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Sample records for multiple gene loci

  1. Identification of multiple genetic loci that regulate adenovirus gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-G; Hsu, H-C; Yang, P-A; Yang, X; Wu, Q; Liu, Z; Yi, N; Mountz, J D

    2004-01-01

    A key aspect of the immune response to adenovirus (Ad) gene therapy is the generation of a cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) response. To better understand the genetic network underlying these events, 20 strains of C57BL/6 x DBA/2 (BXD) recombinant inbred (RI) mice were administered with AdLacZ and analyzed at days 7, 21, 30, and 50 for liver beta-galactosidase (LacZ) expression and CTL response. Sera levels of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed at different times after AdLacZ. There was a distinct strain-dependent expression of LacZ, which was strongly correlated with the CTL response. Among the five BXD RI strains that exhibited significantly prolonged LacZ expression, four also exhibited a marked defect in the production of Ad-specific CTL. There was a strong correlation between the sera levels of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-6, but cytokine responses were not significantly correlated with LacZ expression or the CTL response. Quantitative trait loci regulating LacZ on day 30 were found on chromosome (Chr) 19 (33 cM) and Chr 15 (42.8 cM). Cytotoxicity mapped to Chr 7 (41.0 and 57.4-65.2 cM), Chr 15 (61.7 cM), and Chr X (27.8 cM). IFN-gamma production mapped to Chr 18 (22, 27, and 32 cM) and Chr 11 (64.0 cM). TNF-alpha and IL-6 production mapped to Chr 6 (91.5 cM) Chr 9 (42.0 cM) and Chr 8 (52 and 73.0 cM). These results indicate that different strains of mice exhibit different pathways for effective clearance of AdLacZ depending on genetic polymorphisms and interactions at multiple genetic loci.

  2. SATB1 tethers multiple gene loci to reprogram expression profiledriving breast cancer metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hye-Jung; Kohwi, Yoshinori; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-07-13

    Global changes in gene expression occur during tumor progression, as indicated by expression profiling of metastatic tumors. How this occurs is poorly understood. SATB1 functions as a genome organizer by folding chromatin via tethering multiple genomic loci and recruiting chromatin remodeling enzymes to regulate chromatin structure and expression of a large number of genes. Here we show that SATB1 is expressed at high levels in aggressive breast cancer cells, and is undetectable in non-malignant breast epithelial cells. Importantly, RNAi-mediated removal of SATB1 from highly-aggressive MDA-MB-231 cells altered the expression levels of over 1200 genes, restored breast-like acinar polarity in three-dimensional cultures, and prevented the metastastic phenotype in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of SATB1 in the less-aggressive breast cancer cell line Hs578T altered the gene expression profile and increased metastasis dramatically in vivo. Thus, SATB1 is a global regulator of gene expression in breast cancer cells, directly regulating crucial metastasis-associated genes, including ERRB2 (HER2/NEU), TGF-{beta}1, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and metastasin. The identification of SATB1 as a protein that re-programs chromatin organization and transcription profiles to promote breast cancer metastasis suggests a new model for metastasis and may provide means of therapeutic intervention.

  3. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-analysis across 32 Studies Identifies Multiple Lipid Loci

    PubMed Central

    Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Guo, Yiran; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Tragante, Vinicius; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Lange, Leslie A.; Almoguera, Berta; Appelman, Yolande E.; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gong, Yan; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Johnson, Toby; Kleber, Marcus E.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Mingyao; Li, Yun R.; Liu, Kiang; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Middelberg, Rita P.S.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nelson, Christopher P.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Rafelt, Suzanne; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqing; Smith, Erin N.; Tischfield, Sam E.; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Volcik, Kelly A.; Zhang, Li; Bailey, Kent R.; Bailey, Kristian M.; Bauer, Florianne; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Braund, Peter S.; Burt, Amber; Burton, Paul R.; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; deJong, Jonas S.; Delles, Christian; Duggan, David; Fornage, Myriam; Furlong, Clement E.; Glazer, Nicole; Gums, John G.; Hastie, Claire; Holmes, Michael V.; Illig, Thomas; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kivimaki, Mika; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kumari, Meena; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Mallela, Laya; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Ordovas, Jose; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Post, Wendy S.; Saxena, Richa; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Shah, Tina; Shields, Denis C.; Shimbo, Daichi; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Taylor, Herman A.; Topol, Eric J.; Toskala, Elina; van Pelt, Joost L.; van Setten, Jessica; Yusuf, Salim; Whittaker, John C.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Anand, Sonia S.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Clarke, Robert; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Davidson, Karina W.; Day, Ian N.M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofker, Marten H.; Humphries, Steve E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kaess, Bernhard M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lawlor, Debbie A.; März, Winfried; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Murray, Sarah S.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce; Redline, Susan; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schunkert, Heribert; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Stanton, Alice; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; Tsai, Michael Y.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, Ellen; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W.M. Monique; Watkins, Hugh; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Whitfield, John B.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Reilly, Muredach P.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wilson, James G.; Rader, Daniel J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Reiner, Alex P.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elbers, Clara C.; Keating, Brendan J.; Drenos, Fotios

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), and triglycerides (TGs), can be identified by a dense gene-centric approach. Our meta-analysis of 32 studies in 66,240 individuals of European ancestry was based on the custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) covering ∼2,000 candidate genes. SNP-lipid associations were replicated either in a cohort comprising an additional 24,736 samples or within the Global Lipid Genetic Consortium. We identified four, six, ten, and four unreported SNPs in established lipid genes for HDL-C, LDL-C, TC, and TGs, respectively. We also identified several lipid-related SNPs in previously unreported genes: DGAT2, HCAR2, GPIHBP1, PPARG, and FTO for HDL-C; SOCS3, APOH, SPTY2D1, BRCA2, and VLDLR for LDL-C; SOCS3, UGT1A1, BRCA2, UBE3B, FCGR2A, CHUK, and INSIG2 for TC; and SERPINF2, C4B, GCK, GATA4, INSR, and LPAL2 for TGs. The proportion of explained phenotypic variance in the subset of studies providing individual-level data was 9.9% for HDL-C, 9.5% for LDL-C, 10.3% for TC, and 8.0% for TGs. This large meta-analysis of lipid phenotypes with the use of a dense gene-centric approach identified multiple SNPs not previously described in established lipid genes and several previously unknown loci. The explained phenotypic variance from this approach was comparable to that from a meta-analysis of GWAS data, suggesting that a focused genotyping approach can further increase the understanding of heritability of plasma lipids. PMID:23063622

  4. A convenient method for multiple insertions of desired genes into target loci on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Koma, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Hayato; Moriyoshi, Kunihiko; Ohmoto, Takashi; Sakai, Kiyofumi

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method to insert multiple desired genes into target loci on the Escherichia coli chromosome. The method was based on Red-mediated recombination, flippase and the flippase recognition target recombination, and P1 transduction. Using this method, six copies of the lacZ gene could be simultaneously inserted into different loci on the E. coli chromosome. The inserted lacZ genes were functionally expressed, and β-galactosidase activity increased in proportion to the number of inserted lacZ genes. This method was also used for metabolic engineering to generate overproducers of aromatic compounds. Important genes of the shikimate pathway (aroF (fbr) and tyrA (fbr) or aroF (fbr) and pheA (fbr)) were introduced into the chromosome to generate a tyrosine or a phenylalanine overproducer. Moreover, a heterologous decarboxylase gene was introduced into the chromosome of the tyrosine or phenylalanine overproducer to generate a tyramine or a phenethylamine overproducer, respectively. The resultant strains selectively overproduced the target aromatic compounds. Thus, the developed method is a convenient tool for the metabolic engineering of E. coli for the production of valuable compounds.

  5. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 32 studies identifies multiple lipid loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many SNPs underlying variations in plasma-lipid levels. We explore whether additional loci associated with plasma-lipid phenotypes, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholest...

  6. Dothistromin genes at multiple separate loci are regulated by AflR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, genes involved in the production of secondary metabolites are generally clustered at one location. There are some exceptions, such as genes required for synthesis of dothistromin, a toxin that is a chemical analog of the aflatoxin precursor versicolorin A and made by the pine needle pathog...

  7. Multiple loci and genetic interactions involving flowering time genes regulate stem branching among natural variants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueqing; Ding, Jia; Effgen, Sigi; Turck, Franziska; Koornneef, Maarten

    2013-08-01

    Shoot branching is a major determinant of plant architecture. Genetic variants for reduced stem branching in the axils of cauline leaves of Arabidopsis were found in some natural accessions and also at low frequency in the progeny of multiparent crosses. Detailed genetic analysis using segregating populations derived from backcrosses with the parental lines and bulked segregant analysis was used to identify the allelic variation controlling reduced stem branching. Eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to natural variation for reduced stem branching were identified (REDUCED STEM BRANCHING 1-8 (RSB1-8)). Genetic analysis showed that RSB6 and RSB7, corresponding to flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FRIGIDA (FRI), epistatically regulate stem branching. Furthermore, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which corresponds to RSB8 as demonstrated by fine-mapping, transgenic complementation and expression analysis, caused pleiotropic effects not only on flowering time, but, in the specific background of active FRI and FLC alleles, also on the RSB trait. The consequence of allelic variation only expressed in late-flowering genotypes revealed novel and thus far unsuspected roles of several genes well characterized for their roles in flowering time control.

  8. Spatiotemporal regulation of multiple overlapping sense and novel natural antisense transcripts at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 gene loci during mouse cerebral corticogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ling, King-Hwa; Hewitt, Chelsee A; Beissbarth, Tim; Hyde, Lavinia; Cheah, Pike-See; Smyth, Gordon K; Tan, Seong-Seng; Hahn, Christopher N; Thomas, Tim; Thomas, Paul Q; Scott, Hamish S

    2011-03-01

    Nrgn and Camk2n1 are highly expressed in the brain and play an important role in synaptic long-term potentiation via regulation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. We have shown that the gene loci for these 2 proteins are actively transcribed in the adult cerebral cortex and feature multiple overlapping transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientations with alternative polyadenylation. These transcripts were upregulated in the adult compared with embryonic and P1.5 mouse cerebral cortices, and transcripts with different 3' untranslated region lengths showed differing expression profiles. In situ hybridization (ISH) analysis revealed spatiotemporal regulation of the Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) throughout cerebral corticogenesis. In addition, we also demonstrated that the expression of these transcripts was organ-specific. Both Nrgn and Camk2n1 sense and NATs were also upregulated in differentiating P19 teratocarcinoma cells. RNA fluorescent ISH analysis confirmed the capability of these NATs to form double-stranded RNA aggregates with the sense transcripts in the cytoplasm of cells obtained from the brain. We propose that the differential regulation of multiple sense and novel overlapping NATs at the Nrgn and Camk2n1 loci will increase the diversity of posttranscriptional regulation, resulting in cell- and time-specific regulation of their gene products during cerebral corticogenesis and function.

  9. Mixed Modeling of Meta-Analysis P-Values (MixMAP) Suggests Multiple Novel Gene Loci for Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Foulkes, Andrea S.; Matthews, Gregory J.; Das, Ujjwal; Ferguson, Jane F.; Lin, Rongheng; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2013-01-01

    Informing missing heritability for complex disease will likely require leveraging information across multiple SNPs within a gene region simultaneously to characterize gene and locus-level contributions to disease phenotypes. To this aim, we introduce a novel strategy, termed Mixed modeling of Meta-Analysis P-values (MixMAP), that draws on a principled statistical modeling framework and the vast array of summary data now available from genetic association studies, to test formally for locus level association. The primary inputs to this approach are: (a) single SNP level p-values for tests of association; and (b) the mapping of SNPs to genomic regions. The output of MixMAP is comprised of locus level estimates and tests of association. In application of MixMAP to summary data from the Global Lipids Gene Consortium, we suggest twelve new loci (PKN, FN1, UGT1A1, PPARG, DMDGH, PPARD, CDK6, VPS13B, GAD2, GAB2, APOH and NPC1) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease and we also demonstrate the potential utility of MixMAP in small data settings. Overall, MixMAP offers novel and complementary information as compared to SNP-based analysis approaches and is straightforward to implement with existing open-source statistical software tools. PMID:23405096

  10. Systematics of Plant-Pathogenic and Related Streptomyces Species Based on Phylogenetic Analyses of Multiple Gene Loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 10 species of Streptomyces implicated as the etiological agents in scab disease of potatoes or soft rot disease of sweet potatoes are distributed among 7 different phylogenetic clades in analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, but high sequence similarity of this gene among Streptomyces speci...

  11. Fine mapping analysis of HLA-DP/DQ gene clusters on chromosome 6 reveals multiple susceptibility loci for HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jingjing; Su, Kunkai; Yu, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaoli; Wu, Wei; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Bingxun; Luo, Rui; Yao, Jian; Zhou, Jiawei; Zhan, Yan; Ye, Chao; Yuan, Wenji; Jiang, Xianzhong; Cui, Wenyan; Li, Ming D; Li, Lianjuan

    2015-12-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed the HLA region on chromosome 6p21 as a susceptibility locus for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a finding subsequently replicated in independent samples. However, only limited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed in most of these studies, and it remains to be determined which SNPs contribute to the detected association. After genotyping 140 SNPs within this genomic region in a total of 1657 HBV-positive patients and 1456 HBV-negative controls, we conducted a series of genetic epidemiological and bioinformatics analysis, including individual SNP-based association analysis, haplotype-based association analysis, and conditional analysis. We identified 76 SNPs and 5 LD blocks in HLA-DP/DQ clusters that are significantly associated with HBV infection, with the smallest P value being 3.88 × 10(-18) for rs9277535 in HLA-DPB1. With conditional analysis, we further revealed that the genes contributing to the effects of variants in HLA-DP/DQ on infection are independent of each other, and the LD block 5 in the 3'-UTR region of HLA-DPB1 had a predominant effect in the association of HLA-DP with HBV infection. We also found that the SNPs in the 3'-UTR region of HLA-DPB1 were significant between the subgroups of inactive HBV carrier, chronic hepatitis B, or hepatic cirrhosis from the case group and the spontaneous HBV-clearance subgroup from the control group. Finally, we did further association analysis of SNPs in this region with different subgroups from the case group, which revealed no association of these SNPs with the progression of HBV-related diseases. In sum, we showed, for the first time, that the HLA-DP/DQ clusters contribute independently to HBV infection, and the 3'-UTR region of HLA-DPB1 represents an important functional region involved in HBV infection.

  12. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Till F. M.; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A.; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G.; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H.; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K.; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O.; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M.; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M.; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis. PMID:27386562

  13. Unguided Species Delimitation Using DNA Sequence Data from Multiple Loci

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ziheng; Rannala, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed for simultaneous Bayesian inference of species delimitation and species phylogeny using the multispecies coalescent model. The method eliminates the need for a user-specified guide tree in species delimitation and incorporates phylogenetic uncertainty in a Bayesian framework. The nearest-neighbor interchange algorithm was adapted to propose changes to the species tree, with the gene trees for multiple loci altered in the proposal to avoid conflicts with the newly proposed species tree. We also modify our previous scheme for specifying priors for species delimitation models to construct joint priors for models of species delimitation and species phylogeny. As in our earlier method, the modified algorithm integrates over gene trees, taking account of the uncertainty of gene tree topology and branch lengths given the sequence data. We conducted a simulation study to examine the statistical properties of the method using six populations (two sequences each) and a true number of three species, with values of divergence times and ancestral population sizes that are realistic for recently diverged species. The results suggest that the method tends to be conservative with high posterior probabilities being a confident indicator of species status. Simulation results also indicate that the power of the method to delimit species increases with an increase of the divergence times in the species tree, and with an increased number of gene loci. Reanalyses of two data sets of cavefish and coast horned lizards suggest considerable phylogenetic uncertainty even though the data are informative about species delimitation. We discuss the impact of the prior on models of species delimitation and species phylogeny and of the prior on population size parameters (θ) on Bayesian species delimitation. PMID:25274273

  14. Joint linkage of multiple loci for a complex disorder

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, C.J.; Kendler, K.S.; Sham, P.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Many investigators who have been searching for linkage to complex diseases have by now accumulated a drawer full of negative results. If disease is actually caused by genes at several loci, these data might contain multiple-locus system (MLS) information that the investigator does not realize. Trying to obtain this information formally, through the MLS likelihood, leads to severe computational and statistical difficulties. Therefore, the authors propose a scheme of inference based on single-locus (SL) statistics, considered jointly. By simulation, they find that the MLS lod score is closely approximated by the sum of SL lod scores. However, they also find that for moderately large systems, say three or four loci, both MLS and SL lod scores are likely to be inconclusive. Nonetheless, MLS can often be detected through the correlation of individual pedigree SL lod scores. Significant correlation is itself evidence of an MLS, because, in the absence of linkage, false-positive lod scores are necessarily random. Under epistasis SL lod scores tend to be positively correlated among pedigrees, while under independent action SL lod scores from high-density samples tend to be negatively correlated. 24 refs., 10 tabs.

  15. Identifying loci under selection against gene flow in isolation-with-migration models.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vitor C; Carneiro, Miguel; Ferrand, Nuno; Hey, Jody

    2013-05-01

    When divergence occurs in the presence of gene flow, there can arise an interesting dynamic in which selection against gene flow, at sites associated with population-specific adaptations or genetic incompatibilities, can cause net gene flow to vary across the genome. Loci linked to sites under selection may experience reduced gene flow and may experience genetic bottlenecks by the action of nearby selective sweeps. Data from histories such as these may be poorly fitted by conventional neutral model approaches to demographic inference, which treat all loci as equally subject to forces of genetic drift and gene flow. To allow for demographic inference in the face of such histories, as well as the identification of loci affected by selection, we developed an isolation-with-migration model that explicitly provides for variation among genomic regions in migration rates and/or rates of genetic drift. The method allows for loci to fall into any of multiple groups, each characterized by a different set of parameters, thus relaxing the assumption that all loci share the same demography. By grouping loci, the method can be applied to data with multiple loci and still have tractable dimensionality and statistical power. We studied the performance of the method using simulated data, and we applied the method to study the divergence of two subspecies of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

  16. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  17. Multiple loci of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae are involved in pathogenicity on bean: restoration of one lesion-deficient mutant requires two tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rich, J J; Willis, D K

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of lesion-forming ability was undertaken in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, causal agent of bacterial brown spot disease of bean. Following a screen of 6,401 Tn5-containing derivatives of B728a on bean pods, 26 strains that did not form disease lesions were identified. Nine of the mutant strains were defective in the ability to elicit the hypersensitive reaction (HR) and were shown to contain Tn5 insertions within the P. syringae pv. syringae hrp region. Ten HR+ mutants were defective in the production of the toxin syringomycin, and a region of the chromosome implicated in the biosynthesis of syringomycin was deleted in a subset of these mutants. The remaining seven lesion-defective mutants retained the ability to produce protease and syringomycin. Marker exchange mutagenesis confirmed that the Tn5 insertion was causal to the mutant phenotype in several lesion-defective, HR+ strains. KW239, a lesion- and syringomycin-deficient mutant, was characterized at the molecular level. Sequence analysis of the chromosomal region flanking the Tn5 within KW239 revealed strong similarities to a number of known Escherichia coli gene products and DNA sequences: the nusA operon, including the complete initiator tRNA(Met) gene, metY; a tRNA(Leu) gene; the tpiA gene product; and the MrsA protein. Removal of sequences containing the two potential tRNA genes prevented restoration of mutant KW239 in trans. The Tn5 insertions within the lesion-deficient strains examined, including KW239, were not closely linked to each other or to the lemA or gacA genes previously identified as involved in lesion formation by P. syringae pv. syringae. PMID:9079910

  18. Comprehensive SNP scan of DNA repair and DNA damage response genes reveal multiple susceptibility loci conferring risk to tobacco associated leukoplakia and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pinaki; Datta, Sayantan; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roy, Bidyut; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of DNA repair and damage response genes play major role in carcinogenesis. These variants are suspected as predisposition factors to Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). For identification of susceptible variants affecting OSCC development in Indian population, the "maximally informative" method of SNP selection from HapMap data to non-HapMap populations was applied. Three hundred twenty-five SNPs from 11 key genes involved in double strand break repair, mismatch repair and DNA damage response pathways were genotyped on a total of 373 OSCC, 253 leukoplakia and 535 unrelated control individuals. The significantly associated SNPs were validated in an additional cohort of 144 OSCC patients and 160 controls. The rs12515548 of MSH3 showed significant association with OSCC both in the discovery and validation phases (discovery P-value: 1.43E-05, replication P-value: 4.84E-03). Two SNPs (rs12360870 of MRE11A, P-value: 2.37E-07 and rs7003908 of PRKDC, P-value: 7.99E-05) were found to be significantly associated only with leukoplakia. Stratification of subjects based on amount of tobacco consumption identified SNPs that were associated with either high or low tobacco exposed group. The study reveals a synergism between associated SNPs and lifestyle factors in predisposition to OSCC and leukoplakia.

  19. Evolution of V genes from the TRV loci of mammals.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, David N; Gambón-Cerdá, Santiago; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Information concerning the evolution of T lymphocyte receptors (TCR) can be deciphered from that part of the molecule that recognizes antigen presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC), namely the variable (V) regions. The genes that code for these variable regions are found within the TCR loci. Here, we describe a study of the evolutionary origin of V genes that code for the α and β chains of the TCR loci of mammals. In particular, we demonstrate that most of the 35 TRAV and 25 TRBV conserved genes found in Primates are also found in other Eutheria, while in Marsupials, Monotremes, and Reptiles, these genes diversified in a different manner. We also show that in mammals, all TRAV genes are derived from five ancestral genes, while all TRBV genes originate from four such genes. In Reptiles, the five TRAV and three out of the four TRBV ancestral genes exist, as well as other V genes not found in mammals. We also studied the TRGV and TRDV loci from all mammals, and we show a relationship of the TRDV to the TRAV locus throughout evolutionary time.

  20. Molecularly tagged genes and quantitative trait loci in cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the release of the cucumber draft genome, significant progress has been made in molecular mapping, tagging or cloning of horticulturally important genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cucumber, which provides the foundation for practicing marker-assisted selection in cucumber breeding. ...

  1. Identification of Multiple Loci Associated with Social Parasitism in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pirk, Christian W.; Allsopp, Mike H.

    2016-01-01

    In colonies of the honeybee Apis mellifera, the queen is usually the only reproductive female, which produces new females (queens and workers) by laying fertilized eggs. However, in one subspecies of A. mellifera, known as the Cape bee (A. m. capensis), worker bees reproduce asexually by thelytoky, an abnormal form of meiosis where two daughter nucleii fuse to form single diploid eggs, which develop into females without being fertilized. The Cape bee also exhibits a suite of phenotypes that facilitate social parasitism whereby workers lay such eggs in foreign colonies so their offspring can exploit their resources. The genetic basis of this switch to social parasitism in the Cape bee is unknown. To address this, we compared genome variation in a sample of Cape bees with other African populations. We find genetic divergence between these populations to be very low on average but identify several regions of the genome with extreme differentiation. The regions are strongly enriched for signals of selection in Cape bees, indicating that increased levels of positive selection have produced the unique set of derived phenotypic traits in this subspecies. Genetic variation within these regions allows unambiguous genetic identification of Cape bees and likely underlies the genetic basis of social parasitism. The candidate loci include genes involved in ecdysteroid signaling and juvenile hormone and dopamine biosynthesis, which may regulate worker ovary activation and others whose products localize at the centrosome and are implicated in chromosomal segregation during meiosis. Functional analysis of these loci will yield insights into the processes of reproduction and chemical signaling in both parasitic and non-parasitic populations and advance understanding of the process of normal and atypical meiosis. PMID:27280405

  2. Identification of Multiple Loci Associated with Social Parasitism in Honeybees.

    PubMed

    Wallberg, Andreas; Pirk, Christian W; Allsopp, Mike H; Webster, Matthew T

    2016-06-01

    In colonies of the honeybee Apis mellifera, the queen is usually the only reproductive female, which produces new females (queens and workers) by laying fertilized eggs. However, in one subspecies of A. mellifera, known as the Cape bee (A. m. capensis), worker bees reproduce asexually by thelytoky, an abnormal form of meiosis where two daughter nucleii fuse to form single diploid eggs, which develop into females without being fertilized. The Cape bee also exhibits a suite of phenotypes that facilitate social parasitism whereby workers lay such eggs in foreign colonies so their offspring can exploit their resources. The genetic basis of this switch to social parasitism in the Cape bee is unknown. To address this, we compared genome variation in a sample of Cape bees with other African populations. We find genetic divergence between these populations to be very low on average but identify several regions of the genome with extreme differentiation. The regions are strongly enriched for signals of selection in Cape bees, indicating that increased levels of positive selection have produced the unique set of derived phenotypic traits in this subspecies. Genetic variation within these regions allows unambiguous genetic identification of Cape bees and likely underlies the genetic basis of social parasitism. The candidate loci include genes involved in ecdysteroid signaling and juvenile hormone and dopamine biosynthesis, which may regulate worker ovary activation and others whose products localize at the centrosome and are implicated in chromosomal segregation during meiosis. Functional analysis of these loci will yield insights into the processes of reproduction and chemical signaling in both parasitic and non-parasitic populations and advance understanding of the process of normal and atypical meiosis.

  3. The Impact of the Rate Prior on Bayesian Estimation of Divergence Times with Multiple Loci

    PubMed Central

    Dos Reis, Mario; Zhu, Tianqi; Yang, Ziheng

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian methods provide a powerful way to estimate species divergence times by combining information from molecular sequences with information from the fossil record. With the explosive increase of genomic data, divergence time estimation increasingly uses data of multiple loci (genes or site partitions). Widely used computer programs to estimate divergence times use independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) priors on the substitution rates for different loci. The i.i.d. prior is problematic. As the number of loci (L) increases, the prior variance of the average rate across all loci goes to zero at the rate 1/L. As a consequence, the rate prior dominates posterior time estimates when many loci are analyzed, and if the rate prior is misspecified, the estimated divergence times will converge to wrong values with very narrow credibility intervals. Here we develop a new prior on the locus rates based on the Dirichlet distribution that corrects the problematic behavior of the i.i.d. prior. We use computer simulation and real data analysis to highlight the differences between the old and new priors. For a dataset for six primate species, we show that with the old i.i.d. prior, if the prior rate is too high (or too low), the estimated divergence times are too young (or too old), outside the bounds imposed by the fossil calibrations. In contrast, with the new Dirichlet prior, posterior time estimates are insensitive to the rate prior and are compatible with the fossil calibrations. We re-analyzed a phylogenomic data set of 36 mammal species and show that using many fossil calibrations can alleviate the adverse impact of a misspecified rate prior to some extent. We recommend the use of the new Dirichlet prior in Bayesian divergence time estimation. [Bayesian inference, divergence time, relaxed clock, rate prior, partition analysis.] PMID:24658316

  4. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Liu, Jinze; MacLeod, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6%) were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3%) were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression. PMID:26713731

  5. Identification of CAD candidate genes in GWAS loci and their expression in vascular cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Erbilgin, Ayca; Civelek, Mete; Romanoski, Casey E.; Pan, Calvin; Hagopian, Raffi; Berliner, Judith A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 35 loci that significantly associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) susceptibility. The majority of the genes represented in these loci have not previously been studied in the context of atherosclerosis. To characterize the roles of these candidate genes in the vessel wall, we determined their expression levels in endothelial, smooth muscle, and macrophage cells isolated from healthy, prelesioned, and lesioned mouse aortas. We also performed expression quantitative locus (eQTL) mapping of these genes in human endothelial cells under control and proatherogenic conditions. Of the 57 genes studied, 31 were differentially expressed in one or more cell types in disease state in mice, and the expression levels of 8 were significantly associated with the CAD SNPs in human cells, 7 of which were also differentially expressed in mice. By integrating human and mouse results, we predict that PPAP2B, GALNT4, MAPKAPK5, TCTN1, SRR, SNF8, and ICAM1 play a causal role in the susceptibility to atherosclerosis through a role in the vasculature. Additionally, we highlight the genetic complexity of a subset of CAD loci through the differential expression of multiple candidate genes per locus and the involvement of genes that lie outside linkage disequilibrium blocks. PMID:23667179

  6. apex: phylogenetics with multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Jombart, Thibaut; Archer, Frederick; Schliep, Klaus; Kamvar, Zhian; Harris, Rebecca; Paradis, Emmanuel; Goudet, Jérome; Lapp, Hilmar

    2017-01-01

    Genetic sequences of multiple genes are becoming increasingly common for a wide range of organisms including viruses, bacteria and eukaryotes. While such data may sometimes be treated as a single locus, in practice, a number of biological and statistical phenomena can lead to phylogenetic incongruence. In such cases, different loci should, at least as a preliminary step, be examined and analysed separately. The r software has become a popular platform for phylogenetics, with several packages implementing distance-based, parsimony and likelihood-based phylogenetic reconstruction, and an even greater number of packages implementing phylogenetic comparative methods. Unfortunately, basic data structures and tools for analysing multiple genes have so far been lacking, thereby limiting potential for investigating phylogenetic incongruence. In this study, we introduce the new r package apex to fill this gap. apex implements new object classes, which extend existing standards for storing DNA and amino acid sequences, and provides a number of convenient tools for handling, visualizing and analysing these data. In this study, we introduce the main features of the package and illustrate its functionalities through the analysis of a simple data set.

  7. Simultaneous estimation of the locations and effects of multiple disease loci in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Chien, Li-Chu; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liang, Kung-Yee; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2015-04-01

    The genetic basis of complex diseases often involves multiple causative loci. Under such a disease etiology, assuming one disease locus in linkage disequilibrium mapping is likely to induce bias and lead to efficiency loss in disease locus estimation. An approach is needed for simultaneously localizing multiple functional loci within the same region. However, due to the increasing number of parameters accompanying disease loci, these estimates can be computationally infeasible. To circumvent this problem, we propose to estimate the main and two-adjacent-locus joint effects and a nuisance parameter at the disease loci separately through a linear approximation. Estimates of the genetic effects are entered into a generalized estimating equation to estimate disease loci, and the procedure is conducted iteratively until convergence. The proposed method provides estimates and confidence intervals (CIs) for the disease loci, the genetic main effects, and the joint effects of two adjacent disease loci, with the CIs for the disease loci providing useful regions for further fine-mapping. We apply the proposed approach to a data example of case-control studies. Results of the simulations and data example suggest that the developed method performs well in terms of bias, variance, and coverage probability under scenarios with up to three disease loci.

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Li, Ni; Weinhold, Niels; Försti, Asta; Ali, Mina; van Duin, Mark; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Johnson, David C.; Chen, Bowang; Halvarsson, Britt-Marie; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Kuiper, Rowan; Stephens, Owen W.; Bertsch, Uta; Broderick, Peter; Campo, Chiara; Einsele, Hermann; Gregory, Walter A.; Gullberg, Urban; Henrion, Marc; Hillengass, Jens; Hoffmann, Per; Jackson, Graham H.; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jöud, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurður Y.; Lenhoff, Stig; Lenive, Oleg; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Migliorini, Gabriele; Nahi, Hareth; Nelander, Sven; Nickel, Jolanta; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Ross, Fiona M.; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Thomsen, Hauke; Turesson, Ingemar; Vangsted, Annette; Vogel, Ulla; Waage, Anders; Walker, Brian A.; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Broyl, Annemiek; Davies, Faith E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Langer, Christian; Hansson, Markus; Kaiser, Martin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Stefansson, Kari; Morgan, Gareth J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Nilsson, Björn; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a significant heritable basis. Genome-wide association studies have transformed our understanding of MM predisposition, but individual studies have had limited power to discover risk loci. Here we perform a meta-analysis of these GWAS, add a new GWAS and perform replication analyses resulting in 9,866 cases and 239,188 controls. We confirm all nine known risk loci and discover eight new loci at 6p22.3 (rs34229995, P=1.31 × 10−8), 6q21 (rs9372120, P=9.09 × 10−15), 7q36.1 (rs7781265, P=9.71 × 10−9), 8q24.21 (rs1948915, P=4.20 × 10−11), 9p21.3 (rs2811710, P=1.72 × 10−13), 10p12.1 (rs2790457, P=1.77 × 10−8), 16q23.1 (rs7193541, P=5.00 × 10−12) and 20q13.13 (rs6066835, P=1.36 × 10−13), which localize in or near to JARID2, ATG5, SMARCD3, CCAT1, CDKN2A, WAC, RFWD3 and PREX1. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of MM and insight into the biological basis of tumour development. PMID:27363682

  9. Identification of multiple quantitative trait loci linked to prion disease incubation period in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Sarah E.; Onwuazor, Obia N.; Beck, Jonathan A.; Mallinson, Gary; Farrall, Martin; Targonski, Paul; Collinge, John; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the prion protein gene are known to affect prion disease incubation times and susceptibility in humans and mice. However, studies with inbred lines of mice show that large differences in incubation times occur even with the same amino acid sequence of the prion protein, suggesting that other genes may contribute to the observed variation. To identify these loci we analyzed 1,009 animals from an F2 intercross between two strains of mice, CAST/Ei and NZW/OlaHSd, with significantly different incubation periods when challenged with RML scrapie prions. Interval mapping identified three highly significantly linked regions on chromosomes 2, 11, and 12; composite interval mapping suggests that each of these regions includes multiple linked quantitative trait loci. Suggestive evidence for linkage was obtained on chromosomes 6 and 7. The sequence conservation between the mouse and human genome suggests that identification of mouse prion susceptibility alleles may have direct relevance to understanding human susceptibility to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infection, as well as identifying key factors in the molecular pathways of prion pathogenesis. However, the demonstration of other major genetic effects on incubation period suggests the need for extreme caution in interpreting estimates of variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease epidemic size utilizing existing epidemiological models. PMID:11353827

  10. Genetic and Molecular Basis of Quantitative Trait Loci of Arthritis in Rat: Genes and Polymorphisms1

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qing; Jiao, Yan; Hasty, Karen A.; Stuart, John M.; Postlethwaite, Arnold; Kang, Andrew H.; Gu, Weikuan

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, the pathogenesis of which is affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. To understand the genetic and molecular basis of RA, a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate experimental autoimmune arthritis have been identified using various rat models for RA. However, identifying the particular responsible genes within these QTL remains a major challenge. Using currently available genome data and gene annotation information, we systematically examined RA-associated genes and polymorphisms within and outside QTL over the whole rat genome. By the whole genome analysis of genes and polymorphisms, we found that there are significantly more RA-associated genes in QTL regions as contrasted with non-QTL regions. Further experimental studies are necessary to determine whether these known RA-associated genes or polymorphisms are genetic components causing the QTL effect. PMID:18606636

  11. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-09

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies.

  12. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-02

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.

  13. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  14. Multiple Loci are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Irish wolfhounds.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Ute; Vollmar, Andrea; Häggström, Jens; Thomas, Anne; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a highly prevalent and often lethal disease in Irish wolfhounds. Complex segregation analysis indicated different loci involved in pathogenesis. Linear fixed and mixed models were used for the genome-wide association study. Using 106 DCM cases and 84 controls we identified one SNP significantly associated with DCM on CFA37 and five SNPs suggestively associated with DCM on CFA1, 10, 15, 21 and 17. On CFA37 MOGAT1 and ACSL3 two enzymes of the lipid metabolism were located near the identified SNP.

  15. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

  16. Power of sib-pair and sib-trio linkage analysis with assortative mating and multiple disease loci

    SciTech Connect

    Sribney, W.M.; Swift, M. )

    1992-10-01

    Sib-pair linkage analysis has been proposed for identifying genes that predispose to common diseases. The authors have shown that the presence of assortative mating and multiple disease-susceptibility loci (genetic heterogeneity) can increase the required sample size for affected-affected sib pairs several fold over the sample size required under random mating. They propose a new test statistic based on sib trios composed of either one unaffected and two affected siblings or one affected and two unaffected siblings. The sample-size requirements under assortative mating and multiple disease loci for these sib-trio statistics are much smaller, under most conditions, than the corresponding sample sizes for sib pairs. Study designs based on data from sib trios with one or two affected members are recommended whenever assortative mating and genetic heterogeneity are suspected. 31 refs.

  17. Imprinted Genes and Satellite Loci Are Differentially Methylated in Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Clones

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Jie; Lin, Chiao-Chieh; Shen, Perng-Chih; Cheng, Winston T.K.; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Tsung-Chou; Liu, Shyh-Shyan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, genome-wide epigenetic reprogramming systems exist in primordial germ cells and zygotes. These reprogramming systems play crucial roles in regulating genome functions during critical stages of embryonic development, and they confer the stability of gene expression during mammalian development. The frequent unexpected loss of progeny from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is an ongoing problem. In this study, we used six cloned bovines (named NT-1 to NT-6), which were created by ear fibroblast nuclear transfer and displayed short life spans with multiple organ defects, as an experimental model. We focus here on three imprinted genes (IGF2, H19, and XIST) and four satellite loci (Satellite I, Satellite II, Art2, and VNTR) to investigate their methylation changes. The results revealed that aberrant methylation frequently occurred in the analyzed imprinted genes, but not in the satellite loci, of the cloned bovines. After the bovine fibroblast cells were treated with the 5-aza-2(′)-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dc) demethylation agent, the methylation percentages of the XIST and H19 putative differentially methylated region (DMR) were significantly decreased (XIST, p<0.01; H19, p<0.05) followed by an increase in their mRNA expression levels (p<0.01). Furthermore, we found that five short-lived cloned bovines (NT-1 to NT-5) exhibited more severe aberrant methylation changes in the three imprinted genes examined than the little longer-lived clone (NT-6) compared with wild-type (WT) cows. Our data suggest that the reprogramming of the methylation-controlled regions between the imprinted genes and satellite loci are differences and may be involved with additional mechanisms that need further elucidation. PMID:23961768

  18. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  19. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties.

  20. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-09-01

    There is genetic evidence that schizophrenia is a polygenic disorder with a large number of loci of small effect on disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have had limited success, with the best finding at the MHC locus at chromosome 6p. A recent effort of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs (eQTLs) and differential gene expression in whole blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We examined the 6192 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significance threshold at P<0.001. eQTLs were calculated for these SNPs in a sample of healthy controls (n=437). The transcripts significantly regulated by the top SNPs from the GWAS meta-analysis were subsequently tested for differential expression in an independent set of schizophrenia cases and controls (n=202). After correction for multiple testing, the eQTL analysis yielded 40 significant cis-acting effects of the SNPs. Seven of these transcripts show differential expression between cases and controls. Of these, the effect of three genes (RNF5, TRIM26 and HLA-DRB3) coincided with the direction expected from meta-analysis findings and were all located within the MHC region. Our results identify new genes of interest and highlight again the involvement of the MHC region in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  1. Identifying genetic loci associated with antidepressant drug response with drug-gene interaction models in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Noordam, Raymond; Direk, Nese; Sitlani, Colleen M; Aarts, Nikkie; Tiemeier, Henning; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Psaty, Bruce M; Stricker, Bruno H; Visser, Loes E

    2015-03-01

    It has been difficult to identify genes affecting drug response to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). We used multiple cross-sectional assessments of depressive symptoms in a population-based study to identify potential genetic interactions with SSRIs as a model to study genetic variants associated with SSRI response. This study, embedded in the prospective Rotterdam Study, included all successfully genotyped participants with data on depressive symptoms (CES-D scores). We used repeated measurement models to test multiplicative interaction between genetic variants and use of SSRIs on repeated CESD scores. Besides a genome-wide analysis, we also performed an analysis which was restricted to genes related to the serotonergic signaling pathway. A total of 273 out of 14,937 assessments of depressive symptoms in 6443 participants, use of an SSRI was recorded. After correction for multiple testing, no plausible loci were identified in the genome-wide analysis. However, among the top 10 independent loci with the lowest p-values, findings within two genes (FSHR and HMGB4) might be of interest. Among 26 genes related to the serotonergic signaling pathway, the rs6108160 polymorphism in the PLCB1 gene reached statistical significance after Bonferroni correction (p-value = 8.1e-5). Also, the widely replicated 102C > T polymorphism in the HTR2A gene showed a statistically significant drug-gene interaction with SSRI use. Therefore, the present study suggests that drug-gene interaction models on (repeated) cross-sectional assessments of depressive symptoms in a population-based study can identify potential loci that may influence SSRI response.

  2. Induction and expression of mutations at multiple drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, G.M.; Carver, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We observed quantitative and qualitative differences in the mutability and mutagen-specificity of various drug-resistance marker loci in Chinese hamster ovary (THO) cells, which suggest that mammalian gene loci may differ in their relative mutability by a given mutagenic agent. We have used the CHO-AT3-2 multiple-marker mutagenesis assay system to examine the dose-dependent induction and kinetics of expression of mutations at four well-characterized, drug-resistance marker loci, after treatment with chemical agents which produce various types of DNA damage. The CHO-AT3-2 subline allows simultaneous quantitation and direct comparison of induced mutation frequencies at the hgprt, oua (Na/sup +//K/sup +/ ATPase), aprt, and tk loci. The agents tested in this study included ethyl methanesulfonate, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, ICR-191, benzo(a)pyrene, and dimethylnitrosamine. The expression kinetics and optimal expression times for each drug-resistance marker were determined in dose-response experiments in which cells from mutagen-treated populations were plated at 1-2-day intervals over a period of 10 days following mutagenesis. Comparison of induced mutation frequencies for each drug-resistance marker after mutagen treatments yielding equivalent cell survivals (equitoxic doses resulting in relative cell survivals of 0.37) revealed locus-specific differences in the relative mutagenicities of the agents tested. These results indicate that the apparent mutagenicity of a particular agent at a single genetic locus may not necessarily be an accurate indicator of that agent's mutagenic potential for the genome as a whole.

  3. Mating type loci of Sporisorium reilianum: novel pattern with three a and multiple b specificities.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, Jan; Heinze, Bernadette; Wagenknecht, Martin; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-08-01

    Sporisorium reilianum and Ustilago maydis are two closely related smut fungi, which both infect maize but differ fundamentally in their mode of plant invasion and site of symptom development. As a prelude to studying the molecular basis of these differences, we have characterized the mating type loci of S. reilianum. S. reilianum has two unlinked mating type loci, a and b. Genes in both loci and adjacent regions show a high degree of synteny to the corresponding genes of U. maydis. The b locus occurs in at least five alleles and encodes two subunits of a heterodimeric homeodomain transcription factor, while the a locus encodes a pheromone/receptor system. However, in contrast to that of U. maydis, the a locus of S. reilianum exists in three alleles containing two active pheromone genes each. The alleles of the a locus appear to have arisen through recent recombination events within the locus itself. This has created a situation where each pheromone is specific for recognition by only one mating partner.

  4. Mating Type Loci of Sporisorium reilianum: Novel Pattern with Three a and Multiple b Specificities

    PubMed Central

    Schirawski, Jan; Heinze, Bernadette; Wagenknecht, Martin; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-01-01

    Sporisorium reilianum and Ustilago maydis are two closely related smut fungi, which both infect maize but differ fundamentally in their mode of plant invasion and site of symptom development. As a prelude to studying the molecular basis of these differences, we have characterized the mating type loci of S. reilianum. S. reilianum has two unlinked mating type loci, a and b. Genes in both loci and adjacent regions show a high degree of synteny to the corresponding genes of U. maydis. The b locus occurs in at least five alleles and encodes two subunits of a heterodimeric homeodomain transcription factor, while the a locus encodes a pheromone/receptor system. However, in contrast to that of U. maydis, the a locus of S. reilianum exists in three alleles containing two active pheromone genes each. The alleles of the a locus appear to have arisen through recent recombination events within the locus itself. This has created a situation where each pheromone is specific for recognition by only one mating partner. PMID:16087737

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for craniofacial microsomia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Hu, Jintian; Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Xu; Li, Xin; Gu, Chaohao; Liu, Tun; Xie, Yangchun; Liu, Jiqiang; Gu, Mingliang; Wang, Panpan; Wu, Tingting; Qian, Jin; Wang, Yue; Dong, Xiaoqun; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a rare congenital anomaly that involves immature derivatives from the first and second pharyngeal arches. The genetic pathogenesis of CFM is still unclear. Here we interrogate 0.9 million genetic variants in 939 CFM cases and 2,012 controls from China. After genotyping of an additional 443 cases and 1,669 controls, we identify 8 significantly associated loci with the most significant SNP rs13089920 (logistic regression P=2.15 × 10−120) and 5 suggestive loci. The above 13 associated loci, harboured by candidates of ROBO1, GATA3, GBX2, FGF3, NRP2, EDNRB, SHROOM3, SEMA7A, PLCD3, KLF12 and EPAS1, are found to be enriched for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC) development and vasculogenesis. We then perform whole-genome sequencing on 21 samples from the case cohort, and identify several novel loss-of-function mutations within the associated loci. Our results provide new insights into genetic background of craniofacial microsomia. PMID:26853712

  6. A method to optimize selection on multiple identified quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Reena; Moreau, Laurence; Dekkers, Jack CM

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical approach was developed to model and optimize selection on multiple known quantitative trait loci (QTL) and polygenic estimated breeding values in order to maximize a weighted sum of responses to selection over multiple generations. The model allows for linkage between QTL with multiple alleles and arbitrary genetic effects, including dominance, epistasis, and gametic imprinting. Gametic phase disequilibrium between the QTL and between the QTL and polygenes is modeled but polygenic variance is assumed constant. Breeding programs with discrete generations, differential selection of males and females and random mating of selected parents are modeled. Polygenic EBV obtained from best linear unbiased prediction models can be accommodated. The problem was formulated as a multiple-stage optimal control problem and an iterative approach was developed for its solution. The method can be used to develop and evaluate optimal strategies for selection on multiple QTL for a wide range of situations and genetic models. PMID:12081805

  7. Characterization of gene-environment interactions for colorectal cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Carolyn M.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Slattery, Martha L.; Pflugeisen, Bethann M.; Lin, Yi; Duggan, David; Nan, Hongmei; Lemire, Mathieu; Rangrej, Jagadish; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Jiao, Shuo; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Liu, Yan; Chen, Lin S.; Stelling, Deanna L.; Warnick, Greg S.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Küry, Sébastien; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward; Hazra, Aditi; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gallinger, Steven; Zanke, Brent W.; Brenner, Hermann; Frank, Bernd; Ma, Jing; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A.; Kooperberg, Charles; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Prentice, Ross L.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Hayes, Richard B.; Caan, Bette J.; Potter, John D.; Hsu, Li; Bézieau, Stéphane; Chan, Andrew T.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Peters, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over a dozen loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Here we examined potential effect-modification between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 10 of these loci and probable or established environmental risk factors for CRC in 7,016 CRC cases and 9,723 controls from nine cohort and case-control studies. We used meta-analysis of an efficient empirical-Bayes estimator to detect potential multiplicative interactions between each of the SNPs [rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (EIF3H/UTP23); rs6983267 at 8q24 (MYC); rs10795668 at 10p14 (FLJ3802842); rs3802842 at11q23 (LOC120376); rs4444235 at 14q22.2 (BMP4); rs4779584 at15q13 (GREM1); rs9929218 at16q22.1 (CDH1); rs4939827 at18q21 (SMAD7); rs10411210 at19q13.1 (RHPN2); and rs961253 at 20p12.3 (BMP2)] and select major CRC risk factors (sex, body mass index, height, smoking status, aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, alcohol use, and dietary intake of calcium, folate, red meat, processed meat, vegetables, fruit, and fiber). The strongest statistical evidence for a gene-environment interaction across studies was for vegetable consumption and rs16892766, located on chromosome 8q23.3, near the EIF3H and UTP23 genes (nominal p-interaction =1.3×10–4; adjusted p-value 0.02). The magnitude of the main effect of the SNP increased with increasing levels of vegetable consumption. No other interactions were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, the association of most CRC susceptibility loci identified in initial GWAS appears to be invariant to the other risk factors considered; however, our results suggest potential modification of the rs16892766 effect by vegetable consumption. PMID:22367214

  8. Ubiquitination Events That Regulate Recombination of Immunoglobulin Loci Gene Segments

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jaime; Rothschild, Gerson; Basu, Uttiya

    2014-01-01

    Programed DNA mutagenesis events in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of developing B cells utilize the common and conserved mechanism of protein ubiquitination for subsequent proteasomal degradation to generate the required antigen-receptor diversity. Recombinase proteins RAG1 and RAG2, necessary for V(D)J recombination, and activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an essential mutator protein for catalyzing class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, are regulated by various ubiquitination events that affect protein stability and activity. Programed DNA breaks in the Ig loci can be identified by various components of DNA repair pathways, also regulated by protein ubiquitination. Errors in the ubiquitination pathways for any of the DNA double-strand break repair proteins can lead to inefficient recombination and repair events, resulting in a compromised adaptive immune system or development of cancer. PMID:24653725

  9. Monte Carlo comparison of preliminary methods for ordering multiple genetic loci.

    PubMed

    Olson, J M; Boehnke, M

    1990-09-01

    We carried out a simulation study to compare the power of eight methods for preliminary ordering of multiple genetic loci. Using linkage groups of six loci and a simple pedigree structure, we considered the effects on method performance of locus informativity, interlocus spacing, total distance along the chromosome, and sample size. Method performance was assessed using the mean rank of the true order, the proportion of replicates in which the true order was the best order, and the number of orders that needed to be considered for subsequent multipoint linkage analysis in order to include the true order with high probability. A new method which maximizes the sum of adjacent two-point maximum lod scores divided by the equivalent number of informative meioses and the previously described method which minimizes the sum of adjacent recombination fraction estimates were found to be the best overall locus-ordering methods for the situations considered, although several other methods also performed well.

  10. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Victoria L; Ponce, Lorenz R; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL). We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R)-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI) after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs) with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98) and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61), as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93) and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54). Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3) reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA)-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for irradiation

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Murphy, Elissa; Zhang, Weiming; Peljto, Anna L.; Brown, Kevin K.; Steele, Mark P.; Loyd, James E.; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Lynch, David; Groshong, Steve; Collard, Harold R.; Wolters, Paul J.; Bradford, Williamson Z.; Kossen, Karl; Seiwert, Scott D.; du Bois, Roland M.; Garcia, Christine Kim; Devine, Megan S.; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Isaksson, Helgi J.; Kaminski, Naftali; Zhang, Yingze; Gibson, Kevin F.; Lancaster, Lisa H.; Cogan, Joy D.; Mason, Wendi R.; Maher, Toby M.; Molyneaux, Philip L.; Wells, Athol U.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Selman, Moises; Pardo, Annie; Kim, Dong Soon; Crapo, James D.; Make, Barry J.; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Walek, Dinesha S.; Daniel, Jerry J.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Zelenika, Diana; Smith, Keith; McKean, David; Pedersen, Brent S.; Talbert, Janet; Kidd, Ravin N.; Markin, Cheryl R.; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Lathrop, Mark; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Schwartz, David A.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study in non-Hispanic white subjects with fibrotic idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (N=1616) and controls (N=4683); replication was assessed in 876 cases and 1890 controls. We confirmed association with TERT and MUC5B on chromosomes 5p15 and 11p15, respectively, the chromosome 3q26 region near TERC, and identified 7 novel loci (PMeta = 2.4×10−8 to PMeta = 1.1×10−19). The novel loci include FAM13A (4q22), DSP (6p24), OBFC1 (10q24), ATP11A (13q34), DPP9 (19p13), and chromosomal regions 7q22 and 15q14-15. Our results demonstrate that genes involved in host defense, cell-cell adhesion, and DNA repair contribute to the risk of fibrotic IIP. PMID:23583980

  12. Assignment of Functional Relevance to Genes at Type 2 Diabetes-Associated Loci Through Investigation of β-Cell Mass Deficits

    PubMed Central

    O'Hare, Elizabeth A.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Perry, James A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with a large number of genomic loci, many of which encompass multiple genes without a definitive causal gene. This complexity has hindered efforts to clearly identify functional candidate genes and interpret their role in mediating susceptibility to disease. Here we examined the relevance of individual genes found at T2D-associated loci by assessing their potential contribution to a phenotype relevant to the disease state: production and maintenance of β-cell mass. Using transgenic zebrafish in which β-cell mass could be rapidly visualized in vivo, we systematically suppressed the expression of orthologs of genes found at T2D-associated genomic loci. Overall, we tested 67 orthologs, many of which had no known relevance to β-cell mass, at 62 human T2D-associated loci, including eight loci with multiple candidate genes. In total we identified 25 genes that were necessary for proper β-cell mass, providing functional evidence for their role in a physiological phenotype directly related to T2D. Of these, 16 had not previously been implicated in the regulation of β-cell mass. Strikingly, we identified single functional candidate genes at the majority of the loci for which multiple genes were analyzed. Further investigation into the contribution of the 25 genes to the adaptive capacity of β-cells suggested that the majority of genes were not required for glucose-induced expansion of β-cell mass but were significantly necessary for the regeneration of β-cells. These findings suggest that genetically programmed deficiencies in β-cell mass may be related to impaired maintenance. Finally, we investigated the relevance of our findings to human T2D onset in diabetic individuals from the Old Order Amish and found that risk alleles in β-cell mass genes were associated with significantly younger age of onset and lower body mass index. Taken together, our study offers a functional approach to assign relevance to genes at T2D

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10−5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10−9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10−8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10−7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10−7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  14. Quantitative Trait Loci for Morphological Traits and their Association with Functional Genes in Raphanus sativus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaona; Choi, Su Ryun; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Rameneni, Jana Jeevan; Li, Xiaonan; Pang, Wenxing; Lee, Ji-Young; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing morphologically important traits enables to comprehend their potential genetic mechanisms in the genetic breeding program. In this study, we used 210 F2 populations derived from a cross between two radish inbred lines (Raphanus sativus) “835” and “B2,” including 258 SSR markers were used to detect QTLs for 11 morphological traits that related to whole plant, leaf, and root yield in 3 years of replicated field test. Total 55 QTLs were detected which were distributed on each linkage group of the Raphanus genome. Individual QTLs accounted for 2.69–12.6 of the LOD value, and 0.82–16.25% of phenotypic variation. Several genomic regions have multiple traits that clustered together, suggested the existence of pleiotropy linkage. Synteny analysis of the QTL regions with A. thaliana genome selected orthologous genes in radish. InDels and SNPs in the parental lines were detected in those regions by Illumina genome sequence. Five identified candidate gene-based markers were validated by co-mapping with underlying QTLs affecting different traits. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed the different expression levels of these five genes in parental lines. In addition, comparative QTL analysis with B. rapa revealed six common QTL regions and four key major evolutionarily conserved crucifer blocks (J, U, R, and W) harboring QTL for morphological traits. The QTL positions identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for identifying more functional genes when whole radish genome sequence is released. Candidate genes identified in this study that co-localized in QTL regions are expected to facilitate in radish breeding programs. PMID:26973691

  15. Human leukocyte telomere length is associated with DNA methylation levels in multiple subtelomeric and imprinted loci.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Jessica L; Suderman, Matthew; Pappas, Jane J; Borghol, Nada; McArdle, Wendy; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Hertzman, Clyde; Power, Christine; Szyf, Moshe; Pembrey, Marcus

    2014-05-14

    In humans, leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is positively correlated with lifespan, and shorter LTL is associated with increased risk of age-related disease. In this study we tested for association between telomere length and methylated cytosine levels. Measurements of mean telomere length and DNA methylation at >450,000 CpG sites were obtained for both blood (N = 24) and EBV-transformed cell-line (N = 36) DNA samples from men aged 44-45 years. We identified 65 gene promoters enriched for CpG sites at which methylation levels are associated with leukocyte telomere length, and 36 gene promoters enriched for CpG sites at which methylation levels are associated with telomere length in DNA from EBV-transformed cell-lines. We observed significant enrichment of positively associated methylated CpG sites in subtelomeric loci (within 4 Mb of the telomere) (P < 0.01), and also at loci in imprinted regions (P < 0.001). Our results pave the way for further investigations to help elucidate the relationships between telomere length, DNA methylation and gene expression in health and disease.

  16. Alzheimer's Disease Risk Polymorphisms Regulate Gene Expression in the ZCWPW1 and the CELF1 Loci.

    PubMed

    Karch, Celeste M; Ezerskiy, Lubov A; Bertelsen, Sarah; Goate, Alison M

    2016-01-01

    Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is a genetically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. Recent large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than twenty loci that modify risk for AD. Despite the identification of these loci, little progress has been made in identifying the functional variants that explain the association with AD risk. Thus, we sought to determine whether the novel LOAD GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) alter expression of LOAD GWAS genes and whether expression of these genes is altered in AD brains. The majority of LOAD GWAS SNPs occur in gene dense regions under large linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks, making it unclear which gene(s) are modified by the SNP. Thus, we tested for brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) between LOAD GWAS SNPs and SNPs in high LD with the LOAD GWAS SNPs in all of the genes within the GWAS loci. We found a significant eQTL between rs1476679 and PILRB and GATS, which occurs within the ZCWPW1 locus. PILRB and GATS expression levels, within the ZCWPW1 locus, were also associated with AD status. Rs7120548 was associated with MTCH2 expression, which occurs within the CELF1 locus. Additionally, expression of several genes within the CELF1 locus, including MTCH2, were highly correlated with one another and were associated with AD status. We further demonstrate that PILRB, as well as other genes within the GWAS loci, are most highly expressed in microglia. These findings together with the function of PILRB as a DAP12 receptor supports the critical role of microglia and neuroinflammation in AD risk.

  17. A resource for the simultaneous high-resolution mapping of multiple quantitative trait loci in rats: The NIH heterogeneous stock

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Martina; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Stridh, Pernilla; Diez, Margarita; Tuncel, Jonatan; Blázquez, Gloria; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Cañete, Toni; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Graham, Delyth; Copley, Richard R.; Hernandez-Pliego, Polinka; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Öckinger, Johan; Fernández-Santamaría, Cristina; Gulko, Percio S.; Brenner, Max; Tobeña, Adolf; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Dominiczak, Anna; Holmdahl, Rikard; Gauguier, Dominique; Olsson, Tomas; Mott, Richard; Valdar, William; Redei, Eva E.; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Flint, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a key tool for the study of medicine and pharmacology for human health. A large database of phenotypes for integrated fields such as cardiovascular, neuroscience, and exercise physiology exists in the literature. However, the molecular characterization of the genetic loci that give rise to variation in these traits has proven to be difficult. Here we show how one obstacle to progress, the fine-mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), can be overcome by using an outbred population of rats. By use of a genetically heterogeneous stock of rats, we map a locus contributing to variation in a fear-related measure (two-way active avoidance in the shuttle box) to a region on chromosome 5 containing nine genes. By establishing a protocol measuring multiple phenotypes including immunology, neuroinflammation, and hematology, as well as cardiovascular, metabolic, and behavioral traits, we establish the rat HS as a new resource for the fine-mapping of QTLs contributing to variation in complex traits of biomedical relevance. PMID:18971309

  18. An IF-FISH Approach for Covisualization of Gene Loci and Nuclear Architecture in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-D; Iwasaki, O; Noma, K

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic studies have revealed that chromosomal structures are formed by a hierarchy of organizing processes ranging from gene associations, including interactions among enhancers and promoters, to topologically associating domain formations. Gene associations identified by these studies can be characterized by microscopic analyses. Fission yeast is a model organism, in which gene associations have been broadly mapped across the genome, although many of those associations have not been further examined by cell biological approaches. To address the technically challenging process of the visualization of associating gene loci in the fission yeast nuclei, we provide, in detail, an IF-FISH procedure that allows for covisualizing both gene loci and nuclear structural markers such as the nuclear membrane and nucleolus.

  19. Neocentromeres Provide Chromosome Segregation Accuracy and Centromere Clustering to Multiple Loci along a Candida albicans Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Laura S.; Hutton, Hannah F.; Clancey, Shelly Applen; Plemmons, Alexandra E.; Saha, Amrita; Turman, Breanna; Berman, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of kinetochore complexes, involving greater than one hundred proteins, is essential for chromosome segregation and genome stability. Neocentromeres, or new centromeres, occur when kinetochores assemble de novo, at DNA loci not previously associated with kinetochore proteins, and they restore chromosome segregation to chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. Neocentromeres have been observed in a number of diseases and may play an evolutionary role in adaptation or speciation. However, the consequences of neocentromere formation on chromosome missegregation rates, gene expression, and three-dimensional (3D) nuclear structure are not well understood. Here, we used Candida albicans, an organism with small, epigenetically-inherited centromeres, as a model system to study the functions of twenty different neocentromere loci along a single chromosome, chromosome 5. Comparison of neocentromere properties relative to native centromere functions revealed that all twenty neocentromeres mediated chromosome segregation, albeit to different degrees. Some neocentromeres also caused reduced levels of transcription from genes found within the neocentromere region. Furthermore, like native centromeres, neocentromeres clustered in 3D with active/functional centromeres, indicating that formation of a new centromere mediates the reorganization of 3D nuclear architecture. This demonstrates that centromere clustering depends on epigenetically defined function and not on the primary DNA sequence, and that neocentromere function is independent of its distance from the native centromere position. Together, the results show that a neocentromere can form at many loci along a chromosome and can support the assembly of a functional kinetochore that exhibits native centromere functions including chromosome segregation accuracy and centromere clustering within the nucleus. PMID:27662467

  20. Integrated analysis of phenome, genome, and transcriptome of hybrid rice uncovered multiple heterosis-related loci for yield increase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dayong; Huang, Zhiyuan; Song, Shuhui; Xin, Yeyun; Mao, Donghai; Lv, Qiming; Zhou, Ming; Tian, Dongmei; Tang, Mingfeng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Xue; Chen, Tingting; Song, Xianwei; Fu, Xiqin; Zhao, Bingran; Liang, Chengzhi; Li, Aihong; Liu, Guozhen; Li, Shigui; Hu, Songnian; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jun; Yuan, Longping; Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid rice is the dominant form of rice planted in China, and its use has extended worldwide since the 1970s. It offers great yield advantages and has contributed greatly to the world’s food security. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis have remained a mystery. In this study we integrated genetics and omics analyses to determine the candidate genes for yield heterosis in a model two-line rice hybrid system, Liang-you-pei 9 (LYP9) and its parents. Phenomics study revealed that the better parent heterosis (BPH) of yield in hybrid is not ascribed to BPH of all the yield components but is specific to the BPH of spikelet number per panicle (SPP) and paternal parent heterosis (PPH) of effective panicle number (EPN). Genetic analyses then identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these two components. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed genes and alleles in the hybrid were mapped by transcriptome profiling to the QTL regions as possible candidate genes. In parallel, a major QTL for yield heterosis, rice heterosis 8 (RH8), was found to be the DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 gene. Based on the shared allelic heterozygosity of RH8 in many hybrid rice cultivars, a common mechanism for yield heterosis in the present commercial hybrid rice is proposed. PMID:27663737

  1. Integrated analysis of phenome, genome, and transcriptome of hybrid rice uncovered multiple heterosis-related loci for yield increase.

    PubMed

    Li, Dayong; Huang, Zhiyuan; Song, Shuhui; Xin, Yeyun; Mao, Donghai; Lv, Qiming; Zhou, Ming; Tian, Dongmei; Tang, Mingfeng; Wu, Qi; Liu, Xue; Chen, Tingting; Song, Xianwei; Fu, Xiqin; Zhao, Bingran; Liang, Chengzhi; Li, Aihong; Liu, Guozhen; Li, Shigui; Hu, Songnian; Cao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Jun; Yuan, Longping; Chen, Caiyan; Zhu, Lihuang

    2016-10-11

    Hybrid rice is the dominant form of rice planted in China, and its use has extended worldwide since the 1970s. It offers great yield advantages and has contributed greatly to the world's food security. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis have remained a mystery. In this study we integrated genetics and omics analyses to determine the candidate genes for yield heterosis in a model two-line rice hybrid system, Liang-you-pei 9 (LYP9) and its parents. Phenomics study revealed that the better parent heterosis (BPH) of yield in hybrid is not ascribed to BPH of all the yield components but is specific to the BPH of spikelet number per panicle (SPP) and paternal parent heterosis (PPH) of effective panicle number (EPN). Genetic analyses then identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these two components. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed genes and alleles in the hybrid were mapped by transcriptome profiling to the QTL regions as possible candidate genes. In parallel, a major QTL for yield heterosis, rice heterosis 8 (RH8), was found to be the DTH8/Ghd8/LHD1 gene. Based on the shared allelic heterozygosity of RH8 in many hybrid rice cultivars, a common mechanism for yield heterosis in the present commercial hybrid rice is proposed.

  2. Speciation in Passerina buntings: introgression patterns of sex-linked loci identify a candidate gene region for reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Carling, Matthew D; Brumfield, Robb T

    2009-03-01

    Sex-chromosomes are thought to play an important role in speciation, but few studies of non-model organisms have investigated the relative influence of multiple sex-linked markers on reproductive isolation. We collected 222 individuals along a geographical transect spanning the hybrid zone between Passerina amoena and P. cyanea (Aves: Cardinalidae). Using maximum-likelihood cline fitting methods, we estimated locus-specific introgression rates for 10 z-linked markers. Although the cline width estimates ranged from 2.8 to 584 km, eight of 10 loci had cline widths between 224 and 271 km. We also used coalescent-based estimates of locus-specific divergence times between P. amoena and P. cyanea to test a recently proposed hypothesis of an inverse relationship between divergence time and cline width but did not find a significant association. The narrow width (2.8 km) of the cline estimated from the VLDLR9 locus indicates strong selection retarding introgression of alleles at this locus across the hybrid zone. Interestingly, a mutation in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene, in which VLDLR9 is an intron, is known to reduce the egg-laying ability of some chickens, suggesting a possible link between this gene region and reproductive isolation between P. amoena and P. cyanea. These results underscore the importance of sampling multiple loci to investigate introgression patterns across a chromosome or genome and support previous findings of the importance of sex-linked genes in speciation.

  3. Characterization of the uncertainty of divergence time estimation under relaxed molecular clock models using multiple loci.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tianqi; Dos Reis, Mario; Yang, Ziheng

    2015-03-01

    Genetic sequence data provide information about the distances between species or branch lengths in a phylogeny, but not about the absolute divergence times or the evolutionary rates directly. Bayesian methods for dating species divergences estimate times and rates by assigning priors on them. In particular, the prior on times (node ages on the phylogeny) incorporates information in the fossil record to calibrate the molecular tree. Because times and rates are confounded, our posterior time estimates will not approach point values even if an infinite amount of sequence data are used in the analysis. In a previous study we developed a finite-sites theory to characterize the uncertainty in Bayesian divergence time estimation in analysis of large but finite sequence data sets under a strict molecular clock. As most modern clock dating analyses use more than one locus and are conducted under relaxed clock models, here we extend the theory to the case of relaxed clock analysis of data from multiple loci (site partitions). Uncertainty in posterior time estimates is partitioned into three sources: Sampling errors in the estimates of branch lengths in the tree for each locus due to limited sequence length, variation of substitution rates among lineages and among loci, and uncertainty in fossil calibrations. Using a simple but analogous estimation problem involving the multivariate normal distribution, we predict that as the number of loci ([Formula: see text]) goes to infinity, the variance in posterior time estimates decreases and approaches the infinite-data limit at the rate of 1/[Formula: see text], and the limit is independent of the number of sites in the sequence alignment. We then confirmed the predictions by using computer simulation on phylogenies of two or three species, and by analyzing a real genomic data set for six primate species. Our results suggest that with the fossil calibrations fixed, analyzing multiple loci or site partitions is the most effective way

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo. PMID:26870082

  5. Immunochip analyses identify a novel risk locus for primary biliary cirrhosis at 13q14, multiple independent associations at four established risk loci and epistasis between 1p31 and 7q32 risk variants.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Invernizzi, Pietro; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Li, Yafang; Xie, Gang; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Sun, Ye; Bianchi, Ilaria; Schlicht, Erik M; Lleo, Ana; Coltescu, Catalina; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Podda, Mauro; Lammert, Craig; Shigeta, Russell; Chan, Landon L; Balschun, Tobias; Marconi, Maurizio; Cusi, Daniele; Heathcote, E Jenny; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Franke, Andre; Gregersen, Peter K; Bossa, Fabrizio; Gershwin, M Eric; deAndrade, Mariza; Amos, Christopher I; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Seldin, Michael F; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2012-12-01

    To further characterize the genetic basis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we genotyped 2426 PBC patients and 5731 unaffected controls from three independent cohorts using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array (Immunochip) enriched for autoimmune disease risk loci. Meta-analysis of the genotype data sets identified a novel disease-associated locus near the TNFSF11 gene at 13q14, provided evidence for association at six additional immune-related loci not previously implicated in PBC and confirmed associations at 19 of 22 established risk loci. Results of conditional analyses also provided evidence for multiple independent association signals at four risk loci, with haplotype analyses suggesting independent SNP effects at the 2q32 and 16p13 loci, but complex haplotype driven effects at the 3q25 and 6p21 loci. By imputing classical HLA alleles from this data set, four class II alleles independently contributing to the association signal from this region were identified. Imputation of genotypes at the non-HLA loci also provided additional associations, but none with stronger effects than the genotyped variants. An epistatic interaction between the IL12RB2 risk locus at 1p31and the IRF5 risk locus at 7q32 was also identified and suggests a complementary effect of these loci in predisposing to disease. These data expand the repertoire of genes with potential roles in PBC pathogenesis that need to be explored by follow-up biological studies.

  6. Transient Neonatal Diabetes, ZFP57, and Hypomethylation of Multiple Imprinted Loci

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, Susanne E.; Mackay, Deborah J.G.; Hahnemann, Johanne M.D.; Docherty, Louise; Grønskov, Karen; Lehmann, Anna; Larsen, Lise G.; Haemers, Andreas P.; Kockaerts, Yves; Dooms, Lutgarde; Vũ, Dũng Chí; Ngoc, C.T. Bich; Nguyen, Phuong Bich; Kordonouri, Olga; Sundberg, Frida; Dayanikli, Pinar; Puthi, Vijith; Acerini, Carlo; Massoud, Ahmed F.; Tümer, Zeynep; Temple, I. Karen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 1 (TNDM1) is the most common cause of diabetes presenting at birth. Approximately 5% of the cases are due to recessive ZFP57 mutations, causing hypomethylation at the TNDM locus and other imprinted loci (HIL). This has consequences for patient care because it has impact on the phenotype and recurrence risk for families. We have determined the genotype, phenotype, and epigenotype of the first 10 families to alert health professionals to this newly described genetic subgroup of diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The 10 families (14 homozygous/compound heterozygous individuals) with ZFP57 mutations were ascertained through TNDM1 diagnostic testing. ZFP57 was sequenced in probands and their relatives, and the methylation levels at multiple maternally and paternally imprinted loci were determined. Medical and family histories were obtained, and clinical examination was performed. RESULTS The key clinical features in probands were transient neonatal diabetes, intrauterine growth retardation, macroglossia, heart defects, and developmental delay. However, the finding of two homozygous relatives without diabetes and normal intelligence showed that the phenotype could be very variable. The epigenotype always included total loss of methylation at the TNDM1 locus and reproducible combinations of differential hypomethylation at other maternally imprinted loci, including tissue mosaicism. CONCLUSIONS There is yet no clear genotype–epigenotype–phenotype correlation to explain the variable clinical presentation, and this results in difficulties predicting the prognosis of affected individuals. However, many cases have a more severe phenotype than seen in other causes of TNDM1. Further cases and global epigenetic testing are needed to clarify this. PMID:23150280

  7. Effects of multiple genetic loci on the pathogenesis from serum urate to gout

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zheng; Zhou, Jingru; Jiang, Shuai; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Dongbao; Yang, Chengde; Ma, Yanyun; Wang, Yi; He, Hongjun; Ji, Hengdong; Yang, Yajun; Wang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xia; Pang, Yafei; Zou, Hejian; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun

    2017-01-01

    Gout is a common arthritis resulting from increased serum urate, and many loci have been identified that are associated with serum urate and gout. However, their influence on the progression from elevated serum urate levels to gout is unclear. This study aims to explore systematically the effects of genetic variants on the pathogenesis in approximately 5,000 Chinese individuals. Six genes (PDZK1, GCKR, TRIM46, HNF4G, SLC17A1, LRRC16A) were determined to be associated with serum urate (PFDR < 0.05) in the Chinese population for the first time. ABCG2 and a novel gene, SLC17A4, contributed to the development of gout from hyperuricemia (OR = 1.56, PFDR = 3.68E-09; OR = 1.27, PFDR = 0.013, respectively). Also, HNF4G is a novel gene associated with susceptibility to gout (OR = 1.28, PFDR = 1.08E-03). In addition, A1CF and TRIM46 were identified as associated with gout in the Chinese population for the first time (PFDR < 0.05). The present study systematically determined genetic effects on the progression from elevated serum urate to gout and suggests that urate-associated genes functioning as urate transporters may play a specific role in the pathogenesis of gout. Furthermore, two novel gout-associated genes (HNF4G and SLC17A4) were identified. PMID:28252667

  8. Specific Gene Loci of Clinical Pseudomonas putida Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Lázaro; Udaondo, Zulema; Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Bernal, Patricia; Roca, Amalia; de la Torre, Jesús; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida are ubiquitous inhabitants of soils and clinical isolates of this species have been seldom described. Clinical isolates show significant variability in their ability to cause damage to hosts because some of them are able to modulate the host’s immune response. In the current study, comparisons between the genomes of different clinical and environmental strains of P. putida were done to identify genetic clusters shared by clinical isolates that are not present in environmental isolates. We show that in clinical strains specific genes are mostly present on transposons, and that this set of genes exhibit high identity with genes found in pathogens and opportunistic pathogens. The set of genes prevalent in P. putida clinical isolates, and absent in environmental isolates, are related with survival under oxidative stress conditions, resistance against biocides, amino acid metabolism and toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems. This set of functions have influence in colonization and survival within human tissues, since they avoid host immune response or enhance stress resistance. An in depth bioinformatic analysis was also carried out to identify genetic clusters that are exclusive to each of the clinical isolates and that correlate with phenotypical differences between them, a secretion system type III-like was found in one of these clinical strains, a determinant of pathogenicity in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26820467

  9. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease–associated risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, Joanna M.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  10. Analysis with the exome array identifies multiple new independent variants in lipid loci.

    PubMed

    Kanoni, Stavroula; Masca, Nicholas G D; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Varga, Tibor V; Warren, Helen R; Scott, Robert A; Southam, Lorraine; Zhang, Weihua; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Strawbridge, Rona J; Lataniotis, Lazaros; An Hashim, Nikman; Besse, Céline; Boland, Anne; Braund, Peter S; Connell, John M; Dominiczak, Anna; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Franks, Stephen; Grallert, Harald; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Karaleftheri, Maria; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Matchan, Angela; Pasko, Dorota; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Rayner, Nigel W; Renström, Frida; Rolandsson, Olov; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sennblad, Bengt; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis; Silveira, Angela; Stanton, Alice V; Strauch, Konstantin; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Waldenberger, Melanie; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Dedoussis, George; Escher, Stefan A; Kooner, Jaspal S; McCarthy, Mark I; Palmer, Colin N A; Hamsten, Anders; Caulfield, Mark J; Frayling, Timothy M; Tobin, Martin D; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Gieger, Christian; Chambers, John C; Wareham, Nick J; Munroe, Patricia B; Franks, Paul W; Samani, Nilesh J; Deloukas, Panos

    2016-09-15

    It has been hypothesized that low frequency (1-5% minor allele frequency (MAF)) and rare (<1% MAF) variants with large effect sizes may contribute to the missing heritability in complex traits. Here, we report an association analysis of lipid traits (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol triglycerides) in up to 27 312 individuals with a comprehensive set of low frequency coding variants (ExomeChip), combined with conditional analysis in the known lipid loci. No new locus reached genome-wide significance. However, we found a new lead variant in 26 known lipid association regions of which 16 were >1000-fold more significant than the previous sentinel variant and not in close LD (six had MAF <5%). Furthermore, conditional analysis revealed multiple independent signals (ranging from 1 to 5) in a third of the 98 lipid loci tested, including rare variants. Addition of our novel associations resulted in between 1.5- and 2.5-fold increase in the proportion of heritability explained for the different lipid traits. Our findings suggest that rare coding variants contribute to the genetic architecture of lipid traits.

  11. Amplification of multiple genomic loci from single cells isolated by laser micro-dissection of tissues

    PubMed Central

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Harmelin, Alon; Rechavi, Gideon; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    Background Whole genome amplification (WGA) and laser assisted micro-dissection represent two recently developed technologies that can greatly advance biological and medical research. WGA allows the analysis of multiple genomic loci from a single genome and has been performed on single cells from cell suspensions and from enzymatically-digested tissues. Laser micro-dissection makes it possible to isolate specific single cells from heterogeneous tissues. Results Here we applied for the first time WGA on laser micro-dissected single cells from stained tissue sections, and developed a protocol for sequentially performing the two procedures. The combined procedure allows correlating the cell's genome with its natural morphology and precise anatomical position. From each cell we amplified 122 genomic and mitochondrial loci. In cells obtained from fresh tissue sections, 64.5% of alleles successfully amplified to ~700000 copies each, and mitochondrial DNA was amplified successfully in all cells. Multiplex PCR amplification and analysis of cells from pre-stored sections yielded significantly poorer results. Sequencing and capillary electrophoresis of WGA products allowed detection of slippage mutations in microsatellites (MS), and point mutations in P53. Conclusion Comprehensive genomic analysis of single cells from stained tissue sections opens new research opportunities for cell lineage and depth analyses, genome-wide mutation surveys, and other single cell assays. PMID:18284708

  12. A principal component meta-analysis on multiple anthropometric traits identifies novel loci for body shape.

    PubMed

    Ried, Janina S; Jeff M, Janina; Chu, Audrey Y; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; van Dongen, Jenny; Huffman, Jennifer E; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Cadby, Gemma; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Joel; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Jackson, Anne U; Jokinen, Eero; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Mangino, Massimo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L; Nolte, Ilja M; Pérusse, Louis; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Rose, Lynda M; Salvi, Erika; Smith, Megan T; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van der Harst, Pim; Walker, Ryan W; Wang, Sophie R; Wild, Sarah H; Willems, Sara M; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Bakker, Stephan J L; Barlassina, Cristina; Bartz, Traci M; Beilby, John; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chiang, Charleston W K; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Cucca, Fracensco; Cupples, L Adrienne; D'Avila, Francesca; de Geus, Eco J C; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Döring, Angela; Eriksson, Johan G; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farrall, Martin; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Forouhi, Nita G; Friedrich, Nele; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Glorioso, Nicola; Graff, Mariaelisa; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Hamsten, Anders; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew Tym; Havulinna, Aki S; Heliövaara, Markku; Hillege, Hans; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Hysi, Pirro G; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; James, Alan L; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Marie Justesen, Johanne; Justice, Anne E; Kähönen, Mika; Karaleftheri, Maria; Tee Khaw, Kay; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kinnunen, Leena; Knekt, Paul B; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Laitinen, Tomi; Langenberg, Claudia; Lewin, Alexandra M; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; Mcknight, Barbara; Mohlke, Karen L; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Montasser, May E; Morris, Andrew P; Müller, Gabriele; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S; Paternoster, Lavinia; Penninx, Brenda W; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G; Polašek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rayner, Nigel W; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Rice, Treva K; Richards, Marcus; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ryan, Kathy A; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A; Sebert, Sylvain; Southam, Lorraine; Sparsø, Thomas Hempel; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M; Swertz, Morris A; Swift, Amy J; Tönjes, Anke; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vartiainen, Erkki; Venturini, Cristina; Verweij, Niek; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Widén, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Winkler, Thomas W; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zillikens, M Carola; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Cusi, Daniele; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gieger, Christian; Hansen, Torben; Hicks, Andrew A; Hu, Frank; Hveem, Kristian; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Palmer, Lyle J; Pedersen, Oluf; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Psaty, Bruce M; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shudiner, Alan R; Smit, Jan H; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tremblay, Angelo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G; Uusitupa, Matti; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fox, Caroline; Groop, Leif C; Heid, Iris M; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; McCarthy, Mark I; North, Kari E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Schlessinger, David; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Strachan, David P; Frayling, Timothy; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-11-23

    Large consortia have revealed hundreds of genetic loci associated with anthropometric traits, one trait at a time. We examined whether genetic variants affect body shape as a composite phenotype that is represented by a combination of anthropometric traits. We developed an approach that calculates averaged PCs (AvPCs) representing body shape derived from six anthropometric traits (body mass index, height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio). The first four AvPCs explain >99% of the variability, are heritable, and associate with cardiometabolic outcomes. We performed genome-wide association analyses for each body shape composite phenotype across 65 studies and meta-analysed summary statistics. We identify six novel loci: LEMD2 and CD47 for AvPC1, RPS6KA5/C14orf159 and GANAB for AvPC3, and ARL15 and ANP32 for AvPC4. Our findings highlight the value of using multiple traits to define complex phenotypes for discovery, which are not captured by single-trait analyses, and may shed light onto new pathways.

  13. Simultaneous estimation of multiple quantitative trait loci and growth curve parameters through hierarchical Bayesian modeling

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpää, M J; Pikkuhookana, P; Abrahamsson, S; Knürr, T; Fries, A; Lerceteau, E; Waldmann, P; García-Gil, M R

    2012-01-01

    A novel hierarchical quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping method using a polynomial growth function and a multiple-QTL model (with no dependence in time) in a multitrait framework is presented. The method considers a population-based sample where individuals have been phenotyped (over time) with respect to some dynamic trait and genotyped at a given set of loci. A specific feature of the proposed approach is that, instead of an average functional curve, each individual has its own functional curve. Moreover, each QTL can modify the dynamic characteristics of the trait value of an individual through its influence on one or more growth curve parameters. Apparent advantages of the approach include: (1) assumption of time-independent QTL and environmental effects, (2) alleviating the necessity for an autoregressive covariance structure for residuals and (3) the flexibility to use variable selection methods. As a by-product of the method, heritabilities and genetic correlations can also be estimated for individual growth curve parameters, which are considered as latent traits. For selecting trait-associated loci in the model, we use a modified version of the well-known Bayesian adaptive shrinkage technique. We illustrate our approach by analysing a sub sample of 500 individuals from the simulated QTLMAS 2009 data set, as well as simulation replicates and a real Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) data set, using temporal measurements of height as dynamic trait of interest. PMID:21792229

  14. A principal component meta-analysis on multiple anthropometric traits identifies novel loci for body shape

    PubMed Central

    Ried, Janina S.; Jeff M., Janina; Chu, Audrey Y.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; van Dongen, Jenny; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Cadby, Gemma; Eklund, Niina; Eriksson, Joel; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Goel, Anuj; Gorski, Mathias; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jokinen, Eero; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Mangino, Massimo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Monda, Keri L.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Pérusse, Louis; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Rose, Lynda M.; Salvi, Erika; Smith, Megan T.; Snieder, Harold; Stančáková, Alena; Ju Sung, Yun; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; van der Harst, Pim; Walker, Ryan W.; Wang, Sophie R.; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Wong, Andrew; Zhang, Weihua; Albrecht, Eva; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Barlassina, Cristina; Bartz, Traci M.; Beilby, John; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chiang, Charleston W. K.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S; Cucca, Fracensco; Cupples, L Adrienne; D'Avila, Francesca; de Geus, Eco J .C.; Dedoussis, George; Dimitriou, Maria; Döring, Angela; Eriksson, Johan G.; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Farrall, Martin; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Glorioso, Nicola; Graff, Mariaelisa; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grewal, Jagvir; Hamsten, Anders; Harder, Marie Neergaard; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hassinen, Maija; Hastie, Nicholas; Hattersley, Andrew Tym; Havulinna, Aki S.; Heliövaara, Markku; Hillege, Hans; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Oddgeir; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hui, Jennie; Husemoen, Lise Lotte; Hysi, Pirro G.; Isaacs, Aaron; Ittermann, Till; Jalilzadeh, Shapour; James, Alan L.; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Marie Justesen, Johanne; Justice, Anne E.; Kähönen, Mika; Karaleftheri, Maria; Tee Khaw, Kay; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kinnunen, Leena; Knekt, Paul B.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooner, Ishminder K.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Laitinen, Tomi; Langenberg, Claudia; Lewin, Alexandra M.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Lorbeer, Roberto; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Mcknight, Barbara; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Gabriele; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pichler, Irene; Pilia, Maria G.; Polašek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Rice, Treva K.; Richards, Marcus; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ryan, Kathy A.; Sanna, Serena; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Scholtens, Salome; Scott, Robert A.; Sebert, Sylvain; Southam, Lorraine; Sparsø, Thomas Hempel; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strauch, Konstantin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vartiainen, Erkki; Venturini, Cristina; Verweij, Niek; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Widén, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wright, Alan F.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Hua Zhao, Jing; Carola Zillikens, M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bouchard, Claude; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cusi, Daniele; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gieger, Christian; Hansen, Torben; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hu, Frank; Hveem, Kristian; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kajantie, Eero; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Pedersen, Oluf; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Psaty, Bruce M.; Puolijoki, Hannu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Shudiner, Alan R.; Smit, Jan H.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Stumvoll, Michael; Tremblay, Angelo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Völker, Uwe; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fox, Caroline; Groop, Leif C.; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; McCarthy, Mark I.; North, Kari E.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Schlessinger, David; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Strachan, David P.; Frayling, Timothy; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Large consortia have revealed hundreds of genetic loci associated with anthropometric traits, one trait at a time. We examined whether genetic variants affect body shape as a composite phenotype that is represented by a combination of anthropometric traits. We developed an approach that calculates averaged PCs (AvPCs) representing body shape derived from six anthropometric traits (body mass index, height, weight, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio). The first four AvPCs explain >99% of the variability, are heritable, and associate with cardiometabolic outcomes. We performed genome-wide association analyses for each body shape composite phenotype across 65 studies and meta-analysed summary statistics. We identify six novel loci: LEMD2 and CD47 for AvPC1, RPS6KA5/C14orf159 and GANAB for AvPC3, and ARL15 and ANP32 for AvPC4. Our findings highlight the value of using multiple traits to define complex phenotypes for discovery, which are not captured by single-trait analyses, and may shed light onto new pathways. PMID:27876822

  15. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shah, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen J; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-11-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analyzed 14,498 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (P < 1.0 × 10(-4)). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 subjects with multiple sclerosis and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)), 3 of which we found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants at 103 discrete loci outside of the major histocompatibility complex. With high-resolution Bayesian fine mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalog of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals.

  16. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  17. Fast set-based association analysis using summary data from GWAS identifies novel gene loci for human complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Andrew; Zhu, Zhihong; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Hill, W. David; McRae, Allan F.; Visscher, Peter M.; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method (fastBAT) that performs a fast set-based association analysis for human complex traits using summary-level data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and linkage disequilibrium (LD) data from a reference sample with individual-level genotypes. We demonstrate using simulations and analyses of real datasets that fastBAT is more accurate and orders of magnitude faster than the prevailing methods. Using fastBAT, we analyze summary data from the latest meta-analyses of GWAS on 150,064–339,224 individuals for height, body mass index (BMI), and schizophrenia. We identify 6 novel gene loci for height, 2 for BMI, and 3 for schizophrenia at PfastBAT < 5 × 10−8. The gain of power is due to multiple small independent association signals at these loci (e.g. the THRB and FOXP1 loci for schizophrenia). The method is general and can be applied to GWAS data for all complex traits and diseases in humans and to such data in other species. PMID:27604177

  18. Age-at-Onset in Late Onset Alzheimer Disease is Modified by Multiple Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; Jun, Gyungah; Reitz, Christiane; Kunkle, Brian W.; Perry, William; Park, YoSon; Beecham, Gary W.; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Wang, Li-San; Kauwe, John S.K.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Crane, Paul K.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Barmada, Michael M.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kramer, Patricia; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Hardy, John; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Larson, Eric B.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J.; Reiman, Eric M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Morris, John C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Goate, Alison M.; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance As APOE locus variants contribute to both risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease and differences in age-at-onset, it is important to know if other established late-onset Alzheimer disease risk loci also affect age-at-onset in cases. Objectives To investigate the effects of known Alzheimer disease risk loci in modifying age-at-onset, and to estimate their cumulative effect on age-at-onset variation, using data from genome-wide association studies in the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC). Design, Setting and Participants The ADGC comprises 14 case-control, prospective, and family-based datasets with data on 9,162 Caucasian participants with Alzheimer’s occurring after age 60 who also had complete age-at-onset information, gathered between 1989 and 2011 at multiple sites by participating studies. Data on genotyped or imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most significantly associated with risk at ten confirmed LOAD loci were examined in linear modeling of AAO, and individual dataset results were combined using a random effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis approach to determine if they contribute to variation in age-at-onset. Aggregate effects of all risk loci on AAO were examined in a burden analysis using genotype scores weighted by risk effect sizes. Main Outcomes and Measures Age at disease onset abstracted from medical records among participants with late-onset Alzheimer disease diagnosed per standard criteria. Results Analysis confirmed association of APOE with age-at-onset (rs6857, P=3.30×10−96), with associations in CR1 (rs6701713, P=7.17×10−4), BIN1 (rs7561528, P=4.78×10−4), and PICALM (rs561655, P=2.23×10−3) reaching statistical significance (P<0.005). Risk alleles individually reduced age-at-onset by 3-6 months. Burden analyses demonstrated that APOE contributes to 3.9% of variation in age-at-onset (R2=0.220) over baseline (R2=0.189) whereas the other nine loci together contribute to 1.1% of

  19. Genetic mapping and transcription analyses of resistance gene loci in potato using NBS profiling.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, Bart; Wouters, Doret; van Os, Hans; Hutten, Ronald; van der Linden, Gerard; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J; van der Vossen, Edwin A G

    2008-11-01

    NBS profiling is a method for the identification of resistance gene analog (RGA) derived fragments. Here we report the use of NBS profiling for the genome wide mapping of RGA loci in potato. NBS profiling analyses on a minimal set of F1 genotypes of the diploid mapping population previously used to generate the ultra dense (UHD) genetic map of potato, allowed us to efficiently map polymorphic RGA fragments relative to 10,000 existing AFLP markers. In total, 34 RGA loci were mapped, of which only 13 contained RGA sequences homologous to RGAs genetically positioned at approximately similar positions in potato or tomato. The remaining RGA loci mapped either at approximate chromosomal regions previously shown to contain RGAs in potato or tomato without sharing homology to these RGAs, or mapped at positions not yet identified as RGA-containing regions. In addition to markers representing RGAs with unknown functions, segregating markers were detected that were closely linked to four functional R genes that segregate in the UHD mapping population. To explore the potential of NBS profiling in RGA transcription analyses, RNA isolated from different tissues was used as template for NBS profiling. Of all the fragments amplified approximately 15% showed putative intensity or absent/present differences between different tissues suggesting putative tissue specific RGA or R gene transcription. Putative absent/present differences between individuals were also found. In addition to being a powerful tool for generating candidate gene markers linked to R gene loci, NBS profiling, when applied to cDNA, can be instrumental in identifying those members of an R gene cluster that are transcribed, and thus putatively functional.

  20. Development of a method for simultaneously genotyping multiple horse coat colour loci and genetic investigation of basic colour variation in Thoroughbred and Misaki horses in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kakoi, H; Tozaki, T; Nagata, S; Gawahara, H; Kijima-Suda, I

    2009-12-01

    In order to develop a genotyping method that can be used in the registration procedure for Thoroughbreds, we developed a method for simultaneously genotyping multiple coat colour genes on the basis of single nucleotide polymorphism typing by using the SNaPshot(TM) technique. This method enabled precise and reasonable detection of causal mutations; it was effective for genotyping of MC1R, ASIP, and SLC45A2 at the Extension (E), Agouti (A), Cream dilution (C) loci, and the possibility of identification of rare variants of MC1R, EDNRB and KIT at the E, Overo (O) and Sabino 1 (SB1) loci, respectively, was also indicated. It was considered that this genotyping method would provide information not only for the registration of Thoroughbreds but also for the preservation of phenotypic characters, such as coat colour, of endangered Misaki native horses in Japan. Therefore, genetic variations at the five coat colour loci were investigated in 1111 Thoroughbred and 99 Misaki native horses. Allele frequencies at the polymorphic E and A loci were estimated, and the proportions of basic coat colours that could be expected in the Thoroughbred population were bay, 0.662; black, 0.070; chestnut, 0.268. In the Misaki population, they were bay, 0.792; black, 0.129; chestnut, 0.080. The data presented were the first of its kind on genetic coat colour variation, and will be important with regard to the registration of Thoroughbreds and the management of Misaki horses.

  1. Loci of Mycobacterium avium ser2 gene cluster and their functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, J A; McNeil, M R; Belisle, J T; Jacobs, W R; Brennan, P J

    1994-01-01

    The highly antigenic glycopeptidolipids present on the surface of members of the Mycobacterium avium complex serve to distinguish these bacteria from all others and to define the various serovars that compose this complex. Previously, the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the disaccharide hapten [2,3-di-O-methyl-alpha-L-fucopyranosyl-(1-->3)-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose] of serovar 2 of the M. avium complex were isolated, localized to a contiguous 22- to 27-kb fragment of the M. avium genome, and designated the ser2 gene cluster (J. T. Belisle, L. Pascopella, J. M. Inamine, P. J. Brennan, and W. R. Jacobs, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 173:6991-6997, 1991). In the present study, transposon saturation mutagenesis was used to map the specific genetic loci within the ser2 gene cluster required for expression of this disaccharide. Four essential loci, termed ser2A, -B, -C, and -D, constituting a total of 5.7 kb within the ser2 gene cluster, were defined. The ser2B and ser2D loci encode the methyltransferases required to methylate the fucose at the 3 and 2 positions, respectively. The rhamnosyltransferase was encoded by ser2A, whereas either ser2C or ser2D encoded the fucosyltransferase. The ser2C and ser2D loci are also apparently involved in the de novo synthesis of fucose. Isolation of the truncated versions of the hapten induced by the transposon insertions provides genetic evidence that the glycopeptidolipids of M. avium serovar 2 are synthesized by an initial transfer of the rhamnose unit to the peptide core followed by fucose and finally O methylation of the fucosyl unit. PMID:8050992

  2. Local gene density predicts the spatial position of genetic loci in the interphase nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Murmann, Andrea E.; Gao Juntao; Encinosa, Marissa; Peter, Marcus E.; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de; Rowley, Janet D.

    2005-11-15

    Specific chromosomal translocations are hallmarks of many human leukemias. The basis for these translocation events is poorly understood, but it has been assumed that spatial positioning of genes in the nucleus of hematopoietic cells is a contributing factor. Analysis of the nuclear 3D position of the gene MLL, frequently involved in chromosomal translocations and five of its translocation partners (AF4, AF6, AF9, ENL and ELL), and two control loci revealed a characteristic radial distribution pattern in all hematopoietic cells studied. Genes in areas of high local gene density were found positioned towards the nuclear center, whereas genes in regions of low gene density were detected closer to the nuclear periphery. The gene density within a 2 Mbp window was found to be a better predictor for the relative positioning of a genomic locus within the cell nucleus than the gene density of entire chromosomes. Analysis of the position of MLL, AF4, AF6 and AF9 in cell lines carrying chromosomal translocations involving these genes revealed that the position of the normal genes was different from that of the fusion genes, and this was again consistent with the changes in local gene density within a 2 Mbp window. Thus, alterations in gene density directly at translocation junctions could explain the change in the position of affected genes in leukemia cells.

  3. High Resolution of Quantitative Traits into Multiple Loci via Interval Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R. C.; Stam, P.

    1994-01-01

    A very general method is described for multiple linear regression of a quantitative phenotype on genotype [putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and markers] in segregating generations obtained from line crosses. The method exploits two features, (a) the use of additional parental and F(1) data, which fixes the joint QTL effects and the environmental error, and (b) the use of markers as cofactors, which reduces the genetic background noise. As a result, a significant increase of QTL detection power is achieved in comparison with conventional QTL mapping. The core of the method is the completion of any missing genotypic (QTL and marker) observations, which is embedded in a general and simple expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the model parameters. The method is described in detail for the analysis of an F(2) generation. Because of the generality of the approach, it is easily applicable to other generations, such as backcross progenies and recombinant inbred lines. An example is presented in which multiple QTLs for plant height in tomato are mapped in an F(2) progeny, using additional data from the parents and their F(1) progeny. PMID:8013917

  4. DNA-damaging agents stimulate gene expression at specific loci in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, C.J.; Walker, G.C.

    1988-05-01

    Operon fusions in Escherichia coli were obtained that showed increased beta-galactosidase expression in response to treatment with the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C. These fusions were generated by using the Mud(ApR, lac) vector to insert the lactose structural genes randomly into the bacterial chromosome. Induction of beta-galactosidase in these strains, which carried fusions of lac to these din (damage-inducible) loci, was (i) triggered by UV light as well as by mitomycin C and (ii) abolished by either a recA- or a lexA- mutation. Similar characteristics of induction were observed when the lactose genes were fused to a prophage lambda promoter by using Mud(ApR, lac). These results indicate that E. coli contains a set of genes that, like prophage lambda genes, are expressed in response to DNA-damaging agents and regulated by the recA and lexA gene products. These din genes map at five bacterial loci. One din::Mud(ApR, lac) insertion results in a UV-sensitive phenotype and may be within the uvrA transcriptional unit.

  5. Using early flowering transgenic apple to accelerate the breeding of donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance (Malus x domestica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the goals of the USDA-NIFA-SCRI RosBREED project is to develop donor parents with multiple loci for disease resistance. Due to the long generation time of tree fruit crops, the accumulation of pyramided resistance loci for multiple diseases by conventional breeding methods could require deca...

  6. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    PubMed

    Sazonova, Olga; Zhao, Yuqi; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G; Kim, Juyong B; Salfati, Elias L; Kundaje, Anshul B; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology.

  7. Nonrandom Distribution of miRNAs Genes and Single Nucleotide Variants in Keratoconus Loci.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dorota M; Gajecka, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies, the causes of both development and progression of keratoconus remain elusive. Previous studies of this disorder focused mainly on one or two genetic factors only. However, in the analysis of such complex diseases all potential factors should be taken into consideration. The purpose of this study was a comprehensive analysis of known keratoconus loci to uncover genetic factors involved in this disease causation in the general population, which could be omitted in the original studies. In this investigation genomic data available in various databases and experimental own data were assessed. The lists of single nucleotide variants and miRNA genes localized in reported keratoconus loci were obtained from Ensembl and miRBase, respectively. The potential impact of nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions on protein structure and function was assessed with PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. For selected protein genes the ranking was made to choose those most promising for keratoconus development. Ranking results were based on topological features in the protein-protein interaction network. High specificity for the populations in which the causative sequence variants have been identified was found. In addition, the possibility of links between previously analyzed keratoconus loci was confirmed including miRNA-gene interactions. Identified number of genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory agents corroborated the hypothesis of their effect on the disease etiology. Distribution of the numerous sequences variants within both exons and mature miRNA which forces you to search for a broader look at the determinants of keratoconus. Our findings highlight the complexity of the keratoconus genetics.

  8. Large-scale gene-centric meta-analysis across 39 studies identifies type 2 diabetes loci.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R; Mega, Jessica L; Lanktree, Matthew B; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Böhm, Bernhard O; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Crook, Errol D; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C H; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S; Furlong, Clement E; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A; Glessner, Joseph T; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E; Kim, Cecilia E; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y; Lawlor, Debbie A; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Molony, Cliona M; Morrow, David A; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K; Nelson, Christopher P; Newhouse, Stephen J; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Erin N; Spijkerman, Annemieke W M; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L; van Iperen, Erik P A; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W H Linda; Pankow, James S; Cappola, Thomas P; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C; Bhatt, Deepak L; Bhatt, Deepak; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dorn, Gerald W; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofker, Marten H; Huggins, Gordon S; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Klungel, Olaf H; Knowler, William C; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Meigs, James B; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bielinski, Susan J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J; Schadt, Eric E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Asselbergs, Folkert; de Bakker, Paul I W; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S; Keating, Brendan J

    2012-03-09

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10(-9)) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10(-6)). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10(-7)) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10(-15)). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10(-8)). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups.

  9. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Meta-Analysis across 39 Studies Identifies Type 2 Diabetes Loci

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Richa; Elbers, Clara C.; Guo, Yiran; Peter, Inga; Gaunt, Tom R.; Mega, Jessica L.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Tare, Archana; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Li, Yun R.; Johnson, Toby; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Voight, Benjamin F.; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Barnard, John; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Bhangale, Tushar; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Clarke, Robert; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Crook, Errol D.; Davey-Smith, George; Day, Ian N.; de Boer, Anthonius; de Groot, Mark C.H.; Drenos, Fotios; Ferguson, Jane; Fox, Caroline S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Gibson, Quince; Gieger, Christian; Gilhuijs-Pederson, Lisa A.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Grant, Struan F.A.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hastie, Claire; Humphries, Steve E.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kleber, Marcus; Meisinger, Christa; Kumari, Meena; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Li, Mingyao; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Molony, Cliona M.; Morrow, David A.; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Musani, Solomon K.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmen, Jutta; Patel, Sanjey R.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Price, Thomas S.; Rafelt, Suzanne; Ranchalis, Jane; Rasheed, Asif; Rosenthal, Elisabeth; Ruczinski, Ingo; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Silbernagel, Günther; Smith, Erin N.; Spijkerman, Annemieke W.M.; Stanton, Alice; Steffes, Michael W.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke; van der Harst, Pim; van der A, Daphne L.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; van Setten, Jessica; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Verweij, Niek; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Young, Taylor; Zafarmand, M. Hadi; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark; Kao, W.H. Linda; Pankow, James S.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Sever, Peter; Poulter, Neil; Caulfield, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Shields, Denis C.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhang, Li; Curtis, Sean P.; Danesh, John; Casas, Juan P.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Farrall, Martin; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Hamsten, Anders; Hegele, Robert; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hofker, Marten H.; Huggins, Gordon S.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Klungel, Olaf H.; Knowler, William C.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Meigs, James B.; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Bielinski, Susan J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silverstein, Roy; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Talmud, Philippa J.; Watkins, Hugh; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; McCaffery, Jeanne; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sabatine, Marc S.; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex; Bowden, Donald W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Siscovick, David S.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2012-01-01

    To identify genetic factors contributing to type 2 diabetes (T2D), we performed large-scale meta-analyses by using a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array (the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array) with ∼2000 candidate genes in 39 multiethnic population-based studies, case-control studies, and clinical trials totaling 17,418 cases and 70,298 controls. First, meta-analysis of 25 studies comprising 14,073 cases and 57,489 controls of European descent confirmed eight established T2D loci at genome-wide significance. In silico follow-up analysis of putative association signals found in independent genome-wide association studies (including 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls) performed by the DIAGRAM consortium identified a T2D locus at genome-wide significance (GATAD2A/CILP2/PBX4; p = 5.7 × 10−9) and two loci exceeding study-wide significance (SREBF1, and TH/INS; p < 2.4 × 10−6). Second, meta-analyses of 1,986 cases and 7,695 controls from eight African-American studies identified study-wide-significant (p = 2.4 × 10−7) variants in HMGA2 and replicated variants in TCF7L2 (p = 5.1 × 10−15). Third, conditional analysis revealed multiple known and novel independent signals within five T2D-associated genes in samples of European ancestry and within HMGA2 in African-American samples. Fourth, a multiethnic meta-analysis of all 39 studies identified T2D-associated variants in BCL2 (p = 2.1 × 10−8). Finally, a composite genetic score of SNPs from new and established T2D signals was significantly associated with increased risk of diabetes in African-American, Hispanic, and Asian populations. In summary, large-scale meta-analysis involving a dense gene-centric approach has uncovered additional loci and variants that contribute to T2D risk and suggests substantial overlap of T2D association signals across multiple ethnic groups. PMID:22325160

  10. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions. PMID:26104396

  11. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo).

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions.

  12. Gene-based meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies implicates new loci involved in obesity.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Sara; Ganna, Andrea; Van Der Laan, Sander W; Esko, Tonu; Pers, Tune H; Locke, Adam E; Berndt, Sonja I; Justice, Anne E; Kahali, Bratati; Siemelink, Marten A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Strachan, David P; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; North, Kari E; Loos, Ruth J F; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pawitan, Yudi; Ingelsson, Erik

    2015-12-01

    To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified >100 loci with single variants associated with body mass index (BMI). This approach may miss loci with high allelic heterogeneity; therefore, the aim of the present study was to use gene-based meta-analysis to identify regions with high allelic heterogeneity to discover additional obesity susceptibility loci. We included GWAS data from 123 865 individuals of European descent from 46 cohorts in Stage 1 and Metabochip data from additional 103 046 individuals from 43 cohorts in Stage 2, all within the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium. Each cohort was tested for association between ∼2.4 million (Stage 1) or ∼200 000 (Stage 2) imputed or genotyped single variants and BMI, and summary statistics were subsequently meta-analyzed in 17 941 genes. We used the 'VErsatile Gene-based Association Study' (VEGAS) approach to assign variants to genes and to calculate gene-based P-values based on simulations. The VEGAS method was applied to each cohort separately before a gene-based meta-analysis was performed. In Stage 1, two known (FTO and TMEM18) and six novel (PEX2, MTFR2, SSFA2, IARS2, CEP295 and TXNDC12) loci were associated with BMI (P < 2.8 × 10(-6) for 17 941 gene tests). We confirmed all loci, and six of them were gene-wide significant in Stage 2 alone. We provide biological support for the loci by pathway, expression and methylation analyses. Our results indicate that gene-based meta-analysis of GWAS provides a useful strategy to find loci of interest that were not identified in standard single-marker analyses due to high allelic heterogeneity.

  13. MANBA, CXCR5, SOX8, RPS6KB1 and ZBTB46 are genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lill, Christina M; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M; Graetz, Christine; Ban, Maria; Alcina, Antonio; Ortiz, Miguel A; Pérez, Jennifer; Damotte, Vincent; Booth, David; Lopez de Lapuente, Aitzkoa; Broer, Linda; Schilling, Marcel; Akkad, Denis A; Aktas, Orhan; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafa; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Compston, Alastair; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Dörner, Thomas; Epplen, Joerg T; Fernández, Óscar; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hoffjan, Sabine; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Kemppinen, Anu; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lohse, Peter; Lubetzki, Catherine; Luessi, Felix; Malhotra, Sunny; Mescheriakova, Julia; Montalban, Xavier; Papeix, Caroline; Paredes, Lidia F; Rieckmann, Peter; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe K; Hintzen, Rogier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Stewart, Graeme; Fontaine, Bertrand; Comabella, Manuel; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Sawcer, Stephen; Bertram, Lars; Zipp, Frauke

    2013-06-01

    A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ≈ 20,000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10(-6); rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10(-4); rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10(-6); rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10(-7); rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10(-3)). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology.

  14. MANBA, CXCR5, SOX8, RPS6KB1 and ZBTB46 are genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Christina M.; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M.; Graetz, Christiane; Ban, Maria; Alcina, Antonio; Ortiz, Miguel A.; Pérez, Jennifer; Damotte, Vincent; Booth, David; Lopez de Lapuente, Aitzkoa; Broer, Linda; Schilling, Marcel; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafa; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Compston, Alastair; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Dörner, Thomas; Epplen, Joerg T.; Fernández, Óscar; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hoffjan, Sabine; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Kemppinen, Anu; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lohse, Peter; Lubetzki, Catherine; Luessi, Felix; Malhotra, Sunny; Mescheriakova, Julia; Montalban, Xavier; Papeix, Caroline; Paredes, Lidia F.; Rieckmann, Peter; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe K.; Hintzen, Rogier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Stewart, Graeme; Fontaine, Bertrand; Comabella, Manuel; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Sawcer, Stephen; Bertram, Lars; Zipp, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ∼20 000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10−6; rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10−4; rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10−6; rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10−7; rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10−3). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology. PMID:23739915

  15. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis Identifies Associations Between Genotype and Gene Expression in Human Intestine

    PubMed Central

    KABAKCHIEV, BOYKO; SILVERBERG, MARK S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Genome-wide association studies have greatly increased our understanding of intestinal disease. However, little is known about how genetic variations result in phenotypic changes. Some polymorphisms have been shown to modulate quantifiable phenotypic traits; these are called quantitative trait loci. Quantitative trait loci that affect levels of gene expression are called expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), which can provide insight into the biological relevance of data from genome-wide association studies. We performed a comprehensive eQTL scan of intestinal tissue. METHODS Total RNA was extracted from ileal biopsy specimens and genomic DNA was obtained from whole-blood samples from the same cohort of individuals. Cis- and trans-eQTL analyses were performed using a custom software pipeline for samples from 173 subjects. The analyses determined the expression levels of 19,047 unique autosomal genes listed in the US National Center for Biotechnology Information database and more than 580,000 variants from the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database. RESULTS The presence of more than 15,000 cis- and trans-eQTL was detected with statistical significance. eQTL associated with the same expression trait were in high linkage disequilibrium. Comparative analysis with previous eQTL studies showed that 30% to 40% of genes identified as eQTL in monocytes, liver tissue, lymphoblastoid cell lines, T cells, and fibroblasts are also eQTL in ileal tissue. Conversely, most of the significant eQTL have not been previously identified and could be tissue specific. These are involved in many cell functions, including division and antigen processing and presentation. Our analysis confirmed that previously published cis-eQTL are single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease: rs2298428/UBE2L3, rs1050152/SLC22A4, and SLC22A5. We identified many new associations between inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci and gene expression

  16. Migration-Selection Balance at Multiple Loci and Selection on Dominance and Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Yanchukov, Alexey; Proulx, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    A steady influx of a single deleterious multilocus genotype will impose genetic load on the resident population and leave multiple descendants carrying various numbers of the foreign alleles. Provided that the foreign types are rare at equilibrium, and all immigrant genes are eventually eliminated by selection, the population structure can be inferred explicitly from the branching process taking place within a single immigrant lineage. Unless the migration and recombination rates were high, this novel method gives a close approximation to the simulation with all possible multilocus genotypes considered. Once the load and the foreign genotypes frequencies are known, it becomes possible to estimate selection acting on the invading modifiers of (i) dominance and (ii) recombination rate on the foreign gene block. We found that the modifiers of the (i) type are able to invade faster than the type (ii) modifier, however, this result only applies in the strong selection/low migration/low recombination scenario. Varying the number of genes in the immigrant genotype can have a non-monotonic effect on the migration load and the modifier’s invasion rate: although blocks carrying more genes can give rise to longer lineages, they also experience stronger selection pressure. The heaviest load is therefore imposed by the genotypes carrying moderate numbers of genes. PMID:24551127

  17. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify multiple loci associated with smoking behavior.

    PubMed

    2010-05-01

    Consistent but indirect evidence has implicated genetic factors in smoking behavior. We report meta-analyses of several smoking phenotypes within cohorts of the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (n = 74,053). We also partnered with the European Network of Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) and Oxford-GlaxoSmithKline (Ox-GSK) consortia to follow up the 15 most significant regions (n > 140,000). We identified three loci associated with number of cigarettes smoked per day. The strongest association was a synonymous 15q25 SNP in the nicotinic receptor gene CHRNA3 (rs1051730[A], beta = 1.03, standard error (s.e.) = 0.053, P = 2.8 x 10(-73)). Two 10q25 SNPs (rs1329650[G], beta = 0.367, s.e. = 0.059, P = 5.7 x 10(-10); and rs1028936[A], beta = 0.446, s.e. = 0.074, P = 1.3 x 10(-9)) and one 9q13 SNP in EGLN2 (rs3733829[G], beta = 0.333, s.e. = 0.058, P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) also exceeded genome-wide significance for cigarettes per day. For smoking initiation, eight SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance, with the strongest association at a nonsynonymous SNP in BDNF on chromosome 11 (rs6265[C], odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.04-1.08, P = 1.8 x 10(-8)). One SNP located near DBH on chromosome 9 (rs3025343[G], OR = 1.12, 95% Cl 1.08-1.18, P = 3.6 x 10(-8)) was significantly associated with smoking cessation.

  18. Identification of New Genetic Susceptibility Loci for Breast Cancer Through Consideration of Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schoeps, Anja; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Dunning, Alison M.; Milne, Roger L.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Andrulis, Irene; Brenner, Hermann; Behrens, Sabine; Orr, Nicholas; Jones, Michael; Ashworth, Alan; Li, Jingmei; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Knight, Julia; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna M.; Dumont, Martine; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine; Purrington, Kristen; Moisse, Matthieu; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Spurdle, Amanda; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Malats, Núria; Arias Perez, JoséI.; Benítez, Javier; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Truong, Théresè; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Braaf, Linde; Atsma, Femke; van den Broek, Alexandra J.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Southey, Melissa C.; Cox, Angela; Simard, Jacques; Giles, Graham G.; Lambrechts, Diether; Mannermaa, Arto; Brauch, Hiltrud; Guénel, Pascal; Peto, Julian; Fasching, Peter A.; Hopper, John; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Genes that alter disease risk only in combination with certain environmental exposures may not be detected in genetic association analysis. By using methods accounting for gene-environment (G × E) interaction, we aimed to identify novel genetic loci associated with breast cancer risk. Up to 34,475 cases and 34,786 controls of European ancestry from up to 23 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were included. Overall, 71,527 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), enriched for association with breast cancer, were tested for interaction with 10 environmental risk factors using three recently proposed hybrid methods and a joint test of association and interaction. Analyses were adjusted for age, study, population stratification, and confounding factors as applicable. Three SNPs in two independent loci showed statistically significant association: SNPs rs10483028 and rs2242714 in perfect linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 21 and rs12197388 in ARID1B on chromosome 6. While rs12197388 was identified using the joint test with parity and with age at menarche (P-values = 3 × 10−07), the variants on chromosome 21 q22.12, which showed interaction with adult body mass index (BMI) in 8,891 postmenopausal women, were identified by all methods applied. SNP rs10483028 was associated with breast cancer in women with a BMI below 25 kg/m2 (OR = 1.26, 95% CI 1.15–1.38) but not in women with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or higher (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.72–1.11, P for interaction = 3.2 × 10−05). Our findings confirm comparable power of the recent methods for detecting G × E interaction and the utility of using G × E interaction analyses to identify new susceptibility loci. PMID:24248812

  19. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Pakistani population with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saeeda; ber Rahman, Simeen; Rehman, Sadia; Saba, Nusrat; Ahmad, Wasim; Nilsson, Staffan; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of the skin and a serious chronic systemic autoimmune disease. We undertook an association study to investigate the genetic etiology of psoriasis in a Pakistani population by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated in genome-wide association (GWAS) or in candidate gene studies of psoriasis. Fifty seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 loci were genotyped in 533 psoriasis patients and 373 controls. Our results showed genome wide significant association of the MHC region (rs1265181 being the most significant from five SNPs used with overall OR=3.38; p=2.97E-18), as well as nominally significant associations at ten other loci (p<0.05) in the Pakistani population (LCE3B, REL, IL13/IL4, TNIP1, IL12B, TRAF3IP2, ZC3H12C, NOS2 and RNF114 from GWAS and PRR9 from a previous candidate gene study). Overall, only nine SNPs out of the 42 GWAS loci, displayed an odds ratio in the opposite allelic direction and only three did not reach similar odds ratio within 95% confidence interval as previously reported (SLC45A1/TNFRSF9, ELMO1 and IL28RA). This indicates similar genetic risk factors and molecular mechanisms behind disease in Pakistani psoriasis patients as in other populations. In addition, we show that the MHC and TNIP1 regions are significantly different in patients with psoriasis onset before the age of 40 (type I) compared to after 40 years of age (type II). MHC being associated mainly with type I while TNIP1 with type II patients.

  20. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kane, Maureen A; Folias, Alexandra E; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L

    2010-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.-Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity.

  1. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Folias, Alexandra E.; Wang, Chao; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) supports embryonic development, central nervous system function, and the immune response. atRA initiates neurogenesis and dendritic growth in the hippocampus and is required for spatial memory; superphysiological atRA inhibits neurogenesis, causes teratology and/or embryo toxicity, and alters cognitive function and behavior. Because abnormal atRA shares pathological conditions with alcoholism, inhibition of retinol (vitamin A) activation into atRA has been credited widely as a mechanism of ethanol toxicity. Here, we analyze the effects of ethanol on retinoid concentrations in vivo during normal vitamin A nutriture, using sensitive and analytically robust assays. Ethanol either increased or had no effect on atRA, regardless of changes in retinol and retinyl esters. Acute ethanol (3.5 g/kg) increased atRA in adult hippocampus (1.6-fold), liver (2.4-fold), and testis (1.5-fold). Feeding dams a liquid diet with 6.5% ethanol from embryonic day 13 (e13) to e19 increased atRA in fetal hippocampus (up to 20-fold) and cortex (up to 50-fold), depending on blood alcohol content. One-month feeding of the 6.5% ethanol diet increased atRA in adult hippocampus (20-fold), cortex (2-fold), testis (2-fold), and serum (10-fold). Tissue-specific increases in retinoid dehydrogenase mRNAs and activities, extrahepatic retinol concentrations, and atRA catabolism combined to produce site-specific effects. Because a sustained increase in atRA has deleterious effects on the central nervous system and embryo development, these data suggest that superphysiological atRA contributes to ethanol pathological conditions, including cognitive dysfunction and fetal alcohol syndrome.—Kane, M. A., Folias, A. E., Wang, C., Napoli, J. L. Ethanol elevates physiological all-trans-retinoic acid levels in select loci through altering retinoid metabolism in multiple loci: a potential mechanism of ethanol toxicity. PMID:19890016

  2. Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Böger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Glazer, Nicole L.; Parsa, Afshin; Gao, Xiaoyi; Yang, Qiong; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Li, Man; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Isaacs, Aaron; Ketkar, Shamika; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Paré, Guillaume; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Zeller, Tanja; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Tönjes, Anke; Hayward, Caroline; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore; Harris, Tamara B.; Rapmersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Struchalin, Maksim; Cavalieri, Margherita; Singleton, Andrew; Giallauria, Francesco; Metter, Jeffery; de Boer, Ian; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Oostra, Ben A.; Feitosa, Mary; Province, Michael; Levy, Daniel; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Wilde, Sandra; Muenzel, Thomas F.; Leak, Tennille S; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Koenig, Wolfgang; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Minelli, Cosetta; Hu, Frank B.; Johansson, Åsa; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Nitsch, Dorothea; Brandstätter, Anita; Kollerits, Barbara; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Mägi, Reedik; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Boban, Mladen; Campbell, Susan; Endlich, Karlhans; Völzke, Henry; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Badola, Sunita; Parker, Alexander N.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Franke, Andre; Rochat, Thierry; Paulweber, Bernhard; Prokopenko, Inga; Wang, Wei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shlipak, Michael G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Hastie, Nick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H.; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney. PMID:20383146

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Goncho T.; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  4. Characterization of three genomic loci encoding Rhizobium sp. strain ORS571 N2 fixation genes.

    PubMed

    Donald, R G; Nees, D W; Raymond, C K; Loroch, A I; Ludwig, R A

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five independent, N2 fixation-defective (Nif-) vector insertion (Vi) mutants were selected, cloned, and mapped to the ORS571 genome. The recombinant Nif::Vi plasmids obtained in this way were used as DNA hybridization probes to isolate homologous phages from a genomic library of ORS571 constructed in lambda EMBL3. Genomic maps were drawn for three ORS571 Nif gene loci. Forty-five Nif::Vi mutants in genomic Nif locus 1 defined two gene clusters separated by 8 kilobase pairs (kb) of DNA. In the first cluster, 36 Nif::Vi mutants mapped to a 7-kb DNA segment that showed DNA homology with Klebsiella pneumoniae nifHDKE and encoded at least two Nif operons. In the other cluster, nine Nif::Vi mutants mapped to a 1.5-kb DNA segment that showed homology with K. pneumoniae and Rhizobium meliloti nifA; this DNA segment encoded a separate Nif operon. Fifteen Nif::Vi mutants mapped to a 3.5-kb DNA segment defined as Nif locus 2 and showed DNA homology with the R. meliloti P2 fixABC operon. Nif locus 2 carries a second nifH (nifH2) gene. Four Nif::Vi mutants mapped to a 2-kb DNA segment defined as Nif locus 3 and showed DNA homology with K. pneumoniae nifB. DNA from lambda Nif phages comprising all three genomic Nif loci was subcloned in plasmid vectors able to stably replicate in ORS571. These plasmid subclones were introduced into ORS571 strains carrying physically mapped Nif::Vi insertions, and genetic complementations were conducted. With the exception of certain mutants mapping to the nifDK genes, all mutants could be complemented to Nif+ when they carried plasmid subclones of defined genomic DNA regions. Conversely, most nifDK mutants behaved as pseudodominant alleles.

  5. Localization of multiple pleiotropic genes for lipoprotein metabolism in baboonss⃞

    PubMed Central

    Rainwater, David L.; Cox, Laura A.; Rogers, Jeffrey; VandeBerg, John L.; Mahaney, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    We employed a novel approach to identify the key loci that harbor genes influencing lipoprotein metabolism in approximately 2,000 pedigreed baboons fed various diets differing in levels of fat and cholesterol. In this study, 126 overlapping traits related to both LDL and HDL metabolism were normalized and subjected to genome-wide linkage screening. As was expected, the traits were highly, but not completely, correlated. We exploited the information in these correlated traits by focusing on those genomic regions harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL) for multiple traits, reasoning that the more influential genes would impact a larger number of traits. This study identified five major QTL clusters (each with at least two significant logarithm of the odds scores >4.7), two of which had not been previously reported in baboons. One of these mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 1p32-p34 and influenced concentrations of LDL-cholesterol on Basal and high-fat, low-cholesterol diets. The other novel QTL cluster mapped to the baboon ortholog of human chromosome 12q13.13-q14.1 and influenced LDL size properties on high-fat, low-cholesterol and high-fat, high-cholesterol, but not Basal, diets. Confirming the value of this approach, three of the QTL clusters replicated published linkage findings for the same or similar traits. PMID:19270339

  6. Airway Epithelial Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Reveal Genes Underlying Asthma and Other Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Obeidat, Ma’en; Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Chen, Rong; Sin, Don D.; Paré, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified loci that are robustly associated with asthma and related phenotypes; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations need to be explored. The most relevant tissues to study the functional consequences of asthma are the airways. We used publically available data to derive expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for human epithelial cells from small and large airways and applied the eQTLs in the interpretation of GWAS results of asthma and related phenotypes. For the small airways (n = 105), we discovered 660 eQTLs at a 10% false discovery rate (FDR), among which 315 eQTLs were not previously reported in a large-scale eQTL study of whole lung tissue. A large fraction of the identified eQTLs is supported by data from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) showing that the eQTLs reside in regulatory elements (57.5 and 67.6% of cis- and trans-eQTLs, respectively). Published pulmonary GWAS hits were enriched as airway epithelial eQTLs (9.2-fold). Further, genes regulated by asthma GWAS loci in epithelium are significantly enriched in immune response pathways, such as IL-4 signaling (FDR, 5.2 × 10−4). The airway epithelial eQTLs described in this study are complementary to previously reported lung eQTLs and represent a powerful resource to link GWAS-associated variants to their regulatory function and thus elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying asthma and airway-related conditions. PMID:26102239

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-03-09

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10(-11)), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10(-8)) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10(-8)), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10(-11)) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10(-7)) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10(-8)) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10(-7)). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility.

  9. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  10. Mining Gene Expression Data of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenli; Huang, Zhengliang; Li, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example. Materials and methods Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control) were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models’ performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined. Results An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score. Conclusions The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases. PMID:24932510

  11. Genetic structure and gene flow among Komodo dragon populations inferred by microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, C; Bruford, M W

    1999-12-01

    A general concern for the conservation of endangered species is the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, particularly when they become isolated and reduced in size. Estimates of gene flow and effective population size are therefore important for any conservation initiative directed to the long-term persistence of a species in its natural habitat. In the present study, 10 microsatellite loci were used to assess the level of genetic variability among populations of the Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis. Effective population size was calculated and gene flow estimates were compared with palaeogeographic data in order to assess the degree of vulnerability of four island populations. Rinca and Flores, currently separated by an isthmus of about 200 m, retained a high level of genetic diversity and showed a high degree of genetic similarity, with gene flow values close to one migrant per generation. The island of Komodo showed by far the highest levels of genetic divergence, and its allelic distinctiveness was considered of great importance in the maintenance of genetic variability within the species. A lack of distinct alleles and low levels of gene flow and genetic variability were found for the small population of Gili Motang island, which was identified as vulnerable to stochastic threats. Our results are potentially important for both the short- and long-term management of the Komodo dragon, and are critical in view of future re-introduction or augmentation in areas where the species is now extinct or depleted.

  12. Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Polymorphisms Regulate Gene Expression in the ZCWPW1 and the CELF1 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Celeste M.; Ezerskiy, Lubov A.; Bertelsen, Sarah; Goate, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is a genetically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. Recent large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than twenty loci that modify risk for AD. Despite the identification of these loci, little progress has been made in identifying the functional variants that explain the association with AD risk. Thus, we sought to determine whether the novel LOAD GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) alter expression of LOAD GWAS genes and whether expression of these genes is altered in AD brains. The majority of LOAD GWAS SNPs occur in gene dense regions under large linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks, making it unclear which gene(s) are modified by the SNP. Thus, we tested for brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) between LOAD GWAS SNPs and SNPs in high LD with the LOAD GWAS SNPs in all of the genes within the GWAS loci. We found a significant eQTL between rs1476679 and PILRB and GATS, which occurs within the ZCWPW1 locus. PILRB and GATS expression levels, within the ZCWPW1 locus, were also associated with AD status. Rs7120548 was associated with MTCH2 expression, which occurs within the CELF1 locus. Additionally, expression of several genes within the CELF1 locus, including MTCH2, were highly correlated with one another and were associated with AD status. We further demonstrate that PILRB, as well as other genes within the GWAS loci, are most highly expressed in microglia. These findings together with the function of PILRB as a DAP12 receptor supports the critical role of microglia and neuroinflammation in AD risk. PMID:26919393

  13. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Haiming; Chen, Suchao; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Zhihong; Qin, Xueying; Hu, Landian; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Kong, Xiangyin

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA) analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM) for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039). This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013) on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷). Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  14. Immature surface Ig+ B cells can continue to rearrange kappa and lambda L chain gene loci

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Pro and pre B cells possess the long-term capacity to proliferate in vitro on stromal cells and interleukin 7 (IL-7) and can differentiate to surface immunoglobulin (sIg+) cells upon removal of IL-7 from the cultures. A key event in this differentiation is the extensive cell loss due to apoptosis. Because the proto-oncogene bcl-2 can promote cell survival, we established pre-B cell lines from E mu-bcl-2 transgenic mice. These pre-B cells have the same properties as those derived from non-bcl-2 transgenic mice except that they do not die by apoptosis. This allowed us to study the fate of newly formed B cells in vitro for a longer period of time. Here we show that early during the differentiation of pre-B cells, upregulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression go hand in hand with rearrangements of the Ig gene loci. Moreover, the newly formed sIg+ B cells continue to express RAG-1 and RAG-2 and continue to rearrange L chain gene loci, even in the absence of proliferation, in an orderly fashion, so that kappa L+ sIg+ cells can become lambda L+ sIg+ or sIg- cells, whereas lambda L+ sIg+ cells can become sIg-, but not kappa L+ sIg+ cells. Thus, deposition of a complete Ig molecule on the surface of a B cell does not automatically stop the Ig-rearrangement machinery. PMID:8376934

  15. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hysi, Pirro G; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; MacGregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Pourcain, Beate St; Simpson, Claire L; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W H; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ong, Rick T; Döring, Angela; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Verkerk, Annemieke J M H; Meitinger, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli; Hawthorne, Felicia; Spector, Tim D; Karssen, Lennart C; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Ang, Wei; Mishra, Aniket; Montgomery, Grant W; Pennell, Craig E; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Schache, Maria; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily; Iyengar, Sudha K; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Polasek, Ozren; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Zeller, Tanja; Mirshahi, Alireza; Müller, Christian; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Amin, Najaf; Bergen, Arthur A B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Vitart, Veronique; Williams, Cathy; Baird, Paul N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Young, Terri L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight; Klaver, Caroline C; Hammond, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide and is a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses, including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry and 8,376 from 5 Asian cohorts. We identified 16 new loci for refractive error in individuals of European ancestry, of which 8 were shared with Asians. Combined analysis identified 8 additional associated loci. The new loci include candidate genes with functions in neurotransmission (GRIA4), ion transport (KCNQ5), retinoic acid metabolism (RDH5), extracellular matrix remodeling (LAMA2 and BMP2) and eye development (SIX6 and PRSS56). We also confirmed previously reported associations with GJD2 and RASGRF1. Risk score analysis using associated SNPs showed a tenfold increased risk of myopia for individuals carrying the highest genetic load. Our results, based on a large meta-analysis across independent multiancestry studies, considerably advance understanding of the mechanisms involved in refractive error and myopia.

  16. Gene expression, methylation and neuropathology correlations at progressive supranuclear palsy risk loci.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mariet; Burgess, Jeremy D; Ballard, Travis; Serie, Daniel; Wang, Xue; Younkin, Curtis S; Sun, Zhifu; Kouri, Naomi; Baheti, Saurabh; Wang, Chen; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Nguyen, Thuy; Lincoln, Sarah; Malphrus, Kimberly; Murray, Melissa; Golde, Todd E; Price, Nathan D; Younkin, Steven G; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Asmann, Yan; Ordog, Tamas; Crook, Julia; Dickson, Dennis; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in a genome-wide association study of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we tested their association with brain gene expression, CpG methylation and neuropathology. In 175 autopsied PSP subjects, we performed associations between seven PSP risk variants and temporal cortex levels of 20 genes in-cis, within ±100 kb. Methylation measures were collected using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing in 43 PSP brains. To determine whether SNP/expression associations are due to epigenetic modifications, CpG methylation levels of associated genes were tested against relevant variants. Quantitative neuropathology endophenotypes were tested for SNP associations in 422 PSP subjects. Brain levels of LRRC37A4 and ARL17B were associated with rs8070723; MOBP with rs1768208 and both ARL17A and ARL17B with rs242557. Expression associations for LRRC37A4 and MOBP were available in an additional 100 PSP subjects. Meta-analysis revealed highly significant associations for PSP risk alleles of rs8070723 and rs1768208 with higher LRRC37A4 and MOBP brain levels, respectively. Methylation levels of one CpG in the 3' region of ARL17B associated with rs242557 and rs8070723. Additionally, methylation levels of an intronic ARL17A CpG associated with rs242557 and that of an intronic MOBP CpG with rs1768208. MAPT and MOBP region risk alleles also associated with higher levels of neuropathology. Strongest associations were observed for rs242557/coiled bodies and tufted astrocytes; and for rs1768208/coiled bodies and tau threads. These findings suggest that PSP variants at MAPT and MOBP loci may confer PSP risk via influencing gene expression and tau neuropathology. MOBP, LRRC37A4, ARL17A and ARL17B warrant further assessment as candidate PSP risk genes. Our findings have implications for the mechanism of action of variants at some of the top PSP risk loci.

  17. De Novo and Rare Variants at Multiple Loci Support the Oligogenic Origins of Atrioventricular Septal Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Priest, James R.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Mohammed, Nebil; Nanda, Vivek; Kundu, Ramendra; Schultz, Kathleen; Girirajan, Santhosh; Scheetz, Todd; Waggott, Daryl; Haddad, Francois; Reddy, Sushma; Bernstein, Daniel; Burns, Trudy; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Yang, Xinan H.; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Hurles, Matthew; Lifton, Richard P.; Nickerson, Debbie; Bamshad, Michael; Eichler, Evan E.; Mital, Seema; Sheffield, Val; Quertermous, Thomas; Gelb, Bruce D.; Portman, Michael; Ashley, Euan A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has a complex genetic etiology, and recent studies suggest that high penetrance de novo mutations may account for only a small fraction of disease. In a multi-institutional cohort surveyed by exome sequencing, combining analysis of 987 individuals (discovery cohort of 59 affected trios and 59 control trios, and a replication cohort of 100 affected singletons and 533 unaffected singletons) we observe variation at novel and known loci related to a specific cardiac malformation the atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). In a primary analysis, by combining developmental coexpression networks with inheritance modeling, we identify a de novo mutation in the DNA binding domain of NR1D2 (p.R175W). We show that p.R175W changes the transcriptional activity of Nr1d2 using an in vitro transactivation model in HUVEC cells. Finally, we demonstrate previously unrecognized cardiovascular malformations in the Nr1d2tm1-Dgen knockout mouse. In secondary analyses we map genetic variation to protein-interaction networks suggesting a role for two collagen genes in AVSD, which we corroborate by burden testing in a second replication cohort of 100 AVSDs and 533 controls (p = 8.37e-08). Finally, we apply a rare-disease inheritance model to identify variation in genes previously associated with CHD (ZFPM2, NSD1, NOTCH1, VCAN, and MYH6), cardiac malformations in mouse models (ADAM17, CHRD, IFT140, PTPRJ, RYR1 and ATE1), and hypomorphic alleles of genes causing syndromic CHD (EHMT1, SRCAP, BBS2, NOTCH2, and KMT2D) in 14 of 59 trios, greatly exceeding variation in control trios without CHD (p = 9.60e-06). In total, 32% of trios carried at least one putatively disease-associated variant across 19 loci,suggesting that inherited and de novo variation across a heterogeneous group of loci may contribute to disease risk. PMID:27058611

  18. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A.; Woodman, Scott E.; Kwong, Lawrence N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy.

  19. Somatic Copy Number Alterations at Oncogenic Loci Show Diverse Correlations with Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roszik, Jason; Wu, Chang-Jiun; Siroy, Alan E.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Davies, Michael A; Woodman, Scott E; Kwong, Lawrence N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) affecting oncogenic drivers have a firmly established role in promoting cancer. However, no agreed-upon standard exists for calling locus-specific amplifications and deletions in each patient sample. Here, we report the correlative analysis of copy number amplitude and length with gene expression across 6,109 samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset across 16 cancer types. Using specificity, sensitivity, and precision-based scores, we assigned optimized amplitude and length cutoffs for nine recurrent SCNAs affecting known oncogenic drivers, using mRNA expression as a functional readout. These cutoffs captured the majority of SCNA-driven, highly-expression-altered samples. The majority of oncogenes required only amplitude cutoffs, as high amplitude samples were almost invariably focal; however, CDKN2A and PTEN uniquely required both amplitude and length cutoffs as primary predictors. For PTEN, these extended to downstream AKT activation. In contrast, SCNA genes located peri-telomerically or in fragile sites showed poor expression-copy number correlations. Overall, our analyses identify optimized amplitude and length cutoffs as efficient predictors of gene expression changes for specific oncogenic SCNAs, yet warn against one-size-fits-all interpretations across all loci. Our results have implications for cancer data analyses and the clinic, where copy number and mutation data are increasingly used to personalize cancer therapy. PMID:26787600

  20. The INO2 and INO4 loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are pleiotropic regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Loewy, B S; Henry, S A

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in the formation of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine. The mutant synthesized phosphatidylcholine at a reduced rate and accumulated increased amounts of methylated phospholipid intermediates. It was also found to be auxotrophic for inositol and allelic to an existing series of ino4 mutants. The ino2 and ino4 mutants, originally isolated on the basis of an inositol requirement, are unable to derepress the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase (myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase; EC 5.5.1.4). The INO4 and INO2 genes were, thus, previously identified as regulatory genes whose wild-type product is required for expression of the INO1 gene product inositol-1-phosphate synthase (T. Donahue and S. Henry, J. Biol. Chem. 256:7077-7085, 1981). In addition to the identification of a new ino4-allele, further characterization of the existing series of ino4 and ino2 mutants, reported here, demonstrated that they all have a reduced capacity to convert phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylcholine. The pleiotropic phenotype of the ino2 and ino4 mutants described in this paper suggests that the INO2 and INO4 loci are involved in the regulation of phospholipid methylation in the membrane as well as inositol biosynthesis in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:6392853

  1. Sequencing of Pax6 Loci from the Elephant Shark Reveals a Family of Pax6 Genes in Vertebrate Genomes, Forged by Ancient Duplications and Divergences

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Philippe; Loosli, Felix; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Murdoch, Emma; Coutinho, Pedro; van Heyningen, Veronica; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2013-01-01

    Pax6 is a developmental control gene essential for eye development throughout the animal kingdom. In addition, Pax6 plays key roles in other parts of the CNS, olfactory system, and pancreas. In mammals a single Pax6 gene encoding multiple isoforms delivers these pleiotropic functions. Here we provide evidence that the genomes of many other vertebrate species contain multiple Pax6 loci. We sequenced Pax6-containing BACs from the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and found two distinct Pax6 loci. Pax6.1 is highly similar to mammalian Pax6, while Pax6.2 encodes a paired-less Pax6. Using synteny relationships, we identify homologs of this novel paired-less Pax6.2 gene in lizard and in frog, as well as in zebrafish and in other teleosts. In zebrafish two full-length Pax6 duplicates were known previously, originating from the fish-specific genome duplication (FSGD) and expressed in divergent patterns due to paralog-specific loss of cis-elements. We show that teleosts other than zebrafish also maintain duplicate full-length Pax6 loci, but differences in gene and regulatory domain structure suggest that these Pax6 paralogs originate from a more ancient duplication event and are hence renamed as Pax6.3. Sequence comparisons between mammalian and elephant shark Pax6.1 loci highlight the presence of short- and long-range conserved noncoding elements (CNEs). Functional analysis demonstrates the ancient role of long-range enhancers for Pax6 transcription. We show that the paired-less Pax6.2 ortholog in zebrafish is expressed specifically in the developing retina. Transgenic analysis of elephant shark and zebrafish Pax6.2 CNEs with homology to the mouse NRE/Pα internal promoter revealed highly specific retinal expression. Finally, morpholino depletion of zebrafish Pax6.2 resulted in a “small eye” phenotype, supporting a role in retinal development. In summary, our study reveals that the pleiotropic functions of Pax6 in vertebrates are served by a divergent

  2. Phylogeny and historical biogeography of the cocosoid palms (Arecaceae, Arecoideae, Cocoseae) inferred from sequences of six WRKY gene family loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arecaceae tribe Cocoseae is the most economically important tribe of palms, including both coconut and African oil palm. It is mostly represented in the Neotropics, with one and two genera endemic to South Africa and Madagascar, respectively. Using primers for six single copy WRKY gene family loci...

  3. A meta-analysis of gene expression quantitative trait loci in brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; Xia, K; Tao, R; Giusti-Rodriguez, P; Vladimirov, V; van den Oord, E; Sullivan, P F

    2014-01-01

    Current catalogs of brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) are incomplete and the findings do not replicate well across studies. All existing cortical eQTL studies are small and emphasize the need for a meta-analysis. We performed a meta-analysis of 424 brain samples across five studies to identify regulatory variants influencing gene expression in human cortex. We identified 3584 genes in autosomes and chromosome X with false discovery rate q<0.05 whose expression was significantly associated with DNA sequence variation. Consistent with previous eQTL studies, local regulatory variants tended to occur symmetrically around transcription start sites and the effect was more evident in studies with large sample sizes. In contrast to random SNPs, we observed that significant eQTLs were more likely to be near 5'-untranslated regions and intersect with regulatory features. Permutation-based enrichment analysis revealed that SNPs associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were enriched among brain eQTLs. Genes with significant eQTL evidence were also strongly associated with diseases from OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and the NHGRI (National Human Genome Research Institute) genome-wide association study catalog. Surprisingly, we found that a large proportion (28%) of ~1000 autosomal genes encoding proteins needed for mitochondrial structure or function were eQTLs (enrichment P-value=1.3 × 10−9), suggesting a potential role for common genetic variation influencing the robustness of energy supply in brain and a possible role in the etiology of some psychiatric disorders. These systematically generated eQTL information should be a valuable resource in determining the functional mechanisms of brain gene expression and the underlying biology of associations with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25290266

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cerhan, James R; Berndt, Sonja I; Vijai, Joseph; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Wang, Sophia S; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Nieters, Alexandra; Cox, David; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Teras, Lauren R; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Spinelli, John J; Giles, Graham G; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Weiner, George J; Veron, Amelie S; Zelenika, Diana; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; Birmann, Brenda M; Laden, Francine; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Sampson, Joshua; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Slager, Susan L; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E; Salles, Gilles; Skibola, Christine F; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of European ancestry, with additional genotyping of 9 promising SNPs in 1,359 cases and 4,557 controls. In our multi-stage analysis, five independent SNPs in four loci achieved genome-wide significance marked by rs116446171 at 6p25.3 (EXOC2; P = 2.33 × 10(-21)), rs2523607 at 6p21.33 (HLA-B; P = 2.40 × 10(-10)), rs79480871 at 2p23.3 (NCOA1; P = 4.23 × 10(-8)) and two independent SNPs, rs13255292 and rs4733601, at 8q24.21 (PVT1; P = 9.98 × 10(-13) and 3.63 × 10(-11), respectively). These data provide substantial new evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B cell malignancy and point to pathways involved in immune recognition and immune function in the pathogenesis of DLBCL.

  5. Evolutionary relationships within the lamioid tribe Synandreae (Lamiaceae) based on multiple low-copy nuclear loci

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Tilottama; Catlin, Nathan S.; Garner, Drake M.G.; Cantino, Philip D.; Scheen, Anne-Cathrine

    2016-01-01

    The subfamily Lamioideae (Lamiaceae) comprises ten tribes, of which only Stachydeae and Synandreae include New World members. Previous studies have investigated the phylogenetic relationships among the members of Synandreae based on plastid and nuclear ribosomal DNA loci. In an effort to re-examine the phylogenetic relationships within Synandreae, the current study incorporates data from four low-copy nuclear loci, PHOT1, PHOT2, COR, and PPR. Our results confirm previous studies based on chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal markers in supporting the monophyly of tribe Synandreae, as well as sister relationships between Brazoria and Warnockia, and between that pair of genera and a monophyletic Physostegia. However, we observe incongruence in the relationships of Macbridea and Synandra. The placement of Synandreae within Lamioideae is poorly resolved and incongruent among different analyses, and the sister group of Synandreae remains enigmatic. Comparison of the colonization and migration patterns corroborates a single colonization of the New World by Synandreae during the Late Miocene/Tortonian age. This is in contrast to the only other lamioid tribe that includes New World members, Stachydeae, which colonized the New World at least twice—during the mid-Miocene and Pliocene. Edaphic conditions and intolerance of soil acidity may be factors that restricted the distribution of most genera of Synandreae to southeastern and south–central North America, whereas polyploidy could have increased the colonizing capability of the more wide-ranging genus, Physostegia. PMID:27547537

  6. Multiple-trait quantitative trait loci analysis using a large mouse sibship.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A U; Fornés, A; Galecki, A; Miller, R A; Burke, D T

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci influencing several phenotypes were assessed using a genetically heterogeneous mouse population. The 145 individuals were produced by a cross between (BALB/cJ x C57BL/6J)F1 females and (C3H/HeJ x DBA/2J)F1 males. The population is genetically equivalent to full siblings derived from heterozygous parents, with known linkage phase. Each individual in the population represents a unique combination of alleles from the inbred grandparents. Quantitative phenotypes for eight T cell measures were obtained at 8 and 18 mo of age. Single-marker locus, repeated measures analysis of variance identified nine marker-phenotype associations with an experimentwise significance level of P < 0.05. Six of the eight quantitative phenotypes could be associated with at least one locus having experiment-wide significance. Composite interval, repeated measures analysis of variance identified 13 chromosomal regions with comparisonwise (nominal) significance associations of P < 0.001. The heterozygous-parent cross provides a reproducible, general method for identification of loci associated with quantitative trait phenotypes or repeated phenotypic measures. PMID:9927469

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for glioma.

    PubMed

    Kinnersley, Ben; Labussière, Marianne; Holroyd, Amy; Di Stefano, Anna-Luisa; Broderick, Peter; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Nöthen, Markus M; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of glioma. To identify new glioma susceptibility loci, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS (totalling 4,147 cases and 7,435 controls), with imputation using 1000 Genomes and UK10K Project data as reference. After genotyping an additional 1,490 cases and 1,723 controls we identify new risk loci for glioblastoma (GBM) at 12q23.33 (rs3851634, near POLR3B, P=3.02 × 10(-9)) and non-GBM at 10q25.2 (rs11196067, near VTI1A, P=4.32 × 10(-8)), 11q23.2 (rs648044, near ZBTB16, P=6.26 × 10(-11)), 12q21.2 (rs12230172, P=7.53 × 10(-11)) and 15q24.2 (rs1801591, near ETFA, P=5.71 × 10(-9)). Our findings provide further insights into the genetic basis of the different glioma subtypes.

  8. Genome-wide association analyses identify multiple loci associated with central corneal thickness and keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Vitart, Veronique; Burdon, Kathryn P; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hewitt, Alex W; Koehn, Demelza; Hysi, Pirro G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Zeller, Tanja; Vithana, Eranga N; Cornes, Belinda K; Tay, Wan-Ting; Tai, E Shyong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liu, Jianjun; Foo, Jia-Nee; Saw, Seang Mei; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Stefansson, Kari; Dimasi, David P; Mills, Richard A; Mountain, Jenny; Ang, Wei; Hoehn, René; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Grus, Franz; Wolfs, Roger; Castagne, Raphaële; Lackner, Karl J; Springelkamp, Henriët; Yang, Jian; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leung, Dexter Y L; Chen, Li J; Tham, Clement C Y; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Hayward, Caroline; Gibson, Jane; Cree, Angela J; MacLeod, Alex; Ennis, Sarah; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Fleck, Brian; Li, Xiaohui; Siscovick, David; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Yazar, Seyhan; Ulmer, Megan; Li, Jun; Yaspan, Brian L; Ozel, Ayse B; Richards, Julia E; Moroi, Sayoko E; Haines, Jonathan L; Kang, Jae H; Pasquale, Louis R; Allingham, R Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wright, Alan F; Pennell, Craig; Spector, Timothy D; Young, Terri L; Klaver, Caroline C W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Anderson, Michael G; Aung, Tin; Willoughby, Colin E; Wiggs, Janey L; Pang, Chi P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Lotery, Andrew J; Hammond, Christopher J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hauser, Michael A; Rabinowitz, Yaron S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Central corneal thickness (CCT) is associated with eye conditions including keratoconus and glaucoma. We performed a meta-analysis on >20,000 individuals in European and Asian populations that identified 16 new loci associated with CCT at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). We further showed that 2 CCT-associated loci, FOXO1 and FNDC3B, conferred relatively large risks for keratoconus in 2 cohorts with 874 cases and 6,085 controls (rs2721051 near FOXO1 had odds ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4–1.88, P = 2.7 × 10−10, and rs4894535 in FNDC3B had OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.29–1.68, P = 4.9 × 10−9). FNDC3B was also associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (P = 5.6 × 10−4; tested in 3 cohorts with 2,979 cases and 7,399 controls). Further analyses implicate the collagen and extracellular matrix pathways in the regulation of CCT. PMID:23291589

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Ben; Labussière, Marianne; Holroyd, Amy; Di Stefano, Anna-Luisa; Broderick, Peter; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Fleming, Sarah J.; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Nöthen, Markus M.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of glioma. To identify new glioma susceptibility loci, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS (totalling 4,147 cases and 7,435 controls), with imputation using 1000 Genomes and UK10K Project data as reference. After genotyping an additional 1,490 cases and 1,723 controls we identify new risk loci for glioblastoma (GBM) at 12q23.33 (rs3851634, near POLR3B, P=3.02 × 10−9) and non-GBM at 10q25.2 (rs11196067, near VTI1A, P=4.32 × 10−8), 11q23.2 (rs648044, near ZBTB16, P=6.26 × 10−11), 12q21.2 (rs12230172, P=7.53 × 10−11) and 15q24.2 (rs1801591, near ETFA, P=5.71 × 10−9). Our findings provide further insights into the genetic basis of the different glioma subtypes. PMID:26424050

  10. Integrating phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of multiple loci to test species divergence hypotheses in Passerina buntings.

    PubMed

    Carling, Matt D; Brumfield, Robb T

    2008-01-01

    Phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of DNA sequence data from 10 nuclear loci were used to test species divergence hypotheses within Passerina buntings, with special focus on a strongly supported, but controversial, sister relationship between Passerina amoena and P. caerulea inferred from a previous mitochondrial study. Here, a maximum-likelihood analysis of a concatenated 10-locus data set, as well as minimize-deep-coalescences and maximum-likelihood analyses of the locus-specific gene trees, recovered the traditional sister relationship between P. amoena and P. cyanea. In addition, a more recent divergence time estimate between P. amoena and P. cyanea than between P. amoena and P. caerulea provided evidence for the traditional sister relationship. These results provide a compelling example of how lineage sorting stochasticity can lead to incongruence between gene trees and species trees, and illustrate how phylogenetic and population genetic analyses can be integrated to investigate evolutionary relationships between recently diverged taxa.

  11. Performance of Markov chain-Monte Carlo approaches for mapping genes in oligogenic models with an unknown number of loci.

    PubMed

    Lee, J K; Thomas, D C

    2000-11-01

    Markov chain-Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques for multipoint mapping of quantitative trait loci have been developed on nuclear-family and extended-pedigree data. These methods are based on repeated sampling-peeling and gene dropping of genotype vectors and random sampling of each of the model parameters from their full conditional distributions, given phenotypes, markers, and other model parameters. We further refine such approaches by improving the efficiency of the marker haplotype-updating algorithm and by adopting a new proposal for adding loci. Incorporating these refinements, we have performed an extensive simulation study on simulated nuclear-family data, varying the number of trait loci, family size, displacement, and other segregation parameters. Our simulation studies show that our MCMC algorithm identifies the locations of the true trait loci and estimates their segregation parameters well-provided that the total number of sibship pairs in the pedigree data is reasonably large, heritability of each individual trait locus is not too low, and the loci are not too close together. Our MCMC algorithm was shown to be significantly more efficient than LOKI (Heath 1997) in our simulation study using nuclear-family data.

  12. Quantitative trait loci and candidate genes associated with starch pasting viscosity characteristics in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Thanyasiriwat, T; Sraphet, S; Whankaew, S; Boonseng, O; Bao, J; Lightfoot, D A; Tangphatsornruang, S; Triwitayakorn, K

    2014-01-01

    Starch pasting viscosity is an important quality trait in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivars. The aim here was to identify loci and candidate genes associated with the starch pasting viscosity. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for seven pasting viscosity parameters was carried out using 100 lines of an F1 mapping population from a cross between two cassava cultivars Huay Bong 60 and Hanatee. Starch samples were obtained from roots of cassava grown in 2008 and 2009 at Rayong, and in 2009 at Lop Buri province, Thailand. The traits showed continuous distribution among the F1 progeny with transgressive variation. Fifteen QTL were identified from mean trait data, with Logarithm of Odds (LOD) values from 2.77-13.01 and phenotype variations explained (PVE) from10.0-48.4%. In addition, 48 QTL were identified in separate environments. The LOD values ranged from 2.55-8.68 and explained 6.6-43.7% of phenotype variation. The loci were located on 19 linkage groups. The most important QTL for pasting temperature (PT) (qPT.1LG1) from mean trait values showed largest effect with highest LOD value (13.01) and PVE (48.4%). The QTL co-localised with PT and pasting time (PTi) loci that were identified in separate environments. Candidate genes were identified within the QTL peak regions. However, the major genes of interest, encoding the family of glycosyl or glucosyl transferases and hydrolases, were located at the periphery of QTL peaks. The loci identified could be effectively applied in breeding programmes to improve cassava starch quality. Alleles of candidate genes should be further studied in order to better understand their effects on starch quality traits.

  13. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  14. Evolution of Vertebrate Adam Genes; Duplication of Testicular Adams from Ancient Adam9/9-like Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Members of the disintegrin metalloproteinase (ADAM) family have important functions in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as cell signaling. There are two major types of ADAMs: the somatic ADAMs (sADAMs) that have a significant presence in somatic tissues, and the testicular ADAMs (tADAMs) that are expressed predominantly in the testis. Genes encoding tADAMs can be further divided into two groups: group I (intronless) and group II (intron-containing). To date, tAdams have only been reported in placental mammals, and their evolutionary origin and relationship to sAdams remain largely unknown. Using phylogenetic and syntenic tools, we analyzed the Adam genes in various vertebrates ranging from fishes to placental mammals. Our analyses reveal duplication and loss of some sAdams in certain vertebrate species. In particular, there exists an Adam9-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates but not mammals. We also identified putative group I and group II tAdams in all amniote species that have been examined. These tAdam homologues are more closely related to Adams 9 and 9-like than to other sAdams. In all amniote species examined, group II tAdams lie in close vicinity to Adam9 and hence likely arose from tandem duplication, whereas group I tAdams likely originated through retroposition because of their lack of introns. Clusters of multiple group I tAdams are also common, suggesting tandem duplication after retroposition. Therefore, Adam9/9-like and some of the derived tAdam loci are likely preferred targets for tandem duplication and/or retroposition. Consistent with this hypothesis, we identified a young retroposed gene that duplicated recently from Adam9 in the opossum. As a result of gene duplication, some tAdams were pseudogenized in certain species, whereas others acquired new expression patterns and functions. The rapid duplication of Adam genes has a major contribution to the diversity of ADAMs in various vertebrate species. PMID:26308360

  15. Evolution of Vertebrate Adam Genes; Duplication of Testicular Adams from Ancient Adam9/9-like Loci.

    PubMed

    Bahudhanapati, Harinath; Bhattacharya, Shashwati; Wei, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Members of the disintegrin metalloproteinase (ADAM) family have important functions in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as cell signaling. There are two major types of ADAMs: the somatic ADAMs (sADAMs) that have a significant presence in somatic tissues, and the testicular ADAMs (tADAMs) that are expressed predominantly in the testis. Genes encoding tADAMs can be further divided into two groups: group I (intronless) and group II (intron-containing). To date, tAdams have only been reported in placental mammals, and their evolutionary origin and relationship to sAdams remain largely unknown. Using phylogenetic and syntenic tools, we analyzed the Adam genes in various vertebrates ranging from fishes to placental mammals. Our analyses reveal duplication and loss of some sAdams in certain vertebrate species. In particular, there exists an Adam9-like gene in non-mammalian vertebrates but not mammals. We also identified putative group I and group II tAdams in all amniote species that have been examined. These tAdam homologues are more closely related to Adams 9 and 9-like than to other sAdams. In all amniote species examined, group II tAdams lie in close vicinity to Adam9 and hence likely arose from tandem duplication, whereas group I tAdams likely originated through retroposition because of their lack of introns. Clusters of multiple group I tAdams are also common, suggesting tandem duplication after retroposition. Therefore, Adam9/9-like and some of the derived tAdam loci are likely preferred targets for tandem duplication and/or retroposition. Consistent with this hypothesis, we identified a young retroposed gene that duplicated recently from Adam9 in the opossum. As a result of gene duplication, some tAdams were pseudogenized in certain species, whereas others acquired new expression patterns and functions. The rapid duplication of Adam genes has a major contribution to the diversity of ADAMs in various vertebrate species.

  16. Chromatin interactions and candidate genes at ten prostate cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Tillmans, Lori; Gao, Jianzhong; Gao, Ping; Yuan, Tiezheng; Dittmar, Rachel L; Song, Wei; Yang, Yuehong; Sahr, Natasha; Wang, Tao; Wei, Gong-Hong; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 100 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with prostate cancer risk. However, the vast majority of these SNPs lie in noncoding regions of the genome. To test whether these risk SNPs regulate their target genes through long-range chromatin interactions, we applied capture-based 3C sequencing technology to investigate possible cis-interactions at ten prostate cancer risk loci in six cell lines. We identified significant physical interactions between risk regions and their potential target genes including CAPG at 2p11.2, C2orf43 at 2p24.1, RFX6 at 6q22.1, NFASC at 1q32.1, MYC at 8q24.1 and AGAP7P at 10q11.23. Most of the interaction peaks were co-localized to regions of active histone modification and transcription factor binding sites. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis showed suggestive eQTL signals at rs1446669, rs699664 and rs1078004 for CAPG (p < 0.004), rs13394027 for C2orf43 (p = 2.25E-27), rs10993994 and rs4631830 for AGAP7P (p < 8.02E-5). Further analysis revealed an enhancer activity at genomic region surrounding rs4631830 which was expected to disrupt HOXB-like DNA binding affinity. This study identifies a set of candidate genes and their potential regulatory variants, and provides additional evidence showing the role of long-range chromatin interactions in prostate cancer etiology. PMID:26979803

  17. Diversity of CRISPR loci and virulence genes in pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from various sources.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Yin, Shuang; Dudley, Edward G; Cutter, Catherine N

    2015-07-02

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, including those of O157:H7 and the "big six" serogroups (i.e., O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) are food-borne pathogens that pose a serious health threat to humans. Ruminants, especially cattle, are a major reservoir for O157 and non-O157 STEC. In the present study, 115 E. coli strains isolated from small and very small beef processing plants were screened for virulence genes (stx1, stx2, eae) using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirteen (11.3%) of the 115 isolates tested positive for stx1, stx2, or eae genes, but only 4 (3.5%) tested positive for either stx1 or stx2. A multiplex PCR reaction targeting eight O-serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, O157) identified 12 isolates as O26, O103, O111, or O145, with E. coli O26 being the most predominant serogroup (61.5%). The thirteen isolates were further analyzed using Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) subtyping. Consistent with previous studies, CRISPR alleles from strains of the same serogroup were similar in their spacer content and order, regardless of the isolation source. A completely different CRISPR allele was observed in one isolate ("7-J") which exhibited a different O-serogroup (O78). Our results confirmed previous findings that CRISPR loci are conserved among phylogenetically-related strains. In addition, 8 E. coli O26 isolates and a collection of 42 E. coli O26 isolates were screened for 12 enterohemorrhagic E. coli-specific genes. Seven genes (ECs848-Hypothetical Protein, ECs2226-Hypothetical Protein, ECs3857-nleB, ECs3858-Hypothetical Protein, ECs4552-escF, ECs4553-Hypothetical Protein, and ECs4557-sepL) were found in all 50 isolates. An additional 5 genes (ECs1322-ureA urease subunit γ, ECs1323-ureB urease subunit β, ECs1326-ureF, ECs1561-Hypothetical Protein, and ECs1568-Hypothetical Protein) were found to be highly prevalent in isolates from human sources, while lower in

  18. Population history, biogeography, and taxonomy of orangutans (Genus: Pongo) based on a population genetic meta-analysis of multiple loci.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines orangutan population history and evolution through a meta-analysis of seven loci collected from both Sumatran and Bornean orangutans. Within orangutans, most loci show that the Sumatran population is about twice as diverse as the Bornean population. Orangutans are more diverse than African apes and humans. Sumatran and Bornean populations show significant genetic differentiation from one another and their history does not differ significantly from an 'island model' (population splitting without gene flow). Two different methods support a divergence of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans at 2.7-5 million years ago. This suggests that Pleistocene events, such as the cyclical exposure of the Sunda shelf and the Toba volcanic eruption, did not have a major impact on the divergence of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Pairwise mismatch analyses, however, suggest that Bornean orangutans have undergone a recent population expansion (beginning 39,000-64,000 years ago), while Sumatran orangutan populations were stable. Pleistocene events may have contributed to these aspects of orangutan population history. These conclusions are applied to the debate on orangutan taxonomy.

  19. Data Requirement for Phylogenetic Inference from Multiple Loci: A New Distance Method.

    PubMed

    Dasarathy, Gautam; Nowak, Robert; Roch, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the evolutionary history of a set of species (phylogeny or species tree) from several genes. It is known that the evolutionary history of individual genes (gene trees) might be topologically distinct from each other and from the underlying species tree, possibly confounding phylogenetic analysis. A further complication in practice is that one has to estimate gene trees from molecular sequences of finite length. We provide the first full data-requirement analysis of a species tree reconstruction method that takes into account estimation errors at the gene level. Under that criterion, we also devise a novel reconstruction algorithm that provably improves over all previous methods in a regime of interest.

  20. The historical biogeography of two Caribbean butterflies (Lepidoptera: Heliconiidae) as inferred from genetic variation at multiple loci.

    PubMed

    Davies, Neil; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2002-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA and allozyme variation was examined in populations of two Neotropical butterflies, Heliconius charithonia and Dryas iulia. On the mainland, both species showed evidence of considerable gene flow over huge distances. The island populations, however, revealed significant genetic divergence across some, but not all, ocean passages. Despite the phylogenetic relatedness and broadly similar ecologies of these two butterflies, their intraspecific biogeography clearly differed. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA sequences revealed that populations of D. iulia north of St. Vincent are monophyletic and were probably derived from South America. By contrast, the Jamaican subspecies of H. charithonia rendered West Indian H. charithonia polyphyletic with respect to the mainland populations; thus, H. charithonia seems to have colonized the Greater Antilles on at least two separate occasions from Central America. Colonization velocity does not correlate with subsequent levels of gene flow in either species. Even where range expansion seems to have been instantaneous on a geological timescale, significant allele frequency differences at allozyme loci demonstrate that gene flow is severely curtailed across narrow ocean passages. Stochastic extinction, rapid (re)colonization, but low gene flow probably explain why, in the same species, some islands support genetically distinct and nonexpanding populations, while nearby a single lineage is distributed across several islands. Despite the differences, some common biogeographic patterns were evident between these butterflies and other West Indian taxa; such congruence suggests that intraspecific evolution in the West Indies has been somewhat constrained by earth history events, such as changes in sea level.

  1. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans.

    PubMed

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Mcdonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region.

  2. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J.; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Mcdonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A.; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V.; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  3. Characterization of expressed class II MHC sequences in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) reveals multiple DRB loci.

    PubMed

    Busch, Joseph D; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are exceptionally polymorphic due to the combined effects of natural and sexual selection. Most research in wild populations has focused on the second exon of a single class II locus (DRB), but complete gene sequences can provide an illuminating backdrop for studies of intragenic selection, recombination, and organization. To this end, we characterized class II loci in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). Seven DRB-like sequences (provisionally named MhcDisp-DRB*01 through *07) were isolated from spleen cDNA and most likely comprise > or =5 loci; this multiformity is quite unlike the situation in muroid rodents such as Mus, Rattus, and Peromyscus. In silico translation revealed the presence of important structural residues for glycosylation sites, salt bonds, and CD4+ T-cell recognition. Amino-acid distances varied widely among the seven sequences (2-34%). Nuclear DNA sequences from the Disp-DRB*07 locus (approximately 10 kb) revealed a conventional exon/intron structure as well as a number of microsatellites and short interspersed nuclear elements (B4, Alu, and IDL-Geo subfamilies). Rates of nucleotide substitution at Disp-DRB*07 are similar in both exons and introns (pi = 0.015 and 0.012, respectively), which suggests relaxed selection and may indicate that this locus is an expressed pseudogene. Finally, we performed BLASTn searches against Dipodomys ordii genomic sequences (unassembled reads) and find 90-97% nucleotide similarity between the two kangaroo rat species. Collectively, these data suggest that class II diversity in heteromyid rodents is based on polylocism and departs from the muroid architecture.

  4. Allele distributions at hybrid incompatibility loci facilitate the potential for gene flow between cultivated and weedy rice in the US.

    PubMed

    Craig, Stephanie M; Reagon, Michael; Resnick, Lauren E; Caicedo, Ana L

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of independent mutations over time in two populations often leads to reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolation between diverging populations may be reinforced by barriers that occur either pre- or postzygotically. Hybrid sterility is the most common form of postzygotic isolation in plants. Four postzygotic sterility loci, comprising three hybrid sterility systems (Sa, s5, DPL), have been recently identified in Oryza sativa. These loci explain, in part, the limited hybridization that occurs between the domesticated cultivated rice varieties, O. sativa spp. japonica and O. sativa spp. indica. In the United States, cultivated fields of japonica rice are often invaded by conspecific weeds that have been shown to be of indica origin. Crop-weed hybrids have been identified in crop fields, but at low frequencies. Here we examined the possible role of these hybrid incompatibility loci in the interaction between cultivated and weedy rice. We identified a novel allele at Sa that seemingly prevents loss of fertility in hybrids. Additionally, we found wide-compatibility type alleles at strikingly high frequencies at the Sa and s5 loci in weed groups, and a general lack of incompatible alleles between crops and weeds at the DPL loci. Our results suggest that weedy individuals, particularly those of the SH and BRH groups, should be able to freely hybridize with the local japonica crop, and that prezygotic factors, such as differences in flowering time, have been more important in limiting weed-crop gene flow in the past. As the selective landscape for weedy rice changes due to increased use of herbicide resistant strains of cultivated rice, the genetic barriers that hinder indica-japonica hybridization cannot be counted on to limit the flow of favorable crop genes into weeds.

  5. Genome-wide association study of clinically defined gout identifies multiple risk loci and its association with clinical subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Ken; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Chiba, Toshinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Yuzo; Danjoh, Inaho; Shimizu, Seiko; Abe, Junko; Kawamura, Yusuke; Terashige, Sho; Ogata, Hiraku; Tatsukawa, Seishiro; Yin, Guang; Okada, Rieko; Morita, Emi; Naito, Mariko; Tokumasu, Atsumi; Onoue, Hiroyuki; Iwaya, Keiichi; Ito, Toshimitsu; Takada, Tappei; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Kato, Yukio; Nakamura, Yukio; Sakurai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Ituro; Kubo, Michiaki; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toru; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Gout, caused by hyperuricaemia, is a multifactorial disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of gout have been reported, they included self-reported gout cases in which clinical information was insufficient. Therefore, the relationship between genetic variation and clinical subtypes of gout remains unclear. Here, we first performed a GWAS of clinically defined gout cases only. Methods A GWAS was conducted with 945 patients with clinically defined gout and 1213 controls in a Japanese male population, followed by replication study of 1048 clinically defined cases and 1334 controls. Results Five gout susceptibility loci were identified at the genome-wide significance level (p<5.0×10−8), which contained well-known urate transporter genes (ABCG2 and SLC2A9) and additional genes: rs1260326 (p=1.9×10−12; OR=1.36) of GCKR (a gene for glucose and lipid metabolism), rs2188380 (p=1.6×10−23; OR=1.75) of MYL2-CUX2 (genes associated with cholesterol and diabetes mellitus) and rs4073582 (p=6.4×10−9; OR=1.66) of CNIH-2 (a gene for regulation of glutamate signalling). The latter two are identified as novel gout loci. Furthermore, among the identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we demonstrated that the SNPs of ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were differentially associated with types of gout and clinical parameters underlying specific subtypes (renal underexcretion type and renal overload type). The effect of the risk allele of each SNP on clinical parameters showed significant linear relationships with the ratio of the case–control ORs for two distinct types of gout (r=0.96 [p=4.8×10−4] for urate clearance and r=0.96 [p=5.0×10−4] for urinary urate excretion). Conclusions Our findings provide clues to better understand the pathogenesis of gout and will be useful for development of companion diagnostics. PMID:25646370

  6. REGULATION OF MULTIPLE RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM GENES BY SRY

    PubMed Central

    Milsted, Amy; Underwood, Adam C.; Dunmire, Jeff; DelPuerto, Helen L.; Martins, Almir S.; Ely, Daniel L.; Turner, Monte E.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated that the Sry gene complex on the SHR Y chromosome is a candidate locus for hypertension that accounts for the SHR Y chromosome blood pressure effect. All rat strains examined to date share 6 Sry loci, and a seventh Sry locus (Sry3) appears to be unique to SHR males. Previously, we showed that Sry1 increased activity of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter in transfected PC12 cells, and Sry1 delivered to adrenal gland of WKY rats increased blood pressure and sympathetic nervous system activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether renin-angiotensin system genes participate in Sry-mediated effects. Sry expression vectors were co-transfected into CHO cells with luciferase reporter constructs containing promoters of angiotensinogen (Agt −1430/+22), renin (Ren −1050/−1), ACE (ACE −1677/+21) and ACE2 (ACE2 −1091/+83). Sry1, Sry2 and Sry3 differentially up-regulated activity of the promoters of angiotensinogen, renin and ACE genes, and down-regulated ACE2 promoter activity. The largest effect was seen with Sry3, which increased activity of angiotensinogen promoter by 1.7 fold, renin promoter by 1.3 fold, ACE promoter by 2.6 fold, and decreased activity of ACE2 promoter by 0.5 fold. The effect of Sry1 on promoter activity was significantly less than Sry3. Sry2 activated promoters at a significantly lower level than Sry1. The result of either an additive effect of Sry regulation of multiple genes in the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in expression of a single gene could favor increased levels of Ang II and decreased levels of Ang-(1-7). These actions of Sry could result in increased blood pressure in males and contribute to gender differences in blood pressure. PMID:19809364

  7. Historical divergence and gene flow: coalescent analyses of mitochondrial, autosomal and sex-linked loci in Passerina buntings.

    PubMed

    Carling, Matthew D; Lovette, Irby J; Brumfield, Robb T

    2010-06-01

    Quantifying the role of gene flow during the divergence of closely related species is crucial to understanding the process of speciation. We collected DNA sequence data from 20 loci (one mitochondrial, 13 autosomal, and six sex-linked) for population samples of Lazuli Buntings (Passerina amoena) and Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea) (Aves: Cardinalidae) to test explicitly between a strict allopatric speciation model and a model in which divergence occurred despite postdivergence gene flow. Likelihood ratio tests of coalescent-based population genetic parameter estimates indicated a strong signal of postdivergence gene flow and a strict allopatric speciation model was rejected. Analyses of partitioned datasets (mitochondrial, autosomal, and sex-linked) suggest the overall gene flow patterns are driven primarily by autosomal gene flow, as there is no evidence of mitochondrial gene flow and we were unable to reject an allopatric speciation model for the sex-linked data. This pattern is consistent with either a parapatric divergence model or repeated periods of allopatry with gene flow occurring via secondary contact. These results are consistent with the low fitness of female avian hybrids under Haldane's rule and demonstrate that sex-linked loci likely are important in the initial generation of reproductive isolation, not just its maintenance.

  8. Genome-wide Meta-analyses of Breast, Ovarian and Prostate Cancer Association Studies Identify Multiple New Susceptibility Loci Shared by At Least Two Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Siddhartha P.; Beesley, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Lawrenson, Kate; Lindstrom, Sara; Ramus, Susan J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Kibel, Adam S.; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Michael, Agnieszka; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wolk, Alicja; Monteiro, Alvaro; Peixoto, Ana; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cox, Angela; Rudolph, Anja; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Wu, Anna H.; Lindblom, Annika; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Blomqvist, Carl; Phelan, Catherine; McLean, Catriona; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Vachon, Celine; Cybulski, Cezary; Slavov, Chavdar; Stegmaier, Christa; Maier, Christiane; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Teerlink, Craig C.; Kang, Daehee; Tessier, Daniel C.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Neal, David E.; Eccles, Diana; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Wokozorczyk, Dominika; Levine, Douglas A.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Høgdall, Estrid; Song, Fengju; Bruinsma, Fiona; Heitz, Florian; Modugno, Francesmary; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Giles, Graham G.; Olsson, Håkan; Wildiers, Hans; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Pandha, Hardev; Risch, Harvey A.; Darabi, Hatef; Salvesen, Helga B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Gronberg, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Brauch, Hiltrud; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Song, Honglin; Lim, Hui-Yi; McNeish, Iain; Campbell, Ian; Vergote, Ignace; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Stanford, Janet L.; Benítez, Javier; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Donovan, Jenny L.; Dennis, Joe; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hopper, John L.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Park, Jong Y.; Figueroa, Jonine; Clements, Judith A.; Knight, Julia A.; Peto, Julian; Cunningham, Julie M.; Pow-Sang, Julio; Batra, Jyotsna; Czene, Kamila; Lu, Karen H.; Herkommer, Kathleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Matsuo, Keitaro; Muir, Kenneth; Offitt, Kenneth; Chen, Kexin; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Odunsi, Kunle; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Cook, Linda S.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Hooning, Maartje J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Luedeke, Manuel; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Goodman, Marc T.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Riggan, Marjorie; Aly, Markus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Moisse, Matthieu; Sanderson, Maureen; Southey, Melissa C.; Jones, Michael; Lush, Michael; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Hou, Ming-Feng; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Bogdanova, Natalia; Rahman, Nazneen; Le, Nhu D.; Orr, Nick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pashayan, Nora; Peterlongo, Paolo; Guénel, Pascal; Brennan, Paul; Paulo, Paula; Webb, Penelope M.; Broberg, Per; Fasching, Peter A.; Devilee, Peter; Wang, Qin; Cai, Qiuyin; Li, Qiyuan; Kaneva, Radka; Butzow, Ralf; Kopperud, Reidun Kristin; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Stephenson, Robert A.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Winqvist, Robert; Ness, Roberta; Milne, Roger L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Benlloch, Sara; Olson, Sara H.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Maia, Sofia; Berndt, Sonja; Lee, Soo Chin; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Pejovic, Tanja; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Dörk, Thilo; Brüning, Thomas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Key, Tim J.; Edwards, Todd L.; Menon, Usha; Hamann, Ute; Mitev, Vanio; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Kristensen, Vessela; Arndt, Volker; Vogel, Walther; Zheng, Wei; Sieh, Weiva; Blot, William J.; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Schumacher, Fredrick; Freedman, Matthew L.; Berchuck, Andrew; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Haiman, Christopher A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Sellers, Thomas A.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hall, Per; Gayther, Simon A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Eeles, Rosalind; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Lambrechts, Diether

    2016-01-01

    Breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers are hormone-related and may have a shared genetic basis but this has not been investigated systematically by genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Meta-analyses combining the largest GWA meta-analysis data sets for these cancers totaling 112,349 cases and 116,421 controls of European ancestry, all together and in pairs, identified at P < 10−8 seven new cross-cancer loci: three associated with susceptibility to all three cancers (rs17041869/2q13/BCL2L11; rs7937840/11q12/INCENP; rs1469713/19p13/GATAD2A), two breast and ovarian cancer risk loci (rs200182588/9q31/SMC2; rs8037137/15q26/RCCD1), and two breast and prostate cancer risk loci (rs5013329/1p34/NSUN4; rs9375701/6q23/L3MBTL3). Index variants in five additional regions previously associated with only one cancer also showed clear association with a second cancer type. Cell-type specific expression quantitative trait locus and enhancer-gene interaction annotations suggested target genes with potential cross-cancer roles at the new loci. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of death receptor signaling genes near loci with P < 10−5 in the three-cancer meta-analysis. PMID:27432226

  9. Childhood abuse is associated with methylation of multiple loci in adult DNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood abuse is associated with increased adult disease risk, suggesting that processes acting over the long-term, such as epigenetic regulation of gene activity, may be involved. DNA methylation is a critical mechanism in epigenetic regulation. We aimed to establish whether childhood abuse was associated with adult DNA methylation profiles. Methods In 40 males from the 1958 British Birth Cohort we compared genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in blood taken at 45y for those with, versus those without, childhood abuse (n = 12 vs 28). We analysed the promoter methylation of over 20,000 genes and 489 microRNAs, using MeDIP (methylated DNA immunoprecipitation) in triplicate. Results We found 997 differentially methylated gene promoters (311 hypermethylated and 686 hypomethylated) in association with childhood abuse and these promoters were enriched for genes involved in key cell signaling pathways related to transcriptional regulation and development. Using bisulfite-pyrosequencing, abuse-associated methylation (MeDIP) at the metalloproteinase gene, PM20D1, was validated and then replicated in an additional 27 males. Abuse-associated methylation was observed in 39 microRNAs; in 6 of these, the hypermethylated state was consistent with the hypomethylation of their downstream gene targets. Although distributed across the genome, the differentially methylated promoters associated with child abuse clustered in genome regions of at least one megabase. The observations for child abuse showed little overlap with methylation patterns associated with socioeconomic position. Conclusions Our observed genome-wide methylation profiles in adult DNA associated with childhood abuse justify the further exploration of epigenetic regulation as a mediating mechanism for long-term health outcomes. PMID:24618023

  10. Multiple Regression Analysis of Sib-Pair Data on Reading to Detect Quantitative Trait Loci.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulker, D. W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Applies an extension of an earlier multiple regression model for twin analysis to the problem of detecting linkage in a quantitative trait. Detects a number of possible linkages, indicating that the approach is effective. Discusses detecting genotype-environment interaction and the issue of power. (RS)

  11. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes

    PubMed Central

    Pers, Tune H.; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan; Lent, Samantha; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery rates <0.05); and (3) contain 62 genes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P = 0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4.56, P = 5.00 × 10−4; odds ratio 2.60, P = 0.049).The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first 2 authors should be regarded as joint First Author. PMID:26755824

  12. Comprehensive analysis of schizophrenia-associated loci highlights ion channel pathways and biologically plausible candidate causal genes.

    PubMed

    Pers, Tune H; Timshel, Pascal; Ripke, Stephan; Lent, Samantha; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2016-03-15

    Over 100 associated genetic loci have been robustly associated with schizophrenia. Gene prioritization and pathway analysis have focused on a priori hypotheses and thus may have been unduly influenced by prior assumptions and missed important causal genes and pathways. Using a data-driven approach, we show that genes in associated loci: (1) are highly expressed in cortical brain areas; (2) are enriched for ion channel pathways (false discovery rates <0.05); and (3) contain 62 genes that are functionally related to each other and hence represent promising candidates for experimental follow up. We validate the relevance of the prioritized genes by showing that they are enriched for rare disruptive variants and de novo variants from schizophrenia sequencing studies (odds ratio 1.67, P = 0.039), and are enriched for genes encoding members of mouse and human postsynaptic density proteomes (odds ratio 4.56, P = 5.00 × 10(-4); odds ratio 2.60, P = 0.049).The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first 2 authors should be regarded as joint First Author.

  13. Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Philip J.; Sud, Amit; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Henrion, Marc; Orlando, Giulia; Lenive, Oleg; Broderick, Peter; Speedy, Helen E.; Johnson, David C.; Kaiser, Martin; Weinhold, Niels; Cooke, Rosie; Sunter, Nicola J.; Jackson, Graham H.; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Allsup, David J.; Carmichael, Jonathan; Bailey, James R.; Pratt, Guy; Rahman, Thahira; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Engert, Andreas; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Filho, Miguel Inacio Da Silva; Thomsen, Hauke; Hoffmann, Per; Noethen, Markus M.; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Allan, James M.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10‑9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10‑8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10‑3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10‑12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10‑12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10‑2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10‑10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10‑3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10‑9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs.

  14. Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Law, Philip J.; Sud, Amit; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Henrion, Marc; Orlando, Giulia; Lenive, Oleg; Broderick, Peter; Speedy, Helen E.; Johnson, David C.; Kaiser, Martin; Weinhold, Niels; Cooke, Rosie; Sunter, Nicola J.; Jackson, Graham H.; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Allsup, David J.; Carmichael, Jonathan; Bailey, James R.; Pratt, Guy; Rahman, Thahira; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Engert, Andreas; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Filho, Miguel Inacio da Silva; Thomsen, Hauke; Hoffmann, Per; Noethen, Markus M.; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Allan, James M.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10−9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10−8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10−3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10−12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10−12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10−2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10−10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10−3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10−9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs. PMID:28112199

  15. A radiation hybrid map of 15 loci on the distal long arm of chromosome 4, the region containing the gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Winokur, S.T.; Wasmuth, J.H. ); Schutte, B. ); Weiffenbach, B. ); Washington, S.S.; Chakravarti, A. ); McElligot, D. ); Altherr, M.R. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1993-10-01

    A physical map of 4q35 was constructed through radiation hybrid analysis of 134 clones generated from the cell line HHW416, a chromosome 4-only human-hamster somatic cell hybrid. This subtelomeric region contains the as-yet-unidentified gene responsible for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. The most likely order of 15 loci within 4q35 was determined. The loci ordered on this radiation hybrid map include both genes and polymorphic loci, as well as monomorphic loci which cannot be placed on a genetic linkage map. The physical distance spanning these loci was estimated to be approximately 4.5 Mb, by using a kilobase/centiray conversion factor derived from 4p16.3 marker analysis through the same set of radiation hybrids. The comparison of this physical map to established genetic maps suggests that this region is smaller than initially estimated and that recombination rates are increased near the telomere. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Rapid and robust resampling-based multiple-testing correction with application in a genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Shunping; Sun, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have emerged as a powerful tool to understand the genetic basis of gene expression and complex traits. In a typical eQTL study, the huge number of genetic markers and expression traits and their complicated correlations present a challenging multiple-testing correction problem. The resampling-based test using permutation or bootstrap procedures is a standard approach to address the multiple-testing problem in eQTL studies. A brute force application of the resampling-based test to large-scale eQTL data sets is often computationally infeasible. Several computationally efficient methods have been proposed to calculate approximate resampling-based P-values. However, these methods rely on certain assumptions about the correlation structure of the genetic markers, which may not be valid for certain studies. We propose a novel algorithm, rapid and exact multiple testing correction by resampling (REM), to address this challenge. REM calculates the exact resampling-based P-values in a computationally efficient manner. The computational advantage of REM lies in its strategy of pruning the search space by skipping genetic markers whose upper bounds on test statistics are small. REM does not rely on any assumption about the correlation structure of the genetic markers. It can be applied to a variety of resampling-based multiple-testing correction methods including permutation and bootstrap methods. We evaluate REM on three eQTL data sets (yeast, inbred mouse, and human rare variants) and show that it achieves accurate resampling-based P-value estimation with much less computational cost than existing methods. The software is available at http://csbio.unc.edu/eQTL.

  17. Identification of Gene Loci That Overlap Between Schizophrenia and Educational Attainment.

    PubMed

    Le Hellard, Stéphanie; Wang, Yunpeng; Witoelar, Aree; Zuber, Verena; Bettella, Francesco; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Espeseth, Thomas; Steen, Vidar M; Melle, Ingrid; Desikan, Rahul; Schork, Andrew J; Thompson, Wesley K; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-06-23

    There is evidence for genetic overlap between cognitive abilities and schizophrenia (SCZ), and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) demonstrate that both SCZ and general cognitive abilities have a strong polygenic component with many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) each with a small effect. Here we investigated the shared genetic architecture between SCZ and educational attainment, which is regarded as a "proxy phenotype" for cognitive abilities, but may also reflect other traits. We applied a conditional false discovery rate (condFDR) method to GWAS of SCZ (n = 82 315), college completion ("College," n = 95 427), and years of education ("EduYears," n = 101 069). Variants associated with College or EduYears showed enrichment of association with SCZ, demonstrating polygenic overlap. This was confirmed by an increased replication rate in SCZ. By applying a condFDR threshold <0.01, we identified 18 genomic loci associated with SCZ after conditioning on College and 15 loci associated with SCZ after conditioning on EduYears. Ten of these loci overlapped. Using conjunctional FDR, we identified 10 loci shared between SCZ and College, and 29 loci shared between SCZ and EduYears. The majority of these loci had effects in opposite directions. Our results provide evidence for polygenic overlap between SCZ and educational attainment, and identify novel pleiotropic loci. Other studies have reported genetic overlap between SCZ and cognition, or SCZ and educational attainment, with negative correlation. Importantly, our methods enable identification of bi-directional effects, which highlight the complex relationship between SCZ and educational attainment, and support polygenic mechanisms underlying both cognitive dysfunction and creativity in SCZ.

  18. EST mining for structure and expression of genes in the region of the wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin loci.

    PubMed

    Anderson, O D

    2009-08-01

    An in-depth analysis was carried out with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for genes in and near the HMW-GS loci. Considerations for using ESTs are discussed, including the occurrence of chimeric and aberrant HMW-GS ESTs. Complete gene sequences demonstrated the feasibility of constructing accurate full-length coding regions from EST assemblies and found, or supported, errors in several previously reported HMW-GS gene sequences. New complete HMW-GS gene sequences are reported for the cultivars Chinese Spring and Glenlea. The Ay subunit gene, which is considered null in cultivated wheats, was shown to transcribe in at least two germplasms. Analyses support the conclusion that of the five known genes within this genomic region, the two HMW-GS genes and the globulin gene are highly expressed. The other two genes, encoding a receptor kinase and a protein kinase, have one and no identifiable wheat EST, respectively, although ESTs are found for the orthologous genes in barley. The ESTs of all five genes within the HMW-GS region are either definitely associated with the endosperm or possibly originate from imbibed seed, suggesting the four distinct gene classes in this region are part of a seed or endosperm chromatin domain. EST resources were also used to determine relative abundance of ESTs for all classes of wheat prolamines and indicated differential levels of expression both among germplasms and among the three genomes of hexaploid wheats.

  19. Variant-aware saturating mutagenesis using multiple Cas9 nucleases identifies regulatory elements at trait-associated loci.

    PubMed

    Canver, Matthew C; Lessard, Samuel; Pinello, Luca; Wu, Yuxuan; Ilboudo, Yann; Stern, Emily N; Needleman, Austen J; Galactéros, Frédéric; Brugnara, Carlo; Kutlar, Abdullah; McKenzie, Colin; Reid, Marvin; Chen, Diane D; Das, Partha Pratim; A Cole, Mitchel; Zeng, Jing; Kurita, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Lettre, Guillaume; Bauer, Daniel E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2017-02-20

    Cas9-mediated, high-throughput, saturating in situ mutagenesis permits fine-mapping of function across genomic segments. Disease- and trait-associated variants identified in genome-wide association studies largely cluster at regulatory loci. Here we demonstrate the use of multiple designer nucleases and variant-aware library design to interrogate trait-associated regulatory DNA at high resolution. We developed a computational tool for the creation of saturating-mutagenesis libraries with single or multiple nucleases with incorporation of variants. We applied this methodology to the HBS1L-MYB intergenic region, which is associated with red-blood-cell traits, including fetal hemoglobin levels. This approach identified putative regulatory elements that control MYB expression. Analysis of genomic copy number highlighted potential false-positive regions, thus emphasizing the importance of off-target analysis in the design of saturating-mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data establish a widely applicable high-throughput and high-resolution methodology to identify minimal functional sequences within large disease- and trait-associated regions.

  20. Multiple sclerosis risk loci and disease severity in 7,125 individuals from 10 studies

    PubMed Central

    George, Michaela F.; Briggs, Farren B.S.; Shao, Xiaorong; Gianfrancesco, Milena A.; Kockum, Ingrid; Harbo, Hanne F.; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Bos, Steffan D.; Hedström, Anna; Shen, Ling; Bernstein, Allan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; De Jager, Philip L.; Oturai, Annette B.; Søndergaard, Helle B.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per S.; Gomez, Refujia; Caillier, Stacy J.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Hauser, Stephen L.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Leone, Maurizio A.; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Sorosina, Melissa; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce V.; Zhou, Yuan; Schaefer, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between 52 risk variants identified through genome-wide association studies and disease severity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Ten unique MS case data sets were analyzed. The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) was calculated using the Expanded Disability Status Scale at study entry and disease duration. MSSS was considered as a continuous variable and as 2 dichotomous variables (median and extreme ends; MSSS of ≤5 vs >5 and MSSS of <2.5 vs ≥7.5, respectively). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were examined individually and as both combined weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) and unweighted genetic risk score (GRS) for association with disease severity. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted and adjusted for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. Results: A total of 7,125 MS cases were analyzed. The wGRS and GRS were not strongly associated with disease severity after accounting for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. After restricting analyses to cases with disease duration ≥10 years, associations were null (p value ≥0.05). No SNP was associated with disease severity after adjusting for multiple testing. Conclusions: The largest meta-analysis of established MS genetic risk variants and disease severity, to date, was performed. Results suggest that the investigated MS genetic risk variants are not associated with MSSS, even after controlling for potential confounders. Further research in large cohorts is needed to identify genetic determinants of disease severity using sensitive clinical and MRI measures, which are critical to understanding disease mechanisms and guiding development of effective treatments. PMID:27540591

  1. Genotyping and investigating capsular polysaccharide synthesis gene loci of non-serotypeable Streptococcus suis isolated from diseased pigs in Canada.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Han; Qiu, Xiaotong; Roy, David; Segura, Mariela; Du, Pengchen; Xu, Jianguo; Gottschalk, Marcelo

    2017-02-20

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is an important swine pathogen and an emerging zoonotic agent. Most clinical S. suis strains express capsular polysaccharides (CPS), which can be typed by antisera using the coagglutination test. In this study, 79 S. suis strains recovered from diseased pigs in Canada and which could not be typed using antisera were further characterized by capsular gene typing and sequencing. Four patterns of cps locus were observed: (1) fifteen strains were grouped into previously reported serotypes but presented several mutations in their cps loci, when compared to available data from reference strains; (2) seven strains presented a complete deletion of the cps locus, which would result in an inability to synthesize capsule; (3) forty-seven strains were classified in recently described novel cps loci (NCLs); and (4) ten strains carried novel NCLs not previously described. Different virulence gene profiles (based on the presence of mrp, epf, and/or sly) were observed in these non-serotypeable strains. This study provides further insight in understanding the genetic characteristics of cps loci in non-serotypeable S. suis strains recovered from diseased animals. When using a combination of the previously described 35 serotypes and the complete NCL system, the number of untypeable strains recovered from diseased animals in Canada would be significantly reduced.

  2. Genome-wide linkage scan identifies two novel genetic loci for coronary artery disease: in GeneQuest families.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanxiang; Li, Lin; Rao, Shaoqi; Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing K

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of "missing heritability". Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL  = 5.49) and 3q29 (NPL  = 6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL  = 3.18-4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD.

  3. Genetic variation in the odorant receptors family 13 and the mhc loci influence mate selection in a multiple sclerosis dataset

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When selecting mates, many vertebrate species seek partners with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes different from their own, presumably in response to selective pressure against inbreeding and towards MHC diversity. Attempts at replication of these genetic results in human studies, however, have reached conflicting conclusions. Results Using a multi-analytical strategy, we report validated genome-wide relationships between genetic identity and human mate choice in 930 couples of European ancestry. We found significant similarity between spouses in the MHC at class I region in chromosome 6p21, and at the odorant receptor family 13 locus in chromosome 9. Conversely, there was significant dissimilarity in the MHC class II region, near the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 genes. We also found that genomic regions with significant similarity between spouses show excessive homozygosity in the general population (assessed in the HapMap CEU dataset). Conversely, loci that were significantly dissimilar among spouses were more likely to show excessive heterozygosity in the general population. Conclusions This study highlights complex patterns of genomic identity among partners in unrelated couples, consistent with a multi-faceted role for genetic factors in mate choice behavior in human populations. PMID:21067613

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Multiple Loci Influencing Normal Human Facial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Raffensperger, Zachary D.; Heike, Carrie L.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Kau, Chung How; Moreno, Lina M.; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Santorico, Stephanie; Klein, Ophir; Feingold, Eleanor; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Spritz, Richard A.; Marazita, Mary L.; Weinberg, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence point to a genetic basis for facial morphology in humans, yet little is known about how specific genetic variants relate to the phenotypic expression of many common facial features. We conducted genome-wide association meta-analyses of 20 quantitative facial measurements derived from the 3D surface images of 3118 healthy individuals of European ancestry belonging to two US cohorts. Analyses were performed on just under one million genotyped SNPs (Illumina OmniExpress+Exome v1.2 array) imputed to the 1000 Genomes reference panel (Phase 3). We observed genome-wide significant associations (p < 5 x 10−8) for cranial base width at 14q21.1 and 20q12, intercanthal width at 1p13.3 and Xq13.2, nasal width at 20p11.22, nasal ala length at 14q11.2, and upper facial depth at 11q22.1. Several genes in the associated regions are known to play roles in craniofacial development or in syndromes affecting the face: MAFB, PAX9, MIPOL1, ALX3, HDAC8, and PAX1. We also tested genotype-phenotype associations reported in two previous genome-wide studies and found evidence of replication for nasal ala length and SNPs in CACNA2D3 and PRDM16. These results provide further evidence that common variants in regions harboring genes of known craniofacial function contribute to normal variation in human facial features. Improved understanding of the genes associated with facial morphology in healthy individuals can provide insights into the pathways and mechanisms controlling normal and abnormal facial morphogenesis. PMID:27560520

  5. Dissecting Quantitative Trait Loci for Boron Efficiency across Multiple Environments in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zunkang; Wu, Likun; Nian, Fuzhao; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Taoxiong; Zhang, Didi; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Meng, Jinling

    2012-01-01

    High yield is the most important goal in crop breeding, and boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for plants. However, B deficiency, leading to yield decreases, is an agricultural problem worldwide. Brassica napus is one of the most sensitive crops to B deficiency, and considerable genotypic variation exists among different cultivars in response to B deficiency. To dissect the genetic basis of tolerance to B deficiency in B. napus, we carried out QTL analysis for seed yield and yield-related traits under low and normal B conditions using the double haploid population (TNDH) by two-year and the BQDH population by three-year field trials. In total, 80 putative QTLs and 42 epistatic interactions for seed yield, plant height, branch number, pod number, seed number, seed weight and B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were identified under low and normal B conditions, singly explaining 4.15–23.16% and 0.53–14.38% of the phenotypic variation. An additive effect of putative QTLs was a more important controlling factor than the additive-additive effect of epistatic interactions. Four QTL-by-environment interactions and 7 interactions between epistatic interactions and the environment contributed to 1.27–4.95% and 1.17–3.68% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The chromosome region on A2 of SYLB-A2 for seed yield under low B condition and BEC-A2 for BEC in the two populations was equivalent to the region of a reported major QTL, BE1. The B. napus homologous genes of Bra020592 and Bra020595 mapped to the A2 region and were speculated to be candidate genes for B efficiency. These findings reveal the complex genetic basis of B efficiency in B. napus. They provide a basis for the fine mapping and cloning of the B efficiency genes and for breeding B-efficient cultivars by marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:23028855

  6. Identification of quantitative trait loci in rye introgression lines carrying multiple donor chromosome segments.

    PubMed

    Mahone, Gregory S; Frisch, Matthias; Miedaner, Thomas; Wilde, Peer; Wortmann, Heinrich; Falke, K Christin

    2013-01-01

    Introgression libraries can be used to make favorable genetic variation of exotic donor genotypes available in the genetic background of elite breeding material. Our objective was to employ a combination of the Dunnett test and a linear model analysis to identify favorable donor alleles in introgression lines (ILs) that carry long or multiple donor chromosome segments (DCS). We reanalyzed a dataset of two rye introgression libraries that consisted of ILs carrying on average about four donor segments. After identifying ILs that had a significantly better per se or testcross performance than the recipient line with the Dunnett test, the linear model analysis was in most instances able to clearly identify the donor regions that were responsible for the superior performance. The precise localization of the favorable DCS allowed a detailed analysis of pleiotropic effects and the study of the consistency of effects for per se and testcross performance. We conclude that in many cases the linear model analysis allows the assignment of donor effects to individual DCS even for ILs with long or multiple donor segments. This may considerably increase the efficiency of producing sub-ILs, because only such segments need to be isolated that are known to have a significant effect on the phenotype.

  7. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse--effects of selection and gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Minias, P; Bateson, Z W; Whittingham, L A; Johnson, J A; Oyler-McCance, S; Dunn, P O

    2016-05-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  8. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  9. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J P; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Humphries, Steve E; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-06-24

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10(-8) to 3 × 10(-14)). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1.

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci for variation in human ear morphology

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Kaustubh; Reales, Guillermo; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Konka, Esra; Palmen, Jutta; Quinto-Sanchez, Mirsha; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Jaramillo, Claudia; Arias, William; Fuentes, Macarena; Pizarro, María; Barquera Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín Pérez, Gastón; Gómez-Valdés, Jorge; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Hunemeier, Tábita; Ramallo, Virginia; Silva de Cerqueira, Caio C.; Hurtado, Malena; Villegas, Valeria; Granja, Vanessa; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia; Salzano, Francisco M.; Bortolini, Maria- Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Calderón, Rosario; Rosique, Javier; Cheeseman, Michael; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Humphries, Steve E.; Gonzalez-José, Rolando; Headon, Denis; Balding, David; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genome-wide association study for non-pathological pinna morphology in over 5,000 Latin Americans. We find genome-wide significant association at seven genomic regions affecting: lobe size and attachment, folding of antihelix, helix rolling, ear protrusion and antitragus size (linear regression P values 2 × 10−8 to 3 × 10−14). Four traits are associated with a functional variant in the Ectodysplasin A receptor (EDAR) gene, a key regulator of embryonic skin appendage development. We confirm expression of Edar in the developing mouse ear and that Edar-deficient mice have an abnormally shaped pinna. Two traits are associated with SNPs in a region overlapping the T-Box Protein 15 (TBX15) gene, a major determinant of mouse skeletal development. Strongest association in this region is observed for SNP rs17023457 located in an evolutionarily conserved binding site for the transcription factor Cartilage paired-class homeoprotein 1 (CART1), and we confirm that rs17023457 alters in vitro binding of CART1. PMID:26105758

  11. Evidence for multiple sex-determining loci in Tasmanian Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Eisbrenner, W D; Botwright, N; Cook, M; Davidson, E A; Dominik, S; Elliott, N G; Henshall, J; Jones, S L; Kube, P D; Lubieniecki, K P; Peng, S; Davidson, W S

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic sex in salmonids is determined primarily by a genetic male heterogametic system; yet, sex reversal can be accomplished via hormonal treatment. In Tasmanian Atlantic salmon aquaculture, to overcome problems associated with early sexual maturation in males, sex-reversed females are crossed with normal females to produce all female stock. However, phenotypic distinction of sex-reversed females (neo-males) from true males is problematic. We set out to identify genetic markers that could make this distinction. Microsatellite markers from chromosome 2 (Ssa02), to which the sex-determining locus (SEX) has been mapped in two Scottish Atlantic salmon families, did not predict sex in a pilot study of seven families. A TaqMan 64 SNP genome-wide scan suggested SEX was on Ssa06 in these families, and this was confirmed by microsatellite markers. A survey of 58 families in total representing 38 male lineages in the SALTAS breeding program found that 34 of the families had SEX on Ssa02, in 22 of the families SEX was on Ssa06, and two of the families had a third SEX locus, on Ssa03. A PCR test using primers designed from the recently published sdY gene is consistent with Tasmanian Atlantic salmon having a single sex-determining gene that may be located on at least three linkage groups. PMID:23759729

  12. Campylobacter fetus uses multiple loci for DNA inversion within the 5' conserved regions of sap homologs.

    PubMed

    Tu, Z C; Ray, K C; Thompson, S A; Blaser, M J

    2001-11-01

    Campylobacter fetus cells possess multiple promoterless sap homologs, each capable of expressing a surface layer protein (SLP) by utilizing a unique promoter present on a 6.2-kb invertible element. Each sap homolog includes a 626-bp 5' conserved region (FCR) with 74 bp upstream and 552 bp within the open reading frame. After DNA inversion, the splice is seamless because the FCRs are identical. In mutant strain 23D:ACA2K101, in which sapA and sapA2 flanking the invertible element in opposite orientations were disrupted by promoterless chloramphenicol resistance (Cm(r)) and kanamycin resistance (Km(r)) cassettes, respectively, the frequency of DNA inversion is 100-fold lower than that of wild-type strain 23D. To define the roles of a 15-bp inverted repeat (IR) and a Chi-like site (CLS) in the FCR, we mutagenized each upstream of sapA2 in 23D:ACA2K101 by introducing NotI and KpnI sites to create strains 23D:ACA2K101N and 23D:ACA2K101K, respectively. Alternatively selecting colonies for Cm(r) or Km(r) showed that mutagenizing the IR or CLS had no apparent effect on the frequency of the DNA inversion. However, mapping the unique NotI or KpnI site in relation to the Cm(r) or Km(r) cassette in the cells that changed phenotype showed that splices occurred both upstream and downstream of the mutated sites. PCR and sequence analyses also showed that the splice could occur in the 425-bp portion of the FCR downstream of the cassettes. In total, these data indicate that C. fetus can use multiple sites within the FCR for its sap-related DNA inversion.

  13. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with mathematics ability and disability.

    PubMed

    Docherty, S J; Davis, O S P; Kovas, Y; Meaburn, E L; Dale, P S; Petrill, S A; Schalkwyk, L C; Plomin, R

    2010-03-01

    Numeracy is as important as literacy and exhibits a similar frequency of disability. Although its etiology is relatively poorly understood, quantitative genetic research has demonstrated mathematical ability to be moderately heritable. In this first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of mathematical ability and disability, 10 out of 43 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations nominated from two high- vs. low-ability (n = 600 10-year-olds each) scans of pooled DNA were validated (P < 0.05) in an individually genotyped sample of (*)2356 individuals spanning the entire distribution of mathematical ability, as assessed by teacher reports and online tests. Although the effects are of the modest sizes now expected for complex traits and require further replication, interesting candidate genes are implicated such as NRCAM which encodes a neuronal cell adhesion molecule. When combined into a set, the 10 SNPs account for 2.9% (F = 56.85; df = 1 and 1881; P = 7.277e-14) of the phenotypic variance. The association is linear across the distribution consistent with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hypothesis; the third of children in our sample who harbour 10 or more of the 20 risk alleles identified are nearly twice as likely (OR = 1.96; df = 1; P = 3.696e-07) to be in the lowest performing 15% of the distribution. Our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in indicating that mathematical ability and disability are influenced by many genes generating small effects across the entire spectrum of ability, implying that more highly powered studies will be needed to detect and replicate these QTL associations.

  14. [Gene knockout and knockin on the Escherichia coli lac operon loci using pBR322-red system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yu, Mei; Li, Shan-Hu; Wang, Ming-Gang; Zhou, Jian-Guang

    2005-03-01

    pBR322-Red is a newly constructed recombineering plasmid, which contains a part of the pBR322 vector, a series of regulatory elements of lambda-prophage and Red recombination genes. In the beginning, we studied the best working conditions of pBR322-Red, and then modified lac operon in E. coli W3110 chromosome using the plasmid as follow: Firstly, we knockout the lacI gene using Red-mediated recombineering with overlapping single stranded DNA oligonucleotides. Secondly, we substituded the lacA and lacY genes with lacZ, a report gene, by Red-mediated linearized double strands DNA homologous recombination. Finally, we detected the expression of lacZ on these loci for the first time. The results suggested that pBR322-Red system is suitable for modifying W3110 chromosome with various recombination strategies.

  15. Follow-up of loci from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Disease Project identifies TRIP4 as a novel susceptibility gene

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, A; Heilmann, S; Becker, T; Hernández, I; Wagner, H; Thelen, M; Mauleón, A; Rosende-Roca, M; Bellenguez, C; Bis, J C; Harold, D; Gerrish, A; Sims, R; Sotolongo-Grau, O; Espinosa, A; Alegret, M; Arrieta, J L; Lacour, A; Leber, M; Becker, J; Lafuente, A; Ruiz, S; Vargas, L; Rodríguez, O; Ortega, G; Dominguez, M-A; Mayeux, R; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M A; Farrer, L A; Schellenberg, G D; Chouraki, V; Launer, L J; van Duijn, C; Seshadri, S; Antúnez, C; Breteler, M M; Serrano-Ríos, M; Jessen, F; Tárraga, L; Nöthen, M M; Maier, W; Boada, M; Ramírez, A

    2014-01-01

    To follow-up loci discovered by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Disease Project, we attempted independent replication of 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large Spanish sample (Fundació ACE data set; 1808 patients and 2564 controls). Our results corroborate association with four SNPs located in the genes INPP5D, MEF2C, ZCWPW1 and FERMT2, respectively. Of these, ZCWPW1 was the only SNP to withstand correction for multiple testing (P=0.000655). Furthermore, we identify TRIP4 (rs74615166) as a novel genome-wide significant locus for Alzheimer's disease risk (odds ratio=1.31; confidence interval 95% (1.19–1.44); P=9.74 × 10−9). PMID:24495969

  16. Genomics and genetics of gonadotropin beta-subunit genes: Unique FSHB and duplicated LHB/CGB loci

    PubMed Central

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Rull, Kristiina; Uusküla, Liis; Hallast, Pille; Grigorova, Marina; Laan, Maris

    2010-01-01

    The follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) play a critical role in human reproduction. Despite the common evolutionary ancestry and functional relatedness of the gonadotropin hormone beta (GtHB) genes, the single-copy FSHB (at 11p13) and the multi-copy LHB/CGB genes (at 19q13.32) exhibit locus-specific differences regarding their genomic context, evolution, genetic variation and expressional profile. FSHB represents a conservative vertebrate gene with a unique function and it is located in a structurally stable gene-poor region. In contrast, the primate-specific LHB/CGB gene cluster is located in a gene-rich genomic context and demonstrates an example of evolutionary young and unstable genomic region. The gene cluster is shaped by a constant balance between selection that acts on specific functions of the loci and frequent gene conversion events among duplicons. As the transcription of the GtHB genes is rate-limiting in the assembly of respective hormones, the genomic and genetic context of the FSHB and the LHB/CGB genes largely affects the profile of the hormone production. PMID:20488225

  17. Gene-centric meta-analyses for central adiposity traits in up to 57 412 individuals of European descent confirm known loci and reveal several novel associations.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Sachiko; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B; Barnes, Michael R; Elbers, Clara C; Karczewski, Konrad J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bauer, Florianne; Baumert, Jens; Beitelshees, Amber; Berenson, Gerald S; Boer, Jolanda M A; Burke, Gregory; Cade, Brian; Chen, Wei; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Gaunt, Tom R; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Gorski, Mathias; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Johnson, Toby; Lamonte, Michael J; McDonough, Caitrin; Monda, Keri L; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Nelson, Christopher P; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Ordovas, Jose; Peter, Inga; Peters, Annette; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shen, Haiqinq; Smith, Erin; Speilotes, Liz; Thomas, Fridtjof; Thorand, Barbara; Monique Verschuren, W M; Anand, Sonia S; Dominiczak, Anna; Davidson, Karina W; Hegele, Robert A; Heid, Iris; Hofker, Marten H; Huggins, Gordon S; Illig, Thomas; Johnson, Julie A; Kirkland, Susan; König, Wolfgang; Langaee, Taimour Y; McCaffery, Jeanne; Melander, Olle; Mitchell, Braxton D; Munroe, Patricia; Murray, Sarah S; Papanicolaou, George; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach; Samani, Nilesh J; Schork, Nicholas J; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tobin, Martin D; Wijmenga, Cisca; Yusuf, Salim; Hakonarson, Hakon; Lange, Leslie A; Demerath, Ellen W; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan; Taylor, Kira C

    2014-05-01

    Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are surrogate measures of central adiposity that are associated with adverse cardiovascular events, type 2 diabetes and cancer independent of body mass index (BMI). WC and WHR are highly heritable with multiple susceptibility loci identified to date. We assessed the association between SNPs and BMI-adjusted WC and WHR and unadjusted WC in up to 57 412 individuals of European descent from 22 cohorts collaborating with the NHLBI's Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) project. The study population consisted of women and men aged 20-80 years. Study participants were genotyped using the ITMAT/Broad/CARE array, which includes ∼50 000 cosmopolitan tagged SNPs across ∼2100 cardiovascular-related genes. Each trait was modeled as a function of age, study site and principal components to control for population stratification, and we conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis. No new loci for WC were observed. For WHR analyses, three novel loci were significantly associated (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). Previously unreported rs2811337-G near TMCC1 was associated with increased WHR (β ± SE, 0.048 ± 0.008, P = 7.7 × 10(-9)) as was rs7302703-G in HOXC10 (β = 0.044 ± 0.008, P = 2.9 × 10(-7)) and rs936108-C in PEMT (β = 0.035 ± 0.007, P = 1.9 × 10(-6)). Sex-stratified analyses revealed two additional novel signals among females only, rs12076073-A in SHC1 (β = 0.10 ± 0.02, P = 1.9 × 10(-6)) and rs1037575-A in ATBDB4 (β = 0.046 ± 0.01, P = 2.2 × 10(-6)), supporting an already established sexual dimorphism of central adiposity-related genetic variants. Functional analysis using ENCODE and eQTL databases revealed that several of these loci are in regulatory regions or regions with differential expression in adipose tissue.

  18. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  19. Gene conversion events and variable degree of homogenization of rDNA loci in cultivars of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Sochorová, Jana; Coriton, Olivier; Kuderová, Alena; Lunerová, Jana; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Kovařík, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38, oilseed rape) is a relatively recent allotetraploid species derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Brassica rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and Brassica oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). To determine the influence of intensive breeding conditions on the evolution of its genome, we analysed structure and copy number of rDNA in 21 cultivars of B. napus, representative of genetic diversity. Methods We used next-generation sequencing genomic approaches, Southern blot hybridization, expression analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Subgenome-specific sequences derived from rDNA intergenic spacers (IGS) were used as probes for identification of loci composition on chromosomes. Key Results Most B. napus cultivars (18/21, 86 %) had more A-genome than C-genome rDNA copies. Three cultivars analysed by FISH (‘Darmor’, ‘Yudal’ and ‘Asparagus kale’) harboured the same number (12 per diploid set) of loci. In B. napus ‘Darmor’, the A-genome-specific rDNA probe hybridized to all 12 rDNA loci (eight on the A-genome and four on the C-genome) while the C-genome-specific probe showed weak signals on the C-genome loci only. Deep sequencing revealed high homogeneity of arrays suggesting that the C-genome genes were largely overwritten by the A-genome variants in B. napus ‘Darmor’. In contrast, B. napus ‘Yudal’ showed a lack of gene conversion evidenced by additive inheritance of progenitor rDNA variants and highly localized hybridization signals of subgenome-specific probes on chromosomes. Brassica napus ‘Asparagus kale’ showed an intermediate pattern to ‘Darmor’ and ‘Yudal’. At the expression level, most cultivars (95 %) exhibited stable A-genome nucleolar dominance while one cultivar (‘Norin 9’) showed co-dominance. Conclusions The B. napus cultivars differ in the degree and direction of rDNA homogenization. The prevalent direction of gene conversion (towards the A-genome) correlates

  20. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress.

  1. Simultaneous assessment of loss of heterozygosity at multiple microsatellite loci using semi-automated fluorescence-based detection: subregional mapping of chromosome 4 in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, G M; Larson, A A; Baergen, R N; Sommers, R L; Kern, S; Cavenee, W K

    1996-01-01

    Detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by comparison of normal and tumor genotypes using PCR-based microsatellite loci provides considerable advantages over traditional Southern blotting-based approaches. However, current methodologies are limited by several factors, including the numbers of loci that can be evaluated for LOH in a single experiment, the discrimination of true alleles versus "stutter bands," and the use of radionucleotides in detecting PCR products. Here we describe methods for high throughput simultaneous assessment of LOH at multiple loci in human tumors; these methods rely on the detection of amplified microsatellite loci by fluorescence-based DNA sequencing technology. Data generated by this approach are processed by several computer software programs that enable the automated linear quantitation and calculation of allelic ratios, allowing rapid ascertainment of LOH. As a test of this approach, genotypes at a series of loci on chromosome 4 were determined for 58 carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The results underscore the efficacy, sensitivity, and remarkable reproducibility of this approach to LOH detection and provide subchromosomal localization of two regions of chromosome 4 commonly altered in cervical tumors. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692882

  2. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  3. Species-Level Phylogeny and Polyploid Relationships in Hordeum (Poaceae) Inferred by Next-Generation Sequencing and In Silico Cloning of Multiple Nuclear Loci.

    PubMed

    Brassac, Jonathan; Blattner, Frank R

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism in the barley genus Hordeum. To analyze evolutionary changes after allopolyploidization, knowledge of parental relationships is essential. One chloroplast and 12 nuclear single-copy loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all Hordeum plus six out-group species. Amplicons from each of 96 individuals were pooled, sheared, labeled with individual-specific barcodes and sequenced in a single run on a 454 platform. Reference sequences were obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing of all loci for nine supplementary individuals. The 454 reads were assembled into contigs representing the 13 loci and, for polyploids, also homoeologues. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted for all loci separately and for a concatenated data matrix of all loci. For diploid taxa, a Bayesian concordance analysis and a coalescent-based dated species tree was inferred from all gene trees. Chloroplast matK was used to determine the maternal parent in allopolyploid taxa. The relative performance of different multilocus analyses in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization was also assessed. The resulting multilocus phylogeny reveals for the first time species phylogeny and progenitor-derivative relationships of all di- and polyploid Hordeum taxa within a single analysis. Our study proves that it is possible to obtain a multilocus species-level phylogeny for di- and polyploid taxa by combining PCR with next-generation sequencing, without cloning and without creating a heavy load of sequence data.

  4. Species-Level Phylogeny and Polyploid Relationships in Hordeum (Poaceae) Inferred by Next-Generation Sequencing and In Silico Cloning of Multiple Nuclear Loci

    PubMed Central

    Brassac, Jonathan; Blattner, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is an important speciation mechanism in the barley genus Hordeum. To analyze evolutionary changes after allopolyploidization, knowledge of parental relationships is essential. One chloroplast and 12 nuclear single-copy loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in all Hordeum plus six out-group species. Amplicons from each of 96 individuals were pooled, sheared, labeled with individual-specific barcodes and sequenced in a single run on a 454 platform. Reference sequences were obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing of all loci for nine supplementary individuals. The 454 reads were assembled into contigs representing the 13 loci and, for polyploids, also homoeologues. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted for all loci separately and for a concatenated data matrix of all loci. For diploid taxa, a Bayesian concordance analysis and a coalescent-based dated species tree was inferred from all gene trees. Chloroplast matK was used to determine the maternal parent in allopolyploid taxa. The relative performance of different multilocus analyses in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting and hybridization was also assessed. The resulting multilocus phylogeny reveals for the first time species phylogeny and progenitor-derivative relationships of all di- and polyploid Hordeum taxa within a single analysis. Our study proves that it is possible to obtain a multilocus species-level phylogeny for di- and polyploid taxa by combining PCR with next-generation sequencing, without cloning and without creating a heavy load of sequence data. PMID:26048340

  5. Gene-centric meta-analyses of 108 912 individuals confirm known body mass index loci and reveal three novel signals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Taylor, Kira C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Lange, Leslie A.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic association studies have made progress in uncovering components of the genetic architecture of the body mass index (BMI). We used the ITMAT-Broad-Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) (IBC) array comprising up to 49 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across ∼2100 metabolic and cardiovascular-related loci to genotype up to 108 912 individuals of European ancestry (EA), African-Americans, Hispanics and East Asians, from 46 studies, to provide additional insight into SNPs underpinning BMI. We used a five-phase study design: Phase I focused on meta-analysis of EA studies providing individual level genotype data; Phase II performed a replication of cohorts providing summary level EA data; Phase III meta-analyzed results from the first two phases; associated SNPs from Phase III were used for replication in Phase IV; finally in Phase V, a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of all samples from four ethnicities was performed. At an array-wide significance (P < 2.40E-06), we identify novel BMI associations in loci translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (yeast) - apolipoprotein E - apolipoprotein C-I (TOMM40-APOE-APOC1) (rs2075650, P = 2.95E-10), sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2, rs5996074, P = 9.43E-07) and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 [NTRK2, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor gene, rs1211166, P = 1.04E-06] in the Phase IV meta-analysis. Of 10 loci with previous evidence for BMI association represented on the IBC array, eight were replicated, with the remaining two showing nominal significance. Conditional analyses revealed two independent BMI-associated signals in BDNF and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) regions. Of the 11 array-wide significant SNPs, three are associated with gene expression levels in both primary B-cells and monocytes; with rs4788099 in SH2B adaptor protein 1 (SH2B1) notably being associated with the expression of multiple genes in cis. These multi

  6. Gene-centric meta-analyses of 108 912 individuals confirm known body mass index loci and reveal three novel signals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B; Taylor, Kira C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Lange, Leslie A; Keating, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Recent genetic association studies have made progress in uncovering components of the genetic architecture of the body mass index (BMI). We used the ITMAT-Broad-Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) (IBC) array comprising up to 49 320 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across ~2100 metabolic and cardiovascular-related loci to genotype up to 108 912 individuals of European ancestry (EA), African-Americans, Hispanics and East Asians, from 46 studies, to provide additional insight into SNPs underpinning BMI. We used a five-phase study design: Phase I focused on meta-analysis of EA studies providing individual level genotype data; Phase II performed a replication of cohorts providing summary level EA data; Phase III meta-analyzed results from the first two phases; associated SNPs from Phase III were used for replication in Phase IV; finally in Phase V, a multi-ethnic meta-analysis of all samples from four ethnicities was performed. At an array-wide significance (P < 2.40E-06), we identify novel BMI associations in loci translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (yeast) - apolipoprotein E - apolipoprotein C-I (TOMM40-APOE-APOC1) (rs2075650, P = 2.95E-10), sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2, rs5996074, P = 9.43E-07) and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 [NTRK2, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor gene, rs1211166, P = 1.04E-06] in the Phase IV meta-analysis. Of 10 loci with previous evidence for BMI association represented on the IBC array, eight were replicated, with the remaining two showing nominal significance. Conditional analyses revealed two independent BMI-associated signals in BDNF and melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) regions. Of the 11 array-wide significant SNPs, three are associated with gene expression levels in both primary B-cells and monocytes; with rs4788099 in SH2B adaptor protein 1 (SH2B1) notably being associated with the expression of multiple genes in cis. These multi

  7. Mapping and quantitative trait loci analysis of verticillium wilt resistance genes in cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Lin, Zhong-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Long; Chen, Wei; Guo, Xiao-Ping; Nie, Yi-Chun; Li, Yun-Hai

    2008-02-01

    Verticillium wilt is one of the most serious constraints to cotton production in almost all of the cotton-growing countries. In this study, "XinLuZao1" (XLZ1), a susceptible cultivar Gossypium hirsutum L. and "Hai7124" (H7124), a resistant line G. barbadense, and their F(2:3) families were used to map and study the disease index induced by verticillium wilt. A total of 430 SSR loci were mapped into 41 linkage groups; the map spanned 3,745.9 cM and the average distance between adjacent loci was 8.71 cM. Four and five quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected based on the disease index investigated on July 22 and August 24 in 2004, respectively. These nine QTLs explained 10.63-28.83% of the phenotypic variance, six of them were located on the D sub-genome. Two QTLs located in the same marker intervals may partly explain the significant correlation of the two traits. QTLs explaining large phenotypic variation were identified in this study, which may be quite useful in cotton anti-disease breeding.

  8. Strong cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci for the genes encoding SNHG5 and PEX6

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jihyeon; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Expression of quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the genes located in human chromosome 6 were examined. Data on RNA expression in lymphoblastoid cells of 373 unrelated Europeans were used to identify eQTLs. Genome-wide analysis resulted in 24,447 nucleotide variants associated with gene expression (P < 2.16 × 10−10). We found 36variants with P < 10−100, which were all associated with expression levels of the genes encoding small nucleolar RNA host gene 5 (SNHG5) and peroxisomal biogenesis factor 6 (PEX6). Enhancer eQTLs downstream of theSNHG5 gene might be candidate genetic factors for susceptibility to cancer. This is because nucleotide substitutions (eg, G→T at rs6922) of the enhancer eQTLs may cause low expression of SNHG5 gene, and low expression of snoRNA U50, a product generated from introns of the SNHG5gene, can induce cancer. One presently identified eQTL for the PEX6 gene was rs10948059, which had been associated with prostate cancer from previous association studies. The results imply that variants associated with prostate cancer can be identified through expressional change in the PEX6 gene, but not in the overlapped glycine N-methyltransferase gene which had been considered as a candidate gene. Further studies are required to understand their underlying mechanisms for the strong eQTLs for the SNHG5 and PEX6 genes. PMID:28033303

  9. Genome-Wide Linkage Scan Identifies Two Novel Genetic Loci for Coronary Artery Disease: In GeneQuest Families

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G.; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J.; Wang, Qing K.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of “missing heritability”. Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL  = 5.49) and 3q29 (NPL  = 6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL  = 3.18–4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD. PMID:25485937

  10. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Diego; Fernández, Carlos; Hermida, Miguel; Sciara, Andrés; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cabaleiro, Santiago; Caamaño, Rubén; Martínez, Paulino; Bouza, Carmen

    2016-02-17

    Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species.

  11. Integrative Transcriptome, Genome and Quantitative Trait Loci Resources Identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Candidate Genes for Growth Traits in Turbot

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Diego; Fernández, Carlos; Hermida, Miguel; Sciara, Andrés; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cabaleiro, Santiago; Caamaño, Rubén; Martínez, Paulino; Bouza, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Growth traits represent a main goal in aquaculture breeding programs and may be related to adaptive variation in wild fisheries. Integrating quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and next generation sequencing can greatly help to identify variation in candidate genes, which can result in marker-assisted selection and better genetic structure information. Turbot is a commercially important flatfish in Europe and China, with available genomic information on QTLs and genome mapping. Muscle and liver RNA-seq from 18 individuals was carried out to obtain gene sequences and markers functionally related to growth, resulting in a total of 20,447 genes and 85,344 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Many growth-related genes and SNPs were identified and placed in the turbot genome and genetic map to explore their co-localization with growth-QTL markers. Forty-five SNPs on growth-related genes were selected based on QTL co-localization and relevant function for growth traits. Forty-three SNPs were technically feasible and validated in a wild Atlantic population, where 91% were polymorphic. The integration of functional and structural genomic resources in turbot provides a practical approach for QTL mining in this species. Validated SNPs represent a useful set of growth-related gene markers for future association, functional and population studies in this flatfish species. PMID:26901189

  12. Carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes associated with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for obesity and type 2 diabetes: identification by data mining.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Wise, Carolyn; Kaput, Jim

    2010-09-01

    Increasing consumption of refined carbohydrates is now being recognized as a primary contributor to the development of nutritionally related chronic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A data mining approach was used to evaluate the role of carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes in the development of obesity and T2DM. Data from public databases were used to map the position of the carbohydrate metabolic pathway genes to known quantitative trait loci (QTL) for obesity and T2DM and for examining the pathway genes for the presence of sequence and structural genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNS), respectively. The results demonstrated that a majority of the genes of the carbohydrate metabolic pathways are associated with QTL for obesity and many for T2DM. In addition, some key genes of the pathways also encode non-synonymous SNPs that exhibit significant differences in population frequencies. This study emphasizes the significance of the metabolic pathways genes in the development of disease phenotypes, its differential occurrence across populations and between individuals, and a strategy for interpreting an individuals' risk for disease.

  13. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-γ) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-β. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  14. On the organization of human T-cell receptor loci: log-periodic distribution of T-cell receptor gene segments

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Toor, Abdullah A.; Rahmani, Mohamed; Manjili, Masoud H.

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell repertoire is complex and is generated by the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) segments on the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. The T-cell repertoire demonstrates self-similarity in terms clonal frequencies when defined by V, D and J gene segment usage; therefore to determine whether the structural ordering of these gene segments on the TCR loci contributes to the observed clonal frequencies, the TCR loci were examined for self-similarity and periodicity in terms of gene segment organization. Logarithmic transformation of numeric sequence order demonstrated that the V and J gene segments for both T-cell receptor α (TRA) and β (TRB) loci are arranged in a self-similar manner when the spacing between the adjacent segments was considered as a function of the size of the neighbouring gene segment, with an average fractal dimension of approximately 1.5. Accounting for the gene segments occurring on helical DNA molecules with a logarithmic distribution, sine and cosine functions of the log-transformed angular coordinates of the start and stop nucleotides of successive TCR gene segments showed an ordered progression from the 5′ to the 3′ end of the locus, supporting a log-periodic organization. T-cell clonal frequency estimates, based on V and J segment usage, from normal stem cell donors were plotted against the V and J segment on TRB locus and demonstrated a periodic distribution. We hypothesize that this quasi-periodic variation in gene-segment representation in the T-cell clonal repertoire may be influenced by the location of the gene segments on the periodic-logarithmically scaled TCR loci. Interactions between the two strands of DNA in the double helix may influence the probability of gene segment usage by means of either constructive or destructive interference resulting from the superposition of the two helices. PMID:26763333

  15. A Trans-Acting Regulatory Gene That Inversely Affects the Expression of the White, Brown and Scarlet Loci in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rabinow, L.; Nguyen-Huynh, A. T.; Birchler, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    A trans-acting regulatory gene, Inr-a, that alters the level of expression of the white eye color locus as an inverse function of the number of its functional copies is described. Several independent lines of evidence demonstrate that this regulatory gene interacts with white via the promoter sequences. Among these are the observations that the inverse regulatory effect is conferred to the Adh gene when fused to the white promoter and that cis-regulatory mutants of white fail to respond. The phenotypic response to Inr-a is found in all tissues in which white is expressed, and mutants of the regulator exhibit a recessive lethality during larval periods. Increased white messenger RNA levels in pupal stages are found in Inr-a/+ individuals versus +/+ and a coordinate response is observed for mRNA levels from the brown and scarlet loci. All are structurally related and participate in pigment deposition. These experiments demonstrate that a single regulatory gene can exert an inverse effect on a target structural locus, a situation postulated from segmental aneuploid studies of gene expression and dosage compensation. PMID:1743487

  16. Identification of two aflatrem biosynthesis gene loci in Aspergillus flavus and metabolic engineering of Penicillium paxilli to elucidate their function.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Matthew J; Koulman, Albert; Monahan, Brendon J; Pritchard, Beth L; Payne, Gary A; Scott, Barry

    2009-12-01

    Aflatrem is a potent tremorgenic toxin produced by the soil fungus Aspergillus flavus, and a member of a structurally diverse group of fungal secondary metabolites known as indole-diterpenes. Gene clusters for indole-diterpene biosynthesis have recently been described in several species of filamentous fungi. A search of Aspergillus complete genome sequence data identified putative aflatrem gene clusters in the genomes of A. flavus and Aspergillus oryzae. In both species the genes for aflatrem biosynthesis cluster at two discrete loci; the first, ATM1, is telomere proximal on chromosome 5 and contains a cluster of three genes, atmG, atmC, and atmM, and the second, ATM2, is telomere distal on chromosome 7 and contains five genes, atmD, atmQ, atmB, atmA, and atmP. Reverse transcriptase PCR in A. flavus demonstrated that aflatrem biosynthesis transcript levels increased with the onset of aflatrem production. Transfer of atmP and atmQ into Penicillium paxilli paxP and paxQ deletion mutants, known to accumulate paxilline intermediates paspaline and 13-desoxypaxilline, respectively, showed that AtmP is a functional homolog of PaxP and that AtmQ utilizes 13-desoxypaxilline as a substrate to synthesize aflatrem pathway-specific intermediates, paspalicine and paspalinine. We propose a scheme for aflatrem biosynthesis in A. flavus based on these reconstitution experiments in P. paxilli and identification of putative intermediates in wild-type cultures of A. flavus.

  17. Identifying genetic loci and spleen gene coexpression networks underlying immunophenotypes in BXD recombinant inbred mice

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Rachel M.; Naswa, Sudhir; Rogers, Gary L.; Kania, Stephen A.; Das, Suchita; Chesler, Elissa J.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Langston, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system plays a pivotal role in the susceptibility to and progression of a variety of diseases. Due to a strong genetic basis, heritable differences in immune function may contribute to differential disease susceptibility between individuals. Genetic reference populations, such as the BXD (C57BL/6J × DBA/2J) panel of recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains, provide unique models through which to integrate baseline phenotypes in healthy individuals with heritable risk for disease because of the ability to combine data collected from these populations across both multiple studies and time. We performed basic immunophenotyping (e.g., percentage of circulating B and T lymphocytes and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subpopulations) in peripheral blood of healthy mice from 41 BXD RI strains to define the immunophenotypic variation in this strain panel and to characterize the genetic architecture that underlies these traits. Significant QTL models that explained the majority (50–77%) of phenotypic variance were derived for each trait and for the T:B cell and CD4+:CD8+ ratios. Combining QTL mapping with spleen gene expression data uncovered two quantitative trait transcripts, Ptprk and Acp1, as candidates for heritable differences in the relative abundance of helper and cytotoxic T cells. These data will be valuable in extracting genetic correlates of the immune system in the BXD panel. In addition, they will be a useful resource for prospective, phenotype-driven model selection to test hypotheses about differential disease or environmental susceptibility between individuals with baseline differences in the composition of the immune system. PMID:20179155

  18. Phenotypes Associated with Knockouts of Eight Dense Granule Gene Loci (GRA2-9) in Virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Rommereim, Leah M; Bellini, Valeria; Fox, Barbara A; Pètre, Graciane; Rak, Camille; Touquet, Bastien; Aldebert, Delphine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Mercier, Corinne; Bzik, David J

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii actively invades host cells and establishes a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that accumulates many proteins secreted by the dense granules (GRA proteins). To date, at least 23 GRA proteins have been reported, though the function(s) of most of these proteins still remains unknown. We targeted gene knockouts at ten GRA gene loci (GRA1-10) to investigate the cellular roles and essentiality of these classical GRA proteins during acute infection in the virulent type I RH strain. While eight of these genes (GRA2-9) were successfully knocked out, targeted knockouts at the GRA1 and GRA10 loci were not obtained, suggesting these GRA proteins may be essential. As expected, the Δgra2 and Δgra6 knockouts failed to form an intravacuolar network (IVN). Surprisingly, Δgra7 exhibited hyper-formation of the IVN in both normal and lipid-free growth conditions. No morphological alterations were identified in parasite or PV structures in the Δgra3, Δgra4, Δgra5, Δgra8, or Δgra9 knockouts. With the exception of the Δgra3 and Δgra8 knockouts, all of the GRA knockouts exhibited defects in their infection rate in vitro. While the single GRA knockouts did not exhibit reduced replication rates in vitro, replication rate defects were observed in three double GRA knockout strains (Δgra4Δgra6, Δgra3Δgra5 and Δgra3Δgra7). However, the virulence of single or double GRA knockout strains in CD1 mice was not affected. Collectively, our results suggest that while the eight individual GRA proteins investigated in this study (GRA2-9) are not essential, several GRA proteins may provide redundant and potentially important functions during acute infection.

  19. Phenotypes Associated with Knockouts of Eight Dense Granule Gene Loci (GRA2-9) in Virulent Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Pètre, Graciane; Rak, Camille; Touquet, Bastien; Aldebert, Delphine; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Mercier, Corinne; Bzik, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii actively invades host cells and establishes a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that accumulates many proteins secreted by the dense granules (GRA proteins). To date, at least 23 GRA proteins have been reported, though the function(s) of most of these proteins still remains unknown. We targeted gene knockouts at ten GRA gene loci (GRA1-10) to investigate the cellular roles and essentiality of these classical GRA proteins during acute infection in the virulent type I RH strain. While eight of these genes (GRA2-9) were successfully knocked out, targeted knockouts at the GRA1 and GRA10 loci were not obtained, suggesting these GRA proteins may be essential. As expected, the Δgra2 and Δgra6 knockouts failed to form an intravacuolar network (IVN). Surprisingly, Δgra7 exhibited hyper-formation of the IVN in both normal and lipid-free growth conditions. No morphological alterations were identified in parasite or PV structures in the Δgra3, Δgra4, Δgra5, Δgra8, or Δgra9 knockouts. With the exception of the Δgra3 and Δgra8 knockouts, all of the GRA knockouts exhibited defects in their infection rate in vitro. While the single GRA knockouts did not exhibit reduced replication rates in vitro, replication rate defects were observed in three double GRA knockout strains (Δgra4Δgra6, Δgra3Δgra5 and Δgra3Δgra7). However, the virulence of single or double GRA knockout strains in CD1 mice was not affected. Collectively, our results suggest that while the eight individual GRA proteins investigated in this study (GRA2-9) are not essential, several GRA proteins may provide redundant and potentially important functions during acute infection. PMID:27458822

  20. Fine mapping of type 1 diabetes susceptibility loci and evidence for colocalization of causal variants with lymphoid gene enhancers.

    PubMed

    Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Chen, Wei-Min; Burren, Oliver; Cooper, Nick J; Quinlan, Aaron R; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Farber, Emily; Bonnie, Jessica K; Szpak, Michal; Schofield, Ellen; Achuthan, Premanand; Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D; Stevens, Helen; Walker, Neil M; Ward, Lucas D; Kundaje, Anshul; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cooper, Jason D; Deloukas, Panos; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris; Concannon, Patrick; Rich, Stephen S

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies of type 1 diabetes (T1D) have identified 50 susceptibility regions, finding major pathways contributing to risk, with some loci shared across immune disorders. To make genetic comparisons across autoimmune disorders as informative as possible, a dense genotyping array, the Immunochip, was developed, from which we identified four new T1D-associated regions (P < 5 × 10(-8)). A comparative analysis with 15 immune diseases showed that T1D is more similar genetically to other autoantibody-positive diseases, significantly most similar to juvenile idiopathic arthritis and significantly least similar to ulcerative colitis, and provided support for three additional new T1D risk loci. Using a Bayesian approach, we defined credible sets for the T1D-associated SNPs. The associated SNPs localized to enhancer sequences active in thymus, T and B cells, and CD34(+) stem cells. Enhancer-promoter interactions can now be analyzed in these cell types to identify which particular genes and regulatory sequences are causal.

  1. Physical Localization and DNA Methylation of 45S rRNA Gene Loci in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhiyun; Xue, Chao; Zhang, Mingliang; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Yong; Shi, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays of repeat units, and not all copies are transcribed during mitosis. DNA methylation is considered to be an epigenetic marker for rDNA activation. Here, we established a clear and accurate karyogram for Jatropha curcas L. The chromosomal formula was found to be 2n = 2x = 22 = 12m+10sm. We found that the 45S rDNA loci were located at the termini of chromosomes 7 and 9 in J. curcas. The distribution of 45S rDNA has no significant difference in J. curcas from different sources. Based on the hybridization signal patterns, there were two forms of rDNA - dispersed and condensed. The dispersed type of signals appeared during interphase and prophase, while the condensed types appeared during different stages of mitosis. DNA methylation analysis showed that when 45S rDNA stronger signals were dispersed and connected to the nucleolus, DNA methylation levels were lower at interphase and prophase. However, when the 45S rDNA loci were condensed, especially during metaphase, they showed different forms of DNA methylation. PMID:24386362

  2. The Genetics of a Small Autosomal Region of Drosophila Melanogaster Containing the Structural Gene for Alcohol Dehydrogenase. VII. Characterization of the Region around the Snail and Cactus Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ashburner, M.; Thompson, P.; Roote, J.; Lasko, P. F.; Grau, Y.; Messal, M. E.; Roth, S.; Simpson, P.

    1990-01-01

    The genetic interval 35C to 36A on chromosome arm 2L of Drosophila melanogaster has been saturated for mutations with visible or lethal phenotypes. 38 loci have been characterized, including several maternal-effect lethals (vasa, Bic-C, chiffon, cactus and cornichon) and several early embryonic lethals, including snail and fizzy. About 130 deletions have been used to order these loci. Complex interactions between mutant alleles have been uncovered in the immediate genetic environs of the snail gene, as has further evidence for an interaction between this region and that including the nearby genes no-ocelli and elbow. PMID:2123463

  3. Heterogeneity of genetic loci in chickens: analysis of endogenous viral and nonviral genes by cleavage of DNA with restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S H; Payvar, F; Spector, D; Schimke, R T; Robinson, H L; Payne, G S; Bishop, J M; Varmus, H E

    1979-10-01

    Restriction endonucleases can be used to define the structure and position of genetic loci for which specific molecular hybridization reagents are available. We have used this approach to compare 18 chicken embryos with respect to several cellular genes; endogenous viral DNA related to the replicative genes of avian sarcoma virus (ASV) or to RAV-O, an endogenous virus of chickens; and sequences related to the transforming (src) gene of ASV. Each cellular gene eas remarkably homogeneous within our test population. We found little or no variation in globin and ovomucoid genes; ovalbumin and transferrin (with one exception) showed variation which is probably allelic in nature. The endogenous viral DNA which has homology with RAV-O was found at several different positions in host DNA and its structure resembled that of proviruses acquired by experimental infection, with sequences from both ends of viral RNA repeated near both ends of viral DNA. Within the population of 18 chickens, one endogenous provirus was always present, whereas the several other proviruses were each found in only a few members of this group. However, screening of additional chickens identified individuals lacking the provirus common to the initial 18 animals surveyed; in at least one embryo no RAV-O-related DNA was detected. These findings suggest that the endogenous RAV-O-related sequences have entered the germ line by relatively recent infection and are still segregating in several contemporary chicken flocks. The sequences in the chicken genome which have homology with the src gene of ASV are invariant from bird to bird and in this sense resemble a cellular gene rather than a viral sequence.

  4. Characterization and locus-specific typing of MHC class I genes in the red-billed gull (Larus scopulinus) provides evidence for major, minor, and nonclassical loci.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Alison; Mills, James A; Baker, Allan J

    2011-06-01

    A major challenge facing studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) evolution in birds is the difficulty in genotyping alleles at individual loci, and the consequent inability to investigate sequence variation and selection pressures for each gene. In this study, four MHC class I loci were isolated from the red-billed gull (Larus scopulinus), representing both the first characterized MHCI genes within Charadriiformes (shorebirds, gulls, and allies) and the first full-length MHCI sequences described outside Galloanserae (gamebirds + waterfowl). Complete multilocus genotypes were obtained for 470 individuals using a combination of reference-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing of gene-specific amplification products, and variation of peptide-binding region (PBR) exons was surveyed for all loci. Each gene is transcribed and has conserved sequence features characteristic of antigen-presenting MHCI molecules. However, higher allelic variation, a more even allele frequency distribution, and evidence of positive selection acting on a larger number of PBR residues suggest that only one locus (Lasc-UAA) functions as a major classical MHCI gene. Lasc-UBA, with more limited variation and PBR motifs that encompass a subset of Lasc-UAA diversity, was assigned a putative minor classical function, whereas the divergent and largely invariant binding-groove motifs of Lasc-UCA and -UDA are suggestive of nonclassical loci with specialized ligand-binding roles.

  5. Gene stacking strategies with doubled haploids derived from biparental crosses: theory and simulations assuming a finite number of loci.

    PubMed

    Melchinger, Albrecht E; Technow, Frank; Dhillon, Baldev S

    2011-12-01

    Recent progress in genotyping and doubled haploid (DH) techniques has created new opportunities for development of improved selection methods in numerous crops. Assuming a finite number of unlinked loci (ℓ) and a given total number (n) of individuals to be genotyped, we compared, by theory and simulations, three methods of marker-assisted selection (MAS) for gene stacking in DH lines derived from biparental crosses: (1) MAS for high values of the marker score (T, corresponding to the total number of target alleles) in the F(2) generation and subsequently among DH lines derived from the selected F(2) individual (Method 1), (2) MAS for augmented F(2) enrichment and subsequently for T among DH lines from the best carrier F(2) individual (Method 2), and (3) MAS for T among DH lines derived from the F(1) generation (Method 3). Our objectives were to (a) determine the optimum allocation of resources to the F(2) ([Formula: see text]) and DH generations [Formula: see text] for Methods 1 and 2 by simulations, (b) compare the efficiency of all three methods for gene stacking by simulations, and (c) develop theory to explain the general effect of selection on the segregation variance and interpret our simulation results. By theory, we proved that for smaller values of ℓ, the segregation variance of T among DH lines derived from F(2) individuals, selected for high values of T, can be much smaller than expected in the absence of selection. This explained our simulation results, showing that for Method 1, it is best to genotype more F(2) individuals than DH lines ([Formula: see text]), whereas under Method 2, the optimal ratio [Formula: see text] was close to 0.5. However, for ratios deviating moderately from the optimum, the mean [Formula: see text] of T in the finally selected DH line ([Formula: see text]) was hardly reduced. Method 3 had always the lowest mean [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text] except for small numbers of loci (ℓ = 4) and is favorable only if

  6. Identification of neutral genes at pollen sterility loci Sd and Se of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) with wild rice (O. rufipogon) origin.

    PubMed

    Liu, B; Li, J Q; Liu, X D; Shahid, M Q; Shi, L G; Lu, Y G

    2011-10-31

    Pollen sterility is one of the main hindrances against the utilization of strong intersubspecific (indica-japonica) heterosis in rice. We looked for neutral alleles at known pollen sterility loci Sd and Se that could overcome this pollen sterility characteristic. Taichung 65, a typical japonica cultivar, and its near isogenic lines E7 and E8 for pollen sterility loci Sd and Se were employed as tester lines for crossing with 13 accessions of wild rice (O. rufipogon). Pollen fertility and genotypic segregations of the molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci were analyzed in the paired F(1)s and F(2) populations. One accession of wild rice (GZW054) had high pollen fertility in the paired F(1)s between Taichung 65 and E7 or E8. Genotypic segregations of the molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci fit the expected Mendelian ratio (1:2:1), and non-significances were shown among the mean pollen fertilities with the maternal, parental, and heterozygous genotypes of each molecular markers tightly linked with Sd and Se loci. Evidentially, it indicated that the alleles of Sd and Se loci for GZW054 did not interact with those of Taichung 65 and its near isogenic lines, and, thus were identified as neutral alleles Sd(n) and Se(n). These neutral genes could become important germplasm resources for overcoming pollen sterility in indica-japonica hybrids, making utilization of strong heterosis in such hybrids viable.

  7. MHC class I genes in a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), have evolved by an active process of loci turnover.

    PubMed

    Cadavid, L F; Mejía, B E; Watkins, D I

    1999-03-01

    Lymphocytes of a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), express classical G-related major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with unusually limited polymorphism and variability. Three G-related loci, an F locus, an E locus, and two pseudogenes (So-N1 and So-N3) have been identified by cDNA library screening and extensive PCR analysis of both cDNA and genomic DNA from the cotton-top tamarin. Furthermore, each genus of the subfamily Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets) appears to express its own unique set of MHC class I genes, likely due to a rapid turnover of loci. The rapid emergence of unique MHC class I genes in the Callitrichinae genera, resulting from an active process of duplication and inactivation of loci, may account for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin. To determine the nature of the entire complement of MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin, we synthesized a genomic DNA library and screened it with MHC class I-specific probes. We isolated nine new MHC class I pseudogenes from this library. These newly isolated tamarin G-related MHC class I pseudogenes are not closely related to any of their functional counterparts in the tamarin, suggesting that they do not share a recent common ancestral gene with the tamarin's currently expressed MHC class I loci. In addition, these tamarin sequences display a high rate of nonsynonymous substitutions in their putative peptide binding region. This indicates that the genes from which they have derived were likely subject to positive selection and, therefore, were once functional. Our data support the notion that an extremely high rate of loci turnover is largely responsible for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin.

  8. Gene-centric meta-analyses for central adiposity traits in up to 57 412 individuals of European descent confirm known loci and reveal several novel associations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are surrogate measures of central adiposity that are associated with adverse cardiovascular events, type 2 diabetes and cancer independent of body mass index (BMI). WC and WHR are highly heritable with multiple susceptibility loci identified to d...

  9. Copy number variation and microdeletions of the Y chromosome linked genes and loci across different categories of Indian infertile males

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anju; Yadav, Sandeep Kumar; Misro, Man Mohan; Ahmad, Jamal; Ali, Sher

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 34 azoospermic (AZ), 43 oligospermic (OS), and 40 infertile males with normal spermiogram (INS) together with 55 normal fertile males (NFM) from the Indian population. AZ showed more microdeletions in the AZFa and AZFb regions whereas oligospermic ones showed more microdeletions in the AZFc region. Frequency of the AZF partial deletions was higher in males with spermatogenic impairments than in INS. Significantly, SRY, DAZ and BPY2 genes showed copy number variation across different categories of the patients and much reduced copies of the DYZ1 repeat arrays compared to that in normal fertile males. Likewise, INS showed microdeletions, sequence and copy number variation of several Y linked genes and loci. In the context of infertility, STS deletions and copy number variations both were statistically significant (p = 0.001). Thus, semen samples used during in vitro fertilization (IVF) and assisted reproductive technology (ART) must be assessed for the microdeletions of AZFa, b and c regions in addition to the affected genes reported herein. Present study is envisaged to be useful for DNA based diagnosis of different categories of the infertile males lending support to genetic counseling to the couples aspiring to avail assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26638807

  10. First insights into the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) blood transcriptome: a resource for novel gene loci and immunogenetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Fan, Zhenxin; Shen, Fujun; Yang, Mingyu; Wang, Zili; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-07-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the most famous flagship species for conservation, and its draft genome has recently been assembled. However, the transcriptome is not yet available. In this study, the blood transcriptomes of three pandas were characterized and about 160 million sequencing reads were generated using Illumina HiSeq 2000 paired-end sequencing technology. The assembly yielded 92 598 transcripts with an average length of 1626 bp and N50 length of 2842 bp. Based on a sequence similarity search against nonredundant (nr) protein database, a total of 38 522 (41.6%) transcripts were annotated. Of these annotated transcripts, 25 142 and 8272 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous group, respectively. A search against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) indicated that 9098 (9.83%) transcripts mapped to 324 KEGG pathways, and the best represented functional categories of pathways were signal transduction and immune system. We have also identified 23 460 microsatellites, 43 560 SNPs as well as 21 456 alternative splicing events in the assembly. Additionally, a total of 24 341 complete open reading frames (ORFs) were detected from the assembly where 1492 ORFs were found to be novel gene loci as these have not been annotated so far in any public database.

  11. Hereditary multiple exostoses and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gòmez-Bernal, Germán

    2008-05-01

    I report a case of a patient who suffered schizophrenia and multiple exostoses and argue the possible role of EXT gene and nearly chromosomal loci in further genetic investigations related to schizophrenia.

  12. Multiple mismatches at the low expression HLA loci DP, DQ, and DRB3/4/5 associate with adverse outcomes in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Viña, Marcelo A; Klein, John P; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen R; Anasetti, Claudio; Noreen, Harriet; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Cano, Pedro; Flomenberg, Neal; Confer, Dennis L; Horowitz, Mary M; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W; Setterholm, Michelle; Champlin, Richard; Lee, Stephanie J; de Lima, Marcos

    2013-05-30

    A single mismatch in highly expressed HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 loci (HEL) is associated with worse outcomes in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, while less is known about the cumulative impact of mismatches in the lesser expressed HLA loci DRB3/4/5, DQ, and DP (LEL). We studied whether accumulation of LEL mismatches is associated with deleterious effects in 3853 unrelated donor transplants stratified according to number of matches in the HEL. In the 8/8 matched HEL group, LEL mismatches were not associated with any adverse outcome. Mismatches at HLA-DRB1 were associated with occurrence of multiple LEL mismatches. In the 7/8 HEL group, patients with 3 or more LEL mismatches scored in the graft-versus-host vector had a significantly higher risk of mortality (1.45 and 1.43) and transplant-related mortality (1.68 and 1.54) than the subgroups with 0 or 1 LEL mismatches. No single LEL locus had a more pronounced effect on clinical outcome. Three or more LEL mismatches are associated with lower survival after 7/8 HEL matched transplantation. Prospective evaluation of matching for HLA-DRB3/4/5, -DQ, and -DP loci is warranted to reduce posttransplant risks in donor-recipient pairs matched for 7/8 HEL.

  13. Identification of differently expressed genes with specific SNP Loci for breast cancer by the integration of SNP and gene expression profiling analyses.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun; Deng, Miao; Liu, Jiangbo; Wang, Jianguang; Zhang, Like; Liu, Qipeng; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Yanbin; Jin, Gaoyuan

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the relationship between gene polymorphism and breast cancer, and to screen DEGs (differentially expressed genes) with SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) related to breast cancer. The SNPs of 17 patients and the preprocessed SNP profiling GSE 32258 (38 cases of normal breast cells) were combined to identify their correlation with breast cancer using chi-square test. The gene expression profiling batch8_9 (38 cases of patients and 8 cases of normal tissue) was preprocessed with limma package, and the DEGs were filtered out. Then fisher's method was applied to integrate DEGs and SNPs associated with breast cancer. With NetBox software, TRED (Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database) and UCSC (University of California Santa Cruz) database, genes-associated network and transcriptional regulatory network were constructed using cytoscape software. Further, GO (Gene Ontology) and KEGG analyses were performed for genes in the networks by using siggenes. In total, 332 DEGs were identified. There were 160 breast cancer-related SNPs related to 106 genes of gene expression profiling (19 were significant DEGs). Finally, 11co-correlated DEGs were selected. In genes-associated network, 9 significant DEGs were correlated to 23 LINKER genes while, in transcriptional regulatory network, E2F1 had regulatory relationships with 7 DEGs including MTUS1, CD44, CCNB1 and CCND2. KRAS with SNP locus of rs1137282 was involved in 35 KEGG pathways. The genes of MTUS1, CD44, CCNB1, CCND2 and KRAS with specific SNP loci may be used as biomarkers for diagnosis of breast cancer. Besides, E2F1 was recognized as the transcription factor of 7 DEGs including MTUS1, CD44, CCNB1 and CCND2.

  14. Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies identify multiple novel loci associated with pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Dana B.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Wilk, Jemma B.; Gharib, Sina A.; Loehr, Laura R.; Marciante, Kristin D.; Franceschini, Nora; van Durme, Yannick M.T.A.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Barr, R. Graham; Schabath, Matthew B.; Couper, David J.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Morrison, Alanna C.; Enright, Paul L.; North, Kari E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Stricker, Bruno H.Ch.; O’Connor, George T.; London, Stephanie J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of lung function by spirometry are heritable traits that reflect respiratory health and predict morbidity and mortality. We meta-analyzed genome-wide association studies for two clinically important measures, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and its ratio to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), an indicator of airflow obstruction. This meta-analysis included 20,890 participants of European ancestry from four CHARGE consortium studies: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), Framingham Heart Study (FHS), and Rotterdam Study (RS). We identified eight loci associated with FEV1/FVC (HHIP, GPR126, ADAM19, AGER-PPT2, FAM13A, PTCH1, PID1, and HTR4) and one locus associated with FEV1 (INTS12-GSTCD-NPNT) at or near genome-wide significance (P<5×10−8) in CHARGE; all but 3 loci (FAM13A, PTCH1, and PID1) replicated with the SpiroMeta consortium. Our findings of novel loci influencing pulmonary function may offer insights into chronic lung disease pathogenesis. PMID:20010835

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J; Paterson, Andrew D; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Heit, John A; Pankratz, V Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Beck, Andrew H; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D; Couch, Fergus J; Hopper, John L; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Vachon, Celine M; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2014-10-24

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B and SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23 and TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci.

  16. Sex without sex chromosomes: genetic architecture of multiple loci independently segregating to determine sex ratios in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Edmands, S; Anholt, B R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-determining systems are remarkably diverse and may evolve rapidly. Polygenic sex-determination systems are predicted to be transient and evolutionarily unstable, yet examples have been reported across a range of taxa. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of polygenic sex determination in Tigriopus californicus, a harpacticoid copepod with no heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Using genetically distinct inbred lines selected for male- and female-biased clutches, we generated a genetic map with 39 SNPs across 12 chromosomes. Quantitative trait locus mapping of sex ratio phenotype (the proportion of male offspring produced by an F2 female) in four F2 families revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios. The sex ratio phenotype varied among loci across chromosomes in both direction and magnitude, with the strongest phenotypic effects on chromosome 10 moderated to some degree by loci on four other chromosomes. For a given locus, sex ratio phenotype varied in magnitude for individuals derived from different dam lines. These data, together with the environmental factors known to contribute to sex determination, characterize the underlying complexity and potential lability of sex determination, and confirm the polygenic architecture of sex determination in T. californicus.

  17. Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Sim, Xueling; Go, Min Jin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S-J Cathy; Mei, Hao; Rao, Dabeeru C; Hixson, James E; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Ogihara, Toshio; Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Kooner, Jaspal S; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Cho, Yoon Shin; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2012-07-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), impairment of kidney function, is a serious public health problem, and the assessment of genetic factors influencing kidney function has substantial clinical relevance. Here, we report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for kidney function-related traits, including 71,149 east Asian individuals from 18 studies in 11 population-, hospital- or family-based cohorts, conducted as part of the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN). Our meta-analysis identified 17 loci newly associated with kidney function-related traits, including the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, uric acid and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on serum creatinine levels (eGFRcrea) (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)). We further examined these loci with in silico replication in individuals of European ancestry from the KidneyGen, CKDGen and GUGC consortia, including a combined total of ∼110,347 individuals. We identify pleiotropic associations among these loci with kidney function-related traits and risk of CKD. These findings provide new insights into the genetics of kidney function.

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The identification of QTL involved in heterosis formation is one approach to unravel the not yet fully understood genetic basis of heterosis - the improved agronomic performance of hybrid F1 plants compared to their inbred parents. The identification of candidate genes underlying a QTL is important both for developing markers and determining the molecular genetic basis of a trait, but remains difficult owing to the large number of genes often contained within individual QTL. To address this problem in heterosis analysis, we applied a meta-analysis strategy for grain yield (GY) of Zea mays L. as example, incorporating QTL-, hybrid field-, and parental gene expression data. Results For the identification of genes underlying known heterotic QTL, we made use of tight associations between gene expression pattern and the trait of interest, identified by correlation analyses. Using this approach genes strongly associated with heterosis for GY were discovered to be clustered in pericentromeric regions of the complex maize genome. This suggests that expression differences of sequences in recombination-suppressed regions are important in the establishment of heterosis for GY in F1 hybrids and also in the conservation of heterosis for GY across genotypes. Importantly functional analysis of heterosis-associated genes from these genomic regions revealed over-representation of a number of functional classes, identifying key processes contributing to heterosis for GY. Based on the finding that the majority of the analyzed heterosis-associated genes were addtitively expressed, we propose a model referring to the influence of cis-regulatory variation on heterosis for GY by the compensation of fixed detrimental expression levels in parents. Conclusions The study highlights the utility of a meta-analysis approach that integrates phenotypic and multi-level molecular data to unravel complex traits in plants. It provides prospects for the identification of genes relevant for

  19. The Insertion Green Monster (iGM) Method for Expression of Multiple Exogenous Genes in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Suzuki, Yo; Hanly, Timothy J.; Murao, Ayako; Roth, Frederick P.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Being a simple eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides numerous advantages for expression and functional characterization of proteins from higher eukaryotes, including humans. However, studies of complex exogenous pathways using yeast as a host have been hampered by the lack of tools to engineer strains expressing a large number of genetic components. In addition to inserting multiple genes, it is often desirable to knock out or replace multiple endogenous genes that might interfere with the processes studied. Here, we describe the “insertion Green Monster” (iGM) set of expression vectors that enable precise insertion of many heterologous genes into the yeast genome in a rapid and reproducible manner and permit simultaneous replacement of selected yeast genes. As a proof of principle, we have used the iGM method to replace components of the yeast pathway for methionine sulfoxide reduction with genes encoding the human selenoprotein biosynthesis machinery and generated a single yeast strain carrying 11 exogenous components of the selenoprotein biosynthetic pathway in precisely engineered loci. PMID:24776987

  20. Haplotype analysis of the DQA genes in sheep: evidence supporting recombination between the loci.

    PubMed

    Hickford, J G H; Zhou, H; Fang, Q

    2007-03-01

    The ovine class II major histocompatibility complex mediates specific immune responses to exogenous antigens in sheep. A number of ovine class II loci have been identified, and most of them appear to be polymorphic. In this study we investigated the DQA1 locus of 520 sheep and the DQA2 locus of over 40,000 sheep, finding 12 sequences and 22 sequences, respectively, using DQA1- and DQA2-specific PCR primers. Among the DQA2 sequences, 2 groups of sequences can be found: those that share homology with the DQA2 sequences from closely related species and those that cluster with bovine DQA3 and DQA4 sequences and have been called DQA2-like in sheep. The occurrence of these DQA2-like sequences was once again confirmed to correspond with the absence of detectable DQA1 sequences, suggesting that they are found at the same location as DQA1. Within the sheep studied, 37 haplotypes could be detected, 23 being haplotypes of DQA1 and DQA2 sequences and with frequencies ranging from 0.38 to 9.27%, and 14 being haplotypes of DQA2 and DQA2-like sequences and with frequencies ranging from 0.03 to 14.53%. We discovered 12 DQA1-DQA2 combinations that were derived from 5 DQA1 alleles and 4 DQA2 alleles, and 8 DQA2-DQA2-like combinations from 5 DQA2 alleles and 2 DQA2-like sequences. The frequency of occurrence of recombined DQA1-DQA2 sequences and recombined DQA2-DQA2-like sequences is similar, once again suggesting the DQA2-like sequences are found at the DQA1 locus.

  1. The SNF2-family member Fun30 promotes gene silencing in heterochromatic loci.

    PubMed

    Neves-Costa, Ana; Will, W Ryan; Vetter, Anna T; Miller, J Ross; Varga-Weisz, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Chromatin regulates many key processes in the nucleus by controlling access to the underlying DNA. SNF2-like factors are ATP-driven enzymes that play key roles in the dynamics of chromatin by remodelling nucleosomes and other nucleoprotein complexes. Even simple eukaryotes such as yeast contain members of several subfamilies of SNF2-like factors. The FUN30/ETL1 subfamily of SNF2 remodellers is conserved from yeasts to humans, but is poorly characterized. We show that the deletion of FUN30 leads to sensitivity to the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin and to severe cell cycle progression defects when the Orc5 subunit is mutated. We demonstrate a role of FUN30 in promoting silencing in the heterochromatin-like mating type locus HMR, telomeres and the rDNA repeats. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that Fun30 binds at the boundary element of the silent HMR and within the silent HMR. Mapping of nucleosomes in vivo using micrococcal nuclease demonstrates that deletion of FUN30 leads to changes of the chromatin structure at the boundary element. A point mutation in the ATP-binding site abrogates the silencing function of Fun30 as well as its toxicity upon overexpression, indicating that the ATPase activity is essential for these roles of Fun30. We identify by amino acid sequence analysis a putative CUE motif as a feature of FUN30/ETL1 factors and show that this motif assists Fun30 activity. Our work suggests that Fun30 is directly involved in silencing by regulating the chromatin structure within or around silent loci.

  2. Quantitative trait loci and underlying candidate genes controlling agronomical and fruit quality traits in octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Zorrilla-Fontanesi, Yasmín; Cabeza, Amalia; Domínguez, Pedro; Medina, Juan Jesús; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Denoyes-Rothan, Beatrice; Sánchez-Sevilla, José F; Amaya, Iraida

    2011-09-01

    Breeding for fruit quality traits in strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa, 2n = 8x = 56) is complex due to the polygenic nature of these traits and the octoploid constitution of this species. In order to improve the efficiency of genotype selection, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and associated molecular markers will constitute a valuable tool for breeding programs. However, the implementation of these markers in breeding programs depends upon the complexity and stability of QTLs across different environments. In this work, the genetic control of 17 agronomical and fruit quality traits was investigated in strawberry using a F(1) population derived from an intraspecific cross between two contrasting selection lines, '232' and '1392'. QTL analyses were performed over three successive years based on the separate parental linkage maps and a pseudo-testcross strategy. The integrated strawberry genetic map consists of 338 molecular markers covering 37 linkage groups, thus exceeding the 28 chromosomes. 33 QTLs were identified for 14 of the 17 studied traits and approximately 37% of them were stable over time. For each trait, 1-5 QTLs were identified with individual effects ranging between 9.2 and 30.5% of the phenotypic variation, indicating that all analysed traits are complex and quantitatively inherited. Many QTLs controlling correlated traits were co-located in homoeology group V, indicating linkage or pleiotropic effects of loci. Candidate genes for several QTLs controlling yield, anthocyanins, firmness and L-ascorbic acid are proposed based on both their co-localization and predicted function. We also report conserved QTLs among strawberry and other Rosaceae based on their syntenic location.

  3. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  4. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  5. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  6. Analysis of thirteen trinucleotide repeat loci as candidate genes for Schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S.; Leggo, J.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Rubinsztein, D.C.

    1996-04-09

    A group of diseases are due to abnormal expansions of trinucleotide repeats. These diseases all affect the nervous system. In addition, they manifest the phenomenon of anticipation, in which the disease tends to present at an earlier age or with greater severity in successive generations. Many additional genes with trinucleotide repeats are believed to be expressed in the human brain. As anticipation has been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder, we have examined allele distributions of 13 trinucleotide repeat-containing genes, many novel and all expressed in the brain, in genomic DNA from schizophrenic (n = 20-97) and bipolar affective disorder patients (23-30) and controls (n = 43-146). No evidence was obtained to implicate expanded alleles in these 13 genes as causal factors in these diseases. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Resistance of Mice of the 129 Background to Yersinia pestis Maps to Multiple Loci on Chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Tencati, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of bubonic and pneumonic plague. It is commonly acquired by mammals such as rodents and humans via the bite of an infected flea. We previously reported that multiple substrains of the 129 mouse background are resistant to pigmentation locus-negative (pgm−) Yersinia pestis and that this phenotype maps to a 30-centimorgan (cM) region located on chromosome 1. In this study, we have further delineated this plague resistance locus to a region of less than 20 cM through the creation and phenotyping of recombinant offspring arising from novel crossovers in this region. Furthermore, our experiments have revealed that there are at least two alleles in this initial locus, both of which are required for resistance on a susceptible C57BL/6 background. These two alleles work in trans since resistance is restored in offspring possessing one allele contributed by each parent. Our studies also indicated that the Slc11a1 gene (formerly known as Nramp1) located within the chromosome1 locus is not responsible for conferring resistance to 129 mice. PMID:27481241

  8. Molecular characterization of Verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates from Argentina by Multiple-Loci VNTR Analysis (MLVA)

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Ana V.; Lucchesi, Paula M.A.; Parma, Alberto E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to adapt described MLVA protocols to the molecular typing and characterization of VTEC O157:H7 isolates from Argentina. Nine VNTR loci were amplified by PCR showing diversity values from 0.49 to 0.73. Nine MLVA profiles were observed and the cluster analysis indicated both unrelated and closely related VTEC O157:H7 strains. In spite of the limited number of isolates studied, the panel of VNTR used made it possible to perform a first approach of the high genetic diversity of native strains of O157:H7 by MLVA. PMID:24031443

  9. Integration of Genome-Wide SNP Data and Gene-Expression Profiles Reveals Six Novel Loci and Regulatory Mechanisms for Amino Acids and Acylcarnitines in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Frank; Holdt, Lesca M.; Gross, Arnd; Teren, Andrej; Tönjes, Anke; Becker, Susen; Krohn, Knut; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta; Scholz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Profiling amino acids and acylcarnitines in whole blood spots is a powerful tool in the laboratory diagnosis of several inborn errors of metabolism. Emerging data suggests that altered blood levels of amino acids and acylcarnitines are also associated with common metabolic diseases in adults. Thus, the identification of common genetic determinants for blood metabolites might shed light on pathways contributing to human physiology and common diseases. We applied a targeted mass-spectrometry-based method to analyze whole blood concentrations of 96 amino acids, acylcarnitines and pathway associated metabolite ratios in a Central European cohort of 2,107 adults and performed genome-wide association (GWA) to identify genetic modifiers of metabolite concentrations. We discovered and replicated six novel loci associated with blood levels of total acylcarnitine, arginine (both on chromosome 6; rs12210538, rs17657775), propionylcarnitine (chromosome 10; rs12779637), 2-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (chromosome 21; rs1571700), stearoylcarnitine (chromosome 1; rs3811444), and aspartic acid traits (chromosome 8; rs750472). Based on an integrative analysis of expression quantitative trait loci in blood mononuclear cells and correlations between gene expressions and metabolite levels, we provide evidence for putative causative genes: SLC22A16 for total acylcarnitines, ARG1 for arginine, HLCS for 2-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine, JAM3 for stearoylcarnitine via a trans-effect at chromosome 1, and PPP1R16A for aspartic acid traits. Further, we report replication and provide additional functional evidence for ten loci that have previously been published for metabolites measured in plasma, serum or urine. In conclusion, our integrative analysis of SNP, gene-expression and metabolite data points to novel genetic factors that may be involved in the regulation of human metabolism. At several loci, we provide evidence for metabolite regulation via gene-expression and observed overlaps with GWAS

  10. A non-inheritable maternal Cas9-based multiple-gene editing system in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takayuki; Kamiyoshi, Akiko; Kawate, Hisaka; Mori, Chie; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tanaka, Megumu; Uetake, Ryuichi; Sato, Masahiro; Shindo, Takayuki

    2016-01-28

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of editing multiple genes through one-step zygote injection. The preexisting method is largely based on the co-injection of Cas9 DNA (or mRNA) and guide RNAs (gRNAs); however, it is unclear how many genes can be simultaneously edited by this method, and a reliable means to generate transgenic (Tg) animals with multiple gene editing has yet to be developed. Here, we employed non-inheritable maternal Cas9 (maCas9) protein derived from Tg mice with systemic Cas9 overexpression (Cas9 mice). The maCas9 protein in zygotes derived from mating or in vitro fertilization of Tg/+ oocytes and +/+ sperm could successfully edit the target genome. The efficiency of such maCas9-based genome editing was comparable to that of zygote microinjection-based genome editing widely used at present. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel approach to create "Cas9 transgene-free" gene-modified mice using non-Tg (+/+) zygotes carrying maCas9. The maCas9 protein in mouse zygotes edited nine target loci simultaneously after injection with nine different gRNAs alone. Cas9 mouse-derived zygotes have the potential to facilitate the creation of genetically modified animals carrying the Cas9 transgene, enabling repeatable genome engineering and the production of Cas9 transgene-free mice.

  11. Quantitative Trait Loci and Candidate Genes for Neutrophil Recruitment in Sterile Inflammation Mapped in AXB-BXA Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Quyen; Seltzer, Ze’ev; Sima, Corneliu; Lakschevitz, Flavia S.; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment (NR) to sites of sterile inflammation plays a key role in tissue damage and healing potential of lesions characteristic to non-infectious inflammatory diseases. Previous studies suggested significant genetic control of neutrophil survival, function, and migration in inflammatory responses to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. We have mapped the murine genome for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) harbouring genetic determinants that regulate NR in SI using a murine model of chemically-induced peritonitis. NR was quantified in 16 AXB-BXA recombinant inbred strains and their progenitors, A/J (A) and C57BL/6J (B). A continuous distribution of NR was found among the strains, with parent B showing higher NR and parent A showing lower NR (3.0-fold difference, p=0.05). Within the progeny strains, a 5.5-fold difference in NR was observed between the lowest, BXA1, and the highest responders AXB19 (p<0.001). This data was analyzed using GeneNetwork, which linked NR to one significant QTL on chromosome 12 (Peritoneal Neutrophil Recruitment 1, PNR1) and two suggestive QTLs (PNR2, PNR3) on chromosomes 12 and 16 respectively. Sixty-four candidate genes within PNR1 were cross-referenced with currently published data, mRNA expression from two NR microarrays, and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. The present study brings new light into the genetics of NR in response to cell injury and highlights potential candidate genes Hif1α, Fntb, and Prkch and their products for further studies on neutrophil infiltration and inflammation resolution in sterile inflammation. PMID:25942439

  12. Genotyping of dairy Bacillus licheniformis isolates by high resolution melt analysis of multiple variable number tandem repeat loci.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Rajat; Chauhan, Kanika; Seale, R Brent; Deeth, Hilton C; Pillidge, Christopher J; Powell, Ian B; Craven, Heather; Turner, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    In dairy foods, the sporeformer Bacillus licheniformis can be the cause of spoilage or specification compliance issues. Currently used methods for genotyping B. licheniformis have limited discrimination with only 2 or 3 different subgroups being identified. Here, we have developed a multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) method and combined it with high resolution melt analysis (MLV-HRMA) for genotyping B. licheniformis. Five repetitive loci were identified and used as markers for genotyping 52 isolates from two milk powder processing plants and retail samples. Nineteen genotypes could be identified using both MLVA and MLV-HRMA leading to Hunter-Gaston discrimination indices (D-value) of 0.93 each. It was found that all 5 MLVA loci were stable following 10 days of sub-culturing of 8 representative isolates. All isolates were also genotyped using previously used methods including randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD) and partial rpoB sequencing. Five different RAPD profiles and 5 different partial rpoB sequence types were identified resulting in corresponding D-values of 0.6 and 0.46, respectively. Analysis of the genotypes from dairy samples revealed that dairy B. licheniformis isolates are more heterogeneous than previously thought and that this new method can potentially allow for more discriminatory tracking and monitoring of specific genotypes.

  13. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  14. Candidate genes in quantitative trait loci associated with absolute and relative kidney weight in rats with Inherited Stress Induced Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The kidney mass is significantly increased in hypertensive ISIAH rats with Inherited Stress Induced Arterial Hypertension as compared with normotensive WAG rats. The QTL/microarray approach was carried out to determine the positional candidate genes in the QTL for absolute and relative kidney weight. Results Several known and predicted genes differentially expressed in ISIAH and WAG kidney were mapped to genetic loci associated with the absolute and relative kidney weight in 6-month old F2 hybrid (ISIAHxWAG) males. The knowledge-driven filtering of the list of candidates helped to suggest several positional candidate genes, which may be related to the structural and mass changes in hypertensive ISIAH kidney. In the current study, we showed that all loci found for absolute and relative kidney weight didn't overlap with significant or suggestive loci for arterial blood pressure level. So, the genes differentially expressed in ISIAH and WAG kidneys and located in these QTL regions associated with absolute and relative kidney weight shouldn't substantially influence the BP level in the 6 month-old ISIAH rats. However, in some cases, small effects may be suggested. Conclusions The further experimental validation of causative genes and detection of polymorphisms will provide opportunities to advance our understanding of the underlying nature of structural and mass changes in hypertensive ISIAH kidney. PMID:25707311

  15. Waardenberg syndrome (WS) type I is caused by defects at multiple loci, one of which is near ALPP on chromosome 2: First report of the WS consortium

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Lindsay A.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.; Amos, Jean; Arnos, Kathleen S.; Asher, James H.; Beighton, Peter; Diehl, Scott R.; Fex, Jörgen; Foy, Carole; Friedman, Thomas B.; Greenberg, Jacquie; Hoth, Christopher; Marazita, Mary; Milunsky, Aubrey; Morell, Robert; Nance, Walter; Newton, Valerie; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Agustin, Theresa B. San; Skare, James; Stevens, Cathy A.; Wagner, Ronald G.; Wilcox, Edward R.; Winship, Ingrid; Read, Andrew P.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have localized the gene for Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type I to the distal portion of chromosome 2q, near the ALPP locus. We pooled linkage data obtained from 41 WS type I and 3 WS type II families which were typed for six polymorphic loci on chromosome 2q in order to refine the location of the WS locus (WS1) and evaluate the extent of genetic heterogeneity. In the course of this work, we developed diagnostic criteria for genetic and phenotypic studies. Our findings, based on two-locus and multilocus analysis using a linkage map established from reference pedigrees, suggest that there are two or more mutations causing WS, one of which (i.e., WS1) is located on chromosome 2q, between the ALPP and FN1 loci, at distances of 7.8 cM and 11.2 cM for each marker, respectively. The results also indicate that WS1 is responsible for the illness in approximately 45% of all families in this sample. However, the odds favoring this position over a location between ALPP and SAG are only 2:1 when alternate assumptions about the proportion of linked families are considered. We conclude that a more saturated map of this region of chromosome 2q, including highly polymorphic markers, will be needed to accurately distinguish linked families and, ultimately, isolate the mutant gene. PMID:1349198

  16. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Gancho; Yin, Tongming; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  17. Ring chromosome 20 syndrome without deletions of the subtelomeric and CHRNA4--KCNQ2 genes loci.

    PubMed

    Elghezal, Hatem; Hannachi, Hanene; Mougou, Soumaya; Kammoun, Hassene; Triki, Chahnez; Saad, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Ring chromosome 20 (r(20)) syndrome is a rare disease characterized by refractory epilepsy, moderate mental retardation and particular electroencephalographic disorder with non-convulsive status epilepticus. Here, we report a new case of r(20) syndrome in a 12 year old female who presented minimal dysmorphism, generalised tonic-clonic and absence seizures refractory to medical therapy and behavioural troubles. Among 20 cytogenetically analysed cells, 14 (70%) exhibited a 46,XX,r(20)(p13q13.3) karyotype and 6 (30%) showed a normal 46,XX caryotype. Interphasic FISH using centromeric probe of chromosome 20 detects the presence of a chromosome 20 monosomy in 7% and a duplicated ring chromosome 20 in 8% of studied cells. Metaphase FISH using chromosome 20 telomeric probes and specific probes of CHRNA4 and KCNQ2 genes detects the absence of any deletion in the ring chromosome 20. Clinical symptoms of r(20) syndrome are attributed to telomeric partial monosomy generated by ring chromosome and causing an haploinsufficiency of two epilepsy genes CHRNA4 and KCNQ2. However, our patient presents the typical epilepsy disorder but no detectable deletion in the ring chromosome 20. We speculate that clinical features of ring chromosome 20 syndrome are caused by low mosaicism of chromosome 20 monosomy caused by the loss of the ring chromosome 20.

  18. Restriction fragment length polymorphism within the class I gene loci of the equine major histocompatibility complex

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.J.; Bailey, E.; Woodward, J.G.

    1986-03-05

    Fourteen standard bred horses were serotyped as homozygous for 1 of 6 Equine Leukocyte Antigen (ELA) specificities. DNA was purified from peripheral leukocytes and digested with Hind III or Pvu II. Southern blot hybridization analysis was carried out using a /sup 32/P-labeled mouse cDNA probe (PH2IIa) specific for class I MHC genes. Both enzymes generated blots that contained a large number of bands (23 to 30) per horse. Significant polymorphism existed among most fragment sizes, while a dozen highly conserved band sizes suggested the presence of Qa/tla - like genes. Only 2 animals (both W6's) showed identical band patterns. Polymorphism was greatest between horses of different serotypes and was significantly decreased within serotypes. Unique bands were present on both blots for both W1's and W6's and may account for the serologic specificity seen in ELA W1 and W6 horses. This study is consistent with the findings in other higher vertebrates and implies that the MHC of the horse includes a highly polymorphic class I multigene family.

  19. Multiple Avirulence Loci and Allele-Specific Effector Recognition Control the Pm3 Race-Specific Resistance of Wheat to Powdery Mildew[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Roffler, Stefan; Stirnweis, Daniel; Treier, Georges; Herren, Gerhard; Korol, Abraham B.; Wicker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In cereals, several mildew resistance genes occur as large allelic series; for example, in wheat (Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum), 17 functional Pm3 alleles confer agronomically important race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis). The molecular basis of race specificity has been characterized in wheat, but little is known about the corresponding avirulence genes in powdery mildew. Here, we dissected the genetics of avirulence for six Pm3 alleles and found that three major Avr loci affect avirulence, with a common locus_1 involved in all AvrPm3-Pm3 interactions. We cloned the effector gene AvrPm3a2/f2 from locus_2, which is recognized by the Pm3a and Pm3f alleles. Induction of a Pm3 allele-dependent hypersensitive response in transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and in wheat demonstrated specificity. Gene expression analysis of Bcg1 (encoded by locus_1) and AvrPm3 a2/f2 revealed significant differences between isolates, indicating that in addition to protein polymorphisms, expression levels play a role in avirulence. We propose a model for race specificity involving three components: an allele-specific avirulence effector, a resistance gene allele, and a pathogen-encoded suppressor of avirulence. Thus, whereas a genetically simple allelic series controls specificity in the plant host, recognition on the pathogen side is more complex, allowing flexible evolutionary responses and adaptation to resistance genes. PMID:26452600

  20. Searching for new loci and candidate genes for economically important traits through gene-based association analysis of Simmental cattle

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiangwei; Fan, Huizhong; Chang, Tianpeng; Xu, Lingyang; Zhang, Wengang; Song, Yuxin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Gao, Huijiang

    2017-01-01

    Single-marker genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a convenient strategy of genetic analysis that has been successful in detecting the association of a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with quantitative traits. However, analysis of individual SNPs can only account for a small proportion of genetic variation and offers only limited knowledge of complex traits. This inadequacy may be overcome by employing a gene-based GWAS analytic approach, which can be considered complementary to the single-SNP association analysis. Here we performed an initial single-SNP GWAS for bone weight (BW) and meat pH value with a total of 770,000 SNPs in 1141 Simmental cattle. Additionally, 21836 cattle genes collected from the Ensembl Genes 83 database were analyzed to find supplementary evidence to support the importance of gene-based association study. Results of the single SNP-based association study showed that there were 11 SNPs significantly associated with bone weight (BW) and two SNPs associated with meat pH value. Interestingly, all of these SNPs were located in genes detected by the gene-based association study. PMID:28169328

  1. Searching for new loci and candidate genes for economically important traits through gene-based association analysis of Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiangwei; Fan, Huizhong; Chang, Tianpeng; Xu, Lingyang; Zhang, Wengang; Song, Yuxin; Zhu, Bo; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Gao, Huijiang

    2017-02-07

    Single-marker genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a convenient strategy of genetic analysis that has been successful in detecting the association of a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with quantitative traits. However, analysis of individual SNPs can only account for a small proportion of genetic variation and offers only limited knowledge of complex traits. This inadequacy may be overcome by employing a gene-based GWAS analytic approach, which can be considered complementary to the single-SNP association analysis. Here we performed an initial single-SNP GWAS for bone weight (BW) and meat pH value with a total of 770,000 SNPs in 1141 Simmental cattle. Additionally, 21836 cattle genes collected from the Ensembl Genes 83 database were analyzed to find supplementary evidence to support the importance of gene-based association study. Results of the single SNP-based association study showed that there were 11 SNPs significantly associated with bone weight (BW) and two SNPs associated with meat pH value. Interestingly, all of these SNPs were located in genes detected by the gene-based association study.

  2. Coding Gene Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Mapping and Quantitative Trait Loci Detection for Physiological Reproductive Traits in Brook Charr, Salvelinus fontinalis

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Vagner, Marie; Derôme, Nicolas; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    A linkage map of 40 linkage groups (LGs) was developed for brook charr, Salvelinus fontinalis, using an F2 interstrain hybrid progeny (n = 171) and 256 coding gene SNP developed specifically for brook charr and validated from a large (>1000) subset of putative SNP, as well as 81 microsatellite markers. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) related to reproduction functions, these fish were also phenotyped at six physiological traits, including spermatozoid head diameter, sperm concentration, plasma testosterone, plasma 11-keto-testosterone, egg diameter, and plasma 17β-estradiol. Five significant QTL were detected over four LGs for egg diameter and plasma 17β-estradiol concentration in females, and sperm concentration as well as spermatozoid head diameter in males. In females, two different QTLs located on LG 11 and LG 34 were associated with the egg number, whereas one QTL was associated with plasma 17β-estradiol concentration (LG 8). Their total percent variance explained (PVE) was 26.7% and 27.6%, respectively. In males, two QTL were also detected for the sperm concentration, and their PVE were estimated at 18.58% and 14.95%, respectively. The low QTL number, associated with the high PVE, suggests that the variance in these reproductive physiological traits was either under the control of one major gene or a small number of genes. The QTL associated with sperm concentration, plasma 17β-estradiol, and egg diameter appeared to be under a dominance effect, whereas the two others were under a negative additive effect. These results show that genes underlying the phenotypic variance of these traits are under different modes of action (additive vs. dominance) and may be used to predict an increase or a decrease in their phenotypic values in subsequent generations of selective breeding. Moreover, this newly developed panel of mapped SNP located in coding gene regions will be useful for screening wild populations, especially in the context of investigating the

  3. Anonymous marker loci within 400 kb of HLA-A generate haplotypes in linkage disequilibrium with the hemochromatosis gene (HFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaouanq, J.; Perichon, M.; Treut, A.L.; Kahloun, A.E.; Mauvieux, V.; Blayau, M.; Jouanolle, A.M.; Chauvel, B.; Le Gall, J.Y.; David, V. )

    1994-02-01

    The hemochromatosis gene (HFE) maps to 6p21.3 and is less than 1 cM from the HLA class I gene; however, the precise physical location of the gene has remained elusive and controversial. The unambiguous identification of a crossover event within hemochromatosis families is very difficult; it is particularly hampered by the variability of the phenotypic expression as well as by the sex- and age-related penetrance of the disease. For these considerations, traditional linkage analysis could prove of limited value in further refining the extrapolated physical position of HFE. The authors therefore embarked upon a linkage-disequilibrium analysis of HFE and normal chromosomes for the Brittany population. In this report, 66 hemochromatosis families yielding 151 hemochromatosis chromosomes and 182 normal chromosomes were RFLP-typed with a battery of probes, including two newly derived polymorphic markers from the 6.7 and HLA-F loci located 150 and 250 kb telomeric to HLA-A, respectively. The results suggest a strong peak of existing linkage disequilibrium focused within the i82-to-6.7 interval (approximately 250 kb). The zone of linkage disequilibrium is flanked by the i97 locus, positioned 30 kb proximal to i82, and the HLA-F gene, found 250 kb distal to HLA-A, markers of which display no significant association with HFE. These data support the possibility that HFE resides within the 400-kb expanse of DNA between i97 and HLA-F. Alternatively, the very tight association of HLA-A3 and allele 1 of the 6.7 locus, both of which are comprised by the major ancestral or founder HFE haplotype in Brittany, supports the possibility that the disease gene may reside immediately telomeric to the 6.7 locus within the linkage-disequilibrium zone. Additionally, hemochromatosis haplotypes possessing HLA-A11 and the low-frequency HLA-F polymorphism (allele 2) are supportive of a separate founder chromosome containing a second, independently arising mutant allele. 69 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Migration and Gene Flow Among Domestic Populations of the Chagas Insect Vector Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Detected by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lori; Monroy, M. Carlota; Rodas, Antonieta Guadalupe; Hicks, Robin M.; Lucero, David E.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Dorn, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811) is the most abundant and significant insect vector of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi in Central America, and particularly in Guatemala. Tr. cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, and successful disease control requires understanding the geographic distribution and degree of migration of vectors such as T. dimidiata that frequently re-infest houses within months following insecticide application. The population genetic structure of T. dimidiata collected from six villages in southern Guatemala was studied to gain insight into the migration patterns of the insects in this region where populations are largely domestic. This study provided insight into the likelihood of eliminating T. dimidiata by pesticide application as has been observed in some areas for other domestic triatomines such as Triatoma infestans. Genotypes of microsatellite loci for 178 insects from six villages were found to represent five genetic clusters using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Individual clusters were found in multiple villages, with multiple clusters in the same house. Although migration occurred, there was statistically significant genetic differentiation among villages (FRT = 0.05) and high genetic differentiation among houses within villages (FSR = 0.11). Relatedness of insects within houses varied from 0 to 0.25, i.e., from unrelated to half-sibs. The results suggest that T. dimidiata in southern Guatemala moves between houses and villages often enough that recolonization is likely, implying the use of insecticides alone is not sufficient for effective control of Chagas disease in this region and more sustainable solutions are required. PMID:26334816

  5. Nucleotide variation and balancing selection at the Ckma gene in Atlantic cod: analysis with multiple merger coalescent models.

    PubMed

    Árnason, Einar; Halldórsdóttir, Katrín

    2015-01-01

    High-fecundity organisms, such as Atlantic cod, can withstand substantial natural selection and the entailing genetic load of replacing alleles at a number of loci due to their excess reproductive capacity. High-fecundity organisms may reproduce by sweepstakes leading to highly skewed heavy-tailed offspring distribution. Under such reproduction the Kingman coalescent of binary mergers breaks down and models of multiple merger coalescent are more appropriate. Here we study nucleotide variation at the Ckma (Creatine Kinase Muscle type A) gene in Atlantic cod. The gene shows extreme differentiation between the North (Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Barents Sea) and the South (Faroe Islands, North-, Baltic-, Celtic-, and Irish Seas) with FST > 0.8 between regions whereas neutral loci show no differentiation. This is evidence of natural selection. The protein sequence is conserved by purifying selection whereas silent and non-coding sites show extreme differentiation. The unfolded site-frequency spectrum has three modes, a mode at singleton sites and two high frequency modes at opposite frequencies representing divergent branches of the gene genealogy that is evidence for balancing selection. Analysis with multiple-merger coalescent models can account for the high frequency of singleton sites and indicate reproductive sweepstakes. Coalescent time scales vary with population size and with the inverse of variance in offspring number. Parameter estimates using multiple-merger coalescent models show that times scales are faster than under the Kingman coalescent.

  6. Nucleotide variation and balancing selection at the Ckma gene in Atlantic cod: analysis with multiple merger coalescent models

    PubMed Central

    Halldórsdóttir, Katrín

    2015-01-01

    High-fecundity organisms, such as Atlantic cod, can withstand substantial natural selection and the entailing genetic load of replacing alleles at a number of loci due to their excess reproductive capacity. High-fecundity organisms may reproduce by sweepstakes leading to highly skewed heavy-tailed offspring distribution. Under such reproduction the Kingman coalescent of binary mergers breaks down and models of multiple merger coalescent are more appropriate. Here we study nucleotide variation at the Ckma (Creatine Kinase Muscle type A) gene in Atlantic cod. The gene shows extreme differentiation between the North (Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Barents Sea) and the South (Faroe Islands, North-, Baltic-, Celtic-, and Irish Seas) with FST > 0.8 between regions whereas neutral loci show no differentiation. This is evidence of natural selection. The protein sequence is conserved by purifying selection whereas silent and non-coding sites show extreme differentiation. The unfolded site-frequency spectrum has three modes, a mode at singleton sites and two high frequency modes at opposite frequencies representing divergent branches of the gene genealogy that is evidence for balancing selection. Analysis with multiple-merger coalescent models can account for the high frequency of singleton sites and indicate reproductive sweepstakes. Coalescent time scales vary with population size and with the inverse of variance in offspring number. Parameter estimates using multiple-merger coalescent models show that times scales are faster than under the Kingman coalescent. PMID:25755922

  7. Deletions of multidrug resistance gene loci in breast cancer leads to the down-regulation of its expression and predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Litviakov, Nikolai V.; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Tsyganov, Matvey M.; Slonimskaya, Elena M.; Ibragimova, Marina K.; Kazantseva, Polina V.; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Choinzonov, Eugeniy L.

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is intensively used for the treatment of primary breast cancer. In our previous studies, we reported that clinical tumor response to NAC is associated with the change of multidrug resistance (MDR) gene expression in tumors after chemotherapy. In this study we performed a combined analysis of MDR gene locus deletions in tumor DNA, MDR gene expression and clinical response to NAC in 73 BC patients. Copy number variations (CNVs) in biopsy specimens were tested using high-density microarray platform CytoScanTM HD Array (Affymetrix, USA). 75%–100% persons having deletions of MDR gene loci demonstrated the down-regulation of MDR gene expression. Expression of MDR genes was 2–8 times lower in patients with deletion than in patients having no deletion only in post-NAC tumors samples but not in tumor tissue before chemotherapy. All patients with deletions of ABCB1 ABCB 3 ABCC5 gene loci – 7q21.1, 6p21.32, 3q27 correspondingly, and most patients having deletions in ABCC1 (16p13.1), ABCC2 (10q24), ABCG1 (21q22.3), ABCG2 (4q22.1), responded favorably to NAC. The analysis of all CNVs, including both amplification and deletion showed that the frequency of 13q14.2 deletion was 85% among patients bearing tumor with the deletion at least in one MDR gene locus versus 9% in patients with no deletions. Differences in the frequency of 13q14.2 deletions between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 2.03 ×10−11, Fisher test, Bonferroni-adjusted p = 1.73 × 10−8). In conclusion, our study for the first time demonstrates that deletion MDR gene loci can be used as predictive marker for tumor response to NAC. PMID:26799285

  8. Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium in microsatellite loci isolated from Hymenaea courbaril (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Carneiro, F S; Lacerda, A E B; Lemes, M R; Gribel, R; Kanashiro, M; Sebbenn, A M

    2012-07-19

    The Neotropical tree Hymenaea courbaril, locally known as Jatobá, is a valuable source of lumber and also produces comestible and medicinal fruit. We characterized Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium at nine microsatellite loci isolated from H. courbaril, in order to determine if they would provide accurate estimates of population genetic parameters of this important Amazon species. The study was made on 250 open-pollinated offspring originated from 14 seed trees. Only one of nine loci presented significant deviation from the expected Mendelian segregation (1:1). Genotypic disequilibrium between pairwise loci was investigated based on samples from 55 adult and 56 juvenile trees. No genetic linkage between any paired loci was observed. After Bonferroni's corrections for multiple tests, we found no evidence of genotypic disequilibrium between pairs of loci. We conclude that this set of loci can be used for genetic diversity/ structure, mating system, gene flow, and parentage analyses in H. courbaril populations.

  9. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  10. [Analysis of associations of polymorphic loci of a tumor suppressor gene TP53 with malignant neoplasms in glass fiber manufacturing workers].

    PubMed

    Mukhammadiyeva, G F; Bakirov, A B; Karimova, L K; Valeyeva, E T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the role of TP53 tumor suppressor gene polymorphisms in the occurrence of skin malignant neoplasms in glass fiber manufacturing workers. We carried out a comparative study of polymorphous loci Arg72Pro and dup16bp in TP53 gene in workers with skin cancer and hyperkeratosis (n = 68), occupied in continuous glass fiber manufacture, and in healthy workers (n = 52). The associations of both Pro and dup16 minor alleles of TP53 gene, and Arg/Pro-W/dup16 genotype combination with higher risks for skin oncologic diseases of occupational genesis have been revealed.

  11. Predicting Gene-Disease Associations Using Multiple Species Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-20

    regulatory networks from only positive and unlabeled data. BMC Bioinformatics, 11, 2010. [4] Ernesto Estrada and Desmond J. Higham. Network properties revealed...David Warde-Farley, Chris Grouios, and Quaid Morris . GeneMANIA: a real-time multiple association network integration algorithm for predicting gene

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of Lantana camara in India indicates multiple introductions and gene flow.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Quader, S

    2014-05-01

    Lantana camara is a highly invasive plant, which has spread over 60 countries and island groups of Asia, Africa and Australia. In India, it was introduced in the early nineteenth century, since when it has expanded and gradually established itself in almost every available ecosystem. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of this plant in India in order to understand its introduction, subsequent range expansion and gene flow. A total of 179 individuals were sequenced at three chloroplast loci and 218 individuals were genotyped for six nuclear microsatellites. Both chloroplasts (nine haplotypes) and microsatellites (83 alleles) showed high genetic diversity. Besides, each type of marker confirmed the presence of private polymorphism. We uncovered low to medium population structure in both markers, and found a faint signal of isolation by distance with microsatellites. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed multiple divergent genetic clusters. Taken together, these findings (i.e. high genetic diversity with private alleles and multiple genetic clusters) suggest that Lantana was introduced multiple times and gradually underwent spatial expansion with recurrent gene flow.

  13. Genomic and yeast artificial chromosome long-range physical maps linking six loci in 10q11. 2 and spanning the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A) region

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks-Wilson, A.R.; Goodfellow, P.J. ); Lichter, J.B.; Ward, D.C.; Kidd, K.K. )

    1993-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia types 2A and 2B (MEN2A and MEN2B) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC) are dominantly inherited cancers that have in common the clinical feature of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The authors have performed both genomic long-range restriction mapping and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig assembly and restriction mapping to establish physical linkage, order, and distances between six loci in 10q11.2 near the genes responsible for these hereditary cancers. RET, D10S94, D10S182, and D10S102 have been mapped in genomic DNA. RET, D10S94, D10S182, D10F38S3, and the 10q11.2 sequences detected by DNA marker DM124 are encompassed by a 1-Mb YAC contig. Six physically linked loci are within 1.4 Mb and have an order and orientation of 10cen, D10F38S3, DM124, RET, D10S94, D10S182, D10S102, 10qter. Mutations in the RET proto-oncogene have recently been demonstrated to be associated with MEN2A and FMTC. RET is located within a genetically defined MEN2A candidate interval between D10S141 and D10S94; MEN2B has been mapped to a larger, overlapping region between D10S141 and a more distal locus, RBP3. Both the genomic physical map and the YAC contig span the entire MEN2A candidate region and overlap with that of MEN2B. These maps will facilitate the identification of genes that can be considered candidates for MEN2B and the identification of tumor-specific alterations important in sporadic MTC. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Rapid differentiation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates harbouring egc loci with pseudogenes psient1 and psient2 and the selu or seluv gene using PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Collery, Mark M; Smyth, Cyril J

    2007-02-01

    The egc locus of Staphylococus aureus harbours two enterotoxin genes (seg and sei) and three enterotoxin-like genes (selm, seln and selo). Between the sei and seln genes are located two pseudogenes, psient1 and psient2, or the selu or seluv gene. While these two alternative sei-seln intergenic regions can be distinguished by PCR, to date, DNA sequencing has been the only confirmatory option because of the very high degree of sequence similarity between egc loci bearing the pseudogenes and the selu or seluv gene. In silico restriction enzyme digestion of genomic regions encompassing the egc locus from the 3' end of the sei gene through the 5' first quarter of the seln gene allowed pseudogene- and selu- or seluv-bearing egc loci to be distinguished by PCR-RFLP. Experimental application of these findings demonstrated that endonuclease HindIII cleaved PCR amplimers bearing pseudogenes but not those with a selu or seluv gene, while selu- or seluv-bearing amplimers were susceptible to cleavage by endonuclease HphI, but not by endonuclease HindIII. The restriction enzyme BccI cleaved selu- or seluv-harbouring amplimers at a unique restriction site created by their signature 15 bp insertion compared with pseudogene-bearing amplimers, thereby allowing distinction of these egc loci. PCR-RFLP analysis using these restriction enzymes provides a rapid, easy to interpret alternative to DNA sequencing for verification of PCR findings on the nature of an egc locus type, and can also be used for the primary identification of the intergenic sei-seln egc locus type.

  15. The Role of Multiple Transcription Factors In Archaeal Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J. Daniels

    2008-09-23

    Since the inception of this research program, the project has focused on two central questions: What is the relationship between the 'eukaryal-like' transcription machinery of archaeal cells and its counterparts in eukaryal cells? And, how does the archaeal cell control gene expression using its mosaic of eukaryal core transcription machinery and its bacterial-like transcription regulatory proteins? During the grant period we have addressed these questions using a variety of in vivo approaches and have sought to specifically define the roles of the multiple TATA binding protein (TBP) and TFIIB-like (TFB) proteins in controlling gene expression in Haloferax volcanii. H. volcanii was initially chosen as a model for the Archaea based on the availability of suitable genetic tools; however, later studies showed that all haloarchaea possessed multiple tbp and tfb genes, which led to the proposal that multiple TBP and TFB proteins may function in a manner similar to alternative sigma factors in bacterial cells. In vivo transcription and promoter analysis established a clear relationship between the promoter requirements of haloarchaeal genes and those of the eukaryal RNA polymerase II promoter. Studies on heat shock gene promoters, and the demonstration that specific tfb genes were induced by heat shock, provided the first indication that TFB proteins may direct expression of specific gene families. The construction of strains lacking tbp or tfb genes, coupled with the finding that many of these genes are differentially expressed under varying growth conditions, provided further support for this model. Genetic tools were also developed that led to the construction of insertion and deletion mutants, and a novel gene expression scheme was designed that allowed the controlled expression of these genes in vivo. More recent studies have used a whole genome array to examine the expression of these genes and we have established a linkage between the expression of specific tfb

  16. Molecular epidemiological study of Bacillus anthracis isolated in Mongolia by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis for 8 loci (MLVA-8).

    PubMed

    Okutani, Akiko; Tungalag, Hurelsukh; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Yamada, Akio; Tserennorov, Damdindorj; Otgonchimeg, Ishtsog; Erdenebat, Adiya; Otgonbaatar, Dashdavaa; Inoue, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anthrax, which is caused by Bacillus anthracis, in the human and animal population of Mongolia has increased recently, and control of this infection is a nationwide concern. In this study, 29 isolates obtained from animals and various regions in Mongolia from 2001 to 2007 were analyzed by performing multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis for 8 loci (MLVA-8) to understand the genetic relationship between the Mongolian B. anthracis isolates. We found that all the Mongolian isolates can be classified into A3 cluster along with the Japanese and the Chinese B. anthracis isolates. Our data revealed that MLVA-8 is useful for studying the molecular epidemiology of the Mongolian B. anthracis isolates and would help characterize B. anthracis infections in Mongolia.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of the nettle family (Urticaceae) inferred from multiple loci of three genomes and extensive generic sampling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeng-Yuan; Monro, Alex K; Milne, Richard I; Wang, Hong; Yi, Ting-Shuang; Liu, Jie; Li, De-Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Urticaceae is one of the larger Angiosperm families, but relationships within it remain poorly known. This study presents the first densely sampled molecular phylogeny of Urticaceae, using maximum likelihood (ML), maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian inference (BI) to analyze the DNA sequence data from two nuclear (ITS and 18S), four chloroplast (matK, rbcL, rpll4-rps8-infA-rpl36, trnL-trnF) and one mitochondrial (matR) loci. We sampled 169 accessions representing 122 species, representing 47 of the 54 recognized genera within Urticaceae, including four of the six sometimes separated as Cecropiaceae. Major results included: (1) Urticaceae including Cecropiaceae was monophyletic; (2) Cecropiaceae was biphyletic, with both lineages nested within Urticaceae; (3) Urticaceae can be divided into four well-supported clades; (4) previously erected tribes or subfamilies were broadly supported, with some additions and alterations; (5) the monophyly of many genera was supported, whereas Boehmeria, Pellionia, Pouzolzia and Urera were clearly polyphyletic, while Urtica and Pilea each had a small genus nested within them; (6) relationships between genera were clarified, mostly with substantial support. These results clarify that some morphological characters have been overstated and others understated in previous classifications of the family, and provide a strong foundation for future studies on biogeography, character evolution, and circumscription of difficult genera.

  18. Multiple Gene Repression in Cyanobacteria Using CRISPRi.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lun; Cengic, Ivana; Anfelt, Josefine; Hudson, Elton P

    2016-03-18

    We describe the application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) for gene repression in the model cyanobacterium Synechcocystis sp. PCC 6803. The nuclease-deficient Cas9 from the type-II CRISPR/Cas of Streptrococcus pyogenes was used to repress green fluorescent protein (GFP) to negligible levels. CRISPRi was also used to repress formation of carbon storage compounds polyhydroxybutryate (PHB) and glycogen during nitrogen starvation. As an example of the potential of CRISPRi for basic and applied cyanobacteria research, we simultaneously knocked down 4 putative aldehyde reductases and dehydrogenases at 50-95% repression. This work also demonstrates that tightly repressed promoters allow for inducible and reversible CRISPRi in cyanobacteria.

  19. Gene-alcohol interactions identify several novel blood pressure loci including a promising locus near SLC16A9

    PubMed Central

    Simino, Jeannette; Sung, Yun Ju; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Rao, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for hypertension, with recent candidate studies implicating gene-alcohol interactions in blood pressure (BP) regulation. We used 6882 (predominantly) Caucasian participants aged 20–80 years from the Framingham SNP Health Association Resource (SHARe) to perform a genome-wide analysis of SNP-alcohol interactions on BP traits. We used a two-step approach in the ABEL suite to examine genetic interactions with three alcohol measures (ounces of alcohol consumed per week, drinks consumed per week, and the number of days drinking alcohol per week) on four BP traits [systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial (MAP), and pulse (PP) pressure]. In the first step, we fit a linear mixed model of each BP trait onto age, sex, BMI, and antihypertensive medication while accounting for the phenotypic correlation among relatives. In the second step, we conducted 1 degree-of-freedom (df) score tests of the SNP main effect, alcohol main effect, and SNP-alcohol interaction using the maximum likelihood estimates (MLE) of the parameters from the first step. We then calculated the joint 2 df score test of the SNP main effect and SNP-alcohol interaction using MixABEL. The effect of SNP rs10826334 (near SLC16A9) on SBP was significantly modulated by both the number of alcoholic drinks and the ounces of alcohol consumed per week (p-values of 1.27E-08 and 3.92E-08, respectively). Each copy of the G-allele decreased SBP by 3.79 mmHg in those consuming 14 drinks per week vs. a 0.461 mmHg decrease in non-drinkers. Index SNPs in 20 other loci exhibited suggestive (p-value ≤ 1E-06) associations with BP traits by the 1 df interaction test or joint 2 df test, including 3 rare variants, one low-frequency variant, and SNPs near/in genes ESRRG, FAM179A, CRIPT-SOCS5, KAT2B, ADCY2, GLI3, ZNF716, SLIT1, PDE3A, KERA-LUM, RNF219-AS1, CLEC3A, FBXO15, and IGSF5. SNP-alcohol interactions may enhance discovery of novel variants with large effects that can be

  20. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A; Hopper, John L; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Southey, Melissa C; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine M; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4)). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85) in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5)), with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17) in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05) in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  1. Gene content and diversity of the loci encoding biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharides of the 15 serovar reference strains of Haemophilus parasuis.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kate J; Weinert, Lucy A; Luan, Shi-Lu; Peters, Sarah E; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Harris, David; Angen, Oystein; Aragon, Virginia; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R; Rycroft, Andrew N; Wren, Brendan W; Tucker, Alexander W; Maskell, Duncan J

    2013-09-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease of pigs, and is also associated with pneumonia. H. parasuis can be classified into 15 different serovars. Here we report, from the 15 serotyping reference strains, the DNA sequences of the loci containing genes for the biosynthesis of the group 1 capsular polysaccharides, which are potential virulence factors of this bacterium. We contend that these loci contain genes for polysaccharide capsule structures, and not a lipopolysaccharide O antigen, supported by the fact that they contain genes such as wza, wzb, and wzc, which are associated with the export of polysaccharide capsules in the current capsule classification system. A conserved region at the 3' end of the locus, containing the wza, ptp, wzs, and iscR genes, is consistent with the characteristic export region 1 of the model group 1 capsule locus. A potential serovar-specific region (region 2) has been found by comparing the predicted coding sequences (CDSs) in all 15 loci for synteny and homology. The region is unique to each reference strain with the exception of those in serovars 5 and 12, which are identical in terms of gene content. The identification and characterization of this locus among the 15 serovars is the first step in understanding the genetic, molecular, and structural bases of serovar specificity in this poorly studied but important pathogen and opens up the possibility of developing an improved molecular serotyping system, which would greatly assist diagnosis and control of Glässer's disease.

  2. Gene Content and Diversity of the Loci Encoding Biosynthesis of Capsular Polysaccharides of the 15 Serovar Reference Strains of Haemophilus parasuis

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A.; Luan, Shi-Lu; Peters, Sarah E.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Harris, David; Angen, Øystein; Aragon, Virginia; Parkhill, Julian; Langford, Paul R.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Wren, Brendan W.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer's disease, a systemic disease of pigs, and is also associated with pneumonia. H. parasuis can be classified into 15 different serovars. Here we report, from the 15 serotyping reference strains, the DNA sequences of the loci containing genes for the biosynthesis of the group 1 capsular polysaccharides, which are potential virulence factors of this bacterium. We contend that these loci contain genes for polysaccharide capsule structures, and not a lipopolysaccharide O antigen, supported by the fact that they contain genes such as wza, wzb, and wzc, which are associated with the export of polysaccharide capsules in the current capsule classification system. A conserved region at the 3′ end of the locus, containing the wza, ptp, wzs, and iscR genes, is consistent with the characteristic export region 1 of the model group 1 capsule locus. A potential serovar-specific region (region 2) has been found by comparing the predicted coding sequences (CDSs) in all 15 loci for synteny and homology. The region is unique to each reference strain with the exception of those in serovars 5 and 12, which are identical in terms of gene content. The identification and characterization of this locus among the 15 serovars is the first step in understanding the genetic, molecular, and structural bases of serovar specificity in this poorly studied but important pathogen and opens up the possibility of developing an improved molecular serotyping system, which would greatly assist diagnosis and control of Glässer's disease. PMID:23873912

  3. Multiplex SSR-PCR approaches for semi-automated genotyping and characterization of loci linked to blast disease resistance genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Sadegh; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Shabanimofrad, Mahmoodreza; Foroughi, Majid; Azizia, Parisa; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Sahebi, Mahbod; Harun, Abd Rahim; Nasehi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, 63 polymorphic microsatellite markers related to rice blast resistance genes were fluorescently labelled at the 5'-end with either 6-FAM or HEX using the G5 dye set and incorporated into a multiplex SSR-PCR for the detection of fragments using an automated system. For rice F3 families obtained from crosses between Pongsu Seribu 2 (Malaysian blast resistant cultivar) and Mahsuri (a susceptible rice cultivar), the genotypes for 13 designated multiplex SSR panels were determined. The genotyping assays were performed using a capillary-based ABIPRISM 3100 genetic analyser. The sizes of the SSRs alleles observed in the range from 79 to 324 bp. The observed marker segregation data were analysed using the Chi(2) test. A genetic linkage map covering ten chromosomes and comprising 63 polymorphic SSR markers was constructed, and the distorted loci were localised to linkage groups. The results indicated that distorted loci are presented on eight chromosomes.

  4. Interactions of U2 Gene Loci and Their Nuclear Transcripts with Cajal (Coiled) Bodies: Evidence for PreU2 within Cajal Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kelly P.; Lawrence, Jeanne Bentley

    2000-01-01

    The Cajal (coiled) body (CB) is a structure enriched in proteins involved in mRNA, rRNA, and snRNA metabolism. CBs have been shown to interact with specific histone and snRNA gene loci. To examine the potential role of CBs in U2 snRNA metabolism, we used a variety of genomic and oligonucleotide probes to visualize in situ newly synthesized U2 snRNA relative to U2 loci and CBs. Results demonstrate that long spacer sequences between U2 coding repeats are transcribed, supporting other recent evidence that U2 transcription proceeds past the 3′ box. The presence of bright foci of this U2 locus RNA differed between alleles within the same nucleus; however, this did not correlate with the loci's association with a CB. Experiments with specific oligonucleotide probes revealed signal for preU2 RNA within CBs. PreU2 was also detected in the locus-associated RNA foci, whereas sequences 3′ of preU2 were found only in these foci, not in CBs. This suggests that a longer primary transcript is processed before entry into CBs. Although this work shows that direct contact of a U2 locus with a CB is not simply correlated with RNA at that locus, it provides the first evidence of new preU2 transcripts within CBs. We also show that, in contrast to CBs, SMN gems do not associate with U2 gene loci and do not contain preU2. Because other evidence indicates that preU2 is processed in the cytoplasm before assembly into snRNPs, results point to an involvement of CBs in modification or transport of preU2 RNA. PMID:10982395

  5. Lack of evidence for a role of the myelin basic protein gene in multiple sclerosis susceptibility in Sardinian patients.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Eleonora; Mancosu, Cristina; Fadda, Elisabetta; Murru, Maria Rita; Costa, Gianna; Murru, Raffaele; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2002-11-01

    A link between myelin basic protein (MBP) polymorphism and multiple sclerosis (MS) has been reported in some populations but not in others. We analysed two polymorphisms in the 5' flanking region of the MBP exon 1 gene in MS patients from the founder population of Sardinia. Using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), MBP polymorphisms were analysed in 363 singleton MS families. No distortion in transmission of the tetranucleotide repeat (ATGG)12 and of the 1116-1540 nt alleles was found. Moreover, we discovered no epistatic effect of the MBP gene on the HLA/MHC DRB1,DQB1, DPB1 loci or on alleles defined by D6S1683 marker found to be associated with MS in Sardinians. We concluded that the MBP gene does not play a role in MS susceptibility in Sardinians.

  6. Genome-wide quantitative trait locus mapping identifies multiple major loci for brittle rachis and threshability in Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Luo, Wei; Kong, Xing-Chen; Qi, Peng-Fei; Wang, Ji-Rui; Wei, Yu-Ming; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Liu, Ya-Xi; Peng, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Guo-Yue; Dai, Shou-Fen; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao) is a semi-wild hexaploid wheat resource that is only naturally distributed in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Brittle rachis and hard threshing are two important characters of Tibetan semi-wild wheat. A whole-genome linkage map of T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum was constructed using a recombinant inbred line population (Q1028×ZM9023) with 186 lines, 564 diversity array technology markers, and 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Phenotypic data on brittle rachis and threshability, as two quantitative traits, were evaluated on the basis of the number of average spike rachis fragments per spike and percent threshability in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping performed using inclusive composite interval mapping analysis clearly identified four QTLs for brittle rachis and three QTLs for threshability. However, three loci on 2DS, 2DL, and 5AL showed pleiotropism for brittle rachis and threshability; they respectively explained 5.3%, 18.6%, and 18.6% of phenotypic variation for brittle rachis and 17.4%, 13.2%, and 35.2% of phenotypic variation for threshability. A locus on 3DS showed an independent effect on brittle rachis, which explained 38.7% of the phenotypic variation. The loci on 2DS and 3DS probably represented the effect of Tg and Br1, respectively. The locus on 5AL was in very close proximity to the Q gene, but was different from the predicted q in Tibetan semi-wild wheat. To our knowledge, the locus on 2DL has never been reported in common wheat but was prominent in T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum accession Q1028. It remarkably interacted with the locus on 5AL to affect brittle rachis. Several major loci for brittle rachis and threshability were identified in Tibetan semi-wild wheat, improving the understanding of these two characters and suggesting the occurrence of special evolution in Tibetan semi-wild wheat.

  7. Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height

    PubMed Central

    Lango Allen, Hana; Estrada, Karol; Lettre, Guillaume; Berndt, Sonja I.; Weedon, Michael N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Willer, Cristen J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ferreira, Teresa; Wood, Andrew R.; Weyant, Robert J.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Soranzo, Nicole; Park, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Jian; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Randall, Joshua C.; Qi, Lu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Mägi, Reedik; Pastinen, Tomi; Liang, Liming; Heid, Iris M.; Luan, Jian'an; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Winkler, Thomas W.; Goddard, Michael E.; Lo, Ken Sin; Palmer, Cameron; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Johansson, Åsa; Zillikens, M.Carola; Feitosa, Mary F.; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Kraft, Peter; Mangino, Massimo; Prokopenko, Inga; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Ernst, Florian; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Monda, Keri L.; Polasek, Ozren; Preuss, Michael; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Perry, John R.B.; Surakka, Ida; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Altmaier, Elizabeth L.; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bhangale, Tushar; Boucher, Gabrielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Constance; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew N.; Dixon, Anna L.; Gibson, Quince; Grundberg, Elin; Hao, Ke; Junttila, M. Juhani; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kettunen, Johannes; König, Inke R.; Kwan, Tony; Lawrence, Robert W.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lorentzon, Mattias; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Martina; Ngwa, Julius Suh; Purcell, Shaun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Salem, Rany M.; Salvi, Erika; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Jianxin; Sovio, Ulla; Thompson, John R.; Turchin, Michael C.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Verlaan, Dominique J.; Vitart, Veronique; White, Charles C.; Ziegler, Andreas; Almgren, Peter; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Campbell, Harry; Citterio, Lorena; De Grandi, Alessandro; Dominiczak, Anna; Duan, Jubao; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Glorioso, Nicola; Haiqing, Shen; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Illig, Thomas; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Koiranen, Markku; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Laitinen, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Marusic, Ana; Maschio, Andrea; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Petersmann, Astrid; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Walters, G.Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zagato, Laura; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Alavere, Helene; Farrall, Martin; McArdle, Wendy L.; Nelis, Mari; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ripatti, Samuli; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Aben, Katja K.; Ardlie, Kristin G; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Collins, Francis S.; Cusi, Daniele; den Heijer, Martin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gejman, Pablo V.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Iribarren, Carlos; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Melander, Olle; Mosley, Tom H.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Oostra, Ben; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rissanen, Aila; Rivolta, Carlo; Schunkert, Heribert; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Viikari, Jorma; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Province, Michael A.; Kayser, Manfred; Arnold, Alice M.; Atwood, Larry D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chanock, Stephen J.; Deloukas, Panos; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Hall, Per; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Lathrop, G.Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Uda, Manuela; Waterworth, Dawn; Wright, Alan F.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Hofman, Albert; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Cupples, L.Adrienne; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fox, Caroline S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Harris, Tamara B.

    2010-01-01

    Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that

  8. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) <1.1×10−3. None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160cm (OR=0.83, p=0.039, pint=1.9×10−4). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  9. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-03-15

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) <1.1 × 10(-3) . None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, pint = 1.9 × 10(-4) ). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 × 10(-4) ), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, pint = 6.1 × 10(-4) ). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 × 10(-5) ), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, pint = 3.4 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.

  10. Replication initiation patterns in the beta-globin loci of totipotent and differentiated murine cells: evidence for multiple initiation regions.

    PubMed

    Aladjem, Mirit I; Rodewald, Luo Wei; Lin, Chii Mai; Bowman, Sarah; Cimbora, Daniel M; Brody, Linnea L; Epner, Elliot M; Groudine, Mark; Wahl, Geoffrey M

    2002-01-01

    The replication initiation pattern of the murine beta-globin locus was analyzed in totipotent embryonic stem cells and in differentiated cell lines. Initiation events in the murine beta-globin locus were detected in a region extending from the embryonic Ey gene to the adult betaminor gene, unlike the restricted initiation observed in the human locus. Totipotent and differentiated cells exhibited similar initiation patterns. Deletion of the region between the adult globin genes did not prevent initiation in the remainder of the locus, suggesting that the potential to initiate DNA replication was not contained exclusively within the primary sequence of the deleted region. In addition, a deletion encompassing the six identified 5' hypersensitive sites in the mouse locus control region had no effect on initiation from within the locus. As this deletion also did not affect the chromatin structure of the locus, we propose that the sequences determining both chromatin structure and replication initiation lie outside the hypersensitive sites removed by the deletion.

  11. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci and Candidate Genes for an Anxiolytic-like Response to Ethanol in BXD Recombinant Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Alexander H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Harenza, JoLynne; Yordanova, Roumyana K.; Webb, Bradley T.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Miles, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic differences in acute behavioral responses to ethanol contribute to the susceptibility to alcohol use disorder and the reduction of anxiety is a commonly reported motive underlying ethanol consumption among alcoholics. Therefore, we studied the genetic variance in anxiolytic-like responses to ethanol across the BXD recombinant inbred mouse panel using the light-dark transition model of anxiety. Strain-mean genetic mapping and a mixed-model quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis replicated several previously published QTL for locomotor activity and identified several novel anxiety-related loci. Significant loci included a chromosome 11 saline anxiety-like QTL (Salanq1) and a chromosome 12 locus (Etanq1) influencing the anxiolytic-like response to ethanol. Etanq1 was successfully validated by studies with BXD advanced intercross strains and fine-mapped to a region comprising less than 3.5 Mb. Through integration of genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of the mesocorticolimbic reward circuit (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral midbrain) across the BXD RI panel, we identified high priority candidate genes within Etanq1, the strongest of which was Ninein (Nin), a Gsk3β-interacting protein that is highly expressed in the brain. PMID:26948279

  12. Three gene expression vector sets for concurrently expressing multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Makino, Harumi; Ogura, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    Yeast has the potential to be used in bulk-scale fermentative production of fuels and chemicals due to its tolerance for low pH and robustness for autolysis. However, expression of multiple external genes in one host yeast strain is considerably labor-intensive due to the lack of polycistronic transcription. To promote the metabolic engineering of yeast, we generated systematic and convenient genetic engineering tools to express multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a series of multi-copy and integration vector sets for concurrently expressing two or three genes in S. cerevisiae by embedding three classical promoters. The comparative expression capabilities of the constructed vectors were monitored with green fluorescent protein, and the concurrent expression of genes was monitored with three different fluorescent proteins. Our multiple gene expression tool will be helpful to the advanced construction of genetically engineered yeast strains in a variety of research fields other than metabolic engineering.

  13. Global Population Genetic Structure and Male-Mediated Gene Flow in the Green Turtle (Chelonia Mydas): RFLP Analyses of Anonymous Nuclear Loci

    PubMed Central

    Karl, S. A.; Bowen, B. W.; Avise, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    We introduce an approach for the analysis of Mendelian polymorphisms in nuclear DNA (nDNA), using restriction fragment patterns from anonymous single-copy regions amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and apply this method to the elucidation of population structure and gene flow in the endangered green turtle, Chelonia mydas. Seven anonymous clones isolated from a total cell DNA library were sequenced to generate primers for the amplification of nDNA fragments. Nine individuals were screened for restriction site polymorphisms at these seven loci, using 40 endonucleases. Two loci were monomorphic, while the remainder exhibited a total of nine polymorphic restriction sites and three size variants (reflecting 600-base pair (bp) and 20-bp deletions and a 20-bp insertion). A total of 256 turtle specimens from 15 nesting populations worldwide were then scored for these polymorphisms. Genotypic proportions within populations were in accord with Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Strong linkage disequilibrium observed among polymorphic sites within loci enabled multisite haplotype assignments. Estimates of the standardized variance in haplotype frequency among global collections (F(ST) = 0.17), within the Atlantic-Mediterranean (F(ST) = 0.13), and within the Indian-Pacific (F(ST) = 0.13), revealed a moderate degree of population substructure. Although a previous study concluded that nesting populations appear to be highly structured with respect to female (mitochondrial DNA) lineages, estimates of Nm based on nDNA data from this study indicate moderate rates of male-mediated gene flow. A positive relationship between genetic similarity and geographic proximity suggests historical connections and/or contemporary gene flow between particular rookery populations, likely via matings on overlapping feeding grounds, migration corridors or nonnatal rookeries. PMID:1350555

  14. Inheritance of partial resistance against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus vulgaris and co-localization of quantitative trait loci with genes involved in specific resistance.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, V; Sévignac, M; De Oliveira, J C; Fouilloux, G; Skroch, P; Thoquet, P; Gepts, P; Langin, T; Dron, M

    2000-03-01

    Anthracnose, one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. A "candidate gene" approach was used to map anthracnose resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL). Candidate genes included genes for both pathogen recognition (resistance genes and resistance gene analogs [RGAs]) and general plant defense (defense response genes). Two strains of C. lindemuthianum, identified in a world collection of 177 strains, displayed a reproducible and differential aggressiveness toward BAT93 and JaloEEP558, two parental lines of P. vulgaris representing the two major gene pools of this crop. A reliable test was developed to score partial resistance in aerial organs of the plant (stem, leaf, petiole) under controlled growth chamber conditions. BAT93 was more resistant than JaloEEP558 regardless of the organ or strain tested. With a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between these two parental lines, 10 QTL were located on a genetic map harboring 143 markers, including known defense response genes, anthracnose-specific resistance genes, and RGAs. Eight of the QTL displayed isolate specificity. Two were co-localized with known defense genes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein) and three with anthracnose-specific resistance genes and/or RGAs. Interestingly, two QTL, with different allelic contribution, mapped on linkage group B4 in a 5.0 cM interval containing Andean and Mesoamerican specific resistance genes against C. lindemuthianum and 11 polymorphic fragments revealed with a RGA probe. The possible relationship between genes underlying specific and partial resistance is discussed.

  15. Gene expression profiles in Finnish twins with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Särkijärvi, Silja; Kuusisto, Hanna; Paalavuo, Raija; Levula, Mari; Airla, Nina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kaprio, Jaakko; Koskenvuo, Markku; Elovaara, Irina

    2006-01-01

    Background Since genetic alterations influencing susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), are as yet poorly understood, the purpose of this study was to identify genes responsible for MS by studying monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for MS. Methods In order to identify genes involved in MS development, the gene expression profiles in blood mononuclear cells obtained from eight MZ twin pairs discordant for MS were analyzed by cDNA microarray technology detecting the expression of 8 300 genes. The twins were collected from the Finnish Twin Cohort Study and both affected subjects and their healthy siblings underwent neurological evaluation and cerebral and spinal magnetic resonance imaging. Gene expressions were confirmed by relative quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Results It appeared that 25 genes were at least two-fold up-regulated and 15 genes down-regulated in 25% (2/8) of twins with MS when compared to their healthy siblings. Moreover, 6/25 genes were up-regulated in 40% of MS twins and one gene, interferon alpha-inducible protein (clone IFI-6-16) (G1P3), in 50% of them. The six most constantly expressed genes are (1) G1P3, (2) POU domain, class 3, transcription factor 1, (3) myxovirus resistance 2, (4) lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein-5, (5) hemoglobin alpha 2 and (6) hemoglobin beta. Conclusion Over two-fold up-regulation of these six genes in almost half of MZ twins with MS suggests their role in MS pathogenesis. Studies using MZ MS twins obtained from genetically homogeneous population offer a unique opportunity to explore the genetic nature of MS. PMID:16504146

  16. Multiple Aspects of Gene Dysregulation in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moumné, Lara; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG expansion in the gene encoding Huntingtin (Htt). It is characterized by chorea, cognitive, and psychiatric disorders. The most affected brain region is the striatum, and the clinical symptoms are directly correlated to the rate of striatal degeneration. The wild-type Htt is a ubiquitous protein and its deletion is lethal. Mutated (expanded) Htt produces excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunctions, axonal transport deficit, altered proteasome activity, and gene dysregulation. Transcriptional dysregulation occurs at early neuropathological stages in HD patients. Multiple genes are dysregulated, with overlaps of altered transcripts between mouse models of HD and patient brains. Nuclear localization of Exp-Htt interferes with transcription factors, co-activators, and proteins of the transcriptional machinery. Another key mechanism described so far, is an alteration of cytoplasmic retention of the transcriptional repressor REST, which is normally associated with wild-type Htt. As such, Exp-Htt causes alteration of transcription of multiple genes involved in neuronal survival, plasticity, signaling, and mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Besides these transcriptional dysregulations, Exp-Htt affects the chromatin structure through altered post-translational modifications (PTM) of histones and methylation of DNA. Multiple alterations of histone PTM are described, including acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, polyamination, and phosphorylation. Exp-Htt also affects the expression and regulation of non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs). First multiple neural miRNAs are controlled by REST, and dysregulated in HD, with concomitant de-repression of downstream mRNA targets. Second, Exp-Htt protein or RNA may also play a major role in the processing of miRNAs and hence pathogenesis. These pleiotropic effects of Exp-Htt on gene expression may represent seminal deleterious effects in the

  17. Multiple Genes Cause Postmating Prezygotic Reproductive Isolation in the Drosophila virilis Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of speciation is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Studies of reproductive isolation have provided several insights into the genetic causes of speciation, especially in taxa that lend themselves to detailed genetic scrutiny. Reproductive barriers have usually been divided into those that occur before zygote formation (prezygotic) and after (postzygotic), with the latter receiving a great deal of attention over several decades. Reproductive barriers that occur after mating but before zygote formation [postmating prezygotic (PMPZ)] are especially understudied at the genetic level. Here, I present a phenotypic and genetic analysis of a PMPZ reproductive barrier between two species of the Drosophila virilis group: D. americana and D. virilis. This species pair shows strong PMPZ isolation, especially when D. americana males mate with D. virilis females: ∼99% of eggs laid after these heterospecific copulations are not fertilized. Previous work has shown that the paternal loci contributing to this incompatibility reside on two chromosomes, one of which (chromosome 5) likely carries multiple factors. The other (chromosome 2) is fixed for a paracentric inversion that encompasses nearly half the chromosome. Here, I present two results. First, I show that PMPZ in this species cross is largely due to defective sperm storage in heterospecific copulations. Second, using advanced intercross and backcross mapping approaches, I identify genomic regions that carry genes capable of rescuing heterospecific fertilization. I conclude that paternal incompatibility between D. americana males and D. virilis females is underlain by four or more genes on chromosomes 2 and 5. PMID:27729433

  18. Genome-wide association analysis identifies genetic loci associated with resistance to multiple antimalarials in Plasmodium falciparum from China-Myanmar border

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zenglei; Cabrera, Mynthia; Yang, Jingyun; Yuan, Lili; Gupta, Bhavna; Liang, Xiaoying; Kemirembe, Karen; Shrestha, Sony; Brashear, Awtum; Li, Xiaolian; Porcella, Stephen F.; Miao, Jun; Yang, Zhaoqing; Su, Xin-zhuan; Cui, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance has emerged as one of the greatest challenges facing malaria control. The recent emergence of resistance to artemisinin (ART) and its partner drugs in ART-based combination therapies (ACT) is threatening the efficacy of this front-line regimen for treating Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the resistance to ART and the partner drugs has become a high priority for resistance containment and malaria management. Using genome-wide association studies, we investigated the associations of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms with in vitro sensitivities to 10 commonly used antimalarial drugs in 94 P. falciparum isolates from the China-Myanmar border area, a region with the longest history of ART usage. We identified several loci associated with various drugs, including those containing pfcrt and pfdhfr. Of particular interest is a locus on chromosome 10 containing the autophagy-related protein 18 (ATG18) associated with decreased sensitivities to dihydroartemisinin, artemether and piperaquine – an ACT partner drug in this area. ATG18 is a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding protein essential for autophagy and recently identified as a potential ART target. Further investigations on the ATG18 and genes at the chromosome 10 locus may provide an important lead for a connection between ART resistance and autophagy. PMID:27694982

  19. Loci under selection during multiple range expansions of an invasive plant are mostly population specific, but patterns are associated with climate.

    PubMed

    Zenni, Rafael D; Hoban, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the genes underlying rapid evolutionary changes, describing their function and ascertaining the environmental pressures that determine fitness are the central elements needed for understanding of evolutionary processes and phenotypic changes that improve the fitness of populations. It has been hypothesized that rapid adaptive changes in new environments may contribute to the rapid spread and success of invasive plants and animals. As yet, studies of adaptation during invasion are scarce, as is knowledge of the genes underlying adaptation, especially in multiple replicated invasions. Here, we quantified how genotype frequencies change during invasions, resulting in rapid evolution of naturalized populations. We used six fully replicated common garden experiments in Brazil where Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) was introduced at the same time, in the same numbers, from the same seed sources, and has formed naturalized populations expanding outward from the plantations. We used a combination of nonparametric, population genetics and multivariate statistics to detect changes in genotype frequencies along each of the six naturalization gradients and their association with climate as well as shifts in allele frequencies compared to the source populations. Results show 25 genes with significant shifts in genotype frequencies. Six genes had shifts in more than one population. Climate explained 25% of the variation in the groups of genes under selection across all locations, but specific genes under strong selection during invasions did not show climate-related convergence. In conclusion, we detected rapid evolutionary changes during invasive range expansions, but the particular gene-level patterns of evolution may be population specific.

  20. Multiple Loci and Complete Taxonomic Sampling Resolve the Phylogeny and Biogeographic History of Tenrecs (Mammalia: Tenrecidae) and Reveal Higher Speciation Rates in Madagascar's Humid Forests.

    PubMed

    Everson, Kathryn M; Soarimalala, Voahangy; Goodman, Steven M; Olson, Link E

    2016-09-01

    The family Tenrecidae (tenrecs) is one of only four extant terrestrial mammal lineages to have colonized and diversified on Madagascar. Over the last 15 years, several studies have disagreed on relationships among major tenrec lineages, resulting in multiple reinterpretations of the number and timing of historical transoceanic dispersal events between Africa and Madagascar. We reconstructed the phylogeny of Tenrecidae using multiple loci from all recognized extant species and estimated divergence timing using six fossil calibrations within Afrotheria. All phylogenetic analyses strongly support monophyly of the Malagasy tenrecs, and our divergence timing analysis places their colonization of the island at 30-56 Ma. Our comprehensive phylogeny supports three important taxonomic revisions that reflect the evolutionary history of tenrecs: (1) we formally elevate the African otter shrews to their own family Potamogalidae, thereby rendering extant Tenrecidae entirely endemic to Madagascar; (2) we subsume the semiaquatic genus Limnogale within the shrew tenrec genus Microgale; and (3) we re-elevate the two largest-bodied shrew tenrecs, Microgale dobsoni and Microgale talazaci, to the genus Nesogale Thomas (1918) Finally, we use recently summarized habitat data to test the hypothesis that diversification rates differ between humid and arid habitats on Madagascar, and we compare three common methods for ancestral biogeographic reconstruction. These analyses suggest higher speciation rates in humid habitats and reveal a minimum of three and more likely five independent transitions to arid habitats. Our results resolve the relationships among previously recalcitrant taxa, illuminate the timing and mechanisms of major biogeographic patterns in an extraordinary example of an island radiation, and permit the first comprehensive, phylogenetically consistent taxonomy of Madagascar's tenrecs.

  1. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  2. Functional Classification, Genomic Organization, Putatively cis-Acting Regulatory Elements, and Relationship to Quantitative Trait Loci, of Sorghum Genes with Rhizome-Enriched Expression1[W

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cheol Seong; Kamps, Terry L.; Skinner, D. Neil; Schulze, Stefan R.; Vencill, William K.; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizomes are organs of fundamental importance to plant competitiveness and invasiveness. We have identified genes expressed at substantially higher levels in rhizomes than other plant parts, and explored their functional categorization, genomic organization, regulatory motifs, and association with quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring rhizomatousness. The finding that genes with rhizome-enriched expression are distributed across a wide range of functional categories suggests some degree of specialization of individual members of many gene families in rhizomatous plants. A disproportionate share of genes with rhizome-enriched expression was implicated in secondary and hormone metabolism, and abiotic stimuli and development. A high frequency of unknown-function genes reflects our still limited knowledge of this plant organ. A putative oligosaccharyl transferase showed the highest degree of rhizome-specific expression, with several transcriptional or regulatory protein complex factors also showing high (but lesser) degrees of specificity. Inferred by the upstream sequences of their putative rice (Oryza sativa) homologs, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) genes that were relatively highly expressed in rhizome tip tissues were enriched for cis-element motifs, including the pyrimidine box, TATCCA box, and CAREs box, implicating the gibberellins in regulation of many rhizome-specific genes. From cDNA clones showing rhizome-enriched expression, expressed sequence tags forming 455 contigs were plotted on the rice genome and aligned to QTL likelihood intervals for ratooning and rhizomatous traits in rice and sorghum. Highly expressed rhizome genes were somewhat enriched in QTL likelihood intervals for rhizomatousness or ratooning, with specific candidates including some of the most rhizome-specific genes. Some rhizomatousness and ratooning QTLs were shown to be potentially related to one another as a result of ancient duplication, suggesting long-term functional conservation of

  3. Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project: A platform to investigate multiple sclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongqi; White, Charles C; Owen, Emily K; Von Korff, Alina; Clarkson, Sarah R; McCabe, Cristin A; Cimpean, Maria; Winn, Phoebe A; Hoesing, Ashley; Steele, Sonya U; Cortese, Irene C M; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Reich, Daniel S; Chibnik, Lori B; De Jager, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project establishes a platform to investigate the events leading to multiple sclerosis (MS) in at-risk individuals. It has recruited 2,632 first-degree relatives from across the USA. Using an integrated genetic and environmental risk score, we identified subjects with twice the MS risk when compared to the average family member, and we report an initial incidence rate in these subjects that is 30 times greater than that of sporadic MS. We discuss the feasibility of large-scale studies of asymptomatic at-risk subjects that leverage modern tools of subject recruitment to execute collaborative projects.

  4. Multiple de novo mutations in the MECP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Bunyan, David J; Robinson, David O

    2008-09-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder that usually arises following a single de novo mutation in the MECP2 gene. Point mutation testing and gene dosage analysis of a cohort of British Rett syndrome patients in our laboratory revealed four females who each had two different de novo causative mutations, presumed to be in cis because the patients showed no deviation from the classical Rett syndrome phenotype. Two of these cases had a point mutation and a small intraexonic deletion, a third had a whole exon deletion and a separate small intraexonic deletion, and a fourth case had a small intraexonic deletion and a large duplication. These findings highlight the necessity to perform both point mutation analysis and exon dosage analysis in such cases, particularly because of the possibility of undetected parental mosaicism and the implications for prenatal diagnosis in future pregnancies. These cases also suggest that the MECP2 gene may be particularly prone to multiple mutation events.

  5. Multiple and Variable NHEJ-Like Genes Are Involved in Resistance to DNA Damage in Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Grégory; Bertrand, Claire; Zhang, Lingli; Piotrowski, Emilie; Chipot, Ludovic; Bontemps, Cyril; Confalonieri, Fabrice; McGovern, Stephen; Lecointe, François; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a double strand break (DSB) repair pathway which does not require any homologous template and can ligate two DNA ends together. The basic bacterial NHEJ machinery involves two partners: the Ku protein, a DNA end binding protein for DSB recognition and the multifunctional LigD protein composed a ligase, a nuclease and a polymerase domain, for end processing and ligation of the broken ends. In silico analyses performed in the 38 sequenced genomes of Streptomyces species revealed the existence of a large panel of NHEJ-like genes. Indeed, ku genes or ligD domain homologues are scattered throughout the genome in multiple copies and can be distinguished in two categories: the “core” NHEJ gene set constituted of conserved loci and the “variable” NHEJ gene set constituted of NHEJ-like genes present in only a part of the species. In Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877, not only the deletion of “core” genes but also that of “variable” genes led to an increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by electron beam irradiation. Multiple mutants of ku, ligase or polymerase encoding genes showed an aggravated phenotype compared to single mutants. Biochemical assays revealed the ability of Ku-like proteins to protect and to stimulate ligation of DNA ends. RT-qPCR and GFP fusion experiments suggested that ku-like genes show a growth phase dependent expression profile consistent with their involvement in DNA repair during spores formation and/or germination. PMID:27965636

  6. Copy number variations exploration of multiple genes in Graves’ disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rong-hua; Shao, Xiao-qing; Li, Ling; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Jin-an

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Few previous published papers reported copy number variations of genes could affect the predisposition of Graves’ disease (GD). Herein, the aim of this study was to explore the association between copy number variations (CNV) profile and GD. Methods: The preliminary copy number microarray used to screen copy number variant genes was performed in 6 GD patients. Five CNV candidate genes (CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17) were then validated in an independent set of samples (50 GD patients and 50 matched healthy ones) by the Accucopy assay method. The CNV of the other 2 genes TRY6 and CCL3L1 was investigated in 144 GD patients and 144 healthy volunteers by the definitive genotyping technique using the Taqman quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (Taqman qPCR). TRY6 gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs13230029, was genotyped by the PCR-ligase detection reaction (LDR) in 675 GD patients and 898 healthy controls. Results: There were no correlation of the gene copy number (GCN) of CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, and UGT2B17 with GD. In comparison with that of controls, the GCN distribution of TRY6 and CCL3L1 in GD patients did not show significantly differ (P > 0.05). Furthermore, TRY6-related polymorphism (rs13230029) showed no difference between GD patients and controls. No correlation was found between CNV or SNP genotype and clinical phenotypes. Generally, there were no link of the copy numbers of several genes, including CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1 to GD. Conclusion: Our results clearly indicated that the copy number variations of multiple genes, namely CFH, CFHR1, KIAA0125, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, TRY6, and CCL3L1, were not associated with the development of GD. PMID:28121931

  7. Multiple-to-Multiple Relationships between MicroRNAs and Target Genes in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yutaka; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Yuasa, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as transcriptional regulators and play pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. According to miRNA target databases, one miRNA may regulate many genes as its targets, while one gene may be targeted by many miRNAs. These findings indicate that relationships between miRNAs and their targets may not be one-to-one. However, many reports have described only a one-to-one, one-to-multiple or multiple-to-one relationship between miRNA and its target gene in human cancers. Thus, it is necessary to determine whether or not a combination of some miRNAs would regulate multiple targets and be involved in carcinogenesis. To find some groups of miRNAs that may synergistically regulate their targets in human gastric cancer (GC), we re-analyzed our previous miRNA expression array data and found that 50 miRNAs were up-regulated on treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in a GC cell line. The “TargetScan” miRNA target database predicted that some of these miRNAs have common target genes. We also referred to the GEO database for expression of these common target genes in human GCs, which might be related to gastric carcinogenesis. In this study, we analyzed two miRNA combinations, miR-224 and -452, and miR-181c and -340. Over-expression of both miRNA combinations dramatically down-regulated their target genes, DPYSL2 and KRAS, and KRAS and MECP2, respectively. These miRNA combinations synergistically decreased cell proliferation upon transfection. Furthermore, we revealed that these miRNAs were down-regulated through promoter hypermethylation in GC cells. Thus, it is likely that the relationships between miRNAs and their targets are not one-to-one but multiple-to-multiple in GCs, and that these complex relationships may be related to gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:23667495

  8. Quantitative trait loci identification, fine mapping and gene expression profiling for ovicidal response to whitebacked planthopper (Sogatella furcifera Horvath) in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The whitebacked planthopper (WBPH), Sogatella furcifera Horváth, is a serious rice pest in Asia. Ovicidal resistance is a natural rice defense mechanism against WBPH and is characterized by the formation of watery lesions (WLs) and increased egg mortality (EM) at the WBPH oviposition sites. Results This study aimed to understand the genetic and molecular basis of rice ovicidal resistance to WBPH by combining genetic and genomic analyses. First, the ovicidal trait in doubled haploid rice lines derived from a WBPH-resistant cultivar (CJ06) and a WBPH-susceptible cultivar (TN1) were phenotyped based on the necrotic symptoms of the leaf sheaths and EM. Using a constructed molecular linkage map, 19 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with WLs and EM were identified on eight chromosomes. Of them, qWL6 was determined to be a major QTL for WL. Based on chromosome segment substitution lines and a residual heterozygous population, a high-resolution linkage analysis further defined the qWL6 locus to a 122-kb region on chromosome 6, which was annotated to encode 20 candidate genes. We then conducted an Affymetrix microarray analysis to determine the transcript abundance in the CJ06 and TN1 plants. Upon WBPH infestation, 432 genes in CJ06 and 257 genes in TN1 were significantly up-regulated, while 802 genes in CJ06 and 398 genes in TN1 were significantly down-regulated. This suggests that remarkable global changes in gene expression contribute to the ovicidal resistance of rice. Notably, four genes in the 122-kb region of the qWL6 locus were differentially regulated between CJ06 and TN1 in response to the WBPH infestation, suggesting they may be candidate resistance genes. Conclusions The information obtained from the fine mapping of qWL6 and the microarray analyses will facilitate the isolation of this important resistance gene and its use in breeding WBPH-resistant rice. PMID:24886295

  9. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Battaglia, Giovanni Giorgio; Garozzo, Maurizio; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; Pączek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P; Gharavi, Ali G

    2014-11-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six new genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geospatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation, and genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN.

  10. [Geographical structure of the sable (Martes zibellina L.) gene pool on the basis of microsatellite loci analysis].

    PubMed

    Kashtanov, S N; Svishcheva, G R; Pishchulina, S L; Lazebnyĭ, O E; Meshcherinskiĭ, I G; Simakin, L V; Rozhnov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of seven natural sable populations was investigated with the use of the original panel of 10 microsatellite loci. The populations were selected on the basis of the historical data on sable numbers fluctuations for the last 300 years, as well as on data on natural and artificial migrations affecting neighboring populations. We have demonstrated that the populations are in a state of genetic equilibrium for the majority of the loci. The genetic differences between three samplings from Central Siberia populations were insignificant, and the fixation index values were relatively low. At the same time, populations from the margins of the species habitation areal were characterized by the highest fixation index values. We have shown for the first time that populations from different regions of the sable habitation areal maintain their specific features despite the influence of natural and artificial migrations. The current study, performed with nuclear genetic markers, made it possible to get insight into the genetic structure of the analyzed species as a whole.

  11. Discovery of new risk loci for IgA nephropathy implicates genes involved in immunity against intestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Li, Yifu; Scolari, Francesco; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Choi, Murim; Verbitsky, Miguel; Fasel, David; Lata, Sneh; Prakash, Sindhuri; Shapiro, Samantha; Fischman, Clara; Snyder, Holly J.; Appel, Gerald; Izzi, Claudia; Viola, Battista Fabio; Dallera, Nadia; Vecchio, Lucia Del; Barlassina, Cristina; Salvi, Erika; Bertinetto, Francesca Eleonora; Amoroso, Antonio; Savoldi, Silvana; Rocchietti, Marcella; Amore, Alessandro; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna; Salvadori, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Magistroni, Riccardo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Caridi, Gianluca; Bodria, Monica; Lugani, Francesca; Allegri, Landino; Delsante, Marco; Maiorana, Mariarosa; Magnano, Andrea; Frasca, Giovanni; Boer, Emanuela; Boscutti, Giuliano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Mignani, Renzo; Marcantoni, Carmelita; Di Landro, Domenico; Santoro, Domenico; Pani, Antonello; Polci, Rosaria; Feriozzi, Sandro; Chicca, Silvana; Galliani, Marco; Gigante, Maddalena; Gesualdo, Loreto; Zamboli, Pasquale; Maixnerová, Dita; Tesar, Vladimir; Eitner, Frank; Rauen, Thomas; Floege, Jürgen; Kovacs, Tibor; Nagy, Judit; Mucha, Krzysztof; Pączek, Leszek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mizerska-Wasiak, Małgorzata; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Pawlaczyk, Krzysztof; Gale, Daniel; Barratt, Jonathan; Thibaudin, Lise; Berthoux, Francois; Canaud, Guillaume; Boland, Anne; Metzger, Marie; Panzer, Ulf; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Goto, Shin; Narita, Ichiei; Caliskan, Yasar; Xie, Jingyuan; Hou, Ping; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Hong; Wyatt, Robert J.; Novak, Jan; Julian, Bruce A.; Feehally, John; Stengel, Benedicte; Cusi, Daniele; Lifton, Richard P.; Gharavi, Ali G.

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most common form of glomerulonephritis, with discovery and follow-up in 20,612 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We identified six novel genome-wide significant associations, four in ITGAM-ITGAX, VAV3 and CARD9 and two new independent signals at HLA-DQB1 and DEFA. We replicated the nine previously reported signals, including known SNPs in the HLA-DQB1 and DEFA loci. The cumulative burden of risk alleles is strongly associated with age at disease onset. Most loci are either directly associated with risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or maintenance of the intestinal epithelial barrier and response to mucosal pathogens. The geo-spatial distribution of risk alleles is highly suggestive of multi-locus adaptation and the genetic risk correlates strongly with variation in local pathogens, particularly helminth diversity, suggesting a possible role for host-intestinal pathogen interactions in shaping the genetic landscape of IgAN. PMID:25305756

  12. Prostate cancer risk locus at 8q24 as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genomic loci across the genome.

    PubMed

    Du, Meijun; Yuan, Tiezheng; Schilter, Kala F; Dittmar, Rachel L; Mackinnon, Alexander; Huang, Xiaoyi; Tschannen, Michael; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; Xia, Shu; Gao, Jianzhong; Tillmans, Lori; Lu, Yan; Liu, Pengyuan; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 8q24 locus contains regulatory variants that modulate genetic risk to various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the biological mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. Here, we developed a chromosome conformation capture (3C)-based multi-target sequencing technology and systematically examined three PC risk regions at the 8q24 locus and their potential regulatory targets across human genome in six cell lines. We observed frequent physical contacts of this risk locus with multiple genomic regions, in particular, inter-chromosomal interaction with CD96 at 3q13 and intra-chromosomal interaction with MYC at 8q24. We identified at least five interaction hot spots within the predicted functional regulatory elements at the 8q24 risk locus. We also found intra-chromosomal interaction genes PVT1, FAM84B and GSDMC and inter-chromosomal interaction gene CXorf36 in most of the six cell lines. Other gene regions appeared to be cell line-specific, such as RRP12 in LNCaP, USP14 in DU-145 and SMIN3 in lymphoblastoid cell line. We further found that the 8q24 functional domains more likely interacted with genomic regions containing genes enriched in critical pathways such as Wnt signaling and promoter motifs such as E2F1 and TCF3. This result suggests that the risk locus may function as a regulatory hub by physical interactions with multiple genes important for prostate carcinogenesis. Further understanding genetic effect and biological mechanism of these chromatin interactions will shed light on the newly discovered regulatory role of the risk locus in PC etiology and progression.

  13. Adaptive Horizontal Gene Transfers between Multiple Cheese-Associated Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Jeanne; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sallet, Erika; Dumas, Émilie; Lacoste, Sandrine; Debuchy, Robert; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-10-05

    Domestication is an excellent model for studies of adaptation because it involves recent and strong selection on a few, identified traits [1-5]. Few studies have focused on the domestication of fungi, with notable exceptions [6-11], despite their importance to bioindustry [12] and to a general understanding of adaptation in eukaryotes [5]. Penicillium fungi are ubiquitous molds among which two distantly related species have been independently selected for cheese making-P. roqueforti for blue cheeses like Roquefort and P. camemberti for soft cheeses like Camembert. The selected traits include morphology, aromatic profile, lipolytic and proteolytic activities, and ability to grow at low temperatures, in a matrix containing bacterial and fungal competitors [13-15]. By comparing the genomes of ten Penicillium species, we show that adaptation to cheese was associated with multiple recent horizontal transfers of large genomic regions carrying crucial metabolic genes. We identified seven horizontally transferred regions (HTRs) spanning more than 10 kb each, flanked by specific transposable elements, and displaying nearly 100% identity between distant Penicillium species. Two HTRs carried genes with functions involved in the utilization of cheese nutrients or competition and were found nearly identical in multiple strains and species of cheese-associated Penicillium fungi, indicating recent selective sweeps; they were experimentally associated with faster growth and greater competitiveness on cheese and contained genes highly expressed in the early stage of cheese maturation. These findings have industrial and food safety implications and improve our understanding of the processes of adaptation to rapid environmental changes.

  14. Anti-inflammatory genes associated with multiple sclerosis: a gene expression study.

    PubMed

    Perga, S; Montarolo, F; Martire, S; Berchialla, P; Malucchi, S; Bertolotto, A

    2015-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system caused by a complex interaction between multiple genes and environmental factors. HLA region is the strongest susceptibility locus, but recent huge genome-wide association studies identified new susceptibility genes. Among these, BACH2, PTGER4, RGS1 and ZFP36L1 were highlighted. Here, a gene expression analysis revealed that three of them, namely BACH2, PTGER4 and ZFP36L1, are down-regulated in MS patients' blood cells compared to healthy subjects. Interestingly, all these genes are involved in the immune system regulation with predominant anti-inflammatory role and their reduction could predispose to MS development.

  15. Evolution of duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus possesses two parallel IgH isoloci (IGH-A and IGH-B), that are related to the genomic duplication event in the family Salmonidae. These duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon provide a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of genome diversity and genome evolution of the IgH loci in vertebrates. In this study, we defined the structure of these loci in Atlantic salmon, and sequenced 24 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that were assembled into the IGH-A (1.1 Mb) and IGH-B (0.9 Mb) loci. In addition, over 7,000 cDNA clones from the IgH variable (VH) region have been sequenced and analyzed. Results The present study shows that the genomic organization of the duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon differs from that in other teleosts and other vertebrates. The loci possess multiplegenes upstream of the Cμ region, with three of the Cτ genes being functional. Moreover, the duplicated loci possess over 300 VH segments which could be classified into 18 families. This is the largest number of VH families currently defined in any vertebrate. There were significant structural differences between the two loci, indicating that both IGH-A and -B loci have evolved independently in the short time after the recent genome duplication approximately 60 mya. Conclusions Our results indicate that the duplication of the IgH loci in Atlantic salmon significantly contributes to the increased diversity of the antibody repertoire, as compared with the single IgH locus in other vertebrates. PMID:20813058

  16. Screening of candidate genes and fine mapping of drought tolerance quantitative trait loci on chromosome 4 in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lin; Wu, Yun-Hua; Liu, Hao-Jie; Mao, Wei-Wei; Du, Juan; Xiu, Hai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Xia; Yan, Yu-Wei; Liu, Guo-Lan; Liu, Hong-Yan; Hu, Song-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Due to severe water resource shortage, genetics of and breeding for DT (drought tolerance) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) have become one of the hot research topics. Identification of grain yield QTLs (quantitative trait loci) directly related to the DT trait of rice can provide useful information for breeding new drought-resistant and water-saving rice varieties via marker-assisted selection. A population of 105 advanced BILs (backcross introgression lines) derived from a cross between Zhenshan97B and IRAT109 in Zhenshan97B background were grown under drought stress in a field experiment and phenotypic traits were investigated. The results showed that in the target interval of RM273-RM255 on chromosome 4, three main-effect QTLs related to panicle length, panicle number, and spikelet number per panicle were identified (LOD [logarithm of the odds] > 2.0). The panicle length-related QTL had two loci located in the neighboring intervals of RM17308-RM17305 and RM17349-RM17190, which explained 18.80% and 20.42%, respectively, of the phenotypic variation, while the panicle number-related QTL was identified in the interval of RM1354-RM17308, explaining 11.47% of the phenotypic variation. As far as the spikelet number per panicle-related QTL was concerned, it was found to be located in the interval of RM17308-RM17305, which explained 28.08% of the phenotypic variation. Using the online Plant-GE query system, a total of 13 matched ESTs (expressed sequence tags) were found in the target region, and of the 13 ESTs, 12 had corresponding predicted genes. For instance, the two ESTs CB096766 and CA765747 were corresponded to the same predicted gene LOC_Os04g46370, while the other four ESTs, CA754286, CB000011, CX056247, and CX056240, were corresponded to the same predicted gene LOC_Os04g46390.

  17. Detecting population structure in a high gene-flow species, Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus): direct, simultaneous evaluation of neutral vs putatively selected loci.

    PubMed

    André, C; Larsson, L C; Laikre, L; Bekkevold, D; Brigham, J; Carvalho, G R; Dahlgren, T G; Hutchinson, W F; Mariani, S; Mudde, K; Ruzzante, D E; Ryman, N

    2011-02-01

    In many marine fish species, genetic population structure is typically weak because populations are large, evolutionarily young and have a high potential for gene flow. We tested whether genetic markers influenced by natural selection are more efficient than the presumed neutral genetic markers to detect population structure in Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), a migratory pelagic species with large effective population sizes. We compared the spatial and temporal patterns of divergence and statistical power of three traditional genetic marker types, microsatellites, allozymes and mitochondrial DNA, with one microsatellite locus, Cpa112, previously shown to be influenced by divergent selection associated with salinity, and one locus located in the major histocompatibility complex class IIA (MHC-IIA) gene, using the same individuals across analyses. Samples were collected in 2002 and 2003 at two locations in the North Sea, one location in the Skagerrak and one location in the low-saline Baltic Sea. Levels of divergence for putatively neutral markers were generally low, with the exception of single outlier locus/sample combinations; microsatellites were the most statistically powerful markers under neutral expectations. We found no evidence of selection acting on the MHC locus. Cpa112, however, was highly divergent in the Baltic samples. Simulations addressing the statistical power for detecting population divergence showed that when using Cpa112 alone, compared with using eight presumed neutral microsatellite loci, sample sizes could be reduced by up to a tenth while still retaining high statistical power. Our results show that the loci influenced by selection can serve as powerful markers for detecting population structure in high gene-flow marine fish species.

  18. Genetic analysis of MRL-lpr mice: relationship of the Fas apoptosis gene to disease manifestations and renal disease-modifying loci

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In MRL mice, the mostly recessive lpr mutation results in both the accumulation of CD4-, CD8-, CD3+ T cells in lymphoid tissue and many features of generalized autoimmune disease, including immune complex glomerulonephritis. To positionally clone the lpr mutation and analyze the effects of background genes, backcross offspring were examined from the cross: (MRL/MpJ-lpr x CAST/Ei)F1 x MRL/MpJ-lpr. The lpr gene was found to be closely linked to a mouse chromosome 19 marker defined by a variation of a Fas gene restriction fragment. Our results identified differences in RNA expression and differences in the genomic organization of the Fas gene between normal and lpr mice, and confirm the recent report that a mutation in the Fas apoptosis gene is the lpr mutation. However, our results also indicate that the Fas gene is expressed in spleen cells from normal mice, and spleen and lymph node cells from mice with a second mutation at the lpr locus (lprcg). Together these results suggest that altered Fas transcription results in the failure of lymphocytes to undergo programmed cell death and may lead to an altered immune cell repertoire. This mechanism may explain certain central and peripheral defects in tolerance that are present in autoimmune disease. The current study also demonstrates the profound effect of background genes on the degree of nephritis, lymphadenopathy, and anti-DNA antibody production. Of major note, our studies suggest the identification of chromosomal positions for genes that modify nephritis. Analysis of the backcross mice for markers covering most of the mouse genome suggests that over 50% of the variance in renal disease is attributable to quantitative trait loci on mouse chromosomes 7 and 12. Moreover, this study provides a model for dissecting the complex genetic interactions that result in manifestations of autoimmune disease. PMID:1460423

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance to Fusarium crown rot (Fusarium pseudograminearum) in multiple assay environments in the Pacific Northwestern US.

    PubMed

    Poole, G J; Smiley, R W; Paulitz, T C; Walker, C A; Carter, A H; See, D R; Garland-Campbell, K

    2012-06-01

    Fusarium crown rot (FCR), caused by Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum, reduces wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yields in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the US by as much as 35%. Resistance to FCR has not yet been discovered in currently grown PNW wheat cultivars. Several significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) for FCR resistance have been documented on chromosomes 1A, 1D, 2B, 3B, and 4B in resistant Australian cultivars. Our objective was to identify QTL and tightly linked SSR markers for FCR resistance in the partially resistant Australian spring wheat cultivar Sunco using PNW isolates of F. pseudograminerarum in greenhouse and field based screening nurseries. A second objective was to compare heritabilities of FCR resistance in multiple types of disease assaying environments (seedling, terrace, and field) using multiple disease rating methods. Two recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping populations were derived from crosses between Sunco and PNW spring wheat cultivars Macon and Otis. The Sunco/Macon population comprised 219 F(6):F(7) lines and the Sunco/Otis population comprised 151 F(5):F(6) lines. Plants were inoculated with a single PNW F. pseudograminearum isolate (006-13) in growth room (seedling), outdoor terrace (adult) and field (adult) assays conducted from 2008 through 2010. Crown and lower stem tissues of seedling and adult plants were rated for disease severity on several different scales, but mainly on a numeric scale from 0 to 10 where 0 = no discoloration and 10 = severe disease. Significant QTL were identified on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 4B, 4D, and 7A with LOD scores ranging from 3 to 22. The most significant and consistent QTL across screening environments was located on chromosome 3BL, inherited from the PNW cultivars Macon and Otis, with maximum LOD scores of 22 and 9 explaining 36 and 23% of the variation, respectively for the Sunco/Macon and Sunco/Otis populations. The SSR markers Xgwm247 and Xgwm299 flank these QTL and are being

  20. A rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Pengfei; Yang, Fan; Su, Tianyuan; Wang, Qian; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Direct optimization of the metabolic pathways on the chromosome requires tools that can fine tune the overexpression of a desired gene or optimize the combination of multiple genes. Although plasmid-dependent overexpression has been used for this task, fundamental issues concerning its genetic stability and operational repeatability have not been addressed. Here, we describe a rapid and reliable strategy for chromosomal integration of gene(s) with multiple copies (CIGMC), which uses the flippase from the yeast 2-μm plasmid. Using green fluorescence protein as a model, we verified that the fluorescent intensity was in accordance with the integration copy number of the target gene. When a narrow-host-range replicon, R6K, was used in the integrative plasmid, the maximum integrated copy number of Escherichia coli reached 15. Applying the CIGMC method to optimize the overexpression of single or multiple genes in amino acid biosynthesis, we successfully improved the product yield and stability of the production. As a flexible strategy, CIGMC can be used in various microorganisms other than E. coli. PMID:25851494

  1. Bacterial evolution through the selective loss of beneficial Genes. Trade-offs in expression involving two loci.

    PubMed Central

    Zinser, Erik R; Schneider, Dominique; Blot, Michel; Kolter, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The loss of preexisting genes or gene activities during evolution is a major mechanism of ecological specialization. Evolutionary processes that can account for gene loss or inactivation have so far been restricted to one of two mechanisms: direct selection for the loss of gene activities that are disadvantageous under the conditions of selection (i.e., antagonistic pleiotropy) and selection-independent genetic drift of neutral (or nearly neutral) mutations (i.e., mutation accumulation). In this study we demonstrate with an evolved strain of Escherichia coli that a third, distinct mechanism exists by which gene activities can be lost. This selection-dependent mechanism involves the expropriation of one gene's upstream regulatory element by a second gene via a homologous recombination event. Resulting from this genetic exchange is the activation of the second gene and a concomitant inactivation of the first gene. This gene-for-gene expression tradeoff provides a net fitness gain, even if the forfeited activity of the first gene can play a positive role in fitness under the conditions of selection. PMID:12930738

  2. Resistance gene enrichment sequencing (RenSeq) enables reannotation of the NB-LRR gene family from sequenced plant genomes and rapid mapping of resistance loci in segregating populations.

    PubMed

    Jupe, Florian; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Sliwka, Jadwiga; Pritchard, Leighton; Etherington, Graham J; Maclean, Dan; Cock, Peter J; Leggett, Richard M; Bryan, Glenn J; Cardle, Linda; Hein, Ingo; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2013-11-01

    RenSeq is a NB-LRR (nucleotide binding-site leucine-rich repeat) gene-targeted, Resistance gene enrichment and sequencing method that enables discovery and annotation of pathogen resistance gene family members in plant genome sequences. We successfully applied RenSeq to the sequenced potato Solanum tuberosum clone DM, and increased the number of identified NB-LRRs from 438 to 755. The majority of these identified R gene loci reside in poorly or previously unannotated regions of the genome. Sequence and positional details on the 12 chromosomes have been established for 704 NB-LRRs and can be accessed through a genome browser that we provide. We compared these NB-LRR genes and the corresponding oligonucleotide baits with the highest sequence similarity and demonstrated that ~80% sequence identity is sufficient for enrichment. Analysis of the sequenced tomato S. lycopersicum 'Heinz 1706' extended the NB-LRR complement to 394 loci. We further describe a methodology that applies RenSeq to rapidly identify molecular markers that co-segregate with a pathogen resistance trait of interest. In two independent segregating populations involving the wild Solanum species S. berthaultii (Rpi-ber2) and S. ruiz-ceballosii (Rpi-rzc1), we were able to apply RenSeq successfully to identify markers that co-segregate with resistance towards the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. These SNP identification workflows were designed as easy-to-adapt Galaxy pipelines.

  3. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  4. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    PubMed

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  5. Selection of multiple-antibiotic-resistant (mar) mutants of Escherichia coli by using the disinfectant pine oil: roles of the mar and acrAB loci.

    PubMed Central

    Moken, M C; McMurry, L M; Levy, S B

    1997-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli selected for resistance to the disinfectant pine oil or to a household product containing pine oil also showed resistance to multiple antibiotics (tetracycline, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and nalidixic acid) and overexpressed the marA gene. Likewise, antibiotic-selected Mar mutants, which also overexpress marA, were resistant to pine oil. Deletion of the mar or acrAB locus, the latter encoding a multidrug efflux pump positively regulated in part by MarA, increased the susceptibility of wild-type and mutant strains to pine oil. PMID:9420057

  6. Functional analysis of sirtuin genes in multiple Plasmodium falciparum strains.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Catherine J; Jiang, Rays H Y; Skillman, Kristen M; Samarakoon, Upeka; Moore, Rachel M; Dzikowski, Ron; Ferdig, Michael T; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, employs antigenic variation to avoid host immunity. Antigenic variation is achieved by transcriptional switching amongst polymorphic var genes, enforced by epigenetic modification of chromatin. The histone-modifying 'sirtuin' enzymes PfSir2a and PfSir2b have been implicated in this process. Disparate patterns of var expression have been reported in patient isolates as well as in cultured strains. We examined var expression in three commonly used laboratory strains (3D7, NF54 and FCR-3) in parallel. NF54 parasites express significantly lower levels of var genes compared to 3D7, despite the fact that 3D7 was originally a clone of the NF54 strain. To investigate whether this was linked to the expression of sirtuins, genetic disruption of both sirtuins was attempted in all three strains. No dramatic changes in var gene expression occurred in NF54 or FCR-3 following PfSir2b disruption, contrasting with previous observations in 3D7. In 3D7, complementation of the PfSir2a genetic disruption resulted in a significant decrease in previously-elevated var gene expression levels, but with the continued expression of multiple var genes. Finally, rearranged chromosomes were observed in the 3D7 PfSir2a knockout line. Our results focus on the potential for parasite genetic background to contribute to sirtuin function in regulating virulence gene expression and suggest a potential role for sirtuins in maintaining genome integrity.

  7. Functional Analysis of Sirtuin Genes in Multiple Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Catherine J.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Skillman, Kristen M.; Samarakoon, Upeka; Moore, Rachel M.; Dzikowski, Ron; Ferdig, Michael T.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, employs antigenic variation to avoid host immunity. Antigenic variation is achieved by transcriptional switching amongst polymorphic var genes, enforced by epigenetic modification of chromatin. The histone-modifying ‘sirtuin’ enzymes PfSir2a and PfSir2b have been implicated in this process. Disparate patterns of var expression have been reported in patient isolates as well as in cultured strains. We examined var expression in three commonly used laboratory strains (3D7, NF54 and FCR-3) in parallel. NF54 parasites express significantly lower levels of var genes compared to 3D7, despite the fact that 3D7 was originally a clone of the NF54 strain. To investigate whether this was linked to the expression of sirtuins, genetic disruption of both sirtuins was attempted in all three strains. No dramatic changes in var gene expression occurred in NF54 or FCR-3 following PfSir2b disruption, contrasting with previous observations in 3D7. In 3D7, complementation of the PfSir2a genetic disruption resulted in a significant decrease in previously-elevated var gene expression levels, but with the continued expression of multiple var genes. Finally, rearranged chromosomes were observed in the 3D7 PfSir2a knockout line. Our results focus on the potential for parasite genetic background to contribute to sirtuin function in regulating virulence gene expression and suggest a potential role for sirtuins in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:25780929

  8. Characterization of the rrnB operon of the plant pathogen Rhodococcus fascians and targeted integrations of exogenous genes at rrn loci.

    PubMed

    Pisabarro, A; Correia, A; Martín, J F

    1998-04-01

    A 6.0-kb SalI DNA fragment containing an entire rRNA operon (rrnB) was cloned from a cosmid gene bank of the phytopathogenic strain Rhodococcus fascians D188. The nucleotide sequence of the 6-kb fragment was determined and had the organization 16S rRNA-spacer-23S rRNA-spacer-5S rRNA without tRNA-encoding genes in the spacer regions. The 5' and 3' ends of the mature 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNAs were determined by alignment with the rrn operons of Bacillus subtilis and other gram-positive bacteria. Four copies of the rrn operons were identified by hybridization with an rrnB probe in R. fascians type strain ATCC 12974 and in the virulent strain R. fascians D188. However, another isolate, CECT 3001 (= NRRL B15096), also classified as R. fascians, produced five rrn-hybridizing bands. An integrative vector containing a 2.5-kb DNA fragment internal to rrnB was constructed for targeted integration of exogenous genes at the rrn loci. Transformants carrying the exogenous chloramphenicol resistance gene (cmr) integrated in different rrn operons were obtained. These transformants had normal growth rates in complex medium and minimal medium and were fully stable for the integrated marker.

  9. Implication of European-derived adiposity loci in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Hester, JM; Wing, MR; Li, J; Palmer, ND; Xu, J; Hicks, PJ; Roh, BH; Norris, JM; Wagenknecht, LE; Langefeld, CD; Freedman, BI; Bowden, DW; Ng, MCY

    2012-01-01

    Objective Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple novel loci associated with adiposity in European-derived study populations. Limited study of these loci has been reported in African Americans. Here we examined the effects of these previously identified adiposity loci in African Americans. Methods A total of 46 representative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 19 loci that were previously reported in GWAS in Europeans (including FTO and MC4R) were genotyped in 4992 subjects from six African-American cohorts. These SNPs were tested for association with body mass index (BMI) after adjustment for age, gender, disease status and population structure in each cohort. Meta-analysis was conducted to combine the results. Results Meta-analysis of 4992 subjects revealed seven SNPs near four loci, including NEGR1, TMEM18, SH2B1/ATP2A1 and MC4R, showing significant association at 0.005gene (P = 0.005, 0.020 and 0.019, respectively). Conclusion We replicated the association of variants at four loci in six African-American cohorts that demonstrated a consistent direction of association with previous studies of adiposity in Europeans. These loci are all highly expressed in the brain, consistent with an important role for central nervous system processes in weight regulation. However, further comprehensive examination of these regions may be necessary to fine map and elucidate for possible genetic differences between these two populations. PMID:21750520

  10. A Candy Gene Game for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Roxanne H.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a genetic game that allows students to construct a human face as determined by the random selection of alleles from a gene pool. Can be used to teach the concepts of chromosome inheritance, dominance, incomplete dominance, multiple alleles, multiple loci, independent assortment, multiple gene traits, and evolution. (JRH)

  11. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  12. Estrogen Signaling Multiple Pathways to Impact Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria; Galluzzo, Paola; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Steroid hormones exert profound effects on cell growth, development, differentiation, and homeostasis. Their effects are mediated through specific intracellular steroid receptors that act via multiple mechanisms. Among others, the action mechanism starting upon 17β-estradiol (E2) binds to its receptors (ER) is considered a paradigmatic example of how steroid hormones function. Ligand-activated ER dimerizes and translocates in the nucleus where it recognizes specific hormone response elements located in or near promoter DNA regions of target genes. Behind the classical genomic mechanism shared with other steroid hormones, E2 also modulates gene expression by a second indirect mechanism that involves the interaction of ER with other transcription factors which, in turn, bind their cognate DNA elements. In this case, ER modulates the activities of transcription factors such as the activator protein (AP)-1, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and stimulating protein-1 (Sp-1), by stabilizing DNA-protein complexes and/or recruiting co-activators. In addition, E2 binding to ER may also exert rapid actions that start with the activation of a variety of signal transduction pathways (e.g. ERK/MAPK, p38/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC/PKC). The debate about the contribution of different ER-mediated signaling pathways to coordinate the expression of specific sets of genes is still open. This review will focus on the recent knowledge about the mechanism by which ERs regulate the expression of target genes and the emerging field of integration of membrane and nuclear receptor signaling, giving examples of the ways by which the genomic and non-genomic actions of ERs on target genes converge. PMID:18369406

  13. Interfering ribonucleic acids that suppress expression of multiple unrelated genes

    PubMed Central

    Passioura, Toby; Gozar, Mary M; Goodchild, Amber; King, Andrew; Arndt, Greg M; Poidinger, Michael; Birkett, Donald J; Rivory, Laurent P

    2009-01-01

    Background Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have become the research tool of choice for gene suppression, with human clinical trials ongoing. The emphasis so far in siRNA therapeutics has been the design of one siRNA with complete complementarity to the intended target. However, there is a need for multi-targeting interfering RNA in diseases in which multiple gene products are of importance. We have investigated the possibility of using a single short synthetic duplex RNA to suppress the expression of VEGF-A and ICAM-1; genes implicated in the progression of ocular neovascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. Results Duplex RNA were designed to have incomplete complementarity with the 3'UTR sequences of both target genes. One such duplex, CODEMIR-1, was found to suppress VEGF and ICAM-1 by 90 and 60%, respectively in ARPE-19 cells at a transfected concentration of 40 ng/mL. Use of a cyan fusion reporter with target sites constructed in its 3'UTR demonstrated that the repression of VEGF and ICAM-1 by CODEMIR-1 was indeed due to interaction with the target sequence. An exhaustive analysis of sequence variants of CODEMIR-1 demonstrated a clear positive correlation between activity against VEGF (but not ICAM-1) and the length of the contiguous complementary region (from the 5' end of the guide strand). Various strategies, including the use of inosine bases at the sites of divergence of the target sequences were investigated. Conclusion Our work demonstrates the possibility of designing multitargeting dsRNA to suppress more than one disease-altering gene. This warrants further investigation as a possible therapeutic approach. PMID:19531249

  14. Adaptive Horizontal Gene Transfers between Multiple Cheese-Associated Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Ropars, Jeanne; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Gouzy, Jérôme; Sallet, Erika; Dumas, Émilie; Lacoste, Sandrine; Debuchy, Robert; Dupont, Joëlle; Branca, Antoine; Giraud, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Domestication is an excellent model for studies of adaptation because it involves recent and strong selection on a few, identified traits [1–5]. Few studies have focused on the domestication of fungi, with notable exceptions [6–11], despite their importance to bioindustry [12] and to a general understanding of adaptation in eukaryotes [5]. Penicillium fungi are ubiquitous molds among which two distantly related species have been independently selected for cheese making—P. roqueforti for blue cheeses like Roquefort and P. camemberti for soft cheeses like Camembert. The selected traits include morphology, aromatic profile, lipolytic and proteolytic activities, and ability to grow at low temperatures, in a matrix containing bacterial and fungal competitors [13–15]. By comparing the genomes of ten Penicillium species, we show that adaptation to cheese was associated with multiple recent horizontal transfers of large genomic regions carrying crucial metabolic genes. We identified seven horizontally transferred regions (HTRs) spanning more than 10 kb each, flanked by specific transposable elements, and displaying nearly 100% identity between distant Penicillium species. Two HTRs carried genes with functions involved in the utilization of cheese nutrients or competition and were found nearly identical in multiple strains and species of cheese-associated Penicillium fungi, indicating recent selective sweeps; they were experimentally associated with faster growth and greater competitiveness on cheese and contained genes highly expressed in the early stage of cheese maturation. These findings have industrial and food safety implications and improve our understanding of the processes of adaptation to rapid environmental changes. PMID:26412136

  15. Analysis of ICAM1 gene polymorphism in Slovak multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Shawkatová, Ivana; Javor, Juraj; Párnická, Zuzana; Bucová, Mária; Čopíková-Cudráková, Daniela; Michalík, Jozef; Gmitterová, Karin; Čierny, Daniel; Buc, Milan; Ďurmanová, Vladimíra

    2017-01-27

    Infiltration of immune cells into CNS is one of the essential events in multiple sclerosis (MS) development. Adhesion molecules like the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) play critical role in this process. Therefore, the ICAM1 gene containing two important single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) belongs to candidate loci with possible involvement in MS susceptibility and/or severity. The objective of our case-control study was to analyze the association of two functional ICAM1 polymorphisms rs1799969 (or G241R) and rs5498 (or K469E) with susceptibility to MS and evaluate their influence on the age at disease onset, severity, neurological disability and progression rate. Two hundred forty-eight MS subjects (mean 39.2 years) and 208 age-matched controls (mean 35.6 years) were involved in the study. Genotyping of ICAM1 rs1799969 and rs5498 SNPs was performed by PCR-RFLP. Presence of the rs3135388 polymorphism tagging the major MS risk allele HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele was determined as well. Our analysis revealed no statistically significant association of ICAM1 polymorphisms with risk of MS development in the Slovak population. Stratification of study cohorts by gender, age at onset and presence of the HLA-DRB1*15:01 risk allele showed only moderate changes. Correlation of clinical findings as age at onset, Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale, Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score and progression index with ICAM1 genotypes in MS patients revealed no significant association; however, patients with earlier onset of MS showed slightly higher frequencies of the homozygous G allele at rs5498 in comparison to other genotypes (P = 0.04), suggesting that GG carriers tend to induce MS at an earlier age.

  16. Human antibody expression in transgenic rats: comparison of chimeric IgH loci with human VH, D and JH but bearing different rat C-gene regions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Osborn, Michael J; Avis, Suzanne; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Ménoret, Séverine; Anegon, Ignacio; Buelow, Roland; Brüggemann, Marianne

    2013-12-31

    Expression of human antibody repertoires in transgenic animals has been accomplished by introducing large human Ig loci into mice and, more recently, a chimeric IgH locus into rats. With human VH, D and JH genes linked to the rat C-region antibody expression was significantly increased, similar to wild-type levels not found with fully human constructs. Here we compare four rat-lines containing the same human VH-region (comprising 22 VHs, all Ds and all JHs in natural configuration) but linked to different rat CH-genes and regulatory sequences. The endogenous IgH locus was silenced by zinc-finger nucleases. After breeding, all lines produced exclusively chimeric human H-chain with near normal IgM levels. However, in two lines poor IgG expression and inefficient immune responses were observed, implying that high expression, class-switching and hypermutation are linked to optimal enhancer function provided by the large regulatory region at the 3' end of the IgH locus. Furthermore, exclusion of Cδ and its downstream interval region may assist recombination. Highly diverse IgG and immune responses similar to normal rats were identified in two strains carrying diverse and differently spaced C-genes.

  17. Direct deletion analysis in two Duchenne muscular dystrophy symptomatic females using polymorphic dinucleotide (CA)n loci within the dystrophin gene.

    PubMed

    Giliberto, Florencia; Ferreiro, Verónica; Dalamón, Viviana; Surace, Ezequiel; Cotignola, Javier; Esperante, Sebastián; Borelina, Daniel; Baranzini, Sergio; Szijan, Irene

    2003-03-31

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary neuromuscular disease. It is inherited as an X-linked recessive trait in which males show clinical manifestations. In some rare cases, the disease can also be manifested in females. The aim of the present study was to determine the molecular alteration in two cases of nonrelated DMD symptomatic carriers with no previous history of DMD. Multiplex PCR is commonly used to search for deletion in the DMD gene of affected males. This method could not be used in females because the normal X chromosome masks the deletion of the mutated one. Therefore, we used a set of seven highly polymorphic dinucleotide (CA)(n) repeat markers that lie within the human dystrophin gene. The deletions were evidenced by hemizygosity of the loci under study. We localized a deletion in the locus 7A (intron 7) on the maternal X chromosome in one case, and a deletion in the region of introns 49 and 50 on the paternal X chromosome in the other. The use of microsatellite genotyping within the DMD gene enables the detection of the mutant allele in female carriers. It is also a useful method to provide DMD families with more accurate genetic counseling.

  18. Use of Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC) to identify novel genetic loci that modify the maize hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Chaikam, Vijay; Negeri, Adisu; Dhawan, Rahul; Puchaka, Bala; Ji, Jiabing; Chintamanani, Satya; Gachomo, Emma W; Zillmer, Allen; Doran, Timothy; Weil, Cliff; Balint-Kurti, Peter; Johal, Guri

    2011-10-01

    The partially dominant, autoactive maize disease resistance gene Rp1-D21 causes hypersensitive response (HR) lesions to form spontaneously on leaves and stems in the absence of pathogen recognition. The maize nested association mapping (NAM) population consists of 25 200-line subpopulations each derived from a cross between the maize line B73 and one of 25 diverse inbred lines. By crossing a line carrying the Rp1-D21 gene with lines from three of these subpopulations and assessing the F(1) progeny, we were able to map several novel loci that modify the maize HR, using both single-population quantitative trait locus (QTL) and joint analysis of all three populations. Joint analysis detected QTL in greater number and with greater confidence and precision than did single population analysis. In particular, QTL were detected in bins 1.02, 4.04, 9.03, and 10.03. We have previously termed this technique, in which a mutant phenotype is used as a "reporter" for a trait of interest, Mutant-Assisted Gene Identification and Characterization (MAGIC).

  19. Evolutionary Genomics of Immunoglobulin-Encoding Loci in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Tako, Rea; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (or antibodies) are an essential element of the jawed vertebrate adaptive immune response system. These molecules have evolved over the past 500 million years and generated highly specialized proteins that recognize an extraordinarily large number of diverse substances, collectively known as antigens. During vertebrate evolution the diversification of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci resulted in differences in the genomic organization, gene content, and ratio of functional genes and pseudogenes. The tinkering process in the immunoglobulin-encoding loci often gave rise to lineage-specific characteristics that were formed by selection to increase species adaptation and fitness. Immunoglobulin loci and their encoded antibodies have been shaped repeatedly by contrasting evolutionary forces, either to conserve the prototypic structure and mechanism of action or to generate alternative and diversified structures and modes of function. Moreover, evolution favored the development of multiple mechanisms of primary and secondary antibody diversification, which are used by different species to effectively generate an almost infinite collection of diverse antibody types. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the genomics and evolution of the immunoglobulin-encoding loci and their protein products in jawed vertebrates. PMID:23024601

  20. Identification of Loci and Functional Characterization of Trichothecene Biosynthesis Genes in Filamentous Fungi of the Genus Trichoderma▿†

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza, R. E.; Malmierca, M. G.; Hermosa, M. R.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Proctor, R. H.; Tijerino, A. M.; Rumbero, A.; Monte, E.; Gutiérrez, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by Trichoderma, Fusarium, and at least four other genera in the fungal order Hypocreales. Fusarium has a trichothecene biosynthetic gene (TRI) cluster that encodes transport and regulatory proteins as well as most enzymes required for the formation of the mycotoxins. However, little is known about trichothecene biosynthesis in the other genera. Here, we identify and characterize TRI gene orthologues (tri) in Trichoderma arundinaceum and Trichoderma brevicompactum. Our results indicate that both Trichoderma species have a tri cluster that consists of orthologues of seven genes present in the Fusarium TRI cluster. Organization of genes in the cluster is the same in the two Trichoderma species but differs from the organization in Fusarium. Sequence and functional analysis revealed that the gene (tri5) responsible for the first committed step in trichothecene biosynthesis is located outside the cluster in both Trichoderma species rather than inside the cluster as it is in Fusarium. Heterologous expression analysis revealed that two T. arundinaceum cluster genes (tri4 and tri11) differ in function from their Fusarium orthologues. The Tatri4-encoded enzyme catalyzes only three of the four oxygenation reactions catalyzed by the orthologous enzyme in Fusarium. The Tatri11-encoded enzyme catalyzes a completely different reaction (trichothecene C-4 hydroxylation) than the Fusarium orthologue (trichothecene C-15 hydroxylation). The results of this study indicate that although some characteristics of the tri/TRI cluster have been conserved during evolution of Trichoderma and Fusarium, the cluster has undergone marked changes, including gene loss and/or gain, gene rearrangement, and divergence of gene function. PMID:21642405

  1. Genome-wide association study implicates immune activation of multiple integrin genes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Katrina M; Moutsianas, Loukas; Lee, James C; Lamb, Christopher A; Luo, Yang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Jostins, Luke; Rice, Daniel L; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ji, Sun-Gou; Heap, Graham; Nimmo, Elaine R; Edwards, Cathryn; Henderson, Paul; Mowat, Craig; Sanderson, Jeremy; Satsangi, Jack; Simmons, Alison; Wilson, David C; Tremelling, Mark; Hart, Ailsa; Mathew, Christopher G; Newman, William G; Parkes, Miles; Lees, Charlie W; Uhlig, Holm; Hawkey, Chris; Prescott, Natalie J; Ahmad, Tariq; Mansfield, John C; Anderson, Carl A; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 215 risk loci for inflammatory bowel disease, thereby uncovering fundamental aspects of its molecular biology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 25,305 individuals and conducted a meta-analysis with published summary statistics, yielding a total sample size of 59,957 subjects. We identified 25 new susceptibility loci, 3 of which contain integrin genes that encode proteins in pathways that have been identified as important therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The associated variants are correlated with expression changes in response to immune stimulus at two of these genes (ITGA4 and ITGB8) and at previously implicated loci (ITGAL and ICAM1). In all four cases, the expression-increasing allele also increases disease risk. We also identified likely causal missense variants in a gene implicated in primary immune deficiency, PLCG2, and a negative regulator of inflammation, SLAMF8. Our results demonstrate that new associations at common variants continue to identify genes relevant to therapeutic target identification and prioritization.

  2. The Gene, Environment Association Studies consortium (GENEVA): maximizing the knowledge obtained from GWAS by collaboration across studies of multiple conditions.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Marilyn C; Agrawal, Arpana; Cole, John W; Hansel, Nadia N; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bennett, Siiri N; Bierut, Laura J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feingold, Eleanor; Fornage, Myriam; Haiman, Christopher A; Harris, Emily L; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Heit, John A; Hu, Frank B; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cathy C; Ling, Hua; Manolio, Teri A; Marazita, Mary L; Mathias, Rasika A; Mirel, Daniel B; Paschall, Justin; Pasquale, Louis R; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Rice, John P; Udren, Jenna; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, Xiaojing; Wiggs, Janey L; Williams, Kayleen; Yu, Kai

    2010-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have emerged as powerful means for identifying genetic loci related to complex diseases. However, the role of environment and its potential to interact with key loci has not been adequately addressed in most GWAS. Networks of collaborative studies involving different study populations and multiple phenotypes provide a powerful approach for addressing the challenges in analysis and interpretation shared across studies. The Gene, Environment Association Studies (GENEVA) consortium was initiated to: identify genetic variants related to complex diseases; identify variations in gene-trait associations related to environmental exposures; and ensure rapid sharing of data through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes. GENEVA consists of several academic institutions, including a coordinating center, two genotyping centers and 14 independently designed studies of various phenotypes, as well as several Institutes and Centers of the National Institutes of Health led by the National Human Genome Research Institute. Minimum detectable effect sizes include relative risks ranging from 1.24 to 1.57 and proportions of variance explained ranging from 0.0097 to 0.02. Given the large number of research participants (N>80,000), an important feature of GENEVA is harmonization of common variables, which allow analyses of additional traits. Environmental exposure information available from most studies also enables testing of gene-environment interactions. Facilitated by its sizeable infrastructure for promoting collaboration, GENEVA has established a unified framework for genotyping, data quality control, analysis and interpretation. By maximizing knowledge obtained through collaborative GWAS incorporating environmental exposure information, GENEVA aims to enhance our understanding of disease etiology, potentially identifying opportunities for intervention.

  3. Transcriptomic characterization of two major Fusarium resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Fhb1 and Qfhs.ifa-5A, identifies novel candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Barbara; Ametz, Christian; Siegwart, Gerald; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Berthiller, Franz; Lemmens, Marc; Jia, Haiyan; Adam, Gerhard; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Kreil, David P; Buerstmayr, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat. We developed near-isogenic lines (NILs) differing in the two strongest known F. graminearum resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs), Qfhs.ndsu-3BS (also known as resistance gene Fhb1) and Qfhs.ifa-5A, which are located on the short arm of chromosome 3B and on chromosome 5A, respectively. These NILs showing different levels of resistance were used to identify transcripts that are changed significantly in a QTL-specific manner in response to the pathogen and between mock-inoculated samples. After inoculation with F. graminearum spores, 16 transcripts showed a significantly different response for Fhb1 and 352 for Qfhs.ifa-5A. Notably, we identified a lipid transfer protein which is constitutively at least 50-fold more abundant in plants carrying the resistant allele of Qfhs.ifa-5A. In addition to this candidate gene associated with Qfhs.ifa-5A, we identified a uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferase gene, designated TaUGT12887, exhibiting a positive difference in response to the pathogen in lines harbouring both QTLs relative to lines carrying only the Qfhs.ifa-5A resistance allele, suggesting Fhb1 dependence of this transcript. Yet, this dependence was observed only in the NIL with already higher basal resistance. The complete cDNA of TaUGT12887 was reconstituted from available wheat genomic sequences, and a synthetic recoded gene was expressed in a toxin-sensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This gene conferred deoxynivalenol resistance, albeit much weaker than that observed with the previously characterized barley HvUGT13248. PMID:23738863

  4. Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting the milk fatty acid profile on sheep chromosome 22: role of the stearoyl-CoA desaturase gene in Spanish Churra sheep.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, M; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; García-Gámez, E; Sánchez, J P; Arranz, J J

    2010-01-01

    Sheep milk fat contains several components that may provide human health benefits, such as monounsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Most of the CLA in ruminant milk is synthesized in the mammary gland by the action of the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) on circulating vaccenic acid (trans-11 C18:2; VA). Previous studies have found significant associations between polymorphisms in the SCD gene and the fatty acid composition of ruminant products, including sheep milk. Based on this, we performed a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of an ovine chromosome (22) that harbors the SCD gene for effects on milk fatty acid composition traits and classical milk production traits. We identified a suggestive QTL influencing the CLA/VA ratio with the maximum statistic at position 26 cM of the studied chromosome, whereas the SCD gene has been mapped to position 41.6 cM. The individual introduction of 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms in the QTL model did not cause a reduction of the variance explained by the QTL, which suggests that the SCD gene is not directly responsible for the detected effect in the Churra population studied herein. This conclusion was supported by the lack of any significant association identified between the 4 SCD single nucleotide polymorphisms and the CLA/VA ratio. This association analysis suggested a possible effect of the SCD gene on milk fat percentage in Churra sheep. An independent confirmation of these primary results will be required before attempting its practical implementation in selection programs.

  5. Genetic variation of fifteen folate metabolic pathway associated gene loci and the risk of incident head and neck carcinoma: The Women’s Genome Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Robert Y.L.; Rose, Lynda; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of folate metabolic pathway (FMP) in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancinoma (HNC). Whether the genetic variation within the FMP associated genes modulates HNC remains elusive. To date, prospective, epidemiological data on the relationship of FMP gene variation with the risk of HNC are sparse. Methods The association between 203 tag-SNPs (tSNPs) of 15 FMP associated genes (CBS, BHMT, DHFR, FOLR1, FOLR2, FOLR3, MTHFR, MTR, MTRR, MTHFD1, RFC1, SHMT1, SLC19A1, TCN2, and TYMS) and incident HNC was investigated in 23,294 Caucasian female participants of the prospective Women’s Genome Health Study. All were free of known cancer at baseline. During a 15-year follow-up period, 55 participants developed a first ever HNC. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between genotypes and HNC risk assuming an additive genetic model. Haplotype-block analysis was also performed. Results A total of 11 tSNPs within DHFR, MTHFR, RFC1, and TYMS were associated with HNC risk (all p-uncorrected <0.050). Further investigation using the haplotype-block analysis revealed an association of several prespecified haplotypes of RFC1 with HNC risk (all p-uncorrected <0.050). Conclusion If corroborated in other large prospective studies, the present findings suggest that genetic variation within the folate metabolic pathway gene loci examined, in particular, the replication factor C-1 (RFC1) gene variation may influence HNC risk. PMID:23276522

  6. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C; Butler, Margi I; Poulter, Russell T M; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in >80,000 subjects identifies multiple loci for C-reactive protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F; Paré, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco JC; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert YL; Schnabel, Renate B; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert V; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M; Larson, Martin G; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Freimer, Nelson B; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P; Launer, Lenore J; Buring, Julie E; Yamamoto, Jennifer F; Folsom, Aaron R; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, João D; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H; Kuss, Oliver; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Völzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A; Penninx, Brenda W; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Dörte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Benjamin, Emelia J; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I

    2011-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results We performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis of CRP in 66,185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16,540 individuals from ten independent studies. We found 18 genome-wide significant loci and we provided evidence of replication for eight of them. Our results confirm seven previously known loci and introduce 11 novel loci that are implicated in pathways related to the metabolic syndrome (APOC1, HNF1A, LEPR, GCKR, HNF4A, and PTPN2), immune system (CRP, IL6R, NLRP3, IL1F10, and IRF1), or that reside in regions previously not known to play a role in chronic inflammation (PPP1R3B, SALL1, PABPC4, ASCL1, RORA, and BCL7B). We found significant interaction of body mass index (BMI) with LEPR (p<2.9×10−6). A weighted genetic risk score that was developed to summarize the effect of risk alleles was strongly associated with CRP levels and explained approximately 5% of the trait variance; however, there was no evidence for these genetic variants explaining the association of CRP with coronary heart disease. Conclusion We identified 18 loci that were associated with CRP levels. Our study highlights immune response and metabolic regulatory pathways involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation. PMID:21300955

  8. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C.; Butler, Margi I.; Poulter, Russell T. M.; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M.; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples. PMID:26262683

  9. Detecting Selection in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Using DNA Sequence Data from Multiple Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yednock, Bree K.; Neigel, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available. PMID:24896825

  10. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies and Network Analysis-Based Integration with Gene Expression Data Identify New Suggestive Loci and Unravel a Wnt-Centric Network Associated with Dupuytren’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kerstin; Siegert, Sabine; Toliat, Mohammad Reza; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Casper, Ramona; Dolmans, Guido H.; Werker, Paul M.; Tinschert, Sigrid; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Strauch, Konstantin; Nothnagel, Michael; Nürnberg, Peter; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2016-01-01

    Dupuytren´s disease, a fibromatosis of the connective tissue in the palm, is a common complex disease with a strong genetic component. Up to date nine genetic loci have been found to be associated with the disease. Six of these loci contain genes that code for Wnt signalling proteins. In spite of this striking first insight into the genetic factors in Dupuytren´s disease, much of the inherited risk in Dupuytren´s disease still needs to be discovered. The already identified loci jointly explain ~1% of the heritability in this disease. To further elucidate the genetic basis of Dupuytren´s disease, we performed a genome-wide meta-analysis combining three genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets, comprising 1,580 cases and 4,480 controls. We corroborated all nine previously identified loci, six of these with genome-wide significance (p-value < 5x10-8). In addition, we identified 14 new suggestive loci (p-value < 10−5). Intriguingly, several of these new loci contain genes associated with Wnt signalling and therefore represent excellent candidates for replication. Next, we compared whole-transcriptome data between patient- and control-derived tissue samples and found the Wnt/β-catenin pathway to be the top deregulated pathway in patient samples. We then conducted network and pathway analyses in order to identify protein networks that are enriched for genes highlighted in the GWAS meta-analysis and expression data sets. We found further evidence that the Wnt signalling pathways in conjunction with other pathways may play a critical role in Dupuytren´s disease. PMID:27467239

  12. Gene expression profiles of autophagy-related genes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Igci, Mehri; Baysan, Mehmet; Yigiter, Remzi; Ulasli, Mustafa; Geyik, Sirma; Bayraktar, Recep; Bozgeyik, İbrahim; Bozgeyik, Esra; Bayram, Ali; Cakmak, Ecir Ali

    2016-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an imflammatory disease of central nervous system caused by genetic and environmental factors that remain largely unknown. Autophagy is the process of degradation and recycling of damaged cytoplasmic organelles, macromolecular aggregates, and long-lived proteins. Malfunction of autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, and autophagy genes may modulate the T cell survival. We aimed to examine the expression levels of autophagy-related genes. The blood samples of 95 unrelated patients (aged 17-65years, 37 male, 58 female) diagnosed as MS and 95 healthy controls were used to extract the RNA samples. After conversion to single stranded cDNA using polyT priming: the targeted genes were pre-amplified, and 96×78 (samples×primers) qRT-PCR reactions were performed for each primer pair on each sample on a 96.96 array of Fluidigm BioMark™. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, gene expression levels of ATG16L2, ATG9A, BCL2, FAS, GAA, HGS, PIK3R1, RAB24, RGS19, ULK1, FOXO1, HTT were significantly altered (false discovery rate<0.05). Thus, altered expression levels of several autophagy related genes may affect protein levels, which in turn would influence the activity of autophagy, or most probably, those genes might be acting independent of autophagy and contributing to MS pathogenesis as risk factors. The indeterminate genetic causes leading to alterations in gene expressions require further analysis.

  13. Reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in multiple avian species.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Adam, Iris; Meyer, Anne; Scharff, Constance; Gruber, Achim D

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) rapidly and reliably quantifies gene expression levels across different experimental conditions. Selection of suitable reference genes is essential for meaningful normalization and thus correct interpretation of data. In recent years, an increasing number of avian species other than the chicken has been investigated molecularly, highlighting the need for an experimentally validated pan-avian primer set for reference genes. Here we report testing a set for 14 candidate reference genes (18S, ABL, GAPDH, GUSB, HMBS, HPRT, PGK1, RPL13, RPL19, RPS7, SDHA, TFRC, VIM, YWHAZ) on different tissues of the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus), common crane (Grus grus), white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo f. domestica), cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), Humboldt penguin (Sphenicus humboldti), ostrich (Struthio camelus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), spanning a broad range of the phylogenetic tree of birds. Primer pairs for six to 11 genes were successfully established for each of the nine species. As a proof of principle, we analyzed expression levels of 10 candidate reference genes as well as FOXP2 and the immediate early genes, EGR1 and CFOS, known to be rapidly induced by singing in the avian basal ganglia. We extracted RNA from microbiopsies of the striatal song nucleus Area X of adult male zebra finches after they had sang or remained silent. Using three different statistical algorithms, we identified five genes (18S, PGK1, RPS7, TFRC, YWHAZ) that were stably expressed within each group and also between the singing and silent conditions, establishing them as suitable reference genes. In conclusion, the newly developed pan-avian primer set allows accurate normalization and quantification of gene expression levels in multiple avian species.

  14. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Toro, Jorge R; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

  15. Identification of Single- and Multiple-Class Specific Signature Genes from Gene Expression Profiles by Group Marker Index

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Shuen; Aguan, Kripamoy; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chung, I-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Informative genes from microarray data can be used to construct prediction model and investigate biological mechanisms. Differentially expressed genes, the main targets of most gene selection methods, can be classified as single- and multiple-class specific signature genes. Here, we present a novel gene selection algorithm based on a Group Marker Index (GMI), which is intuitive, of low-computational complexity, and efficient in identification of both types of genes. Most gene selection methods identify only single-class specific signature genes and cannot identify multiple-class specific signature genes easily. Our algorithm can detect de novo certain conditions of multiple-class specificity of a gene and makes use of a novel non-parametric indicator to assess the discrimination ability between classes. Our method is effective even when the sample size is small as well as when the class sizes are significantly different. To compare the effectiveness and robustness we formulate an intuitive template-based method and use four well-known datasets. We demonstrate that our algorithm outperforms the template-based method in difficult cases with unbalanced distribution. Moreover, the multiple-class specific genes are good biomarkers and play important roles in biological pathways. Our literature survey supports that the proposed method identifies unique multiple-class specific marker genes (not reported earlier to be related to cancer) in the Central Nervous System data. It also discovers unique biomarkers indicating the intrinsic difference between subtypes of lung cancer. We also associate the pathway information with the multiple-class specific signature genes and cross-reference to published studies. We find that the identified genes participate in the pathways directly involved in cancer development in leukemia data. Our method gives a promising way to find genes that can involve in pathways of multiple diseases and hence opens up the possibility of using an existing

  16. Analysis of the prion protein gene in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Schottlaender, Lucia; Efthymiou, Stephanie; OConnor, Emer; Meissner, Wassilios G; Holton, Janice L; Houlden, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a very diverse group of disorders but they share some common mechanisms such as abnormally misfolded proteins with prion-like propagation and aggregation. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is the most prevalent prion disease in humans. In the sporadic form of CJD the only known risk factor is the codon 129 polymorphism. Recent reports suggested that α-synuclein in multiple system atrophy (MSA) has similar pathogenic mechanisms as the prion protein. Here we present 1 Italian family with MSA and prion disease. Also, cases of concurrent MSA and prion pathology in the same individual or family suggest the possibility of molecular interaction between prion protein and α-synuclein in the process of protein accumulation and neurodegeneration, warranting further investigations. We assessed the PRNP gene by whole-exome sequencing in 264 pathologically confirmed MSA cases and 462 healthy controls to determine whether the 2 diseases share similar risk factors. We then analyzed codon 129 polymorphism by Sanger sequencing and compared with previously published results in sporadic CJD. Homozygosity at codon 129 was present in 50% of pathologically confirmed MSA cases and in 58% of normal controls (odds ratio, 0.7 (95% confidence interval of 0.5-0.9)) compared with 88.2% in sporadic CJD. Our data show that the homozygous state of position 129 in the PRNP is not a risk factor for MSA. No other variants in the PRNP gene were associated with increased risk for MSA.

  17. Design III with Marker Loci

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, C. C.; Zeng, Z. B.

    1996-01-01

    Design III is an experimental design originally proposed by R. E. COMSTOCK and H. F. ROBINSON for estimating genetic variances and the average degree of dominance for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and has recently been extended for mapping QTL. In this paper, we first extend COMSTOCK and ROBINSON's analysis of variance to include linkage, two-locus epistasis and the use of F(3) parents. Then we develop the theory and statistical analysis of orthogonal contrasts and contrast X environment interaction for a single marker locus to characterize the effects of QTL. The methods are applied to the maize data of C. W. STUBER. The analyses strongly suggest that there are multiple linked QTL in many chromosomes for several traits examined. QTL effects are largely environment-independent for grain yield, ear height, plant height and ear leaf area and largely environment dependent for days to tassel, grain moisture and ear number. There is significant QTL epistasis. The results are generally in favor of the hypothesis of dominance of favorable genes to explain the observed heterosis in grain yield and other traits, although epistasis could also play an important role and overdominance at individual QTL level can not be ruled out. PMID:8807314

  18. Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  19. Two functional loci in the promoter of EPAS1 gene involved in high-altitude adaptation of Tibetans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang-Hong; Huang, Xue-Wen; Qun, Li; Li, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Chao; Ma, Yanyun; Liu, Qing-Mei; Sun, Kang; Qian, Feng; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun

    2014-01-01

    EPAS1 involves in the hypoxic response and is suggested to be responsible for the genetic adaptation of high-altitude hypoxia in Tibetans. However, the detailed molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, a single nucleotide polymorphism rs56721780:G>C and an insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism −742 indel in the promoter region showed divergence between Tibetans and non-Tibetan lowlanders. rs56721780:G>C regulated the transcription of EPAS1 by IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), which was identified as a new transcriptional repressor for EPAS1 gene. It demonstrated that the C allele of rs56721780:G>C decreased the binding of IKZF1, leading to the attenuated transcriptional repression of EPAS1 gene. The insertion at −742 indel provided a new binding site for Sp1 and was related to the activation of EPAS1 promoter. Further functional analysis revealed that lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene, which was reported to be responsible for extracellular matrix protein cross-linking of amnion previously, was a direct target of EPAS1. The CC genotype at rs56721780:G>C and the insertion genotype at −742 indel were found associated with higher EPAS1 and LOX expression levels in amnion, as well as higher birth weight of Tibetan newborns, suggesting that EPAS1 gene might play important roles in the development of amnion, fetus growth and high-altitude adaptation of Tibetans. PMID:25501874

  20. Identification of loci and functional characterization of trichothecene biosynthesis genes in the filamentous fungus of the genus Trichoderma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by Trichoderma, Fusarium and at least four other genera in the fungal order Hypocreales. Fusarium has a trichothecene biosynthetic gene (TRI) cluster that encodes transport and regulatory proteins as well as most enzymes required for formation of the mycotoxin...

  1. Genome-wide linkage analysis in families with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis indicates novel susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Anna; Söderhäll, Cilla; Persson, Sofia; Lundberg, Fredrik; Luthman, Holger; Chung, Eddie; Gardiner, Mark; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2012-02-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) is a common cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction during infancy. A multifactorial background of the disease is well established. Multiple susceptibility loci including the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) gene have previously been linked to IHPS, but contradictory results of linkage studies in different materials indicate genetic heterogeneity. To identify IHPS susceptibility loci, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis in 37 Swedish families. In regions where the Swedish material showed most evidence in favor of linkage, 31 additional British IHPS families were analyzed. Evidence in favor of significant linkage was observed in the Swedish material to two loci on chromosome 2q24 (non-parametric linkage (NPL) =3.77) and 7p21 (NPL=4.55). In addition, evidence of suggestive linkage was found to two loci on chromosome 6p21 (NPL=2.97) and 12q24 (NPL=2.63). Extending the material with British samples did not enhance the level of significance. Regions with linkage harbor interesting candidate genes, such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2 encoded by the glucagon gene GCG), NOS1, motilin (MLN) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). The coding exons for GLP-2, and NPY were screened for mutations with negative results. In conclusion, we could confirm suggestive linkage to the region harboring the NOS1 gene and detected additional novel susceptibility loci for IHPS.

  2. Simultaneous gene quantitation of multiple genes in individual bovine nuclear transfer blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig; Berg, Debbie; Beaumont, Sue; Standley, Neil T; Wells, David N; Pfeffer, Peter L

    2007-01-01

    During somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT), the transcriptional status of the donor cell has to be reprogrammed to reflect that of an embryo. We analysed the accuracy of this process by comparing transcript levels of four developmentally important genes (Oct4, Otx2, Ifitm3, GATA6), a gene involved in epigenetic regulation (Dnmt3a) and three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, beta-tubulin and GAPDH) in 21 NT blastocysts with that in genetically half-identical in vitro produced (IVP, n=19) and in vivo (n=15) bovine embryos. We have optimised an RNA-isolation and SYBR-green-based real-time RT-PCR procedure allowing the reproducible absolute quantification of multiple genes from a single blastocyst. Our data indicated that transcript levels did not differ significantly between stage and grade-matched zona-free NT and IVP embryos except for Ifitm3/Fragilis, which was expressed at twofold higher levels in NT blastocysts. Ifitm3 expression is confined to the inner cell mass at day 7 blastocysts and to the epiblast in day 14 embryos. No ectopic expression in the trophectoderm was seen in NT embryos. Gene expression in NT and IVP embryos increased between two- and threefold for all eight genes from early to late blastocyst stages. This increase exceeded the increase in cell number over this time period indicating an increase in transcript number per cell. Embryo quality (morphological grading) was correlated to cell number for NT and IVP embryos with grade 3 blastocysts containing 30% fewer cells. However, only NT embryos displayed a significant reduction in gene expression (50%) with loss of quality. Variability in gene expression levels was not significantly different in NT, IVP or in vivo embryos but differed among genes, suggesting that the stringency of regulation is intrinsic to a gene and not affected by culture or nuclear transfer. Oct4 levels exhibited the lowest variability. Analysing the total variability of all eight genes for individual embryos revealed that in

  3. Identifying modifier loci in existing genome scan data.

    PubMed

    Daw, E W; Lu, Y; Marian, A J; Shete, S

    2008-09-01

    In many genetic disorders in which a primary disease-causing locus has been identified, evidence exists for additional trait variation due to genetic factors. These findings have led to studies seeking secondary 'modifier' loci. Identification of modifier loci provides insight into disease mechanisms and may provide additional screening and treatment targets. We believe that modifier loci can be identified by re-analysis of genome screen data while controlling for primary locus effects. To test this hypothesis, we simulated multiple replicates of typical genome screening data on to two real family structures from a study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. With this marker data, we simulated two trait models with characteristics similar to one measure of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Both trait models included 3 genes. In the first, the trait was influenced by a primary gene, a secondary 'modifier' gene, and a third very small effect gene. In the second, we modeled an interaction between the first two genes. We examined power and false positive rates to map the secondary locus while controlling for the effect of the primary locus with two types of analyses. First, we examined Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) simultaneous segregation and linkage analysis as implemented in Loki, for which we calculated two scoring statistics. Second, we calculated LOD scores using an individual-specific liability class based on the quantitative trait value. We found that both methods produced scores that are significant on a genome-wide level in some replicates. We conclude that mapping of modifier loci in existing samples is possible with these methods.

  4. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C.; Li, Shengchao A.; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A.; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C.M.; Chan, John K.C.; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10−13), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10−10) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10−9). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings. PMID:26732429

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies multiple lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking Asian women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Seow, Wei Jie; Shiraishi, Kouya; Hsiung, Chao A; Matsuo, Keitaro; Liu, Jie; Chen, Kexin; Yamji, Taiki; Yang, Yang; Chang, I-Shou; Wu, Chen; Hong, Yun-Chul; Burdett, Laurie; Wyatt, Kathleen; Chung, Charles C; Li, Shengchao A; Yeager, Meredith; Hutchinson, Amy; Hu, Wei; Caporaso, Neil; Landi, Maria T; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Song, Minsun; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Kohno, Takashi; Yokota, Jun; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ashikawa, Kyota; Momozawa, Yukihide; Daigo, Yataro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hida, Toyoaki; Hu, Zhibin; Dai, Juncheng; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Song, Bao; Wang, Zhehai; Cheng, Sensen; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Ren, Yangwu; Guan, Peng; Chang, Jiang; Tan, Wen; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chang, Gee-Chen; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Su, Wu-Chou; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Chen, Yuh-Min; Zheng, Hong; Li, Haixin; Cui, Ping; Guo, Huan; Xu, Ping; Liu, Li; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shimazu, Taichi; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Zhu, Junjie; Jiang, Gening; Fei, Ke; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Yeul Hong; Sung, Jae Sook; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Young Tae; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kang, Chang Hyun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Hee Nam; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, In-Jae; Kim, Young-Chul; Sung, Sook Whan; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Shin, Min-Ho; Seow, Adeline; Chen, Ying; Lim, Wei-Yen; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Maria Pik; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Bassig, Bryan A; Tucker, Margaret; Berndt, Sonja I; Chow, Wong-Ho; Ji, Bu-Tian; Wang, Junwen; Xu, Jun; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Ho, James C M; Chan, John K C; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Lu, Daru; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Wei, Fusheng; Wu, Guoping; An, She-Juan; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Su, Jian; Wu, Yi-Long; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; He, Xingzhou; Li, Jihua; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Klein, Robert; Pao, William; Lawrence, Charles; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Wang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chih-Yi; Wang, Chih-Liang; Yu, Chong-Jen; Chen, Hui-Ling; Su, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Yao-Jen; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Lin, Chien-Chung; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Tangchun; Lin, Dongxin; Zhou, Baosen; Yu, Jinming; Shen, Hongbing; Kubo, Michiaki; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of lung cancer in Asian never-smoking women have previously identified six susceptibility loci associated with lung cancer risk. To further discover new susceptibility loci, we imputed data from four GWAS of Asian non-smoking female lung cancer (6877 cases and 6277 controls) using the 1000 Genomes Project (Phase 1 Release 3) data as the reference and genotyped additional samples (5878 cases and 7046 controls) for possible replication. In our meta-analysis, three new loci achieved genome-wide significance, marked by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs7741164 at 6p21.1 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.17; P = 5.8 × 10(-13)), rs72658409 at 9p21.3 (per-allele OR = 0.77; P = 1.41 × 10(-10)) and rs11610143 at 12q13.13 (per-allele OR = 0.89; P = 4.96 × 10(-9)). These findings identified new genetic susceptibility alleles for lung cancer in never-smoking women in Asia and merit follow-up to understand their biological underpinnings.

  6. An integration of genome-wide association study and gene expression profiling to prioritize the discovery of novel susceptibility Loci for osteoporosis-related traits.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Zillikens, M Carola; Wilson, Scott G; Farber, Charles R; Demissie, Serkalem; Soranzo, Nicole; Bianchi, Estelle N; Grundberg, Elin; Liang, Liming; Richards, J Brent; Estrada, Karol; Zhou, Yanhua; van Nas, Atila; Moffatt, Miriam F; Zhai, Guangju; Hofman, Albert; van Meurs, Joyce B; Pols, Huibert A P; Price, Roger I; Nilsson, Olle; Pastinen, Tomi; Cupples, L Adrienne; Lusis, Aldons J; Schadt, Eric E; Ferrari, Serge; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Spector, Timothy D; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P

    2010-06-10

    Osteoporosis is a complex disorder and commonly leads to fractures in elderly persons. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have become an unbiased approach to identify variations in the genome that potentially affect health. However, the genetic variants identified so far only explain a small proportion of the heritability for complex traits. Due to the modest genetic effect size and inadequate power, true association signals may not be revealed based on a stringent genome-wide significance threshold. Here, we take advantage of SNP and transcript arrays and integrate GWAS and expression signature profiling relevant to the skeletal system in cellular and animal models to prioritize the discovery of novel candidate genes for osteoporosis-related traits, including bone mineral density (BMD) at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), as well as geometric indices of the hip (femoral neck-shaft angle, NSA; femoral neck length, NL; and narrow-neck width, NW). A two-stage meta-analysis of GWAS from 7,633 Caucasian women and 3,657 men, revealed three novel loci associated with osteoporosis-related traits, including chromosome 1p13.2 (RAP1A, p = 3.6x10(-8)), 2q11.2 (TBC1D8), and 18q11.2 (OSBPL1A), and confirmed a previously reported region near TNFRSF11B/OPG gene. We also prioritized 16 suggestive genome-wide significant candidate genes based on their potential involvement in skeletal metabolism. Among them, 3 candidate genes were associated with BMD in women. Notably, 2 out of these 3 genes (GPR177, p = 2.6x10(-13); SOX6, p = 6.4x10(-10)) associated with BMD in women have been successfully replicated in a large-scale meta-analysis of BMD, but none of the non-prioritized candidates (associated with BMD) did. Our results support the concept of our prioritization strategy. In the absence of direct biological support for identified genes, we highlighted the efficiency of subsequent functional characterization using publicly available expression profiling relevant to the

  7. The GM2 gangliosidoses databases: allelic variation at the HEXA, HEXB, and GM2A gene loci.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, P; Hechtman, P; Kaplan, F

    2000-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of recessive disorders characterized by accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in neuronal cells. The genes responsible for these disorders are HEXA (Tay-Sachs disease and variants), HEXB (Sandhoff disease and variants), and GM2A (AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis). We report the establishment of three relational locus-specific databases recording allelic variation at the HEXA, HEXB, and GM2A genes and accessed at the GM2 gangliosidoses home page (http://data.mch.mcgill.ca/gm2-gangliosidoses). Submission forms are available for the addition of new mutations to the databases. The databases are available online for users to search and retrieve information about specific alleles by a number of fields describing mutations, phenotypes, or author(s).

  8. Identification of TSG101 Functional Domains and p21 Loci Required for TSG101-Mediated p21 Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shiuan; Chen, Yin-Ju; Cohen, Stanley N.; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2013-01-01

    TSG101 (tumor susceptibility gene 101) is a multi-domain protein known to act in the cell nucleus, cytoplasm, and periplasmic membrane. Remarkably, TSG101, whose location within cells varies with the stage of the cell cycle, affects biological events as diverse as cell growth and proliferation, gene expression, cytokinesis, and endosomal trafficking. The functions of TSG101 additionally are recruited for viral and microvesicle budding and for intracellular survival of invading bacteria. Here we report that the TSG101 protein also interacts with and down-regulates the promoter of the p21CIP1/WAF1tumor suppressor gene, and identify a p21 locus and TSG101 domains that mediate this interaction. TSG101 deficiency in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells was accompanied by an increased abundance of p21 mRNA and protein and the retardation of cell proliferation. A cis-acting element in the p21 promoter that interacts with TSG101 and is required for promoter repression was located using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and p21-driven luciferase reporter gene expression, respectively. Additional analysis of TSG101 deletion mutants lacking specific domains established the role of the central TSG101 domains in binding to the p21 promoter and demonstrated the additional essentiality of the TSG101 C-terminal steadiness box (SB) in the repression of p21 promoter activity. Neither binding of TSG101 to the p21 promoter nor repression of this promoter required the TSG101 N-terminal UEV domain, which mediates the ubiquitin-recognition functions of TSG101 and its actions as a member of ESCRT endocytic trafficking complexes, indicating that regulation of the p21 promoter by TSG101 is independent of its role in such trafficking. PMID:24244542

  9. Distinct Loci in the CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4 Gene Cluster Are Associated With Onset of Regular Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Sarah H.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Hoft, Nicole R.; Saccone, Nancy L.; Corley, Robin C.; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian J.; Breslau, Naomi; Coon, Hilary; Chen, Xiangning; Ducci, Francesca; Dueker, Nicole; Franceschini, Nora; Frank, Josef; Han, Younghun; Hansel, Nadia N.; Jiang, Chenhui; Korhonen, Tellervo; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Jason; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Michel, Martha; Shaffer, John R.; Short, Susan E.; Sun, Juzhong; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, John R.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Wenzlaff, Angela; Wheeler, William; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Aggen, Steven H.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Beaty, Terri H.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Bergen, Andrew W.; Broms, Ulla; Cesarini, David; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cichon, Sven; Couper, David; Cucca, Francesco; Dick, Danielle; Foroud, Tatiana; Furberg, Helena; Giegling, Ina; Gillespie, Nathan A.; Gu, Fangyi; Hall, Alistair S.; Hällfors, Jenni; Han, Shizhong; Hartmann, Annette M.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hickie, Ian B.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kaakinen, Marika; Kähönen, Mika; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Kittner, Stephen; Konte, Bettina; Landi, Maria-Teresa; Laatikainen, Tiina; Leppert, Mark; Levy, Steven M.; Mathias, Rasika A.; McNeil, Daniel W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Murray, Tanda; Nauck, Matthias; North, Kari E.; Paré, Peter D.; Pergadia, Michele; Ruczinski, Ingo; Salomaa, Veikko; Viikari, Jorma; Willemsen, Gonneke; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caporaso, Neil; Edenberg, Howard J.; Francks, Clyde; Gelernter, Joel; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Hops, Hyman; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johannesson, Magnus; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Marazita, Mary L.; Marchini, Jonathan; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Raitakari, Olli; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Shete, Sanjay; Spitz, Margaret; Swan, Gary E.; Völzke, Henry; Veijola, Juha; Wei, Qingyi; Amos, Chris; Cannon, Dale S.; Grucza, Richard; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Heath, Andrew; Johnson, Eric O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Madden, Pamela; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Weiss, Robert B.; Kraft, Peter; Bierut, Laura J.; Ehringer, Marissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) genes (CHRNA5/CHRNA3/CHRNB4) have been reproducibly associated with nicotine dependence, smoking behaviors, and lung cancer risk. Of the few reports that have focused on early smoking behaviors, association results have been mixed. This meta-analysis examines early smoking phenotypes and SNPs in the gene cluster to determine: (1) whether the most robust association signal in this region (rs16969968) for other smoking behaviors is also associated with early behaviors, and/or (2) if additional statistically independent signals are important in early smoking. We focused on two phenotypes: age of tobacco initiation (AOI) and age of first regular tobacco use (AOS). This study included 56,034 subjects (41 groups) spanning nine countries and evaluated five SNPs including rs1948, rs16969968, rs578776, rs588765, and rs684513. Each dataset was analyzed using a centrally generated script. Meta-analyses were conducted from summary statistics. AOS yielded significant associations with SNPs rs578776 (beta = 0.02, P = 0.004), rs1948 (beta = 0.023, P = 0.018), and rs684513 (beta = 0.032, P = 0.017), indicating protective effects. There were no significant associations for the AOI phenotype. Importantly, rs16969968, the most replicated signal in this region for nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, and cotinine levels, was not associated with AOI (P = 0.59) or AOS (P = 0.92). These results provide important insight into the complexity of smoking behavior phenotypes, and suggest that association signals in the CHRNA5/A3/B4 gene cluster affecting early smoking behaviors may be different from those affecting the mature nicotine dependence phenotype. PMID:24186853

  10. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  11. Transient restoration of gene rearrangement at multiple T cell receptor loci in gamma-irradiated scid mice

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The developmental arrest of thymocytes from scid mice, deficient in variable, (diversity), and joining, or V(D)J recombination, can be overcome by sublethal gamma-irradiation. Since previous studies focused on restoration of rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta locus, productive rearrangement of which is selected for, we sought to examine to what extent locus specificity and cellular selection contributed to the observed effects. We report here that irradiation of newborn scid mice induces normal V-D-J rearrangements of the TCR delta locus, which like TCR beta, is also actively rearranged in CD(4-)CD(8-) (double negative) thymocytes. In contrast, no complete V-J alpha rearrangements were detected. Instead, we detected substantial levels of hairpin-terminated coding ends at the 5' end of the J alpha locus, demonstrating that TCR alpha rearrangements manifest the effects of the scid mutation. Irradiation, therefore, transiently compensates for the effects of the scid mutation in a locus-nonspecific manner in thymocytes, resulting in a burst of normal TCR beta and delta rearrangements. Irradiation also allows the development of cells that can initiate but fail to complete V(D)J recombination events at the TCR alpha locus, which is normally inaccessible in scid thymocytes. PMID:8760795

  12. A next-generation sequencing method for overcoming the multiple gene copy problem in polyploid phylogenetics, applied to Poa grasses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidy is important from a phylogenetic perspective because of its immense past impact on evolution and its potential future impact on diversification, survival and adaptation, especially in plants. Molecular population genetics studies of polyploid organisms have been difficult because of problems in sequencing multiple-copy nuclear genes using Sanger sequencing. This paper describes a method for sequencing a barcoded mixture of targeted gene regions using next-generation sequencing methods to overcome these problems. Results Using 64 3-bp barcodes, we successfully sequenced three chloroplast and two nuclear gene regions (each of which contained two gene copies with up to two alleles per individual) in a total of 60 individuals across 11 species of Australian Poa grasses. This method had high replicability, a low sequencing error rate (after appropriate quality control) and a low rate of missing data. Eighty-eight percent of the 320 gene/individual combinations produced sequence reads, and >80% of individuals produced sufficient reads to detect all four possible nuclear alleles of the homeologous nuclear loci with 95% probability. We applied this method to a group of sympatric Australian alpine Poa species, which we discovered to share an allopolyploid ancestor with a group of American Poa species. All markers revealed extensive allele sharing among the Australian species and so we recommend that the current taxonomy be re-examined. We also detected hypermutation in the trnH-psbA marker, suggesting it should not be used as a land plant barcode region. Some markers indicated differentiation between Tasmanian and mainland samples. Significant positive spatial genetic structure was detected at <100 km with chloroplast but not nuclear markers, which may be a result of restricted seed flow and long-distance pollen flow in this wind-pollinated group. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that 454 sequencing of barcoded amplicon mixtures can be used to

  13. Statistical Power of Expression Quantitative Trait Loci for Mapping of Complex Trait Loci in Natural Populations

    PubMed Central

    Schliekelman, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A number of recent genomewide surveys have found numerous QTL for gene expression, often with intermediate to high heritability values. As a result, there is currently a great deal of interest in genetical genomics—that is, the combination of genomewide expression data and molecular marker data to elucidate the genetics of complex traits. To date, most genetical genomics studies have focused on generating candidate genes for previously known trait loci or have otherwise leveraged existing knowledge about trait-related genes. The purpose of this study is to explore the potential for genetical genomics approaches in the context of genomewide scans for complex trait loci. I explore the expected strength of association between expression-level traits and a clinical trait, as a function of the underlying genetic model in natural populations. I give calculations of statistical power for detecting differential expression between affected and unaffected individuals. I model both reactive and causative expression-level traits with both additive and multiplicative multilocus models for the relationship between phenotype and genotype and explore a variety of assumptions about dominance, number of segregating loci, and other parameters. There are two key results. If a transcript is causative for the disease (in the sense that disease risk depends directly on transcript level), then the power to detect association between transcript and disease is quite good. Sample sizes on the order of 100 are sufficient for 80% power. On the other hand, if the transcript is reactive to a disease locus, then the correlation between expression-level traits and disease is low unless the expression-level trait shares several causative loci with the disease—that is, the expression-level trait itself is a complex trait. Thus, there is a trade-off between the power to show association between a reactive expression-level trait and the clinical trait of interest and the power to map expression

  14. X-linked gene expression in the Virginia opossum: differences between the paternally derived Gpd and Pgk-A loci

    SciTech Connect

    Samollow, P.B.; Ford, A.L.; VandeBerg, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Expression of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglycerate kinase-A (PGK-A) in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) was studied electrophoretically in animals from natural populations and those produced through controlled laboratory crosses. Blood from most of the wild animals exhibited a common single-banded phenotype for both enzymes. Rare variant animals, regardless of sex, exhibited single-banded phenotypes different in mobility from the common mobility class of the respective enzyme. The laboratory crosses confirmed the allelic basis for the common and rare phenotypes. Transmission of PGK-A phenotypes followed the pattern of determinate (nonrandom) inactivation of the paternally derived Pgk-A allele, and transmission of G6PD also was consistent with this pattern. A survey of tissue-specific expression of G6PD phenotypes of heterozygous females revealed, in almost all tissues, three-banded patterns skewed in favor of the allele that was expressed in blood cells. Three-banded patterns were never observed in males or in putatively homozygous females. These patterns suggest simultaneous, but unequal, expression of the maternally and paternally derived Gpd alleles within individual cells. The absence of such partial expression was noted in a parallel survey of females heterozygous at the Pgd-A locus. Thus, it appears that Gpd and Pgk-A are X-linked in D. virginiana and subject to preferential paternal allele inactivation, but that dosage compensation may not be complete for all paternally derived X-linked genes.

  15. Epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) of BMI, BMI change and waist circumference in African American adults identifies multiple replicated loci.

    PubMed

    Demerath, Ellen W; Guan, Weihua; Grove, Megan L; Aslibekyan, Stella; Mendelson, Michael; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Hedman, Åsa K; Sandling, Johanna K; Li, Li-An; Irvin, Marguerite R; Zhi, Degui; Deloukas, Panos; Liang, Liming; Liu, Chunyu; Bressler, Jan; Spector, Tim D; North, Kari; Li, Yun; Absher, Devin M; Levy, Daniel; Arnett, Donna K; Fornage, Myriam; Pankow, James S; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is an important component of the pathophysiology of chronic diseases. Identifying epigenetic modifications associated with elevated adiposity, including DNA methylation variation, may point to genomic pathways that are dysregulated in numerous conditions. The Illumina 450K Bead Chip array was used to assay DNA methylation in leukocyte DNA obtained from 2097 African American adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Mixed-effects regression models were used to test the association of methylation beta value with concurrent body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and BMI change, adjusting for batch effects and potential confounders. Replication using whole-blood DNA from 2377 White adults in the Framingham Heart Study and CD4+ T cell DNA from 991 Whites in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network Study was followed by testing using adipose tissue DNA from 648 women in the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource cohort. Seventy-six BMI-related probes, 164 WC-related probes and 8 BMI change-related probes passed the threshold for significance in ARIC (P < 1 × 10(-7); Bonferroni), including probes in the recently reported HIF3A, CPT1A and ABCG1 regions. Replication using blood DNA was achieved for 37 BMI probes and 1 additional WC probe. Sixteen of these also replicated in adipose tissue, including 15 novel methylation findings near genes involved in lipid metabolism, immune response/cytokine signaling and other diverse pathways, including LGALS3BP, KDM2B, PBX1 and BBS2, among others. Adiposity traits are associated with DNA methylation at numerous CpG sites that replicate across studies despite variation in tissue type, ethnicity and analytic approaches.

  16. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI)

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Katherine M.; Gardner, Grant E.; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty. PMID:27252300

  17. Development of a Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI).

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Katherine M; Gardner, Grant E; Seipelt-Thiemann, Rebecca L

    2016-01-01

    Concept inventories (CIs) are valuable tools for educators that assess student achievement and identify misconceptions held by students. Results of student responses can be used to adjust or develop new instructional methods for a given topic. The regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is an important concept in genetics and one that is particularly challenging for undergraduate students. As part of a larger study examining instructional methods related to gene regulation, the authors developed a 12-item CI assessing student knowledge of the lac operon. Using an established protocol, the authors wrote open-ended questions and conducted in-class testing with undergraduate microbiology and genetics students to discover common errors made by students about the lac operon and to determine aspects of item validity. Using these results, we constructed a 12-item multiple-choice lac operon CI called the Lac Operon Concept Inventory (LOCI), The LOCI was reviewed by two experts in the field for content validity. The LOCI underwent item analysis and was assessed for reliability with a sample of undergraduate genetics students (n = 115). The data obtained were found to be valid and reliable (coefficient alpha = 0.994) with adequate discriminatory power and item difficulty.

  18. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  19. Rare CNVs in Suicide Attempt include Schizophrenia-Associated Loci and Neurodevelopmental Genes: A Pilot Genome-Wide and Family-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Jerzy; Wasserman, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Suicidal behavior (SB) has a complex etiology involving genes and environment. One of the genetic components in SB could be copy number variations (CNVs), as CNVs are implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. However, a recently published genome-wide and case-control study did not observe any significant role of CNVs in SB. Here we complemented these initial observations by instead using a family-based trio-sample that is robust to control biases, having severe suicide attempt (SA) in offspring as main outcome (n = 660 trios). We first tested for CNV associations on the genome-wide Illumina 1M SNP-array by using FBAT-CNV methodology, which allows for evaluating CNVs without reliance on CNV calling algorithms, analogous to a common SNP-based GWAS. We observed association of certain T-cell receptor markers, but this likely reflected inter-individual variation in somatic rearrangements rather than association with SA outcome. Next, we used the PennCNV software to call 385 putative rare (<1%) and large (>100 kb) CNVs, observed in n = 225 SA offspring. Nine SA offspring had rare CNV calls in a set of previously schizophrenia-associated loci, indicating the importance of such CNVs in certain SA subjects. Several additional, very large (>1MB) sized CNV calls in 15 other SA offspring also spanned pathogenic regions or other neural genes of interest. Overall, 45 SA had CNVs enriched for 65 medically relevant genes previously shown to be affected by CNVs, which were characterized by a neurodevelopmental biology. A neurodevelopmental implication was partly congruent with our previous SNP-based GWAS, but follow-up analysis here indicated that carriers of rare CNVs had a decreased burden of common SNP risk-alleles compared to non-carriers. In conclusion, while CNVs did not show genome-wide association by the FBAT-CNV methodology, our preliminary observations indicate rare pathogenic CNVs affecting neurodevelopmental functions in a subset of SA, who were distinct from SA

  20. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-12-09

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone.

  1. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02504.001 PMID:25487987

  2. A quantitative trait loci-specific gene-by-sex interaction on systolic blood pressure among American Indians: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; MacCluer, Jean W; Göring, Harald H H; Cole, Shelley A; Rose, Kathryn M; Almasy, Laura; Diego, Vincent; Laston, Sandra; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Best, Lyle G; Fabsitz, Richard R; Roman, Mary J; North, Kari E

    2006-08-01

    Age-adjusted systolic blood pressure is higher in males than females. Genetic factors may account for this sex-specific variation. To localize sex-specific quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing blood pressure, we conducted a genome scan of systolic blood pressure, in males and females, separately and combined, and tested for aggregate and QTL-specific genotype-by-sex interaction in American Indian participants of the Strong Heart Family Study. Blood pressure was measured 3 times and the average of the last 2 measures was used for analyses. Systolic blood pressure was adjusted for age and antihypertensive treatment within study center. We performed variance component linkage analysis in the full sample and stratified by sex among 1168 females and 726 males. Marker allele frequencies were derived using maximum likelihood estimates based on all individuals, and multipoint identity-by-descent sharing was estimated using Loki. We detected suggestive evidence of a QTL influencing systolic blood pressure on chromosome 17 at 129 cM between markers D17S784 and D17S928 (logarithm of odds [LOD] = 2.4). This signal substantially improved when accounting for QTL-specific genotype-by-sex interaction (P = 0.04), because we observed an LOD score of 3.3 for systolic blood pressure in women on chromosome 17 at 136 cM. The magnitude of the linkage signal on chromosome 17q25.3 was slightly attenuated when participants taking antihypertensive medications were excluded, although suggestive evidence for linkage was still identified (LOD = 2.8 in women). Accounting for interaction with sex improved our ability to detect QTLs and demonstrated the importance of considering genotype-by-sex interaction in our search for blood pressure genes.

  3. Expression of GnRH genes is elevated in discrete brain loci of chum salmon before initiation of homing behavior and during spawning migration.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Makino, Keita; Ando, Hironori; Ban, Masatoshi; Fukuwaka, Masa-Aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Urano, Akihisa

    2010-09-15

    Our previous studies suggested the importance of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) for initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon, although supporting evidence had been not available from oceanic fish. In farmed masu salmon, the amounts of salmon GnRH (sGnRH) mRNAs in the forebrain increased in the pre-pubertal stage from winter through spring, followed by a decrease toward summer. We thus hypothesized that gene expression for GnRHs in oceanic chum salmon changes similarly, and examined this hypothesis using brain samples from winter chum salmon in the Gulf of Alaska and summer fish in the Bering Sea. They were classified into sexually immature and maturing adults, which had maturing gonads and left the Bering Sea for the natal river by the end of summer. The absolute amounts of GnRH mRNAs were determined by real-time PCRs. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the maturing winter adults were significantly larger than those in the maturing summer adults. The amounts of sGnRH and chicken GnRH mRNAs then peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. Such changes were observed in various brain loci including the olfactory bulb, terminal nerve, ventral telencephalon, nucleus preopticus parvocellularis anterioris, nucleus preopticus magnocellularis and midbrain tegmentum. These results suggest that sGnRH neurons change their activity for gonadal maturation prior to initiation of homing behavior from the Bering Sea. The present study provides the first evidence to support a possible involvement of neuropeptides in the onset of spawning migration.

  4. Genomes of Ashbya Fungi Isolated from Insects Reveal Four Mating-Type Loci, Numerous Translocations, Lack of Transposons, and Distinct Gene Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Fred S.; Voegeli, Sylvia; Kuo, Sidney; Philippsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii is a cotton pathogen transmitted by insects. It is readily grown and manipulated in the laboratory and is commercially exploited as a natural overproducer of vitamin B2. Our previous genome analysis of A. gossypii isolate ATCC10895, collected in Trinidad nearly 100 years ago, revealed extensive synteny with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, leading us to use it as a model organism to understand the evolution of filamentous growth. To further develop Ashbya as a model system, we have investigated the ecological niche of A. gossypii and isolated additional strains and a sibling species, both useful in comparative analysis. We isolated fungi morphologically similar to A. gossypii from different plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera, generated a phylogenetic tree based on rDNA-ITS sequences, and performed high coverage short read sequencing with one A. gossypii isolate from Florida, a new species, Ashbya aceri, isolated in North Carolina, and a genetically marked derivative of ATCC10895 intensively used for functional studies. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, all strains carry four not three mating type loci, adding a new puzzle in the evolution of Ashbya species. Another surprise was the genome identity of 99.9% between the Florida strain and ATCC10895, isolated in Trinidad. The A. aceri and A. gossypii genomes show conserved gene orders rearranged by eight translocations, 90% overall sequence identity, and fewer tandem duplications in the A. aceri genome. Both species lack transposable elements. Finally, our work identifies plant-feeding insects of the suborder Heteroptera as the most likely natural reservoir of Ashbya, and that infection of cotton and other plants may be incidental to the growth of the fungus in its insect host. PMID:23749448

  5. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  6. Multiple C4/Slp genes distinguished by expression after transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, D M; Malissen, M; Hood, L; Ferreira, A; Walthall, D; Mitchell, M

    1986-01-01

    The S region of the murine major histocompatibility complex contains two closely related genes: C4, encoding the fourth component of complement, and Slp, encoding sex-limited protein. We cloned these genes from a cosmid library of the B10.W7R strain that does not show androgen regulation of the Slp protein. Restriction site polymorphisms revealed at least four C4-like genes within the Sw7 locus, indicating evolutionary amplification of this region. Transfection of these genes into L cells resulted in expression, processing, and secretion of immunologically correct C4 and Slp proteins. At least two different Slp genes and one C4 gene were capable, after transfection, of expressing C4 and Slp indistinguishable from macrophage-derived protein. A third Slp gene exists within this locus whose recombinant cognate did not express in L cells. Thus, the B10.W7R S region includes one C4 gene and at least three Slp-like genes. Images PMID:3023818

  7. Simple and Efficient Targeting of Multiple Genes Through CRISPR-Cas9 in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Obando, Mauricio; Hoffmann, Beate; Géry, Carine; Guyon-Debast, Anouchka; Téoulé, Evelyne; Rameau, Catherine; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Nogué, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Powerful genome editing technologies are needed for efficient gene function analysis. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient gene-knock-out technology in a variety of species. However, in a number of situations, knocking out or modifying a single gene is not sufficient; this is particularly true for genes belonging to a common family, or for genes showing redundant functions. Like many plants, the model organism Physcomitrella patens has experienced multiple events of polyploidization during evolution that has resulted in a number of families of duplicated genes. Here, we report a robust CRISPR-Cas9 system, based on the codelivery of a CAS9 expressing cassette, multiple sgRNA vectors, and a cassette for transient transformation selection, for gene knock-out in multiple gene families. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated targeting of five different genes allows the selection of a quintuple mutant, and all possible subcombinations of mutants, in one experiment, with no mutations detected in potential off-target sequences. Furthermore, we confirmed the observation that the presence of repeats in the vicinity of the cutting region favors deletion due to the alternative end joining pathway, for which induced frameshift mutations can be potentially predicted. Because the number of multiple gene families in Physcomitrella is substantial, this tool opens new perspectives to study the role of expanded gene families in the colonization of land by plants. PMID:27613750

  8. Genetic Variants on 3q21 and in the Sp8 Transcription Factor Gene (SP8) as Susceptibility Loci for Psychotic Disorders: A Genetic Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Kenji; Ikeda, Masashi; Kajio, Yusuke; Saito, Takeo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Aleksic, Branko; Yamada, Kazuo; Toyota, Tomoko; Hattori, Eiji; Ujike, Hiroshi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-01-01

    Caucasian population (P = 4.3×10−3). Conclusions We found 3p21.1 (including PBRM1, strong linkage disequilibrium made it difficult to pinpoint the risk genes) and SP8 as risk loci for BD, SCZ and psychosis. Further replication studies will be required for conclusive results. PMID:23967141

  9. Sesterterpene ophiobolin biosynthesis involving multiple gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hangzhen; Yin, Ru; Liu, Yongfeng; Meng, Huiying; Zhou, Xianqiang; Zhou, Guolin; Bi, Xupeng; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Tonghan; Zhu, Weiming; Deng, Zixin; Hong, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoids are the most diverse and abundant natural products among which sesterterpenes account for less than 2%, with very few reports on their biosynthesis. Ophiobolins are tricyclic 5–8–5 ring sesterterpenes with potential pharmaceutical application. Aspergillus ustus 094102 from mangrove rizhosphere produces ophiobolin and other terpenes. We obtained five gene cluster knockout mutants, with altered ophiobolin yield using genome sequencing and in silico analysis, combined with in vivo genetic manipulation. Involvement of the five gene clusters in ophiobolin synthesis was confirmed by investigation of the five key terpene synthesis relevant enzymes in each gene cluster, either by gene deletion and complementation or in vitro verification of protein function. The results demonstrate that ophiobolin skeleton biosynthesis involves five gene clusters, which are responsible for C15, C20, C25, and C30 terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:27273151

  10. Plasmid pCAR3 Contains Multiple Gene Sets Involved in the Conversion of Carbazole to Anthranilate†

    PubMed Central

    Urata, Masaaki; Uchimura, Hiromasa; Noguchi, Haruko; Sakaguchi, Tomoya; Takemura, Tetsuo; Eto, Kaori; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    The carbazole degradative car-I gene cluster (carAaIBaIBbICIAcI) of Sphingomonas sp. strain KA1 is located on the 254-kb circular plasmid pCAR3. Carbazole conversion to anthranilate is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO; CarAaIAcI), meta-cleavage enzyme (CarBaIBbI), and hydrolase (CarCI). CARDO is a three-component dioxygenase, and CarAaI and CarAcI are its terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components. The car-I gene cluster lacks the gene encoding the ferredoxin reductase component of CARDO. In the present study, based on the draft sequence of pCAR3, we found multiple carbazole degradation genes dispersed in four loci on pCAR3, including a second copy of the car gene cluster (carAaIIBaIIBbIICIIAcII) and the ferredoxin/reductase genes fdxI-fdrI and fdrII. Biotransformation experiments showed that FdrI (or FdrII) could drive the electron transfer chain from NAD(P)H to CarAaI (or CarAaII) with the aid of ferredoxin (CarAcI, CarAcII, or FdxI). Because this electron transfer chain showed phylogenetic relatedness to that consisting of putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase of the P450cam monooxygenase system of Pseudomonas putida, CARDO systems of KA1 can be classified in the class IIA Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase system. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that two car gene clusters constituted operons, and their expression was induced when KA1 was exposed to carbazole, although the fdxI-fdrI and fdrII genes were expressed constitutively. Both terminal oxygenases of KA1 showed roughly the same substrate specificity as that from the well-characterized carbazole degrader Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, although slight differences were observed. PMID:16672458

  11. The RAD7 and RAD16 genes, which are essential for pyrimidine dimer removal from the silent mating type loci, are also required for repair of the nontranscribed strand of an active gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; de Groot, N; Gleig, F; Bang, D D; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1994-01-01

    The rad16 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was previously shown to be impaired in removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the silent mating-type loci (D. D. Bang, R. A. Verhage, N. Goosen, J. Brouwer, and P. van de Putte, Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3925-3931, 1992). Here we show that rad7 as well as rad7 rad16 double mutants have the same repair phenotype, indicating that the RAD7 and RAD16 gene products might operate in the same nucleotide excision repair subpathway. Dimer removal from the genome overall is essentially incomplete in these mutants, leaving about 20 to 30% of the DNA unrepaired. Repair analysis of the transcribed RPB2 gene shows that the nontranscribed strand is not repaired at all in rad7 and rad16 mutants, whereas the transcribed strand is repaired in these mutants at a fast rate similar to that in RAD+ cells. When the results obtained with the RPB2 gene can be generalized, the RAD7 and RAD16 proteins not only are essential for repair of silenced regions but also function in repair of nontranscribed strands of active genes in S. cerevisiae. The phenotype of rad7 and rad16 mutants closely resembles that of human xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, suggesting that RAD7 and RAD16 in S. cerevisiae function in the same pathway as the XPC gene in human cells. RAD4, which on the basis of sequence homology has been proposed to be the yeast XPC counterpart, seems to be involved in repair of both inactive and active yeast DNA, challenging the hypothesis that RAD4 and XPC are functional homologs. Images PMID:8065346

  12. Yeast artificial chromosome and radiation hybrid map of loci in chromosome band 8p22, a common region of allelic loss in multiple human cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Bookstein, R.; Levy, A.; MacGrogan, D.

    1994-11-15

    Polymorphic alleles at loci such as LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor) in chromosome band 8p22 are frequently lost during the genesis of several types of human cancer, including colorectal, non-small cell lung, hepatocellular, and prostatic carcinomas. A physical map of 31 published or novel probes and sequence-tagged sites in this genetic region was constructed using a radiation hybrid panel and the CEPH (Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain) yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library. Thirty-six overlapping YACs defined a physical order for the following polymorphic markers: tel-D8S26-D8S511-D8S549-MSR-D8S254-D8S233-D8S261-D8S21-LPL-D8S2580 cen. These maps unify small consensus regions of allelic loss on chromosome 8p defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms with more informative PCR-based polymorphisms and widely available YAC mapping resources. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Identification of multiple independent horizontal gene transfers into poxviruses using a comparative genomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Poxviruses are important pathogens of humans, livestock and wild animals. These large dsDNA viruses have a set of core orthologs whose gene order is extremely well conserved throughout poxvirus genera. They also contain many genes with sequence and functional similarity to host genes which were probably acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Although phylogenetic trees can indicate the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer and even uncover multiple events, their use may be hampered by uncertainties in both the topology and the rooting of the tree. We propose to use synteny conservation around the horizontally transferred gene (HTgene) to distinguish between single and multiple events. Results Here we devise a method that incorporates comparative genomic information into the investigation of horizontal gene transfer, and we apply this method to poxvirus genomes. We examined the synteny conservation around twenty four pox genes that we identified, or which were reported in the literature, as candidate HTgenes. We found support for multiple independent transfers into poxviruses for five HTgenes. Three of these genes are known to be important for the survival of the virus in or out of the host cell and one of them increases susceptibility to some antiviral drugs. Conclusion In related genomes conserved synteny information can provide convincing evidence for multiple independent horizontal gene transfer events even in the absence of a robust phylogenetic tree for the HTgene. PMID:18304319

  14. Nontypeable pneumococci can be divided into multiple cps types, including one type expressing the novel gene pspK.

    PubMed

    Park, In Ho; Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Briles, David E; McDaniel, Larry S; Nahm, Moon H

    2012-01-01

    Although virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with its capsule, some pathogenic S. pneumoniae isolates lack capsules and are serologically nontypeable (NT). We obtained 64 isolates that were identified as NT "pneumococci" (i.e., bacteria satisfying the conventional definition but without the multilocus sequence typing [MLST]-based definition of S. pneumoniae) by the traditional criteria. All 64 were optochin sensitive and had lytA, and 63 had ply. Twelve isolates had cpsA, suggesting the presence of a conventional but defective capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) locus. The 52 cpsA-negative isolates could be divided into three null capsule clades (NCC) based on aliC (aliB-like ORF1), aliD (aliB-like ORF2), and our newly discovered gene, pspK, in their cps loci. pspK encodes a protein with a long alpha-helical region containing an LPxTG motif and a YPT motif known to bind human pIgR. There were nine isolates in NCC1 (pspK(+) but negative for aliC and aliD), 32 isolates in NCC2 (aliC(+) aliD(+) but negative for pspK), and 11 in NCC3 (aliD(+) but negative for aliC and pspK). Among 52 cpsA-negative isolates, 41 were identified as S. pneumoniae by MLST analysis. All NCC1 and most NCC2 isolates were S. pneumoniae, whereas all nine NCC3 and two NCC2 isolates were not S. pneumoniae. Several NCC1 and NCC2 isolates from multiple individuals had identical MLST and cps regions, showing that unencapsulated S. pneumoniae can be infectious among humans. Furthermore, NCC1 and NCC2 S. pneumoniae isolates could colonize mice as well as encapsulated S. pneumoniae, although S. pneumoniae with an artificially disrupted cps locus did not. Moreover, an NCC1 isolate with pspK deletion did not colonize mice, suggesting that pspK is critical for colonization. Thus, PspK may provide pneumococci a means of surviving in the nasopharynx without capsule. IMPORTANCE The presence of a capsule is critical for many pathogenic bacteria, including pneumococci. Reflecting the

  15. Genotyping of present-day and historical Geobacillus species isolates from milk powders by high-resolution melt analysis of multiple variable-number tandem-repeat loci.

    PubMed

    Seale, R Brent; Dhakal, Rajat; Chauhan, Kanika; Craven, Heather M; Deeth, Hilton C; Pillidge, Christopher J; Powell, Ian B; Turner, Mark S

    2012-10-01

    Spores of thermophilic Geobacillus species are a common contaminant of milk powder worldwide due to their ability to form biofilms within processing plants. Genotyping methods can provide information regarding the source and monitoring of contamination. A new genotyping method was developed based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) in conjunction with high-resolution melt analysis (MLV-HRMA) and compared to the currently used method, randomized amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR). Four VNTR loci were identified and used to genotype 46 Geobacillus isolates obtained from retailed powder and samples from 2 different milk powder processing plants. These 46 isolates were differentiated into 16 different groups using MLV-HRMA (D = 0.89). In contrast, only 13 RAPD-PCR genotypes were identified among the 46 isolates (D = 0.79). This new method was then used to analyze 35 isolates obtained from powders with high spore counts (>10(4) spores · g(-1)) from a single processing plant together with 27 historical isolates obtained from powder samples processed in the same region of Australia 17 years ago. Results showed that three genotypes can coexist in a single processing run, while the same genotypes observed 17 years ago are present today. While certain genotypes could be responsible for powders with high spore counts, there was no correlation to specific genotypes being present in powder plants and retailed samples. In conclusion, the MLV-HRMA method is useful for genotyping Geobacillus spp. to provide insight into the prevalence and persistence of certain genotypes within milk powder processing plants.

  16. Hybridization and restricted gene flow between native and introduced stocks of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp.) across multiple environments

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Kathrin A; Pamminger-Lahnsteiner, Barbara; Wanzenböck, Josef; Weiss, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Translocations of Baltic whitefish (Coregonus sp.) into Austrian Alpine lakes have created ‘artificial hybrid zones’, threatening the genetic integrity of native lineages. We evaluate the genetic structure of Coregonus in Austrian lakes and characterize hybridization and introgression between native and introduced lineages. Fifteen populations (N= 747) were assessed for allelic variation at eight microsatellite loci and a reduced set (N= 253) for variation across two mtDNA genes (cyt b and NADH-3). Bayesian approaches were used to estimate individual admixture proportions (q-values) and classify genotypes as native, introduced or hybrids. q-value distributions varied among populations highlighting differential hybridization and introgression histories. Many lakes revealed a clear distinction between native and introduced genotypes despite hybridization, whereas some locations revealed hybrid swarms. Genetic structure among lakes was congruent with morphological divergence and novelty raising speculation of multiple taxa, including a population south of the Alps, outside the putative native range of Coregonus. Although statistically congruent with inferences based on nuclear markers, mitochondrial haplotype data was not diagnostic with respect to native and non-native lineages, supporting that the Alpine region was colonized post-glacially by an admixture of mtDNA lineages, which coalesce >1 Ma. Mechanisms promoting or eroding lineage isolation are discussed, as well as a high potential to conserve native Alpine lineages despite the extensive historical use of introduced Baltic stocks. PMID:21199024

  17. Multiple actin-based motor genes in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Titus, M A; Warrick, H M; Spudich, J A

    1989-01-01

    Dictyostelium cells, devoid of conventional myosin, display a variety of motile activities, consistent with the presence of other molecular motors. The Dictyostelium genome was probed at low stringency with a gene fragment containing the conserved conventional myosin head domain sequences to identify other actin-based motors that may play a role in the observed motility of these mutant cells. One gene (abmA) has been characterized and encodes a polypeptide of approximately 135 kDa with a head region homologous to other myosin head sequences and a tail region that is not predicted to form either an alpha-helical structure of coiled-coil interactions. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of the tail regions of abmA, Dictyostelium myosin I, and Acanthamoeba myosins IB and IL reveal an area of sequence similarity in the amino terminal half of the tail that may be a membrane-binding domain. The abmA gene, however, does not contain an unusual Gly, Pro, Ala stretch typical of many of the previously described myosin Is. Two additional genes (abmB and abmC) were identified using this approach and also found to contain sequences that encode proteins with typical conserved myosin head sequences. The abm genes may be part of a large family of actin-based motors that play various roles in diverse aspects of cellular motility. Images PMID:2519618

  18. Genes and quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling trace element concentrations in perennial grasses grown on phytotoxic soil contaminated with heavy metals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial grasses cover diverse soils throughout the world, including sites contaminated with heavy metals, producing forages that must be safe for livestock and wildlife. Chromosome regions known as quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling forage mineral concentrations were mapped in a populatio...

  19. Developing Pedagogical Tools to Improve Teaching Multiple Models of the Gene in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auckaraaree, Nantaya

    2013-01-01

    Multiple models of the gene are used to explore genetic phenomena in scientific practices and in the classroom. In genetics curricula, the classical and molecular models are presented in disconnected domains. Research demonstrates that, without explicit connections, students have difficulty developing an understanding of the gene that spans…

  20. A light-switchable bidirectional expression module allowing simultaneous regulation of multiple genes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjun; Li, Ting; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yi

    2015-10-02

    Several light-regulated genetic circuits have been applied to spatiotemporally control transgene expression in mammalian cells. However, simultaneous regulation of multiple genes using one genetic device by light has not yet been reported. In this study, we engineered a bidirectional expression module based on LightOn system. Our data showed that both reporter genes could be regulated at defined and quantitative levels. Simultaneous regulation of four genes was further achieved in cultured cells and mice. Additionally, we successfully utilized the bidirectional expression module to monitor the expression of a suicide gene, showing potential for photodynamic gene therapy. Collectively, we provide a robust and useful tool to simultaneously control multiple genes expression by light, which will be widely used in biomedical research and biotechnology.

  1. Multiple Neuropeptide-Coding Genes Involved in Planarian Pharynx Extension.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Seira; Inoue, Takeshi; Kashima, Makoto; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2016-06-01

    Planarian feeding behavior involves three steps: moving toward food, extending the pharynx from their planarian's ventral side after arriving at the food, and ingesting the food through the pharynx. Although pharynx extension is a remarkable behavior, it remains unknown what neuronal cell types are involved in its regulation. To identify neurons involved in regulating pharynx extension, we quantitatively analyzed pharynx extension and sought to identify these neurons by RNA interference (RNAi) and in situ hybridization. This assay, when performed using planarians with amputation of various body parts, clearly showed that the head portion is indispensable for inducing pharynx extension. We thus tested the effects of knockdown of brain neurons such as serotonergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic neurons by RNAi, but did not observe any effects on pharynx extension behavior. However, animals with RNAi of the Prohormone Convertase 2 (PC2, a neuropeptide processing enzyme) gene did not perform the pharynx extension behavior, suggesting the possible involvement of neuropeptide(s in the regulation of pharynx extension. We screened 24 neuropeptide-coding genes, analyzed their functions by RNAi using the pharynx extension assay system, and identified at least five neuropeptide genes involved in pharynx extension. These was expressed in different cells or neurons, and some of them were expressed in the brain, suggesting complex regulation of planarian feeding behavior by the nervous system.

  2. Trans-species shared polymorphisms at orthologous nuclear gene loci among distant species in the conifer Picea (Pinaceae): implications for the long-term maintenance of genetic diversity in trees.

    PubMed

    Bouillé, Marie; Bousquet, Jean

    2005-01-01

    For each of three nuclear gene loci, intraspecific- as well as trans-specific shared polymorphisms were detected in DNA among three distantly related species in the genus Picea. Few fixed interspecific polymorphisms were observed. Allele genealogies did not match species phylogenies, and species lineages were not reciprocally monophyletic. Based on molecular clocks and morphological evidence from the fossil record, the divergence time between species was estimated at 13-20 million years (my), and a mutation rate of 2.23 × 10(-10) to 3.42 × 10(-10) per site per year was estimated. Large historical population sizes in excess of 100 000 were inferred, which would have delayed the fixation of polymorphisms. These numbers translated into allele coalescence times in the order of 10 to 18 my, which implies the sharing of polymorphisms since common ancestry. These results suggest that trans-species shared polymorphisms might be frequent at plant nuclear gene loci, leading to high allelic diversity. Such a trend is more likely in trees and plants characterized by ecological and life-history determinants favoring large population sizes such as an outcrossing mating system, wind pollination, and a dominant position in ecosystem. These polymorphisms also call for caution in estimating congeneric species phylogenies from nuclear gene sequences in such plant groups.

  3. Integrative genomics identifies distinct molecular classes of neuroblastoma and shows that multiple genes are targeted by regional alterations in DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Diskin, Sharon; Rappaport, Eric; Attiyeh, Edward; Mosse, Yael; Shue, Daniel; Seiser, Eric; Jagannathan, Jayanti; Shusterman, Suzanne; Bansal, Manisha; Khazi, Deepa; Winter, Cynthia; Okawa, Erin; Grant, Gregory; Cnaan, Avital; Zhao, Huaqing; Cheung, Nai-Kong; Gerald, William; London, Wendy; Matthay, Katherine K; Brodeur, Garrett M; Maris, John M

    2006-06-15

    Neuroblastoma is remarkable for its clinical heterogeneity and is characterized by genomic alterations that are strongly correlated with tumor behavior. The specific genes that influence neuroblastoma biology and are targeted by genomic alterations remain largely unknown. We quantified mRNA expression in a highly annotated series of 101 prospectively collected diagnostic neuroblastoma primary tumors using an oligonucleotide-based microarray. Genomic copy number status at the prognostically relevant loci 1p36, 2p24 (MYCN), 11q23, and 17q23 was determined by PCR and was aberrant in 26, 20, 40, and 38 cases, respectively. In addition, 72 diagnostic neuroblastoma primary tumors assayed in a different laboratory were used as an independent validation set. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed that gene expression was highly correlated with genomic alterations and clinical markers of tumor behavior. The vast majority of samples with MYCN amplification and 1p36 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) clustered together on a terminal node of the sample dendrogram, whereas the majority of samples with 11q deletion clustered separately and both of these were largely distinct from the copy number neutral group of tumors. Genes involved in neurodevelopment were broadly overrepresented in the more benign tumors, whereas genes involved in RNA processing and cellular proliferation were highly represented in the most malignant cases. By combining transcriptomic and genomic data, we showed that LOH at 1p and 11q was associated with significantly decreased expression of 122 (61%) and 88 (27%) of the genes mapping to 1p35-36 and all of 11q, respectively, suggesting that multiple genes may be targeted by LOH events. A total of 71 of the 1p35-36 genes were also differentially expressed in the independent validation data set, providing a prioritized list of candidate neuroblastoma suppressor genes. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypotheses that the neuroblastoma