple sclerosis patients and controls were not shown to have statistically significant differences in the MOG region. Further studies on the coding regions are in progress in order to exclude any involvement of the MOG gene in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Involvement of THH1, an Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of the TOM1 gene, in tobamovirus multiplication.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ravelo, Gerald B; Naito, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2006-08-01

    The TOM1 and TOM3 genes of Arabidopsis thaliana encode homologous proteins that are required for tobamovirus multiplication. Although the A. thaliana genome encodes another TOM1-like gene, THH1, the tobamovirus coat protein (CP) does not accumulate to a detectable level in the tom1 tom3 double mutant. Here, double and triple mutants of tom1, tom3 and thh1 were generated to investigate whether THH1 functions to support tobamovirus multiplication. In the tom1 thh1 double mutant, the tobamovirus CP accumulated to a level that was detectable, but lower than that in the tom1 single mutant. In tom1 tom3 double-mutant lines overexpressing THH1, the tobamovirus CP accumulated to a level similar to that observed in wild-type plants. These results suggest that THH1 supports tobamovirus multiplication, but to a lesser extent than TOM1 and TOM3. The expression level of THH1 is lower than that of TOM1 and TOM3, which might explain the smaller contribution of THH1 to tobamovirus multiplication.

  7. Gene microarray assessment of multiple genes and signal pathways involved in androgen-dependent prostate cancer becoming androgen independent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Bao; Dai, Chun-Mei; Su, Xiao-Yun; Cao, Lu; Qin, Rui; Kong, Qing-Bo

    2014-01-01

    To study the gene expression change and possible signal pathway during androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) becoming androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), an LNCaP cell model of AIPC was established using flutamide in combination with androgen-free environment inducement, and differential expression genes were screened by microarray. Then the biological process, molecular function and KEGG pathway of differential expression genes are analyzed by Molecule Annotation System (MAS). By comparison of 12,207 expression genes, 347 expression genes were acquired, of which 156 were up-ragulated and 191 down-regulated. After analyzing the biological process and molecule function of differential expression genes, these genes are found to play crucial roles in cell proliferation, differntiation, cell cycle control, protein metabolism and modification and other biological process, serve as signal molecules, enzymes, peptide hormones, cytokines, cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion molecules. The analysis of KEGG show that the relevant genes of AIPC transformation participate in glutathione metabolism, cell cycle, P53 signal pathway, cytochrome P450 metabolism, Hedgehog signal pathway, MAPK signal pathway, adipocytokines signal pathway, PPAR signal pathway, TGF-β signal pathway and JAK-STAT signal pathway. In conclusion, during the process of ADPC becoming AIPC, it is not only one specific gene or pathway, but multiple genes and pathways that change. The findings above lay the foundation for study of AIPC mechanism and development of AIPC targeting drugs.

  8. Involvement of multiple transcription factors for metal-induced spy gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-20

    Bacteria are directly exposed to metals in environment. To maintain the intracellular metal homeostasis, Escherichia coli contain a number of gene regulation systems, each for response to a specific metal. A periplasmic protein Spy of E. coli was found to be induced upon short-exposure to copper ion in CpxAR-dependent manner. Transcription of the spy gene was also induced by long-exposure to zinc ion. This induction, however, depended on another two-component system BaeSR. Using DNase-I footprinting assay, we identified two BaeR-binding regions on the spy promoter with a direct repeat of the BaeR-box sequence, TCTNCANAA. The zinc-responsive BaeR-binding sites were separated from copper-responsive CpxR-binding site, implying that the spy promoter responds to two species of metal independently through different using sensor-response regulator systems. Since BaeSR-dependent zinc response requires longer time, the induction of spy gene transcription by external zinc may include multiple steps such as through sensing the zinc-induced envelope disorder by BaeSR.

  9. Prion Infection of Mouse Brain Reveals Multiple New Upregulated Genes Involved in Neuroinflammation or Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, James F.; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gliosis is often a preclinical pathological finding in neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases, but the mechanisms facilitating gliosis and neuronal damage in these diseases are not understood. To expand our knowledge of the neuroinflammatory response in prion diseases, we assessed the expression of key genes and proteins involved in the inflammatory response and signal transduction in mouse brain at various times after scrapie infection. In brains of scrapie-infected mice at pre- and postclinical stages, we identified 15 previously unreported differentially expressed genes related to inflammation or activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Levels for the majority of differentially expressed genes increased with time postinfection. In quantitative immunoblotting experiments of STAT proteins, STAT1α, phosphorylated-STAT1α (pSTAT1α), and pSTAT3 were increased between 94 and 131 days postinfection (p.i.) in brains of mice infected with strain 22L. Furthermore, a select group of STAT-associated genes was increased preclinically during scrapie infection, suggesting early activation of the STAT signal transduction pathway. Comparison of inflammatory markers between mice infected with scrapie strains 22L and RML indicated that the inflammatory responses and gene expression profiles in the brains were strikingly similar, even though these scrapie strains infect different brain regions. The endogenous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), an inflammatory marker, was newly identified as increasing preclinically in our model and therefore might influence scrapie pathogenesis in vivo. However, in IL-1Ra-deficient or overexpressor transgenic mice inoculated with scrapie, neither loss nor overexpression of IL-1Ra demonstrated any observable effect on gliosis, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) formation, disease tempo, pathology, or expression of the inflammatory genes analyzed. IMPORTANCE Prion infection leads to Pr

  10. Pathway engineering of Brassica napus seeds using multiple key enzyme genes involved in ketocarotenoid formation.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Masaki; Takita, Eiji; Harada, Hisashi; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Ohyama, Kanji; Shibata, Daisuke; Misawa, Norihiko

    2009-01-01

    Brassica napus (canola) plants were genetically manipulated to increase the amount and composition of carotenoids in seeds by using seven key enzyme genes involved in ketocarotenoid formation, which originated from a soil bacterium Pantoea ananatis (formerly called Erwinia uredovora 20D3), and marine bacteria Brevundimonas sp. strain SD212 and Paracoccus sp. strain N81106 (formerly called Agrobacterium aurantiacum). The seven key gene cassettes, in which each gene was surrounded by an appropriate promoter and terminator, were connected in a tandem manner, and the resulting constructs (17 kb) were inserted into a binary vector and used for transformation of B. napus. Surprisingly, 73-85% of the regenerated plants retained all seven genes, and formed orange- or pinkish orange-coloured seeds (embryos), while untransformed controls had light yellow-coloured seeds with predominant accumulation of lutein. Three of the transgenic lines were analysed further. The total amount of carotenoids in these seeds was 412-657 microg g(-1) fresh weight, which was a 19- to 30-fold increase compared with that of untransformed controls. The total amount of ketocarotenoids was 60-190 microg g(-1) fresh weight. beta-Carotene was the predominant carotenoid, with significant amounts of alpha-carotene, echinenone, phytoene, lutein, and canthaxanthin also detected in the transgenic seeds. The ratio of hydroxylated carotenoids to overall carotenoids was quite small relative to the ratio of ketocarotenoids to overall carotenoids. Interestingly, expression of many endogenous carotenogenic genes was also altered in the transgenic seeds, suggesting that their expression was affected by an increase in carotenoid biosynthesis.

  11. The retinoblastoma gene is involved in multiple aspects of stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, U; Cipollaro, M; Giordano, A

    2006-08-28

    Genetic programs controlling self-renewal and multipotentiality of stem cells have overlapping pathways with cell cycle regulation. Components of cell cycle machinery can play a key role in regulating stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation and aging. Among the negative regulators of cell cycle progression, the RB family members play a prominent role in controlling several aspects of stem cell biology. Stem cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and must have molecular mechanisms that prevent senescence and hold 'stemness'. RB can induce senescence-associated changes in gene expression and its activity is downregulated in stem cells to preserve self-renewal. Several reports evidenced that RB could play a role in lineage specification of several types of stem cells. RB has a role in myogenesis as well as in cardiogenesis. These effects are not only related to its role in suppressing E2F-responsive genes but also to its ability to modulate the activity of tissue-specific transcription factors. RB is also involved in adipogenesis through a strict control of lineage commitment and differentiation of adipocytes as well in determining the switch between brown and white adipocytes. Also, hematopoietic progenitor cells utilize the RB pathway to modulate cell commitment and differentiation. In this review, we will also discuss the role of the other two RB family members: Rb2/p130 and p107 showing that they have both specific and overlapping functions with RB gene.

  12. Multiple and Variable NHEJ-Like Genes Are Involved in Resistance to DNA Damage in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Grégory; Bertrand, Claire; Zhang, Lingli; Piotrowski, Emilie; Chipot, Ludovic; Bontemps, Cyril; Confalonieri, Fabrice; McGovern, Stephen; Lecointe, François; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a double strand break (DSB) repair pathway which does not require any homologous template and can ligate two DNA ends together. The basic bacterial NHEJ machinery involves two partners: the Ku protein, a DNA end binding protein for DSB recognition and the multifunctional LigD protein composed a ligase, a nuclease and a polymerase domain, for end processing and ligation of the broken ends. In silico analyses performed in the 38 sequenced genomes of Streptomyces species revealed the existence of a large panel of NHEJ-like genes. Indeed, ku genes or ligD domain homologues are scattered throughout the genome in multiple copies and can be distinguished in two categories: the “core” NHEJ gene set constituted of conserved loci and the “variable” NHEJ gene set constituted of NHEJ-like genes present in only a part of the species. In Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877, not only the deletion of “core” genes but also that of “variable” genes led to an increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by electron beam irradiation. Multiple mutants of ku, ligase or polymerase encoding genes showed an aggravated phenotype compared to single mutants. Biochemical assays revealed the ability of Ku-like proteins to protect and to stimulate ligation of DNA ends. RT-qPCR and GFP fusion experiments suggested that ku-like genes show a growth phase dependent expression profile consistent with their involvement in DNA repair during spores formation and/or germination. PMID:27965636

  13. Genomic and Coexpression Analyses Predict Multiple Genes Involved in Triterpene Saponin Biosynthesis in Medicago truncatula[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Naoumkina, Marina A.; Modolo, Luzia V.; Huhman, David V.; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Tang, Yuhong; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Saponins, an important group of bioactive plant natural products, are glycosides of triterpenoid or steroidal aglycones (sapogenins). Saponins possess many biological activities, including conferring potential health benefits for humans. However, most of the steps specific for the biosynthesis of triterpene saponins remain uncharacterized at the molecular level. Here, we use comprehensive gene expression clustering analysis to identify candidate genes involved in the elaboration, hydroxylation, and glycosylation of the triterpene skeleton in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Four candidate uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases were expressed in Escherichia coli, one of which (UGT73F3) showed specificity for multiple sapogenins and was confirmed to glucosylate hederagenin at the C28 position. Genetic loss-of-function studies in M. truncatula confirmed the in vivo function of UGT73F3 in saponin biosynthesis. This report provides a basis for future studies to define genetically the roles of multiple cytochromes P450 and glycosyltransferases in triterpene saponin biosynthesis in Medicago. PMID:20348429

  14. Multiple forms of dynamin are encoded by shibire, a Drosophila gene involved in endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, M S; Obar, R A; Schroeder, C C; Austin, T W; Poodry, C A; Wadsworth, S C; Vallee, R B

    1991-06-13

    Dynamin was discovered in bovine brain tissue as a nucleotide-sensitive microtubule-binding protein of relative molecular mass 100,000. It was found to cross-link microtubules into highly ordered bundles, and appeared to have a role in intermicrotubule sliding in vitro. Cloning and sequencing of rat brain dynamin complementary DNA identified an N-terminal region of about 300 amino acids which contained the three consensus elements characteristic of GTP-binding proteins. Extensive homology was found between this domain and the mammalian Mx proteins which are involved in interferon-induced viral resistance, and with the product of the VPS1 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has been implicated both in membrane protein sorting, and in meiotic spindle pole separation. Dynamin-containing microtubule bundles were not observed in an immunofluorescence study of cultured mammalian cells, but a role for a GTP-requiring protein in intermicrotubule sliding during mitosis in plants has been reported. We report here that Drosophila melanogaster contains multiple tissue-specific and developmentally-regulated forms of dynamin, which are products of the shibire locus previously implicated in endocytic protein sorting.

  15. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Methods Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. Results The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). Conclusion We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. PMID:17430594

  16. Promoter CpG methylation of multiple genes in pituitary adenomas: frequent involvement of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Bello, M Josefa; De Campos, Jose M; Isla, Alberto; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rey, Juan A

    2006-02-01

    The epigenetic changes in pituitary adenomas were identified by evaluating the methylation status of nine genes (RB1, p14(ARF), p16(INK4a), p73, TIMP-3, MGMT, DAPK, THBS1 and caspase-8) in a series of 35 tumours using methylation-specific PCR analysis plus sequencing. The series included non-functional adenomas (n=23), prolactinomas (n=6), prolactinoma plus thyroid-stimulating hormone adenoma (n=1), growth hormone adenomas (n=4), and adrenocorticotropic adenoma (n=1). All of the tumours had methylation of at least one of these genes and 40% of samples (14 of 35) displayed concurrent methylation of at least three genes. The frequencies of aberrant methylation were: 20% for RB1, 17% for p14(ARF), 34% for p16(INK4a), 29% for p73, 11% for TIMP-3, 23% for MGMT, 6% for DAPK, 43% for THBS1 and 54% for caspase-8. No aberrant methylation was observed in two non-malignant pituitary samples from healthy controls. Although some differences in the frequency of gene methylation between functional and non-functional adenomas were detected, these differences did not reach statistical significance. Our results suggest that promoter methylation is a frequent event in pituitary adenoma tumourigenesis, a process in which inactivation of apoptosis-related genes (DAPK, caspase-8) might play a key role.

  17. Characterization of a novel putative zinc finger gene MIF1: involvement in multiple hormonal regulation of Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Ma, Hong

    2006-02-01

    Phytohormones play crucial roles in regulating many aspects of plant development. Although much has been learned about the effects of individual hormones, cross-talk between and integration of different hormonal signals are still not well understood. We present a study of MINI ZINC FINGER 1 (MIF1), a putative zinc finger protein from Arabidopsis, and suggest that it may be involved in integrating signals from multiple hormones. MIF1 homologs are highly conserved among seed plants, each characterized by a very short sequence containing a central putative zinc finger domain. Constitutive overexpression of MIF1 caused dramatic developmental defects, including dwarfism, reduced apical dominance, extreme longevity, dark-green leaves, altered flower morphology, poor fertility, reduced hypocotyl length, spoon-like cotyledons, reduced root growth, and ectopic root hairs on hypocotyls and cotyledons. In addition, 35S::MIF1 seedlings underwent constitutive photomorphogenesis in the dark, with root growth similar to that in the light. Furthermore, 35S::MIF1 seedlings were demonstrated to be non-responsive to gibberellin (GA) for cell elongation, hypersensitive to the GA synthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol (PAC) and abscisic acid (ABA), and hyposensitive to auxin, brassinosteroid and cytokinin, but normally responsive to ethylene. The de-etiolation defect could not be rescued by the hormones tested. Consistent with these observations, genome-scale expression profiling revealed that 35S::MIF1 seedlings exhibited decreased expression of genes involved in GA, auxin and brassinosteroid signaling as well as cell elongation/expansion, and increased expression of ABA-responsive genes. We propose that MIF1, or the protein(s) with which MIF1 interacts, is involved in mediating the control of plant development by multiple hormones.

  18. Associations of common variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals with risk of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Laura S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Lan, Qing; Milliken, Kevin; Davis, Scott; Chanock, Stephen J.; Zhang, Yawei; Severson, Richard; Zahm, Sheila H.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Rothman, Nat; Baris, Dalsu

    2009-01-01

    Background We examined risk of multiple myeloma (MM) associated with variants in genes involved in metabolism and response to exogenous chemicals [cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP1B1, CYP2C9), epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase receptor (AHR), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)]. Methods This study included 279 MM cases and 782 controls in a pooled analysis of two population-based case control studies. One common variant from each candidate gene was genotyped using DNA from blood or buccal cells. We estimated risk of MM associated with each genotype, controlling for race, gender, study site, and age, using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Evaluations of the CYP1B1 V432L variant (rs1056836) suggested increased risk of MM among persons with the CG and GG genotypes compared to the CC genotype [OR (95% CI) = 1.4 (1.0–2.0)]. Similar results were seen in analyses stratified by race and gender. We did not find any associations between MM and the CYP2C9, EPHX1, NQO1, or PON1 genes. Conclusions CYP1B1 activates chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins to create oxidized, reactive intermediates, and higher gene activity has been shown for the G allele. We conducted the largest analysis to date on MM and these genetic variants and our results provide preliminary evidence that variation in CYP1B1 may influence susceptibility to MM. PMID:19736056

  19. Interstitial deletion of 11(p11.2p12): A newly described contiguous gene deletion syndrome involving the gene for hereditary multiple exostoses

    SciTech Connect

    Potocki, L.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1996-03-29

    Individuals with deletions of the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 11 share many manifestations including mental retardation, biparietal foramina, minor facial anomalies, and multiple cartilaginous exostoses. The finding of multiple exostoses in these patients is remarkable as the disorder hereditary multiple exostoses, which is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, has recently been mapped by linkage to three regions, including proximal 11p. We report the clinical and molecular findings in an additional patient with an 11(p11.2p12) deletion. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis demonstrated a de novo, paternally derived deletion for markers which have been shown to be tightly linked to the 11p locus (EXT2). These data support the location of EXT2 within this region and also provide information regarding the ordering of polymorphic markers on 11p. Deletion 11(p11.2p12) is a rare, yet specific, deletion syndrome involving the EXT2 locus, a gene for parietal foramina, and a mental retardation locus, and therefore can be classified as a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Nitric oxide-induced murine hematopoietic stem cell fate involves multiple signaling proteins, gene expression, and redox modulation.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Dias, Carolina C; Regina, Helena; Segreto, C; Addios, Priscilla C; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Barros, Carlos C; Higa, Elisa M S; Buri, Marcus V; Ferreira, Alice T; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

    2014-11-01

    There are a growing number of reports showing the influence of redox modulation in cellular signaling. Although the regulation of hematopoiesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has been described, their direct participation in the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains unclear. In this work, the direct role of nitric oxide (NO(•)), a RNS, in the modulation of hematopoiesis was investigated using two sources of NO(•) , one produced by endothelial cells stimulated with carbachol in vitro and another using the NO(•)-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) in vivo. Two main NO(•) effects were observed: proliferation of HSCs-especially of the short-term HSCs-and its commitment and terminal differentiation to the myeloid lineage. NO(•)-induced proliferation was characterized by the increase in the number of cycling HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells positive to BrdU and Ki-67, upregulation of Notch-1, Cx43, PECAM-1, CaR, ERK1/2, Akt, p38, PKC, and c-Myc. NO(•)-induced HSCs differentiation was characterized by the increase in granulocytic-macrophage progenitors, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units, mature myeloid cells, upregulation of PU.1, and C/EBPα genes concomitantly to the downregulation of GATA-3 and Ikz-3 genes, activation of Stat5 and downregulation of the other analyzed proteins mentioned above. Also, redox status modulation differed between proliferation and differentiation responses, which is likely associated with the transition of the proliferative to differentiation status. Our findings provide evidence of the role of NO(•) in inducing HSCs proliferation and myeloid differentiation involving multiple signaling.

  1. De novo Transcriptome Assembly of Chinese Kale and Global Expression Analysis of Genes Involved in Glucosinolate Metabolism in Multiple Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuanghua; Lei, Jianjun; Chen, Guoju; Chen, Hancai; Cao, Bihao; Chen, Changming

    2017-01-01

    Chinese kale, a vegetable of the cruciferous family, is a popular crop in southern China and Southeast Asia due to its high glucosinolate content and nutritional qualities. However, there is little research on the molecular genetics and genes involved in glucosinolate metabolism and its regulation in Chinese kale. In this study, we sequenced and characterized the transcriptomes and expression profiles of genes expressed in 11 tissues of Chinese kale. A total of 216 million 150-bp clean reads were generated using RNA-sequencing technology. From the sequences, 98,180 unigenes were assembled for the whole plant, and 49,582~98,423 unigenes were assembled for each tissue. Blast analysis indicated that a total of 80,688 (82.18%) unigenes exhibited similarity to known proteins. The functional annotation and classification tools used in this study suggested that genes principally expressed in Chinese kale, were mostly involved in fundamental processes, such as cellular and molecular functions, the signal transduction, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The expression levels of all unigenes were analyzed in various tissues of Chinese kale. A large number of candidate genes involved in glucosinolate metabolism and its regulation were identified, and the expression patterns of these genes were analyzed. We found that most of the genes involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis were highly expressed in the root, petiole, and in senescent leaves. The expression patterns of ten glucosinolate biosynthetic genes from RNA-seq were validated by quantitative RT-PCR in different tissues. These results provided an initial and global overview of Chinese kale gene functions and expression activities in different tissues. PMID:28228764

  2. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis.

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  4. Plasmid pCAR3 Contains Multiple Gene Sets Involved in the Conversion of Carbazole to Anthranilate†

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Masaaki; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Noguchi, Haruko; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Takemura, Tetsuo; Eto, Kaori; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    The carbazole degradative car-I gene cluster (carAaIBaIBbICIAcI) of Sphingomonas sp. strain KA1 is located on the 254-kb circular plasmid pCAR3. Carbazole conversion to anthranilate is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO; CarAaIAcI), meta-cleavage enzyme (CarBaIBbI), and hydrolase (CarCI). CARDO is a three-component dioxygenase, and CarAaI and CarAcI are its terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components. The car-I gene cluster lacks the gene encoding the ferredoxin reductase component of CARDO. In the present study, based on the draft sequence of pCAR3, we found multiple carbazole degradation genes dispersed in four loci on pCAR3, including a second copy of the car gene cluster (carAaIIBaIIBbIICIIAcII) and the ferredoxin/reductase genes fdxI-fdrI and fdrII. Biotransformation experiments showed that FdrI (or FdrII) could drive the electron transfer chain from NAD(P)H to CarAaI (or CarAaII) with the aid of ferredoxin (CarAcI, CarAcII, or FdxI). Because this electron transfer chain showed phylogenetic relatedness to that consisting of putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam monooxygenase system of Pseudomonas putida, CARDO systems of KA1 can be classified in the class IIA Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase system. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that two car gene clusters constituted operons, and their expression was induced when KA1 was exposed to carbazole, although the fdxI-fdrI and fdrII genes were expressed constitutively. Both terminal oxygenases of KA1 showed roughly the same substrate specificity as that from the well-characterized carbazole degrader Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, although slight differences were observed. PMID:16672458

  5. Lymphoblastic lymphoma involving multiple vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Xu, Yu-Lun; Wu, Zhen

    2017-09-26

    Acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL) was a malignant hematological disease in childhood but rarely, initially involved epidural compartment in adult. A 20-year-old male presented with progressive osphyalgia for 2 months and left lower motor weakness for 2 weeks with constipation. Physical examination revealed decreased muscle strength and numbness of left lower limb, and abnormal gait. Contrasted MRI showed multiple vertebrae of hypointense T1 signals (C2/C4/C7/T5/T8/T9/T12/L2/L4) and an intraspinal epidural lesion (L2-4). Subtotal resection was achieved. Histopathology suggested malignant B-cell lymphoma with Ki-67 of 90% and positivity of leukocyte common antigen (LCA). A bone marrow biopsy was unequivocally diagnostic of B-cell ALL followed by chemotherapy (Methotrexate) and partial recovery was observed. The present case was the oldest patient with epidural ALL. The radiographic changes in multiple vertebrae suggested metabolic, hematological, or granulomatous disease. The marrow biopsy was necessary if without hypercalcemia and abnormal peripheral blood examination. Accurate pathological diagnosis was essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hindsight regulates photoreceptor axon targeting through transcriptional control of jitterbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Carlos; Molina-Fernandez, Claudia; Maureira, Miguel; Candia, Noemi; López, Estefanía; Hassan, Bassem; Aerts, Stein; Cánovas, José; Olguín, Patricio; Sierralta, Jimena

    2015-09-01

    During axon targeting, a stereotyped pattern of connectivity is achieved by the integration of intrinsic genetic programs and the response to extrinsic long and short-range directional cues. How this coordination occurs is the subject of intense study. Transcription factors play a central role due to their ability to regulate the expression of multiple genes required to sense and respond to these cues during development. Here we show that the transcription factor HNT regulates layer-specific photoreceptor axon targeting in Drosophila through transcriptional control of jbug/Filamin and multiple genes involved in axon guidance and cytoskeleton organization.Using a microarray analysis we identified 235 genes whose expression levels were changed by HNT overexpression in the eye primordia. We analyzed nine candidate genes involved in cytoskeleton regulation and axon guidance, six of which displayed significantly altered gene expression levels in hnt mutant retinas. Functional analysis confirmed the role of OTK/PTK7 in photoreceptor axon targeting and uncovered Tiggrin, an integrin ligand, and Jbug/Filamin, a conserved actin- binding protein, as new factors that participate of photoreceptor axon targeting. Moreover, we provided in silico and molecular evidence that supports jbug/Filamin as a direct transcriptional target of HNT and that HNT acts partially through Jbug/Filamin in vivo to regulate axon guidance. Our work broadens the understanding of how HNT regulates the coordinated expression of a group of genes to achieve the correct connectivity pattern in the Drosophila visual system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 1018-1032, 2015.

  7. Regulation of the genes involved in nitrification.

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, D.J.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.A.

    2003-08-14

    OAK-B135 This project focuses on the characterization of the regulation of the genes involved in nitrification in the bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The key genes in the nitrification pathway, amo and hao, are present in multiple copies in the genome. The promoters for these genes were identified and characterized. It was shown that there were some differences in the transcriptional regulation of the copies of these genes.

  8. Clustering of two genes putatively involved in cyanate detoxification evolved recently and independently in multiple fungal lineages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trac...

  9. [Hypothalamic involvement in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Darlix, A; Mathey, G; Monin, M-L; Sauvée, M; Braun, M; Schaff, J-L; Debouverie, M

    2012-05-01

    Hypothalamic involvement is a rare condition in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We report two patients with a long history of MS who presented with severe acute hypothermia with associated thrombocytopenia and elevated transaminase levels. Several cases of hypothermia or hyperthermia in patients with MS have been reported in the literature. They could be linked with hypothalamic lesions, in particular in the pre-optic area. However, other anatomical locations seem to be involved in thermoregulation and can be affected by MS. Besides, some cases of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion have been reported in patients with MS. Finally, some sleep disorders, particularly hypersomnia or narcolepsy, could be related to hypothalamic lesions, through the fall in hypocretin-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Hypocretin-1 is a neuropeptide that is secreted by some hypothalamic cells. It plays a role in the sleep-awake rhythm. We report one patient with narcolepsy and cataplexy before the first symptoms of MS appeared. Hypothalamic signs are rare in MS. However, several series of autopsies have shown a high frequency of demyelinating lesions in the hypothalamic area. Among these lesions, the proportion of active lesions seems elevated. Yet only few of them have a clinical or biological translation such as thermoregulation dysfunction, sleep disorders or natremia abnormalities. Thus, it seems unlikely that inflammatory hypothalamic lesions alone, even when bilateral, could be the explanation of these signs. A sufficient number of inflammatory demyelinating lesions, which we can observe in patients with a long history of MS and an already severe disability, is probably necessary to develop such a rare symptomatology. Hypothalamic signs might be a factor of poor prognosis for the disease course and progression of the disability.

  10. Clustering of Two Genes Putatively Involved in Cyanate Detoxification Evolved Recently and Independently in Multiple Fungal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, M. Holly; McGary, Kriston L.; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Slot, Jason C.; Geiser, David M.; Sink, Stacy; O’Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC’s closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture. PMID:25663439

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the Gene Encoding an Alcohol Dehydrogenase in the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus Involves Multiple Factors and Control Elements

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Gabriella; Cannio, Raffaele; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    2003-01-01

    A transcriptionally active region has been identified in the 5′ flanking region of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus through the evaluation of the activity of putative transcriptional regulators and the role of the region upstream of the gene under specific metabolic circumstances. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with crude extracts revealed protein complexes that most likely contain TATA box-associated factors. When the TATA element was deleted from the region, binding sites for both DNA binding proteins, such as the small chromatin structure-modeling Sso7d and Sso10b (Alba), and transcription factors, such as the repressor Lrs14, were revealed. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the substrate-induced expression of the adh gene, the promoter was analyzed for the presence of cis-acting elements recognized by specific transcription factors upon exposure of the cell to benzaldehyde. Progressive dissection of the identified promoter region restricted the analysis to a minimal responsive element (PAL) located immediately upstream of the transcription factor B-responsive element-TATA element, resembling typical bacterial regulatory sequences. A benzaldehyde-activated transcription factor (Bald) that specifically binds to the PAL cis-acting element was also identified. This protein was purified from heparin-fractionated extracts of benzaldehyde-induced cells and was shown to have a molecular mass of ∼16 kDa. The correlation between S. solfataricus adh gene activation and benzaldehyde-inducible occupation of a specific DNA sequence in its promoter suggests that a molecular signaling mechanism is responsible for the switch of the aromatic aldehyde metabolism as a response to environmental changes. PMID:12813087

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Revealed Changes of Multiple Genes Involved in Haliotis discus hannai Innate Immunity during Vibrio parahemolyticus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Jung, Myunghee; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Yoo, Seung-il; Markkandan, Kesavan; Moon, Ji-Young; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; An, Cheul Min; Shin, Younhee; Jung, Ho-jin; Park, Jun-hyung

    2016-01-01

    Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) is one of the most valuable marine aquatic species in Korea, Japan and China. Tremendous exposure to bacterial infection is common in aquaculture environment, especially by Vibrio sp. infections. It’s therefore necessary and urgent to understand the mechanism of H. discus hannai host defense against Vibrio parahemolyticus infection. However studies on its immune system are hindered by the lack of genomic resources. In the present study, we sequenced the transcriptome of control and bacterial challenged H. discus hannai tissues. Totally, 138 MB of reference transcriptome were obtained from de novo assembly of 34 GB clean bases from ten different libraries and annotated with the biological terms (GO and KEGG). A total of 10,575 transcripts exhibiting the differentially expression at least one pair of comparison and the functional annotations highlight genes related to immune response, cell adhesion, immune regulators, redox molecules and mitochondrial coding genes. Mostly, these groups of genes were dominated in hemocytes compared to other tissues. This work is a prerequisite for the identification of those physiological traits controlling H. discus hannai ability to survive against Vibrio infection. PMID:27088873

  13. Involvement of multiple phytoene synthase genes in tissue- and cultivar-specific accumulation of carotenoids in loquat

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiumin; Feng, Chao; Wang, Chunyan; Yin, Xueren; Lu, Pengjun; Grierson, Don; Xu, Changjie; Chen, Kunsong

    2014-01-01

    Differences in carotenoid accumulation between tissues and cultivars is common in plants. White-fleshed loquat cultivars had low levels of carotenoids in the flesh, but accumulated carotenoids in peel when ripe, and the leaves accumulated similar carotenoids to those in the red-fleshed loquat cultivars. The catalytic activity and expression patterns of four phytoene synthase (PSY) genes, EjPSY1, EjPSY2A, EjPSY2B, and EjPSY3, were analysed to understand their roles in different loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) types. EjPSY1 was responsible for carotenoid synthesis in the fruit peel but not the flesh, whereas EjPSY2A was responsible for carotenoid accumulation in flesh of ripening fruit. A mutant EjPSY2A d, with the same tissue specificity and expression level as EjPSY2A, but lacking the C-terminal region and corresponding catalytic activity, was discovered in white-fleshed varieties, explaining the lack of carotenoids in the white flesh. The catalytic role of EjPSY2B was most significant in leaves. The tissue-specific expression of EjPSY1 and EjPSY2B explained well how peel and leaf tissues can still accumulate carotenoids in white-fleshed cultivars, which have lost the functional EjPSY2A. EjPSY3 mRNA abundance was ~1000-fold less than that of other PSY mRNAs in all tissues examined. In addition, neither the normal sized transcript nor two alternatively spliced forms, EjPSY3α in LYQ and EjPSY3β in BS cultivars, encoded functional enzymes, and it is concluded that EjPSY3 plays no role in carotenoid accumulation. In addition, it was noted that recruitment of PSY genes for expression in specific tissues of different plants has occurred independently of gene structure and evolutionary origin. PMID:24935622

  14. Multiple loci and genetic interactions involving flowering time genes regulate stem branching among natural variants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueqing; Ding, Jia; Effgen, Sigi; Turck, Franziska; Koornneef, Maarten

    2013-08-01

    Shoot branching is a major determinant of plant architecture. Genetic variants for reduced stem branching in the axils of cauline leaves of Arabidopsis were found in some natural accessions and also at low frequency in the progeny of multiparent crosses. Detailed genetic analysis using segregating populations derived from backcrosses with the parental lines and bulked segregant analysis was used to identify the allelic variation controlling reduced stem branching. Eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to natural variation for reduced stem branching were identified (REDUCED STEM BRANCHING 1-8 (RSB1-8)). Genetic analysis showed that RSB6 and RSB7, corresponding to flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FRIGIDA (FRI), epistatically regulate stem branching. Furthermore, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which corresponds to RSB8 as demonstrated by fine-mapping, transgenic complementation and expression analysis, caused pleiotropic effects not only on flowering time, but, in the specific background of active FRI and FLC alleles, also on the RSB trait. The consequence of allelic variation only expressed in late-flowering genotypes revealed novel and thus far unsuspected roles of several genes well characterized for their roles in flowering time control.

  15. Placental gene-expression profiles of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in blood vessel formation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-associated liver disease with potentially deleterious consequences for the fetus, particularly when maternal serum bile-acid concentration >40 μM. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of ICP remain elusive. To reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms for the association of maternal serum bile-acid level and fetal outcome in ICP patients, DNA microarray was applied to characterize the whole-genome expression profiles of placentas from healthy women and women diagnosed with ICP. Methods Thirty pregnant women recruited in this study were categorized evenly into three groups: healthy group; mild ICP, with serum bile-acid concentration ranging from 10–40 μM; and severe ICP, with bile-acid concentration >40 μM. Gene Ontology analysis in combination with construction of gene-interaction and gene co-expression networks were applied to identify the core regulatory genes associated with ICP pathogenesis, which were further validated by quantitative real-time PCR and histological staining. Results The core regulatory genes were mainly involved in immune response, VEGF signaling pathway and G-protein-coupled receptor signaling, implying essential roles of immune response, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in ICP pathogenesis. This implication was supported by the observed aggregated immune-cell infiltration and deficient blood vessel formation in ICP placentas. Conclusions Our study provides a system-level insight into the placental gene-expression profiles of women with mild or severe ICP, and reveals multiple molecular pathways in immune response and blood vessel formation that might contribute to ICP pathogenesis. PMID:25001852

  16. Placental gene-expression profiles of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in blood vessel formation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Du, QiaoLing; Pan, YouDong; Zhang, YouHua; Zhang, HaiLong; Zheng, YaJuan; Lu, Ling; Wang, JunLei; Duan, Tao; Chen, JianFeng

    2014-07-07

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-associated liver disease with potentially deleterious consequences for the fetus, particularly when maternal serum bile-acid concentration >40 μM. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of ICP remain elusive. To reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms for the association of maternal serum bile-acid level and fetal outcome in ICP patients, DNA microarray was applied to characterize the whole-genome expression profiles of placentas from healthy women and women diagnosed with ICP. Thirty pregnant women recruited in this study were categorized evenly into three groups: healthy group; mild ICP, with serum bile-acid concentration ranging from 10-40 μM; and severe ICP, with bile-acid concentration >40 μM. Gene Ontology analysis in combination with construction of gene-interaction and gene co-expression networks were applied to identify the core regulatory genes associated with ICP pathogenesis, which were further validated by quantitative real-time PCR and histological staining. The core regulatory genes were mainly involved in immune response, VEGF signaling pathway and G-protein-coupled receptor signaling, implying essential roles of immune response, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis in ICP pathogenesis. This implication was supported by the observed aggregated immune-cell infiltration and deficient blood vessel formation in ICP placentas. Our study provides a system-level insight into the placental gene-expression profiles of women with mild or severe ICP, and reveals multiple molecular pathways in immune response and blood vessel formation that might contribute to ICP pathogenesis.

  17. Parabrachial nucleus involvement in multiple system atrophy☆

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch, E.E.; Schmeichel, A.M.; Low, P.A.; Parisi, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is associated with respiratory dysfunction, including sleep apnea, respiratory dysrhythmia, and laryngeal stridor. Neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) control respiratory rhythmogenesis and airway resistance. Objectives The objective of this study is to determine whether there was involvement of putative respiratory regions of the PBN in MSA. Methods We examined the pons at autopsy in 10 cases with neuropathologically confirmed MSA and 8 age-matched controls. Sections obtained throughout the pons were processed for calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and Nissl staining to identify the lateral crescent of the lateral PBN (LPB) and the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (K-F), which are involved in respiratory control. Cell counts were performed using stereology. Results There was loss of CGRP neurons in the PBN in MSA (total estimated cell counts for the external LPB cluster was 12,584 ± 1146 in controls and 5917 ± 389 in MSA, p < 0.0001); for the external medial PBN (MPB) cluster it was 15,081 ± 1758 in controls and 7842 ± 466 in MSA, p < 0.001. There was also neuronal loss in putative respiratory regions of the PBN, including the lateral crescent of the LPB (13,039 ± 1326 in controls and 4164 ± 872 in MSA, p < 0.0001); and K-F (5120 ± 495 in controls and 999 ± 308 in MSA, p < 0.0001). Conclusions There is involvement of both CGRP and putative respiratory cell groups in the PBN in MSA. Whereas the clinical implications of CGRP cell loss are still undetermined, involvement of the LPB and K-F may contribute to respiratory dysfunction in this disorder. PMID:23665165

  18. A novel chromosomal translocation t(4; 14)(p16.3; q32) in multiple myeloma involves the fibroblast growth-factor receptor 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Richelda, R; Ronchetti, D; Baldini, L; Cro, L; Viggiano, L; Marzella, R; Rocchi, M; Otsuki, T; Lombardi, L; Maiolo, A T; Neri, A

    1997-11-15

    Chromosomal translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) locus at chromosome 14q32 represent a common mechanism of oncogene activation in lymphoid malignancies. In multiple myeloma (MM), the most consistent chromosomal abnormality is the 14q+ marker, which originates in one third of cases through a t(11; 14)(q13; q32) chromosomal translocation; in the remaining cases, the identity of the partner chromosomes has not been well established. We used a Southern blot approach based on the linkage analysis of the joining (J) and the constant (C) mu, alpha, and gamma regions to detect cases bearing IGH switch-mediated chromosomal translocations. We evaluated DNA of 88 nonkaryotyped patients with MM (78 cases) or plasma cell leukemia (PCL) (10 cases) and found the presence of "illegitimate" rearranged IGH fragments (no comigration between the J and C regions) in 21 cases. To confirm this analysis, we cloned the illegitimate rearranged fragments from three samples, and the molecular and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses indicated the presence of chromosomal translocations juxtaposing a switch IGH region to sequences from chromosomes 11q13 (one PCL case) or 4p16.3 (two MM cases). Interestingly, the breakpoints on 4p16.3 occurred about 14 kb apart in a genomic region located approximately 50 kb centromeric to the fibroblast growth-factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. Moreover, Southern blot analysis using 4p16.3 genomic probes detected a rearrangement in an additional MM tumor. FISH analysis of the MM-derived KMS-11 cell line, reported to be associated with a t(4; 14)(p16.3; q32), showed that the FGFR3 gene was translocated on 14q32. High levels of FGFR3 mRNA expression were observed in the cloned MM tumors and KMS-11 cell line, but not in the cases that were apparently negative for this lesion. Furthermore, a point mutation at codon 373 in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR3 gene resulting in an amino acid substitution (Tyr --> Cys) was detected

  19. Application of CRISPRi for prokaryotic metabolic engineering involving multiple genes, a case study: Controllable P(3HB-co-4HB) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Ren, Yi-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is used to edit eukaryotic genomes. Here, we show that CRISPRi can also be used for fine-tuning prokaryotic gene expression while simultaneously regulating multiple essential gene expression with less labor and time consumption. As a case study, CRISPRi was used to control polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis pathway flux and to adjust PHA composition. A pathway was constructed in Escherichia coli for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] from glucose. The native gene sad encoding E. coli succinate semi-aldehyde dehydrogenase was expressed under the control of CRISPRi using five specially designed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for regulating carbon flux to 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB) biosynthesis. The system allowed formation of P(3HB-co-4HB) consisting of 1-9mol% 4HB. Additionally, succinate, generated by succinyl-coA synthetase and succinate dehydrogenase (respectively encoded by genes sucC, sucD and sdhA, sdhB) was channeled preferentially to the 4HB precursor by using selected sgRNAs such as sucC2, sucD2, sdhB2 and sdhA1 via CRISPRi. The resulting 4HB content in P(3HB-co-4HB) was found to range from 1.4 to 18.4mol% depending on the expression levels of down-regulated genes. The results show that CRISPRi is a feasible method to simultaneously manipulate multiple genes in E. coli.

  20. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  1. Acute multiple infarction involving the anterior circulation.

    PubMed

    Bogousslavsky, J; Bernasconi, A; Kumral, E

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency and clinical, topographic, and etiologic patterns of acute multiple infarction involving the anterior circulation. Data analysis from a prospective acute stroke registry in a community-based primary care center. Among 751 patients with first ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation over a 4-year period, 40 patients (5%) had acute multiple infarcts involving the anterior circulation. On computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement, there were four topographic patterns of infarction: (1) superficial infarcts (11 patients [28%]); (2) superficial and deep infarcts (12 patients [30%]); (3) deep infarcts (three patients [8%]); and (4) infarcts involving the anterior and the posterior circulation (14 patients [35%]). Both cerebral hemispheres were involved in one fourth of the cases. A specific clinical picture was found in up to 20% of the patients. This included global aphasia with left hemianopia, hemisensory loss or hemiparesis (in right-handed patients), transcortical mixed aphasia with hemianopia, and acute pure cognitive impairment ("dementia"). Large-artery disease was found in 13 patients (33%); a cardiac source of embolism was found in 11 patients (28%); and both were found in three patients (8%). Bilateral infarcts were related to cardioembolism (four patients) and bilateral large-artery disease (three patients). One month after stroke, one fourth of the patients were independent, one third had some disability, and 40% were either dead or completely dependent. Acute multiple infarcts involving the anterior circulation may be bilateral more frequently than is currently thought, and they are often associated with posterior circulation infarcts. They mainly involve the pial hemispheral territories, commonly being caused by cardioembolism or bilateral carotid atheroma. They may be associated with a specific neurologic-neuropsychological dysfunction pattern in up to one fifth of the patients, allowing

  2. Multiple loci of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae are involved in pathogenicity on bean: restoration of one lesion-deficient mutant requires two tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, J J; Willis, D K

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of lesion-forming ability was undertaken in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of bacterial brown spot disease of bean. Following a screen of 6,401 Tn5-containing derivatives of B728a on bean pods, 26 strains that did not form disease lesions were identified. Nine of the mutant strains were defective in the ability to elicit the hypersensitive reaction (HR) and were shown to contain Tn5 insertions within the P. syringae pv. syringae hrp region. Ten HR+ mutants were defective in the production of the toxin syringomycin, and a region of the chromosome implicated in the biosynthesis of syringomycin was deleted in a subset of these mutants. The remaining seven lesion-defective mutants retained the ability to produce protease and syringomycin. Marker exchange mutagenesis confirmed that the Tn5 insertion was causal to the mutant phenotype in several lesion-defective, HR+ strains. KW239, a lesion- and syringomycin-deficient mutant, was characterized at the molecular level. Sequence analysis of the chromosomal region flanking the Tn5 within KW239 revealed strong similarities to a number of known Escherichia coli gene products and DNA sequences: the nusA operon, including the complete initiator tRNA(Met) gene, metY; a tRNA(Leu) gene; the tpiA gene product; and the MrsA protein. Removal of sequences containing the two potential tRNA genes prevented restoration of mutant KW239 in trans. The Tn5 insertions within the lesion-deficient strains examined, including KW239, were not closely linked to each other or to the lemA or gacA genes previously identified as involved in lesion formation by P. syringae pv. syringae. PMID:9079910

  3. Hand involvement in multiple hereditary exostosis.

    PubMed

    Wood, V E; Molitor, C; Mudge, M K

    1990-11-01

    In summary, patients with multiple hereditary exostosis often inherit hand involvement but rarely show hand deformity. The principal area of involvement appears to be around the MCP joint but the PIP joint is the most common area of deformity. Metacarpal shortening usually does not cause functional problems and need not be treated. Angular deformity, though rare, does cause problems and needs surgical treatment. Unfortunately, there is no evidence that prevention of deformity is possible by early excision of osteochondromas. Treatment, therefore, requires both osteochondroma excision and closing-wedge corrective osteotomy.

  4. Gene expression analysis of overwintering mountain pine beetle larvae suggests multiple systems involved in overwintering stress, cold hardiness, and preparation for spring development

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, Tiffany; Pitt, Caitlin; Spooner, Luke J.; Fraser, Jordie; Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Keeling, Christopher I.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P.W.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-induced mortality has historically been a key aspect of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), population control, but little is known about the molecular basis for cold tolerance in this insect. We used RNA-seq analysis to monitor gene expression patterns of mountain pine beetle larvae at four time points during their overwintering period—early-autumn, late-autumn, early-spring, and late-spring. Changing transcript profiles over the winter indicates a multipronged physiological response from larvae that is broadly characterized by gene transcripts involved in insect immune responses and detoxification during the autumn. In the spring, although transcripts associated with developmental process are present, there was no particular biological process dominating the transcriptome. PMID:27441109

  5. Gene expression analysis of overwintering mountain pine beetle larvae suggests multiple systems involved in overwintering stress, cold hardiness, and preparation for spring development.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jeanne A; Bonnett, Tiffany; Pitt, Caitlin; Spooner, Luke J; Fraser, Jordie; Yuen, Macaire M S; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P W

    2016-01-01

    Cold-induced mortality has historically been a key aspect of mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), population control, but little is known about the molecular basis for cold tolerance in this insect. We used RNA-seq analysis to monitor gene expression patterns of mountain pine beetle larvae at four time points during their overwintering period-early-autumn, late-autumn, early-spring, and late-spring. Changing transcript profiles over the winter indicates a multipronged physiological response from larvae that is broadly characterized by gene transcripts involved in insect immune responses and detoxification during the autumn. In the spring, although transcripts associated with developmental process are present, there was no particular biological process dominating the transcriptome.

  6. Lung Involvement in Multiple Myeloma - Case Study

    PubMed Central

    NIŢU, MIMI; CRIȘAN, EMILIA; OLTEANU, M.; CĂLĂRAŞU, CRISTINA; OLTEANU, MĂDĂLINA; POPESCU, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mutiple mieloma (MM) cells are rarely found in extramedullary sites. The sites of extramedullary dissemination reported in the literature are spleen, liver, lymph nodes, kidneys, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, ovary, tests, lung, pleura, pericardium, intestinal tract and skin. We report a case in which the myeloma was diagnosed after we discovered the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL). Matherial and method: a case in which diagnosis was established from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid demonstrating the presence of monoclonal plasma cells in Craiova Pneumology Departament. Results: Analysis of BAL fluid for the presence of plasma cells and for cytoplasmic immunoglobulin DNA provides a noninvasive means of establishing the diagnosis. Conclusions: Pulmonary parenchyma is an uncommon site of extramedullary involvement in multiple myeloma. Interstitial lung disease as pulmonary manifestation of multiple myeloma is even rarer; only isolated cases with histological proofs have been reported in the literature. PMID:26788357

  7. Crash involvement of drivers with multiple crashes.

    PubMed

    Chandraratna, Susantha; Stamatiadis, Nikiforos; Stromberg, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    A goal for any licensing agency is the ability to identify high-risk drivers. Kentucky data show that a significant number of drivers are repeatedly involved in crashes. The objective of this study is the development of a crash prediction model that can be used to estimate the likelihood of a driver being at fault for a near future crash occurrence. Multiple logistic regression techniques were employed using the available data for the Kentucky licensed drivers. This study considers as crash predictors the driver's total number of previous crashes, citations accumulated, the time gap between the latest two crashes, crash type, and demographic factors. The driver's total number of previous crashes was further disaggregated into the drivers' total number of previous at-fault and not-at-fault crashes. The model can be used to correctly classify at-fault drivers up to 74.56% with an overall efficiency of 63.34%. The total number of previous at-fault crash involvements, and having previous driver license suspensions and traffic school referrals are strongly associated with a driver being responsible for a subsequent crash. In addition, a driver's likelihood to be at fault in a crash is higher for very young or very old, males, drivers with both speeding and non-speeding citations, and drivers that had a recent crash involvement. Thus, the model presented here enables agencies to more actively monitor the likelihood of a driver to be at fault in a crash.

  8. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a novel apple MdCIPK6L gene reveals its involvement in multiple abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Kai; Li, Ling-Li; Cao, Zhong-Hui; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Ming; Zhang, Ling-Yun; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2012-05-01

    CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs) are involved in many aspects of plant responses to abiotic stresses. However, their functions are poorly understood in fruit trees. In this study, a salt-induced MdCIPK6L gene was isolated from apple. Its expression was positively induced by abiotic stresses, stress-related hormones and exogenous Ca(2+). MdCIPK6L was not homologous to AtSOS2, however, its ectopic expression functionally complemented Arabidopsis sos2 mutant. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid assay showed that MdCIPK6L protein interacted with AtSOS3, indicating that it functions in salt tolerance partially like AtSOS2 through SOS pathway. As a result, the overexpression of both MdCIPK6L and MdCIPK6LT175D remarkably enhanced the tolerance to salt, osmotic/drought and chilling stresses, but did not affect root growth, in transgenic Arabidopsis and apple. Also, T-to-D mutation to MdCIPK6L at Thr175 did not affect its function. These differences between MdCIPK6L and other CIPKs, especially CIPK6s, indicate that MdCIPK6L encodes a novel CIPK in apple. Finally, MdCIPK6L overexpression also conferred tolerance to salt, drought and chilling stresses in transgenic tomatoes. Therefore, MdCIPK6L functions in stress tolerance crossing the species barriers, and is supposed to be a potential candidate gene to improve stress tolerance by genetic manipulation in apple and other crops.

  9. Evidence of Multiple Treponema Phylotypes Involved in Bovine Digital Dermatitis as Shown by 16S rRNA Gene Analysis and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization▿

    PubMed Central

    Klitgaard, Kirstine; Boye, Mette; Capion, Nynne; Jensen, Tim K.

    2008-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of the skin disease digital dermatitis (DD), an important cause of lameness in cattle, remains uncertain. Microscopically, the disease appears to be polymicrobial, with spirochetes as the predominant bacteria. The objective of this study was to identify the main part of the bacteria involved in DD lesions of cattle by using culture-independent molecular methods. Ten different phylotypes of Treponema were identified either by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of bacteria from DD lesions or by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using phylotype-specific 16S rRNA-directed oligonucleotide probes. Two phylotypes, phylotype 1 (PT1) and PT2, were not closely related to any characterized treponemal species. PT7 was 99.3% identical to Treponema denticola, while PT9 resembled T. vincentii by 96%. The remaining phylotypes, PT3, PT4, PT5, PT6, and PT8, and Treponema brennaborense had previously been isolated from DD lesions. Forty DD biopsy specimens were examined for Treponema by FISH. With one exception, all of the biopsy specimens revealed epidermotropic, intermingled infection with three or more different phylotypes (mean, 4.7). The most prevalent species were PT1 (95%), PT6 (93%), and PT3 (85%). While colonization by PT3 was confined to the surface of the epidermis, both PT1 and PT6 invaded deep into the stratum spinosum and were seen in ulcerated dermal papillae. In two cases, all 10 phylotypes were demonstrated. Furthermore, FISH with a Treponema group-specific probe showed that Treponema accounted for more than 90% of the total bacterial population in the biopsy specimens. These data strongly suggest that a group of apparently symbiotic Treponema species are involved as primary bacterial pathogens in DD. PMID:18562583

  10. Peculiar chondroblastoma involving multiple tarsal bones.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masaharu; Asanuma, Kazuo; Irie, Takeo

    2010-07-01

    A case of peculiar chondroblastoma involving multiple tarsal bones in a 49-year-old woman is described. The patient presented with pain and swelling of the right foot. Radiographs revealed a lytic expansile lesion of medial, intermediate, and lateral cuneiform bones, navicular, cuboid, and tarsal bones of the right foot, indicating a malignant tumor. Biopsies demonstrated a diffuse proliferation of round cells with eccentric and indented nuclei with longitudinal grooves and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Atypia was prominent, but mitotic figures were rare. The stroma was chondroid with focal chicken-wire calcification. On electron microscopy, the tumor exhibited chondroblastic features. The patient is alive with the tumor 7 years after radiotherapy. The tumor is considered a chondroblastoma with low malignant potential.

  11. Molecular mechanism of anticancer effect of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in HT29 cells involves differential expression of genes associated with multiple signaling pathways: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Barkeer, Srikanth; Guha, Nilanjan; Hothpet, Vishwanathreddy; Saligrama Adavigowda, Deepak; Hegde, Prajna; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Yu, Lu-Gang; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2015-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from fungus S. rolfsii and has high binding specificity toward the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich carbohydrate antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF), which is expressed in more than 90% of human cancers. Our previous studies have shown that binding of SRL to human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells induces cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. This study investigated the SRL-mediated cell signaling in human colon cancer HT29 cells by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. It was found that SRL treatment results in altered expression of several hundred molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-JUN-associated, apoptosis-associated and cell cycle and DNA replication-associated signaling molecules. Pathway analysis using GeneSpring 12.6.1 revealed that SRL treatment induces changes of MAPK and c-JUN-associated signaling pathways as early as 2 h while changes of cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis pathways were significantly affected only after 24 h. A significant change of cell miRNA expression was also observed after 12 h treatment of the cells with SRL. These changes were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. This study thus suggests that the presence of SRL affects multiple signaling pathways in cancer cells with early effects on cell proliferation pathways associated with MAPK and c-JUN, followed by miRNA-associated cell activity and apoptosis. This provides insight information into the molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of this fungal lectin.

  12. apex: phylogenetics with multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Jombart, Thibaut; Archer, Frederick; Schliep, Klaus; Kamvar, Zhian; Harris, Rebecca; Paradis, Emmanuel; Goudet, Jérome; Lapp, Hilmar

    2017-01-01

    Genetic sequences of multiple genes are becoming increasingly common for a wide range of organisms including viruses, bacteria and eukaryotes. While such data may sometimes be treated as a single locus, in practice, a number of biological and statistical phenomena can lead to phylogenetic incongruence. In such cases, different loci should, at least as a preliminary step, be examined and analysed separately. The r software has become a popular platform for phylogenetics, with several packages implementing distance-based, parsimony and likelihood-based phylogenetic reconstruction, and an even greater number of packages implementing phylogenetic comparative methods. Unfortunately, basic data structures and tools for analysing multiple genes have so far been lacking, thereby limiting potential for investigating phylogenetic incongruence. In this study, we introduce the new r package apex to fill this gap. apex implements new object classes, which extend existing standards for storing DNA and amino acid sequences, and provides a number of convenient tools for handling, visualizing and analysing these data. In this study, we introduce the main features of the package and illustrate its functionalities through the analysis of a simple data set.

  13. Cold induction of Arabidopsis CBF genes involves multiple ICE (inducer of CBF expression) promoter elements and a cold-regulatory circuit that is desensitized by low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zarka, Daniel G; Vogel, Jonathan T; Cook, Daniel; Thomashow, Michael F

    2003-10-01

    The Arabidopsis CBF1, 2, and 3 genes (also known as DREB1b, c, and a, respectively) encode transcriptional activators that have a central role in cold tolerance. CBF1-3 are rapidly induced upon exposing plants to low temperature, followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes, the CBF regulon, resulting in an increase in plant freezing tolerance. At present, little is known about the cold-sensing mechanism that controls CBF expression. Results presented here indicate that this mechanism does not require a cold shock to bring about the accumulation of CBF transcripts, but instead, absolute temperature is monitored with a greater degree of input, i.e. lower temperature, resulting in a greater output, i.e. higher levels of CBF transcripts. Temperature-shift experiments also indicate that the cold-sensing mechanism becomes desensitized to a given low temperature, such as 4 degrees C, and that resensitization to that temperature requires between 8 and 24 h at warm temperature. Gene fusion experiments identified a 125-bp section of the CBF2 promoter that is sufficient to impart cold-responsive gene expression. Mutational analysis of this cold-responsive region identified two promoter segments that work in concert to impart robust cold-regulated gene expression. These sequences, designated ICEr1 and ICEr2 (induction of CBF expression region 1 or 2), were also shown to stimulate transcription in response to mechanical agitation and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide.

  14. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C.

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Gene expression studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tajouri, Lotti; Fernandez, Francesca; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2007-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious neurological disorder affecting young Caucasian individuals, usually with an age of onset at 18 to 40 years old. Females account for approximately 60x of MS cases and the manifestation and course of the disease is highly variable from patient to patient. The disorder is characterised by the development of plaques within the central nervous system (CNS). Many gene expression studies have been undertaken to look at the specific patterns of gene transcript levels in MS. Human tissues and experimental mice were used in these gene-profiling studies and a very valuable and interesting set of data has resulted from these various expression studies. In general, genes showing variable expression include mainly immunological and inflammatory genes, stress and antioxidant genes, as well as metabolic and central nervous system markers. Of particular interest are a number of genes localised to susceptible loci previously shown to be in linkage with MS. However due to the clinical complexity of the disease, the heterogeneity of the tissues used in expression studies, as well as the variable DNA chips/membranes used for the gene profiling, it is difficult to interpret the available information. Although this information is essential for the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS, it is difficult to decipher and define the gene pathways involved in the disorder. Experiments in gene expression profiling in MS have been numerous and lists of candidates are now available for analysis. Researchers have investigated gene expression in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells (PBMCs), in MS animal models Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE) and post mortem MS brain tissues. This review will focus on the results of these studies.

  16. Predicting cancer involvement of genes from heterogeneous data

    PubMed Central

    Aragues, Ramon; Sander, Chris; Oliva, Baldo

    2008-01-01

    Background Systematic approaches for identifying proteins involved in different types of cancer are needed. Experimental techniques such as microarrays are being used to characterize cancer, but validating their results can be a laborious task. Computational approaches are used to prioritize between genes putatively involved in cancer, usually based on further analyzing experimental data. Results We implemented a systematic method using the PIANA software that predicts cancer involvement of genes by integrating heterogeneous datasets. Specifically, we produced lists of genes likely to be involved in cancer by relying on: (i) protein-protein interactions; (ii) differential expression data; and (iii) structural and functional properties of cancer genes. The integrative approach that combines multiple sources of data obtained positive predictive values ranging from 23% (on a list of 811 genes) to 73% (on a list of 22 genes), outperforming the use of any of the data sources alone. We analyze a list of 20 cancer gene predictions, finding that most of them have been recently linked to cancer in literature. Conclusion Our approach to identifying and prioritizing candidate cancer genes can be used to produce lists of genes likely to be involved in cancer. Our results suggest that differential expression studies yielding high numbers of candidate cancer genes can be filtered using protein interaction networks. PMID:18371197

  17. Site-specific deletions involving the tal-1 and sil genes are restricted to cells of the T cell receptor alpha/beta lineage: T cell receptor delta gene deletion mechanism affects multiple genes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Site-specific deletions in the tal-1 gene are reported to occur in 12- 26% of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL). So far two main types of tal-1 deletions have been described. Upon analysis of 134 T- ALL we have found two new types of tal-1 deletions. These four types of deletions juxtapose the 5' part of the tal-1 gene to the sil gene promoter, thereby deleting all coding sil exons but leaving the coding tal-1 exons undamaged. The recombination signal sequences (RSS) and fusion regions of the tal-1 deletion breakpoints strongly resemble the RSS and junctional regions of immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements, which implies that they are probably caused by the same V(D)J recombinase complex. Analysis of the 134 T-ALL suggested that the occurrence of tal-1 deletions is associated with the CD3 phenotype, because no tal-1 deletions were found in 25 TCR-gamma/delta + T-ALL, whereas 8 of the 69 CD3- T-ALL and 11 of the 40 TCR-alpha/beta + T-ALL contained such a deletion. Careful examination of all TCR genes revealed that tal-1 deletions exclusively occurred in CD3- or CD3+ T- ALL of the alpha/beta lineage with a frequency of 18% in T-ALL with one deleted TCR-delta allele, and a frequency of 34% in T-ALL with TCR- delta gene deletions on both alleles. Therefore, we conclude that alpha/beta lineage commitment of the T-ALL and especially the extent of TCR-delta gene deletions determines the chance of a tal-1 deletion. This suggests that tal-1 deletions are mediated via the same deletion mechanism as TCR-delta gene deletions. PMID:8459224

  18. CkDREB gene in Caragana korshinskii is involved in the regulation of stress response to multiple abiotic stresses as an AP2/EREBP transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemin; Chen, Xiaofang; Liu, Yun; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Zan; Sun, Guizhi

    2011-04-01

    Using RACE method, a DREB-like gene-CkDREB, which contains a conserved AP2/ERF domain, was isolated from Caragana korshinskii. Full length of CkDREB cDNA was 1743 bp, including an ORF of 1038 bp and encoding a polypeptide of 345 amino acids. CkDREB protein shared high identification with other homologs from other plants. The KR-rich motif at the N-terminal region played an essential role in nuclear localization of CkDREB. Yeast one-hybrid experiments testified that CkDREB possess specific DRE element-binding activity and transcriptional activation. A variety of abiotic stress, including high salt, dehydration, low temperature all significantly induced the expression of CkDREB gene. Exogenous phytohormone ABA also slightly up-regulated the mRNA accumulation of CkDREB. Overexpression of CkDREB in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced tolerance to high salinity and osmotic stresses and induction of downstream target genes under normal conditions. These results suggested that CkDREB may play an essential role as a DREB transcription factor in regulation of stress-responsive signaling in C. korshinskii.

  19. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress.

  20. The Shared Crosstalk of Multiple Pathways Involved in the Inflammation between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Coronary Artery Disease Based on a Digital Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Jiang, Miao; He, Dan; Bian, Yanqin; Zhang, Ge; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Lu, Aiping

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are both complex inflammatory diseases, and an increased prevalence of CAD and a high rate of mortality have been observed in RA patients. But the molecular mechanism of inflammation that is shared between the two disorders is unclear. High-throughput techniques, such as transcriptome analysis, are becoming important tools for genetic biomarker discovery in highly complex biological samples, which is critical for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of disease. In the present study, we reported one type of transcriptome analysis method: digital gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 10 RA patients, 10 CAD patients and 10 healthy people. In all, 213 and 152 differently expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in RA patients compared with normal controls (RA vs. normal) and CAD patients compared with normal controls (CAD vs. normal), respectively, with 73 shared DEGs between them. Using this technique in combination with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis software, the effects on inflammation of four shared canonical pathways, three shared activated predicted upstream regulators and three shared molecular interaction networks were identified and explored. These shared molecular mechanisms may provide the genetic basis and potential targets for optimizing the application of current drugs to more effectively treat these diseases simultaneously and for preventing one when the other is diagnosed. PMID:25514790

  1. Apolipoprotein gene involved in lipid metabolism

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Edward; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2007-07-03

    Methods and materials for studying the effects of a newly identified human gene, APOAV, and the corresponding mouse gene apoAV. The sequences of the genes are given, and transgenic animals which either contain the gene or have the endogenous gene knocked out are described. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene are described and characterized. It is demonstrated that certain SNPs are associated with diseases involving lipids and triglycerides and other metabolic diseases. These SNPs may be used alone or with SNPs from other genes to study individual risk factors. Methods for intervention in lipid diseases, including the screening of drugs to treat lipid-related or diabetic diseases are also disclosed.

  2. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  3. Involvement of multiple receptors in the biological effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide and amylin in rat and guinea-pig preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, S.; Wimalawansa, S. J.; Maggi, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The activity of rat alpha and beta calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as compared to the structurally related peptide, rat amylin, has been investigated in the guinea-pig isolated left atrium (electrically driven), in mucosa-free strips from the base of the guinea-pig urinary bladder and in the rat isolated vas deferens (pars prostatica). The antagonist activity of the C-terminal fragment of human alpha CGRP, alpha CGRP(8-37), was also investigated. 2. In the guinea-pig isolated left atrium the three peptides produced a concentration-related positive inotropic effect, amylin being about 16 and 31 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP, respectively. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) produced a rightward displacement of the log concentration-response curve to the three agonists tested, without depression of maximal response attainable. Apparent pKB values calculated on the basis of the displacement produced by 1 microM human alpha CGRP(8-37) indicated an agonist-independent affinity of the antagonist (6.66 +/- 0.11 for alpha CGRP, 6.42 +/- 0.17 for beta CGRP and 6.95 +/- 0.11 for amylin). 3. In the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder, alpha or beta CGRP or amylin produce a concentration-related inhibition of twitch contractions evoked by train electrical field stimulation (10 Hz frequency, 0.25 ms duration at 100 V for 0.5 s every 60 s). Amylin was about 100 times less potent than alpha or beta CGRP. Human alpha CGRP(8-37) (3 microM) did not significantly affect the inhibitory action of the three agonists tested.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1330181

  4. Congenital onychoheterotopia involving multiple toe nails.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Savita; Khullar, Geeti; Dogra, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Onychoheterotopia is an uncommon condition in which nail tissue is found beyond the common nail unit of the digits of the hands and feet, most often on the fifth digit of the hand. It represents an extra and independent nail that can be present either congenitally, or more commonly, acquired following trauma. The exact pathogenesis of the congenital type is undetermined. We report a 25-year-old male with multiple congenital ectopic nails of the toes since birth, which has not been reported before.

  5. [Multiple primary malignant tumors involving the liver].

    PubMed

    Tiszlavicz, L; Tasnádi, T

    1993-01-31

    In the Department of Pathology of the Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical University in Szeged during the last 30 years 1770 (19.4% of the cancers) primary malignant lung tumours were observed in autopsy material, from which 86 patients (4.9%) had other malignancies as well. In 81 cases other extrapulmonary and in 5 cases other primary lung tumours were observed. The male predominance in these cases was significant. All of the patients were heavy smokers. Amongst these synchronous tumour-associations the most frequent extrapulmonary tumours arose in the urogenital tract, in the head and neck, relatively frequently also in the breast, liver, stomach, intestine and thyroid. These cases caused diagnostic dilemmas both for the clinician and even for the pathologist. Several signs help to distinguish a new primary tumour from a metastasis. Multiplicity itself does not mean poorer prognosis. Each cancer should possibly receive adequate treatment.

  6. Mining Gene Expression Data of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Zhengliang; Li, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example. Materials and methods Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control) were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models’ performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined. Results An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score. Conclusions The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases. PMID:24932510

  7. Multiple cis-acting elements involved in up-regulation of a cytochrome P450 gene conferring resistance to deltamethrin in smal brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén).

    PubMed

    Pu, Jian; Sun, Haina; Wang, Jinda; Wu, Min; Wang, Kangxu; Denholm, Ian; Han, Zhaojun

    2016-11-01

    As well as arising from single point mutations in binding sites or detoxifying enzymes, it is likely that insecticide resistance mechanisms are frequently controlled by multiple genetic factors, resulting in resistance being inherited as a quantitative trait. However, empirical evidence for this is still rare. Here we analyse the causes of up-regulation of CYP6FU1, a monoxygenase implicated in resistance to deltamethrin in the rice pest Laodelphax striatellus. The 5'-flanking region of this gene was cloned and sequenced from individuals of a susceptible and a resistant strain. A luminescent reporter assay was used to evaluate different 5'-flanking regions and their fragments for promoter activity. Mutations enhancing promoter activity in various fragments were characterized, singly and in combination, by site mutation recovery. Nucleotide diversity in flanking sequences was greatly reduced in deltamethrin-resistant insects compared to susceptible ones. Phylogenetic sequence analysis found that CYP6FU1 had five different types of 5'-flanking region. All five types were present in a susceptible strain but only a single type showing the highest promoter activity was present in a resistant strain. Four cis-acting elements were identified whose influence on up-regulation was much more pronounced in combination than when present singly. Of these, two were new transcription factor (TF) binding sites produced by mutations, another one was also a new TF binding site alternated from an existing one, and the fourth was a unique transcription start site. These results demonstrate that multiple cis-acting elements are involved in up-regulating CYP6FU1 to generate a resistance phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of genes and gene clusters involved in mycotoxin synthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research methods to identify and characterize genes involved in mycotoxin biosynthetic pathways have evolved considerably over the years. Before whole genome sequences were available (e.g. pre-genomics), work focused primarily on chemistry, biosynthetic mutant strains and molecular analysis of sing...

  9. MGDB: a comprehensive database of genes involved in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhang, Hanqian; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Xia, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    The Melanoma Gene Database (MGDB) is a manually curated catalog of molecular genetic data relating to genes involved in melanoma. The main purpose of this database is to establish a network of melanoma related genes and to facilitate the mechanistic study of melanoma tumorigenesis. The entries describing the relationships between melanoma and genes in the current release were manually extracted from PubMed abstracts, which contains cumulative to date 527 human melanoma genes (422 protein-coding and 105 non-coding genes). Each melanoma gene was annotated in seven different aspects (General Information, Expression, Methylation, Mutation, Interaction, Pathway and Drug). In addition, manually curated literature references have also been provided to support the inclusion of the gene in MGDB and establish its association with melanoma. MGDB has a user-friendly web interface with multiple browse and search functions. We hoped MGDB will enrich our knowledge about melanoma genetics and serve as a useful complement to the existing public resources. Database URL: http://bioinfo.ahu.edu.cn:8080/Melanoma/index.jsp PMID:26424083

  10. Mutation analysis of the gene involved in adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, B.A. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Kemp, S.; Bolhuis, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    A gene responsible for the X-linked genetic disorder adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) that is characterized by demyelination of the nervous system and adrenocortical insufficiency has been identified by positional cloning. The gene encodes an ATP-binding transporter which is located in the peroxisomal membrane. Deficiency of the gene leads to accumulation of unsaturated very long chain fatty acids due to impaired peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation. A systematic analysis of the open reading frame of the ALD gene unraveled the mutations in 28 different families using reverse transcriptase-PCR followed by direct sequencing. No entire gene deletions or drastic promoter mutations have been detected. Only in one family did the mutation involved multiple exons. The remaining mutations were subtle alterations leading to missense (about 50%) or nonsense mutations, frameshifts or splice acceptor site defects. In one patient a single codon was missing. Mutations affecting a single amino acid were concentrated in the region between the third and fourth putative membrane spanning fragments and in the ATP-binding domain. This overview of mutations aids in the determination of structural and functional important regions and facilitates the screening for mutations in other ALD patients. The detection of mutations in virtually all ALD families tested indicates that the isolated gene is the only gene responsible for ALD located in Xq28.

  11. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  12. Fatal cryptococcosis involving multiple sites in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Kaur, H; Zaman, K; Thapa, B R; Rudramurthy, S M

    2015-02-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis is less common in immunocompetent individuals. Herein, we report a fatal case of cryptococcosis in apparently immunocompetent child with multiple site involvement. The yeast isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, blood, endotracheal, gastric and lymph node aspirate was identified by molecular method as Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii.

  13. Analysis of bilinear stochastic systems. [involving multiplicative noise processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.; Marcus, S. I.; Martin, D. N.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of stochastic dynamical systems that involve multiplicative (bilinear) noise processes is considered. After defining the systems of interest, the evolution of the moments of such systems, the question of stochastic stability, and estimation for bilinear stochastic systems are discussed. Both exact and approximate methods of analysis are introduced, and, in particular, the uses of Lie-theoretic concepts and harmonic analysis are discussed.

  14. Two persistent organic pollutants which act through different xenosensors (alpha-endosulfan and 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) interact in a mixture and downregulate multiple genes involved in human hepatocyte lipid and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ambolet-Camoit, Ariane; Ottolenghi, Chris; Leblanc, Alix; Kim, Min Ji; Letourneur, Franck; Jacques, Sébastien; Cagnard, Nicolas; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine

    2015-09-01

    Individuals, typically, are exposed to mixtures of environmental xenobiotics affecting multiple organs and acting through different xenosensors and pathways in species and cell-type specific manners. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and α-endosulfan are Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) and endocrine disruptors which act through different xenosensors and accumulate in the liver. Our objective in this HEALS study was to investigate the effects of the mixture of these POPs on gene expression in a human-derived hepatocyte cell line, HepaRG. We found that, in spite of having largely uncorrelated effects, TCDD and α-endosulfan, when mixed, alter the expression of genes. The combined effects of the mixture of the POPs significantly altered the expression of 100 genes (42 up- and 58 down-regulated) whereas the same concentration of either POP alone did not alter significantly the expression of these genes. For 32 other genes, selective inhibitory crosstalk between TCDD and α-endosulfan was observed. One of the POPs inhibited the effect, on gene expression, of the other in the mixture although, when used alone, that POP did not affect expression. The expression of another 82 genes was significantly altered (up- or down-regulated) by a single POP. The addition of the second POP either increased, in the same direction, the effect on gene expression or had no further effect. At low concentrations (0.2 nM TCDD and 1 μM α-endosulfan), the POPs still had significant effects and the levels of expression of the corresponding proteins were found to be affected for some genes. Particularly striking was the 80-90% inhibition, by the mixture, of the expression of a number of genes of several hepatic intermediary metabolic pathways (glycerolipid metabolism, FXR/RXR activation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, retinoid and bile acid biosynthesis), whereas each pollutant alone had only a moderate effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie

  15. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  16. Fractional populations in multiple gene inheritance.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2003-01-22

    With complete knowledge of the human genome sequence, one of the most interesting tasks remaining is to understand the functions of individual genes and how they communicate. Using the information about genes (locus, allele, mutation rate, fitness, etc.), we attempt to explain population demographic data. This population evolution study could complement and enhance biologists' understanding about genes. We present a general approach to study population genetics in complex situations. In the present approach, multiple allele inheritance, multiple loci inheritance, natural selection and mutations are allowed simultaneously in order to consider a more realistic situation. A simulation program is presented so that readers can readily carry out studies with their own parameters. It is shown that the multiplicity of the loci greatly affects the demographic results of fractional population ratios. Furthermore, the study indicates that some high infant mortality rates due to congenital anomalies can be attributed to multiple loci inheritance. The simulation program can be downloaded from http://won.hongik.ac.kr/~mhchung/index_files/yapop.htm. In order to run this program, one needs Visual Studio.NET platform, which can be downloaded from http://msdn.microsoft.com/netframework/downloads/default.asp.

  17. Multiple behavioural impulsivity tasks predict prospective alcohol involvement in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fernie, Gordon; Peeters, Margot; Gullo, Matthew J; Christiansen, Paul; Cole, Jon C; Sumnall, Harry; Field, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Aims We investigated reciprocal prospective relationships between multiple behavioural impulsivity tasks (assessing delay discounting, risk-taking and disinhibition) and alcohol involvement (consumption, drunkenness and problems) among adolescents. We hypothesized that performance on the tasks would predict subsequent alcohol involvement, and that alcohol involvement would lead to increases in behavioural impulsivity over time. Design Cross-lagged prospective design in which impulsivity and alcohol involvement were assessed five times over 2 years (once every 6 months, on average). Setting Classrooms in secondary schools in North West England. Participants Two hundred and eighty-seven adolescents (51.2% male) who were aged 12 or 13 years at study enrolment. Measurements Participants reported their alcohol involvement and completed computerized tasks of disinhibition, delay discounting and risk-taking at each assessment. Cross-sectional and prospective relationships between the variables of interest were investigated using cross-lagged analyses. Findings All behavioural impulsivity tasks predicted a composite index of alcohol involvement 6 months later (all Ps < 0.01), and these prospective relationships were reliable across the majority of time-points. Importantly, we did not observe the converse relationship across time: alcohol involvement did not predict performance on behavioural impulsivity tasks at any subsequent time point. Conclusions Several measures of impulsivity predict escalation in alcohol involvement in young adolescents, but alcohol use does not appear to alter impulsivity. PMID:23795646

  18. Parent involvement and student academic performance: a multiple mediational analysis.

    PubMed

    Topor, David R; Keane, Susan P; Shelton, Terri L; Calkins, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year-old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives are discussed.

  19. Parent involvement and student academic performance: A multiple mediational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Topor, David R.; Keane, Susan P.; Shelton, Terri L.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Parent involvement in a child's education is consistently found to be positively associated with a child's academic performance. However, there has been little investigation of the mechanisms that explain this association. The present study examines two potential mechanisms of this association: the child's perception of cognitive competence and the quality of the student-teacher relationship. This study used a sample of 158 seven-year old participants, their mothers, and their teachers. Results indicated a statistically significant association between parent involvement and a child's academic performance, over and above the impact of the child's intelligence. A multiple mediation model indicated that the child's perception of cognitive competence fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and the child's performance on a standardized achievement test. The quality of the student-teacher relationship fully mediated the relation between parent involvement and teacher ratings of the child's classroom academic performance. Limitations, future research directions, and implications for public policy initiatives were discussed. PMID:20603757

  20. New genes potentially involved in breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Schwirzke, M; Schiemann, S; Gnirke, A U; Weidle, U H

    1999-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer opens new avenues for improved diagnostic markers and new molecular targets for improved treatment of this malignancy. In the following we review genes with proved involvement in invasion and metastasis of breast cancer as well as genes which exhibit an expression pattern that correlates with invasion and metastasis.

  1. Clinical Applications Involving CNS Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Boris; McCown, Thomas; Leone, Paola; Gray, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have traditionally been the most difficult to treat by traditional pharmacological methods, due mostly to the blood–brain barrier and the difficulties associated with repeated drug administration targeting the CNS. Viral vector gene transfer represents a way to permanently provide a therapeutic protein within the nervous system after a single administration, whether this be a gene replacement strategy for an inherited disorder or a disease-modifying protein for a disease such as Parkinson's. Gene therapy approaches for CNS disorders has evolved considerably over the last two decades. Although a breakthrough treatment has remained elusive, current strategies are now considerably safer and potentially much more effective. This chapter will explore the past, current, and future status of CNS gene therapy, focusing on clinical trials utilizing adeno-associated virus and lentiviral vectors. PMID:25311921

  2. THE BIOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE INVOLVES MULTIPLE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Stephanie J.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Prough, Russell A.; Miller, Kristy K. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone has been thought to have physiological functions other than as an androgen precursor. The previous studies performed have demonstrated a number of biological effects in rodents, such as amelioration of disease in diabetic, chemical carcinogenesis, and obesity models. To date, activation of the peroxisome proliferators activated receptor alpha, pregnane X receptor, and estrogen receptor by DHEA and its metabolites have been demonstrated. Several membrane-associated receptors have also been elucidated leading to additional mechanisms by which DHEA may exert its biological effects. This review will provide an overview of the receptor multiplicity involved in the biological activity of this sterol. PMID:16684650

  3. Pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving multiple masticatory muscles: Imaging evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Kamalapur, Muralidhar G; Patil, Pritam B; Joshi, Shyamsundar; Shastri, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is a rare cause of trismus. We present a case of pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving medial pterygoid, lateral pterygoid, and temporalis muscles. Patient presented with gross limitation in mouth opening. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a bone density mass located in the region of medial and lateral pterygoid muscles on the right and temporalis muscle on the left. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed similar findings. Radiological diagnosis was pseudomalignant myositis ossificans. The masses were resected and histopathologic examination confirmed the above diagnosis. This report describes the characteristic CT and MRI features. The unique feature of this case is the absence of history of trauma with involvement of multiple masticatory muscles, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported before. PMID:24851010

  4. Pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving multiple masticatory muscles: Imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kamalapur, Muralidhar G; Patil, Pritam B; Joshi, Shyamsundar; Shastri, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Myositis ossificans is a rare cause of trismus. We present a case of pseudomalignant myositis ossificans involving medial pterygoid, lateral pterygoid, and temporalis muscles. Patient presented with gross limitation in mouth opening. There was no history of trauma. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a bone density mass located in the region of medial and lateral pterygoid muscles on the right and temporalis muscle on the left. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed similar findings. Radiological diagnosis was pseudomalignant myositis ossificans. The masses were resected and histopathologic examination confirmed the above diagnosis. This report describes the characteristic CT and MRI features. The unique feature of this case is the absence of history of trauma with involvement of multiple masticatory muscles, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported before.

  5. Multiple Goals and Homework Involvement in Elementary School Students.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Pan, Irene; Núñez, José C; Rodríguez, Susana; Rosário, Pedro; Regueiro, Bibiana

    2015-10-27

    This work arises from the need to investigate the role of motivational variables in homework involvement and academic achievement of elementary school students. The aims of this study are twofold: identifying the different combinations of student academic goals and analyzing the differences in homework involvement and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 535 fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade elementary school students, between the ages of 9 and 13 years old. Findings showed three groups with different motivational profiles: a group of students with high multiple goals, another group with a learning goal orientation and a third group defined by a low multiple goals profile. Focusing on the differences between groups, it was observed that the amount of time doing homework was not associated with any motivational profile. Nevertheless, the differences were statistically significant between the motivational groups in the amount of homework (F(2, 530) = 42.59; p < .001; ηp 2 = .138), in the management of time spent on homework (F(2, 530) = 33.08; p < .001; ηp 2 = .111), and in academic achievement (F(2, 530) = 33.99; p < .001; ηp 2 = .114). The effect size was large for the amount of homework performed and was also relatively large in the case of management of time and academic achievement.

  6. In Silico Gene Prioritization by Integrating Multiple Data Sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingyao; Shields, Robert; Chanda, Sumit K.; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is crucial to the understanding of disease pathogenesis, and to the improvement of disease diagnosis and treatment. In recent years, many researchers have proposed approaches to prioritize candidate genes by considering the relationship of candidate genes and existing known disease genes, reflected in other data sources. In this paper, we propose an expandable framework for gene prioritization that can integrate multiple heterogeneous data sources by taking advantage of a unified graphic representation. Gene-gene relationships and gene-disease relationships are then defined based on the overall topology of each network using a diffusion kernel measure. These relationship measures are in turn normalized to derive an overall measure across all networks, which is utilized to rank all candidate genes. Based on the informativeness of available data sources with respect to each specific disease, we also propose an adaptive threshold score to select a small subset of candidate genes for further validation studies. We performed large scale cross-validation analysis on 110 disease families using three data sources. Results have shown that our approach consistently outperforms other two state of the art programs. A case study using Parkinson disease (PD) has identified four candidate genes (UBB, SEPT5, GPR37 and TH) that ranked higher than our adaptive threshold, all of which are involved in the PD pathway. In particular, a very recent study has observed a deletion of TH in a patient with PD, which supports the importance of the TH gene in PD pathogenesis. A web tool has been implemented to assist scientists in their genetic studies. PMID:21731658

  7. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  8. Identification of single- and multiple-class specific signature genes from gene expression profiles by group marker index.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  9. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression identifies new genes involved in steatotic liver

    PubMed Central

    Guillén, Natalia; Navarro, María A.; Arnal, Carmen; Noone, Enda; Arbonés-Mainar, José M.; Acín, Sergio; Surra, Joaquín C.; Muniesa, Pedro; Roche, Helen M.; Osada, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    Trans-10, cis-12-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched diets promote fatty liver in mice, while cis-9, trans-11-CLA ameliorates this effect, suggesting regulation of multiple genes. To test this hypothesis, apoE-deficient mice were fed a Western-type diet enriched with linoleic acid isomers, and their hepatic gene expression was analyzed with DNA microarrays. To provide an initial screening of candidate genes, only 12 with remarkably modified expression between both CLA isomers were considered and confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Additionally mRNA expression of 15 genes involved in lipid metabolism was also studied. Ten genes (Fsp27, Aqp4, Cd36, Ly6d, Scd1, Hsd3b5, Syt1, Cyp7b1, and Tff3) showed significant associations among their expressions and the degree of hepatic steatosis. Their involvement was also analyzed in other models of steatosis. In hyperhomocysteinemic mice lacking Cbs gene, only Fsp27, Cd36, Scd1, Syt1, and Hsd3b5 hepatic expressions were associated with steatosis. In apoE-deficient mice consuming olive-enriched diet displaying reduction of the fatty liver, only Fsp27 and Syt1 expressions were found associated. Using this strategy, we have shown that expression of these genes is highly associated with hepatic steatosis in a genetic disease such as Cbs deficiency and in two common situations such as Western diets containing CLA isomers or a Mediterranean-type diet. Conclusion: The results highlight new processes involved in lipid handling in liver and will help to understand the complex human pathology providing new proteins and new strategies to cope with hepatic steatosis. PMID:19258494

  10. Anti-inflammatory genes associated with multiple sclerosis: a gene expression study.

    PubMed

    Perga, S; Montarolo, F; Martire, S; Berchialla, P; Malucchi, S; Bertolotto, A

    2015-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by a complex interaction between multiple genes and environmental factors. HLA region is the strongest susceptibility locus, but recent huge genome-wide association studies identified new susceptibility genes. Among these, BACH2, PTGER4, RGS1 and ZFP36L1 were highlighted. Here, a gene expression analysis revealed that three of them, namely BACH2, PTGER4 and ZFP36L1, are down-regulated in MS patients' blood cells compared to healthy subjects. Interestingly, all these genes are involved in the immune system regulation with predominant anti-inflammatory role and their reduction could predispose to MS development.

  11. Involvement of homeobox genes in early body plan of monocot.

    PubMed

    Ito, Momoyo; Sato, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Homeobox genes are known as transcriptional regulators that are involved in various aspects of developmental processes in many organisms. In plants, many types of homeobox genes have been identified, and mutational or expression pattern analyses of these genes have indicated the involvement of several classes of homeobox genes in developmental processes. The fundamental body plan of plants is established during embryogenesis, whereas morphogenetic events in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) continue after embryogenesis. Knotted1-like homeobox genes (knox genes) are preferentially expressed in both the SAM and the immature embryo. Therefore, these genes are considered to be key regulators of plant morphogenesis. In this review, we discuss the regulatory role of knox genes and other types of homeobox genes in SAM establishment during embryogenesis and SAM maintenance after embryogenesis, mainly in rice.

  12. Gene expression profiles in Finnish twins with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Särkijärvi, Silja; Kuusisto, Hanna; Paalavuo, Raija; Levula, Mari; Airla, Nina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kaprio, Jaakko; Koskenvuo, Markku; Elovaara, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Background Since genetic alterations influencing susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), are as yet poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to identify genes responsible for MS by studying monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for MS. Methods In order to identify genes involved in MS development, the gene expression profiles in blood mononuclear cells obtained from eight MZ twin pairs discordant for MS were analyzed by cDNA microarray technology detecting the expression of 8 300 genes. The twins were collected from the Finnish Twin Cohort Study and both affected subjects and their healthy siblings underwent neurological evaluation and cerebral and spinal magnetic resonance imaging. Gene expressions were confirmed by relative quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results It appeared that 25 genes were at least two-fold up-regulated and 15 genes down-regulated in 25% (2/8) of twins with MS when compared to their healthy siblings. Moreover, 6/25 genes were up-regulated in 40% of MS twins and one gene, interferon alpha-inducible protein (clone IFI-6-16) (G1P3), in 50% of them. The six most constantly expressed genes are (1) G1P3, (2) POU domain, class 3, transcription factor 1, (3) myxovirus resistance 2, (4) lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein-5, (5) hemoglobin alpha 2 and (6) hemoglobin beta. Conclusion Over two-fold up-regulation of these six genes in almost half of MZ twins with MS suggests their role in MS pathogenesis. Studies using MZ MS twins obtained from genetically homogeneous population offer a unique opportunity to explore the genetic nature of MS. PMID:16504146

  13. Inferring Host Gene Subnetworks Involved in Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Gancarz, Brandi; Hao, Linhui; Ferris, Michael; Ahlquist, Paul; Craven, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Systematic, genome-wide loss-of-function experiments can be used to identify host factors that directly or indirectly facilitate or inhibit the replication of a virus in a host cell. We present an approach that combines an integer linear program and a diffusion kernel method to infer the pathways through which those host factors modulate viral replication. The inputs to the method are a set of viral phenotypes observed in single-host-gene mutants and a background network consisting of a variety of host intracellular interactions. The output is an ensemble of subnetworks that provides a consistent explanation for the measured phenotypes, predicts which unassayed host factors modulate the virus, and predicts which host factors are the most direct interfaces with the virus. We infer host-virus interaction subnetworks using data from experiments screening the yeast genome for genes modulating the replication of two RNA viruses. Because a gold-standard network is unavailable, we assess the predicted subnetworks using both computational and qualitative analyses. We conduct a cross-validation experiment in which we predict whether held-aside test genes have an effect on viral replication. Our approach is able to make high-confidence predictions more accurately than several baselines, and about as well as the best baseline, which does not infer mechanistic pathways. We also examine two kinds of predictions made by our method: which host factors are nearest to a direct interaction with a viral component, and which unassayed host genes are likely to be involved in viral replication. Multiple predictions are supported by recent independent experimental data, or are components or functional partners of confirmed relevant complexes or pathways. Integer program code, background network data, and inferred host-virus subnetworks are available at http://www.biostat.wisc.edu/~craven/chasman_host_virus/. PMID:24874113

  14. Multiple Aspects of Gene Dysregulation in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moumné, Lara; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the gene encoding Huntingtin (Htt). It is characterized by chorea, cognitive, and psychiatric disorders. The most affected brain region is the striatum, and the clinical symptoms are directly correlated to the rate of striatal degeneration. The wild-type Htt is a ubiquitous protein and its deletion is lethal. Mutated (expanded) Htt produces excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunctions, axonal transport deficit, altered proteasome activity, and gene dysregulation. Transcriptional dysregulation occurs at early neuropathological stages in HD patients. Multiple genes are dysregulated, with overlaps of altered transcripts between mouse models of HD and patient brains. Nuclear localization of Exp-Htt interferes with transcription factors, co-activators, and proteins of the transcriptional machinery. Another key mechanism described so far, is an alteration of cytoplasmic retention of the transcriptional repressor REST, which is normally associated with wild-type Htt. As such, Exp-Htt causes alteration of transcription of multiple genes involved in neuronal survival, plasticity, signaling, and mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Besides these transcriptional dysregulations, Exp-Htt affects the chromatin structure through altered post-translational modifications (PTM) of histones and methylation of DNA. Multiple alterations of histone PTM are described, including acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, polyamination, and phosphorylation. Exp-Htt also affects the expression and regulation of non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs). First multiple neural miRNAs are controlled by REST, and dysregulated in HD, with concomitant de-repression of downstream mRNA targets. Second, Exp-Htt protein or RNA may also play a major role in the processing of miRNAs and hence pathogenesis. These pleiotropic effects of Exp-Htt on gene expression may represent seminal deleterious effects in the

  15. Multiple cyclophilins involved in different cellular pathways mediate HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Gaither, L Alex; Borawski, Jason; Anderson, Leah J; Balabanis, Kara A; Devay, Piroska; Joberty, Gerard; Rau, Christina; Schirle, Markus; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Mickanin, Craig; Zhao, Shanchuan; Vickers, Chad; Lee, Lac; Deng, Gejing; Baryza, Jeremy; Fujimoto, Roger A; Lin, Kai; Compton, Teresa; Wiedmann, Brigitte

    2010-02-05

    Three cyclophilin inhibitors (DEBIO-025, SCY635, and NIM811) are currently in clinical trials for hepatitis C therapy. The mechanism of action of these, however, is not completely understood. There are at least 16 cyclophilins expressed in human cells which are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes. Large-scale siRNA experiments, chemoproteomic assays with cyclophilin binding compounds, and mRNA profiling of HCV replicon containing cells were used to identify the cyclophilins that are instrumental to HCV replication. The previously reported cyclophilin A was confirmed and additional cyclophilin containing pathways were identified. Together, the experiments provide strong evidence that NIM811 reduces viral replication by inhibition of multiple cyclophilins and pathways with protein trafficking as the most strongly and persistently affected pathway. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitrile Hydratase Genes Are Present in Multiple Eukaryotic Supergroups

    PubMed Central

    Marron, Alan O.; Akam, Michael; Walker, Giselle

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitrile hydratases are enzymes involved in the conversion of nitrile-containing compounds into ammonia and organic acids. Although they are widespread in prokaryotes, nitrile hydratases have only been reported in two eukaryotes: the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis and the stramenopile Aureococcus anophagefferens. The nitrile hydratase gene in M. brevicollis was believed to have arisen by lateral gene transfer from a prokaryote, and is a fusion of beta and alpha nitrile hydratase subunits. Only the alpha subunit has been reported in A. anophagefferens. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the detection of nitrile hydratase genes in five eukaryotic supergroups: opisthokonts, amoebozoa, archaeplastids, CCTH and SAR. Beta-alpha subunit fusion genes are found in the choanoflagellates, ichthyosporeans, apusozoans, haptophytes, rhizarians and stramenopiles, and potentially also in the amoebozoans. An individual alpha subunit is found in a dinoflagellate and an individual beta subunit is found in a haptophyte. Phylogenetic analyses recover a clade of eukaryotic-type nitrile hydratases in the Opisthokonta, Amoebozoa, SAR and CCTH; this is supported by analyses of introns and gene architecture. Two nitrile hydratase sequences from an animal and a plant resolve in the prokaryotic nitrile hydratase clade. Conclusions/Significance The evidence presented here demonstrates that nitrile hydratase genes are present in multiple eukaryotic supergroups, suggesting that a subunit fusion gene was present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes. The absence of nitrile hydratase from several sequenced species indicates that subunits were lost in multiple eukaryotic taxa. The presence of nitrile hydratases in many other eukaryotic groups is unresolved due to insufficient data and taxon sampling. The retention and expression of the gene in distantly related eukaryotic species suggests that it plays an important metabolic role. The novel family of eukaryotic

  17. Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions Associated with Multiple Complex Traits with U-Statistics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Wei, Changshuai; Wen, Yalu; Wang, Tong; Lu, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Many complex diseases, such as psychiatric and behavioral disorders, are commonly characterized through various measurements that reflect physical, behavioral and psychological aspects of diseases. While it remains a great challenge to find a unified measurement to characterize a disease, the available multiple phenotypes can be analyzed jointly in the genetic association study. Simultaneously testing these phenotypes has many advantages, including considering different aspects of the disease in the analysis, and utilizing correlated phenotypes to improve the power of detecting disease-associated variants. Furthermore, complex diseases are likely caused by the interplay of multiple genetic variants through complicated mechanisms. Considering gene-gene interactions in the joint association analysis of complex diseases could further increase our ability to discover genetic variants involving complex disease pathways. In this article, we propose a stepwise U-test for joint association analysis of multiple loci and multiple phenotypes. Through simulations, we demonstrated that testing multiple phenotypes simultaneously could attain higher power than testing one single phenotype at a time, especially when there are shared genes contributing to multiple phenotypes. We also illustrated the proposed method with an application to Nicotine Dependence (ND), using datasets from the Study of Addition, Genetics and Environment (SAGE). The joint analysis of three ND phenotypes identified two SNPs, rs10508649 and rs2491397, and reached a nominal P-value of 3.79e-13. The association was further replicated in two independent datasets with P-values of 2.37e-05 and 7.46e-05.

  18. MicroRNA399 is involved in multiple nutrient starvation responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Deng, Kun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Zhihua; Zhang, Lianhe; Chu, Chengcai

    2015-01-01

    The increasing evidences have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play significant role in nutrient stress response. Previously, miR399 was documented to be induced by phosphorus (P) starvation and involved in regulating P starvation responses. To further investigate the function of miR399 in rice (Oryza sativa L.), we performed GeneChip analysis with OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. Interestingly, our results showed that, besides P starvation responsive genes, the expression of a number of genes involved in iron (Fe), potassium (K), sodium (Na), and calcium (Ca) absorption was dramatically up-regulated in OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. Consistently, the concentrations of Fe, K, Na, and Ca were also increased in OsmiR399 over-expressing plants. The expression of OsmiR399 was also up-regulated by these nutrient starvations, respectively. Moreover, the loss-of-function of LTN1, the down-stream target of OsmiR399, also resulted in the increase of multiple metal elements and the up-regulation of the absorption related genes. These results indicated that OsmiR399 participates in the regulation of multiple nutrient starvation responses, which also gives new view on understanding the interaction among different nutrients mediated by miR399.

  19. Horizontal acquisition of multiple mitochondrial genes from a parasitic plant followed by gene conversion with host mitochondrial genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is relatively common in plant mitochondrial genomes but the mechanisms, extent and consequences of transfer remain largely unknown. Previous results indicate that parasitic plants are often involved as either transfer donors or recipients, suggesting that direct contact between parasite and host facilitates genetic transfer among plants. Results In order to uncover the mechanistic details of plant-to-plant HGT, the extent and evolutionary fate of transfer was investigated between two groups: the parasitic genus Cuscuta and a small clade of Plantago species. A broad polymerase chain reaction (PCR) survey of mitochondrial genes revealed that at least three genes (atp1, atp6 and matR) were recently transferred from Cuscuta to Plantago. Quantitative PCR assays show that these three genes have a mitochondrial location in the one species line of Plantago examined. Patterns of sequence evolution suggest that these foreign genes degraded into pseudogenes shortly after transfer and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses demonstrate that none are detectably transcribed. Three cases of gene conversion were detected between native and foreign copies of the atp1 gene. The identical phylogenetic distribution of the three foreign genes within Plantago and the retention of cytidines at ancestral positions of RNA editing indicate that these genes were probably acquired via a single, DNA-mediated transfer event. However, samplings of multiple individuals from two of the three species in the recipient Plantago clade revealed complex and perplexing phylogenetic discrepancies and patterns of sequence divergence for all three of the foreign genes. Conclusions This study reports the best evidence to date that multiple mitochondrial genes can be transferred via a single HGT event and that transfer occurred via a strictly DNA-level intermediate. The discovery of gene conversion between co-resident foreign and native mitochondrial copies suggests

  20. Impaired Object Manipulation in Mildly Involved Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vennila; de Freitas, Paulo Barbosa; Jaric, Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    We investigated hand function in mildly involved Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients (N = 16; EDSS 1−5, 9-hole peg test 14−32 s) during static and dynamic manipulation tasks using an instrumented device. When compared with healthy controls (N = 16), the patients revealed impaired task performance regarding their ability to exert prescribed patterns of load force (L; force acting tangentially at the digits-object surface). Regarding the coordination of grip force (G; normal component) and L, the data only revealed elevated G/L ratio, although both the G and L coupling (maximum correlation coefficients and the time lags between them), and G modulation (gain and offset of G with respect to L) remained comparable in the two groups. Finally, most of the data suggested no MS-specific effects of switching from uni- to bimanual tasks, from available visual feedback to deprived feedback conditions. We conclude that the deterioration in the ability for precise control of external forces and overgripping could precede the decoupling of G and L and decreased G modulation in early phases of the disease. The results also suggest that the applied methodology could be sensitive enough to detect mild levels of impairment of hand function in MS and, possibly, other neurological diseases. PMID:18209246

  1. Multiple-to-Multiple Relationships between MicroRNAs and Target Genes in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yutaka; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Yuasa, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as transcriptional regulators and play pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. According to miRNA target databases, one miRNA may regulate many genes as its targets, while one gene may be targeted by many miRNAs. These findings indicate that relationships between miRNAs and their targets may not be one-to-one. However, many reports have described only a one-to-one, one-to-multiple or multiple-to-one relationship between miRNA and its target gene in human cancers. Thus, it is necessary to determine whether or not a combination of some miRNAs would regulate multiple targets and be involved in carcinogenesis. To find some groups of miRNAs that may synergistically regulate their targets in human gastric cancer (GC), we re-analyzed our previous miRNA expression array data and found that 50 miRNAs were up-regulated on treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in a GC cell line. The “TargetScan” miRNA target database predicted that some of these miRNAs have common target genes. We also referred to the GEO database for expression of these common target genes in human GCs, which might be related to gastric carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed two miRNA combinations, miR-224 and -452, and miR-181c and -340. Over-expression of both miRNA combinations dramatically down-regulated their target genes, DPYSL2 and KRAS, and KRAS and MECP2, respectively. These miRNA combinations synergistically decreased cell proliferation upon transfection. Furthermore, we revealed that these miRNAs were down-regulated through promoter hypermethylation in GC cells. Thus, it is likely that the relationships between miRNAs and their targets are not one-to-one but multiple-to-multiple in GCs, and that these complex relationships may be related to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:23667495

  2. Differential involvement of hypothalamic vasopressin neurons in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Sandroni, Paola; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2006-10-01

    We sought to determine whether there is differential involvement of different groups of hypothalamic arginine-vasopressin (AVP) synthesizing neurons in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Hypothalamus was obtained from five subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA confirmed neuropathologically and five age-matched controls. Sections were immunostained for AVP, and cells with visible nuclei were counted in the posterior portion of the paraventricular nucleus (PVNp), supraoptic nucleus (SON), magnocellular PVN and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Sections of the hypothalamus and medulla were also immunostained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). There was a significant loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp in MSA compared with controls (17 +/- 3 versus 59 +/- 10 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was preservation of AVP- and TH-immunoreactive neurons in the SON and magnocellular PVN in all MSA cases. In contrast, there was marked depletion of TH-immunoreactive fibres innervating these magnocellular AVP neurons, coincident with a loss of neurons in the A1 area (6 +/- 1 versus 13 +/- 1 cells/section, P < 0.01). There was loss of AVP neurons in the SCN in MSA compared with control cases (14 +/- 3 versus 71 +/- 16 cells/section, P < 0.02). Our results indicate that, in MSA, loss of AVP neurons in the PVNp may contribute to sympathetic failure, whereas loss of catecholaminergic input from the brainstem to the magnocellular AVP neurons may contribute to impaired AVP secretion in response to orthostatic stress. Loss of AVP neurons in the SCN may contribute to impaired circadian regulation of endocrine and autonomic functions.

  3. Abundance of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A. V.; Podar, M.; Gilmour, C. C.; Brandt, C. C.; Brown, S. D.; Crable, B. R.; Weighill, D.; Jacobson, D. A.; Somenahally, A. C.; Elias, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution and diversity of genes involved in mercury methylation in oceanic environments is of interest in determining the source of mercury in ocean environments and may have predictive value for mercury methylation rates. The highly conserved hgcAB genes involved in mercury methylation provide an avenue for evaluating the genetic potential for mercury methylation. The genes are sporadically present in a few diverse groups of bacteria and Archaea including Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes and Archaea and of over 7000 sequenced species they are only present in about 100 genomes. Examination of sequence data from methylators and non-methylators indicates that these genes are associated with other genes involved in metal transformations and transport. We examined hgcAB presence in over 3500 microbial metagenomes (from all environments) and found the hgcAB genes were present in anaerobic oceanic environments but not in aerobic layers of the open ocean. The genes were common in sediments from marine, coastal and estuarine sources as well as polluted environments. The genes were rare, found in 7 of 138 samples, in metagenomes from the pelagic water column including profiles though the oxygen minimum zone. Other oxic and sub-oxic coastal waters also demonstrated a lack of hgcAB genes including the OMZ in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean. There were some unique hgcA like unique sequences found in metagenomes from depth in the Pacific and Southern Atlantic Ocean. Coastal "dead zone" waters may be important sources of MeHg as the hgcAB genes were abundant in the anoxic waters of a stratified fjord. The genes were absent in microbiomes from vertebrates but were in invertebrate microbiomes However, oceanic species were underrepresented in these samples. Climate change could provide an additional flux of MeHg to the oceans as we found the most abundant representation of hgcAB genes in arctic permafrost. Thus warming could increase flux of methyl mercury to arctic waters.

  4. Multiple CMS-restorer gene polymorphism in gynodioecious Plantago coronopus.

    PubMed

    van Damme, J M M; Hundscheid, M P J; Ivanovic, S; Koelewijn, H P

    2004-08-01

    The mode of inheritance of the male sterility trait is crucial for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of the sexual system gynodioecy, which is the co-occurrence of female and hermaphrodite plants in natural populations. Both cytoplasmic (CMS) and nuclear (restorer) genes are known to be involved. Theoretical models usually assume a limited number of CMS genes with each a single restorer gene, while reality is more complex. In this study, it is shown that in the gynodioecious species Plantago coronopus two new CMS-restorer polymorphisms exist in addition to the two that were already known, which means four CMS-restorer systems at the species level. Furthermore, three CMS types were shown to co-occur within a single population. All new CMS types showed a multilocus system for male fertility restoration, in which both recessive and dominant restorer alleles occur. Our finding of more than two co-occurring CMS-restorer systems each with multiple restorer genes raises the question how this complex of male sterility systems is maintained in natural populations.

  5. The relationships among MRI-defined spinal cord involvement, brain involvement, and disability in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam B; Neema, Mohit; Arora, Ashish; Dell’Oglio, Elisa; Benedict, Ralph HB; Tauhid, Shahamat; Goldberg-Zimring, Daniel; Chavarro-Nieto, Christian; Ceccarelli, Antonia; Klein, Joshua P; Stankiewicz, James M; Houtchens, Maria K.; Buckle, Guy J; Alsop, David C.; Guttmann, Charles RG; Bakshi, Rohit

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the inter-relationships between MRI-defined lesion and atrophy measures of spinal cord involvement and brain involvement and their relationships to disability in a small cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Background Although it is known that cervical spinal cord atrophy correlates with disability in MS, it is unknown whether it is the most important determinant when compared to other regions of the CNS. Furthermore, it is not clear to what extent brain and cord lesions and atrophy are related. Design/methods 3T MRI of the whole brain and whole spinal cord was obtained in 21 patients with MS, including 18 with relapsing-remitting, one with secondary progressive, one with primary progressive, and one with a clinically isolated syndrome. Brain global gray and white matter volumes were segmented with SPM8. Spinal cord contour volume was segmented in whole by a semi-automated method with bins assigned to either the cervical or thoracic regions. All CNS volumes were normalized by the intracranial volume. Brain and cord T2 hyperintense lesions were segmented using a semi-automated edge finding tool. Results Among all MRI measures, only upper cervical spinal cord volume significantly correlated with Expanded Disability Status Scale score (r=−0.515, p=0.020). The brain-cord relationships between whole or regional spinal cord volume or lesions and gray matter, white matter, or whole brain volume or whole brain lesions were generally weak and all non-significant. Conclusions/relevance In this preliminary study of mildly disabled, treated MS patients, cervical spinal cord atrophy most strongly correlates with physical disability in MS when accounting for a wide range of other CNS measures of lesions and atrophy, including thoracic or whole spinal cord volume, and cerebral gray, white or whole brain volume. The weak relationship between spinal cord and brain lesions and atrophy may suggest that they progress rather independently in

  6. Adaptive Horizontal Gene Transfers between Multiple Cheese-Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Jeanne; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sallet, Erika; Dumas, Émilie; Lacoste, Sandrine; Debuchy, Robert; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Domestication is an excellent model for studies of adaptation because it involves recent and strong selection on a few, identified traits [1–5]. Few studies have focused on the domestication of fungi, with notable exceptions [6–11], despite their importance to bioindustry [12] and to a general understanding of adaptation in eukaryotes [5]. Penicillium fungi are ubiquitous molds among which two distantly related species have been independently selected for cheese making—P. roqueforti for blue cheeses like Roquefort and P. camemberti for soft cheeses like Camembert. The selected traits include morphology, aromatic profile, lipolytic and proteolytic activities, and ability to grow at low temperatures, in a matrix containing bacterial and fungal competitors [13–15]. By comparing the genomes of ten Penicillium species, we show that adaptation to cheese was associated with multiple recent horizontal transfers of large genomic regions carrying crucial metabolic genes. We identified seven horizontally transferred regions (HTRs) spanning more than 10 kb each, flanked by specific transposable elements, and displaying nearly 100% identity between distant Penicillium species. Two HTRs carried genes with functions involved in the utilization of cheese nutrients or competition and were found nearly identical in multiple strains and species of cheese-associated Penicillium fungi, indicating recent selective sweeps; they were experimentally associated with faster growth and greater competitiveness on cheese and contained genes highly expressed in the early stage of cheese maturation. These findings have industrial and food safety implications and improve our understanding of the processes of adaptation to rapid environmental changes. PMID:26412136

  7. Adaptive Horizontal Gene Transfers between Multiple Cheese-Associated Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Jeanne; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sallet, Erika; Dumas, Émilie; Lacoste, Sandrine; Debuchy, Robert; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-10-05

    Domestication is an excellent model for studies of adaptation because it involves recent and strong selection on a few, identified traits [1-5]. Few studies have focused on the domestication of fungi, with notable exceptions [6-11], despite their importance to bioindustry [12] and to a general understanding of adaptation in eukaryotes [5]. Penicillium fungi are ubiquitous molds among which two distantly related species have been independently selected for cheese making-P. roqueforti for blue cheeses like Roquefort and P. camemberti for soft cheeses like Camembert. The selected traits include morphology, aromatic profile, lipolytic and proteolytic activities, and ability to grow at low temperatures, in a matrix containing bacterial and fungal competitors [13-15]. By comparing the genomes of ten Penicillium species, we show that adaptation to cheese was associated with multiple recent horizontal transfers of large genomic regions carrying crucial metabolic genes. We identified seven horizontally transferred regions (HTRs) spanning more than 10 kb each, flanked by specific transposable elements, and displaying nearly 100% identity between distant Penicillium species. Two HTRs carried genes with functions involved in the utilization of cheese nutrients or competition and were found nearly identical in multiple strains and species of cheese-associated Penicillium fungi, indicating recent selective sweeps; they were experimentally associated with faster growth and greater competitiveness on cheese and contained genes highly expressed in the early stage of cheese maturation. These findings have industrial and food safety implications and improve our understanding of the processes of adaptation to rapid environmental changes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of Multiple Transporters-mediated Transports in Mizoribine and Methotrexate Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Teruo; Mori, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Mizoribine is administered orally and excreted into urine without being metabolized. Many research groups have reported a linear relationship between the dose and peak serum concentration, between the dose and AUC, and between AUC and cumulative urinary excretion of mizoribine. In contrast, a significant interindividual variability, with a small intraindividual variability, in oral bioavailability of mizoribine is also reported. The interindividual variability is mostly considered to be due to the polymophisms of transporter genes. Methotrexate (MTX) is administered orally and/or by parenteral routes, depending on the dose. Metabolic enzymes and multiple transporters are involved in the pharmacokinetics of MTX. The oral bioavailability of MTX exhibits a marked interindividual variability and saturation with increase in the dose of MTX, with a small intraindividual variability, where the contribution of gene polymophisms of transporters and enzymes is suggested. Therapeutic drug monitoring of both mizoribine and MTX is expected to improve their clinical efficacy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24280676

  9. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  10. Genes involved in convergent evolution of eusociality in bees.

    PubMed

    Woodard, S Hollis; Fischman, Brielle J; Venkat, Aarti; Hudson, Matt E; Varala, Kranthi; Cameron, Sydney A; Clark, Andrew G; Robinson, Gene E

    2011-05-03

    Eusociality has arisen independently at least 11 times in insects. Despite this convergence, there are striking differences among eusocial lifestyles, ranging from species living in small colonies with overt conflict over reproduction to species in which colonies contain hundreds of thousands of highly specialized sterile workers produced by one or a few queens. Although the evolution of eusociality has been intensively studied, the genetic changes involved in the evolution of eusociality are relatively unknown. We examined patterns of molecular evolution across three independent origins of eusociality by sequencing transcriptomes of nine socially diverse bee species and combining these data with genome sequence from the honey bee Apis mellifera to generate orthologous sequence alignments for 3,647 genes. We found a shared set of 212 genes with a molecular signature of accelerated evolution across all eusocial lineages studied, as well as unique sets of 173 and 218 genes with a signature of accelerated evolution specific to either highly or primitively eusocial lineages, respectively. These results demonstrate that convergent evolution can involve a mosaic pattern of molecular changes in both shared and lineage-specific sets of genes. Genes involved in signal transduction, gland development, and carbohydrate metabolism are among the most prominent rapidly evolving genes in eusocial lineages. These findings provide a starting point for linking specific genetic changes to the evolution of eusociality.

  11. Genes involved in convergent evolution of eusociality in bees

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, S. Hollis; Fischman, Brielle J.; Venkat, Aarti; Hudson, Matt E.; Varala, Kranthi; Cameron, Sydney A.; Clark, Andrew G.; Robinson, Gene E.

    2011-01-01

    Eusociality has arisen independently at least 11 times in insects. Despite this convergence, there are striking differences among eusocial lifestyles, ranging from species living in small colonies with overt conflict over reproduction to species in which colonies contain hundreds of thousands of highly specialized sterile workers produced by one or a few queens. Although the evolution of eusociality has been intensively studied, the genetic changes involved in the evolution of eusociality are relatively unknown. We examined patterns of molecular evolution across three independent origins of eusociality by sequencing transcriptomes of nine socially diverse bee species and combining these data with genome sequence from the honey bee Apis mellifera to generate orthologous sequence alignments for 3,647 genes. We found a shared set of 212 genes with a molecular signature of accelerated evolution across all eusocial lineages studied, as well as unique sets of 173 and 218 genes with a signature of accelerated evolution specific to either highly or primitively eusocial lineages, respectively. These results demonstrate that convergent evolution can involve a mosaic pattern of molecular changes in both shared and lineage-specific sets of genes. Genes involved in signal transduction, gland development, and carbohydrate metabolism are among the most prominent rapidly evolving genes in eusocial lineages. These findings provide a starting point for linking specific genetic changes to the evolution of eusociality. PMID:21482769

  12. [Obesity based on mutation of genes involved in energy balance].

    PubMed

    Hainerová, I

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decade an intensive research led to an identification of several genes which are involved in a regulation of energy balance. In most cases, carriers of these gene mutations do not exhibit further characteristic phenotypic features except for a severe obesity. Obesity based on mutation of one gene product is called monogenic obesity. Mutations in genes for leptin, leptin receptor, proopiomelanocortin, prohormone convertase 1, melanocortin 4 and 3 receptor disrupt the physiological humoral signalization between peripheral signals and the hypothalamic centres of satiety and hunger. Defects of all above mentioned genes lead to phenotype of abnormal eating behaviour followed by a development of severe early-onset obesity. Mutations of melanocortin 4 receptor gene represent the most common cause of monogenic obesity because they are detected in almost 6 % children with early-onset severe obesity. Mutations of the other genes involved in energy homeostasis are very rare. Although these mutations are sporadic we assume that further research of monogenic forms of obesity might lead to our understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of regulation of the energy homeostasis and eating behaviour. Additionally, they may open new approach to the management of eating behaviour and to the treatment of obesity.

  13. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  14. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  15. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  16. Stably Expressed Genes Involved in Basic Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kejian; Vijay, Vikrant; Fuscoe, James C

    2017-01-01

    Stably Expressed Genes (SEGs) whose expression varies within a narrow range may be involved in core cellular processes necessary for basic functions. To identify such genes, we re-analyzed existing RNA-Seq gene expression profiles across 11 organs at 4 developmental stages (from immature to old age) in both sexes of F344 rats (n = 4/group; 320 samples). Expression changes (calculated as the maximum expression / minimum expression for each gene) of >19000 genes across organs, ages, and sexes ranged from 2.35 to >109-fold, with a median of 165-fold. The expression of 278 SEGs was found to vary ≤4-fold and these genes were significantly involved in protein catabolism (proteasome and ubiquitination), RNA transport, protein processing, and the spliceosome. Such stability of expression was further validated in human samples where the expression variability of the homologous human SEGs was significantly lower than that of other genes in the human genome. It was also found that the homologous human SEGs were generally less subject to non-synonymous mutation than other genes, as would be expected of stably expressed genes. We also found that knockout of SEG homologs in mouse models was more likely to cause complete preweaning lethality than non-SEG homologs, corroborating the fundamental roles played by SEGs in biological development. Such stably expressed genes and pathways across life-stages suggest that tight control of these processes is important in basic cellular functions and that perturbation by endogenous (e.g., genetics) or exogenous agents (e.g., drugs, environmental factors) may cause serious adverse effects.

  17. Stably Expressed Genes Involved in Basic Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Fuscoe, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Stably Expressed Genes (SEGs) whose expression varies within a narrow range may be involved in core cellular processes necessary for basic functions. To identify such genes, we re-analyzed existing RNA-Seq gene expression profiles across 11 organs at 4 developmental stages (from immature to old age) in both sexes of F344 rats (n = 4/group; 320 samples). Expression changes (calculated as the maximum expression / minimum expression for each gene) of >19000 genes across organs, ages, and sexes ranged from 2.35 to >109-fold, with a median of 165-fold. The expression of 278 SEGs was found to vary ≤4-fold and these genes were significantly involved in protein catabolism (proteasome and ubiquitination), RNA transport, protein processing, and the spliceosome. Such stability of expression was further validated in human samples where the expression variability of the homologous human SEGs was significantly lower than that of other genes in the human genome. It was also found that the homologous human SEGs were generally less subject to non-synonymous mutation than other genes, as would be expected of stably expressed genes. We also found that knockout of SEG homologs in mouse models was more likely to cause complete preweaning lethality than non-SEG homologs, corroborating the fundamental roles played by SEGs in biological development. Such stably expressed genes and pathways across life-stages suggest that tight control of these processes is important in basic cellular functions and that perturbation by endogenous (e.g., genetics) or exogenous agents (e.g., drugs, environmental factors) may cause serious adverse effects. PMID:28125669

  18. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  19. A study of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunming; Cheng, Gong; Zhu, Huolan; Guan, Gongchang

    2015-01-01

    With the use of the microarray technique, genes expressed in the late phase of adipocyte differentiation were investigated. These genes play an important role in stimulating adipocyte growth and lipid droplet formation. Therefore, they contribute a great deal to the onset of obesity. With the use of SW872 adipocytes and the microarray technique, genes related to adipocyte differentiation were tested and compared with undifferentiated preadipocytes 14 days after induction. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for confirmation. More than 21,329 transcriptors were expressed and determined, of which 1326 increased and 687 decreased undifferentiated adipocytes. Among them, 21 were highly expressed by more than 10-fold. With RT-PCR, 12 were confirmed, including apelin, CIDEC, PID1, LYRM1, ADD1, PPARγ2, ANGPTL4, ADIPOQ, ACOX1, FIP1L1, MAP3K2 and PEX14. Furthermore, genes involved in lipid metabolism, signal transduction, DNA replication, redox status and transcription factors were determined as well. Novel genes involved in adipogenesis (e.g., apelin) were detected. A variety of genes were discovered and validated with RT-PCR at the late phase of adipocyte differentiation. This may help us better understand the onset of obesity and the potential role of adipocytes in other organs.

  20. Bioinformatics analysis of gene expression profile data to screen key genes involved in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Jing; Zong, Minru; Yang, Hailing

    2017-01-05

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic inflammatory and granulomatous disease that occurs in almost all populations and affects multiple organs. Meanwhile, its most common manifestation is pulmonary sarcoidosis. This study aimed to identify effective biomarkers for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary sarcoidosis. GSE16538 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus, including 6 pulmonary sarcoidosis samples and 6 normal lung samples. Then, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by limma package in R. After the expression values of the DEGs were extracted, hierarchical clustering analysis was performed for the DEGs using the pheatmap package in R. Subsequently, protein-protein interaction (PPI) pairs among the DEGs were searched by STRING or REACTOME databases, and then PPI networks were visualized by Cytoscape software. Using DAVID and KOBAS, functional and pathway enrichment analyses separately were performed for the DEGs involved in the PPI network. Total 208 DEGs were identified in pulmonary sarcoidosis samples, including 179 up-regulated genes and 29 down-regulated genes. Hierarchical clustering showed that the DEGs could clearly distinguish the pulmonary sarcoidosis samples from the normal lung samples. In the PPI network constructed by STRING database, CXCL9, STAT1, CCL5, CXCL11 and GBP1 had higher degrees and betweenness values, and could interact with each other. Functional enrichment showed that CXCL9, CXCL11 and CCL5 were enriched in immune response. Moreover, STAT1 was enriched in pathways of chemokine signaling pathway and JAK-STAT signaling pathway. CXCL9, CXCL11, STAT1, CCL5 and GBP1 might be implicated in pulmonary sarcoidosis through interacting with each other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genes Involved in Survival of Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Jarolim, Stefanie; Ayer, Anita; Pillay, Bethany; Gee, Allison C.; Phrakaysone, Alex; Perrone, Gabriel G.; Breitenbach, Michael; Dawes, Ian W.

    2013-01-01

    The heat-shock response in cells, involving increased transcription of a specific set of genes in response to a sudden increase in temperature, is a highly conserved biological response occurring in all organisms. Despite considerable attention to the processes activated during heat shock, less is known about the role of genes in survival of a sudden temperature increase. Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the maintenance of heat-shock resistance in exponential and stationary phase were identified by screening the homozygous diploid deletants in nonessential genes and the heterozygous diploid mutants in essential genes for survival after a sudden shift in temperature from 30 to 50°. More than a thousand genes were identified that led to altered sensitivity to heat shock, with little overlap between them and those previously identified to affect thermotolerance. There was also little overlap with genes that are activated or repressed during heat-shock, with only 5% of them regulated by the heat-shock transcription factor. The target of rapamycin and protein kinase A pathways, lipid metabolism, vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar protein sorting, and mitochondrial genome maintenance/translation were critical to maintenance of resistance. Mutants affected in l-tryptophan metabolism were heat-shock resistant in both growth phases; those affected in cytoplasmic ribosome biogenesis and DNA double-strand break repair were resistant in stationary phase, and in mRNA catabolic processes in exponential phase. Mutations affecting mitochondrial genome maintenance were highly represented in sensitive mutants. The cell division transcription factor Swi6p and Hac1p involved in the unfolded protein response also play roles in maintenance of heat-shock resistance. PMID:24142923

  2. EST analysis reveals putative genes involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhiza uralensis is one of the most popular medicinal plants in the world and is also widely used in the flavoring of food and tobacco. Due to limited genomic and transcriptomic data, the biosynthetic pathway of glycyrrhizin, the major bioactive compound in G. uralensis, is currently unclear. Identification of candidate genes involved in the glycyrrhizin biosynthetic pathway will significantly contribute to the understanding of the biosynthetic and medicinal chemistry of this compound. Results We used the 454 GS FLX platform and Titanium regents to produce a substantial expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset from the vegetative organs of G. uralensis. A total of 59,219 ESTs with an average read length of 409 bp were generated. 454 ESTs were combined with the 50,666 G. uralensis ESTs in GenBank. The combined ESTs were assembled into 27,229 unique sequences (11,694 contigs and 15,535 singletons). A total of 20,437 unique gene elements representing approximately 10,000 independent transcripts were annotated using BLAST searches (e-value ≤ 1e-5) against the SwissProt, KEGG, TAIR, Nr and Nt databases. The assembled sequences were annotated with gene names and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. With respect to the genes related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, genes encoding 16 enzymes of the 18 total steps of the glycyrrhizin skeleton synthesis pathway were found. To identify novel genes that encode cytochrome P450 enzymes and glycosyltransferases, which are related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, a total of 125 and 172 unigenes were found to be homologous to cytochrome P450s and glycosyltransferases, respectively. The cytochrome P450 candidate genes were classified into 32 CYP families, while the glycosyltransferase candidate genes were classified into 45 categories by GO analysis. Finally, 3 cytochrome P450 enzymes and 6 glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis through an organ-specific expression

  3. Transcriptome-Guided Mining of Genes Involved in Crocin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Aijia; Jia, Jing; Xu, Zhichao; Li, Ying; Bi, Wu; Ren, Fengming; He, Chunnian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Kaizhi; Song, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Gardenia jasminoides is used in traditional Chinese medicine and has drawn attention as a rich source of crocin, a compound with reported activity against various cancers, depression and cardiovascular disease. However, genetic information on the crocin biosynthetic pathway of G. jasminoides is scarce. In this study, we performed a transcriptome analysis of the leaves, green fruits, and red fruits of G. jasminoides to identify and predict the genes that encode key enzymes responsible for crocin production, compared with Crocus sativus. Twenty-seven putative pathway genes were specifically expressed in the fruits, consistent with the distribution of crocin in G. jasminoides. Twenty-four of these genes were reported for the first time, and a novel CCD4a gene was predicted that encodes carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase leading to crocin synthesis, in contrast to CCD2 of C. sativus. In addition, 6 other candidate genes (ALDH12, ALDH14, UGT94U1, UGT86D1, UGT71H4, and UGT85K18) were predicted to be involved in crocin biosynthesis following phylogenetic analysis and different gene expression profiles. Identifying the genes that encode key enzymes should help elucidate the crocin biosynthesis pathway. PMID:28443112

  4. Hormonal Regulation and Expression Profiles of Wheat Genes Involved during Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sipla; Shukla, Vishnu; Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Kaur, Mandeep; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, Anuradha; Mantri, Shrikant; Pandey, Ajay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) biosynthesis pathway genes were reported from multiple crop species. PA accumulation was enhanced during grain filling and at that time, hormones like Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA3) interplay to control the process of seed development. Regulation of wheat PA pathway genes has not yet been reported in seeds. In an attempt to find the clues for the regulation by hormones, the promoter region of wheat PA pathway genes was analyzed for the presence of cis-elements. Multiple cis-elements of those known to be involved for ABA, GA3, salicylic acid (SA), and cAMP sensing were identified in the promoters of PA pathway genes. Eight genes (TaIMP, TaITPK1-4, TaPLC1, TaIPK2 and TaIPK1) involved in the wheat PA biosynthesis pathway were selected for the expression studies. The temporal expression response was studied in seeds treated with ABA and GA3 using quantitative real time PCR. Our results suggested that exogenous application of ABA induces few PA pathway genes in wheat grains. Comparison of expression profiles for PA pathway for GA3 and ABA suggested the antagonistic regulation of certain genes. Additionally, to reveal stress responses of wheat PA pathway genes, expression was also studied in the presence of SA and cAMP. Results suggested SA specific differential expression of few genes, whereas, overall repression of genes was observed in cAMP treated samples. This study is an effort to understand the regulation of PA biosynthesis genes in wheat. PMID:27135330

  5. Hormonal Regulation and Expression Profiles of Wheat Genes Involved during Phytic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sipla; Shukla, Vishnu; Bhati, Kaushal Kumar; Kaur, Mandeep; Sharma, Shivani; Singh, Anuradha; Mantri, Shrikant; Pandey, Ajay Kumar

    2015-06-11

    Phytic acid (PA) biosynthesis pathway genes were reported from multiple crop species. PA accumulation was enhanced during grain filling and at that time, hormones like Abscisic acid (ABA) and Gibberellic acid (GA₃) interplay to control the process of seed development. Regulation of wheat PA pathway genes has not yet been reported in seeds. In an attempt to find the clues for the regulation by hormones, the promoter region of wheat PA pathway genes was analyzed for the presence of cis-elements. Multiple cis-elements of those known to be involved for ABA, GA₃, salicylic acid (SA), and cAMP sensing were identified in the promoters of PA pathway genes. Eight genes (TaIMP, TaITPK1-4, TaPLC1, TaIPK2 and TaIPK1) involved in the wheat PA biosynthesis pathway were selected for the expression studies. The temporal expression response was studied in seeds treated with ABA and GA₃ using quantitative real time PCR. Our results suggested that exogenous application of ABA induces few PA pathway genes in wheat grains. Comparison of expression profiles for PA pathway for GA₃ and ABA suggested the antagonistic regulation of certain genes. Additionally, to reveal stress responses of wheat PA pathway genes, expression was also studied in the presence of SA and cAMP. Results suggested SA specific differential expression of few genes, whereas, overall repression of genes was observed in cAMP treated samples. This study is an effort to understand the regulation of PA biosynthesis genes in wheat.

  6. Involvement of medullary serotonergic groups in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Eduardo E; Schmeichel, Ann M; Low, Phillip A; Parisi, Joseph E

    2004-03-01

    We sought to determine whether medullary serotonergic neurons were affected in multiple system atrophy (MSA). Immunostaining for tryptophan hydroxylase was performed on serial 50 microm sections of the medulla of brains obtained at autopsy from six control subjects, eight subjects with clinical diagnosis of MSA, and four with Parkinson's disease. There was a severe depletion of serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus, raphe obscurus, raphe pallidus, and ventrolateral medulla in MSA. Depletion of serotonergic neurons may contribute to impaired control of sympathetic outflow and other abnormalities in MSA.

  7. Long genes and genes with multiple splice variants are enriched in pathways linked to cancer and other multigenic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2016-03-12

    The role of random mutations and genetic errors in defining the etiology of cancer and other multigenic diseases has recently received much attention. With the view that complex genes should be particularly vulnerable to such events, here we explore the link between the simple properties of the human genes, such as transcript length, number of splice variants, exon/intron composition, and their involvement in the pathways linked to cancer and other multigenic diseases. We reveal a substantial enrichment of cancer pathways with long genes and genes that have multiple splice variants. Although the latter two factors are interdependent, we show that the overall gene length and splicing complexity increase in cancer pathways in a partially decoupled manner. Our systematic survey for the pathways enriched with top lengthy genes and with genes that have multiple splice variants reveal, along with cancer pathways, the pathways involved in various neuronal processes, cardiomyopathies and type II diabetes. We outline a correlation between the gene length and the number of somatic mutations. Our work is a step forward in the assessment of the role of simple gene characteristics in cancer and a wider range of multigenic diseases. We demonstrate a significant accumulation of long genes and genes with multiple splice variants in pathways of multigenic diseases that have already been associated with de novo mutations. Unlike the cancer pathways, we note that the pathways of neuronal processes, cardiomyopathies and type II diabetes contain genes long enough for topoisomerase-dependent gene expression to also be a potential contributing factor in the emergence of pathologies, should topoisomerases become impaired.

  8. Polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in wine production.

    PubMed

    Vigentini, Ileana; Fracassetti, Daniela; Picozzi, Claudia; Foschino, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The setting up of new molecular methods for Saccharomyces cerevisiae typing is valuable in enology. Actually, the ability to discriminate different strains in wine making can have a benefit both for the control of the fermentation process and for the preservation of wine typicity. This study focused on the screening of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in wine production that could evolve rapidly considering the selective pressure of the isolation environment. Preliminary screening of 30 genes in silico was performed, followed by the selection of 10 loci belonging to 8 genes. The sequence analysis showed a low polymorphism and a degree of heterozygosity. However, a new potential molecular target was recognized in the TPS1 gene coding for the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase enzyme involved in the ethanol resistance mechanism. This gene showed a 1.42% sequence diversity with seven different nucleotide substitutions. Moreover, classic techniques were applied to a collection of 50 S. cerevisiae isolates, mostly with enologic origin. Our results confirmed that the wine making was not carried out only by the inoculated commercial starter because indigenous strains of S. cerevisiae present during fermentation were detected. In addition, a high genetic relationship among some commercial cultures was found, highlighting imprecision or fraudulent practices by starter manufacturers.

  9. Multiple jeopardy: poor, economically disconnected, and child welfare involved.

    PubMed

    Marcenko, Maureen O; Hook, Jennifer L; Romich, Jennifer L; Lee, JoAnn S

    2012-08-01

    Although the welfare literature reveals a growing number of parents who are economically disconnected, meaning neither employed nor receiving cash assistance, little is known about the prevalence and impacts of disconnection among child welfare-involved parents. This study took advantage of a statewide survey of child welfare-involved parents to examine economic disconnection in this population and to explore the relationship between disconnection and parent engagement in child welfare. One fifth of the sample reported that they were economically disconnected, with several patterns differentiating disconnected caregivers from those who received benefits or earned income through employment. Disconnected caregivers were younger and more frequently had children in out-of-home placements as opposed to receiving services in home than economically connected caregivers. They also reported higher unmet needs for basic services, such as housing and medical care, but were more likely to report financial help from their informal network. Finally, disconnected caregivers reported lower engagement in child welfare services even when controlling for demographic characteristics, chronic psychosocial risk factors, placement status, and maltreatment type. The findings document economic disconnection among child welfare-involved parents and raise important questions about the implications of disconnection for families and for child welfare outcomes.

  10. Repression of genes involved in melanocyte differentiation in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Marjorie-Allison; Champagne, Sophie; Gaudreault, Manon; Deschambeault, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Uveal melanoma (UM) has been the subject of intense interest due to its distinctive metastatic pattern, which involves hematogenous dissemination of cancerous cells toward the liver in 50% of patients. To search for new UM prognostic markers, the Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) technique was used to isolate genes that are differentially expressed between UM primary tumors and normal uveal melanocytes (UVM). Methods A subtracted cDNA library was prepared using cDNA from uncultured UM primary tumors and UVM. The expression level of selected genes was further validated by cDNA microarray, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunofluorescence analyses. Results One hundred-fifteen genes were identified using the SSH technique. Microarray analyses comparing the gene expression profiles of UM primary tumors to UVM validated a significant differential expression for 48% of these genes. The expression pattern of selected genes was then analyzed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR and was found to be consistent with the SSH and cDNA microarray findings. A down-regulation of genes associated with melanocyte differentiation was confirmed in UM primary tumors. Presence of undifferentiated cells in the UM was demonstrated by the expression of stem cell markers ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) and octamer-binding protein 4 (OCT4). Conclusions We demonstrated that the SSH technique is efficient to detect differentially expressed genes between UM and UVM. The genes identified in this study represent valuable candidates for further functional analysis in UM and should be informative in studying the biology of this tumor. In addition, deregulation of the melanocyte differentiation pathway revealed the presence of UM cells exhibiting a stem cell-like phenotype. PMID:22815634

  11. Obstacle Detection System Involving Fusion of Multiple Sensor Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannì, C.; Balsi, M.; Esposito, S.; Fallavollita, P.

    2017-08-01

    Obstacle detection is a fundamental task for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) as a part of a Sense and Avoid system. In this study, we present a method of multi-sensor obstacle detection that demonstrated good results on different kind of obstacles. This method can be implemented on low-cost platforms involving a DSP or small FPGA. In this paper, we also present a study on the typical targets that can be tough to detect because of their characteristics of reflectivity, form factor, heterogeneity and show how data fusion can often overcome the limitations of each technology.

  12. Simultaneous gene quantitation of multiple genes in individual bovine nuclear transfer blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Berg, Debbie; Beaumont, Sue; Standley, Neil T; Wells, David N; Pfeffer, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    During somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT), the transcriptional status of the donor cell has to be reprogrammed to reflect that of an embryo. We analysed the accuracy of this process by comparing transcript levels of four developmentally important genes (Oct4, Otx2, Ifitm3, GATA6), a gene involved in epigenetic regulation (Dnmt3a) and three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, beta-tubulin and GAPDH) in 21 NT blastocysts with that in genetically half-identical in vitro produced (IVP, n=19) and in vivo (n=15) bovine embryos. We have optimised an RNA-isolation and SYBR-green-based real-time RT-PCR procedure allowing the reproducible absolute quantification of multiple genes from a single blastocyst. Our data indicated that transcript levels did not differ significantly between stage and grade-matched zona-free NT and IVP embryos except for Ifitm3/Fragilis, which was expressed at twofold higher levels in NT blastocysts. Ifitm3 expression is confined to the inner cell mass at day 7 blastocysts and to the epiblast in day 14 embryos. No ectopic expression in the trophectoderm was seen in NT embryos. Gene expression in NT and IVP embryos increased between two- and threefold for all eight genes from early to late blastocyst stages. This increase exceeded the increase in cell number over this time period indicating an increase in transcript number per cell. Embryo quality (morphological grading) was correlated to cell number for NT and IVP embryos with grade 3 blastocysts containing 30% fewer cells. However, only NT embryos displayed a significant reduction in gene expression (50%) with loss of quality. Variability in gene expression levels was not significantly different in NT, IVP or in vivo embryos but differed among genes, suggesting that the stringency of regulation is intrinsic to a gene and not affected by culture or nuclear transfer. Oct4 levels exhibited the lowest variability. Analysing the total variability of all eight genes for individual embryos revealed that in

  13. Multiple Factors Involved in the Pathogenesis of White Matter Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Dilong; Lan, Linfang

    2017-01-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs), also known as leukoaraiosis (LA) or white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), are characterized mainly by hyperintensities on T2-weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. With the aging of the population and the development of imaging technology, the morbidity and diagnostic rates of WMLs are increasing annually. WMLs are not a benign process. They clinically manifest as cognitive decline and the subsequent development of dementia. Although WMLs are important, their pathogenesis is still unclear. This review elaborates on the advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of WMLs, focusing on anatomy, cerebral blood flow autoregulation, venous collagenosis, blood brain barrier disruption, and genetic factors. In particular, the attribution of WMLs to chronic ischemia secondary to venous collagenosis and cerebral blood flow autoregulation disruption seems reasonable. With the development of gene technology, the effect of genetic factors on the pathogenesis of WMLs is gaining gradual attention. PMID:28316994

  14. Screening for Multiple Genes Influencing Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shelley D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the "sib pair" method of linkage analysis designed to locate genes influencing dyslexia, which has several advantages over the "LOD" score method. Notes that the sib pair analysis was able to detect the same linkages as the LOD method, plus a possible third region. Confirms that the sib pair method is an effective means of screening. (RS)

  15. Bradyoxetin, a unique chemical signal involved in symbiotic gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John; Carlson, Russell W.; York, William S.; Stacey, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic bacterium that nodulates soybean. Critical for the infection and establishment of this symbiosis are the bacterial nodulation genes (nod, nol, noe), which are induced in the presence of plant produced isoflavones. Transcription of the nodulation genes is also controlled in a population density-dependent fashion. Expression of the nod genes is maximal at low population densities, and decreases significantly at higher culture densities. Population density control of the nodulation genes involves NolA and NodD2, both of which function in tandem to repress nod gene expression. An extracellular secreted factor (CDF) is known to mediate this repression. Here, we report that CDF is a novel signaling molecule, designated bradyoxetin, different from other Gram-negative quorum signals. The proposed structure of bradyoxetin is 2-{4-[[4-(3-aminooxetan-2-yl)phenyl](imino)methyl]phenyl}oxetan-3-ylamine. Interestingly, expression of bradyoxetin is iron-regulated, and is maximally produced under iron-starved conditions. Consistent with this, expression of the nodulation genes occurred in an iron-dependent fashion. Addition of iron to B. japonicum cultures at high optical densities resulted in decreased bradyoxetin production, and a concomitant reduction in nolA expression. A corresponding increase in nodY–lacZ expression was observed with iron treatment. PMID:12393811

  16. Polymorphisms in genes involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

    PubMed

    Arinami, T; Ishiguro, H; Onaivi, E S

    2000-12-27

    Smoking behavior is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic contribution to smoking behavior is at least as great as its contribution to alcoholism. Much progress has been achieved in genomic research related to cigarette-smoking within recent years. Linkage studies indicate that there are several loci linked to smoking, and candidate genes that are related to neurotransmission have been examined. Possible associated genes include cytochrome P450 subfamily polypeptide 6 (CYP2A6), dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(4) receptors, dopamine transporter, and serotonin transporter genes. There are other important candidate genes but studies evaluating the link with smoking have not been reported. These include genes encoding the dopamine D(3) and D(5) receptors, serotonin receptors, tyrosine hydroxylase, trytophan 2,3-dioxygenase, opioid receptors, and cannabinoid receptors. Since smoking-related factors are extremely complex, studies of diverse populations and of many aspects of smoking behavior including initiation, maintenance, cessation, relapse, and influence of environmental factors are needed to identify smoking-associated genes. We now review genetic polymorphisms reported to be involved in neurotransmission in relation to smoking.

  17. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  18. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  19. Plant genes involved in harbouring symbiotic rhizobia or pathogenic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Hopkins, Julie; Andrio, Emilie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Lecomte, Philippe; Puppo, Alain; Abad, Pierre; Favery, Bruno; Hérouart, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The establishment and development of plant-microorganism interactions involve impressive transcriptomic reprogramming of target plant genes. The symbiont (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and the root knot-nematode pathogen (Meloidogyne incognita) induce the formation of new root organs, the nodule and the gall, respectively. Using laser-assisted microdissection, we specifically monitored, at the cell level, Medicago gene expression in nodule zone II cells, which are preparing to receive rhizobia, and in gall giant and surrounding cells, which play an essential role in nematode feeding and constitute the typical root swollen structure, respectively. We revealed an important reprogramming of hormone pathways and C1 metabolism in both interactions, which may play key roles in nodule and gall neoformation, rhizobia endocytosis and nematode feeding. Common functions targeted by rhizobia and nematodes were mainly down-regulated, whereas the specificity of the interaction appeared to involve up-regulated genes. Our transcriptomic results provide powerful datasets to unravel the mechanisms involved in the accommodation of rhizobia and root-knot nematodes. Moreover, they raise the question of host specificity and the evolution of plant infection mechanisms by a symbiont and a pathogen.

  20. A search engine to identify pathway genes from expression data on multiple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunnuan; Weirauch, Matthew T; Powell, Corey C; Zambon, Alexander C; Stuart, Joshua M

    2007-01-01

    Background The completion of several genome projects showed that most genes have not yet been characterized, especially in multicellular organisms. Although most genes have unknown functions, a large collection of data is available describing their transcriptional activities under many different experimental conditions. In many cases, the coregulatation of a set of genes across a set of conditions can be used to infer roles for genes of unknown function. Results We developed a search engine, the Multiple-Species Gene Recommender (MSGR), which scans gene expression datasets from multiple organisms to identify genes that participate in a genetic pathway. The MSGR takes a query consisting of a list of genes that function together in a genetic pathway from one of six organisms: Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Helicobacter pylori. Using a probabilistic method to merge searches, the MSGR identifies genes that are significantly coregulated with the query genes in one or more of those organisms. The MSGR achieves its highest accuracy for many human pathways when searches are combined across species. We describe specific examples in which new genes were identified to be involved in a neuromuscular signaling pathway and a cell-adhesion pathway. Conclusion The search engine can scan large collections of gene expression data for new genes that are significantly coregulated with a pathway of interest. By integrating searches across organisms, the MSGR can identify pathway members whose coregulation is either ancient or newly evolved. PMID:17477880

  1. Highlights of glycosylation and adhesion related genes involved in myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myogenesis is initiated by myoblast differentiation and fusion to form myotubes and muscle fibres. A population of myoblasts, known as satellite cells, is responsible for post-natal growth of muscle and for its regeneration. This differentiation requires many changes in cell behaviour and its surrounding environment. These modifications are tightly regulated over time and can be characterized through the study of changes in gene expression associated with this process. During the initial myogenesis steps, using the myoblast cell line C2C12 as a model, Janot et al. (2009) showed significant variations in expression for genes involved in pathways of glycolipid synthesis. In this study we used murine satellite cells (MSC) and their ability to differentiate into myotubes or early fat storage cells to select glycosylation related genes whose variation of expression is myogenesis specific. Results The comparison of variant genes in both MSC differentiation pathways identified 67 genes associated with myogenesis. Comparison with data obtained for C2C12 revealed that only 14 genes had similar expression profiles in both cell types and that 17 genes were specifically regulated in MSC. Results were validated statistically by without a priori clustering. Classification according to protein function encoded by these 31 genes showed that the main regulated cellular processes during this differentiation were (i) remodeling of the extracellular matrix, particularly, sulfated structures, (ii) down-regulation of O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis, and (iii) an increase in adhesion protein expression. A functional study was performed on Itga11 and Chst5 encoding two highly up-regulated proteins. The inactivation of Chst5 by specific shRNA delayed the fusion of MSC. By contrast, the inactivation of Itga11 by specific shRNA dramatically decreased the fusion ability of MSC. This result was confirmed by neutralization of Itga11 product by specific antibodies. Conclusions Our

  2. Identification of genes involved in the response of Arabidopsis to simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Nicky J; Lilley, Catherine J; Urwin, Peter E

    2013-08-01

    In field conditions, plants may experience numerous environmental stresses at any one time. Research suggests that the plant response to multiple stresses is different from that for individual stresses, producing nonadditive effects. In particular, the molecular signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact and antagonize one another. The transcriptome response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to concurrent water deficit (abiotic stress) and infection with the plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii (biotic stress) was analyzed by microarray. A unique program of gene expression was activated in response to a combination of water deficit and nematode stress, with 50 specifically multiple-stress-regulated genes. Candidate genes with potential roles in controlling the response to multiple stresses were selected and functionally characterized. RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR-LIKE8 (AtRALFL8) was induced in roots by joint stresses but conferred susceptibility to drought stress and nematode infection when overexpressed. Constitutively expressing plants had stunted root systems and extended root hairs. Plants may produce signal peptides such as AtRALFL8 to induce cell wall remodeling in response to multiple stresses. The methionine homeostasis gene METHIONINE GAMMA LYASE (AtMGL) was up-regulated by dual stress in leaves, conferring resistance to nematodes when overexpressed. It may regulate methionine metabolism under conditions of multiple stresses. AZELAIC ACID INDUCED1 (AZI1), involved in defense priming in systemic plant immunity, was down-regulated in leaves by joint stress and conferred drought susceptibility when overexpressed, potentially as part of abscisic acid-induced repression of pathogen response genes. The results highlight the complex nature of multiple stress responses and confirm the importance of studying plant stress factors in combination.

  3. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb

  4. Light- and clock-control of genes involved in detoxification.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, G; Santi, M; Migaud, H; Vera, L M

    2017-06-15

    Circadian regulation of hepatic detoxification seems to be amongst the key roles of the biological clock. The liver is the major site for biotransformation, and in mammals, it contains several clock-controlled transcription factors such as proline and acidic amino acid-rich basic leucine zipper proteins (PAR bZIP) and basic-helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH-PAS) family that act as circadian regulators of detoxification genes. This investigation explored the existence of daily and circadian expression of transcription factors involved in detoxification, as well as the temporal profile of a set of their target genes in zebrafish liver. In our study, zebrafish were able to synchronize to a light-dark (LD) cycle and displayed a diurnal pattern of activity. In addition, the expression of clock genes presented daily and circadian rhythmicity in liver. Apart from hlfa, the expression of PAR bZIP transcription factors also displayed daily rhythms, which appeared to be both light-dependent and clock-controlled, as circadian rhythms free-ran under constant conditions (continuous darkness, DD). Under LD, tefb, dbpa and dbpb expression peaked at the end of the darkness period whereas tefa showed peak levels of expression at the onset of the photophase. In addition, these four genes exhibited circadian expression under DD, with higher expression levels at the end of the subjective night. The expression of the bHLH-PAS transcription factor arh2 also showed circadian rhythmicity in zebrafish liver, peaking in the middle of the subjective night and approximately 3-4 h before peak expression of the PAR bZIP genes. Regarding the detoxification genes, the major target gene of AhR, cyp1a, showed daily and circadian expression with an acrophase 2 h after ahr2. Under LD, abcb4 also showed daily rhythmicity, with an acrophase 1-2 h after that of PAR bZIP factors during the transition between darkness and light phases, when zebrafish become active. However, the expression of six

  5. Genes Involved in Bacitracin Resistance in Streptococcus mutans†

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Shibata, Yukie; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is resistant to bacitracin, which is a peptide antibiotic produced by certain species of Bacillus. The purpose of this study was to clarify the bacitracin resistance mechanism of S. mutans. We cloned and sequenced two S. mutans loci that are involved in bacitracin resistance. The rgp locus, which is located downstream from rmlD, contains six rgp genes (rgpA to rgpF) that are involved in rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP) synthesis in S. mutans. The inactivation of RGP synthesis in S. mutans resulted in an approximately fivefold-higher sensitivity to bacitracin relative to that observed for the wild-type strain Xc. The second bacitracin resistance locus comprised four mbr genes (mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, and mbrD) and was located immediately downstream from gtfC, which encodes the water-insoluble glucan-synthesizing enzyme. Although the bacitracin sensitivities of mutants that had defects in flanking genes were similar to that of the parental strain Xc, mutants that were defective in mbrA, mbrB, mbrC, or mbrD were about 100 to 120 times more sensitive to bacitracin than strain Xc. In addition, a mutant that was defective in all of the mbrABCD genes and rgpA was more sensitive to bacitracin than either the RGP or Mbr mutants. We conclude that RGP synthesis is related to bacitracin resistance in S. mutans and that the mbr genes modulate resistance to bacitracin via an unknown mechanism that is independent of RGP synthesis. PMID:12435673

  6. Multiple Gene Repression in Cyanobacteria Using CRISPRi.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lun; Cengic, Ivana; Anfelt, Josefine; Hudson, Elton P

    2016-03-18

    We describe the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) for gene repression in the model cyanobacterium Synechcocystis sp. PCC 6803. The nuclease-deficient Cas9 from the type-II CRISPR/Cas of Streptrococcus pyogenes was used to repress green fluorescent protein (GFP) to negligible levels. CRISPRi was also used to repress formation of carbon storage compounds polyhydroxybutryate (PHB) and glycogen during nitrogen starvation. As an example of the potential of CRISPRi for basic and applied cyanobacteria research, we simultaneously knocked down 4 putative aldehyde reductases and dehydrogenases at 50-95% repression. This work also demonstrates that tightly repressed promoters allow for inducible and reversible CRISPRi in cyanobacteria.

  7. A plant virus evolved by acquiring multiple nonconserved genes to extend its host range

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Robertson, Cecile J.; Garnsey, Stephen M.; Dawson, William O.

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have evolved as combinations of genes whose products interact with cellular components to produce progeny virus throughout the plants. Some viral genes, particularly those that are involved in replication and assembly, tend to be relatively conserved, whereas other genes that have evolved for interactions with the specific host for movement and to counter host–defense systems tend to be less conserved. Closteroviridae encode 1–5 nonconserved ORFs. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a Closterovirus, possesses nonconserved p33, p18, and p13 genes that are expendable for systemic infection of the two laboratory hosts, Citrus macrophylla and Mexican lime. In this study, we show that the extended host range of CTV requires these nonconserved genes. The p33 gene was required to systemically infect sour orange and lemon trees, whereas either the p33 or the p18 gene was sufficient for systemic infection of grapefruit trees and the p33 or the p13 gene was sufficient for systemic infection of calamondin plants. Thus, these three genes are required for systemic infection of the full host range of CTV, but different genes were specific for different hosts. Remarkably, either of two genes was sufficient for infection of some citrus hybrids. These findings suggest that CTV acquired multiple nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) and, as a result, gained the ability to interact with multiple hosts, thus extending its host range during the course of evolution. These results greatly extend the complexity of known virus–plant interactions. PMID:21987809

  8. Temporally controlled multiple-gene delivery in scaffolds: A promising strategy to enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Xu, Lihua; Li, Yiming; Ma, Jianfeng

    2011-02-01

    Bone defects sometimes require more effective repair regimens than conventional clinical therapies can provide. On account of this, tissue-engineered scaffolds have emerged as a promising alternative. Scaffolds that release genes encoding growth factors (GFs) offer additional benefits for bone regeneration in comparison with scaffolds providing protein delivery. The present gene delivery systems focus on unitary or dual genes delivery without controlled release. In the meantime, evidences indicate that bone formation is a complex cascade of events, in which time-dependent expression of multiple growth factors is involved. In our hypothesis, a temporally controlled, multi-gene delivery system embedded in a scaffold matrix can be fabricated; such a system is capable of mimicking the expression of growth factor profile in osteogenesis. Consequently, bone regeneration can be promoted by sequential gene expression of multiple growth factors.

  9. Genes and proteins involved in bacterial magnetic particle formation.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Tadashi; Okamura, Yoshiko

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize intracellular magnetosomes that impart a cellular swimming behaviour referred to as magnetotaxis. The magnetic structures aligned in chains are postulated to function as biological compass needles allowing the bacterium to migrate along redox gradients through the Earth's geomagnetic field lines. Despite the discovery of this unique group of microorganisms 28 years ago, the mechanisms of magnetic crystal biomineralization have yet to be fully elucidated. This review describes the current knowledge of the genes and proteins involved in magnetite formation in magnetic bacteria and the biotechnological applications of biomagnetites in the interdisciplinary fields of nanobiotechnology, medicine and environmental management.

  10. Mosaic 7q31 deletion involving FOXP2 gene associated with language impairment.

    PubMed

    Palka, Chiara; Alfonsi, Melissa; Mohn, Angelika; Cerbo, Renato; Guanciali Franchi, Paolo; Fantasia, Donatella; Morizio, Elisena; Stuppia, Liborio; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Zori, Roberto; Chiarelli, Francesco; Palka, Giandomenico

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 10-year-old patient with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and mild dysmorphic features. Although multiple karyotypes were reported as normal, a bacterial artificial chromosome array comparative genomic hybridization revealed the presence of a de novo 14.8-Mb mosaic deletion of chromosome 7q31. The deleted region involved several genes, including FOXP2, which has been associated with CAS. Interestingly, the deletion reported here was observed in about 50% of cells, which is the first case of mosaicism in a 7q31 deletion. Despite the presence of the deletion in only 50% of cells, the phenotype of the patient was not milder than other published cases. To date, 6 cases with a deletion of 9.1-20 Mb involving the FOXP2 gene have been reported, suggesting a new contiguous gene deletion syndrome characterized mainly by CAS caused by haploinsufficiency of the genes encompassed in the 7q critical region. This report suggests that children found with a deletion involving the FOXP2 region should be evaluated for CAS and that analysis of the FOXP2 gene including array comparative genomic hybridization should be considered in selected patients with CAS. Mosaic deletions in this area may also be considered as causative of CAS.

  11. Adaptive evolution of genes involved in the regulation of germline stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    PubMed

    Flores, Heather A; DuMont, Vanessa L Bauer; Fatoo, Aalya; Hubbard, Diana; Hijji, Mohammed; Barbash, Daniel A; Aquadro, Charles F

    2015-02-09

    Population genetic and comparative analyses in diverse taxa have shown that numerous genes involved in reproduction are adaptively evolving. Two genes involved in germline stem cell regulation, bag of marbles (bam) and benign gonial cell neoplasm (bgcn), have been shown previously to experience recurrent, adaptive evolution in both Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Here we report a population genetic survey on eight additional genes involved in germline stem cell regulation in D. melanogaster and D. simulans that reveals all eight of these genes reject a neutral model of evolution in at least one test and one species after correction for multiple testing using a false-discovery rate of 0.05. These genes play diverse roles in the regulation of germline stem cells, suggesting that positive selection in response to several evolutionary pressures may be acting to drive the adaptive evolution of these genes.

  12. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Welcsh, Piri L.; Lee, Ming K.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rachel M.; Black, Daniel J.; Mahadevappa, Mamatha; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Warrington, Janet A.; King, Mary-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of BRCA1 caused by inherited mutation and tissue-specific somatic mutation leads to breast and ovarian cancer. Nearly all BRCA1 germ-line mutations involve truncation or loss of the C-terminal BRCT transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that transcriptional regulation is a critical function of the wild-type gene. The purpose of this project was to determine whether there is a link between the role of BRCA1 in transcriptional regulation and its role in tumor suppression. We developed a cell line (in which BRCA1 can be induced) and used microarray analysis to compare transcription profiles of epithelial cells with low endogenous levels of BRCA1 vs. transcription profiles of cells with 2–4-fold higher induced levels of expression of BRCA1. At these levels of expression, BRCA1 did not induce apoptosis. Undirected cluster analysis of six paired experiments revealed 373 genes, the expression of which was altered significantly and consistently by BRCA1 induction. Expression of 62 genes was altered more than 2-fold. BRCA1-regulated genes associated with breast tumorigenesis included the estrogen-responsive genes MYC and cyclin D1, which are overexpressed in many breast tumors; STAT1 and JAK1, key components of the cytokine signal transduction pathway; the extracellular matrix protein laminin 3A; ID4, an inhibitor of DNA-binding transcriptional activators, which in turn negatively regulates BRCA1 expression; and the prohormone stanniocalcin, expression of which is lost in breast tumor cells. Coordinated expression of BRCA1 with ID4 and with stanniocalcin was confirmed in primary breast and ovarian tumors. PMID:12032322

  13. RECQ1 helicase is involved in replication stress survival and drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Viziteu, E; Klein, B; Basbous, J; Lin, Y-L; Hirtz, C; Gourzones, C; Tiers, L; Bruyer, A; Vincent, L; Grandmougin, C; Seckinger, A; Goldschmidt, H; Constantinou, A; Pasero, P; Hose, D; Moreaux, J

    2017-03-10

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell cancer with poor survival, characterized by the expansion of multiple myeloma cells (MMCs) in the bone marrow. Using a microarray-based genome-wide screen for genes responding to DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) inhibition in MM cells, we identified RECQ1 among the most downregulated genes. RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding enzymes involved in the maintenance of chromosome stability. Here we show that RECQ1 is significantly overexpressed in MMCs compared to normal plasma cells and that increased RECQ1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in three independent cohorts of patients. Interestingly, RECQ1 knockdown inhibits cells growth and induces apoptosis in MMCs. Moreover, RECQ1 depletion promotes the development of DNA double-strand breaks, as evidenced by the formation of 53BP1 foci and the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and histone variant H2A.X (H2AX). In contrast, RECQ1 overexpression protects MMCs from melphalan and bortezomib cytotoxicity. RECQ1 interacts with PARP1 in MMCs exposed to treatment and RECQ1 depletion sensitizes MMCs to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. DNMT inhibitor treatment results in RECQ1 downregulation through miR-203 deregulation in MMC. Altogether, these data suggest that association of DNA damaging agents and/or PARP inhibitors with DNMT inhibitors may represent a therapeutic approach in patients with high RECQ1 expression associated with a poor prognosis.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.54.

  14. Phylogeographic support for horizontal gene transfer involving sympatric bruchid species

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Nadir; Benrey, Betty; Hossaert-McKey, Martine; Grill, Andrea; McKey, Doyle; Galtier, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    pseudogenisation. However, none of these seem able to explain the patterns observed. A fourth hypothesis, involving recent horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between A. obtectus and A. obvelatus, and from one of these species to Z. subfasciatus in the Mexican Altiplano, seems the only plausible explanation. The HGT between our study species seems to have occurred recently, and only in a zone where the three beetles are sympatric and share common host plants. This suggests that transfer could have been effected by some external vector such as a eukaryotic or viral parasite, which might still host the transferred fragment. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, Adam Eyre-Walker and Alexey Kondrashov. PMID:16872524

  15. Predicting Gene-Disease Associations Using Multiple Species Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    predictions on interactions from protein - protein interaction networks such as HPRD [26], and Goh et al. [5] construct a network where genes are connected...they can achieve much greater coverage than pure protein - protein interaction networks. In the past decades, the growth of gene-phenotype...collected from multiple sources including [11, 12, 8, 10]. Detailed description on the extraction of the data sets can be found in [22]. In particular

  16. Genes Involved in Cronobacter sakazakii Biofilm Formation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Isabel; Carranza, Paula; Lehner, Angelika; Stephan, Roger; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin

    2010-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic food-borne pathogens that can cause severe and sometimes lethal infections in neonates. In some outbreaks, the sources of infection were traced to contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF) or contaminated utensils used for PIF reconstitution. In this study, we investigated biofilm formation in Cronobacter sakazakii strain ES5. To investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in Cronobacter on abiotic surfaces, we screened a library of random transposon mutants of strain ES5 for reduced biofilm formation using a polystyrene microtiter assay. Genetic characterization of the mutants led to identification of genes that are associated with cellulose biosynthesis and flagellar structure and biosynthesis and genes involved in basic cellular processes and virulence, as well as several genes whose functions are currently unknown. In two of the mutants, hypothetical proteins ESA_00281 and ESA_00282 had a strong impact on flow cell biofilm architecture, and their contribution to biofilm formation was confirmed by genetic complementation. In addition, adhesion of selected biofilm formation mutants to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. Our findings suggest that flagella and hypothetical proteins ESA_00281 and ESA_00282, but not cellulose, contribute to adhesion of Cronobacter to this biotic surface. PMID:20118366

  17. Cooperation of multiple signaling pathways in CD40-regulated gene expression in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dadgostar, Hajir; Zarnegar, Brian; Hoffmann, Alexander; Qin, Xiao-Feng; Truong, Uyen; Rao, Govinda; Baltimore, David; Cheng, Genhong

    2002-01-01

    CD40/CD40L interaction is essential for multiple biological events in T dependent humoral immune responses, including B cell survival and proliferation, germinal center and memory B cell formation, and antibody isotype switching and affinity maturation. By using high-density microarrays, we examined gene expression in primary mouse B lymphocytes after multiple time points of CD40L stimulation. In addition to genes involved in cell survival and growth, which are also induced by other mitogens such as lipopolysaccharide, CD40L specifically activated genes involved in germinal center formation and T cell costimulatory molecules that facilitate T dependent humoral immunity. Next, by examining the roles of individual CD40-activated signal transduction pathways, we dissected the overall CD40-mediated response into genes independently regulated by the individual pathways or collectively by all pathways. We also found that gene down-regulation is a significant part of the overall response and that the p38 pathway plays an important role in this process, whereas the NF-κB pathway is important for the up-regulation of primary response genes. Our finding of overlapping independent control of gene expression modules by different pathways suggests, in principle, that distinct biological behaviors that depend on distinct gene expression subsets can be manipulated by targeting specific signaling pathways. PMID:11830667

  18. Potential hippocampal genes and pathways involved in Alzheimer's disease: a bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, X Q; Chu, J F; Zhang, X; Yan, Z R; Li, Y Z

    2015-06-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disor-der and the most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Nu-merous studies have focused on the dysregulated genes in AD, but the pathogenesis is still unknown. In this study, we explored critical hippocampal genes and pathways that might potentially be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Four transcriptome datasets for the hip-pocampus of patients with AD were downloaded from ArrayExpress, and the gene signature was identified by integrated analysis of mul-tiple transcriptomes using novel genome-wide relative significance and genome-wide global significance models. A protein-protein interaction network was constructed, and five clusters were selected. The biologi-cal functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology and Kyo-to Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. A total of 6994 genes were screened, and the top 300 genes were subjected to further analysis. Four significant KEGG pathways were identified, including oxidative phosphorylation and Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and Alzheimer's disease pathways. The hub network of cluster 1 with the highest average rank value was de-fined. The genes (NDUFB3, NDUFA9, NDUFV1, NDUFV2, NDUFS3, NDUFA10, COX7B, and UQCR1) were considered critical with high degree in cluster 1 as well as being shared by the four significant path-ways. The oxidative phosphorylation process was also involved in the other three pathways and is considered to be relevant to energy-related AD pathology in the hippocampus. This research provides a perspec-tive from which to explore critical genes and pathways for potential AD therapies.

  19. Differentially expressed genes and gene networks involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia.

    PubMed

    Terenina, Elena; Fabre, Stephane; Bonnet, Agnès; Monniaux, Danielle; Robert-Granié, Christèle; SanCristobal, Magali; Sarry, Julien; Vignoles, Florence; Gondret, Florence; Monget, Philippe; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian folliculogenesis corresponds to the development of follicles leading to either ovulation or degeneration, this latter process being called atresia. Even if atresia involves apoptosis, its mechanism is not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze global gene expression in pig granulosa cells of ovarian follicles during atresia. The transcriptome analysis was performed on a 9,216 cDNA microarray to identify gene networks and candidate genes involved in pig ovarian follicular atresia. We found 1,684 significantly regulated genes to be differentially regulated between small healthy follicles and small atretic follicles. Among them, 287 genes had a fold-change higher than two between the two follicle groups. Eleven genes (DKK3, GADD45A, CAMTA2, CCDC80, DAPK2, ECSIT, MSMB, NUPR1, RUNX2, SAMD4A, and ZNF628) having a fold-change higher than five between groups could likely serve as markers of follicular atresia. Moreover, automatic confrontation of deregulated genes with literature data highlighted 93 genes as regulatory candidates of pig granulosa cell atresia. Among these genes known to be inhibitors of apoptosis, stimulators of apoptosis, or tumor suppressors INHBB, HNF4, CLU, different interleukins (IL5, IL24), TNF-associated receptor (TNFR1), and cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) were suggested as playing an important role in porcine atresia. The present study also enlists key upstream regulators in follicle atresia based on our results and on a literature review. The novel gene candidates and gene networks identified in the current study lead to a better understanding of the molecular regulation of ovarian follicular atresia. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Transcriptomic analysis illuminates genes involved in chlorophyll synthesis after nitrogen starvation in Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Aki; Wittmann, Bruce J; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E; Dantas, Gautam

    2016-08-01

    Acaryochloris species are a genus of cyanobacteria that utilize chlorophyll (chl) d as their primary chlorophyll molecule during oxygenic photosynthesis. Chl d allows Acaryochloris to harvest red-shifted light, which gives them the ability to live in filtered light environments that are depleted in visible light. Although genomes of multiple Acaryochloris species have been sequenced, their analysis has not revealed how chl d is synthesized. Here, we demonstrate that Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 cells undergo chlorosis by nitrogen depletion and exhibit robust regeneration of chl d by nitrogen repletion. We performed a time course RNA-Seq experiment to quantify global transcriptomic changes during chlorophyll recovery. We observed upregulation of numerous known chl biosynthesis genes and also identified an oxygenase gene with a similar transcriptional profile as these chl biosynthesis genes, suggesting its possible involvement in chl d biosynthesis. Moreover, our data suggest that multiple prochlorophyte chlorophyll-binding homologs are important during chlorophyll recovery, and light-independent chl synthesis genes are more dominant than the light-dependent gene at the transcription level. Transcriptomic characterization of this organism provides crucial clues toward mechanistic elucidation of chl d biosynthesis.

  1. The Maltase Involved in Starch Metabolism in Barley Endosperm Is Encoded by a Single Gene

    PubMed Central

    Andriotis, Vasilios M. E.; Saalbach, Gerhard; Waugh, Robbie; Field, Robert A.; Smith, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    During germination and early seedling growth of barley (Hordeum vulgare), maltase is responsible for the conversion of maltose produced by starch degradation in the endosperm to glucose for seedling growth. Despite the potential relevance of this enzyme for malting and the production of alcoholic beverages, neither the nature nor the role of maltase is fully understood. Although only one gene encoding maltase has been identified with certainty, there is evidence for the existence of other genes and for multiple forms of the enzyme. It has been proposed that maltase may be involved directly in starch granule degradation as well as in maltose hydrolysis. The aim of our work was to discover the nature of maltase in barley endosperm. We used ion exchange chromatography to fractionate maltase activity from endosperm of young seedlings, and we partially purified activity for protein identification. We compared maltase activity in wild-type barley and transgenic lines with reduced expression of the previously-characterised maltase gene Agl97, and we used genomic and transcriptomic information to search for further maltase genes. We show that all of the maltase activity in the barley endosperm can be accounted for by a single gene, Agl97. Multiple forms of the enzyme most likely arise from proteolysis and other post-translational modifications. PMID:27011041

  2. Simultaneous Clustering of Multiple Gene Expression and Physical Interaction Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Manikandan; Vetta, Adrian; Schadt, Eric E.; Zhu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Many genome-wide datasets are routinely generated to study different aspects of biological systems, but integrating them to obtain a coherent view of the underlying biology remains a challenge. We propose simultaneous clustering of multiple networks as a framework to integrate large-scale datasets on the interactions among and activities of cellular components. Specifically, we develop an algorithm JointCluster that finds sets of genes that cluster well in multiple networks of interest, such as coexpression networks summarizing correlations among the expression profiles of genes and physical networks describing protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions among genes or gene-products. Our algorithm provides an efficient solution to a well-defined problem of jointly clustering networks, using techniques that permit certain theoretical guarantees on the quality of the detected clustering relative to the optimal clustering. These guarantees coupled with an effective scaling heuristic and the flexibility to handle multiple heterogeneous networks make our method JointCluster an advance over earlier approaches. Simulation results showed JointCluster to be more robust than alternate methods in recovering clusters implanted in networks with high false positive rates. In systematic evaluation of JointCluster and some earlier approaches for combined analysis of the yeast physical network and two gene expression datasets under glucose and ethanol growth conditions, JointCluster discovers clusters that are more consistently enriched for various reference classes capturing different aspects of yeast biology or yield better coverage of the analysed genes. These robust clusters, which are supported across multiple genomic datasets and diverse reference classes, agree with known biology of yeast under these growth conditions, elucidate the genetic control of coordinated transcription, and enable functional predictions for a number of uncharacterized genes. PMID:20419151

  3. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Anne-Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T.; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Demenais, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Methods Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay—Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. Results One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Conclusions Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits. PMID:27334786

  4. Genes Involved in Interleukin-1 Receptor Type II Activities Are Associated With Asthmatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Madore, Anne Marie; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Sarnowski, Chloé; Monier, Florent; Dizier, Marie Hélène; Demenais, Florence; Laprise, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a key role in inflammation and immunity and its decoy receptor, IL-1R2, has been implicated in transcriptomic and genetic studies of asthma. Two large asthma family collections, the French-Canadian Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) study and the French Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA), were used to investigate the association of SNPs in 10 genes that modulate IL-1R2 activities with asthma, allergic asthma, and atopy. Gene-gene interactions were also tested. One SNP in BACE2 was associated with allergic asthma in the SLSJ study and replicated in the EGEA study before statistical correction for multiple testing. Additionally, two SNPs in the MMP2 gene were replicated in both studies prior to statistical correction and reached significance in the combined analysis. Moreover, three gene-gene interactions also survived statistical correction in the combined analyses (BACE1-IL1RAP in asthma and allergic asthma and IL1R1-IL1RAP in atopy). Our results highlight the relevance of genes involved in the IL-1R2 activity in the context of asthma and asthma-related traits.

  5. Genes and signaling pathways involved in memory enhancement in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Seok

    2014-06-04

    Mutant mice have been used successfully as a tool for investigating the mechanisms of memory at multiple levels, from genes to behavior. In most cases, manipulating a gene expressed in the brain impairs cognitive functions such as memory and their underlying cellular mechanisms, including synaptic plasticity. However, a remarkable number of mutations have been shown to enhance memory in mice. Understanding how to improve a system provides valuable insights into how the system works under normal conditions, because this involves understanding what the crucial components are. Therefore, more can be learned about the basic mechanisms of memory by studying mutant mice with enhanced memory. This review will summarize the genes and signaling pathways that are altered in the mutants with enhanced memory, as well as their roles in synaptic plasticity. Finally, I will discuss how knowledge of memory-enhancing mechanisms could be used to develop treatments for cognitive disorders associated with impaired plasticity.

  6. Genes and signaling pathways involved in memory enhancement in mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mutant mice have been used successfully as a tool for investigating the mechanisms of memory at multiple levels, from genes to behavior. In most cases, manipulating a gene expressed in the brain impairs cognitive functions such as memory and their underlying cellular mechanisms, including synaptic plasticity. However, a remarkable number of mutations have been shown to enhance memory in mice. Understanding how to improve a system provides valuable insights into how the system works under normal conditions, because this involves understanding what the crucial components are. Therefore, more can be learned about the basic mechanisms of memory by studying mutant mice with enhanced memory. This review will summarize the genes and signaling pathways that are altered in the mutants with enhanced memory, as well as their roles in synaptic plasticity. Finally, I will discuss how knowledge of memory-enhancing mechanisms could be used to develop treatments for cognitive disorders associated with impaired plasticity. PMID:24894914

  7. Multiple abiotic stimuli are integrated in the regulation of rice gene expression under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Plessis, Anne; Hafemeister, Christoph; Wilkins, Olivia; Gonzaga, Zennia Jean; Meyer, Rachel Sarah; Pires, Inês; Müller, Christian; Septiningsih, Endang M; Bonneau, Richard; Purugganan, Michael

    2015-11-26

    Plants rely on transcriptional dynamics to respond to multiple climatic fluctuations and contexts in nature. We analyzed the genome-wide gene expression patterns of rice (Oryza sativa) growing in rainfed and irrigated fields during two distinct tropical seasons and determined simple linear models that relate transcriptomic variation to climatic fluctuations. These models combine multiple environmental parameters to account for patterns of expression in the field of co-expressed gene clusters. We examined the similarities of our environmental models between tropical and temperate field conditions, using previously published data. We found that field type and macroclimate had broad impacts on transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations, especially for genes involved in photosynthesis and development. Nevertheless, variation in solar radiation and temperature at the timescale of hours had reproducible effects across environmental contexts. These results provide a basis for broad-based predictive modeling of plant gene expression in the field.

  8. Multiple differential expression networks identify key genes in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ri-Heng; Zhang, Ai-Min; Li, Shuang; Li, Tian-Yang; Wang, Lian-Jing; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Li, Ping; Jia, Xiong-Jie; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Xin-Yu; Liu, Min-Di; Wang, Xu; Lang, Yan; Xue, Wei-Lan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yan-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is an important contributor to cancer mortality. The objective of this paper is to identify key genes across three phenotypes (fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer) of rectal cancer based on multiple differential expression networks (DENs). Differential interactions and non-differential interactions were evaluated according to Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) algorithm, and were selected to construct DENs. Topological analysis was performed for exploring hub genes in largest components of DENs. Key genes were denoted as intersections between nodes of DENs and rectal cancer associated genes from Genecards. Finally, we utilized hub genes to classify phenotypes of rectal cancer on the basis of support vector machines (SVM) methodology. We obtained 19 hub genes and total 12 common key genes of three largest components of DENs, and EGFR was the common element. The SVM results revealed that hub genes could classify phenotypes, and validated feasibility of DEN methods. We have successfully identified significant genes (such as EGFR and UBC) across fungating, polypoid and polypoid & small-ulcer phenotype of rectal cancer. They might be potential biomarkers for classification, detection and therapy of this cancer.

  9. Slitrks as emerging candidate genes involved in neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, Catia C.; Gao, Kate P.; Shmelkov, Sergey V.; Rafii, Shahin; Lee, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    Slitrks are a family of structurally-related transmembrane proteins belonging to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) superfamily. Six family members exist (Slitrk1–Slitrk6), and all are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Slitrks have been implicated in mediating basic neuronal processes ranging from neurite outgrowth and dendritic elaboration to neuronal survival. Recent studies in humans and genetic mouse models have led to the identification of Slitrks as candidate genes that may be involved in the development of neuropsychiatric conditions such as obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. While these system level approaches have suggested that Slitrks play prominent roles in CNS development, key questions remain regarding the molecular mechanisms through which Slitrks mediate neuronal signaling and connectivity. PMID:21315458

  10. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-03-27

    The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P < 0.05), 163 up-regulated and 352 down-regulated. Real-time PCR expression analysis confirmed the microarray data. Singular Enrichment Analysis identified 48 significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions (28), biological processes (18) and cell components (2). Furthermore, we selected six candidate genes for functional examination by a single-marker association approach, which demonstrated that 20 SNPs in five candidate genes significantly associated with photosynthetic traits, and the phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 2.3% to 12.6%. This revealed that regulation of photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses.

  11. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P < 0.05), 163 up-regulated and 352 down-regulated. Real-time PCR expression analysis confirmed the microarray data. Singular Enrichment Analysis identified 48 significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions (28), biological processes (18) and cell components (2). Furthermore, we selected six candidate genes for functional examination by a single-marker association approach, which demonstrated that 20 SNPs in five candidate genes significantly associated with photosynthetic traits, and the phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 2.3% to 12.6%. This revealed that regulation of photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  12. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties: Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregivers' perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Methods: Twenty-five…

  13. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties: Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregivers' perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Methods: Twenty-five…

  14. Multiple Family Groups: An Engaging Intervention for Child Welfare-Involved Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Geetha; Bannon, William; Dean-Assael, Kara; Fuss, Ashley; Gardner, Lauren; LaBarbera, Brooke; McKay, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Differences between child welfare- and nonchild welfare-involved families regarding barriers to child mental health care, attendance, program satisfaction, and relationship with facilitators are examined for a multiple family group service delivery model aimed at reducing childhood disruptive behaviors. Although child welfare-involved caregivers…

  15. Multiple Family Groups: An Engaging Intervention for Child Welfare-Involved Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Geetha; Bannon, William; Dean-Assael, Kara; Fuss, Ashley; Gardner, Lauren; LaBarbera, Brooke; McKay, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Differences between child welfare- and nonchild welfare-involved families regarding barriers to child mental health care, attendance, program satisfaction, and relationship with facilitators are examined for a multiple family group service delivery model aimed at reducing childhood disruptive behaviors. Although child welfare-involved caregivers…

  16. Involvement of Working Memory in Mental Multiplication in Chinese Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ru-De; Ding, Yi; Xu, Le; Wang, Jia

    2017-01-01

    The authors' aim was to examine the relation between two-digit mental multiplication and working memory. In Study 1, involving 30 fifth-grade students, we used digit span backward as an abbreviated measure of working memory. In Study 2, involving 41 fourth-grade students, working memory comprised measures of phonological loop, visuospatial…

  17. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Genes, Environment, and a Comprehensive Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Ryan; Theroux, Liana; Brenton, J Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis is an increasingly recognized and studied disorder that accounts for 3% to 10% of all patients with multiple sclerosis. The risk for pediatric multiple sclerosis is thought to reflect a complex interplay between environmental and genetic risk factors. Environmental exposures, including sunlight (ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D levels), infections (Epstein-Barr virus), passive smoking, and obesity, have been identified as potential risk factors in youth. Genetic predisposition contributes to the risk of multiple sclerosis, and the major histocompatibility complex on chromosome 6 makes the single largest contribution to susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. With the use of large-scale genome-wide association studies, other non-major histocompatibility complex alleles have been identified as independent risk factors for the disease. The bridge between environment and genes likely lies in the study of epigenetic processes, which are environmentally-influenced mechanisms through which gene expression may be modified. This article will review these topics to provide a framework for discussion of a comprehensive approach to counseling and ultimately treating the pediatric patient with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella . E-mail: stella@szn.it

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca{sup 2+} interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  19. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca(2+) interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  20. Identifying candidate genes for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and obesity through gene expression profiling in multiple tissues or cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junhui; Meng, Yuhuan; Zhou, Jinghui; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Du, Hongli; Wang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become increasingly prevalent in recent years. Recent studies have focused on identifying causal variations or candidate genes for obesity and T2DM via analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) within a single tissue. T2DM and obesity are affected by comprehensive sets of genes in multiple tissues. In the current study, gene expression levels in multiple human tissues from GEO datasets were analyzed, and 21 candidate genes displaying high percentages of differential expression were filtered out. Specifically, DENND1B, LYN, MRPL30, POC1B, PRKCB, RP4-655J12.3, HIBADH, and TMBIM4 were identified from the T2DM-control study, and BCAT1, BMP2K, CSRNP2, MYNN, NCKAP5L, SAP30BP, SLC35B4, SP1, BAP1, GRB14, HSP90AB1, ITGA5, and TOMM5 were identified from the obesity-control study. The majority of these genes are known to be involved in T2DM and obesity. Therefore, analysis of gene expression in various tissues using GEO datasets may be an effective and feasible method to determine novel or causal genes associated with T2DM and obesity.

  1. Three gene expression vector sets for concurrently expressing multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Makino, Harumi; Ogura, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    Yeast has the potential to be used in bulk-scale fermentative production of fuels and chemicals due to its tolerance for low pH and robustness for autolysis. However, expression of multiple external genes in one host yeast strain is considerably labor-intensive due to the lack of polycistronic transcription. To promote the metabolic engineering of yeast, we generated systematic and convenient genetic engineering tools to express multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a series of multi-copy and integration vector sets for concurrently expressing two or three genes in S. cerevisiae by embedding three classical promoters. The comparative expression capabilities of the constructed vectors were monitored with green fluorescent protein, and the concurrent expression of genes was monitored with three different fluorescent proteins. Our multiple gene expression tool will be helpful to the advanced construction of genetically engineered yeast strains in a variety of research fields other than metabolic engineering.

  2. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves. PMID:26793453

  3. Father Involvement and Young, Rural African American Men's Engagement in Substance Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Barton, Allen W; Kogan, Steven M; Cho, Junhan; Brown, Geoffrey L

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the associations of biological father and social father involvement during childhood with African American young men's development and engagement in risk behaviors. With a sample of 505 young men living in the rural South of the United States, a dual mediation model was tested in which retrospective reports of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers were linked to young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through men's relational schemas and future expectations. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that levels of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers predicted young men's relational schemas; only biological fathers' involvement predicted future expectations. In turn, future expectations predicted levels of substance misuse, and negative relational schemas predicted multiple sexual partnerships. Biological fathers' involvement evinced significant indirect associations with young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through both schemas and expectations; social fathers' involvement exhibited an indirect association with multiple sexual partnerships through relational schemas. Findings highlight the unique influences of biological fathers and social fathers on multiple domains of African American young men's psychosocial development that subsequently render young men more or less likely to engage in risk behaviors.

  4. Father Involvement and Young, Rural African American Men's Engagement in Substance Misuse and Multiple Sexual Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Allen W.; Kogan, Steven M.; Cho, Junhan; Brown, Geoffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the associations of biological father and social father involvement during childhood with African American young men's development and engagement in risk behaviors. With a sample of 505 young men living in the rural South, a dual mediation model was tested in which retrospective reports of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers were linked to young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through men's relational schemas and future expectations. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that levels of involvement from biological fathers and social fathers predicted young men's relational schemas; only biological fathers' involvement predicted future expectations. In turn, future expectations predicted levels of substance misuse, and negative relational schemas predicted multiple sexual partnerships. Biological fathers' involvement evinced significant indirect associations with young men's substance misuse and multiple sexual partnerships through both schemas and expectations; social fathers' involvement exhibited an indirect association with multiple sexual partnerships through relational schemas. Findings highlight the unique influences of biological fathers and social fathers on multiple domains of African American young men's psychosocial development that subsequently render young men more or less likely to engage in risk behaviors. PMID:26362297

  5. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mission concepts and operations for asteroid mitigation involving multiple gravity tractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Cyrus; Bellerose, Julie; Mauro, David; Jaroux, Belgacem

    2013-09-01

    The gravity tractor concept is a proposed method to deflect an imminent asteroid impact through gravitational tugging over a time scale of years. In this study, we present mission scenarios and operational considerations for asteroid mitigation efforts involving multiple gravity tractors. We quantify the deflection performance improvement provided by a multiple gravity tractor campaign and assess its sensitivity to staggered launches. We next explore several proximity operation strategies to accommodate multiple gravity tractors at a single asteroid including formation-flying and mechanically-docked configurations. Finally, we utilize 99942 Apophis as an illustrative example to assess the performance of a multiple gravity tractor campaign.

  7. Mission Concepts and Operations for Asteroid Mitigation Involving Multiple Gravity Tractors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Cyrus; Bellerose, Julie; Jaroux, Belgacem; Mauro, David

    2012-01-01

    The gravity tractor concept is a proposed method to deflect an imminent asteroid impact through gravitational tugging over a time scale of years. In this study, we present mission scenarios and operational considerations for asteroid mitigation efforts involving multiple gravity tractors. We quantify the deflection performance improvement provided by a multiple gravity tractor campaign and assess its sensitivity to staggered launches. We next explore several proximity operation strategies to accommodate multiple gravity tractors at a single asteroid including formation-flying and mechanically-docked configurations. Finally, we utilize 99942 Apophis as an illustrative example to assess the performance of a multiple gravity tractor campaign.

  8. Percutaneous Release of Trigger Fingers: Comparing Multiple Digits with Single Digit Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Hakhamaneshi, Elham; Rabiei, Mohamad Ali Seif

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate safety and efficacy of percutaneous release of trigger finger in multiple digits involvement in comparison with single digit involvement. Method: A number of 100 patients (131 fingers) were treated by percutaneous release and divided into two groups: single digit (group A) and multiple digits (group B). They were followed up for one year. Success rate, pain, complications and duration of analgesic use were studied and then compared in both groups. Results: All patients in both groups were treated successfully without any recurrence in a one-year follow-up. No complication was observed, but postoperative duration of pain was significantly different between the two groups. Period of painkiller use was also different between the two groups. Conclusion: Percutaneous release is a safe and effective treatment for trigger fingers even if multiple digits are involved. It is also safe in thumb and index finger involvement and diabetic patients. PMID:27517066

  9. A high-density association screen of 155 ion transport genes for involvement with common migraine

    PubMed Central

    Nyholt, Dale R.; LaForge, K. Steven; Kallela, Mikko; Alakurtti, Kirsi; Anttila, Verneri; Färkkilä, Markus; Hämaläinen, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Göbel, Hartmut; Todt, Unda; Ferrari, Michel D.; Launer, Lenore J.; Frants, Rune R.; Terwindt, Gisela M.; de Vries, Boukje; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Brand, Jan; Freilinger, Tobias; Pfaffenrath, Volker; Straube, Andreas; Ballinger, Dennis G.; Zhan, Yiping; Daly, Mark J.; Cox, David R.; Dichgans, Martin; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.; Kubisch, Christian; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wessman, Maija; Peltonen, Leena; Palotie, Aarno

    2008-01-01

    The clinical overlap between monogenic Familial Hemiplegic Migraine (FHM) and common migraine subtypes, and the fact that all three FHM genes are involved in the transport of ions, suggest that ion transport genes may underlie susceptibility to common forms of migraine. To test this leading hypothesis, we examined common variation in 155 ion transport genes using 5257 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a Finnish sample of 841 unrelated migraine with aura cases and 884 unrelated non-migraine controls. The top signals were then tested for replication in four independent migraine case–control samples from the Netherlands, Germany and Australia, totalling 2835 unrelated migraine cases and 2740 unrelated controls. SNPs within 12 genes (KCNB2, KCNQ3, CLIC5, ATP2C2, CACNA1E, CACNB2, KCNE2, KCNK12, KCNK2, KCNS3, SCN5A and SCN9A) with promising nominal association (0.00041 < P < 0.005) in the Finnish sample were selected for replication. Although no variant remained significant after adjusting for multiple testing nor produced consistent evidence for association across all cohorts, a significant epistatic interaction between KCNB2 SNP rs1431656 (chromosome 8q13.3) and CACNB2 SNP rs7076100 (chromosome 10p12.33) (pointwise P = 0.00002; global P = 0.02) was observed in the Finnish case–control sample. We conclude that common variants of moderate effect size in ion transport genes do not play a major role in susceptibility to common migraine within these European populations, although there is some evidence for epistatic interaction between potassium and calcium channel genes, KCNB2 and CACNB2. Multiple rare variants or trans-regulatory elements of these genes are not ruled out. PMID:18676988

  10. Child Abuse, Depression, and Methylation in Genes Involved with Stress, Neural Plasticity, and Brain Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Weder, Natalie; Zhang, Huiping; Jensen, Kevin; Yang, Bao Zhu; Simen, Arthur; Jackowski, Andrea; Lipschitz, Deborah; Douglas-Palumberi, Heather; Ge, Margrat; Perepletchikova, Francheska; O’Laughlin, Kerry; Hudziak, James J.; Gelernter, Joel; Kaufman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Determine if epigenetic markers predict dimensional ratings of depression in maltreated children. Method A Genome-wide methylation study was completed using the Illumina 450K BeadChip array in 94 maltreated and 96 non-traumatized children with saliva-derived DNA. The 450K BeadChip does not include any methylation sites in the exact location as sites in candidate genes previously examined in the literature, so a test for replication of prior research findings was not feasible. Results Methylation in three genes emerged as genomewide-significant predictors of depression: DNA-Binding Protein Inhibitor ID-3 (ID3); Glutamate Receptor, Ionotropic NMDA 1 (GRIN1); and Tubulin Polymerization Promoting Protein (TPPP) (p<5.0 × 10−7, all analyses). These genes are all biologically relevant–with ID3 involved in the stress response, GRIN1 involved in neural plasticity, and TPPP involved in neural circuitry development. Methylation in CpG sites in candidate genes were not predictors of depression at significance levels corrected for whole genome testing, but maltreated and control children did have significantly different beta values after Bonferroni correction at multiple methylation sites in these candidate genes (e.g., BDNF, NR3C1, FKBP5). Conclusion This study suggests epigenetic changes in ID3, GRIN1, and TPPP genes, in combination with experiences of maltreatment, may confer risk for depression in children. It adds to a growing body of literature supporting a role for epigenetic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of stress-related psychiatric disorders. While epigenetic changes are frequently long lasting, they are not necessarily permanent. Consequently, interventions to reverse the negative biological and behavioral sequelae associated with child maltreatment are briefly discussed. PMID:24655651

  11. Genome-wide identification and characterization of novel genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yimian; Yuan, Lichai; Wu, Bin; Li, Xian’en; Chen, Shilin; Lu, Shanfa

    2012-01-01

    Terpenoids are the largest class of plant secondary metabolites and have attracted widespread interest. Salvia miltiorrhiza, belonging to the largest and most widely distributed genus in the mint family, is a model medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. Diterpenoid tanshinones are the major lipophilic bioactive components in S. miltiorrhiza. Systematic analysis of genes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis has not been reported to date. Searching the recently available working draft of the S. miltiorrhiza genome, 40 terpenoid biosynthesis-related genes were identified, of which 27 are novel. These genes are members of 19 families, which encode all of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the universal isoprene precursor isopentenyl diphosphate and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate, and two enzymes associated with the biosynthesis of labdane-related diterpenoids. Through a systematic analysis, it was found that 20 of the 40 genes could be involved in tanshinone biosynthesis. Using a comprehensive approach, the intron/exon structures and expression patterns of all identified genes and their responses to methyl jasmonate treatment were analysed. The conserved domains and phylogenetic relationships among the deduced S. miltiorrhiza proteins and their homologues isolated from other plant species were revealed. It was discovered that some of the key enzymes, such as 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, are encoded by multiple gene members with different expression patterns and subcellular localizations, and both homomeric and heteromeric geranyl diphosphate synthases exist in S. miltiorrhiza. The results suggest the complexity of terpenoid biosynthesis and the existence of metabolic channels for diverse terpenoids in S. miltiorrhiza and provide useful information for improving tanshinone production through genetic

  12. Drosophila germline invasion by the endogenous retrovirus gypsy: involvement of the viral env gene.

    PubMed

    Pelisson, A; Mejlumian, L; Robert, V; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    2002-10-01

    The endogenous retrovirus gypsy is expressed at high levels in mutant flamenco female flies. Gypsy viral particles extracted from such flies can infect naive flamenco individuals raised in the presence of these extracts mixed into their food. This results in the integration of new proviruses into the germline genome. These proviruses can then increase their copy number by (1) expression in the flamenco female somatic cells, (2) transfer into the oocyte and (3) integration into the genome of the progeny. Surprisingly, unlike the infection observed in the feeding experiments, this strategy of endogenous proviral multiplication does not seem to involve the expression of the viral env gene.

  13. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis reveals key genes involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Giulietti, Matteo; Occhipinti, Giulia; Principato, Giovanni; Piva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy. Up till now, the patient's prognosis remains poor which, among others, is due to the paucity of reliable early diagnostic biomarkers. In the past, candidate diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets have been delineated from genes that were found to be differentially expressed in normal versus tumour samples. Recently, new systems biology approaches have been developed to analyse gene expression data, which may yield new biomarkers. As of yet, the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) tool has not been applied to PDAC microarray-based gene expression data. PDAC microarray-based gene expression datasets, listed in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, were analysed. After pre-processing of the data, we built two final datasets, Normal and PDAC, encompassing 104 and 129 patient samples, respectively. Next, we constructed a weighted gene co-expression network and identified modules of co-expressed genes distinguishing normal from disease conditions. Functional annotations of the genes in these modules were carried out to highlight PDAC-associated molecular pathways and common regulatory mechanisms. Finally, overall survival analyses were carried out to assess the suitability of the genes identified as prognostic biomarkers. Using WGCNA, we identified several key genes that may play important roles in PDAC. These genes are mainly related to either endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion or membrane functions, exhibit transferase or hydrolase activities and are involved in biological processes such as lipid metabolism or transmembrane transport. As a validation of the applied method, we found that some of the identified key genes (CEACAM1, MCU, VDAC1, CYCS, C15ORF52, TMEM51, LARP1 and ERLIN2) have previously been reported by others as potential PDAC biomarkers. Using overall survival analyses, we found that several of the newly identified genes may serve as biomarkers to

  14. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  15. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  16. Identification and analysis of novel genes involved in gravitropism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Miyo T.; Tasaka, Masao; Masatoshi Taniguchi, .

    2012-07-01

    Gravitropism is a continuous control with regard to the orientation and juxtaposition of the various parts of the plant body in response to gravity. In higher plants, the relative directional change of gravity is mainly suscepted in specialized cells called statocytes, followed by signal conversion from physical information into physiological information within the statocytes. We have studied the early process of shoot gravitropism, gravity sensing and signaling process, mainly by molecular genetic approach. In Arabidopsis shoot, statocytes are the endodermal cells. sgr1/scarcrow (scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants fail to form the endodermis and to respond to gravity in their inflorescence stems. Since both SGR1/SCR and SGR7/SHR are transcriptional factors, at least a subset of their downstream genes can be expected to be involved in gravitropism. In addition, eal1 (endodermal-amyloplast less 1), which exhibits no gravitropism in inflorescence stem but retains ability to form endodermis, is a hypomorphic allele of sgr7/shr. Take advantage of these mutants, we performed DNA microarray analysis and compared gene expression profiles between wild type and the mutants. We found that approx. 40 genes were commonly down-regulated in these mutants and termed them DGE (DOWN-REGULATED GENE IN EAL1) genes. DGE1 has sequence similarity to Oryza sativa LAZY1 that is involved in shoot gravitropism of rice. DGE2 has a short region homologous to DGE1. DTL (DGE TWO-LIKE}) that has 54% identity to DGE2 is found in Arabidopsis genome. All three genes are conserved in angiosperm but have no known functional domains or motifs. We analyzed T-DNA insertion for these genes in single or multiple combinations. In dge1 dge2 dtl triple mutant, gravitropic response of shoot, hypocotyl and root dramatically reduced. Now we are carrying out further physiological and molecular genetic analysis of the triple mutant.

  17. A synthetic small molecule for rapid induction of multiple pluripotency genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Nakano, Yusuke; Sato, Shinsuke; Morinaga, Hironobu; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    Cellular reprogramming involves profound alterations in genome-wide gene expression that is precisely controlled by a hypothetical epigenetic code. Small molecules have been shown to artificially induce epigenetic modifications in a sequence independent manner. Recently, we showed that specific DNA binding hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) could be conjugated with chromatin modifying histone deacetylase inhibitors like SAHA to epigenetically activate certain pluripotent genes in mouse fibroblasts. In our steadfast progress to improve the efficiency of SAHA-PIPs, we identified a novel compound termed, δ that could dramatically induce the endogenous expression of Oct-3/4 and Nanog. Genome-wide gene analysis suggests that in just 24 h and at nM concentration, δ induced multiple pluripotency-associated genes including Rex1 and Cdh1 by more than ten-fold. δ treated MEFs also rapidly overcame the rate-limiting step of epithelial transition in cellular reprogramming by switching ``'' the complex transcriptional gene network.

  18. Meta-Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis Microarray Data Reveals Dysregulation in RNA Splicing Regulatory Genes.

    PubMed

    Paraboschi, Elvezia Maria; Cardamone, Giulia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Gemmati, Donato; Spreafico, Marta; Duga, Stefano; Soldà, Giulia; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-09-30

    Abnormalities in RNA metabolism and alternative splicing (AS) are emerging as important players in complex disease phenotypes. In particular, accumulating evidence suggests the existence of pathogenic links between multiple sclerosis (MS) and altered AS, including functional studies showing that an imbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms may contribute to disease etiology. Here, we tested whether the altered expression of AS-related genes represents a MS-specific signature. A comprehensive comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of publicly-available microarray datasets (190 MS cases, 182 controls), followed by gene-ontology enrichment analysis, highlighted a significant enrichment for differentially-expressed genes involved in RNA metabolism/AS. In detail, a total of 17 genes were found to be differentially expressed in MS in multiple datasets, with CELF1 being dysregulated in five out of seven studies. We confirmed CELF1 downregulation in MS (p=0.0015) by real-time RT-PCRs on RNA extracted from blood cells of 30 cases and 30 controls. As a proof of concept, we experimentally verified the unbalance in alternatively-spliced isoforms in MS of the NFAT5 gene, a putative CELF1 target. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence of a consistent dysregulation of splicing-related genes in MS and we discuss its possible implications in modulating specific AS events in MS susceptibility genes.

  19. Tensor decomposition for multiple-tissue gene expression experiments.

    PubMed

    Hore, Victoria; Viñuela, Ana; Buil, Alfonso; Knight, Julian; McCarthy, Mark I; Small, Kerrin; Marchini, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies of gene expression traits and other cellular phenotypes have successfully identified links between genetic variation and biological processes. The majority of discoveries have uncovered cis-expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) effects via mass univariate testing of SNPs against gene expression in single tissues. Here we present a Bayesian method for multiple-tissue experiments focusing on uncovering gene networks linked to genetic variation. Our method decomposes the 3D array (or tensor) of gene expression measurements into a set of latent components. We identify sparse gene networks that can then be tested for association against genetic variation across the genome. We apply our method to a data set of 845 individuals from the TwinsUK cohort with gene expression measured via RNA-seq analysis in adipose, lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and skin. We uncover several gene networks with a genetic basis and clear biological and statistical significance. Extensions of this approach will allow integration of different omics, environmental and phenotypic data sets.

  20. Gene-environment interaction involving recently identified colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Elizabeth D.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Minnier, Jessica; Berndt, Sonja I.; Brenner, Hermann; Caan, Bette J.; Campbell, Peter T.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Du, Mengmeng; Duggan, David; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gong, Jian; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lemire, Mathieu; Ma, Jing; Newcomb, Polly A.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thornquist, Mark; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Warnick, Greg S.; Zanke, Brent W.; Peters, Ulrike; Hsu, Li; White, Emily

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Prior research has evaluated the presence of gene-environment interaction involving the first 10 identified susceptibility loci, but little work has been conducted on interaction involving SNPs at recently identified susceptibility loci, including: rs10911251, rs6691170, rs6687758, rs11903757, rs10936599, rs647161, rs1321311, rs719725, rs1665650, rs3824999, rs7136702, rs11169552, rs59336, rs3217810, rs4925386, and rs2423279. METHODS Data on 9160 cases and 9280 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO) and Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) were used to evaluate the presence of interaction involving the above-listed SNPs and sex, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, smoking, aspirin use, post-menopausal hormone (PMH) use, as well as intake of dietary calcium, dietary fiber, dietary folate, red meat, processed meat, fruit, and vegetables. Interaction was evaluated using a fixed-effects meta-analysis of an efficient Empirical Bayes estimator, and permutation was used to account for multiple comparisons. RESULTS None of the permutation-adjusted p-values reached statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS The associations between recently identified genetic susceptibility loci and CRC are not strongly modified by sex, BMI, alcohol, smoking, aspirin, PMH use, and various dietary factors. IMPACT Results suggest no evidence of strong gene-environment interactions involving the recently identified 16 susceptibility loci for CRC taken one at a time. PMID:24994789

  1. A gene pathway analysis highlights the role of cellular adhesion molecules in multiple sclerosis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Damotte, V; Guillot-Noel, L; Patsopoulos, N A; Madireddy, L; El Behi, M; De Jager, P L; Baranzini, S E; Cournu-Rebeix, I; Fontaine, B

    2014-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) perform per-SNP association tests to identify variants involved in disease or trait susceptibility. However, such an approach is not powerful enough to unravel genes that are not individually contributing to the disease/trait, but that may have a role in interaction with other genes as a group. Pathway analysis is an alternative way to highlight such group of genes. Using SNP association P-values from eight multiple sclerosis (MS) GWAS data sets, we performed a candidate pathway analysis for MS susceptibility by considering genes interacting in the cell adhesion molecule (CAMs) biological pathway using Cytoscape software. This network is a strong candidate, as it is involved in the crossing of the blood-brain barrier by the T cells, an early event in MS pathophysiology, and is used as an efficient therapeutic target. We drew up a list of 76 genes belonging to the CAM network. We highlighted 64 networks enriched with CAM genes with low P-values. Filtering by a percentage of CAM genes up to 50% and rejecting enriched signals mainly driven by transcription factors, we highlighted five networks associated with MS susceptibility. One of them, constituted of ITGAL, ICAM1 and ICAM3 genes, could be of interest to develop novel therapeutic targets.

  2. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  3. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S.; Linnen, Catherine R.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Convergence—the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa—has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among closely related populations, for example, in the pale beach mice inhabiting Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. By contrast, the exact same mutation can create similar phenotypes in distantly related species such as mice and mammoths. Next, we show that different mutations in the same gene need not be functionally equivalent to produce similar phenotypes. For example, separate mutations produce divergent protein function but convergent pale coloration in two lizard species. Similarly, mutations that alter the expression of a gene in different ways can, nevertheless, result in similar phenotypes, as demonstrated by sister species of deer mice. Together these studies underscore the importance of identifying not only the genes, but also the precise mutations and their effects on protein function, that contribute to adaptation and highlight how convergence can occur at different genetic levels. PMID:20643733

  4. Parallel recruitment of multiple genes into c4 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function.

  5. Parallel Recruitment of Multiple Genes into C4 Photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Boxall, Susanna F.; Gregory, Richard; Edwards, Erika J.; Hartwell, James; Osborne, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    During the diversification of living organisms, novel adaptive traits usually evolve through the co-option of preexisting genes. However, most enzymes are encoded by gene families, whose members vary in their expression and catalytic properties. Each may therefore differ in its suitability for recruitment into a novel function. In this work, we test for the presence of such a gene recruitment bias using the example of C4 photosynthesis, a complex trait that evolved recurrently in flowering plants as a response to atmospheric CO2 depletion. We combined the analysis of complete nuclear genomes and high-throughput transcriptome data for three grass species that evolved the C4 trait independently. For five of the seven enzymes analyzed, the same gene lineage was recruited across the independent C4 origins, despite the existence of multiple copies. The analysis of a closely related C3 grass confirmed that C4 expression patterns were not present in the C3 ancestors but were acquired during the evolutionary transition to C4 photosynthesis. The significant bias in gene recruitment indicates that some genes are more suitable for a novel function, probably because the mutations they accumulated brought them closer to the characteristics required for the new function. PMID:24179135

  6. Finite element simulations involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts in phase change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, Tianhong; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the simulation of phase change problems involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts employing the finite element method. Much of the past investigations employing finite elements have been restricted to primarily a single phase change situation. The existence of more than one phase, that is, the presence of multiple phase fronts poses certain challenges and further complications. However, the results provide a very interesting thermal behavior for this class of problems. In this paper, attention is focused on fixed grid methods and the trapezoidal family of one-step methods using the enthalpy formulations. Illustrative examples which handle simultaneous multiple fronts in phase change problems are presented.

  7. Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project: A platform to investigate multiple sclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongqi; White, Charles C; Owen, Emily K; Von Korff, Alina; Clarkson, Sarah R; McCabe, Cristin A; Cimpean, Maria; Winn, Phoebe A; Hoesing, Ashley; Steele, Sonya U; Cortese, Irene C M; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Reich, Daniel S; Chibnik, Lori B; De Jager, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project establishes a platform to investigate the events leading to multiple sclerosis (MS) in at-risk individuals. It has recruited 2,632 first-degree relatives from across the USA. Using an integrated genetic and environmental risk score, we identified subjects with twice the MS risk when compared to the average family member, and we report an initial incidence rate in these subjects that is 30 times greater than that of sporadic MS. We discuss the feasibility of large-scale studies of asymptomatic at-risk subjects that leverage modern tools of subject recruitment to execute collaborative projects.

  8. Multiple de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Robinson, David O

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder that usually arises following a single de novo mutation in the MECP2 gene. Point mutation testing and gene dosage analysis of a cohort of British Rett syndrome patients in our laboratory revealed four females who each had two different de novo causative mutations, presumed to be in cis because the patients showed no deviation from the classical Rett syndrome phenotype. Two of these cases had a point mutation and a small intraexonic deletion, a third had a whole exon deletion and a separate small intraexonic deletion, and a fourth case had a small intraexonic deletion and a large duplication. These findings highlight the necessity to perform both point mutation analysis and exon dosage analysis in such cases, particularly because of the possibility of undetected parental mosaicism and the implications for prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. These cases also suggest that the MECP2 gene may be particularly prone to multiple mutation events.

  9. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Involving Multiple Organs: An Unusual Case with Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranaivo, Irina Mamisoa; Andrianarison, Malalaniaina; Razanakoto, Naina Harinjara; Ramarozatovo, Lala Soavina

    2016-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare, benign histiocytic proliferative disorder that usually affects the lymph nodes. Although extranodal involvement has been reported in diverse sites, manifestation in the cardiovascular system is extremely rare. Specifically, cardiac involvement in Rosai-Dorfman disease is an extraordinarily infrequent event. We describe a case of a 36-year-old female who presented Rosai-Dorfman disease of multiple organs including the heart, with poor prognosis. PMID:27872644

  10. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Among children who remain at home with their permanent caregivers following a child welfare investigation, few who manifest emotional and behavioral difficulties actually engage in mental health treatment. The Multiple Family Group service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders (MFG) has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregiver perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families.

  11. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rong-hua; Shao, Xiao-qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-an

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves’ disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. Methods: The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. Results: There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Conclusion: Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD. PMID:28121931

  12. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong-Hua; Shao, Xiao-Qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-An

    2017-01-01

    Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves' disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD.

  13. SHC2 gene copy number in multiple system atrophy (MSA).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Marcus C; Garland, Emily M; Hedges, Lora; Womack-Nunley, Bethany; Hamid, Rizwan; Phillips, John A; Shibao, Cyndya A; Raj, Satish R; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2014-02-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a sporadic, late onset, rapidly progressing neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by autonomic failure, together with Parkinsonian, cerebellar, and pyramidal motor symptoms. The pathologic hallmark is the glial cytoplasmic inclusion with α-synuclein aggregates. MSA is thus an α-synucleinopathy. Recently, Sasaki et al. reported that heterozygosity for copy number loss of Src homology 2 domain containing-transforming protein 2 (SHC2) genes (heterozygous SHC2 gene deletions) occurred in DNAs from many Japanese individuals with MSA. Because background copy number variation can be distinct in different human populations, we assessed SHC2 allele copy number in DNAs from a US cohort of individuals with MSA, to determine the contribution of SHC2 gene copy number variation in an American cohort followed at a US referral center for MSA. Our cohort included 105 carefully phenotyped individuals with MSA. We studied 105 well-characterized patients with MSA and 5 control subjects with reduced SHC2 gene copy number. We used two TaqMan Gene Copy Number Assays, to determine the copy number of two segments of the SHC2 gene that are separated by 27 kb. Assay results of DNAs from all of our 105 subjects with MSA showed 2 copies of both segments of their SHC2 genes. Our results indicate that SHC2 gene deletions underlie few, if any, cases of well-characterized MSA in the US population. This is in contrast to the Japanese experience reported by Sasaki et al., likely reflecting heterogeneity of the disease in different genetic backgrounds.

  14. Combining multiple tools outperforms individual methods in gene set enrichment analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Milica; Wilson, Nicholas J.; Sheridan, Julie M.; Huynh, Huy; Wilson, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Motivation: Gene set enrichment (GSE) analysis allows researchers to efficiently extract biological insight from long lists of differentially expressed genes by interrogating them at a systems level. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of GSE analysis methods and hence it has become increasingly difficult for researchers to select an optimal GSE tool based on their particular dataset. Moreover, the majority of GSE analysis methods do not allow researchers to simultaneously compare gene set level results between multiple experimental conditions. Results: The ensemble of genes set enrichment analyses (EGSEA) is a method developed for RNA-sequencing data that combines results from twelve algorithms and calculates collective gene set scores to improve the biological relevance of the highest ranked gene sets. EGSEA’s gene set database contains around 25 000 gene sets from sixteen collections. It has multiple visualization capabilities that allow researchers to view gene sets at various levels of granularity. EGSEA has been tested on simulated data and on a number of human and mouse datasets and, based on biologists’ feedback, consistently outperforms the individual tools that have been combined. Our evaluation demonstrates the superiority of the ensemble approach for GSE analysis, and its utility to effectively and efficiently extrapolate biological functions and potential involvement in disease processes from lists of differentially regulated genes. Availability and Implementation: EGSEA is available as an R package at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/EGSEA/. The gene sets collections are available in the R package EGSEAdata from http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/EGSEAdata/. Contacts:monther.alhamdoosh@csl.com.au ormritchie@wehi.edu.au Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27694195

  15. Combining multiple tools outperforms individual methods in gene set enrichment analyses.

    PubMed

    Alhamdoosh, Monther; Ng, Milica; Wilson, Nicholas J; Sheridan, Julie M; Huynh, Huy; Wilson, Michael J; Ritchie, Matthew E

    2017-02-01

    Gene set enrichment (GSE) analysis allows researchers to efficiently extract biological insight from long lists of differentially expressed genes by interrogating them at a systems level. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of GSE analysis methods and hence it has become increasingly difficult for researchers to select an optimal GSE tool based on their particular dataset. Moreover, the majority of GSE analysis methods do not allow researchers to simultaneously compare gene set level results between multiple experimental conditions. The ensemble of genes set enrichment analyses (EGSEA) is a method developed for RNA-sequencing data that combines results from twelve algorithms and calculates collective gene set scores to improve the biological relevance of the highest ranked gene sets. EGSEA's gene set database contains around 25 000 gene sets from sixteen collections. It has multiple visualization capabilities that allow researchers to view gene sets at various levels of granularity. EGSEA has been tested on simulated data and on a number of human and mouse datasets and, based on biologists' feedback, consistently outperforms the individual tools that have been combined. Our evaluation demonstrates the superiority of the ensemble approach for GSE analysis, and its utility to effectively and efficiently extrapolate biological functions and potential involvement in disease processes from lists of differentially regulated genes. EGSEA is available as an R package at http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/EGSEA/ . The gene sets collections are available in the R package EGSEAdata from http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/EGSEAdata/ . monther.alhamdoosh@csl.com.au mritchie@wehi.edu.au. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Regulation of SUP Expression Identifies Multiple Regulators Involved in Arabidopsis Floral Meristem Development

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Hajime; Krizek, Beth A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2000-01-01

    During the course of flower development, floral homeotic genes are expressed in defined concentric regions of floral meristems called whorls. The SUPERMAN (SUP, also called FLO10) gene, which encodes a C2H2-type zinc finger protein, is involved in maintenance of the stamen/carpel whorl boundary (the boundary between whorl 3 and whorl 4) in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that the regulation of SUP expression in floral meristems is complex, consisting of two distinct phases, initiation and maintenance. The floral meristem identity gene LEAFY (LFY) plays a role in the initiation phase through at least two pathways, which differ from each other in the involvement of two homeotic genes, APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI). AP3, PI, and another homeotic gene, AGAMOUS (AG), are further required for SUP expression in the later maintenance phase. Aside from these genes, there are other as yet unidentified genes that control both the temporal and spatial patterns of SUP expression in whorl 3 floral meristems. SUP appears to act transiently, probably functioning to trigger a genetic circuit that creates the correct position of the whorl 3/whorl 4 boundary. PMID:11006335

  17. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and smoking in two subsets of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kallberg, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Plenge, Robert M; Ronnelid, Johan; Gregersen, Peter K; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2007-05-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are key features in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other complex diseases. The aim of this study was to use and compare three different definitions of interaction between the two major genetic risk factors of RA--the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles and the PTPN22 R620W allele--in three large case-control studies: the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, the North American RA Consortium (NARAC) study, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic study (in total, 1,977 cases and 2,405 controls). The EIRA study was also used to analyze interactions between smoking and the two genes. "Interaction" was defined either as a departure from additivity, as interaction in a multiplicative model, or in terms of linkage disequilibrium--for example, deviation from independence of penetrance of two unlinked loci. Consistent interaction, defined as departure from additivity, between HLA-DRB1 SE alleles and the A allele of PTPN22 R620W was seen in all three studies regarding anti-CCP-positive RA. Testing for multiplicative interactions demonstrated an interaction between the two genes only when the three studies were pooled. The linkage disequilibrium approach indicated a gene-gene interaction in EIRA and NARAC, as well as in the pooled analysis. No interaction was seen between smoking and PTPN22 R620W. A new pattern of interactions is described between the two major known genetic risk factors and the major environmental risk factor concerning the risk of developing anti-CCP-positive RA. The data extend the basis for a pathogenetic hypothesis for RA involving genetic and environmental factors. The study also raises and illustrates principal questions concerning ways to define interactions in complex diseases.

  18. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions Involving HLA-DRB1, PTPN22, and Smoking in Two Subsets of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Källberg, Henrik; Padyukov, Leonid; Plenge, Robert M.; Rönnelid, Johan; Gregersen, Peter K.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W.; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are key features in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other complex diseases. The aim of this study was to use and compare three different definitions of interaction between the two major genetic risk factors of RA—the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles and the PTPN22 R620W allele—in three large case-control studies: the Swedish Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, the North American RA Consortium (NARAC) study, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic study (in total, 1,977 cases and 2,405 controls). The EIRA study was also used to analyze interactions between smoking and the two genes. “Interaction” was defined either as a departure from additivity, as interaction in a multiplicative model, or in terms of linkage disequilibrium—for example, deviation from independence of penetrance of two unlinked loci. Consistent interaction, defined as departure from additivity, between HLA-DRB1 SE alleles and the A allele of PTPN22 R620W was seen in all three studies regarding anti-CCP–positive RA. Testing for multiplicative interactions demonstrated an interaction between the two genes only when the three studies were pooled. The linkage disequilibrium approach indicated a gene-gene interaction in EIRA and NARAC, as well as in the pooled analysis. No interaction was seen between smoking and PTPN22 R620W. A new pattern of interactions is described between the two major known genetic risk factors and the major environmental risk factor concerning the risk of developing anti-CCP–positive RA. The data extend the basis for a pathogenetic hypothesis for RA involving genetic and environmental factors. The study also raises and illustrates principal questions concerning ways to define interactions in complex diseases. PMID:17436241

  19. ENDEAVOUR update: a web resource for gene prioritization in multiple species.

    PubMed

    Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Barriot, Roland; Yu, Shi; Van Vooren, Steven; Van Loo, Peter; Coessens, Bert; De Moor, Bart; Aerts, Stein; Moreau, Yves

    2008-07-01

    Endeavour (http://www.esat.kuleuven.be/endeavourweb; this web site is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement) is a web resource for the prioritization of candidate genes. Using a training set of genes known to be involved in a biological process of interest, our approach consists of (i) inferring several models (based on various genomic data sources), (ii) applying each model to the candidate genes to rank those candidates against the profile of the known genes and (iii) merging the several rankings into a global ranking of the candidate genes. In the present article, we describe the latest developments of Endeavour. First, we provide a web-based user interface, besides our Java client, to make Endeavour more universally accessible. Second, we support multiple species: in addition to Homo sapiens, we now provide gene prioritization for three major model organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus and Caenorhabditis elegans. Third, Endeavour makes use of additional data sources and is now including numerous databases: ontologies and annotations, protein-protein interactions, cis-regulatory information, gene expression data sets, sequence information and text-mining data. We tested the novel version of Endeavour on 32 recent disease gene associations from the literature. Additionally, we describe a number of recent independent studies that made use of Endeavour to prioritize candidate genes for obesity and Type II diabetes, cleft lip and cleft palate, and pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Characterization of Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) Genes Involved in the Accumulation of Carotenoid Pigments in Wheat Grain

    PubMed Central

    Colasuonno, Pasqualina; Marcotuli, Ilaria; Lozito, Maria L.; Simeone, Rosanna; Blanco, Antonio; Gadaleta, Agata

    2017-01-01

    Aldehyde Oxidase (AO) enzyme (EC 1.2.3.1) catalyzes the final steps of carotenoid catabolism and it is a key enzyme in the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis. AO isoforms are located in the cytosolic compartment of tissues in many plants, where induce the oxidation of aldehydes into carboxylic acid, and in addition, catalyze the hydroxylation of some heterocycles. The goal of the present study was to characterize the AO genes involved in the accumulation of carotenoid pigments in wheat grain, an important quantitative trait controlled by multiple genes. The cDNAs corresponding to the four AO isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana and five AO isoforms from Brachypodium distachyon were used as query in 454 sequence assemblies data for Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Spring (https://urgi.versailles.inra.fr/blast/blast.php) to obtain the partial or whole orthologous wheat AO sequences. Three wheat isoforms, designated AO1, AO2, and AO3 were located on the chromosome groups 2, 5, and 7, respectively, and mapped on two consensus wheat maps by SNP markers located within the AO gene sequences. To validate the possible relationships between AO3 genes and carotenoid accumulation in wheat, the expression levels of AO-A3 and AO-B3 gene were determined during the kernel maturation stage of two durum wheat cultivars, Ciccio and Svevo, characterized by a low and high carotenoid content, respectively. Different AO-A3 gene expression values were observed between the two cultivars indicating that the AO-A3 allele present in Ciccio was more active in carotenoid degradation. A gene marker was developed and can be used for marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding programs. PMID:28596779

  1. Persistence of asthma requires multiple feedback circuits involving type 2 innate lymphoid cells and IL-33.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Christina A; Goplen, Nicholas P; Zafar, Iram; Irvin, Chaoyu; Good, James T; Rollins, Donald R; Gorentla, Balachandra; Liu, Weimin; Gorska, Magdalena M; Chu, HongWei; Martin, Richard J; Alam, Rafeul

    2015-07-01

    Asthma in a mouse model spontaneously resolves after cessation of allergen exposure. We developed a mouse model in which asthma features persisted for 6 months after cessation of allergen exposure. We sought to elucidate factors contributing to the persistence of asthma. We used a combination of immunologic, genetic, microarray, and pharmacologic approaches to dissect the mechanism of asthma persistence. Elimination of T cells though antibody-mediated depletion or lethal irradiation and transplantation of recombination-activating gene (Rag1)(-/-) bone marrow in mice with chronic asthma resulted in resolution of airway inflammation but not airway hyperreactivity or remodeling. Elimination of T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) through lethal irradiation and transplantation of Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) bone marrow or blockade of IL-33 resulted in resolution of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Persistence of asthma required multiple interconnected feedback and feed-forward circuits between ILC2s and epithelial cells. Epithelial IL-33 induced ILC2s, a rich source of IL-13. The latter directly induced epithelial IL-33, establishing a positive feedback circuit. IL-33 autoinduced, generating another feedback circuit. IL-13 upregulated IL-33 receptors and facilitated IL-33 autoinduction, thus establishing a feed-forward circuit. Elimination of any component of these circuits resulted in resolution of chronic asthma. In agreement with the foregoing, IL-33 and ILC2 levels were increased in the airways of asthmatic patients. IL-33 levels correlated with disease severity. We present a critical network of feedback and feed-forward interactions between epithelial cells and ILC2s involved in maintaining chronic asthma. Although T cells contributed to the severity of chronic asthma, they were redundant in maintaining airway hyperreactivity and remodeling. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multiple functional involvement of thymosin beta-4 in tooth germ development.

    PubMed

    Ookuma, Yukiko F; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Ieyoshi; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2013-02-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is known to be ubiquitously involved in the actin monomer sequestering on the cytoskeleton. Our previous study showed specific temporal and special in situ expression pattern of Tβ4 mRNA in dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. In this study, we examined the functional implications of Tβ4 in the developmental course of the mouse lower first molar. An inhibition assay using Tβ4 antisense sulfur-substituted oligodeoxynucleotide (AS S-ODN) in cultured embryonic day 11.0 (E11.0) mandibles showed a significant growth inhibition of the tooth germ. However, no growth arrest of the cultured E15.0 tooth germ was observed by using Tβ4 AS S-ODN. The Tβ4 knockdown led to significantly decreased expression levels of type II/III runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and nucleolin (Ncl) in the cultured E11.0 mandibles. Since our previous studies proved that the inhibition of type II/III Runx2 and Ncl translations resulted in the developmental arrest of the tooth germ in the cultured E11.0 mandible, Tβ4 appears to play roles in tooth germ development via the regulation of the type II/III Runx2 and Ncl expressions. Tβ4 knockdown also resulted in decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)-2, a reduced cell motility activity and upregulation of E-cadherin in dental epithelial mDE6 cells. These results suggest that Tβ4 plays multiple functional roles in odontogenic epithelial cells in the early stages of tooth germ development by regulating the expression of odontogenesis-related genes.

  3. "Running a Train": Adolescent Boys' Accounts of Sexual Intercourse Involving Multiple Males and One Female

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Emily F.; Decker, Michele R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Raj, Anita; Silverman, Jay G.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The authors used qualitative research methods to explore the context and sexual risk behavior associated with sexual intercourse involving multiple males and one female, commonly called "running a train." Participants were 20 adolescent males aged 14 to 22 years who were either perpetrators of dating violence or perceived by teachers to…

  4. Adolescent Non-Involvement in Multiple Risk Behaviors: An Indicator of Successful Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Busseri, Michael A.; Bosacki, Sandra; Dupont, Diane; Marini, Zopito; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Sadava, Stan; Ward, Anthony; Woloshyn, Vera

    2007-01-01

    Based on the conceptualization of successful development as the joint maximization of desirable outcomes and minimization of undesirable outcomes (Baltes, 1997), the present study examined connections between adolescent non-involvement in multiple risk behaviors and positive developmental status. Results from a survey of 7290 high school students…

  5. Isolation and antibiotic sensitivity of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections with involvement of multiple organs in lambs.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Verma, Amit Kumar; Sharma, Arvind Kumar; Rahal, Anu

    2013-12-15

    Respiratory diseases particularly lamb pneumonia is a multifactorial disease involving the interaction between host, etiological agent and environment. The present study was carried out to determine the causative agent of an outbreak of pneumonia in a sheep flock and to establish its pathogenicity and public health importance. The incidence occurred in sheep unit at Madhurikund farm of University (DUVASU), Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India. At the time of incidence, the population of sheep at the farm was 90. Affected animals were clinically examined and nasal swabs and blood samples were collected from live animals, while morbid materials were collected from dead animals after postmortem examination. The etiological agent was isolated and characterized with conventional microbiological and biochemical methods. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the bacteria isolated from blood, different organs and cerebrospinal fluid. The antibiotic sensitivity revealed resistant to multiple drugs viz., penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Pathological examination revealed multiple involvements of organs with different degrees of inflammation and haemorrhages of the lower respiratory tract, lungs, liver, heart and kidney. Further, its pathogenicity was established by histopathological examination. In conclusion, presence of multi drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in weaning lambs with the involvement of multiple organs appears to be an emerging zoonotic threat to human particularly in shepherds. This seems to be the first report of isolation of multi drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae from outbreak in lambs with multiple organ involvement in India.

  6. Adolescent Non-Involvement in Multiple Risk Behaviors: An Indicator of Successful Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather; Busseri, Michael A.; Bosacki, Sandra; Dupont, Diane; Marini, Zopito; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Sadava, Stan; Ward, Anthony; Woloshyn, Vera

    2007-01-01

    Based on the conceptualization of successful development as the joint maximization of desirable outcomes and minimization of undesirable outcomes (Baltes, 1997), the present study examined connections between adolescent non-involvement in multiple risk behaviors and positive developmental status. Results from a survey of 7290 high school students…

  7. "Running a Train": Adolescent Boys' Accounts of Sexual Intercourse Involving Multiple Males and One Female

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Emily F.; Decker, Michele R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Raj, Anita; Silverman, Jay G.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The authors used qualitative research methods to explore the context and sexual risk behavior associated with sexual intercourse involving multiple males and one female, commonly called "running a train." Participants were 20 adolescent males aged 14 to 22 years who were either perpetrators of dating violence or perceived by teachers to…

  8. Single and Multiple Gene Manipulations in Mouse Models of Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Heather L; Stairs, Douglas B

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancer play a critical role in understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Advances continue to be made in modeling human disease in a mouse, though the relevance of a mouse model often relies on how closely it is able to mimic the histologic, molecular, and physiologic characteristics of the respective human cancer. A classic use of a genetically engineered mouse in studying cancer is through the overexpression or deletion of a gene. However, the manipulation of a single gene often falls short of mimicking all the characteristics of the carcinoma in humans; thus a multiple gene approach is needed. Here we review genetic mouse models of cancers and their abilities to recapitulate human carcinoma with single versus combinatorial approaches with genes commonly involved in cancer. PMID:26380553

  9. Investigation of polymorphisms in genes involved in estrogen metabolism in menstrual migraine.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Champion, Morgane; Plays, Amelie; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Frith, Alison; MacGregor, E Anne; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-04-05

    Migraine is a common, disabling headache disorder, which is influenced by multiple genes and environmental triggers. After puberty, the prevalence of migraine in women is three times higher than in men and >50% of females suffering from migraine report a menstrual association, suggesting hormonal fluctuations can influence the risk of migraine attacks. It has been hypothesized that the drop in estrogen during menses is an important trigger for menstrual migraine. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Functional polymorphisms in these genes can influence estrogen levels and therefore may be associated with risk of menstrual migraine. In this study we investigated four single nucleotide polymorphisms in three genes involved in estrogen metabolism that have been reported to impact enzyme levels or function, in a specific menstrual migraine cohort. 268 menstrual migraine cases and 142 controls were genotyped for rs4680 in COMT (Val158Met), rs4646903 and rs1048943 in CYP1A1 (T3801C and Ile462Val) and rs700519 in CYP19A1 (Cys264Arg). Neither genotype nor allele frequencies for the COMT and CYP SNPs genotyped were found to be significantly different between menstrual migraineurs and controls by chi-square analysis (P>0.05). Therefore we did not find association of functional polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism genes COMT, CYP1A1 or CYP19A1 with menstrual migraine. Further studies are required to assess whether menstrual migraine is genetically distinct from the common migraine subtypes and identify genes that influence risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of genes involved in cytokinin signaling and metabolism from rice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Chang; Weir, Nicholas R; Hill, Kristine; Zhang, Wenjing; Kim, Hyo Jung; Shiu, Shin-Han; Schaller, G Eric; Kieber, Joseph J

    2012-04-01

    Two-component signaling elements play important roles in plants, including a central role in cytokinin signaling. We characterized two-component elements from the monocot rice (Oryza sativa) using several complementary approaches. Phylogenetic analysis reveals relatively simple orthologous relationships among the histidine kinases in rice and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In contrast, the histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins (OsHPs) and response regulators (OsRRs) display a higher degree of lineage-specific expansion. The intracellular localizations of several OsHPs and OsRRs were examined in rice and generally found to correspond to the localizations of their dicot counterparts. The functionality of rice type-B OsRRs was tested in Arabidopsis; one from a clade composed of both monocot and dicot type-B OsRRs complemented an Arabidopsis type-B response regulator mutant, but a type-B OsRR from a monocot-specific subfamily generally did not. The expression of genes encoding two-component elements and proteins involved in cytokinin biosynthesis and degradation was analyzed in rice roots and shoots and in response to phytohormones. Nearly all type-A OsRRs and OsHK4 were up-regulated in response to cytokinin, but other cytokinin signaling elements were not appreciably affected. Furthermore, multiple cytokinin oxidase (OsCKX) genes were up-regulated by cytokinin. Abscisic acid treatment decreased the expression of several genes involved in cytokinin biosynthesis and degradation. Auxin affected the expression of a few genes; brassinosteroid and gibberellin had only modest effects. Our results support a shared role for two-component elements in mediating cytokinin signaling in monocots and dicots and reveal how phytohormones can impact cytokinin function through modulating gene expression.

  11. Key genes involved in desiccation tolerance and dormancy across life forms.

    PubMed

    Costa, Maria Cecília D; Farrant, Jill M; Oliver, Melvin J; Ligterink, Wilco; Buitink, Julia; Hilhorst, Henk M W

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation tolerance (DT, the ability of certain organisms to survive severe dehydration) was a key trait in the evolution of life in terrestrial environments. Likely, the development of desiccation-tolerant life forms was accompanied by the acquisition of dormancy or a dormancy-like stage as a second powerful adaptation to cope with variations in the terrestrial environment. These naturally stress tolerant life forms may be a good source of genetic information to generate stress tolerant crops to face a future with predicted higher occurrence of drought. By mining for key genes and mechanisms related to DT and dormancy conserved across different species and life forms, unique candidate key genes may be identified. Here we identify several of these putative key genes, shared among multiple organisms, encoding for proteins involved in protection, growth and energy metabolism. Mutating a selection of these genes in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in clear DT-, dormancy- and other seed-associated phenotypes, showing the efficiency and power of our approach and paves the way for the development of drought-stress tolerant crops. Our analysis supports a co-evolution of DT and dormancy by shared mechanisms that favour survival and adaptation to ever-changing environments with strong seasonal fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration

    PubMed Central

    Simpkins, Jessica A.; Rickel, Kirby E.; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A.; Carlisle, Gabriel B.; Nelson, Heidi J.; Cardillo, Andrew L.; Weber, Emily A.; Vitiello, Peter F.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  13. Identification of the key genes connected with plasma cells of multiple myeloma using expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kefeng; Xu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To uncover the potential regulatory mechanisms of the relevant genes that contribute to the prognosis and prevention of multiple myeloma (MM). Methods Microarray data (GSE13591) were downloaded, including five plasma cell samples from normal donors and 133 plasma cell samples from MM patients. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by Student’s t-test. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for DEGs using the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Transcription factors and tumor-associated genes were also explored by mapping genes in the TRANSFAC, the tumor suppressor gene (TSGene), and tumor-associated gene (TAG) databases. A protein–protein interaction (PPI) network and PPI subnetworks were constructed by Cytoscape software using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING) database. Results A total of 63 DEGs (42 downregulated, 21 upregulated) were identified. Functional enrichment analysis showed that HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1 might be involved in the positive regulation of immune system processes, and HLA-DRB1 might be related to the intestinal immune network for IgA production pathway. The genes CEBPD, JUND, and ATF3 were identified as transcription factors. The top ten nodal genes in the PPI network were revealed including HLA-DRB1, VCAM1, and TFRC. In addition, genes in the PPI subnetwork, such as HLA-DRB1 and VCAM1, were enriched in the cell adhesion molecules pathway, whereas CD4 and TFRC were both enriched in the hematopoietic cell pathway. Conclusion Several crucial genes correlated to MM were identified, including CD4, HLA-DRB1, TFRC, and VCAM1, which might exert their roles in MM progression via immune-mediated pathways. There might be certain regulatory correlations between HLA-DRB1, CD4, and TFRC. PMID:26229487

  14. Gene expression correlation analysis predicts involvement of high- and low-confidence risk genes in different stages of prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kojiro

    2010-12-01

    Whole genome association studies have identified many loci associated with the risk of prostate cancer (PC). However, very few of the genes associated with these loci have been related to specific processes of prostate carcinogenesis. Therefore I inferred biological functions associated with these risk genes using gene expression correlation analysis. PC risk genes reported in the literature were classified as having high (P<10(-6)), medium (P<10(-4)), or low (P<10(-2)) statistical confidence. Correlation coefficients of the expression levels between the risk genes and other genes in cancerous prostates samples were compared against those in normal prostates using a microarray dataset from Gene Expression Omnibus. Overall, significant decrease of correlations in PC was observed between the levels of expression of the high-confidence genes and other genes in the microarray dataset, whereas correlation between low-confidence genes and other genes in PC showed smaller decrease. Genes involved in developmental processes were significantly correlated with all risk gene categories. Ectoderm development genes, which may be related to squamous metaplasia, and genes enriched in fetal prostate stem cells (PSCs) showed strong association with the high-confidence genes. The association between the PSC genes and the low-confidence genes was weak, but genes related to neural system genes showed strong association with low-confidence genes. The high-confidence risk genes may be associated with an early stage of prostate carcinogenesis, possibly involving PSCs and squamous metaplasia. The low-confidence genes may be involved in a later stage of carcinogenesis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Efficient Incorporation of Multiple Selenocysteines Involves an Inefficient Decoding Step Serving as a Potential Translational Checkpoint and Ribosome Bottleneck▿

    PubMed Central

    Stoytcheva, Zoia; Tujebajeva, Rosa M.; Harney, John W.; Berry, Marla J.

    2006-01-01

    Selenocysteine is incorporated into proteins via “recoding” of UGA from a stop codon to a sense codon, a process that requires specific secondary structures in the 3′ untranslated region, termed selenocysteine incorporation sequence (SECIS) elements, and the protein factors that they recruit. Whereas most selenoprotein mRNAs contain a single UGA codon and a single SECIS element, selenoprotein P genes encode multiple UGAs and two SECIS elements. We have identified evolutionary adaptations in selenoprotein P genes that contribute to the efficiency of incorporating multiple selenocysteine residues in this protein. The first is a conserved, inefficiently decoded UGA codon in the N-terminal region, which appears to serve both as a checkpoint for the presence of factors required for selenocysteine incorporation and as a “bottleneck,” slowing down the progress of elongating ribosomes. The second adaptation involves the presence of introns downstream of this inefficiently decoded UGA which confer the potential for nonsense-mediated decay when factors required for selenocysteine incorporation are limiting. Third, the two SECIS elements in selenoprotein P mRNA function with differing efficiencies, affecting both the rate and the efficiency of decoding different UGAs. The implications for how these factors contribute to the decoding of multiple selenocysteine residues are discussed. PMID:17000762

  16. Transcriptome analysis reveals crosstalk of responsive genes to multiple abiotic stresses in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Na; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Ruan, Meng-Bin; Zhang, Li-Li; Meng, Zhao-Hong; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a major environmental factor that limits cotton growth and yield, moreover, this problem has become more and more serious recently, as multiple stresses often occur simultaneously due to the global climate change and environmental pollution. In this study, we sought to identify genes involved in diverse stresses including abscisic acid (ABA), cold, drought, salinity and alkalinity by comparative microarray analysis. Our result showed that 5790, 3067, 5608, 778 and 6148 transcripts, were differentially expressed in cotton seedlings under treatment of ABA (1 μM ABA), cold (4°C), drought (200 mM mannitol), salinity (200 mM NaCl) and alkalinity (pH=11) respectively. Among the induced or suppressed genes, 126 transcripts were shared by all of the five kinds of abiotic stresses, with 64 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated. These common members are grouped as stress signal transduction, transcription factors (TFs), stress response/defense proteins, metabolism, transport facilitation, as well as cell wall/structure, according to the function annotation. We also noticed that large proportion of significant differentially expressed genes specifically regulated in response to different stress. Nine of the common transcripts of multiple stresses were selected for further validation with quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, several well characterized TF families, for example, WRKY, MYB, NAC, AP2/ERF and zinc finger were shown to be involved in different stresses. As an original report using comparative microarray to analyze transcriptome of cotton under five abiotic stresses, valuable information about functional genes and related pathways of anti-stress, and/or stress tolerance in cotton seedlings was unveiled in our result. Besides this, some important common factors were focused for detailed identification and characterization. According to our analysis, it suggested that there was crosstalk of responsive genes or pathways to multiple

  17. A rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Fan; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Direct optimization of the metabolic pathways on the chromosome requires tools that can fine tune the overexpression of a desired gene or optimize the combination of multiple genes. Although plasmid-dependent overexpression has been used for this task, fundamental issues concerning its genetic stability and operational repeatability have not been addressed. Here, we describe a rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies (CIGMC), which uses the flippase from the yeast 2-μm plasmid. Using green fluorescence protein as a model, we verified that the fluorescent intensity was in accordance with the integration copy number of the target gene. When a narrow-host-range replicon, R6K, was used in the integrative plasmid, the maximum integrated copy number of Escherichia coli reached 15. Applying the CIGMC method to optimize the overexpression of single or multiple genes in amino acid biosynthesis, we successfully improved the product yield and stability of the production. As a flexible strategy, CIGMC can be used in various microorganisms other than E. coli. PMID:25851494

  18. Expression Profiles of the Individual Genes Corresponding to the Genes Generated by Cytotoxicity Experiments with Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mehdi; Alpsoy, Semih; Türk, Seyhan; Malkan, Ümit Y.; Atakan, Şükrü; Haznedaroğlu, İbrahim C.; Güneş, Gürsel; Gündüz, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Burak; Etgül, Sezgin; Aydın, Seda; Aslan, Tuncay; Sayınalp, Nilgün; Aksu, Salih; Demiroğlu, Haluk; Özcebe, Osman İ.; Büyükaşık, Yahya; Göker, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Multiple myeloma (MM) is currently incurable due to refractory disease relapse even under novel anti-myeloma treatment. In silico studies are effective for key decision making during clinicopathological battles against the chronic course of MM. The aim of this present in silico study was to identify individual genes whose expression profiles match that of the one generated by cytotoxicity experiments for bortezomib. Materials and Methods: We used an in silico literature mining approach to identify potential biomarkers by creating a summarized set of metadata derived from relevant information. The E-MTAB-783 dataset containing expression data from 789 cancer cell lines including 8 myeloma cell lines with drug screening data from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute database obtained from ArrayExpress was “Robust Multi-array analysis” normalized using GeneSpring v.12.5. Drug toxicity data were obtained from the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer project. In order to identify individual genes whose expression profiles matched that of the one generated by cytotoxicity experiments for bortezomib, we used a linear regression-based approach, where we searched for statistically significant correlations between gene expression values and IC50 data. The intersections of the genes were identified in 8 cell lines and used for further analysis. Results: Our linear regression model identified 73 genes and some genes expression levels were found to very closely correlated with bortezomib IC50 values. When all 73 genes were used in a hierarchical cluster analysis, two major clusters of cells representing relatively sensitive and resistant cells could be identified. Pathway and molecular function analysis of all the significant genes was also investigated, as well as the genes involved in pathways. Conclusion: The findings of our present in silico study could be important not only for the understanding of the genomics of MM but also for the better arrangement of

  19. The multiple imputation method: a case study involving secondary data analysis.

    PubMed

    Walani, Salimah R; Cleland, Charles M

    2015-05-01

    To illustrate with the example of a secondary data analysis study the use of the multiple imputation method to replace missing data. Most large public datasets have missing data, which need to be handled by researchers conducting secondary data analysis studies. Multiple imputation is a technique widely used to replace missing values while preserving the sample size and sampling variability of the data. The 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. The authors created a model to impute missing values using the chained equation method. They used imputation diagnostics procedures and conducted regression analysis of imputed data to determine the differences between the log hourly wages of internationally educated and US-educated registered nurses. The authors used multiple imputation procedures to replace missing values in a large dataset with 29,059 observations. Five multiple imputed datasets were created. Imputation diagnostics using time series and density plots showed that imputation was successful. The authors also present an example of the use of multiple imputed datasets to conduct regression analysis to answer a substantive research question. Multiple imputation is a powerful technique for imputing missing values in large datasets while preserving the sample size and variance of the data. Even though the chained equation method involves complex statistical computations, recent innovations in software and computation have made it possible for researchers to conduct this technique on large datasets. The authors recommend nurse researchers use multiple imputation methods for handling missing data to improve the statistical power and external validity of their studies.

  20. Identification and Isolation of Brucella suis Virulence Genes Involved in Resistance to the Human Innate Immune System▿

    PubMed Central

    Liautard, Janny; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Lafont, Virginie; Köhler, Stephan; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Brucella strains are facultative intracellular pathogens that induce chronic diseases in humans and animals. This observation implies that Brucella subverts innate and specific immune responses of the host to develop its full virulence. Deciphering the genes involved in the subversion of the immune system is of primary importance for understanding the virulence of the bacteria, for understanding the pathogenic consequences of infection, and for designing an efficient vaccine. We have developed an in vitro system involving human macrophages infected by Brucella suis and activated syngeneic γ9δ2 T lymphocytes. Under these conditions, multiplication of B. suis inside macrophages is only slightly reduced. To identify the genes responsible for this reduced sensitivity, we screened a library of 2,000 clones of transposon-mutated B. suis. For rapid and quantitative analysis of the multiplication of the bacteria, we describe a simple method based on Alamar blue reduction, which is compatible with screening a large library. By comparing multiplication inside macrophages alone and multiplication inside macrophages with activated γ9δ2 T cells, we identified four genes of B. suis that were necessary to resist to the action of the γ9δ2 T cells. The putative functions of these genes are discussed in order to propose possible explanations for understanding their exact role in the subversion of innate immunity. PMID:17709411

  1. Functional analysis of sirtuin genes in multiple Plasmodium falciparum strains.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Catherine J; Jiang, Rays H Y; Skillman, Kristen M; Samarakoon, Upeka; Moore, Rachel M; Dzikowski, Ron; Ferdig, Michael T; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, employs antigenic variation to avoid host immunity. Antigenic variation is achieved by transcriptional switching amongst polymorphic var genes, enforced by epigenetic modification of chromatin. The histone-modifying 'sirtuin' enzymes PfSir2a and PfSir2b have been implicated in this process. Disparate patterns of var expression have been reported in patient isolates as well as in cultured strains. We examined var expression in three commonly used laboratory strains (3D7, NF54 and FCR-3) in parallel. NF54 parasites express significantly lower levels of var genes compared to 3D7, despite the fact that 3D7 was originally a clone of the NF54 strain. To investigate whether this was linked to the expression of sirtuins, genetic disruption of both sirtuins was attempted in all three strains. No dramatic changes in var gene expression occurred in NF54 or FCR-3 following PfSir2b disruption, contrasting with previous observations in 3D7. In 3D7, complementation of the PfSir2a genetic disruption resulted in a significant decrease in previously-elevated var gene expression levels, but with the continued expression of multiple var genes. Finally, rearranged chromosomes were observed in the 3D7 PfSir2a knockout line. Our results focus on the potential for parasite genetic background to contribute to sirtuin function in regulating virulence gene expression and suggest a potential role for sirtuins in maintaining genome integrity.

  2. Functional Analysis of Sirtuin Genes in Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Catherine J.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Skillman, Kristen M.; Samarakoon, Upeka; Moore, Rachel M.; Dzikowski, Ron; Ferdig, Michael T.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, employs antigenic variation to avoid host immunity. Antigenic variation is achieved by transcriptional switching amongst polymorphic var genes, enforced by epigenetic modification of chromatin. The histone-modifying ‘sirtuin’ enzymes PfSir2a and PfSir2b have been implicated in this process. Disparate patterns of var expression have been reported in patient isolates as well as in cultured strains. We examined var expression in three commonly used laboratory strains (3D7, NF54 and FCR-3) in parallel. NF54 parasites express significantly lower levels of var genes compared to 3D7, despite the fact that 3D7 was originally a clone of the NF54 strain. To investigate whether this was linked to the expression of sirtuins, genetic disruption of both sirtuins was attempted in all three strains. No dramatic changes in var gene expression occurred in NF54 or FCR-3 following PfSir2b disruption, contrasting with previous observations in 3D7. In 3D7, complementation of the PfSir2a genetic disruption resulted in a significant decrease in previously-elevated var gene expression levels, but with the continued expression of multiple var genes. Finally, rearranged chromosomes were observed in the 3D7 PfSir2a knockout line. Our results focus on the potential for parasite genetic background to contribute to sirtuin function in regulating virulence gene expression and suggest a potential role for sirtuins in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25780929

  3. Meta-Analysis of Differential Connectivity in Gene Co-Expression Networks in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Creanza, Teresa Maria; Liguori, Maria; Liuni, Sabino; Nuzziello, Nicoletta; Ancona, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Differential gene expression analyses to investigate multiple sclerosis (MS) molecular pathogenesis cannot detect genes harboring genetic and/or epigenetic modifications that change the gene functions without affecting their expression. Differential co-expression network approaches may capture changes in functional interactions resulting from these alterations. We re-analyzed 595 mRNA arrays from publicly available datasets by studying changes in gene co-expression networks in MS and in response to interferon (IFN)-β treatment. Interestingly, MS networks show a reduced connectivity relative to the healthy condition, and the treatment activates the transcription of genes and increases their connectivity in MS patients. Importantly, the analysis of changes in gene connectivity in MS patients provides new evidence of association for genes already implicated in MS by single-nucleotide polymorphism studies and that do not show differential expression. This is the case of amiloride-sensitive cation channel 1 neuronal (ACCN1) that shows a reduced number of interacting partners in MS networks, and it is known for its role in synaptic transmission and central nervous system (CNS) development. Furthermore, our study confirms a deregulation of the vitamin D system: among the transcription factors that potentially regulate the deregulated genes, we find TCF3 and SP1 that are both involved in vitamin D3-induced p27Kip1 expression. Unveiling differential network properties allows us to gain systems-level insights into disease mechanisms and may suggest putative targets for the treatment. PMID:27314336

  4. Flower development of Phalaenopsis orchid involves functionally divergent SEPALLATA-like genes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhao-Jun; Chen, You-Yi; Du, Jian-Syun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chung, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Neng; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid produces complex flowers that are commercially valuable, which has promoted the study of its flower development. E-class MADS-box genes, SEPALLATA (SEP), combined with B-, C- and D-class MADS-box genes, are involved in various aspects of plant development, such as floral meristem determination, organ identity, fruit maturation, seed formation and plant architecture. Four SEP-like genes were cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid, and the duplicated PeSEPs were grouped into PeSEP1/3 and PeSEP2/4. All PeSEPs were expressed in all floral organs. PeSEP2 expression was detectable in vegetative tissues. The study of protein–protein interactions suggested that PeSEPs may form higher order complexes with the B-, C-, D-class and AGAMOUS LIKE6-related MADS-box proteins to determine floral organ identity. The tepal became a leaf-like organ when PeSEP3 was silenced by virus-induced silencing, with alterations in epidermis identity and contents of anthocyanin and chlorophyll. Silencing of PeSEP2 had minor effects on the floral phenotype. Silencing of the E-class genes PeSEP2 and PeSEP3 resulted in the downregulation of B-class PeMADS2-6 genes, which indicates an association of PeSEP functions and B-class gene expression. These findings reveal the important roles of PeSEP in Phalaenopsis floral organ formation throughout the developmental process by the formation of various multiple protein complexes. PMID:24571782

  5. Flower development of Phalaenopsis orchid involves functionally divergent SEPALLATA-like genes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhao-Jun; Chen, You-Yi; Du, Jian-Syun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chung, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Neng; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-05-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid produces complex flowers that are commercially valuable, which has promoted the study of its flower development. E-class MADS-box genes, SEPALLATA (SEP), combined with B-, C- and D-class MADS-box genes, are involved in various aspects of plant development, such as floral meristem determination, organ identity, fruit maturation, seed formation and plant architecture. Four SEP-like genes were cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid, and the duplicated PeSEPs were grouped into PeSEP1/3 and PeSEP2/4. All PeSEPs were expressed in all floral organs. PeSEP2 expression was detectable in vegetative tissues. The study of protein-protein interactions suggested that PeSEPs may form higher order complexes with the B-, C-, D-class and AGAMOUS LIKE6-related MADS-box proteins to determine floral organ identity. The tepal became a leaf-like organ when PeSEP3 was silenced by virus-induced silencing, with alterations in epidermis identity and contents of anthocyanin and chlorophyll. Silencing of PeSEP2 had minor effects on the floral phenotype. Silencing of the E-class genes PeSEP2 and PeSEP3 resulted in the downregulation of B-class PeMADS2-6 genes, which indicates an association of PeSEP functions and B-class gene expression. These findings reveal the important roles of PeSEP in Phalaenopsis floral organ formation throughout the developmental process by the formation of various multiple protein complexes.

  6. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of White and Purple Potato to Identify Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhui; Lin-Wang, Kui; Deng, Cecilia; Warran, Ben; Wang, Li; Yu, Bin; Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Jing; Espley, Richard V.; Zhang, Junlian; Wang, Di; Allan, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivar ‘Xin Daping’ is tetraploid with white skin and white flesh, while the cultivar ‘Hei Meiren’ is also tetraploid with purple skin and purple flesh. Comparative transcriptome analysis of white and purple cultivars was carried out using high-throughput RNA sequencing in order to further understand the mechanism of anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato. Methods and Results By aligning transcript reads to the recently published diploid potato genome and de novo assembly, 209 million paired-end Illumina RNA-seq reads from these tetraploid cultivars were assembled on to 60,930 transcripts, of which 27,754 (45.55%) are novel transcripts and 9393 alternative transcripts. Using a comparison of the RNA-sequence datasets, multiple versions of the genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic steps and regulatory transcription factors were identified. Other novel genes potentially involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato tubers were also discovered. Real-time qPCR validation of candidate genes revealed good correlation with the transcriptome data. SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and indels were predicted and validated for the transcription factors MYB AN1 and bHLH1 and the biosynthetic gene anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT). Conclusions These results contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanism of white and purple potato development, by identifying differential responses of biosynthetic gene family members together with the variation in structural genes and transcription factors in this highly heterozygous crop. This provides an excellent platform and resource for future genetic and functional genomic research. PMID:26053878

  7. Gene expression in self-repressing system with multiple gene copies.

    PubMed

    Miekisz, Jacek; Szymańska, Paulina

    2013-02-01

    We analyze a simple model of a self-repressing system with multiple gene copies. Protein molecules may bound to DNA promoters and block their own transcription. We derive analytical expressions for the variance of the number of protein molecules in the stationary state in the self-consistent mean-field approximation. We show that the Fano factor (the variance divided by the mean value) is bigger for the one-gene case than for two gene copies and the difference decreases to zero as frequencies of binding and unbinding increase to infinity.

  8. Lines of evidence for horizontal gene transfer of a phenazine producing operon into multiple bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, David A

    2009-02-01

    Phenazines are secondary metabolites with broad-spectrum antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and eukaryotes. In pseudomonad species, a conserved seven-gene phenazine operon (phzABCDEFG) is required for the conversion of chorismic acid to the broad-spectrum antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylate. Previous analyses of genes involved in phenazine production from nonpseudomonad species uncovered a high degree of sequence similarity to pseudomonad homologues. The analyses undertaken in this study wished to eluciadate the evolutionary history of genes involved in the production of phenazines. Furthermore, I wanted to determine if the phenazine operon has been transferred through horizontal gene transfer. Analyses of GC content, codon usage patterns, frequency of 3:1 dinucleotides, sequence similarities, and phylogenetic reconstructions were undertaken to map the evolutionary history of phenazine genes from multiple bacterial species. Patchy phyletic distribution, high sequence similarities, and phylogenetic evidence infer that pseudomonad, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Pantoea agglomerans, Burkholderia cepacia, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Brevibacterium linens, and Mycobacterium abscessus species all contain a phenazine operon which has most likely been transferred among these species through horizontal gene transfer. The acquisition of an antibiotic-associated operon is significant, as it may increase the relative fitness of the recipient species.

  9. NGF-induction of the metalloproteinase-transin/stromelysin in PC12 cells: involvement of multiple protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Machida, C M; Scott, J D; Ciment, G

    1991-09-01

    In previous work, we found that nerve growth factor (NGF) induced expression of the mRNA transcript encoding the metalloproteinase transin/stromelysin in PC12 cells. Transin was found, moreover, to be a "late" gene product whose expression correlated with neurites extension. In this study, various aspects of the NGF intracellular signaling pathway in PC12 cells are investigated. We show that the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, but not various other kinase inhibitors, specifically blocked the NGF induction of transin. Preliminary characterization of this staurosporine-sensitive kinase suggest that it does not correspond to a tyrosine kinase, nor various serine kinases, and that it is involved both at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels of transin gene regulation. In contrast to these effects of staurosporine, various activators of protein kinases C and A augmented the NGF induction of transin. Similar effects of these kinase inhibitors and activators were also observed with the expression of various immediate-early genes that have been proposed to mediate the transcriptional effects of NGF, including c-fos and c-jun. These data suggest, therefore, that the NGF induction of transin mRNA expression involves multiple protein kinases acting at a number of postreceptor regulatory steps in the NGF signaling pathway.

  10. Central nervous system involvement in primary Sjogren`s syndrome manifesting as multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Yao; Zhao, Teng; Zhou, Chun-Kui

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system symptoms in patients with primary Sjogren`s syndrome are rare. They can present as extraglandular manifestations and require a differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis. Due to a variety of presentations, Sjogren`s syndrome with neurologic involvement may be difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2010, but who was subsequently diagnosed with primary Sjogren`s syndrome 2 years later after showing signs of atypical neurologic manifestations. Therefore, primary Sjogren`s syndrome should be suspected in patients who present with atypical clinical and radiologic neurologic manifestations.

  11. Virtual reality and claustrophobia: multiple components therapy involving game editor virtual environments exposure.

    PubMed

    Malbos, E; Mestre, D R; Note, I D; Gellato, C

    2008-12-01

    The effectiveness of a multiple components therapy regarding claustrophobia and involving virtual reality (VR) will be demonstrated through a trial which immersed six claustrophobic patients in multiple context-graded enclosed virtual environments (VE) using affordable VR apparatus and software. The results of the questionnaires and behavior tests exhibited a significant reduction in fear towards the enclosed space and quality of life improvement. Such gains were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Presence score indicated the patients felt immersed and present inside the game editor VE.

  12. Multiple mutations in a specific gene in a small geographic area: A common phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Zlotogora, J.; Bach, G.; Gieselmann, V.

    1996-01-01

    We read with interest the article from Allamand et al., which demonstrates in a genetic isolate the presence of at least six different haplotypes in the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A chromosome. Several hypotheses were proposed by the authors to explain this finding, but, after the identification of calpain, the gene involved in the disorder, multiple mutations were proved to be at the origin of this observation. The authors proposed that both the presence of multiple distinct calpain mutations within the Reunion Island pedigrees and the relatively low frequency of the disease in the isolate may be explained by a digenic inheritance of the disorder. Their hypothesis postulates that, although calpain mutations may be frequent in all populations, the disease manifestations are controlled by another frequently mutated nuclear or mitochondrial gene in the Reunion isolate. 8 refs.

  13. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma.

  14. Multiple-input multiple-output causal strategies for gene selection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional strategies for selecting variables in high dimensional classification problems aim to find sets of maximally relevant variables able to explain the target variations. If these techniques may be effective in generalization accuracy they often do not reveal direct causes. The latter is essentially related to the fact that high correlation (or relevance) does not imply causation. In this study, we show how to efficiently incorporate causal information into gene selection by moving from a single-input single-output to a multiple-input multiple-output setting. Results We show in synthetic case study that a better prioritization of causal variables can be obtained by considering a relevance score which incorporates a causal term. In addition we show, in a meta-analysis study of six publicly available breast cancer microarray datasets, that the improvement occurs also in terms of accuracy. The biological interpretation of the results confirms the potential of a causal approach to gene selection. Conclusions Integrating causal information into gene selection algorithms is effective both in terms of prediction accuracy and biological interpretation. PMID:22118187

  15. Involvement of the Rabies Virus Phosphoprotein Gene in Neuroinvasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Satoko; Ito, Naoto; Ohka, Seii; Kaneda, Shohei; Nakamura, Hiroko; Agari, Takahiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Okada, Kazuma; Okadera, Kota; Mitake, Hiromichi; Fujii, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV), which is transmitted via a bite wound caused by a rabid animal, infects peripheral nerves and then spreads to the central nervous system (CNS) before causing severe neurological symptoms and death in the infected individual. Despite the importance of this ability of the virus to spread from a peripheral site to the CNS (neuroinvasiveness) in the pathogenesis of rabies, little is known about the mechanism underlying the neuroinvasiveness of RABV. In this study, to obtain insights into the mechanism, we conducted comparative analysis of two fixed RABV strains, Nishigahara and the derivative strain Ni-CE, which cause lethal and asymptomatic infections, respectively, in mice after intramuscular inoculation. Examination of a series of chimeric viruses harboring the respective genes from Nishigahara in the genetic background of Ni-CE revealed that the Nishigahara phosphoprotein (P) gene plays a major role in the neuroinvasiveness by mediating infection of peripheral nerves. The results obtained from both in vivo and in vitro experiments strongly suggested that the Nishigahara P gene, but not the Ni-CE P gene, is important for stable viral replication in muscle cells. Further investigation based on the previous finding that RABV phosphoprotein counteracts the host interferon (IFN) system demonstrated that the Nishigahara P gene, but not the Ni-CE P gene, functions to suppress expression of the beta interferon (IFN-β) gene (Ifn-β) and IFN-stimulated genes in muscle cells. In conclusion, we provide the first data strongly suggesting that RABV phosphoprotein assists viral replication in muscle cells by counteracting the host IFN system and, consequently, enhances infection of peripheral nerves. PMID:24027304

  16. Genes Involved in Oxidation and Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    association of genes and prostate cancer progression from these simulated nested case - control studies to what would be observed if the entire...Control Sampling: Methods for Nested Case - Control Studies of Candidate Genes and Prostate Cancer Progression”. This work forms one aim of MS Wang’s...prostate cancer risk: results from two large nested case - control studies . Carcinogenesis. 2007 Nov 13; [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 17999989 Dr

  17. Multiple ATP-binding cassette transporters are involved in insecticide resistance in the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Pu, J; Chen, F; Wang, J; Han, Z

    2017-03-16

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane-bound proteins involved in the movement of various substrates, including drugs and insecticides, across the lipid membrane. Demonstration of the role of human ABC transporters in multidrug resistance has led to speculation that they might be an important mechanism controlling the fate of insecticides in insects. However, the role of ABC transporters in insects remains largely unknown. The small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus Fallén, has developed resistance to most of the insecticides used for its control. Our goals were to identify the ABC transporters in La. striatellus and to examine their involvement in resistance mechanisms, using related strains resistant to chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin and imidacloprid, compared with the susceptible strain. Based on the transcriptome of La. striatellus, 40 full-length ABC transporters belonging to the ABCA-ABCH subfamilies were identified. Quantitative PCR revealed that over 20% of genes were significantly up-regulated in different resistant strains, and eight genes from the ABCB/C/D/G subfamilies were up-regulated in all three resistant strains, compared with the susceptible strain. Furthermore, synergism studies showed verapamil significantly enhanced insecticide toxicity in various resistant strains but not in the susceptible strain. These results suggest that ABC transporters might be involved in resistance to multiple insecticides in La. striatellus.

  18. Silicon Regulates Potential Genes Involved in Major Physiological Processes in Plants to Combat Stress.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Ahn, Yul-Kuyn

    2017-01-01

    Silicon (Si), the quasi-essential element occurs as the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. Biological importance of Si in plant kingdom has become inevitable particularly under stressed environment. In general, plants are classified as high, medium, and low silicon accumulators based on the ability of roots to absorb Si. The uptake of Si directly influence the positive effects attributed to the plant but Si supplementation proves to mitigate stress and recover plant growth even in low accumulating plants like tomato. The application of Si in soil as well as soil-less cultivation systems have resulted in the enhancement of quantitative and qualitative traits of plants even under stressed environment. Silicon possesses several mechanisms to regulate the physiological, biochemical, and antioxidant metabolism in plants to combat abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, very few reports are available on the aspect of Si-mediated molecular regulation of genes with potential role in stress tolerance. The recent advancements in the era of genomics and transcriptomics have opened an avenue for the determination of molecular rationale associated with the Si amendment to the stress alleviation in plants. Therefore, the present endeavor has attempted to describe the recent discoveries related to the regulation of vital genes involved in photosynthesis, transcription regulation, defense, water transport, polyamine synthesis, and housekeeping genes during abiotic and biotic stress alleviation by Si. Furthermore, an overview of Si-mediated modulation of multiple genes involved in stress response pathways such as phenylpropanoid pathway, jasmonic acid pathway, ABA-dependent or independent regulatory pathway have been discussed in this review.

  19. REGULATION OF MULTIPLE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM GENES BY SRY

    PubMed Central

    Milsted, Amy; Underwood, Adam C.; Dunmire, Jeff; DelPuerto, Helen L.; Martins, Almir S.; Ely, Daniel L.; Turner, Monte E.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated that the Sry gene complex on the SHR Y chromosome is a candidate locus for hypertension that accounts for the SHR Y chromosome blood pressure effect. All rat strains examined to date share 6 Sry loci, and a seventh Sry locus (Sry3) appears to be unique to SHR males. Previously, we showed that Sry1 increased activity of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter in transfected PC12 cells, and Sry1 delivered to adrenal gland of WKY rats increased blood pressure and sympathetic nervous system activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether renin-angiotensin system genes participate in Sry-mediated effects. Sry expression vectors were co-transfected into CHO cells with luciferase reporter constructs containing promoters of angiotensinogen (Agt −1430/+22), renin (Ren −1050/−1), ACE (ACE −1677/+21) and ACE2 (ACE2 −1091/+83). Sry1, Sry2 and Sry3 differentially up-regulated activity of the promoters of angiotensinogen, renin and ACE genes, and down-regulated ACE2 promoter activity. The largest effect was seen with Sry3, which increased activity of angiotensinogen promoter by 1.7 fold, renin promoter by 1.3 fold, ACE promoter by 2.6 fold, and decreased activity of ACE2 promoter by 0.5 fold. The effect of Sry1 on promoter activity was significantly less than Sry3. Sry2 activated promoters at a significantly lower level than Sry1. The result of either an additive effect of Sry regulation of multiple genes in the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in expression of a single gene could favor increased levels of Ang II and decreased levels of Ang-(1-7). These actions of Sry could result in increased blood pressure in males and contribute to gender differences in blood pressure. PMID:19809364

  20. Interfering ribonucleic acids that suppress expression of multiple unrelated genes

    PubMed Central

    Passioura, Toby; Gozar, Mary M; Goodchild, Amber; King, Andrew; Arndt, Greg M; Poidinger, Michael; Birkett, Donald J; Rivory, Laurent P

    2009-01-01

    Background Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have become the research tool of choice for gene suppression, with human clinical trials ongoing. The emphasis so far in siRNA therapeutics has been the design of one siRNA with complete complementarity to the intended target. However, there is a need for multi-targeting interfering RNA in diseases in which multiple gene products are of importance. We have investigated the possibility of using a single short synthetic duplex RNA to suppress the expression of VEGF-A and ICAM-1; genes implicated in the progression of ocular neovascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. Results Duplex RNA were designed to have incomplete complementarity with the 3'UTR sequences of both target genes. One such duplex, CODEMIR-1, was found to suppress VEGF and ICAM-1 by 90 and 60%, respectively in ARPE-19 cells at a transfected concentration of 40 ng/mL. Use of a cyan fusion reporter with target sites constructed in its 3'UTR demonstrated that the repression of VEGF and ICAM-1 by CODEMIR-1 was indeed due to interaction with the target sequence. An exhaustive analysis of sequence variants of CODEMIR-1 demonstrated a clear positive correlation between activity against VEGF (but not ICAM-1) and the length of the contiguous complementary region (from the 5' end of the guide strand). Various strategies, including the use of inosine bases at the sites of divergence of the target sequences were investigated. Conclusion Our work demonstrates the possibility of designing multitargeting dsRNA to suppress more than one disease-altering gene. This warrants further investigation as a possible therapeutic approach. PMID:19531249

  1. Molecular cloning of a gene involved in methotrexate uptake by DNA-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Underhill, T M; Williams, F M; Murray, R C; Flintoff, W F

    1992-07-01

    A methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in methotrexate uptake has been complemented to methotrexate sensitivity by transfection with DNA isolated from a wild-type Chinese hamster ovary genomic cosmid library. Primary and secondary transfectants, which contain a limited number of cosmid sequences, have been shown to regain methotrexate sensitivity and to take up methotrexate. Furthermore, the DNA from three cosmid clones, isolated from a primary methotrexate-sensitive transfectant, after transfection rescued the methotrexate-resistant phenotype at a high frequency. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of these cosmid clones indicated that they overlapped extensively and shared two regions of Chinese hamster ovary DNA of 6.6 kb and 20.6 kb. These observations indicate that a gene involved in methotrexate uptake is contained in its entirety within one of these regions. This is the first report of the functional molecular cloning of a gene involved in methotrexate uptake. A general strategy is also described for screening large cosmid libraries from primary transfectants.

  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ryang; Kanda, Fumio; Kobessho, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Koji; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kudo, Masatoshi; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2006-11-07

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement. The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  3. Genome-wide enrichment screening reveals multiple targets and resistance genes for triclosan in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Jung Ae; Ju, Hyun Mok; Choi, Soo-Kyung; Hwang, Seung Jin; Park, Sungyoo; Kim, Euijoong; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2012-10-01

    Triclosan is a widely used biocide effective against different microorganisms. At bactericidal concentrations, triclosan appears to affect multiple targets, while at bacteriostatic concentrations, triclosan targets FabI. The site-specific antibiotic-like mode-of-action and a widespread use of triclosan in household products claimed to possibly induce cross-resistance to other antibiotics. Thus, we set out to define more systematically the genes conferring resistance to triclosan; A genomic library of Escherichia coli strain W3110 was constructed and enriched in a selective medium containing a lethal concentration of triclosan. The genes enabling growth in the presence of triclosan were identified by using a DNA microarray and confirmed consequently by ASKA clones overexpressing the selected 62 candidate genes. Among these, forty-seven genes were further confirmed to enhance the resistance to triclosan; these genes, including the FabI target, were involved in inner or outer membrane synthesis, cell-surface material synthesis, transcriptional activation, sugar phosphotransferase (PTS) systems, various transporter systems, cell division, and ATPase and reductase/dehydrogenase reactions. In particular, overexpression of pgsA, rcsA, or gapC conferred to E. coli cells a similar level of triclosan resistance induced by fabI overexpression. These results indicate that triclosan may have multiple targets other than well-known FabI and that there are several undefined novel mechanisms for the resistance development to triclosan, thus probably inducing cross antibiotic resistance.

  4. Assembly and multiple gene expression of thermophilic enzymes in Escherichia coli for in vitro metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Pham Huynh; Honda, Kohsuke; Sakai, Takaaki; Okano, Kenji; Ohtake, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    In vitro reconstitution of an artificial metabolic pathway is an emerging approach for the biocatalytic production of industrial chemicals. However, several enzymes have to be separately prepared (and purified) for the construction of an in vitro metabolic pathway, thereby limiting the practical applicability of this approach. In this study, genes encoding the nine thermophilic enzymes involved in a non-ATP-forming chimeric glycolytic pathway were assembled in an artificial operon and co-expressed in a single recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Gene expression levels of the thermophilic enzymes were controlled by their sequential order in the artificial operon. The specific activities of the recombinant enzymes in the cell-free extract of the multiple-gene-expression E. coli were 5.0-1,370 times higher than those in an enzyme cocktail prepared from a mixture of single-gene-expression strains, in each of which a single one of the nine thermophilic enzymes was overproduced. Heat treatment of a crude extract of the multiple-gene-expression cells led to the denaturation of indigenous proteins and one-step preparation of an in vitro synthetic pathway comprising only a limited number of thermotolerant enzymes. Coupling this in vitro pathway with other thermophilic enzymes including the H2 O-forming NADH oxidase or the malate/lactate dehydrogenase facilitated one-pot conversion of glucose to pyruvate or lactate, respectively.

  5. Functions of genes and enzymes involved in phenalinolactone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Daum, Martina; Schnell, Hans-Jörg; Herrmann, Simone; Günther, Andreas; Murillo, Renato; Müller, Rolf; Bisel, Philippe; Müller, Michael; Bechthold, Andreas

    2010-07-05

    Phenalinolactones are novel terpene glycoside antibiotics produced by Streptomyces sp. Tü6071. Inactivation of three oxygenase genes (plaO2, plaO3 and plaO5), two dehydrogenase genes (plaU, plaZ) and one putative acetyltransferase gene (plaV) led to the production of novel phenalinolactone derivatives (PL HS6, PL HS7, PL HS2 and PL X1). Furthermore, the exact biosynthetic functions of two enzymes were determined, and their in vitro activities were demonstrated. PlaO1, an Fe(II)/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, is responsible for the key step in gamma-butyrolactone formation, whereas PlaO5, a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, catalyses the 1-C-hydroxylation of phenalinolactone D. In addition, stable isotope feeding experiments with biosynthetic precursors shed light on the origin of the carbons in the gamma-butyrolactone moiety.

  6. Character Development within Youth Development Programs: Exploring Multiple Dimensions of Activity Involvement.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Alicia Doyle; Ferris, Kaitlyn A; Burkhard, Brian; Wang, Jun; Hershberg, Rachel M; Lerner, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    We examined links among three dimensions of youth involvement (intensity, duration, and engagement) in Boy Scouts of America (BSA), an international out-of-school time (OST) youth development program designed to promote moral and performance character in boys. Using data from 737 youth and their parents who participated in one of 40 BSA program sites (commonly referred to as "packs"), we first considered how individual- and pack-level measures of program involvement were differentially linked with character development. Next, we examined whether pack-level involvement characteristics moderate individual-level involvement characteristics, hypothesizing that highly involved packs would serve to further enhance the positive effects of high levels of individual involvement. Results indicated engagement was the strongest, most frequent predictor of increases in both moral and performance character. Although there were no direct effects of pack-level intensity, duration, or engagement, the effects of individual-level engagement were moderated by pack-level engagement, suggesting that the largest increases in moral and performance character occurred among highly engaged youth who were enrolled in highly engaged packs. These results highlight the need to examine multiple dimensions of OST program involvement simultaneously, and suggest that strengthening youth engagement in programming may provide a means for enhancing the positive effects of high-quality youth programming.

  7. Expression of Multiple Stress Response Genes by Escherichia Coli Under Modeled Reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukanti, Raja; Leff, Laura G.

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria, in response to changes in their environment, quickly regulate gene expression; hence, transcriptional profiling has been widely used to characterize bacterial responses to various environmental conditions. In this study, we used clinorotation to grow bacteria under low-sedimentation, -shear, and -turbulence conditions (referred to as modeled reduced gravity, MRG, below) which profoundly impacts bacteria including causing elevated resistance to multiple environmental stresses. To explore potential mechanisms behind the multiple stress resistance response to MRG, we assessed expression levels of E. coli genes, using reverse transcription followed by real-time-PCR, involved in specific stress and general stress responses under MRG and normal gravity (NG) in nutritionally rich and minimal media, and during exponential and stationary phases of growth. In addition, growth rates as well as physico-chemical parameters of culture media were examined. Over-expression of stress response genes (csiD, cstA, katE, otsA, treA) occurred under MRG compared to NG controls, but only during the later stages of growth in rich medium demonstrating that bacterial response to MRG varies with growth-medium and -phase. At stationary phase in rich medium under MRG and NG, E. coli had similar growth rates (based on rRNA-leader abundance) and yields (cell mass and numbers); this coupled, with observations of simultaneous induction of starvation response genes (csiD and cstA) suggests the multiple stress resistance phenotype under MRG could be attributable to microzones of nutrient unavailability around cells. Overall, in rich medium, the response resembled the general stress response (GSR) that E. coli develops during stationary phase of growth. Along these same lines, induction of genes coding for GSR was reversed by improving nutritional conditions under MRG. The reversal of GSR under MRG suggests that the multiple stress response exhibited is not specific to MRG but may result

  8. Novel Vibrio cholerae O139 genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stroeher, U H; Parasivam, G; Dredge, B K; Manning, P A

    1997-01-01

    The sequence of part of the rfb region of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 and the physical map of a 35-kb region of the O139 chromosome have been determined. The O139 rfb region presented contains a number of open reading frames which show similarities to other rfb and capsular biosynthesis genes found in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family and in V. cholerae O1. The cloned and sequenced region can complement the defects in O139 antigen biosynthesis in transposon insertions within the O139 rfb cluster. Linkage is demonstrated among IS1358 of V. cholerae O139, the rfb region, and the recently reported otnA and otnB genes (E. M. Bik, A. E. Bunschoten, R. D. Gouw, and F. R. Mooi, EMBO J. 14:209-216, 1995). In addition, the whole of this region has been linked to the rfaD gene. Furthermore, determination of the sequence flanking IS1358 has revealed homology to other rfb-like genes. The exact site of insertion with respect to rfaD is defined for the novel DNAs of both the Bengal and the Argentinian O139 isolates. PMID:9098074

  9. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  10. Transcriptome profiling to identify genes involved in peroxisome assembly and function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jennifer J.; Marelli, Marcello; Christmas, Rowan H.; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Dilworth, David J.; Ideker, Trey; Galitski, Timothy; Dimitrov, Krassen; Rachubinski, Richard A.; Aitchison, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Yeast cells were induced to proliferate peroxisomes, and microarray transcriptional profiling was used to identify PEX genes encoding peroxins involved in peroxisome assembly and genes involved in peroxisome function. Clustering algorithms identified 224 genes with expression profiles similar to those of genes encoding peroxisomal proteins and genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis. Several previously uncharacterized genes were identified, two of which, YPL112c and YOR084w, encode proteins of the peroxisomal membrane and matrix, respectively. Ypl112p, renamed Pex25p, is a novel peroxin required for the regulation of peroxisome size and maintenance. These studies demonstrate the utility of comparative gene profiling as an alternative to functional assays to identify genes with roles in peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:12135984

  11. Possible involvement of ACSS2 gene in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; de Lacerda, Roseli Boerngen; Correia, Diego; Brunialti-Godard, Ana Lúcia; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Campos, Valdir Ribeiro; de Souza, Valéria Fernandes; Ribeiro, Angela Maria

    2017-05-26

    Alcoholism is a psychiatric disorder that composes one of the principal causes of health disabilities in the world population. Furthermore, the available pharmacotherapy is limited. Therefore, this research was carried out to better understand the basis of the underlying neurobiological processes of this disorder and to discover potential therapeutic targets. Real-time PCR analysis was performed in the amygdala nuclei region of the brain of mice exposed to a chronic three-bottle free-choice model (water, 5 and 10% v/v ethanol). Based on individual ethanol intake, the mice were classified into three groups: "compulsive-like" (i.e., ethanol intake not affected by quinine adulteration), "ethanol-preferring" and "ethanol non-preferring". A fourth group had access only to tap water (control group). The candidate gene ACSS2 was genotyped in human alcoholics by real-time polymerase chain reaction using the markers rs6088638 and rs7266550. Seven genes were picked out (Acss2, Acss3, Acat1, Acsl1, Acaa2, Hadh, and Hadhb) and the mRNA level of the Acss2 gene was increased only in the "compulsive-like" group (p = 0.004). The allele frequency of rs6088638 for the gene ACSS2 was higher in the Alcoholic human group (p = 0.03), although sample size was very small. The gene ACSS2 is associated with alcoholism, suggesting that biochemical pathways where it participates may have a role in the biological mechanisms susceptible to the ethanol effects.

  12. Conditional gene silencing of multiple genes with antisense RNAs and generation of a mutator strain of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Nobutaka; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we describe a method of simultaneous conditional gene silencing of up to four genes in Escherichia coli by using antisense RNAs. We used antisense RNAs with paired termini, which carried flanking inverted repeats to create paired double-stranded RNA termini; these RNAs have been proven to have high silencing efficacy. To express antisense RNAs, we constructed four IPTG-inducible vectors carrying different but compatible replication origins. When the lacZ antisense RNA was expressed using these vectors, lacZ expression was successfully silenced by all the vectors, but the expression level of the antisense RNA and silencing efficacy differed depending on the used vectors. All the vectors were co-transformable; the antisense RNAs against lacZ, ackA, pta and pepN were co-expressed, and silencing of all the target genes was confirmed. Furthermore, when antisense RNAs were targeted to the mutator genes mutS, mutD (dnaQ) and ndk, which are involved in DNA replication or DNA mismatch repair, spontaneous mutation frequencies increased over 2000-fold. The resulting mutator strain is useful for random mutagenesis of plasmids. The method provides a robust tool for investigating functional relationships between multiple genes or altering cell phenotypes for biotechnological and industrial applications. PMID:19515932

  13. Identification and validation of genes involved in cervical tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among Indian women. This cancer has well defined pre-cancerous stages and evolves over 10-15 years or more. This study was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes between normal, dysplastic and invasive cervical cancer. Materials and methods A total of 28 invasive cervical cancers, 4 CIN3/CIS, 4 CIN1/CIN2 and 5 Normal cervix samples were studied. We have used microarray technique followed by validation of the significant genes by relative quantitation using Taqman Low Density Array Real Time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the protein expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in normal, dysplasia and cancers of the cervix. The effect of a dominant negative UBE2C on the growth of the SiHa cells was assessed using a MTT assay. Results Our study, for the first time, has identified 20 genes to be up-regulated and 14 down-regulated in cervical cancers and 5 up-regulated in CIN3. In addition, 26 genes identified by other studies, as to playing a role in cervical cancer, were also confirmed in our study. UBE2C, CCNB1, CCNB2, PLOD2, NUP210, MELK, CDC20 genes were overexpressed in tumours and in CIN3/CIS relative to both Normal and CIN1/CIN2, suggesting that they could have a role to play in the early phase of tumorigenesis. IL8, INDO, ISG15, ISG20, AGRN, DTXL, MMP1, MMP3, CCL18, TOP2A AND STAT1 were found to be upregulated in tumours. Using Immunohistochemistry, we showed over-expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in cancers compared to normal cervical epithelium and varying grades of dysplasia. A dominant negative UBE2C was found to produce growth inhibition in SiHa cells, which over-expresses UBE2C 4 fold more than HEK293 cells. Conclusions Several novel genes were found to be differentially expressed in cervical cancer. MMP3, UBE2C and p16 protein overexpression in cervical cancers was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These will need to be validated further in a larger series of samples. UBE2C could be

  14. Identification and validation of genes involved in cervical tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Sabitha, Kesavan; Vijayalakshmi, Neelakantan; Shirley, Sundersingh; Bose, Mayil Vahanan; Gopal, Gopisetty; Selvaluxmy, Ganesharaja

    2011-02-22

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among Indian women. This cancer has well defined pre-cancerous stages and evolves over 10-15 years or more. This study was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes between normal, dysplastic and invasive cervical cancer. A total of 28 invasive cervical cancers, 4 CIN3/CIS, 4 CIN1/CIN2 and 5 Normal cervix samples were studied. We have used microarray technique followed by validation of the significant genes by relative quantitation using Taqman Low Density Array Real Time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was used to study the protein expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in normal, dysplasia and cancers of the cervix. The effect of a dominant negative UBE2C on the growth of the SiHa cells was assessed using a MTT assay. Our study, for the first time, has identified 20 genes to be up-regulated and 14 down-regulated in cervical cancers and 5 up-regulated in CIN3. In addition, 26 genes identified by other studies, as to playing a role in cervical cancer, were also confirmed in our study. UBE2C, CCNB1, CCNB2, PLOD2, NUP210, MELK, CDC20 genes were overexpressed in tumours and in CIN3/CIS relative to both Normal and CIN1/CIN2, suggesting that they could have a role to play in the early phase of tumorigenesis. IL8, INDO, ISG15, ISG20, AGRN, DTXL, MMP1, MMP3, CCL18, TOP2A AND STAT1 were found to be upregulated in tumours. Using Immunohistochemistry, we showed over-expression of MMP3, UBE2C and p16 in cancers compared to normal cervical epithelium and varying grades of dysplasia. A dominant negative UBE2C was found to produce growth inhibition in SiHa cells, which over-expresses UBE2C 4 fold more than HEK293 cells. Several novel genes were found to be differentially expressed in cervical cancer. MMP3, UBE2C and p16 protein overexpression in cervical cancers was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. These will need to be validated further in a larger series of samples. UBE2C could be evaluated further to assess its potential as a

  15. Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation reduces abnormalities in the expression of immune genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Paula A Sousa, Alessandra; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Brum, Doralina S; Barreira, Amilton A; Carlos Dos Santos, Antonio; Araújo, Amélia G; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Oliveira, Maria C; Moraes, Daniela A; Pieroni, Fabiano; Barros, George M; Simões, Belinda P; Nicholas, Richard; Burt, Richard K; Voltarelli, Júlio C; Muraro, Paolo A

    2015-01-01

    Autologous haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) has been experimented as a treatment in patients affected by severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) who failed to respond to standard immunotherapy. The rationale of AHSCT is to 'reboot' the immune system and reconstitute a new adaptive immunity. The aim of our study was to identify, through a robust and unbiased transcriptomic analysis, any changes of gene expression in T-cells potentially underlying the treatment effect in patients who underwent non-myeloablative AHSCT for treatment of MS. We evaluated by microarray DNA-chip technology the gene expression of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets sorted from patients with MS patients before AHSCT, at 6 months, 1 year and 2 years after AHSCT and from healthy control subjects. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed that reconstituted CD8+ T-cells of MS patients at 2 years post-transplantation, aggregated together with healthy controls, suggesting a normalization of gene expression in CD8+ cells post-therapy. When we compared the gene expression in MS patients before and after therapy, we detected a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEG) in both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets at all time points after transplantation. We catalogued the biological function of DEG and we selected 27 genes known to be involved in immune function for accurate quantification of gene expression by real-time PCR. The analysis confirmed and extended with quantitative data, a number of significant changes in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells subsets from MS post-transplant. Notably, CD8+ T-cells revealed more extensive changes in the expression of genes involved in effector immune responses.

  16. The expression of type III hyperlipoproteinemia: involvement of lipolysis genes

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Peter; van der Sman-de Beer, Femke; Moghaddam, Payman Hanifi; Huijts, Petra; Stalenhoef, Anton FH; Kastelein, John JP; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Havekes, Louis M; Frants, Rune R; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Smelt, Augustinus HM

    2009-01-01

    Type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) is mainly found in homozygous apolipoprotein (APO) E2 (R158C) carriers. Genetic factors contributing to the expression of type III HLP were investigated in 113 hyper- and 52 normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, by testing for polymorphisms in APOC3, APOA5, HL (hepatic lipase) and LPL (lipoprotein lipase) genes. In addition, 188 normolipidemic Dutch control panels (NDCP) and 141 hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) patients were genotyped as well. No associations were found for four HL gene polymorphisms and two LPL gene polymorphisms and type III HLP. The frequency of the rare allele of APOC3 3238 G>C and APOA5 −1131 T>C (in linkage disequilibrium) was significantly higher in type III HLP patients when compared with normolipidemic E2/2 subjects, 15.6 vs 6.9% and 15.1 vs 5.8%, respectively, (P<0.05). Furthermore, the frequencies of the APOA5 c.56 G>C polymorphism and LPL c.27 G>A mutation were higher in type III HLP patients, though not significant. Some 58% of the type III HLP patients carried either the APOA5 −1131 T>C, c.56 G>C and/or LPL c.27 G>A mutation as compared to 27% of the normolipidemic APOE2/2 subjects (odds ratio 3.7, 95% confidence interval=1.8–7.5, P<0.0001). The HTG patients showed similar allele frequencies of the APOA5, APOC3 and LPL polymorphisms, whereas the NDCP showed similar allele frequencies as the normolipidemic APOE2/2. Patients with the APOC3 3238 G>C/APOA5 −1131 T>C polymorphism showed a more severe hyperlipidemia than patients without this polymorphism. Polymorphisms in lipolysis genes associate with the expression and severity of type III HLP in APOE2/2. PMID:19034316

  17. Genes involved in virulence of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Valero-Jiménez, Claudio A; Wiegers, Harm; Zwaan, Bas J; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; van Kan, Jan A L

    2016-01-01

    Pest insects cause severe damage to global crop production and pose a threat to human health by transmitting diseases. Traditionally, chemical pesticides (insecticides) have been used to control such pests and have proven to be effective only for a limited amount of time because of the rapid spread of genetic insecticide resistance. The basis of this resistance is mostly caused by (co)dominant mutations in single genes, which explains why insecticide use alone is an unsustainable solution. Therefore, robust solutions for insect pest control need to be sought in alternative methods such as biological control agents for which single-gene resistance is less likely to evolve. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has shown potential as a biological control agent of insects, and insight into the mechanisms of virulence is essential to show the robustness of its use. With the recent availability of the whole genome sequence of B. bassiana, progress in understanding the genetics that constitute virulence toward insects can be made more quickly. In this review we divide the infection process into distinct steps and provide an overview of what is currently known about genes and mechanisms influencing virulence in B. bassiana. We also discuss the need for novel strategies and experimental methods to better understand the infection mechanisms deployed by entomopathogenic fungi. Such knowledge can help improve biocontrol agents, not only by selecting the most virulent genotypes, but also by selecting the genotypes that use combinations of virulence mechanisms for which resistance in the insect host is least likely to develop.

  18. Local Area Disadvantage and Gambling Involvement and Disorder: Evidence for Gene-Environment Correlation and Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Deutsch, Arielle R.; Statham, Dixie B.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that local area characteristics (such as disadvantage and gambling outlet density) and genetic risk factors are associated with gambling involvement and disordered gambling. These two lines of research were brought together in the present study by examining the extent to which genetic contributions to individual differences in gambling involvement and disorder contributed to being exposed to, and were also accentuated by, local area disadvantage. Participants were members of the national community-based Australian Twin Registry who completed a telephone interview in which the past-year frequency of gambling and symptoms of disordered gambling were assessed. Indicators of local area disadvantage were based on census data matched to the participants' postal codes. Univariate biometric model-fitting revealed that exposure to area disadvantage was partially explained by genetic factors. Bivariate biometric model-fitting was conducted to examine the evidence for gene-environment interaction while accounting for gene-environment correlation. These analyses demonstrated that: (a) a small portion of the genetic propensity to gamble was explained by moving to or remaining in a disadvantaged area, and (b) the remaining genetic and unique environmental variation in the frequency of participating in electronic machine gambling (among men and women) and symptoms of disordered gambling (among women) was greater in more disadvantaged localities. As the gambling industry continues to grow, it will be important to take into account the multiple contexts in which problematic gambling behavior can emerge -- from genes to geography -- as well as the ways in which such contexts may interact with each other. PMID:26147321

  19. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  20. Gene Expression Analysis for the Identification of Genes Involved in Early Tumour Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Stefano; Scarpulla, Salvatore; Lagana, Alessandro; Memeo, Lorenzo; Gulisano, Massimo

    Prostatic tissues can undergo to cancer insurgence and prostate cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies affecting adult men in the United States. Primary adenocarcinoma of the seminal vesi-cles (SVCA) is a very rare neoplasm with only 48 histologically confirmed cases reported in the European and United States literature. Prostatic tissues, seminal vesicles and epididymis belongs all to the same microenvironment, shows a very close morphology and share the same embryological origin. Despite these common features the rate of cancer occurrence is very different. The understanding of molecular differences between non neoplastic prostatic tissues and non neoplastic epididymis or seminal vesicles may suggest potential mechanisms of resistance to tumour occurrence. The comparison of expression patterns of non neoplastic prostatic and seminal vesicles tissues to identify differentially expressed genes can help researchers in the identification of biological actors involved in the early stages of the tumour development.

  1. Reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in multiple avian species.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Adam, Iris; Meyer, Anne; Scharff, Constance; Gruber, Achim D

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) rapidly and reliably quantifies gene expression levels across different experimental conditions. Selection of suitable reference genes is essential for meaningful normalization and thus correct interpretation of data. In recent years, an increasing number of avian species other than the chicken has been investigated molecularly, highlighting the need for an experimentally validated pan-avian primer set for reference genes. Here we report testing a set for 14 candidate reference genes (18S, ABL, GAPDH, GUSB, HMBS, HPRT, PGK1, RPL13, RPL19, RPS7, SDHA, TFRC, VIM, YWHAZ) on different tissues of the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus), common crane (Grus grus), white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo f. domestica), cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), Humboldt penguin (Sphenicus humboldti), ostrich (Struthio camelus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), spanning a broad range of the phylogenetic tree of birds. Primer pairs for six to 11 genes were successfully established for each of the nine species. As a proof of principle, we analyzed expression levels of 10 candidate reference genes as well as FOXP2 and the immediate early genes, EGR1 and CFOS, known to be rapidly induced by singing in the avian basal ganglia. We extracted RNA from microbiopsies of the striatal song nucleus Area X of adult male zebra finches after they had sang or remained silent. Using three different statistical algorithms, we identified five genes (18S, PGK1, RPS7, TFRC, YWHAZ) that were stably expressed within each group and also between the singing and silent conditions, establishing them as suitable reference genes. In conclusion, the newly developed pan-avian primer set allows accurate normalization and quantification of gene expression levels in multiple avian species.

  2. Walking on multiple disease-gene networks to prioritize candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering causal genes for human inherited diseases, as the primary step toward understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, requires a combined analysis of genetic and genomic data. Although bioinformatics methods have been designed to prioritize candidate genes resulting from genetic linkage analysis or association studies, the coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods is quite limited, thereby preventing the scan of causal genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method named pgWalk to prioritize candidate genes by integrating multiple phenomic and genomic data. We derive three types of phenotype similarities among 7719 diseases and nine types of functional similarities among 20327 genes. Based on a pair of phenotype and gene similarities, we construct a disease-gene network and then simulate the process that a random walker wanders on such a heterogeneous network to quantify the strength of association between a candidate gene and a query disease. A weighted version of the Fisher's method with dependent correction is adopted to integrate 27 scores obtained in this way, and a final q-value is calibrated for prioritizing candidate genes. A series of validation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the superior performance of this approach. We further show the effectiveness of this method in exome sequencing studies of autism and epileptic encephalopathies. An online service and the standalone software of pgWalk can be found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgwalk. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing protocol identifies genes involved in multi-stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the function of a particular gene under various stresses is important for engineering plants for broad-spectrum stress tolerance. Although virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been used to characterize genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance, currently available gene silencing and stress imposition methodology at the whole plant level is not suitable for high-throughput functional analyses of genes. This demands a robust and reliable methodology for characterizing genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. Results Our methodology employs VIGS-based gene silencing in leaf disks combined with simple stress imposition and effect quantification methodologies for easy and faster characterization of genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. By subjecting leaf disks from gene-silenced plants to various abiotic stresses and inoculating silenced plants with various pathogens, we show the involvement of several genes for multi-stress tolerance. In addition, we demonstrate that VIGS can be used to characterize genes involved in thermotolerance. Our results also showed the functional relevance of NtEDS1 in abiotic stress, NbRBX1 and NbCTR1 in oxidative stress; NtRAR1 and NtNPR1 in salinity stress; NbSOS1 and NbHSP101 in biotic stress; and NtEDS1, NbETR1, NbWRKY2 and NbMYC2 in thermotolerance. Conclusions In addition to widening the application of VIGS, we developed a robust, easy and high-throughput methodology for functional characterization of genes involved in multi-stress tolerance. PMID:24289810

  4. A high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing protocol identifies genes involved in multi-stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Senthil-kumar, Muthappa; Udayakumar, Makarla; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the function of a particular gene under various stresses is important for engineering plants for broad-spectrum stress tolerance. Although virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been used to characterize genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance, currently available gene silencing and stress imposition methodology at the whole plant level is not suitable for high-throughput functional analyses of genes. This demands a robust and reliable methodology for characterizing genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. Our methodology employs VIGS-based gene silencing in leaf disks combined with simple stress imposition and effect quantification methodologies for easy and faster characterization of genes involved in abiotic and multi-stress tolerance. By subjecting leaf disks from gene-silenced plants to various abiotic stresses and inoculating silenced plants with various pathogens, we show the involvement of several genes for multi-stress tolerance. In addition, we demonstrate that VIGS can be used to characterize genes involved in thermotolerance. Our results also showed the functional relevance of NtEDS1 in abiotic stress, NbRBX1 and NbCTR1 in oxidative stress; NtRAR1 and NtNPR1 in salinity stress; NbSOS1 and NbHSP101 in biotic stress; and NtEDS1, NbETR1, NbWRKY2 and NbMYC2 in thermotolerance. In addition to widening the application of VIGS, we developed a robust, easy and high-throughput methodology for functional characterization of genes involved in multi-stress tolerance.

  5. Influence of sugars and hormones on the genes involved in sucrose metabolism in maize endosperms.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; Liu, H M; Liu, Y H; Hu, Y F; Zhang, J J; Huang, Y B

    2015-03-06

    Starch is the major storage product in the endosperm of cereals. Its synthesis is closely related to sucrose metabolism. In our previous study, we found that the expression of most of the genes involved in starch synthesis might be regulated by sugars and hormones in the maize endosperm. However, little is known regarding the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism. Thus, in this study, maize endosperms were treated with different sugars and hormones and the expression of genes involved in sucrose metabolism (including synthesis, degradation, and transport) were evaluated using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that genes affected by different sugars and hormones were primarily regulated by abscisic acid. Sucrose and abscisic acid showed an additive effect on the expression of some genes. Differences in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and starch biosynthesis were observed.

  6. Identification of yeast genes involved in k homeostasis: loss of membrane traffic genes affects k uptake.

    PubMed

    Fell, Gillian L; Munson, Amanda M; Croston, Merriah A; Rosenwald, Anne G

    2011-06-01

    Using the homozygous diploid Saccharomyces deletion collection, we searched for strains with defects in K(+) homeostasis. We identified 156 (of 4653 total) strains unable to grow in the presence of hygromycin B, a phenotype previously shown to be indicative of ion defects. The most abundant group was that with deletions of genes known to encode membrane traffic regulators. Nearly 80% of these membrane traffic defective strains showed defects in uptake of the K(+) homolog, (86)Rb(+). Since Trk1, a plasma membrane protein localized to lipid microdomains, is the major K(+) influx transporter, we examined the subcellular localization and Triton-X 100 insolubility of Trk1 in 29 of the traffic mutants. However, few of these showed defects in the steady state levels of Trk1, the localization of Trk1 to the plasma membrane, or the localization of Trk1 to lipid microdomains, and most defects were mild compared to wild-type. Three inositol kinase mutants were also identified, and in contrast, loss of these genes negatively affected Trk1 protein levels. In summary, this work reveals a nexus between K(+) homeostasis and membrane traffic, which does not involve traffic of the major influx transporter, Trk1.

  7. Identification of Yeast Genes Involved in K+ Homeostasis: Loss of Membrane Traffic Genes Affects K+ Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Gillian L.; Munson, Amanda M.; Croston, Merriah A.; Rosenwald, Anne G.

    2011-01-01

    Using the homozygous diploid Saccharomyces deletion collection, we searched for strains with defects in K+ homeostasis. We identified 156 (of 4653 total) strains unable to grow in the presence of hygromycin B, a phenotype previously shown to be indicative of ion defects. The most abundant group was that with deletions of genes known to encode membrane traffic regulators. Nearly 80% of these membrane traffic defective strains showed defects in uptake of the K+ homolog, 86Rb+. Since Trk1, a plasma membrane protein localized to lipid microdomains, is the major K+ influx transporter, we examined the subcellular localization and Triton-X 100 insolubility of Trk1 in 29 of the traffic mutants. However, few of these showed defects in the steady state levels of Trk1, the localization of Trk1 to the plasma membrane, or the localization of Trk1 to lipid microdomains, and most defects were mild compared to wild-type. Three inositol kinase mutants were also identified, and in contrast, loss of these genes negatively affected Trk1 protein levels. In summary, this work reveals a nexus between K+ homeostasis and membrane traffic, which does not involve traffic of the major influx transporter, Trk1. PMID:22384317

  8. Changes in expression of genes involved in apoptosis in activated human T-cells in response to modeled microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Nancy E.; Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diana; Risin, Semyon A.; Liu, Wenbin

    2006-09-01

    Space flights result in remarkable effects on various physiological systems, including a decline in cellular immune functions. Previous studies have shown that exposure to microgravity, both true and modeled, can cause significant changes in numerous lymphocyte functions. The purpose of this study was to search for microgravity-sensitive genes, and specifically for apoptotic genes influenced by the microgravity environment and other genes related to immune response. The experiments were performed on anti-CD3 and IL-2 activated human T cells. To model microgravity conditions we have utilized the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor. Control lymphocytes were cultured in static 1g conditions. To assess gene expression we used DNA microarray chip technology. We had shown that multiple genes (approximately 3-8% of tested genes) respond to microgravity conditions by 1.5 and more fold change in expression. There is a significant variability in the response. However, a certain reproducible pattern in gene response could be identified. Among the genes showing reproducible changes in expression in modeled microgravity, several genes involved in apoptosis as well as in immune response were identified. These are IL-7 receptor, Granzyme B, Beta-3-endonexin, Apo2 ligand and STAT1. Possible functional consequences of these changes are discussed.

  9. Terbinafine resistance conferred by multiple copies of the salicylate 1-monooxygenase gene in Trichophyton rubrum.

    PubMed

    Santos, Hemelin L; Lang, Elza A S; Segato, Fernando; Rossi, Antonio; Martinez-Rossi, Nilce M

    2017-06-02

    Resistance to antifungals is a leading concern in the treatment of human mycoses. We demonstrate that the salA gene, encoding salicylate 1-monooxygenase, is involved in resistance of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum to terbinafine, one of the most effective antifungal drugs against dermatophytes. A strain with multiple copies of salA was constructed and exhibited elevated expression of salA and increased terbinafine resistance. This reflects a mechanism not yet reported in a pathogenic fungus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. RNA Binding Proteins Posttranscriptionally Regulate Genes Involved In Oncogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Cloning and characterization of HuR, a ubiquitously expressed Elav-like protein . J Biol Chem 1996, 271(14):8144-8151. 21. Meisner NC, Hackermuller J...Hauptmann S: Expression of the ELAV-like protein HuR is associated with higher tumor grade and increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human breast...SH3 domain, ankyrin repeat and pH domain 3 tumor microarray reveals 47 annotated genes up regulated in the HA-HuR overexpressing tumors as compared to

  11. Localization of multiple pleiotropic genes for lipoprotein metabolism in baboonss⃞

    PubMed Central

    Rainwater, David L.; Cox, Laura A.; Rogers, Jeffrey; VandeBerg, John L.; Mahaney, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a novel approach to identify the key loci that harbor genes influencing lipoprotein metabolism in approximately 2,000 pedigreed baboons fed various diets differing in levels of fat and cholesterol. In this study, 126 overlapping traits related to both LDL and HDL metabolism were normalized and subjected to genome-wide linkage screening. As was expected, the traits were highly, but not completely, correlated. We exploited the information in these correlated traits by focusing on those genomic regions harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL) for multiple traits, reasoning that the more influential genes would impact a larger number of traits. This study identified five major QTL clusters (each with at least two significant logarithm of the odds scores >4.7), two of which had not been previously reported in baboons. One of these mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 1p32-p34 and influenced concentrations of LDL-cholesterol on Basal and high-fat, low-cholesterol diets. The other novel QTL cluster mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 12q13.13-q14.1 and influenced LDL size properties on high-fat, low-cholesterol and high-fat, high-cholesterol, but not Basal, diets. Confirming the value of this approach, three of the QTL clusters replicated published linkage findings for the same or similar traits. PMID:19270339

  12. Analysis of the prion protein gene in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Schottlaender, Lucia; Efthymiou, Stephanie; OConnor, Emer; Meissner, Wassilios G; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a very diverse group of disorders but they share some common mechanisms such as abnormally misfolded proteins with prion-like propagation and aggregation. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most prevalent prion disease in humans. In the sporadic form of CJD the only known risk factor is the codon 129 polymorphism. Recent reports suggested that α-synuclein in multiple system atrophy (MSA) has similar pathogenic mechanisms as the prion protein. Here we present 1 Italian family with MSA and prion disease. Also, cases of concurrent MSA and prion pathology in the same individual or family suggest the possibility of molecular interaction between prion protein and α-synuclein in the process of protein accumulation and neurodegeneration, warranting further investigations. We assessed the PRNP gene by whole-exome sequencing in 264 pathologically confirmed MSA cases and 462 healthy controls to determine whether the 2 diseases share similar risk factors. We then analyzed codon 129 polymorphism by Sanger sequencing and compared with previously published results in sporadic CJD. Homozygosity at codon 129 was present in 50% of pathologically confirmed MSA cases and in 58% of normal controls (odds ratio, 0.7 (95% confidence interval of 0.5-0.9)) compared with 88.2% in sporadic CJD. Our data show that the homozygous state of position 129 in the PRNP is not a risk factor for MSA. No other variants in the PRNP gene were associated with increased risk for MSA.

  13. Multiple abiotic stimuli are integrated in the regulation of rice gene expression under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plessis, Anne; Hafemeister, Christoph; Wilkins, Olivia; Gonzaga, Zennia Jean; Meyer, Rachel Sarah; Pires, Inês; Müller, Christian; Septiningsih, Endang M; Bonneau, Richard; Purugganan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Plants rely on transcriptional dynamics to respond to multiple climatic fluctuations and contexts in nature. We analyzed the genome-wide gene expression patterns of rice (Oryza sativa) growing in rainfed and irrigated fields during two distinct tropical seasons and determined simple linear models that relate transcriptomic variation to climatic fluctuations. These models combine multiple environmental parameters to account for patterns of expression in the field of co-expressed gene clusters. We examined the similarities of our environmental models between tropical and temperate field conditions, using previously published data. We found that field type and macroclimate had broad impacts on transcriptional responses to environmental fluctuations, especially for genes involved in photosynthesis and development. Nevertheless, variation in solar radiation and temperature at the timescale of hours had reproducible effects across environmental contexts. These results provide a basis for broad-based predictive modeling of plant gene expression in the field. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08411.001 PMID:26609814

  14. Genes involved in alkane degradation in the Alcanivorax hongdengensis strain A-11-3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-04-01

    Alcanivorax hongdengensis A-11-3 is a newly identified type strain isolated from the surface water of the Malacca and Singapore Straits that can degrade a wide range of alkanes. To understand the degradation mechanism of this strain, the genes encoding alkane hydroxylases were obtained by PCR screening and shotgun sequencing of a genomic fosmid library. Six genes involved in alkane degradation were found, including alkB1, alkB2, p450-1, p450-2, p450-3 and almA. Heterogeneous expression analysis confirmed their functions as alkane oxidases in Pseudomonas putida GPo12 (pGEc47ΔB) or Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. Q-PCR revealed that the transcription of alkB1 and alkB2 was enhanced in the presence of n-alkanes C(12) to C(24); three p450 genes were up-regulated by C(8)-C(16) n-alkanes at different levels, whereas enhanced expression of almA was observed when strain A-11-3 grew with long-chain alkanes (C(24) to C(36)). In the case of branched alkanes, pristane significantly enhanced the expression of alkB1, p450-3 and almA. The six genes enable strain A-11-3 to degrade short (C(8)) to long (C(36)) alkanes that are straight or branched. The ability of A. hongdengensis A-11-3 to thrive in oil-polluted marine environments may be due to this strain's multiple systems for alkane degradation and its range of substrates.

  15. DAT1 and DRD4 genes involved in key dimensions of adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hasler, R; Salzmann, A; Bolzan, T; Zimmermann, J; Baud, P; Giannakopoulos, P; Perroud, N

    2015-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder often persisting in adulthood. Genetic studies of ADHD mainly focused on the Dopamine Transporter (DAT1) and the Dopamine Receptor 4 (DRD4) genes. Nevertheless, polymorphisms of these genes explain only a small fraction of the assigned risk, suggesting that intermediate dimensions and environmental factors should also be considered. We investigated in 77 adult ADHD subjects compared to 474 controls, how polymorphisms within the genes coding for DAT1 (40-bp VNTR in 3'UTR), the Dopamine Receptor 2 (DRD2) (rs1799732) and DRD4 (48-bp VNTR in exon 3), may modulate the expression of the disorder. By genotyping DAT1, we detected a new 9.5R allele showing a deletion of 40 bp and also an insertion of 19 bp compared to the 10R allele. This novel allele was found to be significantly protective for ADHD (p < 0.0001). Another significant difference was found in the distribution of DRD4 48-bp VNTR 6R allele when comparing patients and controls (p = 0.0007). In addition significant results were also found for DAT1 9.5R allele, which was associated with impulsiveness (p = 1.98 × 10(-4)) and trait anger scores (p = 7.66 × 10(-4)). Moreover, impulsiveness scores were partly modulated by an interaction between the DRD4 48-bp VNTR 6R allele and childhood maltreatment (p = 0.01), however, this result did not resist correction for multiple comparisons. Altogether, our results show the putative involvement of DAT1 and DRD4 genes in the aetiology of ADHD with a main role in modulation of key dimensions of the disorder.

  16. The involvement of multiple caregivers in cognitive-behavior therapy for anxiety in persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Paukert, Amber; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia A.; Snow, A. Lynn; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy L.; Teri, Linda; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Peaceful Mind, a cognitive-behavioral therapy for treating anxiety in persons with dementia, is a promising new treatment currently under investigation. This article reports results of our examination of a modification of the treatment protocol in two cases that included multiple caregivers in treating two persons with dementia. Method Two case presentations of the benefits and challenges of including multiple caregivers in treatment are discussed. Treatment outcome data for these cases were collected as part of a larger investigation of Peaceful Mind. Results The involvement of multiple collaterals resulted in several benefits, including increased family communication, as well as increased opportunities for the practice of new skills. These cases have also presented unique challenges requiring alterations in therapy structure and attention to issues of family conflict. Conclusions Including multiple collaterals in cognitive-behavioral therapy for treating anxiety in persons with dementia is feasible and may be beneficial in maximizing treatment gains and increasing the family’s investment in therapy. PMID:21491216

  17. Evidence suggesting possible SCA1 gene involvement in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, S.R.; Wange, S.; Sun, C.

    1994-09-01

    Several findings suggest a possible role for the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p in some cases of schizophrenia. First, linkage analyses in Irish pedigrees provided LOD scores up to 3.0 for one model tested using microsatellites closely linked to SCA1. Reanalysis of these data using affected sibpair methods yielded a significant result (p = 0.01) for one marker. An attempt to replicate this linkage finding was made using 44 NIMH families (206 individuals, 80 affected) and 12 Utah families (120 individuals, 49 affected). LOD scores were negative in these new families, even allowing for heterogeneity, as were results using affected sibpair methods. However, one Utah family provided a LOD score of 1.3. We also screened the SCA1 trinucleotide repeat to search for expansions characteristic of this disorder in these families and in 38 additional unrelated schizophrenics. We found 1 schizophrenic with 41 repeats, which is substantially larger than the maximum size of 36 repeats observed in previous studies of several hundred controls. We are now assessing whether the distribution of SCA1 repeats differs significantly in schizophrenia versus controls. Recent reports suggest possible anticipation in schizophrenia (also characteristic of SCA1) and a few cases of psychiatric symptoms suggesting schizophrenia have been observed in the highly related disorder DRPLA (SCA2), which is also based on trinucleotide repeat expansion. These findings suggest that further investigations of this gene and chromosome region may be a priority.

  18. Involvement of PTCH gene in various noninflammatory cysts.

    PubMed

    Levanat, S; Pavelić, B; Crnić, I; Oresković, S; Manojlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Constitutional hemizygous inactivation of PTCH, the Shh signaling pathway gene that moderates the signal, manifests itself as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome or Gorlin syndrome, a condition variably characterized by a number of developmental disorders and malformations, and by predisposition to some malignancies, basal cell carcinoma in particular. Loss of heterozygosity for the PTCH region was found several years ago in the epithelial lining of odontogenic keratocysts, the cyst type with highly increased incidence in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. This finding confirmed the expectations that the gene responsible for the syndrome would have a decisive role in the genesis of these cysts even when they are not syndrome related. Suggestive temporal distribution of Shh signaling, recently observed during tooth development, lead us to investigate PTCH association with dentigerous cysts, the other major noninflammatory cyst of odontogenic origin. We report here that PTCH appears to be inactivated in dentigerous cysts, suggesting that it is responsible for their genesis as well. More generally, if our similar observations of incomplete heterozygosity in this region for dermoid cysts can be interpreted as loss of heterozygosity, PTCH alterations may prove to be a necessary, and perhaps the initiating event, in formation and growth of various noninflammatory cysts. This would be consistent with our view that local PTCH inactivation can, under favorable circumstances, lead to persistent though not by itself truly aggressive cell proliferation.

  19. Lung Postmortem Autopsy Revealing Extramedullary Involvement in Multiple Myeloma Causing Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ravinet, Aurélie; Perbet, Sébastien; Guièze, Romain; Guérin, Renaud; Gayraud, Guillaume; Aliane, Jugurtha; Tremblay, Aymeric; Pascal, Julien; Ledoux, Albane; Chaleteix, Carine; Dechelotte, Pierre; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Constantin, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement with multiple myeloma is rare. We report the case of a 61-year-old man with past medical history of chronic respiratory failure with emphysema, and a known multiple myeloma (Durie and Salmon stage III B and t(4;14) translocation). Six months after diagnosis and first line of treatment, he presented acute dyspnea with interstitial lung disease. Computed tomography showed severe bullous emphysema and diffuse, patchy, multifocal infiltrations bilaterally with nodular character, small bilateral pleural effusions, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and a known lytic lesion of the 12th vertebra. He was treated with piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin, oseltamivir, and methylprednisolone. Finally, outcome was unfavourable. Postmortem analysis revealed diffuse and nodular infracentimetric infiltration of the lung parenchyma by neoplastic plasma cells. Physicians should be aware that acute respiratory distress syndrome not responding to treatment of common causes could be a manifestation of the disease, even with negative BAL or biopsy and could be promptly treated with salvage therapy. PMID:25165587

  20. Research Ethics Committees and the Benefits of Involving People with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxall, Kathy; Ralph, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in service user involvement in research, such involvement rarely extends to people with profound and multiple learning disabilities. New developments in visual methodologies offer the potential for people with profound and multiple learning disabilities to be included in research. At the same time, however,…

  1. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Results Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase) and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase), suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. Conclusions In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster’s stress and/or immune responses. PMID:22974230

  2. Characterization of genes involved in ceramide metabolism in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Timmins-Schiffman, Emma; Roberts, Steven

    2012-09-13

    The lipid signaling molecule, ceramide, is a key component of the vertebrate stress response, however, there is limited information concerning its role in invertebrate species. In order to identify genes involved in ceramide metabolism in bivalve molluscs, Pacific oyster genomic resources were examined for genes associated with ceramide metabolism and signaling. Several genes were identified including full-length sequences characterized for serine palmitoyltransferase-1, 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, acid ceramidase, and ceramide glucosyltransferase. Genes involved in ceramide synthesis and metabolism are conserved across taxa in both form and function. Expression analysis as assessed by quantitative PCR indicated all genes were expressed at high levels in gill tissue. The role of the ceramide pathway genes in the invertebrate stress response was also explored by measuring expression levels in adult oysters exposed to Vibrio vulnificus. Two genes demonstrated increased expression during the bacterial challenge: a gene involved in hydrolytic breakdown of ceramide (acid ceramidase) and a gene involved in de novo generation of ceramide (3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase), suggesting a possible role of ceramide in the invertebrate stress and immune responses. In silico and laboratory results support that Pacific oysters have the basic components of the ceramide metabolism pathway. These results also indicate that ceramide may have analogous functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. The gene expression pattern of acid ceramidase and 3-kethodihydrosphingosine reductase in response to bacterial exposure especially supports that ceramide and sphingolipid metabolism may be involved in the oyster's stress and/or immune responses.

  3. Human T-cell receptor v{beta} gene polymorphism and multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Charmley, P.; Birchfield, R.I.; Concannon, P.

    1995-04-01

    Population-based genetic associations have been reported between RFLPs detected with probes corresponding to the genes encoding the {beta} chain of the T-cell receptor for antigen (RCRB) and a variety of autoimmune disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis (MS), these studies have localized a putative disease-associated gene to a region of {approximately}110 kb in length, located within the TCRB locus. In the current study, all 14 known TCRBV (variable region) genes within the region of localization were mapped and identified. The nucleotide sequences of these genes were determined in a panel of six MS patients and six healthy controls, who were human-leukocyte antigen and TCRB-RFLP haplotype matched. Nine of the 14 TCRBV genes studied showed evidence of polymorphism. PCR-based assays for each of these polymorphic genes were developed, and allele and genotype frequencies were determined in a panel of DNA samples from 48 MS patients and 60 control individuals. No significant differences in allele, genotype, or phenotype frequencies were observed between the MS patients and controls for any of the 14 TCRBV-gene polymorphisms studied. In light of the extensive linkage disequilibrium across the region studied, the saturating numbers of polymorphisms examined, and the direct sequence analysis of all BV genes in the region, these results suggest that it is unlikely that germ-line polymorphism in the TCRBV locus makes a major contribution to MS susceptibility. The TCRBV coding region-specific markers generated in these studies, as well as the approach of testing for associations with specific functionally relevant polymorphic sites within individual BV genes, should be useful in the evaluation of the many reported disease associations involving the human TCRB region. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  5. Multiple Evolutionary Events Involved in Maintaining Homologs of Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Li, Jing; Sun, Jin-Long; Ma, Xian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Ting; Berkey, Robert; Yang, Hui; Niu, Ying-Ze; Fan, Jing; Li, Yan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 (RPW8) locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are four Homologous to RPW8s (BrHRs) in Brassica rapa and three in Brassica oleracea (BoHRs). Brassica napus (Bn) is derived from diploidization of a hybrid between B. rapa and B. oleracea, thus should have seven homologs of RPW8 (BnHRs). It is unclear whether these genes are still maintained or lost in B. napus after diploidization and how they might have been evolved. Here, we reported the identification and sequence polymorphisms of BnHRs from a set of B. napus accessions. Our data indicated that while the BoHR copy from B. oleracea is highly conserved, the BrHR copy from B. rapa is relatively variable in the B. napus genome owing to multiple evolutionary events, such as gene loss, point mutation, insertion, deletion, and intragenic recombination. Given the overall high sequence homology of BnHR genes, it is not surprising that both intragenic recombination between two orthologs and two paralogs were detected in B. napus, which may explain the loss of BoHR genes in some B. napus accessions. When ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis, a C-terminally truncated version of BnHRa and BnHRb, as well as the full length BnHRd fused with YFP at their C-termini could trigger cell death in the absence of pathogens and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew disease. Moreover, subcellular localization analysis showed that both BnHRa-YFP and BnHRb-YFP were mainly localized to the extra-haustorial membrane encasing the haustorium of powdery mildew. Taken together, our data suggest that the duplicated BnHR genes might have been subjected to differential selection and at least some may play a role in defense and could serve as resistance resource in engineering disease-resistant plants.

  6. Multiple Evolutionary Events Involved in Maintaining Homologs of Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Li, Jing; Sun, Jin-Long; Ma, Xian-Feng; Wang, Ting-Ting; Berkey, Robert; Yang, Hui; Niu, Ying-Ze; Fan, Jing; Li, Yan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The Resistance to Powdery Mildew 8 (RPW8) locus confers broad-spectrum resistance to powdery mildew in Arabidopsis thaliana. There are four Homologous to RPW8s (BrHRs) in Brassica rapa and three in Brassica oleracea (BoHRs). Brassica napus (Bn) is derived from diploidization of a hybrid between B. rapa and B. oleracea, thus should have seven homologs of RPW8 (BnHRs). It is unclear whether these genes are still maintained or lost in B. napus after diploidization and how they might have been evolved. Here, we reported the identification and sequence polymorphisms of BnHRs from a set of B. napus accessions. Our data indicated that while the BoHR copy from B. oleracea is highly conserved, the BrHR copy from B. rapa is relatively variable in the B. napus genome owing to multiple evolutionary events, such as gene loss, point mutation, insertion, deletion, and intragenic recombination. Given the overall high sequence homology of BnHR genes, it is not surprising that both intragenic recombination between two orthologs and two paralogs were detected in B. napus, which may explain the loss of BoHR genes in some B. napus accessions. When ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis, a C-terminally truncated version of BnHRa and BnHRb, as well as the full length BnHRd fused with YFP at their C-termini could trigger cell death in the absence of pathogens and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew disease. Moreover, subcellular localization analysis showed that both BnHRa-YFP and BnHRb-YFP were mainly localized to the extra-haustorial membrane encasing the haustorium of powdery mildew. Taken together, our data suggest that the duplicated BnHR genes might have been subjected to differential selection and at least some may play a role in defense and could serve as resistance resource in engineering disease-resistant plants. PMID:27493652

  7. Morphogenesis of the C. elegans Intestine Involves Axon Guidance Genes.

    PubMed

    Asan, Alparsan; Raiders, Stephan A; Priess, James R

    2016-04-01

    Genetic and molecular studies have provided considerable insight into how various tissue progenitors are specified in early embryogenesis, but much less is known about how those progenitors create three-dimensional tissues and organs. The C. elegans intestine provides a simple system for studying how a single progenitor, the E blastomere, builds an epithelial tube of 20 cells. As the E descendants divide, they form a primordium that transitions between different shapes over time. We used cell contours, traced from confocal optical z-stacks, to build a 3D graphic reconstruction of intestine development. The reconstruction revealed several new aspects of morphogenesis that extend and clarify previous observations. The first 8 E descendants form a plane of four right cells and four left cells; the plane arises through oriented cell divisions and VANG-1/Van Gogh-dependent repositioning of any non-planar cells. LIN-12/Notch signaling affects the left cells in the E8 primordium, and initiates later asymmetry in cell packing. The next few stages involve cell repositioning and intercalation events that shuttle cells to their final positions, like shifting blocks in a Rubik's cube. Repositioning involves breaking and replacing specific adhesive contacts, and some of these events involve EFN-4/Ephrin, MAB-20/semaphorin-2a, and SAX-3/Robo. Once cells in the primordium align along a common axis and in the correct order, cells at the anterior end rotate clockwise around the axis of the intestine. The anterior rotation appears to align segments of the developing lumen into a continuous structure, and requires the secreted ligand UNC-6/netrin, the receptor UNC-40/DCC, and an interacting protein called MADD-2. Previous studies showed that rotation requires a second round of LIN-12/Notch signaling in cells on the right side of the primordium, and we show that MADD-2-GFP appears to be downregulated in those cells.

  8. Morphogenesis of the C. elegans Intestine Involves Axon Guidance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Asan, Alparsan; Raiders, Stephan A.; Priess, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and molecular studies have provided considerable insight into how various tissue progenitors are specified in early embryogenesis, but much less is known about how those progenitors create three-dimensional tissues and organs. The C. elegans intestine provides a simple system for studying how a single progenitor, the E blastomere, builds an epithelial tube of 20 cells. As the E descendants divide, they form a primordium that transitions between different shapes over time. We used cell contours, traced from confocal optical z-stacks, to build a 3D graphic reconstruction of intestine development. The reconstruction revealed several new aspects of morphogenesis that extend and clarify previous observations. The first 8 E descendants form a plane of four right cells and four left cells; the plane arises through oriented cell divisions and VANG-1/Van Gogh-dependent repositioning of any non-planar cells. LIN-12/Notch signaling affects the left cells in the E8 primordium, and initiates later asymmetry in cell packing. The next few stages involve cell repositioning and intercalation events that shuttle cells to their final positions, like shifting blocks in a Rubik’s cube. Repositioning involves breaking and replacing specific adhesive contacts, and some of these events involve EFN-4/Ephrin, MAB-20/semaphorin-2a, and SAX-3/Robo. Once cells in the primordium align along a common axis and in the correct order, cells at the anterior end rotate clockwise around the axis of the intestine. The anterior rotation appears to align segments of the developing lumen into a continuous structure, and requires the secreted ligand UNC-6/netrin, the receptor UNC-40/DCC, and an interacting protein called MADD-2. Previous studies showed that rotation requires a second round of LIN-12/Notch signaling in cells on the right side of the primordium, and we show that MADD-2-GFP appears to be downregulated in those cells. PMID:27035721

  9. Network-based analysis of differentially expressed genes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood reveals new candidate genes for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Alighiarloo, Nahid; Taghizadeh, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyyed Mohammad; Namaki, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background The involvement of multiple genes and missing heritability, which are dominant in complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), entail using network biology to better elucidate their molecular basis and genetic factors. We therefore aimed to integrate interactome (protein–protein interaction (PPI)) and transcriptomes data to construct and analyze PPI networks for MS disease. Methods Gene expression profiles in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) samples from MS patients, sampled in relapse or remission and controls, were analyzed. Differentially expressed genes which determined only in CSF (MS vs. control) and PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) separately integrated with PPI data to construct the Query-Query PPI (QQPPI) networks. The networks were further analyzed to investigate more central genes, functional modules and complexes involved in MS progression. Results The networks were analyzed and high centrality genes were identified. Exploration of functional modules and complexes showed that the majority of high centrality genes incorporated in biological pathways driving MS pathogenesis. Proteasome and spliceosome were also noticeable in enriched pathways in PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) which were identified by both modularity and clique analyses. Finally, STK4, RB1, CDKN1A, CDK1, RAC1, EZH2, SDCBP genes in CSF (MS vs. control) and CDC37, MAP3K3, MYC genes in PBMCs (relapse vs. remission) were identified as potential candidate genes for MS, which were the more central genes involved in biological pathways. Discussion This study showed that network-based analysis could explicate the complex interplay between biological processes underlying MS. Furthermore, an experimental validation of candidate genes can lead to identification of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:28028462

  10. Identification of Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Involved in Stromal-Epithelial Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    epithelial cross talk. We have now genotyped 2138 samples for 1536 tagging, ns and miRNA binding site SNPs in 174 genes. Following Quality Control...candidate genes highlighted by our analysis of cross talk between fibroblast and epithelial elements of ovarian tumors, as well as a set of tagging SNPs...candidate genes involved in cross talk The original application proposed genotyping of candidate genes based on a series of in vitro experiments

  11. Identification and characterization of genes involved in naphthalene degradation in Rhodococcus opacus R7.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Terreni, Paola; Masi, Gianmarco; Botti, Silvia; De Ferra, Francesca; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    2010-06-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a naphthalene-degrading microorganism which is also able to grow on o-xylene. This work describes the isolation and analysis of two new genomic regions in which genes involved in naphthalene (nar gene cluster) and salicylate (gen gene cluster) degradation are located. In the nar gene cluster we found: two genes encoding the large (narAa) and the small (narAb) components of the naphthalene dioxygenase, three genes (rub1, rub2, rub1bis) encoding three rubredoxins, an orf (orf7) associated to the complex encoding a protein of unknown function, two regulatory genes (narR1, narR2), a gene (narB) encoding the naphthalene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase and six orfs (orf1, orf2, orf3, orf4, orf5, orf6) encoding proteins of unknown function. In the gen gene cluster, we found the following genes: two genes encoding the salicylate CoA ligase and the salicylate CoA synthetase (genA and genB), respectively, a gene (genC) encoding a salicylate hydroxylase, a gene (genH) encoding a gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, a gene (genI) encoding a 3-maleylpyruvate isomerase, and a gene (genL) encoding a protein of unknown function. The transcription of some genes of R. opacus R7 strain grown on different substrates was also investigated to evaluate the expression of the two gene clusters after cDNA preparations.

  12. Genes involved in stress response and alcohol use among high-risk African American youth

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Neeru; Aliev, Fazil; Latendresse, Shawn J.; Kertes, Darlene A.; Bolland, John; Byck, Gayle R.; Mustanski, Brian; Salvatore, Jessica E.; Dick, Danielle M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors influence substance use behaviors in youth. One of the known environmental risk factors is exposure to life stressors. The aim of this project is to study the interaction between NR3C1 and CRHBP, genes thought to be involved in stress pathways, exposure to stressful life events, and adolescent alcohol use/misuse. Methods The sample included 541 African American individuals (ages 13–18) from the Genes, Environment, and Neighborhood Initiative, a subset of the Mobile Youth Survey sample from whom DNA and more extensive phenotypic data were collected. Participants were selected from high poverty neighborhoods in Mobile, Alabama with potential exposure to a variety of extreme life stressors. Results A measure of stressful life events was significantly predictive of alcohol use/misuse. In addition, this association was significantly dependent upon the number of putative risk variants at rs1715749, a SNP in CRHBP (p≤0.006). There was no significant interaction between NR3C1 and stressful life events with respect to alcohol use/misuse, after taking into account multiple testing. Conclusions These findings suggest that CRHBP variants are potentially relevant for adolescent alcohol use/misuse among African American youth populations being reared within the context of stressful life events, and warrants replication. PMID:26751645

  13. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Oegema, Renske; Cushion, Thomas D.; Phelps, Ian G.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Dempsey, Jennifer C.; Collins, Sarah; Mullins, Jonathan G.L.; Dudding, Tracy; Gill, Harinder; Green, Andrew J.; Dobyns, William B.; Ishak, Gisele E.; Rees, Mark I.; Doherty, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in only 1–13%. We identified patients with a highly characteristic cerebellar dysplasia but without lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria typically associated with tubulin mutations. Remarkably, in seven of nine patients (78%), targeted sequencing revealed mutations in three different tubulin genes (TUBA1A, TUBB2B and TUBB3), occurring de novo or inherited from a mosaic parent. Careful re-review of the cortical phenotype on brain imaging revealed only an irregular pattern of gyri and sulci, for which we propose the term tubulinopathy-related dysgyria. Basal ganglia (100%) and brainstem dysplasia (80%) were common features. On the basis of in silico structural predictions, the mutations affect amino acids in diverse regions of the alpha-/beta-tubulin heterodimer, including the nucleotide binding pocket. Cell-based assays of tubulin dynamics reveal various effects of the mutations on incorporation into microtubules: TUBB3 p.Glu288Lys and p.Pro357Leu do not incorporate into microtubules at all, whereas TUBB2B p.Gly13Ala shows reduced incorporation and TUBA1A p.Arg214His incorporates fully, but at a slower rate than wild-type. The broad range of effects on microtubule incorporation is at odds with the highly stereotypical clinical phenotype, supporting differential roles for the three tubulin genes involved. Identifying this highly characteristic phenotype is important due to the low recurrence risk compared with the other (recessive) cerebellar dysplasias and the apparent lack of non-neurological medical issues. PMID:26130693

  14. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  15. Novel essential gene Involved in 16S rRNA processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-27

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is a complex process mediated by many factors. While its transcription proceeds, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) folds itself into a characteristic three-dimensional structure through interaction with ribosomal proteins, during which its ends are processed. Here, we show that the essential protein YqgF, a RuvC family protein with an RNase-H-like motif, is involved in the processing of pre-16S rRNA during ribosome maturation. Indeed, pre-16S rRNA accumulated in cells of a temperature-sensitive yqgF mutant (yqgF(ts)) cultured at a non-permissive temperature. In addition, purified YqgF was shown to process the 5' end of pre-16S rRNA within 70S ribosomes in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis of the total proteins in the yqgF(ts) mutant cells showed that the expression of genes containing multiple Shine-Dalgarno-like sequences was observed to be lower than in wild type. These results are interpreted to indicate that YqgF is involved in a novel enzymic activity necessary for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, thereby affecting elongation of translation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression profiling reveals functionally redundant multiple-copy genes related to zinc, iron and cadmium responses in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Li, Jimeng; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu; Aarts, Mark G M; Wu, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Genes underlying environmental adaptability tend to be over-retained in polyploid plant species. Zinc deficiency (ZnD) and iron deficiency (FeD), excess Zn (ZnE) and cadmium exposure (CdE) are major environmental problems for crop cultivation, but little is known about the differential expression of duplicated genes upon these stress conditions. Applying Tag-Seq technology to leaves of Brassica rapa grown under FeD, ZnD, ZnE or CdE conditions, with normal conditions as a control, we examined global gene expression changes and compared the expression patterns of multiple paralogs. We identified 812, 543, 331 and 447 differentially expressed genes under FeD, ZnD, ZnE and CdE conditions, respectively, in B. rapa leaves. Genes involved in regulatory networks centered on the transcription factors bHLH038 or bHLH100 were differentially expressed under (ZnE-induced) FeD. Further analysis revealed that genes associated with Zn, Fe and Cd responses tended to be over-retained in the B. rapa genome. Most of these multiple-copy genes showed the same direction of expression change under stress conditions. We conclude that the duplicated genes involved in trace element responses in B. rapa are functionally redundant, making the regulatory network more complex in B. rapa than in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  17. The Development of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Involves Multiple Response Stages and Multiple Proteins ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Ramkissoon, Kevin; Doolittle, Janet; Clark, Martha; Khatun, Jainab; Secrest, Ashley; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Giddings, Morgan C.

    2010-01-01

    Microbes have developed resistance to nearly every antibiotic, yet the steps leading to drug resistance remain unclear. Here we report a multistage process by which Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquires drug resistance following exposure to ciprofloxacin at levels ranging from 0.5× to 8× the initial MIC. In stage I, susceptible cells are killed en masse by the exposure. In stage II, a small, slow to nongrowing population survives antibiotic exposure that does not exhibit significantly increased resistance according to the MIC measure. In stage III, exhibited at 0.5× to 4× the MIC, a growing population emerges to reconstitute the population, and these cells display heritable increases in drug resistance of up to 50 times the original level. We studied the stage III cells by proteomic methods to uncover differences in the regulatory pathways that are involved in this phenotype, revealing upregulation of phosphorylation on two proteins, succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) and methylmalonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (MMSADH), and also revealing upregulation of a highly conserved protein of unknown function. Transposon disruption in the encoding genes for each of these targets substantially dampened the ability of cells to develop the stage III phenotype. Considering these results in combination with computational models of resistance and genomic sequencing results, we postulate that stage III heritable resistance develops from a combination of both genomic mutations and modulation of one or more preexisting cellular pathways. PMID:20696867

  18. Multiple Service System Involvement and Later Offending Behavior: Implications for Prevention and Early Intervention.

    PubMed

    Bright, Charlotte Lyn; Jonson-Reid, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    We investigated patterns of childhood and adolescent experiences that correspond to later justice system entry, including persistence into adulthood, and explored whether timing of potential supports to the child or onset of family poverty, according to developmental periods and gender, would distinguish among latent classes. We constructed a database containing records for 8587 youths from a Midwestern metropolitan region, born between 1982 and 1991, with outcomes. We used data from multiple publicly funded systems (child welfare, income maintenance, juvenile and criminal justice, mental health, Medicaid, vital statistics). We applied a latent class analysis and interpreted a 7-class model. Classes with higher rates of offending persisting into adulthood were characterized by involvement with multiple publicly funded systems in childhood and adolescence, with the exception of 1 less-urban, predominantly female class that had similarly high system involvement coupled with lower rates of offending. Poverty and maltreatment appear to play a critical role in offending trajectories. Identifying risk factors that cluster together may help program and intervention staff best target those most in need of more intensive intervention.

  19. Heat shock protein 70-hom gene polymorphism and protein expression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Boiocchi, C; Monti, M C; Osera, C; Mallucci, G; Pistono, C; Ferraro, O E; Nosari, G; Romani, A; Cuccia, M; Govoni, S; Pascale, A; Montomoli, C; Bergamaschi, R

    2016-09-15

    Immune-mediated and neurodegenerative mechanisms are involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). Growing evidences highlight the role of HSP70 genes in the susceptibility of some neurological diseases. In this explorative study we analyzed a polymorphism (i.e. HSP70-hom rs2227956) of the gene HSPA1L, which encodes for the protein hsp70-hom. We sequenced the polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in 191 MS patients and 365 healthy controls. The hsp70-hom protein expression was quantified by western blotting. We reported a strong association between rs2227956 polymorphism and MS risk, which is independent from the association with HSP70-2 rs1061581, and a significant link between hsp70-hom protein expression and MS severity.

  20. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunctions. Furthermore, reported cases of the acute multiple cranial neuropathies show electrophysiological abnormalities compatible with the typical Guillain-Barre syndromes (GBS). We recently experienced a patient with a benign infectious disease who subsequently developed symptoms of variant GBS. Here, we describe the case of a 48-year-old male patient who developed multiple symptoms of cranial neuropathy without limb weakness. His laboratory findings showed a positive result for anti-GQ1b IgG antibody. As compared with previously described variants of GBS, the patient exhibited widespread cranial neuropathy, which included neuropathies of cranial nerves III-XII, without limb involvement or ataxia. PMID:24236266

  1. Acceleration of multiple solution of a boundary value problem involving a linear algebraic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, Talgat R.; Kuksenko, Sergey P.; Surovtsev, Roman S.

    2016-06-01

    Multiple solution of a boundary value problem that involves a linear algebraic system is considered. New approach to acceleration of the solution is proposed. The approach uses the structure of the linear system matrix. Particularly, location of entries in the right columns and low rows of the matrix, which undergo variation due to the computing in the range of parameters, is used to apply block LU decomposition. Application of the approach is considered on the example of multiple computing of the capacitance matrix by method of moments used in numerical electromagnetics. Expressions for analytic estimation of the acceleration are presented. Results of the numerical experiments for solution of 100 linear systems with matrix orders of 1000, 2000, 3000 and different relations of variated and constant entries of the matrix show that block LU decomposition can be effective for multiple solution of linear systems. The speed up compared to pointwise LU factorization increases (up to 15) for larger number and order of considered systems with lower number of variated entries.

  2. Permethrin Induction of Multiple Cytochrome P450 Genes in Insecticide Resistant Mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Youhui; Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Gao, Xiwu; Liu, Nannan

    2013-01-01

    The expression of some insect P450 genes can be induced by both exogenous and endogenous compounds and there is evidence to suggest that multiple constitutively overexpressed P450 genes are co-responsible for the development of resistance to permethrin in resistant mosquitoes. This study characterized the permethrin induction profiles of P450 genes known to be constitutively overexpressed in resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. The gene expression in 7 of the 19 P450 genes CYP325K3v1, CYP4D42v2, CYP9J45, (CYP) CPIJ000926, CYP325G4, CYP4C38, CYP4H40 in the HAmCqG8 strain, increased more than 2-fold after exposure to permethrin at an LC50 concentration (10 ppm) compared to their acetone treated counterpart; no significant differences in the expression of these P450 genes in susceptible S-Lab mosquitoes were observed after permethrin treatment. Eleven of the fourteen P450 genes overexpressed in the MAmCqG6 strain, CYP9M10, CYP6Z12, CYP9J33, CYP9J43, CYP9J34, CYP306A1, CYP6Z15, CYP9J45, CYPPAL1, CYP4C52v1, CYP9J39, were also induced more than doubled after exposure to an LC50 (0.7 ppm) dose of permethrin. No significant induction in P450 gene expression was observed in the susceptible S-Lab mosquitoes after permethrin treatment except for CYP6Z15 and CYP9J39, suggesting that permethrin induction of these two P450 genes are common to both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes while the induction of the others are specific to insecticide resistant mosquitoes. These results demonstrate that multiple P450 genes are co-up-regulated in insecticide resistant mosquitoes through both constitutive overexpression and induction mechanisms, providing additional support for their involvement in the detoxification of insecticides and the development of insecticide resistance. PMID:24155662

  3. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  4. The thyroxine inactivating gene, type III deiodinase, suppresses multiple signaling centers in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi Prakash; Dhakshinamoorthy, Ranjani; Jaiswal, Pundrik; Schmidt, Stefanie; Thewes, Sascha; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2014-12-15

    Thyroxine deiodinases, the enzymes that regulate thyroxine metabolism, are essential for vertebrate growth and development. In the genome of Dictyostelium discoideum, a single intronless gene (dio3) encoding type III thyroxine 5' deiodinase is present. The amino acid sequence of D. discoideum Dio3 shares 37% identity with human T4 deiodinase and is a member of the thioredoxin reductase superfamily. dio3 is expressed throughout growth and development and by generating a knockout of dio3, we have examined the role of thyroxine 5' deiodinase in D. discoideum. dio3(-) had multiple defects that affected growth, timing of development, aggregate size, cell streaming, and cell-type differentiation. A prominent phenotype of dio3(-) was the breaking of late aggregates into small signaling centers, each forming a fruiting body of its own. cAMP levels, its relay, photo- and chemo-taxis were also defective in dio3(-). Quantitative RT-PCR analyses suggested that expression levels of genes encoding adenylyl cyclase A (acaA), cAMP-receptor A (carA) and cAMP-phosphodiesterases were reduced. There was a significant reduction in the expression of CadA and CsaA, which are involved in cell-cell adhesion. The dio3(-) slugs had prestalk identity, with pronounced prestalk marker ecmA expression. Thus, Dio3 seems to have roles in mediating cAMP synthesis/relay, cell-cell adhesion and slug patterning. The phenotype of dio3(-) suggests that Dio3 may prevent the formation of multiple signaling centers during D. discoideum development. This is the first report of a gene involved in thyroxine metabolism that is also involved in growth and development in a lower eukaryote.

  5. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context. PMID:27733850

  6. New Genes Involved in Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ramon; Morales, Pilar; Tronchoni, Jordi; Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Vaudano, Enrico; Quirós, Manuel; Novo, Maite; Torres-Pérez, Rafael; Valero, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to changes in osmolarity is fundamental for the survival of living cells, and has implications in food and industrial biotechnology. It has been extensively studied in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where the Hog1 stress activated protein kinase was discovered about 20 years ago. Hog1 is the core of the intracellular signaling pathway that governs the adaptive response to osmotic stress in this species. The main endpoint of this program is synthesis and intracellular retention of glycerol, as a compatible osmolyte. Despite many details of the signaling pathways and yeast responses to osmotic challenges have already been described, genome-wide approaches are contributing to refine our knowledge of yeast adaptation to hypertonic media. In this work, we used a quantitative fitness analysis approach in order to deepen our understanding of the interplay between yeast cells and the osmotic environment. Genetic requirements for proper growth under osmotic stress showed both common and specific features when hypertonic conditions were induced by either glucose or sorbitol. Tolerance to high-glucose content requires mitochondrial function, while defective protein targeting to peroxisome, GID-complex function (involved in negative regulation of gluconeogenesis), or chromatin dynamics, result in poor survival to sorbitol-induced osmotic stress. On the other side, the competitive disadvantage of yeast strains defective in the endomembrane system is relieved by hypertonic conditions. This finding points to the Golgi-endosome system as one of the main cell components negatively affected by hyperosmolarity. Most of the biological processes highlighted in this analysis had not been previously related to osmotic stress but are probably relevant in an ecological and evolutionary context.

  7. Clinical profile of kidney involvement preceding diagnosis of multiple myeloma; a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Balwani, Manish R; Gumber, Manoj R.; Shah, Pankaj R.; Kute, Vivek B.; Patel, Himanshu V.; Engineer, Divyesh P.; Gera, Dinesh N; Godhani, Umesh; Gautam, Rajesh Singh; Trivedi, Hargovind L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The kidneys are involved in significant number of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who can present with acute or chronic renal failure, nephritic syndrome, non-nephrotic proteinuria or tubular function defects. Objectives: To assess the clinical profile of kidney involvement preceding diagnosis of multiple myeloma Patients and Methods: Renal involvement in 29 cases with MM admitted over an 18-month period to our tertiary care center was retrospectively examined. Diagnosis of MM was confirmed by two or more of the following four features: lytic bone lesions, serum or urine monoclonal peak, Bence-Jones proteinuria, and greater than 20% plasma cells in bone marrow. Results: Renal disease was present in all patients before MM was diagnosed. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was the most common precipitating factor for acute kidney injury (AKI). All 29 patients received combination chemotherapy of bortezomib, dexamethasone and thalidomide. More than half of the total number of patients did not complete chemotherapy because of death or lost to follow-up. Twenty-two of 29 patients required hemodialysis support. AKI was the most common renal presentation of MM. Four patients with AKI had complete renal recovery. Eleven patients who required hemodialysis support initially later on recovered to non-dialyzable range of renal failure. Seven patients became hemodialysis dependent. Twelve patients died from infection, uremia or hyperkalemia. Nine patients lost to follow up. Remission of MM was seen in 8 patients who completed chemotherapy. Conclusion: In our study AKI is the most common renal presentation preceding the diagnosis of MM. Reversal of renal function was achieved with chemotherapy and high flux hemodialysis in few cases. PMID:28197511

  8. The multiple myeloma–associated MMSET gene contributes to cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth, and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Garay, Joseph P.; Gustin, John P.; Wang, Qiuju; Arceci, Robert J.; Matsui, William

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematologic malignancy characterized by recurrent chromosomal translocations. Patients with t(4;14)(p16;q32) are the worst prognostic subgroup in MM, although the basis for this poor prognosis is unknown. The t(4;14) is unusual in that it involves 2 potential target genes: fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and multiple myeloma SET domain (MMSET). MMSET is universally overexpressed in t(4;14) MM, whereas FGFR3 expression is lost in one-third of cases. Nonetheless, the role of MMSET in t(4;14) MM has remained unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for MMSET in t(4;14) MM cells. Down-regulation of MMSET expression in MM cell lines by RNA interference and by selective disruption of the translocated MMSET allele using gene targeting dramatically reduced colony formation in methylcellulose but had only modest effects in liquid culture. In addition, MMSET knockdown led to cell-cycle arrest of adherent MM cells and reduced the ability of MM cells to adhere to extracellular matrix. Finally, MMSET knockdown and knockout reduced tumor formation by MM xenografts. These results provide the first direct evidence that MMSET plays a significant role in t(4;14) MM and suggest that therapies targeting this gene could impact this particular subset of poor-prognosis patients. PMID:17942756

  9. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  10. Astrocyte elevated gene-1: recent insights into a novel gene involved in tumor progression, metastasis and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Lee, Seok-Geun; Kang, Dong-Chul; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B

    2007-05-01

    Tumor progression and metastasis are complex processes involving intricate interplay among multiple gene products. Astrocyte elevated gene (AEG)-1 was cloned as an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-inducible and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-inducible transcript in primary human fetal astrocytes (PHFA) by a rapid subtraction hybridization approach. AEG-1 down-regulates the expression of the glutamate transporter EAAT2; thus, it is implicated in glutamate-induced excitotoxic damage to neurons as evident in HIV-associated neurodegeneration. Interestingly, AEG-1 expression is elevated in subsets of breast cancer, glioblastoma multiforme and melanoma cells, and AEG-1 cooperates with Ha-ras to augment the transformed phenotype of normal immortal cells. Moreover, AEG-1 is overexpressed in >95% of human malignant glioma samples when compared with normal human brain. Overexpression of AEG-1 increases and siRNA inhibition of AEG-1 decreases migration and invasion of human glioma cells, respectively. AEG-1 contains a lung-homing domain facilitating breast tumor metastasis to lungs. These findings indicate that AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis, progression and metastasis of diverse cancers. Our recent observations indicate that AEG-1 exerts its effects by activating the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) pathway and AEG-1 is a downstream target of Ha-ras and plays an important role in Ha-ras-mediated tumorigenesis. These provocative findings are intensifying interest in AEG-1 as a crucial regulator of tumor progression and metastasis and as a potential mediator of neurodegeneration. In this review, we discuss the cloning, structure and function(s) of AEG-1 and provide recent insights into the diverse actions and intriguing properties of this molecule.

  11. Parent Involvement in School Conceptualizing Multiple Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Gwynne O; Lengua, Liliana J; McMahon, Robert J

    2000-11-01

    Parent involvement (PI) in school is associated with more positive academic performance and social competence in children. However, there are inadequacies in current measures of PI and a need for a better understanding of predictors of PI. In this study, measures were obtained from a normative sample of 387 children in kindergarten and first grade from high-risk neighborhoods in 4 different sites. First, a confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical factor model of PI identified 6 reliable multiple-reporter PI factors: Parent-Teacher Contact, Parent Involvement at School, Quality of Parent-Teacher Relationship, Teacher's Perception of the Parent, Parent Involvement at Home, and Parent Endorsement of School. Next, the relations among 3 specific family and demographic risk factors-parental education level, maternal depression, and single-parent status-and these 6 PI factors were examined using path analyses in structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the 3 risk factors were differentially associated with the 6 PI factors: Parental education was significantly associated with 4 PI outcomes, maternal depression was significantly associated with 5 PI outcomes, and single-parent status was significantly associated with 3 PI outcomes. No significant ethnic group differences between African American and Caucasian families were found in these relations.

  12. Parent Involvement in School Conceptualizing Multiple Dimensions and Their Relations with Family and Demographic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Gwynne O.; Lengua, Liliana J.; McMahon, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Parent involvement (PI) in school is associated with more positive academic performance and social competence in children. However, there are inadequacies in current measures of PI and a need for a better understanding of predictors of PI. In this study, measures were obtained from a normative sample of 387 children in kindergarten and first grade from high-risk neighborhoods in 4 different sites. First, a confirmatory factor analysis of a theoretical factor model of PI identified 6 reliable multiple-reporter PI factors: Parent—Teacher Contact, Parent Involvement at School, Quality of Parent—Teacher Relationship, Teacher’s Perception of the Parent, Parent Involvement at Home, and Parent Endorsement of School. Next, the relations among 3 specific family and demographic risk factors—parental education level, maternal depression, and single-parent status—and these 6 PI factors were examined using path analyses in structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the 3 risk factors were differentially associated with the 6 PI factors: Parental education was significantly associated with 4 PI outcomes, maternal depression was significantly associated with 5 PI outcomes, and single-parent status was significantly associated with 3 PI outcomes. No significant ethnic group differences between African American and Caucasian families were found in these relations. PMID:20357900

  13. Multiple proteins of White spot syndrome virus involved in recognition of beta-integrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Qing-Hui; Huang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    The recognition and attachment of virus to its host cell surface is a critical step for viral infection. Recent research revealed that beta-integrin was involved in White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. In this study, the interaction of beta-integrin with structure proteins of WSSV and motifs involved in WSSV infection was examined. The results showed that envelope proteins VP26, VP31, VP37, VP90 and nucleocapsid protein VP136 interacted with LvInt. RGD-, YGL- and LDV-related peptide functioned as motifs of WSSV proteins binding with beta-integrin. The beta-integrin ligand of RGDT had better blocking effect compared with that of YGL- and LDV-related peptides. In vivo assay indicated that RGD-, LDV- and YGL-related peptides could partially block WSSV infection. These data collectively indicate that multiple proteins were involved in recognition of beta-integrin. Identification of proteins in WSSV that are associated with beta-integrin will assist development of new agents for effective control of the white spot syndrome.

  14. Identification of genes involved in regulatory mechanism of pigments in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tarique, T M; Yang, S; Mohsina, Z; Qiu, J; Yan, Z; Chen, G; Chen, A

    2014-09-05

    Chicken is an important model organism that unites the evolutionary gap between mammals and other vertebrates and provide major source of protein from meat and eggs for all over the world population. However, specific genes underlying the regulatory mechanism of broiler pigmentation have not yet been determined. In order to better understand the genes involved in the mechanism of pigmentation in the muscle tissues of broilers, the Affymetrix microarray hybridization experiment platform was used to identify gene expression profiles at 7 weeks of age. Broilers fed canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII pigments (100 mg/kg) were used to explore gene expression profiles). Our data showed that the 7th week of age was a very important phase with regard to gene expression profiles. We identified a number of differentially expressed genes; in canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII, there were 54 (32 upregulated and 22 downregulated), 23 (15 upregulated and 8 downregulated), and 7 (5 upregulated and 2 downregulated) known genes, respectively. Our data indicate that the numbers of differentially expressed genes were more upregulated than downregulated, and several genes showed conserved signaling to previously known functions. Thus, functional characterization of differentially expressed genes revealed several categories that are involved in important biological processes, including pigmentation, growth, molecular mechanisms, fat metabolism, cell proliferation, immune response, lipid metabolism, and protein synthesis and degradation. The results of the present study demonstrate that the genes associated with canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII are key regulatory genes that control the regulatory mechanisms of pigmentation.

  15. Identification of genes involved in radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by integrating gene ontology and protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Qu, Song; Li, Ling; Su, Fang; Li, Ye; Huang, Shi-Ting; Li, Dan-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Radioresistance remains one of the important factors in relapse and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Thus, it is imperative to identify genes involved in radioresistance and explore the underlying biological processes in the development of radioresistance. In this study, we used cDNA microarrays to select differential genes between radioresistant CNE-2R and parental CNE-2 cell lines. One hundred and eighty-three significantly differentially expressed genes (p<0.05) were identified, of which 138 genes were upregulated and 45 genes were downregulated in CNE-2R. We further employed publicly available bioinformatics related software, such as GOEAST and STRING to examine the relationship among differentially expressed genes. The results show that these genes were involved in type I interferon-mediated signaling pathway biological processes; the nodes tended to have high connectivity with the EGFR pathway, IFN-related pathways, NF-κB. The node STAT1 has high connectivity with other nodes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Finally, the reliability of microarray data was validated for selected genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results were consistent with the microarray data. Our study suggests that microarrays combined with gene ontology and protein interaction networks have great value in the identification of genes of radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma; genes involved in several biological processes and protein interaction networks may be relevant to NPC radioresistance; in particular, the verified genes CCL5, STAT1-α, STAT2 and GSTP1 may become potential biomarkers for predicting NPC response to radiotherapy.

  16. A novel molecular mechanism involved in multiple myeloma development revealed by targeting MafB to haematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Gutierrez, Norma C; Orfao, Alberto; Marín, Nieves; Villar, Luisa María; Criado, Ma Carmen Fernández; Pintado, Belén; Flores, Teresa; Alonso-López, Diego; De Las Rivas, Javier; Jiménez, Rafael; Criado, Francisco Javier García; Cenador, María Begoña García; Lossos, Izidore S; Cobaleda, César; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the cellular origin of cancer can help to improve disease prevention and therapeutics. Human plasma cell neoplasias are thought to develop from either differentiated B cells or plasma cells. However, when the expression of Maf oncogenes (associated to human plasma cell neoplasias) is targeted to mouse B cells, the resulting animals fail to reproduce the human disease. Here, to explore early cellular changes that might take place in the development of plasma cell neoplasias, we engineered transgenic mice to express MafB in haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HS/PCs). Unexpectedly, we show that plasma cell neoplasias arise in the MafB-transgenic mice. Beyond their clinical resemblance to human disease, these neoplasias highly express genes that are known to be upregulated in human multiple myeloma. Moreover, gene expression profiling revealed that MafB-expressing HS/PCs were more similar to B cells and tumour plasma cells than to any other subset, including wild-type HS/PCs. Consistent with this, genome-scale DNA methylation profiling revealed that MafB imposes an epigenetic program in HS/PCs, and that this program is preserved in mature B cells of MafB-transgenic mice, demonstrating a novel molecular mechanism involved in tumour initiation. Our findings suggest that, mechanistically, the haematopoietic progenitor population can be the target for transformation in MafB-associated plasma cell neoplasias. PMID:22903061

  17. An analysis of gene expression in PTSD implicates genes involved in the glucocorticoid receptor pathway and neural responses to stress

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Mark W.; Smith, Alicia K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Wolf, Erika J.; Guffanti, Guia; Ratanatharathorn, Andrew; Stone, Annjanette; Schichman, Steven A.; Humphries, Donald; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Arloth, Janine; Menke, Andreas; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Galea, Sandro; Aiello, Allison E.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Miller, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and gene expression using whole blood samples from a cohort of trauma-exposed white non-Hispanic male veterans (115 cases and 28 controls). 10,264 probes of genes and gene transcripts were analyzed. We found 41 that were differentially expressed in PTSD cases versus controls (multiple-testing corrected p<0.05). The most significant was DSCAM, a neurological gene expressed widely in the developing brain and in the amygdala and hippocampus of the adult brain. We then examined the 41 differentially expressed genes in a meta-analysis using two replication cohorts and found significant associations with PTSD for 7 of the 41 (p<0.05), one of which (ATP6AP1L) survived multiple-testing correction. There was also broad evidence of overlap across the discovery and replication samples for the entire set of genes implicated in the discovery data based on the direction of effect and an enrichment of p<0.05 significant probes beyond what would be expected under the null. Finally, we found that the set of differentially expressed genes from the discovery sample was enriched for genes responsive to glucocorticoid signaling with most showing reduced expression in PTSD cases compared to controls. PMID:25867994

  18. Multiple Gene-Environment Interactions on the Angiogenesis Gene-Pathway Impact Rectal Cancer Risk and Survival.

    PubMed

    Sharafeldin, Noha; Slattery, Martha L; Liu, Qi; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Caan, Bette J; Potter, John D; Yasui, Yutaka

    2017-09-28

    Characterization of gene-environment interactions (GEIs) in cancer is limited. We aimed at identifying GEIs in rectal cancer focusing on a relevant biologic process involving the angiogenesis pathway and relevant environmental exposures: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and animal protein intake. We analyzed data from 747 rectal cancer cases and 956 controls from the Diet, Activity and Lifestyle as a Risk Factor for Rectal Cancer study. We applied a 3-step analysis approach: first, we searched for interactions among single nucleotide polymorphisms on the pathway genes; second, we searched for interactions among the genes, both steps using Logic regression; third, we examined the GEIs significant at the 5% level using logistic regression for cancer risk and Cox proportional hazards models for survival. Permutation-based test was used for multiple testing adjustment. We identified 8 significant GEIs associated with risk among 6 genes adjusting for multiple testing: TNF (OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.11), TLR4 (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.38, 3.98), and EGR2 (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.04, 4.78) with smoking; IGF1R (OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.72), TLR4 (OR = 2.10, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.60) and EGR2 (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.46) with alcohol; and PDGFB (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.92) and MMP1 (OR = 2.44, 95% CI: 1.24, 4.81) with protein. Five GEIs were associated with survival at the 5% significance level but not after multiple testing adjustment: CXCR1 (HR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.75) with smoking; and KDR (HR = 4.36, 95% CI: 1.62, 11.73), TLR2 (HR = 9.06, 95% CI: 1.14, 72.11), EGR2 (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.42, 4.22), and EGFR (HR = 6.33, 95% CI: 1.95, 20.54) with protein. GEIs between angiogenesis genes and smoking, alcohol, and animal protein impact rectal cancer risk. Our results support the importance of considering the biologic hypothesis to characterize GEIs associated with cancer outcomes.

  19. Genes of Both Parental Origins Are Differentially Involved in Early Embryogenesis of a Tobacco Interspecies Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hai-Ping; Zhao, Jing; Li, Shi-Sheng; Qu, Liang-Huan; Ma, Li-Gang; Scholten, Stefan; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Background In animals, early embryonic development is largely dependent on maternal transcripts synthesized during gametogenesis. However, in higher plants, the extent of maternal control over zygote development and early embryogenesis is not fully understood yet. Nothing is known about the activity of the parental genomes during seed formation of interspecies hybrids. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report that an interspecies hybridization system between SR1 (Nicotiana tabacum) and Hamayan (N. rustica) has been successfully established. Based on the system we selected 58 genes that have polymorphic sites between SR1 and Hamayan, and analyzed the allele-specific expression of 28 genes in their hybrid zygotes (Hamayan x SR1). Finally the allele-specific expressions of 8 genes in hybrid zygotes were repeatedly confirmed. Among them, 4 genes were of paternal origin, 1 gene was of maternal origin and 3 genes were of biparental origin. These results revealed obvious biparental involvement and differentially contribution of parental-origin genes to zygote development in the interspecies hybrid. We further detected the expression pattern of the genes at 8-celled embryo stage found that the involvement of the parental-origin genes may change at different stages of embryogenesis. Conclusions/Significance We reveal that genes of both parental origins are differentially involved in early embryogenesis of a tobacco interspecies hybrid and functions in a developmental stage-dependent manner. This finding may open a window to seek for the possible molecular mechanism of hybrid vigor. PMID:21829711

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-mediated functional characterization of two genes involved in lignocellulosic secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Shashank K; Nookaraju, Akula; Fujino, Takeshi; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P

    2016-11-01

    Functional characterization of two tobacco genes, one involved in xylan synthesis and the other, a positive regulator of secondary cell wall formation, is reported. Lignocellulosic secondary cell walls (SCW) provide essential plant materials for the production of second-generation bioethanol. Therefore, thorough understanding of the process of SCW formation in plants is beneficial for efficient bioethanol production. Recently, we provided the first proof-of-concept for using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach for rapid functional characterization of nine genes involved in cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin synthesis during SCW formation. Here, we report VIGS-mediated functional characterization of two tobacco genes involved in SCW formation. Stems of VIGS plants silenced for both selected genes showed increased amount of xylem formation but thinner cell walls than controls. These results were further confirmed by production of stable transgenic tobacco plants manipulated in expression of these genes. Stems of stable transgenic tobacco plants silenced for these two genes showed increased xylem proliferation with thinner walls, whereas transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing these two genes showed increased fiber cell wall thickness but no change in xylem proliferation. These two selected genes were later identified as possible members of DUF579 family involved in xylan synthesis and KNAT7 transcription factor family involved in positive regulation of SCW formation, respectively. Glycome analyses of cell walls showed increased polysaccharide extractability in 1 M KOH extracts of both VIGS-NbDUF579 and VIGS-NbKNAT7 lines suggestive of cell wall loosening. Also, VIGS-NbDUF579 and VIGS-NbKNAT7 lines showed increased saccharification rates (74.5 and 40 % higher than controls, respectively). All these properties are highly desirable for producing higher quantities of bioethanol from lignocellulosic materials of bioenergy plants.

  1. Novel MLPA procedure using self-designed probes allows comprehensive analysis for CNVs of the genes involved in Hirschsprung disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hirschsprung disease is characterized by the absence of intramural ganglion cells in the enteric plexuses, due to a fail during enteric nervous system formation. Hirschsprung has a complex genetic aetiology and mutations in several genes have been related to the disease. There is a clear predominance of missense/nonsense mutations in these genes whereas copy number variations (CNVs) have been seldom described, probably due to the limitations of conventional techniques usually employed for mutational analysis. In this study, we have looked for CNVs in some of the genes related to Hirschsprung (EDNRB, GFRA1, NRTN and PHOX2B) using the Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) approach. Methods CNVs screening was performed in 208 HSCR patients using a self-designed set of MLPA probes, covering the coding region of those genes. Results A deletion comprising the first 4 exons in GFRA1 gene was detected in 2 sporadic HSCR patients and in silico approaches have shown that the critical translation initiation signal in the mutant gene was abolished. In this study, we have been able to validate the reliability of this technique for CNVs screening in HSCR. Conclusions The implemented MLPA based technique presented here allows CNV analysis of genes involved in HSCR that have not been not previously evaluated. Our results indicate that CNVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of HSCR, although they seem to be an uncommon molecular cause of HSCR. PMID:20459765

  2. A group LASSO-based method for robustly inferring gene regulatory networks from multiple time-course datasets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As an abstract mapping of the gene regulations in the cell, gene regulatory network is important to both biological research study and practical applications. The reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from microarray gene expression data is a challenging research problem in systems biology. With the development of biological technologies, multiple time-course gene expression datasets might be collected for a specific gene network under different circumstances. The inference of a gene regulatory network can be improved by integrating these multiple datasets. It is also known that gene expression data may be contaminated with large errors or outliers, which may affect the inference results. Results A novel method, Huber group LASSO, is proposed to infer the same underlying network topology from multiple time-course gene expression datasets as well as to take the robustness to large error or outliers into account. To solve the optimization problem involved in the proposed method, an efficient algorithm which combines the ideas of auxiliary function minimization and block descent is developed. A stability selection method is adapted to our method to find a network topology consisting of edges with scores. The proposed method is applied to both simulation datasets and real experimental datasets. It shows that Huber group LASSO outperforms the group LASSO in terms of both areas under receiver operating characteristic curves and areas under the precision-recall curves. Conclusions The convergence analysis of the algorithm theoretically shows that the sequence generated from the algorithm converges to the optimal solution of the problem. The simulation and real data examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the Huber group LASSO in integrating multiple time-course gene expression datasets and improving the resistance to large errors or outliers. PMID:25350697

  3. A group LASSO-based method for robustly inferring gene regulatory networks from multiple time-course datasets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Zhi; Wu, Fang-Xiang; Zhang, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    As an abstract mapping of the gene regulations in the cell, gene regulatory network is important to both biological research study and practical applications. The reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from microarray gene expression data is a challenging research problem in systems biology. With the development of biological technologies, multiple time-course gene expression datasets might be collected for a specific gene network under different circumstances. The inference of a gene regulatory network can be improved by integrating these multiple datasets. It is also known that gene expression data may be contaminated with large errors or outliers, which may affect the inference results. A novel method, Huber group LASSO, is proposed to infer the same underlying network topology from multiple time-course gene expression datasets as well as to take the robustness to large error or outliers into account. To solve the optimization problem involved in the proposed method, an efficient algorithm which combines the ideas of auxiliary function minimization and block descent is developed. A stability selection method is adapted to our method to find a network topology consisting of edges with scores. The proposed method is applied to both simulation datasets and real experimental datasets. It shows that Huber group LASSO outperforms the group LASSO in terms of both areas under receiver operating characteristic curves and areas under the precision-recall curves. The convergence analysis of the algorithm theoretically shows that the sequence generated from the algorithm converges to the optimal solution of the problem. The simulation and real data examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the Huber group LASSO in integrating multiple time-course gene expression datasets and improving the resistance to large errors or outliers.

  4. Multiple gene sequencing for risk assessment in patients with early-onset or familial breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Po-Han; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ai-Chu; Lu, Yen-Shen; Lin, Ching-Hung; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wang, Ming-Yang; Liu, Chun-Yu; Cheng, Fiona Tsui-Fen; Yeh, Ming-Hsin; Li, Huei-Ying; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Hsu, Yu-Hua; Fan, Sheng-Chih; Li, Long-Yuan; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chang, King-Jen; Chen, Pei-Lung; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Huang, Chiun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Since BRCA mutations are only responsible for 10–20% of cases of breast cancer in patients with early-onset or a family history and since next-generation sequencing technology allows the simultaneous sequencing of a large number of target genes, testing for multiple cancer-predisposing genes is now being considered, but its significance in clinical practice remains unclear. We then developed a sequencing panel containing 68 genes that had cancer risk association for patients with early-onset or familial breast cancer. A total of 133 patients were enrolled and 30 (22.6%) were found to carry germline deleterious mutations, 9 in BRCA1, 11 in BRCA2, 2 in RAD50, 2 in TP53 and one each in ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUTYH, and RAD51C. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) was associated with the highest mutation rate (45.5%, p = 0.025). Seven of the 9 BRCA1 mutations and the single FANCI mutation were in the TNBC group; 9 of the 11 BRCA2, 1 of the 2 RAD50 as well as BRIP1, MSH2, MUTYH, and RAD51C mutations were in the hormone receptor (HR)(+)Her2(−) group, and the other RAD50, ATM, and TP53 mutations were in the HR(+)Her2(+) group. Mutation carriers were considered as high-risk to develop malignancy and advised to receive cancer screening. Screening protocols of non-BRCA genes were based on their biologic functions; for example, patients carrying RAD51C mutation received a screening protocol similar to that for BRCA, since BRCA and RAD51C are both involved in homologous recombination. In conclusion, we consider that multiple gene sequencing in cancer risk assessment is clinically valuable. PMID:26824983

  5. Overexpression of Multiple Detoxification Genes in Deltamethrin Resistant Laodelphax striatellus (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Wu, Min; Han, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    Background The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), is one of the major rice pests in Asia and has developed resistance to multiple classes of insecticides. Understanding resistance mechanisms is essential to the management of this pest. Biochemical and molecular assays were performed in this study to systematically characterize deltamethrin resistance mechanisms with laboratory-selected resistant and susceptible strains of SBPH. Methodology/Principal Findings Deltamethrin resistant strains of SBPH (JH-del) were derived from a field population by continuously selections (up to 30 generations) in the laboratory, while a susceptible strain (JHS) was obtained from the same population by removing insecticide pressure for 30 generations. The role of detoxification enzymes in the resistance was investigated using synergism and enzyme activity assays with strains of different resistant levels. Furthermore, 71 cytochrome P450, 93 esterases and 12 glutathione-S-transferases cDNAs were cloned based on transcriptome data of a field collected population. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR screening analysis of 176 identified detoxification genes demonstrated that multiple P450 and esterase genes were overexpressed (>2-fold) in JH-del strains (G4 and G30) when compared to that in JHS, and the results of quantitative PCR coincided with the semi-quantitative RT-PCR results. Target mutation at IIS3–IIS6 regions encoded by the voltage-gated sodium channel gene was ruled out for conferring the observed resistance. Conclusion/Significance As the first attempt to discover genes potentially involved in SBPH pyrethroid resistance, this study putatively identified several candidate genes of detoxification enzymes that were significantly overexpressed in the resistant strain, which matched the synergism and enzyme activity testing. The biochemical and molecular evidences suggest that the high level pyrethroid resistance in L. striatellus could be due to enhanced

  6. Multiple gene sequencing for risk assessment in patients with early-onset or familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Han; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Huang, Ai-Chu; Lu, Yen-Shen; Lin, Ching-Hung; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wang, Ming-Yang; Liu, Chun-Yu; Cheng, Fiona Tsui-Fen; Yeh, Ming-Hsin; Li, Huei-Ying; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Hsu, Yu-Hua; Fan, Sheng-Chih; Li, Long-Yuan; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chang, King-Jen; Chen, Pei-Lung; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Huang, Chiun-Sheng

    2016-02-16

    Since BRCA mutations are only responsible for 10-20% of cases of breast cancer in patients with early-onset or a family history and since next-generation sequencing technology allows the simultaneous sequencing of a large number of target genes, testing for multiple cancer-predisposing genes is now being considered, but its significance in clinical practice remains unclear. We then developed a sequencing panel containing 68 genes that had cancer risk association for patients with early-onset or familial breast cancer. A total of 133 patients were enrolled and 30 (22.6%) were found to carry germline deleterious mutations, 9 in BRCA1, 11 in BRCA2, 2 in RAD50, 2 in TP53 and one each in ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUTYH, and RAD51C. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) was associated with the highest mutation rate (45.5%, p = 0.025). Seven of the 9 BRCA1 mutations and the single FANCI mutation were in the TNBC group; 9 of the 11 BRCA2, 1 of the 2 RAD50 as well as BRIP1, MSH2, MUTYH, and RAD51C mutations were in the hormone receptor (HR)(+)Her2(-) group, and the other RAD50, ATM, and TP53 mutations were in the HR(+)Her2(+) group. Mutation carriers were considered as high-risk to develop malignancy and advised to receive cancer screening. Screening protocols of non-BRCA genes were based on their biologic functions; for example, patients carrying RAD51C mutation received a screening protocol similar to that for BRCA, since BRCA and RAD51C are both involved in homologous recombination. In conclusion, we consider that multiple gene sequencing in cancer risk assessment is clinically valuable.

  7. Interactions Between Alcohol Metabolism Genes and Religious Involvement in Association With Maximum Drinks and Alcohol Dependence Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Karen G; Dick, Danielle M; Almasy, Laura; Chan, Grace; Aliev, Fazil; Schuckit, Marc A; Scott, Denise M; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Bierut, Laura J; Nurnberger, John; Porjesz, Bernice; Hesselbrock, Victor M

    2016-05-01

    Variations in the genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzymes are associated with both alcohol consumption and dependence in multiple populations. Additionally, some environmental factors have been recognized as modifiers of these relationships. This study examined the modifying effect of religious involvement on relationships between ADH gene variants and alcohol consumption-related phenotypes. Subjects were African American, European American, and Hispanic American adults with lifetime exposure to alcohol (N = 7,716; 53% female) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. Genetic markers included ADH1Brs1229984, ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, ADH4-rs1042364, and ADH4-rs1800759. Phenotypes were maximum drinks consumed in a 24-hour period and total number of alcohol dependence symptoms according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Religious involvement was defined by self-reported religious services attendance. Both religious involvement and ADH1B-rs1229984 were negatively associated with the number of maximum drinks consumed and the number of lifetime alcohol dependence symptoms endorsed. The interactions of religious involvement with ADH1B-rs2066702, ADH1C-rs698, and ADH4-rs1042364 were significantly associated with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms. Risk variants had weaker associations with maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms as a function of increasing religious involvement. This study provided initial evidence of a modifying effect for religious involvement on relationships between ADH variants and maximum drinks and alcohol dependence symptoms.

  8. Identification and evolution of an NFAT gene involving Branchiostoma belcheri innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojun; Hu, Jing; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2013-10-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, but no NFAT genes have yet been identified in amphioxus species. Here we identified and characterized an NFAT-like gene from Branchiostoma belcheri, and also studied extensively the evolutionary history of NFAT family genes. We found that the amphioxus genome contains an AmphiNFAT gene encoding an NFAT homolog. The AmphiNFAT gene was found to be involved in the innate immune response to LPS stimulation in B. belcheri and was ubiquitously and differentially expressed in all investigated tissues. The NFAT family genes were present in a common ancestor with cnidaria, and NFAT1-4 paralogs were lost early in Branchiostoma and Strongylocentrotus genomes. We discovered that NFAT family genes underwent strong purifying selection. Taken together, our findings provide an insight into the innate immune response of amphioxus and the evolution of the NFAT gene family.

  9. A gene expression inflammatory signature specifically predicts multiple myeloma evolution and patients survival

    PubMed Central

    Botta, C; Di Martino, M T; Ciliberto, D; Cucè, M; Correale, P; Rossi, M; Tagliaferri, P; Tassone, P

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is closely dependent on cross-talk between malignant plasma cells and cellular components of the inflammatory/immunosuppressive bone marrow milieu, which promotes disease progression, drug resistance, neo-angiogenesis, bone destruction and immune-impairment. We investigated the relevance of inflammatory genes in predicting disease evolution and patient survival. A bioinformatics study by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on gene expression profiling dataset of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering and symptomatic-MM, identified inflammatory and cytokine/chemokine pathways as the most progressively affected during disease evolution. We then selected 20 candidate genes involved in B-cell inflammation and we investigated their role in predicting clinical outcome, through univariate and multivariate analyses (log-rank test, logistic regression and Cox-regression model). We defined an 8-genes signature (IL8, IL10, IL17A, CCL3, CCL5, VEGFA, EBI3 and NOS2) identifying each condition (MGUS/smoldering/symptomatic-MM) with 84% accuracy. Moreover, six genes (IFNG, IL2, LTA, CCL2, VEGFA, CCL3) were found independently correlated with patients' survival. Patients whose MM cells expressed high levels of Th1 cytokines (IFNG/LTA/IL2/CCL2) and low levels of CCL3 and VEGFA, experienced the longest survival. On these six genes, we built a prognostic risk score that was validated in three additional independent datasets. In this study, we provide proof-of-concept that inflammation has a critical role in MM patient progression and survival. The inflammatory-gene prognostic signature validated in different datasets clearly indicates novel opportunities for personalized anti-MM treatment. PMID:27983725

  10. Multiple mechanisms are involved in 6-gingerol-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Ho; Cekanova, Maria; Baek, Seung Joon

    2008-03-01

    6-Gingerol, a natural product of ginger, has been known to possess anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities. However, the mechanisms by which it prevents cancer are not well understood in human colorectal cancer. Cyclin D1 is a proto-oncogene that is overexpressed in many cancers and plays a role in cell proliferation through activation by beta-catenin signaling. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) is a cytokine associated with pro-apoptotic and anti-tumorigenic properties. In the present study, we examined whether 6-gingerol influences cyclin D1 and NAG-1 expression and determined the mechanisms by which 6-gingerol affects the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. 6-Gingerol treatment suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and G(1) cell cycle arrest. Subsequently, 6-gingerol suppressed cyclin D1 expression and induced NAG-1 expression. Cyclin D1 suppression was related to inhibition of beta-catenin translocation and cyclin D1 proteolysis. Furthermore, experiments using inhibitors and siRNA transfection confirm the involvement of the PKCepsilon and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta pathways in 6-gingerol-induced NAG-1 expression. The results suggest that 6-gingerol stimulates apoptosis through upregulation of NAG-1 and G(1) cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclin D1. Multiple mechanisms appear to be involved in 6-gingerol action, including protein degradation as well as beta-catenin, PKCepsilon, and GSK-3beta pathways.

  11. Escherichia coli Genes and Pathways Involved in Surviving Extreme Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Rose T.; Chen, Stefanie H.; Wood, Elizabeth A.; Cabot, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    To further an improved understanding of the mechanisms used by bacterial cells to survive extreme exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), we broadly screened nonessential Escherichia coli genes for those involved in IR resistance by using transposon-directed insertion sequencing (TraDIS). Forty-six genes were identified, most of which become essential upon heavy IR exposure. Most of these were subjected to direct validation. The results reinforced the notion that survival after high doses of ionizing radiation does not depend on a single mechanism or process, but instead is multifaceted. Many identified genes affect either DNA repair or the cellular response to oxidative damage. However, contributions by genes involved in cell wall structure/function, cell division, and intermediary metabolism were also evident. About half of the identified genes have not previously been associated with IR resistance or recovery from IR exposure, including eight genes of unknown function. PMID:25049088

  12. Regulation of the expression of key genes involved in HDL metabolism by unsaturated fatty acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects, and possible mechanisms of action, of unsaturated fatty acids on the expression of genes involved in HDL metabolism in HepG2 cells. The mRNA concentration of target genes was assessed by real time PCR. Protein concentrations were determined by wes...

  13. Wounding induces expression of genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound-periderm development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using tuber...

  14. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  15. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed Central

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S.

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar ‘Morex’ or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes. PMID:26937960

  16. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    PubMed

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar 'Morex'. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar 'Morex' or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes.

  17. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  18. Functional adaptation to loading of a single bone is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones.

    PubMed

    Sample, Susannah J; Behan, Mary; Smith, Lesley; Oldenhoff, William E; Markel, Mark D; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; Miletic, Vjekoslav; Muir, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of load-induced bone formation is considered a local phenomenon controlled by osteocytes, although it has also been hypothesized that functional adaptation may be neuronally regulated. The aim of this study was to examine bone formation in multiple bones, in response to loading of a single bone, and to determine whether adaptation may be neuronally regulated. Load-induced responses in the left and right ulnas and humeri were determined after loading of the right ulna in male Sprague-Dawley rats (69 +/- 16 days of age). After a single period of loading at -760-, -2000-, or -3750-microepsilon initial peak strain, rats were given calcein to label new bone formation. Bone formation and bone neuropeptide concentrations were determined at 10 days. In one group, temporary neuronal blocking was achieved by perineural anesthesia of the brachial plexus with bupivicaine during loading. We found right ulna loading induces adaptive responses in other bones in both thoracic limbs compared with Sham controls and that neuronal blocking during loading abrogated bone formation in the loaded ulna and other thoracic limb bones. Skeletal adaptation was more evident in distal long bones compared with proximal long bones. We also found that the single period of loading modulated bone neuropeptide concentrations persistently for 10 days. We conclude that functional adaptation to loading of a single bone in young rapidly growing rats is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones. Persistent changes in bone neuropeptide concentrations after a single loading period suggest that plasticity exists in the innervation of bone.

  19. Multiplicity of solutions for a class of fractional Choquard-Kirchhoff equations involving critical nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuliang; Xiang, Mingqi

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the multiplicity of solutions to the following nonlocal fractional Choquard-Kirchhoff type equation involving critical exponent, ( a+b[u]_{s,p}^p) (-Δ )_p^su=\\int _{R^N}|u(y)|^{p_{μ ,s}^*}/|x-y|^{μ }dy|u|^{p_{μ ,s}^*-2}u +λ h(x)|u|^{q-2}u\\quad { in } {R}^N, [u]_{s,p}=( \\int _{RN}\\int _{R^N}|u(x)- u(y)|^p/|x-y|^{N+sp}dxdy) ^{1/p} where a≥0, b>0 , 00 is a parameter, p_{μ ,s}^*=(N-{μ/2)p}/{N-sp} is the critical exponent in the sense of the Hardy-Littlewood-Sobolev inequality, 1multiplicity of nontrivial solutions by using variational methods. In particular, we get the existence of infinitely many nontrivial solutions for the degenerate Kirchhoff case by using Krasnoselskii's genus theory.

  20. BK channel opening involves side-chain reorientation of multiple deep-pore residues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xixi; Yan, Jiusheng; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Three deep-pore locations, L312, A313, and A316, were identified in a scanning mutagenesis study of the BK (Ca2+-activated, large-conductance K+) channel S6 pore, where single aspartate substitutions led to constitutively open mutant channels (L312D, A313D, and A316D). To understand the mechanisms of the constitutive openness of these mutant channels, we individually mutated these three sites into the other 18 amino acids. We found that charged or polar side-chain substitutions at each of the sites resulted in constitutively open mutant BK channels, with high open probability at negative voltages, as well as a loss of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. Given the fact that multiple pore residues in BK displayed side-chain hydrophilicity-dependent constitutive openness, we propose that BK channel opening involves structural rearrangement of the deep-pore region, where multiple residues undergo conformational changes that may increase the exposure of their side chains to the polar environment of the pore. PMID:24367115

  1. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease and Candidate Risk Genes Involved in Endolysosomal Transport.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, Brian W; Vardarajan, Badri N; Naj, Adam C; Whitehead, Patrice L; Rolati, Sophie; Slifer, Susan; Carney, Regina M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Gilbert, John R; Wang, Li-San; Farrer, Lindsay A; Reitz, Christiane; Haines, Jonathan L; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard P; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2017-09-01

    (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years; and of the 7001 NHW controls, 4215 (60.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years. The gene PSD2, for which multiple unrelated NHW cases had rare missense variants, was significantly associated with EOAD (P = 2.05 × 10-6; Bonferroni-corrected P value [BP] = 1.3 × 10-3) and LOAD (P = 6.22 × 10-6; BP = 4.1 × 10-3). A missense variant in TCIRG1, present in a NHW patient and segregating in 3 cases of a Hispanic family, was more frequent in EOAD cases (odds ratio [OR], 2.13; 95% CI, 0.99-4.55; P = .06; BP = 0.413), and significantly associated with LOAD (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.37-3.62; P = 7.2 × 10-4; BP = 5.0 × 10-3). A missense variant in the LOAD risk gene RIN3 showed suggestive evidence of association with EOAD after Bonferroni correction (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 1.26-16.48; P = .02, BP = 0.091). In addition, a missense variant in RUFY1 identified in 2 NHW EOAD cases showed suggestive evidence of an association with EOAD as well (OR, 18.63; 95% CI, 1.62-213.45; P = .003; BP = 0.129). The genes PSD2, TCIRG1, RIN3, and RUFY1 all may be involved in endolysosomal transport-a process known to be important to development of AD. Furthermore, this study identified shared risk genes between EOAD and LOAD similar to previously reported genes, such as SORL1, PSEN2, and TREM2.

  2. Transcriptome analysis of the exocarp of apple fruit identifies light-induced genes involved in red color pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Zheng, Danman; Han, Yuepeng; Khan, M Awais; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Korban, Schuyler S

    2014-01-15

    Although the mechanism of light regulation of color pigmentation of apple fruit is not fully understood, it has been shown that light can regulate expression of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway by inducing transcription factors (TFs). Moreover, expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in this pathway may be coordinately regulated by multiple TFs. In this study, fruits on trees of apple cv. Red Delicious were covered with paper bags during early stages of fruit development and then removed prior to maturation to analyze the transcriptome in the exocarp of apple fruit. Comparisons of gene expression profiles of fruit covered with paper bags (dark-grown treatment) and those subjected to 14 h light treatment, following removal of paper bags, were investigated using an apple microarray of 40,000 sequences. Expression profiles were investigated over three time points, at one week intervals, during fruit development. Overall, 736 genes with expression values greater than two-fold were found to be modulated by light treatment. Light-induced products were classified into 19 categories with highest scores in primary metabolism (17%) and transcription (12%). Based on the Arabidopsis gene ontology annotation, 18 genes were identified as TFs. To further confirm expression patterns of flavonoid-related genes, these were subjected to quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) using fruit of red-skinned apple cv. Red Delicious and yellow-skinned apple cv. Golden Delicious. Of these, two genes showed higher levels of expression in 'Red Delicious' than in 'Golden Delicious', and were likely involved in the regulation of fruit red color pigmentation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  4. Comparative Genomics Revealed Multiple Helicobacter pylori Genes Associated with Biofilm Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eng Guan; Tay, Alfred Chin Yen; Peters, Fanny; Marshall, Barry J.; Ho, Bow; Goh, Khean Lee; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Loke, Mun Fai

    2016-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Helicobacter pylori may be one of the factors influencing eradication outcome. However, genetic differences between good and poor biofilm forming strains have not been studied. Materials and Methods Biofilm yield of 32 Helicobacter pylori strains (standard strain and 31 clinical strains) were determined by crystal-violet assay and grouped into poor, moderate and good biofilm forming groups. Whole genome sequencing of these 32 clinical strains was performed on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Annotation and comparison of the differences between the genomic sequences were carried out using RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) and SEED viewer. Genes identified were confirmed using PCR. Results Genes identified to be associated with biofilm formation in H. pylori includes alpha (1,3)-fucosyltransferase, flagellar protein, 3 hypothetical proteins, outer membrane protein and a cag pathogenicity island protein. These genes play a role in bacterial motility, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis, Lewis antigen synthesis, adhesion and/or the type-IV secretion system (T4SS). Deletion of cagA and cagPAI confirmed that CagA and T4SS were involved in H. pylori biofilm formation. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that biofilm formation in H. pylori might be genetically determined and might be influenced by multiple genes. Good, moderate and poor biofilm forming strain might differ during the initiation of biofilm formation. PMID:27870886

  5. Characterization of Differentially Expressed Genes Involved in Pathways Associated with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Yu, Beiqin; Li, Jianfang; Su, Liping; Yan, Min; Zhang, Jun; Li, Chen; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya

    2015-01-01

    To explore the patterns of gene expression in gastric cancer, a total of 26 paired gastric cancer and noncancerous tissues from patients were enrolled for gene expression microarray analyses. Limma methods were applied to analyze the data, and genes were considered to be significantly differentially expressed if the False Discovery Rate (FDR) value was < 0.01, P-value was <0.01 and the fold change (FC) was >2. Subsequently, Gene Ontology (GO) categories were used to analyze the main functions of the differentially expressed genes. According to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, we found pathways significantly associated with the differential genes. Gene-Act network and co-expression network were built respectively based on the relationships among the genes, proteins and compounds in the database. 2371 mRNAs and 350 lncRNAs considered as significantly differentially expressed genes were selected for the further analysis. The GO categories, pathway analyses and the Gene-Act network showed a consistent result that up-regulated genes were responsible for tumorigenesis, migration, angiogenesis and microenvironment formation, while down-regulated genes were involved in metabolism. These results of this study provide some novel findings on coding RNAs, lncRNAs, pathways and the co-expression network in gastric cancer which will be useful to guide further investigation and target therapy for this disease. PMID:25928635

  6. Molecular Basis of Gene-Gene Interaction: Cyclic Cross-Regulation of Gene Expression and Post-GWAS Gene-Gene Interaction Involved in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufeng; Wang, Chuchu; Yao, Yufeng; Zuo, Xiaoyu; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Chengqi; Zhang, Hongfu; Lu, Qiulun; Chang, Le; Wang, Fan; Wang, Pengxia; Zhang, Rongfeng; Hu, Zhenkun; Song, Qixue; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Cong; Li, Sisi; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yang, Qin; Yin, Dan; Wang, Xiaojing; Si, Wenxia; Li, Xiuchun; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yuan; Luo, Chunyan; Li, Jia; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Jing; Wang, Longfei; Wang, Li; Han, Meng; Ye, Jian; Chen, Feifei; Liu, Jingqiu; Liu, Ying; Wu, Gang; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yuhua; Wu, Yanxia; Ke, Tie; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Elston, Robert; Rao, Shaoqi; Yang, Yanzong; Xia, Yunlong; Wang, Qing K

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia at the clinic. Recent GWAS identified several variants associated with AF, but they account for <10% of heritability. Gene-gene interaction is assumed to account for a significant portion of missing heritability. Among GWAS loci for AF, only three were replicated in the Chinese Han population, including SNP rs2106261 (G/A substitution) in ZFHX3, rs2200733 (C/T substitution) near PITX2c, and rs3807989 (A/G substitution) in CAV1. Thus, we analyzed the interaction among these three AF loci. We demonstrated significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 in three independent populations and combined population with 2,020 cases/5,315 controls. Compared to non-risk genotype GGCC, two-locus risk genotype AATT showed the highest odds ratio in three independent populations and the combined population (OR=5.36 (95% CI 3.87-7.43), P=8.00×10-24). The OR of 5.36 for AATT was significantly higher than the combined OR of 3.31 for both GGTT and AACC, suggesting a synergistic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733. Relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) analysis also revealed significant interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 when exposed two copies of risk alleles (RERI=2.87, P<1.00×10-4) or exposed to one additional copy of risk allele (RERI=1.29, P<1.00×10-4). The INTERSNP program identified significant genotypic interaction between rs2106261 and rs2200733 under an additive by additive model (OR=0.85, 95% CI: 0.74-0.97, P=0.02). Mechanistically, PITX2c negatively regulates expression of miR-1, which negatively regulates expression of ZFHX3, resulting in a positive regulation of ZFHX3 by PITX2c; ZFHX3 positively regulates expression of PITX2C, resulting in a cyclic loop of cross-regulation between ZFHX3 and PITX2c. Both ZFHX3 and PITX2c regulate expression of NPPA, TBX5 and NKX2.5. These results suggest that cyclic cross-regulation of gene expression is a molecular basis for gene-gene

  7. Multiple rice microRNAs are involved in immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lu, Yuan-Gen; Shi, Yi; Wu, Liang; Xu, Yong-Ju; Huang, Fu; Guo, Xiao-Yi; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Jing; Zhao, Ji-Qun; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Zhou, Jian-Min; Wu, Xian-Jun; Wang, Ping-Rong; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are indispensable regulators for development and defense in eukaryotes. However, the miRNA species have not been explored for rice (Oryza sativa) immunity against the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the most devastating fungal pathogen in rice production worldwide. Here, by deep sequencing small RNA libraries from susceptible and resistant lines in normal conditions and upon M. oryzae infection, we identified a group of known rice miRNAs that were differentially expressed upon M. oryzae infection. They were further classified into three classes based on their expression patterns in the susceptible japonica line Lijiangxin Tuan Hegu and in the resistant line International Rice Blast Line Pyricularia-Kanto51-m-Tsuyuake that contains a single resistance gene locus, Pyricularia-Kanto 51-m (Pikm), within the Lijiangxin Tuan Hegu background. RNA-blot assay of nine of them confirmed sequencing results. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay showed that the expression of some target genes was negatively correlated with the expression of miRNAs. Moreover, transgenic rice plants overexpressing miR160a and miR398b displayed enhanced resistance to M. oryzae, as demonstrated by decreased fungal growth, increased hydrogen peroxide accumulation at the infection site, and up-regulated expression of defense-related genes. Taken together, our data indicate that miRNAs are involved in rice immunity against M. oryzae and that overexpression of miR160a or miR398b can enhance rice resistance to the disease.

  8. Prediction processes during multiple object tracking (MOT): involvement of dorsal and ventral premotor cortices

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, Silke; Stadler, Waltraud; Keitel, Anne; Ott, Derek V M; Lepsien, Jöran; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The multiple object tracking (MOT) paradigm is a cognitive task that requires parallel tracking of several identical, moving objects following nongoal-directed, arbitrary motion trajectories. Aims The current study aimed to investigate the employment of prediction processes during MOT. As an indicator for the involvement of prediction processes, we targeted the human premotor cortex (PM). The PM has been repeatedly implicated to serve the internal modeling of future actions and action effects, as well as purely perceptual events, by means of predictive feedforward functions. Materials and methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), BOLD activations recorded during MOT were contrasted with those recorded during the execution of a cognitive control task that used an identical stimulus display and demanded similar attentional load. A particular effort was made to identify and exclude previously found activation in the PM-adjacent frontal eye fields (FEF). Results We replicated prior results, revealing occipitotemporal, parietal, and frontal areas to be engaged in MOT. Discussion The activation in frontal areas is interpreted to originate from dorsal and ventral premotor cortices. The results are discussed in light of our assumption that MOT engages prediction processes. Conclusion We propose that our results provide first clues that MOT does not only involve visuospatial perception and attention processes, but prediction processes as well. PMID:24363971

  9. Effect of fluoxetine on learning and memory involves multiple 5-HT systems.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1995-10-01

    Diverse evidence suggests that 5-HT uptake blockers enhance learning and memory. However, there is no information about the mechanisms of action involved in such effects. The aim of the present work was to investigate the nature of the receptors involved in the effects of fluoxetine on learning. Therefore, a dose-response curve of posttraining injection (intraperitoneal) of fluoxetine was carried out in an associative learning task (auto-shaping). Fluoxetine or the vehicle was injected 10 min after 5-HT antagonists: (+/-)-pindolol, (+/-)-propanolol, NAN-190, ketanserin, ritanserin, mesulergine, MDL 72222, or SDZ 205-557. Presynaptic activity was eliminated by means of chloroamphetamine pretreatment. Scopolamine (an anticholinergic) and dizocilpine (a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist) were also used. Results showed that fluoxetine enhanced learning of the conditioned response (CR) in a dose-dependent fashion. All 5-HT antagonists had no effects by themselves but inhibited the effects of fluoxetine at different degrees. Decrement of CR produced by scopolamine was reversed by fluoxetine. Dizocilpine did not affect CR but prevented the effects of fluoxetine. The present findings suggest that the actions of fluoxetine on learning are due to an interaction with multiple receptors of postsynaptic nature.

  10. Direct sampling of multiple single-molecular rupture dominant pathways involving a multistep transition.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Ding, Huai; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-12-14

    We report a novel single-molecular rupture mechanism revealed by direct sampling of the dominant pathway using a self-optimized path sampling method. Multiple dominant pathways involving multistep transitions are identified. The rupture may take place via a direct unfolding from the native state to the unfolding state, or through a two-step pathway bypassing a distinct intermediate metastable state (IMS). This scenario facilitates us to propose a three-state kinetic model, which can produce a nonlinear dependence of the rupture time on pulling forces similar to the ones reported in the literature. In particular, molecule conformations in the IMS maintain an elongation of the tail at one terminal, by which external pulling will enhance the relative stability of IMS. Consequently, even though the overall transition rate of the multistep pathway is relatively small, the molecule still has to be ruptured via the multistep pathway rather than the direct pathway. Thus, our work demonstrates an IMS trapping effect induced rupture mechanism involving an abnormal switching from a fast dominant pathway to a slow one.

  11. Retroperitoneal unicentric Castleman’s disease with multiple lymph node involvement

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Sinha, Prakash; Talat, Nadia; Diaz-Cano, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman with B-symptoms was referred for a left adrenal incidentaloma of 5 cm. Imaging revealed features compatible with adrenal cancer. The authors excluded excess production of catecholamines or adrenal steroids. The tumour was removed by en bloc radical left retroperitonectomy with adrenalectomy, nephrectomy, interaortocaval lymphadenectomy and splenectomy. Histology demonstrated periadrenal hyaline vascular Castleman’s disease with local infiltration and 14 positive lymph nodes. The lymphoid infiltrate spilled into the adjacent renal cortex. HHV8 was negative. The Ki67 proliferative index was 30–40% in germinal centres. There was no syn- or metachronous disease on extended imaging including fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT and narrow follow-up at 3 years. This is a rare case of unicentric hyaline vascular Castleman’s disease with documented locoregional lymph node involvement. The case exemplifies the transition from unifocal unicentric disease into disseminated disease with involvement of multiple lymph node stations (multicentric disease). The authors demonstrate surgical cure by oncological resection. PMID:22696693

  12. Analysis of multiple factors involved in acute progressive cerebral infarction and extra- and intracranial arterial lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuefu; Liu, Yajie; Luo, Chenghong; Lu, Weiheng; Su, Binru

    2014-06-01

    In order to identify the potential factors involved in the development of acute progressive cerebral infarction (PCI), the association between potential risk factors and extra- and intracranial arterial lesions was investigated. A total of 608 patients underwent cerebral angiography to analyze the morphological characteristics between the PCI and NPCI groups. In addition, data from numerous cases of extra- and intracranial arterial lesions were collected and compared with the control groups, and the associations between the severity of arterial lesions and the potential influential factors were analyzed. In the blood vessels responsible for cerebral infarction, various degrees of atherosclerotic plaques and stenosis were observed. Age, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, glycosylated hemoglobin and blood pressure affected the degrees of hardening, plaques and stenosis. Analysis of cerebral artery stenosis revealed that age, diabetes mellitus and plasma fibrinogen were risk factors for cerebral artery stenosis, while the HDL/low density lipoprotein ratio was a protective factor. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that the lesions of blood vessels are a major pathological change in PCI and multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis.

  13. Identification and transcriptional profiling of Pseudomonas putida genes involved in furoic acid metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Furfural (2-furaldehyde) is a furan formed by dehydration of pentose sugars. Pseudomonas putida Fu1 metabolizes furfural through a pathway involving conversion to 2-oxoglutarate, via 2-furoic acid and Coenzyme A intermediates. To identify genes involved in furan metabolism, two P. putida transposo...

  14. Transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening of genes involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Onuki-Nagasaki, Reiko; Nagasaki, Akira; Hakamada, Kazumi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Fujita, Satoshi; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is important in several biological phenomena, such as cancer metastasis. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in cell migration might facilitate the discovery of antimetastatic drugs. However, screening of genes by the current methods can be complicated by factors related to cell stimulation, for example, abolition of contact inhibition and the release inflammatory cytokines from wounded cells during examinations of wound healing in vitro. To overcome these problems and identify genes involved in cell migration, in this chapter we describe the use of transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening.

  15. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in the Pathogenesis of Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; dos Santos Dias, Ivoneth; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; Batista de Paula, Alfredo Maurício; Feltenberger, John David; Sena Guimarães, André Luiz; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of odontogenic tumors is not well known. It is important to identify genetic deregulations and molecular alterations. This study aimed to investigate, through bioinformatic analysis, the possible genes involved in the pathogenesis of ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Genes involved in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT were identified in GeneCards. Gene list was expanded, and the gene interactions network was mapped using the STRING software. “Weighted number of links” (WNL) was calculated to identify “leader genes” (highest WNL). Genes were ranked by K-means method and Kruskal-Wallis test was used (P<0.001). Total interactions score (TIS) was also calculated using all interaction data generated by the STRING database, in order to achieve global connectivity for each gene. The topological and ontological analyses were performed using Cytoscape software and BinGO plugin. Literature review data was used to corroborate the bioinformatics data. CDK1 was identified as leader gene for AM. In KCOT group, results show PCNA and TP53. Both tumors exhibit a power law behavior. Our topological analysis suggested leader genes possibly important in the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT, by clustering coefficient calculated for both odontogenic tumors (0.028 for AM, zero for KCOT). The results obtained in the scatter diagram suggest an important relationship of these genes with the molecular processes involved in AM and KCOT. Ontological analysis for both AM and KCOT demonstrated different mechanisms. Bioinformatics analyzes were confirmed through literature review. These results may suggest the involvement of promising genes for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AM and KCOT. PMID:28357197

  16. Involvement of multiple elements in FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of FGF19.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal endocrine hormone human fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is involved in the regulation of not only hepatic bile acid metabolism but also carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the present study, bile acid/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) responsiveness in the FGF19 promoter region was investigated by a reporter assay using the human colon carcinoma cell line LS174T. The assay revealed the presence of bile acid/FXR-responsive elements in the 5'-flanking region up to 8.8 kb of FGF19. Deletion analysis indicated that regions from -1866 to -1833, from -1427 to -1353, and from -75 to +262 were involved in FXR responsiveness. Four, four, and two consecutive half-sites of nuclear receptors were observed in the three regions, respectively. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer binding in these three regions. EMSA and reporter assays using mutated constructs indicated that the nuclear receptor IR1, ER2, and DR8 motifs in the 5'-flanking region were involved in FXR responsiveness of FGF19. Lithocholic acid (LCA) (10 μM), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (10 μM), or GW4064 (0.1 μM) treatment increased reporter activity in a construct including the three motifs under FXR-expressing conditions whereas LCA and not CDCA or GW4064 treatment increased the reporter activity under pregnane X receptor (PXR)-expressing conditions. These results suggest that FGF19 is transcriptionally activated through multiple FXR-responsive elements in the promoter region.

  17. 11C-Methionine-PET in Multiple Myeloma: Correlation with Clinical Parameters and Bone Marrow Involvement.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Knop, Stefan; Schreder, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Knott, Markus; Jörg, Gerhard; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K; Einsele, Hermann; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an essentially incurable hematologic malignancy originating from clonal plasma cells. This study evaluated the usefulness of the radiotracers (11)C-methionine (MET) and (18)F-2`-deoxy-2`-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for staging and re-staging in MM. 43 patients with MM underwent both MET- and FDG-PET/CT for staging or re-staging within 3±2 days. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with the degree of bone marrow (BM) involvement and standard clinical parameters of disease activity. Additionally, BM samples were stained for L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in 15 patients. MET-PET detected focal lesions (FL) in 39/43 subjects (90.7%), whereas 10 patients were missed in FDG-PET/CT (detection rate, 33/43; 76.7%; p<0.05). MET depicted more FL in 28/43 patients (65.1%; p<0.001), whereas in the remainder (34.9%, n=15) both tracers yielded comparable results. LAT1 was highly expressed on the cell surface of myeloma cells. Both FDG and MET uptake correlated significantly with biopsy-proven BM involvement (p<0.001), with MET demonstrating a stronger correlation (SUVmean, r=0.9 vs r=0.6; SUVmax, r=0.88 vs r=0.58). Abnormal beta-2-microglobulin and free light chain levels correlated with the presence of focal intramedullary lesions detected in MET- or FDG-PET/CT (MET, p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively; FDG, p=0.02 and p=0.01). MET appears to be superior to FDG for staging and re-staging of both intra- and extramedullary MM lesions. Tracer uptake correlates with BM involvement, β2m and FLC levels and appears to be a more accurate marker of tumor burden and disease activity.

  18. 11C-Methionine-PET in Multiple Myeloma: Correlation with Clinical Parameters and Bone Marrow Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Knop, Stefan; Schreder, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Knott, Markus; Jörg, Gerhard; Samnick, Samuel; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Einsele, Hermann; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an essentially incurable hematologic malignancy originating from clonal plasma cells. This study evaluated the usefulness of the radiotracers 11C-methionine (MET) and 18F-2`-deoxy-2`-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for staging and re-staging in MM. 43 patients with MM underwent both MET- and FDG-PET/CT for staging or re-staging within 3±2 days. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with the degree of bone marrow (BM) involvement and standard clinical parameters of disease activity. Additionally, BM samples were stained for L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in 15 patients. MET-PET detected focal lesions (FL) in 39/43 subjects (90.7%), whereas 10 patients were missed in FDG-PET/CT (detection rate, 33/43; 76.7%; p<0.05). MET depicted more FL in 28/43 patients (65.1%; p<0.001), whereas in the remainder (34.9%, n=15) both tracers yielded comparable results. LAT1 was highly expressed on the cell surface of myeloma cells. Both FDG and MET uptake correlated significantly with biopsy-proven BM involvement (p<0.001), with MET demonstrating a stronger correlation (SUVmean, r=0.9 vs r=0.6; SUVmax, r=0.88 vs r=0.58). Abnormal beta-2-microglobulin and free light chain levels correlated with the presence of focal intramedullary lesions detected in MET- or FDG-PET/CT (MET, p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively; FDG, p=0.02 and p=0.01). MET appears to be superior to FDG for staging and re-staging of both intra- and extramedullary MM lesions. Tracer uptake correlates with BM involvement, β2m and FLC levels and appears to be a more accurate marker of tumor burden and disease activity. PMID:26877783

  19. Simulated microgravity alters the expression of key genes involved in fracture healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, N. Patrick; Androjna, Caroline; Hill, Esther; Globus, Ruth K.; Midura, Ronald J.

    2013-11-01

    Fracture healing in animal models has been shown to be altered in both ground based analogs of spaceflight and in those exposed to actual spaceflight. The molecular mechanisms behind altered fracture healing as a result of chronic exposure to microgravity remain to be elucidated. This study investigates temporal gene expression of multiple factors involved in secondary fracture healing, specifically those integral to the development of a soft tissue callus and the transition to that of hard tissue. Skeletally mature female rats were subjected to a 4 week period of simulated microgravity and then underwent a closed femoral fracture procedure. Thereafter, they were reintroduced to the microgravity and allowed to heal for a 1 or 2 week period. A synchronous group of weight bearing rats was used as a normal fracture healing control. Utilizing Real-Time quantitative PCR on mRNA from fracture callus tissue, we found significant reductions in the levels of transcripts associated with angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. These data suggest an altered fracture healing process in a simulated microgravity environment, and these alterations begin early in the healing process. These findings may provide mechanistic insight towards developing countermeasure protocols to mitigate these adaptations.

  20. Involvement of Arabidopsis histone acetyltransferase HAC family genes in the ethylene signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Xu, Jiang; Li, Jian; Li, Qingyun; Yang, Hongchun

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetic modifications play a fundamental role in regulating chromatin dynamics and gene expression. The level of histone acetylation is controlled by two functionally antagonistic enzymes, namely histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC). CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 proteins, a subfamily of highly conserved HATs, are involved in various physiological events including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In this work, we study the poorly known function of their homologous genes, the HAC genes, in Arabidopsis. We found that hac1-involved mutants displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, in particular hypersensitivity to ethylene both in the dark and in the light. We also found that the transcriptional levels of ethylene-responsive genes are significantly higher in the hac1hac5 double mutant than in wild-type plants. Moreover, an ethylene synthesis inhibitor cannot release the triple responses of hac mutants. These results suggest that HACs are involved in the ethylene signaling pathway.

  1. Screening for genes involved in antibody response to sheep red blood cells in the chicken, Gallus gallus.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Guan, Xiaojing; Smith, Edward J

    2015-09-01

    Antibody response, an important trait in both agriculture and biomedicine, plays a part in protecting animals from infection. Dissecting molecular basis of antibody response may improve artificial selection for natural disease resistance in livestock and poultry. A number of genetic markers associated with antibody response have been identified in the chicken and mouse by linkage-based association studies, which only define genomic regions by genetic markers but do not pinpoint genes for antibody response. In contrast, global expression profiling has been applied to define the molecular bases of a variety of biological traits through identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Here, we employed Affimetrix GeneChip Chicken Genome Arrays to identify differentially expressed genes for antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) using chickens challenged with and without SRBC or chickens with high and low anti-SRBC titers. The DEGs include those with known (i.e., MHC class I and IgH genes) or unknown function in antibody response. Classification test of these genes suggested that the response of the chicken to intravenous injection of SRBC involved multiple biological processes, including response to stress or other different stimuli, sugar, carbohydrate or protein binding, and cell or soluble fraction, in addition to antibody response. This preliminary study thus provides an insight into molecular basis of antibody response to SRBC in the chicken. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. A Fast Multiple-Kernel Method with Applications to Detect Gene-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Rachel; Lu, Wenbin; Holloway, Shannon; Sale, Michèle M.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Williams, Stephen R.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Kernel machine (KM) models are a powerful tool for exploring associations between sets of genetic variants and complex traits. While most KM methods use a single kernel function to assess the marginal effect of a variable set, KM analyses involving multiple kernels have become increasingly popular. Multi-kernel analysis allows researchers to study more complex problems, such as assessing gene-gene or gene-environment interactions, incorporating variance-component based methods for population substructure into rare-variant association testing, and assessing the conditional effects of a variable set adjusting for other variable sets. The KM framework is robust, powerful, and provides efficient dimension reduction for multi-factor analyses, but requires the estimation of high dimensional nuisance parameters. Traditional estimation techniques, including regularization and the EM algorithm, have a large computational cost and are not scalable to large sample sizes needed for rare variant analysis. Therefore, under the context of gene-environment interaction, we propose a computationally efficient and statistically rigorous “fastKM” algorithm for multi-kernel analysis that is based on a low-rank approximation to the nuisance-effect kernel matrices. Our algorithm is applicable to various trait types (e.g., continuous, binary, and survival traits) and can be implemented using any existing single-kernel analysis software. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our algorithm has similar performance to an EM-based KM approach for quantitative traits while running much faster. We also apply our method to the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, examining gene-by-vitamin effects on recurrent stroke risk and gene-by-age effects on change in homocysteine level. PMID:26139508

  3. A Fast Multiple-Kernel Method With Applications to Detect Gene-Environment Interaction.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Rachel; Lu, Wenbin; Holloway, Shannon; Sale, Michèle M; Worrall, Bradford B; Williams, Stephen R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-09-01

    Kernel machine (KM) models are a powerful tool for exploring associations between sets of genetic variants and complex traits. Although most KM methods use a single kernel function to assess the marginal effect of a variable set, KM analyses involving multiple kernels have become increasingly popular. Multikernel analysis allows researchers to study more complex problems, such as assessing gene-gene or gene-environment interactions, incorporating variance-component based methods for population substructure into rare-variant association testing, and assessing the conditional effects of a variable set adjusting for other variable sets. The KM framework is robust, powerful, and provides efficient dimension reduction for multifactor analyses, but requires the estimation of high dimensional nuisance parameters. Traditional estimation techniques, including regularization and the "expectation-maximization (EM)" algorithm, have a large computational cost and are not scalable to large sample sizes needed for rare variant analysis. Therefore, under the context of gene-environment interaction, we propose a computationally efficient and statistically rigorous "fastKM" algorithm for multikernel analysis that is based on a low-rank approximation to the nuisance effect kernel matrices. Our algorithm is applicable to various trait types (e.g., continuous, binary, and survival traits) and can be implemented using any existing single-kernel analysis software. Through extensive simulation studies, we show that our algorithm has similar performance to an EM-based KM approach for quantitative traits while running much faster. We also apply our method to the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) clinical trial, examining gene-by-vitamin effects on recurrent stroke risk and gene-by-age effects on change in homocysteine level.

  4. Multiple Evolutionary Selections Involved in Synonymous Codon Usages in the Streptococcus agalactiae Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan-Ping; Ke, Hao; Liang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Hao, Le; Ma, Jiang-Yao; Li, Yu-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important human and animal pathogen. To better understand the genetic features and evolution of S. agalactiae, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in S. agalactiae were analyzed in this study. A- and U-ending rich codons were used in S. agalactiae function genes through the overall codon usage analysis, indicating that Adenine (A)/Thymine (T) compositional constraints might contribute an important role to the synonymous codon usage pattern. The GC3% against the effective number of codon (ENC) value suggested that translational selection was the important factor for codon bias in the microorganism. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that (i) mutational pressure was the most important factor in shaping codon usage of all open reading frames (ORFs) in the S. agalactiae genome; (ii) strand specific mutational bias was not capable of influencing the codon usage bias in the leading and lagging strands; and (iii) gene length was not the important factor in synonymous codon usage pattern in this organism. Additionally, the high correlation between tRNA adaptation index (tAI) value and codon adaptation index (CAI), frequency of optimal codons (Fop) value, reinforced the role of natural selection for efficient translation in S. agalactiae. Comparison of synonymous codon usage pattern between S. agalactiae and susceptible hosts (human and tilapia) showed that synonymous codon usage of S. agalactiae was independent of the synonymous codon usage of susceptible hosts. The study of codon usage in S. agalactiae may provide evidence about the molecular evolution of the bacterium and a greater understanding of evolutionary relationships between S. agalactiae and its hosts. PMID:26927064

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Frankia sp. Strain FaC1 Genes Involved in Nitrogen Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ligon, James M.; Nakas, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from Frankia sp. strain FaC1, an Alnus root nodule endophyte, and used to construct a genomic library in the cosmid vector pHC79. The genomic library was screened by in situ colony hybridization to identify clones of Frankia nitrogenase (nif) genes based on DNA sequence homology to structural nitrogenase genes from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Several Frankia nif clones were isolated, and hybridization with individual structural nitrogenase gene fragments (nifH, nifD, and nifK) from K. pneumoniae revealed that they all contain the nifD and nifK genes, but lack the nifH gene. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the nifD and nifK hybridizing region from one clone revealed that the nifD and nifK genes in Frankia sp. are contiguous, while the nifH gene is absent from a large region of DNA on either side of the nifDK gene cluster. Additional hybridizations with gene fragments derived from K. pneumoniae as probes and containing other genes involved in nitrogen fixation demonstrated that the Frankia nifE and nifN genes, which play a role in the biosynthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor, are located adjacent to the nifDK gene cluster. Images PMID:16347453

  6. Identification of genes involved in DNA replication of the Autographa californica baculovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kool, M; Ahrens, C H; Goldbach, R W; Rohrmann, G F; Vlak, J M

    1994-01-01

    By use of a transient replication assay, nine genes involved in DNA replication were identified in the genome of the Autographa californica baculovirus. Six genes encoding helicase, DNA polymerase, IE-1, LEF-1, LEF-2, and LEF-3 are essential for DNA replication while three genes encoding P35, IE-2, and PE38 stimulate DNA replication. No stimulation by the AcMNPV pcna gene, encoding a protein with sequence homology to proliferating-cell nuclear antigen, was observed. A pattern of amino acids found in a number of single-stranded-DNA-binding proteins was identified in the carboxyl-terminal region of IE-1. Images PMID:7972036

  7. Tissue Specific Expression Levels of Apoptosis Involved Genes Have Correlations with Codon and Amino Acid Usage

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Iman; Salavaty, Abbas; Nasiri, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms, including transcriptional and post transcriptional processes, regulate tissue specific expression of genes. In this study, we report differences in gene/protein compositional features between apoptosis involved genes selectively expressed in human tissues. We found some correlations between codon/amino acid usage and tissue specific expression level of genes. The findings can be significant for understanding the translational selection on these features. The selection may play an important role in the differentiation of human tissues and can be considered for future studies in diagnosis of some diseases such as cancer. PMID:28154517

  8. Abnormal pituitary development and function in three siblings of a Jamaican family: A new syndrome involving the Pit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.C.; Schiavi, A.; Parks, J.

    1994-09-01

    In 1967 Mckusick et al. reported three siblings in Canada who had combine pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). Since that report there have been several families with multiple affected members who share the common characteristics of autosomal recessive inheritance and clinical expression of pituitary deficiencies at an early age. We report here a CPHD family of Jamaican origin with three affected and two unaffected siblings. The affected siblings have evidence of severe growth failure, growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism and variable prolactin deficiency. Recently, in some families with CPHD a defect has been detected in the Pit-1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of the pituitary and the production of growth hormone, TSH and prolactin. We are studying the Pit-1 gene in this family as a candidate gene that may explain the family phenotype. The Pit-1 gene has been analyzed in DNA extracted from blood. No gross deletion were detected in exons 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 using exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Exon 1 is also currently being analyzed. Single stand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a screening technique for point mutations within genes, is being used to identify putative base pair changes in the Pit-1 gene. The exon findings will be confirmed using standard DNA sequencing procedures. If a Pit-1 gene is detected, this family would provide a novel presentation, since gonadotropin deficiency appears to be present. Alternatively, this family may represent a mutation on another yet unknown factor involved in normal pituitary development.

  9. Multiple antibiotic resistance genes distribution in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanmei; Shen, Yue-Xiao; Liang, Peng; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng; Huang, Xia

    2016-12-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are thought to be potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, GeoChip was used for analyzing multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including four multidrug efflux system gene groups and three β-lactamase genes in ten large-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment. Results revealed that the diversity of antibiotic genes varied a lot among MBRs, but about 40% common antibiotic resistance genes were existent. The average signal intensity of each antibiotic resistance group was similar among MBRs, nevertheless the total abundance of each group varied remarkably and the dominant resistance gene groups were different in individual MBR. The antibiotic resistance genes majorly derived from Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Further study indicated that TN, TP and COD of influent, temperature and conductivity of mixed liquor were significant (P<0.05) correlated to the multiple antibiotic resistance genes distribution in MBRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intersections of pathways involving biotin and iron relative to therapeutic mechanisms for progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heidker, Rebecca M; Emerson, Mitchell R; LeVine, Steven M

    2016-12-01

    While there are a variety of therapies for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a lack of treatments for progressive MS. An early study indicated that high dose biotin therapy has beneficial effects in approximately 12-15% of patients with progressive MS. The mechanisms behind the putative improvements seen with biotin therapy are not well understood, but have been postulated to include: 1) improving mitochondrial function which is impaired in MS, 2) increasing synthesis of lipids and cholesterol to facilitate remyelination, and 3) affecting gene expression. We suggest one reason that a greater percentage of patients with MS didn't respond to biotin therapy is the inaccessibility or lack of other nutrients, such as iron. In addition to biotin, iron (or heme) is necessary for energy production, biosynthesis of cholesterol and lipids, and for some protective mechanisms. Both biotin and iron are required for myelination during development, and by inference, remyelination. However, iron can also play a role in the pathology of MS. Increased deposition of iron can occur in some CNS structures possibly promoting oxidative damage while low iron levels can occur in other areas. Thus, the potential, detrimental effects of iron need to be considered together with the need for iron to support metabolic demands associated with repair and/or protective processes. We propose the optimal utilization of iron may be necessary to maximize the beneficial effects of biotin. This review will examine the interactions between biotin and iron in pathways that may have therapeutic or pathogenic implications for MS.

  11. Identification of multiple genetic loci that regulate adenovirus gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-G; Hsu, H-C; Yang, P-A; Yang, X; Wu, Q; Liu, Z; Yi, N; Mountz, J D

    2004-01-01

    A key aspect of the immune response to adenovirus (Ad) gene therapy is the generation of a cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response. To better understand the genetic network underlying these events, 20 strains of C57BL/6 x DBA/2 (BXD) recombinant inbred (RI) mice were administered with AdLacZ and analyzed at days 7, 21, 30, and 50 for liver beta-galactosidase (LacZ) expression and CTL response. Sera levels of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed at different times after AdLacZ. There was a distinct strain-dependent expression of LacZ, which was strongly correlated with the CTL response. Among the five BXD RI strains that exhibited significantly prolonged LacZ expression, four also exhibited a marked defect in the production of Ad-specific CTL. There was a strong correlation between the sera levels of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, but cytokine responses were not significantly correlated with LacZ expression or the CTL response. Quantitative trait loci regulating LacZ on day 30 were found on chromosome (Chr) 19 (33 cM) and Chr 15 (42.8 cM). Cytotoxicity mapped to Chr 7 (41.0 and 57.4-65.2 cM), Chr 15 (61.7 cM), and Chr X (27.8 cM). IFN-gamma production mapped to Chr 18 (22, 27, and 32 cM) and Chr 11 (64.0 cM). TNF-alpha and IL-6 production mapped to Chr 6 (91.5 cM) Chr 9 (42.0 cM) and Chr 8 (52 and 73.0 cM). These results indicate that different strains of mice exhibit different pathways for effective clearance of AdLacZ depending on genetic polymorphisms and interactions at multiple genetic loci.

  12. Pathways and genes involved in steroid hormone metabolism in male pigs: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Robic, Annie; Faraut, Thomas; Prunier, Armelle

    2014-03-01

    This paper reviews state-of-the-art knowledge on steroid biosynthesis pathways in the pig and provides an updated characterization of the porcine genes involved in these pathways with particular focus on androgens, estrogens, and 16-androstenes. At least 21 different enzymes appear to be involved in these pathways in porcine tissues together with at least five cofactors. Until now, data on several porcine genes were scarce or confusing. We characterized the complete genomic and transcript sequences of the single porcine CYP11B gene. We analyzed the porcine AKR1 gene cluster and identified four AKR1C, one AKR1C like genes and one AKR1E2 gene. We provide evidence that porcine AKR1C genes are not orthologous to human AKR1C. A new nomenclature is thus needed for this gene family in the pig. Thirty-two genes are now described: transcript (30+2 characterized in this study) and genomic (complete: 18+1 and partial: 12+1) sequences are identified. However, despite increasing knowledge on steroid metabolism in the pig, there is still no explanation of why porcine testes can produce androstenone and epiandrosterone, but not dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is also a reduced steroid.

  13. Transcriptome profiling in response to different types of ionizing radiation and identification of multiple radio marker genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Eun; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Lee, Kyung Jun; Jang, Cheol Seong; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kim, Sang Hoon; Ha, Bo-Keun; Ahn, Joon-Woo; Kang, Si-Yong; Kim, Dong Sub

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) affects gene expression from plant genomes. To monitor the genome-wide transcriptional changes induced by three types of IR, we used the rice Affymetrix GeneChip microarray to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated by gamma rays (GAs), cosmic rays (CRs) and ion beams (IBs). The overall expression patterns in rice seedlings generated from seeds exposed to GAs and IBs were similar but differed for CRs exposure. Expression profiles of genes involved in metabolic pathways and cellular response were identified using MapMan analysis. This result revealed that IRs induced gene expression related to sucrose-starch metabolisms; sugar and starch accumulation was significantly increased in response to three types of IR in rice. In addition, we compared the genes commonly up- or down-regulated by exposure to three types of IR and identified 53 candidate radio marker genes (RMGs) that were differentially regulated by radiation exposure but not by other stresses. Among these genes, we selected six RMGs commonly applicable to different types of IR by specific coexpression networks using the algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (aracne) and confirmed the expression of these genes by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Our results provided insight into the mechanisms of the responses to different types of IR and identified multiple marker genes to predict sensitivity to three types of IR. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Multiple Signaling Pathways in Gene Expression during Sugar Starvation. Pharmacological Analysis of din Gene Expression in Suspension-Cultured Cells of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Yuki; Ito, Masaki; Nishida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Akira

    2000-01-01

    We have identified many dark-inducible (din) genes that are expressed in Arabidopsis leaves kept in the dark. In the present study we addressed the question of how plant cells sense the depletion of sugars, and how sugar starvation triggers din gene expression in suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis. Depletion of sucrose in the medium triggered marked accumulation of din transcripts. Suppression of din gene expression by 2-deoxy-Glc, and a non-suppressive effect exerted by 3-O-methyl-Glc, suggested that sugar-repressible expression of din genes is mediated through the phosphorylation of hexose by hexokinase, as exemplified in the repression of photosynthetic genes by sugars. We have further shown that the signaling triggered by sugar starvation involves protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events, and have provided the first evidence that multiple pathways of protein dephosphorylation exist in sugar starvation-induced gene expression. An inhibitor of serine/threonine protein kinase, K-252a, inhibited din gene expression in sugar-depleted cells. Okadaic acid, which may preferentially inhibit type 2A protein phosphatases over type 1, enhanced the transcript levels of all din genes, except din6 and din10, under sugar starvation. Conversely, a more potent inhibitor of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, calyculin A, increased transcripts from din2 and din9, but decreased those from other din genes, in sugar-depleted cells. On the other hand, calyculin A, but not okadaic acid, completely inhibited the gene expression of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein under sugar starvation. These results indicate that multiple signaling pathways, mediated by different types of protein phosphatases, regulate gene expression during sugar starvation. PMID:11080291

  15. OrCGDB: a database of genes involved in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Levine, A E; Steffen, D L

    2001-01-01

    The Oral Cancer Gene Database (OrCGDB; http://www.tumor-gene. org/Oral/oral.html) was developed to provide the biomedical community with easy access to the latest information on the genes involved in oral cancer. The information is stored in a relational database and accessed through a WWW interface. The OrCGDB is organized by gene name, which is linked to information describing properties of the gene. This information is stored as a collection of findings ('facts') that are entered by the database curator in a semi-structured format from information in primary publications using a WWW interface. These facts include causes of oncogenic activation, chromosomal localization of the gene, mutations associated with the gene, the biochemical identity and activity of the gene product, synonyms for the gene name and a variety of clinical information. Each fact is associated with a MEDLINE citation. The user can search the OrCGDB by gene name or by entering a textword. The OrCGDB is part of a larger WWW-based tumor gene database and represents a new approach to catalog and display the research literature.

  16. Multiple C4/Slp genes distinguished by expression after transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, D M; Malissen, M; Hood, L; Ferreira, A; Walthall, D; Mitchell, M

    1986-01-01

    The S region of the murine major histocompatibility complex contains two closely related genes: C4, encoding the fourth component of complement, and Slp, encoding sex-limited protein. We cloned these genes from a cosmid library of the B10.W7R strain that does not show androgen regulation of the Slp protein. Restriction site polymorphisms revealed at least four C4-like genes within the Sw7 locus, indicating evolutionary amplification of this region. Transfection of these genes into L cells resulted in expression, processing, and secretion of immunologically correct C4 and Slp proteins. At least two different Slp genes and one C4 gene were capable, after transfection, of expressing C4 and Slp indistinguishable from macrophage-derived protein. A third Slp gene exists within this locus whose recombinant cognate did not express in L cells. Thus, the B10.W7R S region includes one C4 gene and at least three Slp-like genes. Images PMID:3023818

  17. The involvement of supratentorial white matter in multiple system atrophy: a diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Shan; Yeh, Chien-Li; Lu, Chia-Feng; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Soong, Bing-Wen; Wu, Yu-Te

    2017-03-01

    It has been assumed that cognitive disorder and visual-spatial disturbance in multiple system atrophy of the predominantly cerebellar type (MSA-C) are attributable to degradation of cerebellar function. The purpose of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography to determine if patients with MSA-C characterized in part by visual-spatial disorders and cognitive disorders have changes of the structural connectivity network of nerve fibers, and to further describe the structural connectivity network. The study included 20 patients with MSA-C and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner was used to obtain images for DTI tractography. Image preprocessing was done by large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping. Whole-brain connectivity analysis was carried out. The patients had decreased numbers of long association fibers connecting the right parietal lobe to the frontal lobe. The commissural fibers and short association fibers connecting the bilateral frontal and occipital lobes and the number of short association fibers at the bilateral frontal and occipital region were also decreased significantly. The patients had a significant decrease in fiber density in the cerebellum compared to the healthy subjects. Our results provide DTI evidence suggesting that frontal and occipital white matter is involved in patients with MSA-C. This finding may correlate with their clinical symptoms such as cognitive disturbance as well as visual-spatial impairment. Therefore, cognitive disturbance and visual-spatial deficits in MSA-C might not be due to cerebellar lesions only as is widely believed but also involve cerebral lesions.

  18. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  19. Hierarchical inverse Gaussian models and multiple testing: application to gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Labbe, Aurelie; Thompson, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Detecting differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments is a topic that has been well studied in the literature. Many hypothesis testing methods have been proposed that rely on strong distributional assumptions for the gene intensities. However, the shape of microarray data may vary substantially from one experiment to another, and model assumptions may be seriously violated in many cases. The literature on microarray data is mainly based on two distributions: the log-normal and the gamma distributions, that often appear to be effective when used in a Bayesian hierarchical framework. However, if a model that fits the data well in a global manner seems attractive, two points should be regarded with attention: the ability of the model to fit the tail of the observed distribution, and its robustness to a wrong specification of the model, in terms of error rates for the hypothesis tests. In order to focus on these aspects, we propose to use Bayesian models involving the inverse Gaussian distribution to describe gene expression data. We show that these models can be good competitors to the traditional Bayesian or random effect gamma or log-normal models in some situations. A multiple testing procedure is then proposed, based on an asymptotic property of the posterior probability of the one-sided alternative hypothesis. We show that the asymptotic property is well approximated for inverse Gaussian models, even when the number of observations available for each test is very small.

  20. Afibrinogenemia resulting from homozygous nonsense mutation in A alpha chain gene associated with multiple thrombotic episodes.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Ismail; de Mazancourt, Philippe; Horellou, Marie-Hèléne; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinc, Ayhan; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2008-04-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare disorder characterized by the absence in circulating fibrinogen, a hexamer composed of two sets of three polypeptides (Aalpha, Bbeta and gamma). Although predisposition to thrombosis is a well known feature of dysfibrinogenemia, the relatively frequent thrombotic manifestations seen in congenital afibrinogenemia are puzzling. We herein report a mutational analysis of a young afibrinogenemic man from Turkey with multiple thrombo-embolic events involving both arteries and veins. Purified DNAs of the propositus was used for amplification by polymerase chain reaction of all the exons of the A subunit gene with primers allowing the analysis of the intron-exon boundaries. Analysis of the genes coding for the three fibrinogen chains of the propositus found a homozygous G to A transition in the exon 5 of the A alpha chain gene (g.g4277a; access number gi458553). The TGG to TGA codon change predicts a homozygous W315X in the A alpha chain (p.W334X when referring to the translation initiation codon). Both parents and his brother were found to carry this heterozygous mutation. This is the first report of a patient homozygous for this rare mutation associated with afibrinogenemia. Our patient was free of known risk factors as well as diseases associated with thrombosis including atherosclerosis, vasculitis, Buerger's disease, and it seems therefore probable that afibrinogenemia itself might have contributed to both arterial and venous thrombosis.

  1. Multiple independent insertions of 5S rRNA genes in the spliced-leader gene family of trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Beauparlant, Marc A; Drouin, Guy

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of the 5S rRNA genes found in the spliced-leader (SL) gene repeat units of numerous trypanosome species suggest that such linkages were not inherited from a common ancestor, but were the result of independent 5S rRNA gene insertions. In trypanosomes, 5S rRNA genes are found either in the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes or in independent tandemly repeated units. Given that trypanosome species where 5S rRNA genes are within the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes are phylogenetically related, one might hypothesize that this arrangement is the result of an ancestral insertion of 5S rRNA genes into the tandemly repeated SL gene family of trypanosomes. Here, we use the types of 5S rRNA genes found associated with SL genes, the flanking regions of the inserted 5S rRNA genes and the position of these insertions to show that most of the 5S rRNA genes found within SL gene repeat units of trypanosome species were not acquired from a common ancestor but are the results of independent insertions. These multiple 5S rRNA genes insertion events in trypanosomes are likely the result of frequent founder events in different hosts and/or geographical locations in species having short generation times.

  2. Characterization of Arabidopsis Genes Involved in Gene Silencing. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, S. R.

    1999-02-05

    Enhancer of gene silencing 1 (egs1) is an Arabidopsis mutant that enhances post-transcriptional gene silencing of the rolB gene introduced by genetic engineering (transgene). The goal of our proposal was cloning EGS1 based on its map position. Although we screened more than 2000 chromosomes for recombination, we were unable to get closer than 2 cM to the gene. We experienced an unexpected tendency of the post-transcriptionally silenced transgene to switch to a more stable silenced state. This made it impossible to select egs1 homozygotes for map based cloning. This forced us to reconsider our cloning strategy. One possibility would have been to use a different transgene as the target of gene silencing. We tested two other transgenes. Both encoded proteins unrelated to the first but they were all expressed from the same type of promoter and they all had a similar tendency to become post-transcriptionally silenced. After screening over 80 F2 segregants from each cross between our egs1 mutant and Arabidopsis of the same ecotype homozygous for the new transgene, we were disappointed to find that the egs1 mutation did not enhance post-transcription silencing of the two new genes. In 80 plants we expected to have between 4 and 6 plants that were homozygous for the transgene and for the mutant egs1 allele. If egs1 mutations could enhance gene silencing of the new transgene, these plants would not express it. However all the double homozygotes still expressed the transgene. Therefore, we could not change the target transgene for mapping. This was the state of the cloning at the time for renewal of the grant in 1999. Because the selection of new meaningful recombinant plants had become extremely inefficient using the original rolB transgene, we abandoned the attempt at map based cloning and did not apply for further funding.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Involvement of multiple myeloma cell-derived exosomes in osteoclast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Lavinia; De Luca, Angela; Amodio, Nicola; Manno, Mauro; Raccosta, Samuele; Taverna, Simona; Bellavia, Daniele; Naselli, Flores; Fontana, Simona; Schillaci, Odessa; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Santoro, Alessandra; De Leo, Giacomo; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Alessandro, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone disease is the most frequent complication in multiple myeloma (MM) resulting in osteolytic lesions, bone pain, hypercalcemia and renal failure. In MM bone disease the perfect balance between bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) and bone-forming osteoblasts (OBs) activity is lost in favour of OCs, thus resulting in skeletal disorders. Since exosomes have been described for their functional role in cancer progression, we here investigate whether MM cell-derived exosomes may be involved in OCs differentiation. We show that MM cells produce exosomes which are actively internalized by Raw264.7 cell line, a cellular model of osteoclast formation. MM cell-derived exosomes positively modulate pre-osteoclast migration, through the increasing of CXCR4 expression and trigger a survival pathway. MM cell-derived exosomes play a significant pro-differentiative role in murine Raw264.7 cells and human primary osteoclasts, inducing the expression of osteoclast markers such as Cathepsin K (CTSK), Matrix Metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) and Tartrate-resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). Pre-osteoclast treated with MM cell-derived exosomes differentiate in multinuclear OCs able to excavate authentic resorption lacunae. Similar results were obtained with exosomes derived from MM patient's sera. Our data indicate that MM-exosomes modulate OCs function and differentiation. Further studies are needed to identify the OCs activating factors transported by MM cell-derived exosomes. PMID:25944696

  5. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  6. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: Assessing Pontine Involvement Using Proton MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Wan Hazlin; Giuliani, Fabrizio; Beaulieu, Christian; Kalra, Sanjay; Hanstock, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective The underlying mechanism of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains poorly understood. Our study investigates the involvement of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), originating in the pontine brainstem, in MS patients with symptoms of fatigue. Methods Female relapsing-remitting MS patients (n = 17) and controls (n = 15) underwent a magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging protocol at 1.5T. Fatigue was assessed in every subject using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Using an FSS cut-off of 36, patients were categorized into a low (n = 9, 22 ± 10) or high (n = 10, 52 ± 6) fatigue group. The brain metabolites N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) were measured from sixteen 5x5x10 mm3 spectroscopic imaging voxels in the rostral pons. Results MS patients with high fatigue had lower NAA/tCr concentration in the tegmental pons compared to control subjects. By using NAA and Cr values in the cerebellum for comparison, these NAA/tCr changes in the pons were driven by higher tCr concentration, and that these changes were focused in the WM regions. Discussion/Conclusion Since there were no changes in NAA concentration, the increase in tCr may be suggestive of gliosis, or an imbalanced equilibrium of the creatine and phosphocreatine ratio in the pons of relapsing-remitting MS patients with fatigue. PMID:26895076

  7. The Low Expression of IL-37 Involved in Multiple Myeloma – Associated Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zun-chang; Sun, Ming-dong; Zheng, Yong-qing; Fu, Hong-jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis plays a significant role in complex inflammatory and angiogenic processes and is also involved in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis. IL-37 is a proinflammatory cytokine in antitumor activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the IL-37 clinical significance on MM. Material/Methods We measured serum levels of IL-37 in 45 patients with different stages of MM and 30 healthy control subjects and correlated IL-37 with numerous cytokines, such as angiogenesis factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiotensin-2 (Ang-2). We also measured the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) after pretreatment with recombinant human IL-37 (rhIL-37). Results Serum IL-37 level was lower in the patients with MM than in the healthy control subjects, whereas VEGF and Ang-2 levels were higher, depending on International Staging System stage. Serum IL-37 level had a negative correlation to VEGF and Ang-2 levels, and VEGF had a positive correlation to Ang-2 level. The tube formation of HUVECs was suppressed by the rhIL-37 pretreatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that serum level of IL-37 plays a part in the pathophysiology of MM progression. Therefore, IL-37 serum level may be a biomarker for disease stage and angiogenesis processes. PMID:27807338

  8. Analysis of multiple components involved in the interaction between Cryptococcus neoformans and Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Juliana; Albuquerque, Priscila C; Wolf, Julie M; Nascimento, Renata; Pereira, Marcos D; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an environmental fungus that can cause lethal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. The mechanisms by which environmental microbes become pathogenic to mammals are still obscure, but different studies suggest that fungal virulence evolved from selection imposed by environmental predators. The soil-living Acanthamoeba castellanii is a well-known predator of C. neoformans. In this work, we evaluated the participation of C. neoformans virulence-associated structures in the interaction of fungal cells with A. castellanii. Fungal extracellular vesicles (EVs) and the polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) were internalized by A. castellanii with no impact on the viability of amoebal cells. EVs, but not free GXM, modulated antifungal properties of A. castellanii by inducing enhanced yeast survival. Phagocytosis of C. neoformans by amoebal cells and the pathogenic potential in a Galleria mellonella model were not affected by EVs, but previous interactions with A. castellanii rendered fungal cells more efficient in killing this invertebrate host. This observation was apparently associated with marked amoeba-induced changes in surface architecture and increased resistance to both oxygen- and nitrogen-derived molecular species. Our results indicate that multiple components with the potential to impact pathogenesis are involved in C. neoformans environmental interactions. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Low Expression of IL-37 Involved in Multiple Myeloma - Associated Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zun-Chang; Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qing; Fu, Hong-Jie

    2016-11-03

    BACKGROUND Angiogenesis plays a significant role in complex inflammatory and angiogenic processes and is also involved in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis. IL-37 is a proinflammatory cytokine in antitumor activity. Our purpose was to evaluate the IL-37 clinical significance on MM. MATERIAL AND METHODS We measured serum levels of IL-37 in 45 patients with different stages of MM and 30 healthy control subjects and correlated IL-37 with numerous cytokines, such as angiogenesis factors including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiotensin-2 (Ang-2). We also measured the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) after pretreatment with recombinant human IL-37 (rhIL-37). RESULTS Serum IL-37 level was lower in the patients with MM than in the healthy control subjects, whereas VEGF and Ang-2 levels were higher, depending on International Staging System stage. Serum IL-37 level had a negative correlation to VEGF and Ang-2 levels, and VEGF had a positive correlation to Ang-2 level. The tube formation of HUVECs was suppressed by the rhIL-37 pretreatment. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that serum level of IL-37 plays a part in the pathophysiology of MM progression. Therefore, IL-37 serum level may be a biomarker for disease stage and angiogenesis processes.

  10. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B; Sørensen, Kasper K; Jensen, Knud J; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  11. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-01-01

    LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed. PMID:25760608

  12. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  13. Phylogenomic study of lipid genes involved in microalgal biofuel production-candidate gene mining and metabolic pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their conserved motif/domain organization and phylogenetic profile. The results indicated that the core lipid metabolic pathways in all the species are carried out by a comparable number of orthologous proteins. Although the fundamental gene organizations were observed to be invariantly conserved between microalgae and Arabidopsis genome, with increased order of genome complexity there seems to be an association with more number of genes involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and catabolism. Further, phylogenomic analysis of the genes provided insights into the molecular evolution of lipid biosynthetic pathway in microalgae and confirm the close evolutionary proximity between the Streptophyte and Chlorophyte lineages. Together, these studies will improve our understanding of the global lipid metabolic pathway and contribute to the engineering of regulatory networks of algal strains for higher accumulation of oil.

  14. Phylogenomic Study of Lipid Genes Involved in Microalgal Biofuel Production—Candidate Gene Mining and Metabolic Pathway Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Namrata; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Parida, Bikram Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing microalgal biofuel production using metabolic engineering tools requires an in-depth understanding of the structure-function relationship of genes involved in lipid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, genome-wide identification and characterization of 398 putative genes involved in lipid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Volvox carteri, Ostreococcus lucimarinus, Ostreococcus tauri and Cyanidioschyzon merolae was undertaken on the basis of their conserved motif/domain organization and phylogenetic profile. The results indicated that the core lipid metabolic pathways in all the species are carried out by a comparable number of orthologous proteins. Although the fundamental gene organizations were observed to be invariantly conserved between microalgae and Arabidopsis genome, with increased order of genome complexity there seems to be an association with more number of genes involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and catabolism. Further, phylogenomic analysis of the genes provided insights into the molecular evolution of lipid biosynthetic pathway in microalgae and confirm the close evolutionary proximity between the Streptophyte and Chlorophyte lineages. Together, these studies will improve our understanding of the global lipid metabolic pathway and contribute to the engineering of regulatory networks of algal strains for higher accumulation of oil. PMID:23032611

  15. Simple and Efficient Targeting of Multiple Genes Through CRISPR-Cas9 in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Hoffmann, Beate; Géry, Carine; Guyon-Debast, Anouchka; Téoulé, Evelyne; Rameau, Catherine; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Nogué, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Powerful genome editing technologies are needed for efficient gene function analysis. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient gene-knock-out technology in a variety of species. However, in a number of situations, knocking out or modifying a single gene is not sufficient; this is particularly true for genes belonging to a common family, or for genes showing redundant functions. Like many plants, the model organism Physcomitrella patens has experienced multiple events of polyploidization during evolution that has resulted in a number of families of duplicated genes. Here, we report a robust CRISPR-Cas9 system, based on the codelivery of a CAS9 expressing cassette, multiple sgRNA vectors, and a cassette for transient transformation selection, for gene knock-out in multiple gene families. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated targeting of five different genes allows the selection of a quintuple mutant, and all possible subcombinations of mutants, in one experiment, with no mutations detected in potential off-target sequences. Furthermore, we confirmed the observation that the presence of repeats in the vicinity of the cutting region favors deletion due to the alternative end joining pathway, for which induced frameshift mutations can be potentially predicted. Because the number of multiple gene families in Physcomitrella is substantial, this tool opens new perspectives to study the role of expanded gene families in the colonization of land by plants. PMID:27613750

  16. Functional Identification of Novel Genes Involved in the Glutathione-Independent Gentisate Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xi-Hui; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum used gentisate and 3-hydroxybenzoate as its sole carbon and energy source for growth. By genome-wide data mining, a gene cluster designated ncg12918-ncg12923 was proposed to encode putative proteins involved in gentisate/3-hydroxybenzoate pathway. Genes encoding gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (ncg12920) and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase (ncg12919) were identified by cloning and expression of each gene in Escherichia coli. The gene of ncg12918 encoding a hypothetical protein (Ncg12918) was proved to be essential for gentisate-3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Mutant strain RES167Δncg12918 lost the ability to grow on gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate, but this ability could be restored in C. glutamicum upon the complementation with pXMJ19-ncg12918. Cloning and expression of this ncg12918 gene in E. coli showed that Ncg12918 is a glutathione-independent maleylpyruvate isomerase. Upstream of ncg12920, the genes ncg12921-ncg12923 were located, which were essential for gentisate and/or 3-hydroxybenzoate catabolism. The Ncg12921 was able to up-regulate gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylpyruvate isomerase, and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase activities. The genes ncg12922 and ncg12923 were deduced to encode a gentisate transporter protein and a 3-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, respectively, and were essential for gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Based on the results obtained in this study, a GSH-independent gentisate pathway was proposed, and genes involved in this pathway were identified. PMID:16000747

  17. Microarray Technology Reveals Potentially Novel Genes and Pathways Involved in Non-Functioning Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, X; Wang, H; Wang, X; Zhao, B; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microarray data of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) were analyzed to disclose novel genes and pathways involved in NFPA tumorigenesis. Raw microarray data were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Data pre-treatment and differential analysis were conducted using packages in R. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using package GOs-tats. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using server STRING and Cytoscape. Known genes involved in pituitary adenomas (PAs), were obtained from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. A total of 604 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identifed between NFPAs and controls, including 177 up- and 427 down-regulated genes. Jak-STAT and p53 signaling pathways were significantly enriched by DEGs. The PPI network of DEGs was constructed, containing 99 up- and 288 down-regulated known disease genes (e.g. EGFR and ESR1) as well as 16 up- and 17 down-regulated potential novel NFPAs-related genes (e.g. COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR). Genes like COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR and pathways such as p53 signaling and Jak-STAT signaling, might participate in NFPA development. Although further validations are required, these findings might provide guidance for future basic and therapy researches. PMID:28289583

  18. Differential Involvement of β-Glucosidases from Hypocrea jecorina in Rapid Induction of Cellulase Genes by Cellulose and Cellobiose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingxin; Xu, Jintao; Kou, Yanbo; Lv, Xinxing; Zhang, Xi; Zhao, Guolei; Zhang, Weixin; Chen, Guanjun

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate perception of cellulose outside the cell by transforming it into an intracellular signal ensures the rapid production of cellulases by cellulolytic Hypocrea jecorina. The major extracellular β-glucosidase BglI (CEL3a) has been shown to contribute to the efficient induction of cellulase genes. Multiple β-glucosidases belonging to glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 3 and 1, however, exist in H. jecorina. Here we demonstrated that CEL1b, like CEL1a, was an intracellular β-glucosidase displaying in vitro transglycosylation activity. We then found evidence that these two major intracellular β-glucosidases were involved in the rapid induction of cellulase genes by insoluble cellulose. Deletion of cel1a and cel1b significantly compromised the efficient gene expression of the major cellulase gene, cbh1. Simultaneous absence of BglI, CEL1a, and CEL1b caused the induction of the cellulase gene by cellulose to further deteriorate. The induction defect, however, was not observed with cellobiose. The absence of the three β-glucosidases, rather, facilitated the induced synthesis of cellulase on cellobiose. Furthermore, addition of cellobiose restored the productive induction on cellulose in the deletion strains. The results indicate that the three β-glucosidases may not participate in transforming cellobiose beyond hydrolysis to provoke cellulase formation in H. jecorina. They may otherwise contribute to the accumulation of cellobiose from cellulose as inducing signals. PMID:23002106

  19. Investigation of autism and GABA receptor subunit genes in multiple ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Ann L.; Ma, Deqiong; Whitehead, Patrice L.; Martin, Eden R.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Hussman, John P.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Gilbert, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder of complex genetics, characterized by impairment in social interaction and communication, as well as repetitive behavior. Multiple lines of evidence, including alterations in levels of GABA and GABA receptors in autistic patients, indicate that the GABAergic system, which is responsible for synaptic inhibition in the adult brain, may be involved in autism. Previous studies in our lab indicated association of noncoding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a GABA receptor subunit gene on chromosome 4, GABRA4, and interaction between SNPs in GABRA4 and GABRB1 (also on chromosome 4), within Caucasian autism patients. Studies of genetic variation in African-American autism families are rare. Analysis of 557 Caucasian and an independent population of 54 African-American families with 35 SNPs within GABRB1 and GABRA4 strengthened the evidence for involvement of GABRA4 in autism risk in Caucasians (rs17599165, p=0.0015; rs1912960, p=0.0073; and rs17599416, p=0.0040) and gave evidence of significant association in African-Americans (rs2280073, p=0.0287 and rs16859788, p=0.0253). The GABRA4 and GABRB1 interaction was also confirmed in the Caucasian dataset (most significant pair, rs1912960 and rs2351299; p=0.004). Analysis of the subset of families with a positive history of seizure activity in at least one autism patient revealed no association to GABRA4; however, three SNPs within GABRB1 showed significant allelic association; rs2351299 (p=0.0163), rs4482737 (p=0.0339), and rs3832300 (p=0.0253). These results confirmed our earlier findings, indicating GABRA4 and GABRB1 as genes contributing to autism susceptibility, extending the effect to multiple ethnic groups and suggesting seizures as a stratifying phenotype. PMID:16770606

  20. A screen for dynein synthetic lethals in Aspergillus nidulans identifies spindle assembly checkpoint genes and other genes involved in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Efimov, V P; Morris, N R

    1998-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a ubiquitously expressed microtubule motor involved in vesicle transport, mitosis, nuclear migration, and spindle orientation. In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, inactivation of cytoplasmic dynein, although not lethal, severely impairs nuclear migration. The role of dynein in mitosis and vesicle transport in this organism is unclear. To investigate the complete range of dynein function in A. nidulans, we searched for synthetic lethal mutations that significantly reduced growth in the absence of dynein but had little effect on their own. We isolated 19 sld (synthetic lethality without dynein) mutations in nine different genes. Mutations in two genes exacerbate the nuclear migration defect seen in the absence of dynein. Mutations in six other genes, including sldA and sldB, show a strong synthetic lethal interaction with a mutation in the mitotic kinesin bimC and, thus, are likely to play a role in mitosis. Mutations in sldA and sldB also confer hypersensitivity to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl. sldA and sldB were cloned by complementation of their mutant phenotypes using an A. nidulans autonomously replicating vector. Sequencing revealed homology to the spindle assembly checkpoint genes BUB1 and BUB3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic interaction between dynein and spindle assembly checkpoint genes, as well as other mitotic genes, indicates that A. nidulans dynein plays a role in mitosis. We suggest a model for dynein motor action in A. nidulans that can explain dynein involvement in both mitosis and nuclear distribution. PMID:9584089

  1. Comparative Genomics Uncovers Unique Gene Turnover and Evolutionary Rates in a Gene Family Involved in the Detection of Insect Cuticular Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Almeida, Francisca C.; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Chemoreception is an essential process for the survival and reproduction of animals. Many of the proteins responsible for recognizing and transmitting chemical stimuli in insects are encoded by genes that are members of moderately sized multigene families. The members of the CheB family are specialized in gustatory-mediated detection of long-chain hydrocarbon pheromones in Drosophila melanogaster and play a central role in triggering and modulating mating behavior in this species. Here, we present a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis of the CheB family across 12 species of the Drosophila genus. We have identified a total of 102 new CheB genes in the genomes of these species, including a functionally divergent member previously uncharacterized in D. melanogaster. We found that, despite its relatively small repertory size, the CheB family has undergone multiple gain and loss events and various episodes of diversifying selection during the divergence of the surveyed species. Present estimates of gene turnover and coding sequence substitution rates show that this family is evolving faster than any known Drosophila chemosensory family. To date, only other insect gustatory-related genes among these families had shown evolutionary dynamics close to those observed in CheBs. Our findings reveal the high adaptive potential of molecular components of the gustatory system in insects and anticipate a key role of genes involved in this sensory modality in species adaptation and diversification.

  2. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; ZHU, MINGHUI; LI, YANG

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy. PMID:24944708

  3. An atlas of gene regulatory networks reveals multiple three-gene mechanisms for interpreting morphogen gradients

    PubMed Central

    Cotterell, James; Sharpe, James

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of morphogen gradients is a pivotal concept in developmental biology, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how gene regulatory networks (GRNs) achieve concentration-dependent responses. However, the number of different mechanisms that may exist for cells to interpret morphogens, and the importance of design features such as feedback or local cell–cell communication, is unclear. A complete understanding of such systems will require going beyond a case-by-case analysis of real morphogen interpretation mechanisms and mapping out a complete GRN ‘design space.' Here, we generate a first atlas of design space for GRNs capable of patterning a homogeneous field of cells into discrete gene expression domains by interpreting a fixed morphogen gradient. We uncover multiple very distinct mechanisms distributed discretely across the atlas, thereby expanding the repertoire of morphogen interpretation network motifs. Analyzing this diverse collection of mechanisms also allows us to predict that local cell–cell communication will rarely be responsible for the basic dose-dependent response of morphogen interpretation networks. PMID:21045819

  4. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  5. A Developmentally Regulated Gene Cluster Involved in Conidial Pigment Biosynthesis in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huei-Fung; Wheeler, Michael H.; Chang, Yun C.; Kwon-Chung, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a filamentous fungus producing bluish-green conidia, is an important opportunistic pathogen that primarily affects immunocompromised patients. Conidial pigmentation of A. fumigatus significantly influences its virulence in a murine model. In the present study, six genes, forming a gene cluster spanning 19 kb, were identified as involved in conidial pigment biosynthesis in A. fumigatus. Northern blot analyses showed the six genes to be developmentally regulated and expressed during conidiation. The gene products of alb1 (for “albino 1”), arp1 (for “aspergillus reddish-pink 1”), and arp2 have high similarity to polyketide synthases, scytalone dehydratases, and hydroxynaphthalene reductases, respectively, found in the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin pathway of brown and black fungi. The abr1 gene (for “aspergillus brown 1”) encodes a putative protein possessing two signatures of multicopper oxidases. The abr2 gene product has homology to the laccase encoded by the yA gene of Aspergillus nidulans. The function of ayg1 (for “aspergillus yellowish-green 1”) remains unknown. Involvement of the six genes in conidial pigmentation was confirmed by the altered conidial color phenotypes that resulted from disruption of each gene in A. fumigatus. The presence of a DHN-melanin pathway in A. fumigatus was supported by the accumulation of scytalone and flaviolin in the arp1 deletant, whereas only flaviolin was accumulated in the arp2 deletants. Scytalone and flaviolin are well-known signature metabolites of the DHN-melanin pathway. Based on DNA sequence similarity, gene disruption results, and biochemical analyses, we conclude that the 19-kb DNA fragment contains a six-gene cluster which is required for conidial pigment biosynthesis in A. fumigatus. However, the presence of abr1, abr2, and ayg1 in addition to alb1, arp1, and arp2 suggests that conidial pigment biosynthesis in A. fumigatus is more complex than the known DHN-melanin pathway

  6. Identification of key genes involved in polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis in Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Peize; Li, Zhipeng; Yu, Wencheng; Wang, Zhi; Yao, Haosheng; Wang, Yuanpeng; Li, Qingbiao; Deng, Xu; He, Ning

    2017-03-01

    The present study reports the sequenced genome of Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC 2876, which is composed of a 4,284,461 bp chromosome that contains 4,188 protein-coding genes, 72 tRNA genes, and 21 rRNA genes. Additional analysis revealed an eps gene cluster with 16 open reading frames. Conserved Domains Database analysis combined with qPCR experiments indicated that all genes in this cluster were involved in polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis. Phosphoglucomutase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were supposed to be key enzymes in polysaccharide secretion in B. licheniformis. A biosynthesis pathway for the production of polysaccharide bioflocculant involving the integration of individual genes was proposed based on functional analysis. Overexpression of epsDEF from the eps gene cluster in B. licheniformis CGMCC 2876 increased the flocculating activity of the recombinant strain by 90% compared to the original strain. Similarly, the crude yield of polysaccharide bioflocculant was enhanced by 27.8%. Overexpression of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene not only increased the flocculating activity by 71% but also increased bioflocculant yield by 13.3%. Independent of UDP-N-acetyl-D-mannosamine dehydrogenase gene, flocculating activity, and polysaccharide yield were negatively impacted by overexpression of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase gene. Overall, epsDEF and gtaB2 were identified as key genes for polysaccharide bioflocculant synthesis in B. licheniformis. These results will be useful for further engineering of B. licheniformis for industrial bioflocculant production. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 645-655. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Deciphering the onychophoran 'segmentation gene cascade': Gene expression reveals limited involvement of pair rule gene orthologs in segmentation, but a highly conserved segment polarity gene network.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    The hallmark of the arthropods is their segmented body, although origin of segmentation, however, is unresolved. In order to shed light on the origin of segmentation we investigated orthologs of pair rule genes (PRGs) and segment polarity genes (SPGs) in a member of the closest related sister-group to the arthropods, the onychophorans. Our gene expression data analysis suggests that most of the onychophoran PRGs do not play a role in segmentation. One possible exception is the even-skipped (eve) gene that is expressed in the posterior end of the onychophoran where new segments are likely patterned, and is also expressed in segmentation-gene typical transverse stripes in at least a number of newly formed segments. Other onychophoran PRGs such as runt (run), hairy/Hes (h/Hes) and odd-skipped (odd) do not appear to have a function in segmentation at all. Onychophoran PRGs that act low in the segmentation gene cascade in insects, however, are potentially involved in segment-patterning. Most obvious is that from the expression of the pairberry (pby) gene ortholog that is expressed in a typical SPG-pattern. Since this result suggested possible conservation of the SPG-network we further investigated SPGs (and associated factors) such as Notum in the onychophoran. We find that the expression patterns of SPGs in arthropods and the onychophoran are highly conserved, suggesting a conserved SPG-network in these two clades, and indeed also in an annelid. This may suggest that the common ancestor of lophotrochozoans and ecdysozoans was already segmented utilising the same SPG-network, or that the SPG-network was recruited independently in annelids and onychophorans/arthropods.

  8. sugE: A gene involved in tributyltin (TBT) resistance of Aeromonas molluscorum Av27.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andreia; Micaelo, Nuno; Félix, Vitor; Song, Jun-Young; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Satoru; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of bacterial resistance to tributyltin (TBT) is still unclear. The results herein presented contribute to clarify that mechanism in the TBT-resistant bacterium Aeromonas molluscorum Av27. We have identified and cloned a new gene that is involved in TBT resistance in this strain. The gene is highly homologous (84%) to the Aeromonas hydrophila-sugE gene belonging to the small multidrug resistance gene family (SMR), which includes genes involved in the transport of lipophilic drugs. In Av27, expression of the Av27-sugE was observed at the early logarithmic growth phase in the presence of a high TBT concentration (500 μM), thus suggesting the contribution of this gene for TBT resistance. E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to ethidium bromide (EtBr), chloramphenicol (CP) and tetracycline (TE), besides TBT. According to the Moriguchi logP (miLogP) values, EtBr, CP and TE have similar properties and are substrates for the sugE-efflux system. Despite the different miLogP of TBT, E. coli cells transformed with Av27-sugE become resistant to this compound. So it seems that TBT is also a substrate for the SugE protein. The modelling studies performed also support this hypothesis. The data herein presented clearly indicate that sugE is involved in TBT resistance of this bacterium.

  9. Selank Administration Affects the Expression of Some Genes Involved in GABAergic Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Volkova, Anastasiya; Shadrina, Maria; Kolomin, Timur; Andreeva, Lyudmila; Limborska, Svetlana; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Slominsky, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown the similarity of the spectrum of physiological effects of Selank and classical benzodiazepines, such as diazepam and phenazepam. These data suggest that there is a similar basis of their mechanism of action. To test this hypothesis we studied the effect of Selank and GABA on the expression of genes involved in neurotransmission. We analyzed the expression of 84 genes involved in neurotransmission (e.g., major subunit of the GABA receptor, transporters, ion channels, dopamine, and serotonin receptors) in the frontal cortex of rats 1 and 3 h after the administration of Selank or GABA (300 μg/kg) using real-time PCR method. We found significant changes in the expression of 45 genes 1 h after the administration of the compounds. Three hours after Selank or GABA administration, 22 genes changed their expression. We found positive correlation between the changes in genes expression within 1 h after administration of Selank or GABA. Our results showed that Selank caused a number of alterations in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmission. The data obtained indicate that Selank is characterized by its complex effects on nerve cells, and one of its possible molecular mechanisms is associated with allosteric modulation of the GABAergic system. PMID:26924987

  10. Gene expression analysis reveals that Delta/Notch signalling is not involved in onychophoran segmentation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ralf; Budd, Graham E

    2016-03-01

    Delta/Notch (Dl/N) signalling is involved in the gene regulatory network underlying the segmentation process in vertebrates and possibly also in annelids and arthropods, leading to the hypothesis that segmentation may have evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterian animals. Because of seemingly contradicting results within the well-studied arthropods, however, the role and origin of Dl/N signalling in segmentation generally is still unclear. In this study, we investigate core components of Dl/N signalling by means of gene expression analysis in the onychophoran Euperipatoides kanangrensis, a close relative to the arthropods. We find that neither Delta or Notch nor any other investigated components of its signalling pathway are likely to be involved in segment addition in onychophorans. We instead suggest that Dl/N signalling may be involved in posterior elongation, another conserved function of these genes. We suggest further that the posterior elongation network, rather than classic Dl/N signalling, may be in the control of the highly conserved segment polarity gene network and the lower-level pair-rule gene network in onychophorans. Consequently, we believe that the pair-rule gene network and its interaction with Dl/N signalling may have evolved within the arthropod lineage and that Dl/N signalling has thus likely been recruited independently for segment addition in different phyla.

  11. Assessment of Sugar Components and Genes Involved in the Regulation of Sucrose Accumulation in Peach Fruit.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Zheng, Hongyu; Peng, Qian; Jiang, Quan; Wang, Huiliang; Fang, Ting; Liao, Liao; Wang, Lu; He, Huaping; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-09-07

    Soluble sugar contents in mature fruits of 45 peach accessions were quantified using gas chromatography analysis. Sucrose is the predominant sugar in mature fruit, followed by glucose and fructose, which have similar concentrations. Overall, sucrose metabolism and accumulation are crucial determinants of sugar content in peach fruit, and there is a w