Science.gov

Sample records for multiple independent lyme

  1. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  2. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves. PMID:27635267

  3. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  4. Lyme Disease Presenting with Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Baker, Keith; Jeanmonod, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted multisystem inflammatory disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. With more than 25,000 CDC reported cases annually, it has become the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. We report a case of 38-year-old man with Lyme disease presenting with simultaneous palsy of 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves. PMID:27635267

  5. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  6. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The same disease occurs in many parts of Europe and Asia. In the United States, most Lyme ... Risk factors for Lyme disease include: Doing outside activities that increase tick exposure (for example, gardening, hunting, ...

  7. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  8. Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew L; Kobayashi, Takaaki; Higgins, Yvonne; Calkins, Hugh; Melia, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is a common disease that uncommonly affects the heart. Because of the rarity of this diagnosis and the frequent absence of other concurrent clinical manifestations of early Lyme disease, consideration of Lyme carditis demands a high level of suspicion when patients in endemic areas come to attention with cardiovascular symptoms and evidence of higher-order heart block. A majority of cases manifest as atrioventricular block. A minority of Lyme carditis cases are associated with myopericarditis. Like other manifestations of Lyme disease, carditis can readily be managed with antibiotic therapy and supportive care measures, such that affected patients almost always completely recover.

  9. Multiple independent transmission cycles of a tick-borne pathogen within a local host community.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Maude; Abrial, David; Gasqui, Patrick; Bord, Severine; Marsot, Maud; Masseglia, Sébastien; Pion, Angélique; Poux, Valérie; Zilliox, Laurence; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogens are maintained by multiple host species and involve multiple strains with potentially different phenotypic characteristics. Disentangling transmission patterns in such systems is often challenging, yet investigating how different host species contribute to transmission is crucial to properly assess and manage disease risk. We aim to reveal transmission cycles of bacteria within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which include Lyme disease agents. We characterized Borrelia genotypes found in 488 infected Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Sénart Forest located near Paris (France). These genotypes were compared to those observed in three sympatric species of small mammals and network analyses reveal four independent transmission cycles. Statistical modelling shows that two cycles involving chipmunks, an introduced species, and non-sampled host species such as birds, are responsible for the majority of tick infections. In contrast, the cycle involving native bank voles only accounts for a small proportion of infected ticks. Genotypes associated with the two primary transmission cycles were isolated from Lyme disease patients, confirming the epidemiological threat posed by these strains. Our work demonstrates that combining high-throughput sequence typing with networks tools and statistical modeling is a promising approach for characterizing transmission cycles of multi-host pathogens in complex ecological settings.

  10. Multiple independent transmission cycles of a tick-borne pathogen within a local host community.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Maude; Abrial, David; Gasqui, Patrick; Bord, Severine; Marsot, Maud; Masseglia, Sébastien; Pion, Angélique; Poux, Valérie; Zilliox, Laurence; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogens are maintained by multiple host species and involve multiple strains with potentially different phenotypic characteristics. Disentangling transmission patterns in such systems is often challenging, yet investigating how different host species contribute to transmission is crucial to properly assess and manage disease risk. We aim to reveal transmission cycles of bacteria within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which include Lyme disease agents. We characterized Borrelia genotypes found in 488 infected Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Sénart Forest located near Paris (France). These genotypes were compared to those observed in three sympatric species of small mammals and network analyses reveal four independent transmission cycles. Statistical modelling shows that two cycles involving chipmunks, an introduced species, and non-sampled host species such as birds, are responsible for the majority of tick infections. In contrast, the cycle involving native bank voles only accounts for a small proportion of infected ticks. Genotypes associated with the two primary transmission cycles were isolated from Lyme disease patients, confirming the epidemiological threat posed by these strains. Our work demonstrates that combining high-throughput sequence typing with networks tools and statistical modeling is a promising approach for characterizing transmission cycles of multi-host pathogens in complex ecological settings. PMID:27498685

  11. Multiple independent transmission cycles of a tick-borne pathogen within a local host community

    PubMed Central

    Jacquot, Maude; Abrial, David; Gasqui, Patrick; Bord, Severine; Marsot, Maud; Masseglia, Sébastien; Pion, Angélique; Poux, Valérie; Zilliox, Laurence; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Vourc’h, Gwenaël; Bailly, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Many pathogens are maintained by multiple host species and involve multiple strains with potentially different phenotypic characteristics. Disentangling transmission patterns in such systems is often challenging, yet investigating how different host species contribute to transmission is crucial to properly assess and manage disease risk. We aim to reveal transmission cycles of bacteria within the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex, which include Lyme disease agents. We characterized Borrelia genotypes found in 488 infected Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected in the Sénart Forest located near Paris (France). These genotypes were compared to those observed in three sympatric species of small mammals and network analyses reveal four independent transmission cycles. Statistical modelling shows that two cycles involving chipmunks, an introduced species, and non-sampled host species such as birds, are responsible for the majority of tick infections. In contrast, the cycle involving native bank voles only accounts for a small proportion of infected ticks. Genotypes associated with the two primary transmission cycles were isolated from Lyme disease patients, confirming the epidemiological threat posed by these strains. Our work demonstrates that combining high-throughput sequence typing with networks tools and statistical modeling is a promising approach for characterizing transmission cycles of multi-host pathogens in complex ecological settings. PMID:27498685

  12. [Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Herzer, P; Fingerle, V; Pfister, H-W; Krause, A

    2014-07-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem infectious disease affecting mainly the skin, nervous system, joints and heart. It is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex which are transmitted by ticks. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is based primarily on typical clinical symptoms and signs with serological confirmation. Antibiotic therapy is beneficial for all manifestations and treatment refractory cases are rare. The diagnosis "chronic Lyme borreliosis" is increasingly being misused for all conceivable medically unexplained symptoms. PMID:24969608

  13. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  14. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  15. American Lyme Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infectious Diseases, 35: 451-464, 2002) What is Lyme Disease? Lyme disease (LD) is an infection caused by ... mission with your own tax-deductible contribution. American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. PO Box 466 Lyme, CT 06371 ...

  16. [Lyme carditis].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Olszowska, Maria; Kaźnica-Wiatr, Magdalena; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infectious disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A steady increase in the number of cases is noticed both in Poland and Europe. Cardiac involvement in the course of borreliosis is relatively rare. It is estimated that it concerns about 0.5-10% of patients with Lyme disease. Cardiac involvement generally occurs in the early phase of illness. The most common manifestation of Lyme carditis are transient conduction abnormality, arrhythmias, myocarditis and pericarditis. The basic method of treatment Lyme carditis are antibiotics. The clinical course is usually benign. In most cases a complete recovery is observed. However, in a small proportion of patients dilated cardiomyopathy may occur. Furthermore, death from Lyme carditis has been reported. Lyme carditis remains a real diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. Factors that can make the diagnosis difficult are: atypical clinical picture, negation of tick bite, the absence of erythema migrans, onset of symptoms outside the period of tick activity and negative serological results in the initial stage of the disease.

  17. Multiple thermoregulatory effectors with independent central controls.

    PubMed

    McAllen, Robin M; Tanaka, Mutsumi; Ootsuka, Yoichiro; McKinley, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    This review first considers how mammalian body temperature regulation evolved, and how the brain's responses to thermoregulatory challenges are likely to be organised differently from the way an engineer would design them. This is because thermoregulatory effector mechanisms would have evolved one at a time, with each being superimposed on pre-existing mechanisms. There may be no functional need for the final ensemble of control loops to be coordinated by neural cross-connections: appropriate thermal thresholds would solve the problem sufficiently. Investigations first into thermoregulatory behaviours and later into unconscious thermoregulatory mechanisms (autonomic and shivering) have led investigators to the realisation that multiple control loops exist in the brain, with each effector system apparently regulated by its own central temperature sensors. This theme is developed with reference to data on four temperature-regulated neural outflows that have been studied on anaesthetized rats under standard conditions in the authors' laboratory. Direct comparisons were made between the behaviour of sympathetic nerves supplying the tail vasculature, vessels in the proximal hairy skin, interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) and fusimotor fibres to hind limb muscle. All four outflows were activated by cooling the skin, and all were silenced by neuronal inhibition in the medullary raphé. Their thermal thresholds were quite different, however, as were their relative responsiveness to core temperature. This was ranked as: tail > back skin > BAT > fusimotor. These and other data indicate that the four thermoeffector outflows are driven by separate neural pathways, each regulated by independent brain temperature sensors.

  18. Interleukin-10 alters effector functions of multiple genes induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in macrophages to regulate Lyme disease inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T; Singh, Shree R; Morici, Lisa A; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A

    2011-12-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation.

  19. Contrasting emergence of Lyme disease across ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Mysterud, Atle; Easterday, William Ryan; Stigum, Vetle Malmer; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Meisingset, Erling L.; Viljugrein, Hildegunn

    2016-01-01

    Global environmental changes are causing Lyme disease to emerge in Europe. The life cycle of Ixodes ricinus, the tick vector of Lyme disease, involves an ontogenetic niche shift, from the larval and nymphal stages utilizing a wide range of hosts, picking up the pathogens causing Lyme disease from small vertebrates, to the adult stage depending on larger (non-transmission) hosts, typically deer. Because of this complexity the role of different host species for emergence of Lyme disease remains controversial. Here, by analysing long-term data on incidence in humans over a broad geographical scale in Norway, we show that both high spatial and temporal deer population density increase Lyme disease incidence. However, the trajectories of deer population sizes play an overall limited role for the recent emergence of the disease. Our study suggests that managing deer populations will have some effect on disease incidence, but that Lyme disease may nevertheless increase as multiple drivers are involved. PMID:27306947

  20. Contrasting emergence of Lyme disease across ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mysterud, Atle; Easterday, William Ryan; Stigum, Vetle Malmer; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Meisingset, Erling L; Viljugrein, Hildegunn

    2016-06-16

    Global environmental changes are causing Lyme disease to emerge in Europe. The life cycle of Ixodes ricinus, the tick vector of Lyme disease, involves an ontogenetic niche shift, from the larval and nymphal stages utilizing a wide range of hosts, picking up the pathogens causing Lyme disease from small vertebrates, to the adult stage depending on larger (non-transmission) hosts, typically deer. Because of this complexity the role of different host species for emergence of Lyme disease remains controversial. Here, by analysing long-term data on incidence in humans over a broad geographical scale in Norway, we show that both high spatial and temporal deer population density increase Lyme disease incidence. However, the trajectories of deer population sizes play an overall limited role for the recent emergence of the disease. Our study suggests that managing deer populations will have some effect on disease incidence, but that Lyme disease may nevertheless increase as multiple drivers are involved.

  1. Contrasting emergence of Lyme disease across ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mysterud, Atle; Easterday, William Ryan; Stigum, Vetle Malmer; Aas, Anders Bjørnsgaard; Meisingset, Erling L; Viljugrein, Hildegunn

    2016-01-01

    Global environmental changes are causing Lyme disease to emerge in Europe. The life cycle of Ixodes ricinus, the tick vector of Lyme disease, involves an ontogenetic niche shift, from the larval and nymphal stages utilizing a wide range of hosts, picking up the pathogens causing Lyme disease from small vertebrates, to the adult stage depending on larger (non-transmission) hosts, typically deer. Because of this complexity the role of different host species for emergence of Lyme disease remains controversial. Here, by analysing long-term data on incidence in humans over a broad geographical scale in Norway, we show that both high spatial and temporal deer population density increase Lyme disease incidence. However, the trajectories of deer population sizes play an overall limited role for the recent emergence of the disease. Our study suggests that managing deer populations will have some effect on disease incidence, but that Lyme disease may nevertheless increase as multiple drivers are involved. PMID:27306947

  2. Lyme endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Hidri, N; Barraud, O; de Martino, S; Garnier, F; Paraf, F; Martin, C; Sekkal, S; Laskar, M; Jaulhac, B; Ploy, M-C

    2012-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common tick-borne disease with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Cardiac involvement has been reported during both the acute phase (atrioventricular block, pericarditis) and the chronic stage (dilated cardiomyopathy), but is rare (<5%). Here we describe the first case of Borrelia afzelii Lyme endocarditis, in a 61-year-old man living in an endemic area of France. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of B. afzelii DNA in the mitral valve by specific real-time PCR. He was treated empirically with amoxicillin for 6 weeks and remains well 12 months later. PMID:23043635

  3. Multiple-Wavelength Pyrometry Independent Of Emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-wavelength pyrometric method provides for determination of two sequential temperatures of same surface or temperatures of two surfaces made of same material. Temperatures measured, without knowing emissivity, by uncalibrated spectral radiometer.

  4. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  5. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  6. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  7. Origin of the Lyme Dome and implications for the timing of multiple Alleghanian deformational and intrusive events in southern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, and geochronology in the area of the Lyme dome, southern Connecticut provides constraints on the origin of the rocks in the core of the dome, the absolute timing of the principal deformational and thermal events attributed to Alleghanian orogenesis, and the processes that generated the dome. Detrital zircon geochronology in combination with ages on intrusive rocks brackets the deposition of quartzite in the core of the dome sometime between ca. 925 and 620 Ma. Granite and granodiorite intruded the Neoproteorozic metasedimentary rocks in the core of the dome at ca. 620 to 610 Ma. Four major early Permian events associated with the Alleghanian orogeny affected the rocks in the Lyme dome area. Syn-tectonic migmatization and widespread penetrative deformation (D1, ca. 300 - 290 Ma) included emplacement of alaskite at 290 ?? 4 Ma during regional foliation development and aluminosilicate-orthoclase metamorphic conditions. Rocks of the Avalon terrane may have wedged between Gander cover rocks and Gander basement in the core of the Lyme during D1. Limited structural evidence for diapiric uplift of the Lyme dome indicates that diapirism started late in D1 and was completed by D2 (ca. 290 - 280 Ma) when horizontal WNW contractional stresses dominated over vertical stresses. Second sillimanite metamorphism continued and syn-tectonic D2 granite pegmatite (288 ?? 4 Ma) and the Joshua Rock Granite Gniess (284 ?? 3 Ma) intruded at this time. North-northwest extension during D3 (ca. 280 - 275 Ma) led to granitic pegmatite intrusion along S3 cleavage planes and in extensional zones in boudin necks during hydraulic failure and decompression melting. Intrusion of a Westerly Granite dike at 275 ?? 4 Ma suggests that D3 extension was active, and perhaps concluding, by ca. 275 Ma. Late randomly oriented but gently dipping pegmatite dikes record a final stage of intrusion during D4 (ca. 275 - 260 Ma), and a switch from NNW extension to vertical

  8. Lyme Disease: Fact or Fiction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Preventing tick bites On people On pets In ... What you need to know about Lyme carditis Lyme Disease Rashes and Look-alikes Diagnosis and testing Two- ...

  9. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs.

  10. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs. PMID:26601457

  11. MyD88- and TRIF-independent induction of type I interferon drives naive B cell accumulation but not loss of lymph node architecture in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hastey, Christine J; Ochoa, Jennine; Olsen, Kimberley J; Barthold, Stephen W; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    Rapidly after infection, live Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, is found within lymph nodes, causing rapid and strong tissue enlargement, a loss of demarcation between B cell follicles and T cell zones, and an unusually large accumulation of B cells. We sought to explore the mechanisms underlying these changes, as lymph tissue disruption could be detrimental for the development of robust Borrelia-specific immunity. A time course study demonstrated that the loss of the normal lymph node structure was a distinct process that preceded the strong increases in B cells at the site. The selective increases in B cell frequencies were due not to proliferation but rather to cytokine-mediated repositioning of B cells to the lymph nodes, as shown with various gene-targeted and bone marrow irradiation chimeras. These studies demonstrated that B. burgdorferi infection induced type I interferon receptor (IFNR) signaling in lymph nodes in a MyD88- and TRIF-independent manner and that type I IFNR indirect signaling was required for the excessive increases of naive B cells at those sites. It did not, however, drive the observed histopathological changes, which occurred independently also from major shifts in the lymphocyte-homing chemokines, CXCL12, CXCL13, and CCL19/21, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and transwell migration experiments. Thus, B. burgdorferi infection drives the production of type I IFN in lymph nodes and in so doing strongly alters the cellular composition of the lymph nodes, with potential detrimental effects for the development of robust Borrelia-specific immunity.

  12. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  13. Lyme Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Lyme Disease Print A A A Text Size What's in ... and summer, you might hear about something called Lyme disease. It has nothing to do with limes, but ...

  14. Chronic Lyme disease: the controversies and the science.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    The diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease has been embroiled in controversy for many years. This is exacerbated by the lack of a clinical or microbiologic definition, and the commonality of chronic symptoms in the general population. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that Lyme disease is the appropriate diagnosis for only a minority of patients in whom it is suspected. In prospective studies of Lyme disease, very few patients go on to have a chronic syndrome dominated by subjective complaints. There is no systematic evidence that Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiology of Lyme disease, can be identified in patients with chronic symptoms following treated Lyme disease. Multiple prospective trials have revealed that prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor alleviate such post-Lyme syndromes. Extended courses of intravenous antibiotics have resulted in severe adverse events, which in light of their lack of efficacy, make them contraindicated.

  15. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Goldings, E A; Jericho, J

    1986-08-01

    Although initially considered a localized epidemic form of arthritis. Lyme disease is now known to have protean manifestation (skin, joint, heart, nervous system) and worldwide distribution. It is caused by infection with the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted by a variety of hard ticks and, in some localities, fleas. Antigenic variation between isolates may determine the differences in clinical expression observed between cases in North America and Europe. The reservoir in the animal kingdom is primarily in deer and mice but house pets have also been implicated. The disease is easily treated with oral antibiotics (tetracycline or penicillin) at an early stage but requires parenteral penicillin and can become refractory to medication at late stages. Prompt diagnosis assures the best outcome. Whereas the classic rash, erythema chronicum migrans, is pathognomonic, diagnosis in its absence may rest on serological tests. Bacteriological isolation is seldom successful and is lengthy (Shrestha et al, 1985). Since cloning of the DNA for several of B. burgdorferi antigens has been accomplished, utilization of hybridization techniques may allow rapid detection of the presence of the organism and confirm difficult cases in the future.

  16. Lyme disease in athletes.

    PubMed

    DuPrey, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks, is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. Athletes who train or compete in wooded environments in endemic regions are at increased risk of contracting Lyme disease. Variability in clinical presentation, masquerading symptoms, and limitations in testing may lead to misdiagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment result in full recovery for most patients with Lyme disease; however symptoms may persist for months to years, especially when diagnosis is delayed. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Lyme disease, with focus on the athletic population.

  17. Interleukin-10 Alters Effector Functions of Multiple Genes Induced by Borrelia burgdorferi in Macrophages To Regulate Lyme Disease Inflammation ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Aarti; Dixit, Saurabh; Philipp, Mario T.; Singh, Shree R.; Morici, Lisa A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Dennis, Vida A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates inflammatory responses elicited in vitro and in vivo by Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete. How IL-10 modulates these inflammatory responses still remains elusive. We hypothesize that IL-10 inhibits effector functions of multiple genes induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammation. Because macrophages are essential in the initiation of inflammation, we used mouse J774 macrophages and live B. burgdorferi spirochetes as the model target cell and stimulant, respectively. First, we employed transcriptome profiling to identify genes that were induced by stimulation of cells with live spirochetes and that were perturbed by addition of IL-10 to spirochete cultures. Spirochetes significantly induced upregulation of 347 genes at both the 4-h and 24-h time points. IL-10 inhibited the expression levels, respectively, of 53 and 65 of the 4-h and 24-h genes, and potentiated, respectively, at 4 h and 24 h, 65 and 50 genes. Prominent among the novel identified IL-10-inhibited genes also validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR2, IRAK3, TRAF1, IRG1, PTGS2, MMP9, IFI44, IFIT1, and CD40. Proteome analysis using a multiplex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed the IL-10 modulation/and or potentiation of RANTES/CCL5, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2)/CXCL2, IP-10/CXCL10, MIP-1α/CCL3, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)/CSF3, CXCL1, CXCL5, CCL2, CCL4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1α, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-9. Similar results were obtained using sonicated spirochetes or lipoprotein as stimulants. Our data show that IL-10 alters effectors induced by B. burgdorferi in macrophages to control concomitantly elicited inflammatory responses. Moreover, for the first time, this study provides global insight into potential mechanisms used by IL-10 to control Lyme disease inflammation. PMID

  18. Ocular Lyme borreliosis as a rare presentation of unilateral vision loss.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Kohli, Anita; Suarez, Maria J; Miller, P Elliott

    2016-04-25

    Ocular Lyme borreliosis is a rare manifestation of Lyme disease. We describe a case of an 80-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month history of unilateral painless central vision loss. Based on a temporal artery biopsy, she was initially diagnosed with giant cell arteritis and treated with a 3-day course of high-dose intravenous steroids. A more detailed history uncovered multiple previous treatments for Lyme disease and residence in an endemic Lyme area. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with ocular Lyme borreliosis and treated with intravenous antibiotics. After 5 weeks of treatment, unilateral vision loss did not progress and optic disc oedema resolved.

  19. Recognition of multiple antibody epitopes throughout Borrelia burgdorferi p66, a candidate adhesin, in patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ntchobo, H; Rothermel, H; Chege, W; Steere, A C; Coburn, J

    2001-03-01

    Antibody responses to p66, a candidate integrin ligand of Borrelia burgdorferi, were studied in 79 patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease. The central portion of p66 was previously shown to contain all of the information required for specific recognition of beta3-chain integrins, but work by others had suggested that the C-terminal portion of the protein contains a single surface-exposed, immunodominant loop. In examining antibody responses to full-length p66 and to three overlapping fragments of the protein, we found that the majority of Lyme disease patients had immunoglobulin M (IgM) and/or IgG responses to p66 and that, particularly early in the disease, epitopes throughout p66 were recognized. Among patients with later manifestations of the illness, antibody responses to the C-terminal portion of the protein were more prominent. These results demonstrate that Lyme disease patient sera recognize epitopes throughout p66.

  20. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm.

  1. Chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Lyme disease is a poorly defined diagnosis that is usually given to patients with prolonged, unexplained symptoms or with alternative medical diagnoses. Data do not support the proposition that chronic, treatment-refractory infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible for the many conditions that get labeled as chronic Lyme disease. Prolonged symptoms after successful treatment of Lyme disease are uncommon, but in rare cases may be severe. Prolonged courses of antibiotics neither prevent nor ameliorate these symptoms and are associated with considerable harm. PMID:25999227

  2. [Combatting Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Hovius, Joppe W R; Sprong, Hein

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of ticks seems to have increased with time, and the number of patients with Lyme disease in the Netherlands is also increasing. Lyme disease and other tick-transmitted diseases now attract a lot of attention. Several national initiatives at different levels are now in progress, with the aim of suppressing Lyme disease and providing better care for patients with indications of having these diseases. A more uniform approach between different treatment centres, joint research and further expansion of education and continuing education for physicians and the public could lead to further improvement.

  3. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events

    PubMed Central

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Hillis, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  4. Widespread transmission of independent cancer lineages within multiple bivalve species.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Michael J; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J; Iglesias, David; Sherry, James; Reinisch, Carol; Muttray, Annette F; Baldwin, Susan A; Goff, Stephen P

    2016-06-30

    Most cancers arise from oncogenic changes in the genomes of somatic cells, and while the cells may migrate by metastasis, they remain within that single individual. Natural transmission of cancer cells from one individual to another has been observed in two distinct cases in mammals (Tasmanian devils and dogs), but these are generally considered to be rare exceptions in nature. The discovery of transmissible cancer in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) suggested that this phenomenon might be more widespread. Here we analyse disseminated neoplasia in mussels (Mytilus trossulus), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), and golden carpet shell clams (Polititapes aureus) and find that neoplasias in all three species are attributable to independent transmissible cancer lineages. In mussels and cockles, the cancer lineages are derived from their respective host species; however, unexpectedly, cancer cells in P. aureus are all derived from Venerupis corrugata, a different species living in the same geographical area. No cases of disseminated neoplasia have thus far been found in V. corrugata from the same region. These findings show that transmission of cancer cells in the marine environment is common in multiple species, that it has originated many times, and that while most transmissible cancers are found spreading within the species of origin, cross-species transmission of cancer cells can occur. PMID:27338791

  5. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  6. Lyme disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sunil K

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis and management of Lyme disease in children is similar to that in adults with a few clinically relevant exceptions. The use of doxycycline as an initial empiric choice is to be avoided for children 8 years old and younger. Children may present with insidious onset of elevated intracranial pressure during acute disseminated Lyme disease; prompt diagnosis and treatment of this condition is important to prevent loss of vision. Children who acquire Lyme disease have an excellent prognosis even when they present with the late disseminated manifestation of Lyme arthritis. Guidance on the judicious use of serologic tests is provided. Pediatricians and family practitioners should be familiar with the prevention and management of tick bites, which are common in children.

  7. Pancytopenia in Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehrzad, Raman; Bravoco, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We present a 49-year-old man with subacute onset of fever, weakness, shortness of breath, unilateral lower extremity oedema and pancytopenia who was found to have positive serology for Lyme disease. The patient presented with an intravascular haemolytic pattern on laboratory findings where an extensive infectious disease and haematological workup ruled out ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, HIV, hepatitis B and other parasitic infections. This left a very atypical presentation of Lyme disease. PMID:24596410

  8. Multiple Independent Oscillatory Networks in the Degenerating Retina.

    PubMed

    Euler, Thomas; Schubert, Timm

    2015-01-01

    During neuronal degenerative diseases, microcircuits undergo severe structural alterations, leading to remodeling of synaptic connectivity. This can be particularly well observed in the retina, where photoreceptor degeneration triggers rewiring of connections in the retina's first synaptic layer (e.g., Strettoi et al., 2003; Haq et al., 2014), while the synaptic organization of inner retinal circuits appears to be little affected (O'Brien et al., 2014; Figures 1A,B). Remodeling of (outer) retinal circuits and diminishing light-driven activity due to the loss of functional photoreceptors lead to spontaneous activity that can be observed at different retinal levels (Figure 1C), including the retinal ganglion cells, which display rhythmic spiking activity in the degenerative retina (Margolis et al., 2008; Stasheff, 2008; Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Stasheff et al., 2011). Two networks have been suggested to drive the oscillatory activity in the degenerating retina: a network of remnant cone photoreceptors, rod bipolar cells (RBCs) and horizontal cells in the outer retina (Haq et al., 2014), and the AII amacrine cell-cone bipolar cell network in the inner retina (Borowska et al., 2011). Notably, spontaneous rhythmic activity in the inner retinal network can be triggered in the absence of synaptic remodeling in the outer retina, for example, in the healthy retina after photo-bleaching (Menzler et al., 2014). In addition, the two networks show remarkable differences in their dominant oscillation frequency range as well as in the types and numbers of involved cells (Menzler and Zeck, 2011; Haq et al., 2014). Taken together this suggests that the two networks are self-sustained and can be active independently from each other. However, it is not known if and how they modulate each other. In this mini review, we will discuss: (i) commonalities and differences between these two oscillatory networks as well as possible interaction pathways; (ii) how multiple self

  9. Lyme disease and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  10. Lyme disease vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wormser, G P

    1996-01-01

    Subunit vaccines consisting of single recombinant outer surface proteins (Osp) of Borrelia burgdorferi have been highly successful in protecting mice against challenge by borrelial strains closely related to the strain from which the immunogen was derived. Humoral immunity is sufficient for protection. A dual mode of action for these vaccines has been suggested because serum factors ingested by the tick during the blood meal may begin to reduce the spirochete inoculum prior to transmission to the host. At present two different recombinant OspA vaccine preparations (monovalent) are being evaluated in humans in large-scale phase III efficacy trials in the United States. Local discomfort at the intramuscular injection site has been the principal adverse effect seen to date with these vaccines, but further data on safety are being collected. The greater heterogeneity of OspA among Lyme Borrelia in Europe implies that a vaccine preparation containing multiple antigens (multivalent) may be necessary there, although this is also a concern in the United States.

  11. Lyme disease and the orthopaedic implications of lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian G; Cruz, Aristides I; Milewski, Matthew D; Shapiro, Eugene D

    2011-02-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. Increased awareness of the clinical manifestations of the disease is needed to improve detection and treatment. In the acute and late stages, Lyme disease may be difficult to distinguish from other disease processes. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of Lyme disease are directly related to the Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete and its effects on the integumentary, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal systems. Lyme arthritis is a common clinical manifestation of Lyme disease and should be considered in the evaluation of patients with monoarticular or pauciarticular joint complaints in a geographic area in which Lyme disease is endemic. Management of Lyme arthritis involves eradication of the spirochete with antibiotics. Generally, the prognosis is excellent. Arthroscopic synovectomy is reserved for refractory cases that do not respond to antibiotics.

  12. Recognition of Multiple Antibody Epitopes throughout Borrelia burgdorferi p66, a Candidate Adhesin, in Patients with Early or Late Manifestations of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ntchobo, Hyacinthe; Rothermel, Holly; Chege, Wambui; Steere, Allen C.; Coburn, Jenifer

    2001-01-01

    Antibody responses to p66, a candidate integrin ligand of Borrelia burgdorferi, were studied in 79 patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease. The central portion of p66 was previously shown to contain all of the information required for specific recognition of β3-chain integrins, but work by others had suggested that the C-terminal portion of the protein contains a single surface-exposed, immunodominant loop. In examining antibody responses to full-length p66 and to three overlapping fragments of the protein, we found that the majority of Lyme disease patients had immunoglobulin M (IgM) and/or IgG responses to p66 and that, particularly early in the disease, epitopes throughout p66 were recognized. Among patients with later manifestations of the illness, antibody responses to the C-terminal portion of the protein were more prominent. These results demonstrate that Lyme disease patient sera recognize epitopes throughout p66. PMID:11179382

  13. Macrophage Polarization during Murine Lyme Borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Lasky, Carrie E; Olson, Rachel M; Brown, Charles R

    2015-07-01

    Infection of C3H mice with Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, reliably produces an infectious arthritis and carditis that peak around 3 weeks postinfection and then spontaneously resolve. Macrophage polarization has been suggested to drive inflammation, the clearance of bacteria, and tissue repair and resolution in a variety of infectious disease models. During Lyme disease it is clear that macrophages are capable of clearing Borrelia spirochetes and exhausted neutrophils; however, the role of macrophage phenotype in disease development or resolution has not been studied. Using classical (NOS2) and alternative (CD206) macrophage subset-specific markers, we determined the phenotype of F4/80(+) macrophages within the joints and heart throughout the infection time course. Within the joint, CD206(+) macrophages dominated throughout the course of infection, and NOS2(+) macrophage numbers became elevated only during the peak of inflammation. We also found dual NOS2(+) CD206(+) macrophages which increased during resolution. In contrast to findings for the ankle joints, numbers of NOS2(+) and CD206(+) macrophages in the heart were similar at the peak of inflammation. 5-Lipoxygenase-deficient (5-LOX(-/-)) mice, which display a failure of Lyme arthritis resolution, recruited fewer F4/80(+) cells to the infected joints and heart, but macrophage subset populations were unchanged. These results highlight differences in the inflammatory infiltrates during Lyme arthritis and carditis and demonstrate the coexistence of multiple macrophage subsets within a single inflammatory site.

  14. Posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aucott, John N

    2015-06-01

    The prognosis following appropriate antibiotic treatment of early or late Lyme disease is favorable but can be complicated by persistent symptoms of unknown cause termed posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS), characterized by fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints that persist for 6 months or longer after completion of antibiotic therapy. Risk factors include delayed diagnosis, increased severity of symptoms, and presence of neurologic symptoms at time of initial treatment. Two-tier serologic testing is neither sensitive nor specific for diagnosis of PTLDS because of variability in convalescent serologic responses after treatment of early Lyme disease. Optimal treatment of PTLDS awaits more precise understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in this illness and future treatment trials.

  15. Lyme disease: review.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Grażyna; Czepiel, Jacek; Leśniak, Maciej R; Garlicki, Aleksander; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-12-20

    Lyme disease is a multi-organ animal-borne disease, caused by spirochetes of Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), which typically affect the skin, nervous system, musculoskeletal system and heart. A history of confirmed exposure to tick bites, typical signs and symptoms of Lyme borreliosis and positive tests for anti-Bb antibodies, are the basis of a diagnosis. A two-step diagnosis is necessary: the first step is based on a high sensitivity ELISA test with positive results confirmed by a more specific Western blot assay. Antibiotic therapy is curative in most cases, but some patients develop chronic symptoms, which do not respond to antibiotics. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the symptoms, clinical diagnosis and treatment of Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23319969

  16. Disseminated Lyme borreliosis preceded by hepatitis in an African American male.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Huang, William Wei-ting; Brown, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and has a multitude of systemic effects. Infrequently, however, Lyme disease is seen to cause liver dysfunction. Dermatologists should be aware that early, disseminated borreliosis can present with multiple erythema migrans plaques and hepatitis. PMID:23122011

  17. Disseminated Lyme borreliosis preceded by hepatitis in an African American male.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ramin; Huang, William Wei-ting; Brown, Katherine

    2012-10-15

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and has a multitude of systemic effects. Infrequently, however, Lyme disease is seen to cause liver dysfunction. Dermatologists should be aware that early, disseminated borreliosis can present with multiple erythema migrans plaques and hepatitis.

  18. Lyme Disease Data

    MedlinePlus

    ... the northeast and upper Midwest. Lyme Disease Data File To facilitate the public health and research community’s ... Right–click the link and select “save”. File Formats Help: How do I view different file ...

  19. Chronic Lyme disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Marques, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Studies have shown that most patients diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease either have no objective evidence of previous or current infection with Borrelia burgdorferi or are patients who should be classified as having post-Lyme disease syndrome, which is defined as continuing or relapsing nonspecific symptoms (such as fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and cognitive complaints) in a patient previously treated for Lyme disease. Despite extensive study, there is currently no clear evidence that post-Lyme disease syndrome is caused by persistent infection with B burgdorferi. Four randomized placebo-controlled studies have shown that antibiotic therapy offers no sustained benefit to patients who have post-Lyme disease syndrome. These studies also showed a substantial placebo effect and a significant risk of treatment-related adverse events. Further research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying persistent symptoms after Lyme disease and controlled trials of new approaches to the treatment and management of these patients are needed.

  20. Multiple independent introductions of Plasmodium falciparum in South America

    PubMed Central

    Yalcindag, Erhan; Elguero, Eric; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Akiana, Jean; Anderson, Timothy J.; Aubouy, Agnes; Balloux, François; Besnard, Patrick; Bogreau, Hervé; Carnevale, Pierre; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Fontenille, Didier; Gamboa, Dionicia; Jombart, Thibaut; Le Mire, Jacques; Leroy, Eric; Maestre, Amanda; Mayxay, Mayfong; Ménard, Didier; Musset, Lise; Newton, Paul N.; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Noya, Oscar; Ollomo, Benjamin; Rogier, Christophe; Veron, Vincent; Wide, Albina; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Carme, Bernard; Legrand, Eric; Chevillon, Christine; Ayala, Francisco J.; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2012-01-01

    The origin of Plasmodium falciparum in South America is controversial. Some studies suggest a recent introduction during the European colonizations and the transatlantic slave trade. Other evidence—archeological and genetic—suggests a much older origin. We collected and analyzed P. falciparum isolates from different regions of the world, encompassing the distribution range of the parasite, including populations from sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and South America. Analyses of microsatellite and SNP polymorphisms show that the populations of P. falciparum in South America are subdivided in two main genetic clusters (northern and southern). Phylogenetic analyses, as well as Approximate Bayesian Computation methods suggest independent introductions of the two clusters from African sources. Our estimates of divergence time between the South American populations and their likely sources favor a likely introduction from Africa during the transatlantic slave trade. PMID:22203975

  1. Delivering multiple independent RIB simultaneously: Technical and operational challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, A. C.

    2016-06-01

    ISAC is an ISOL-type facility at which RIB are produced by direct reactions of 480 MeV protons from TRIUMFs main cyclotron on thick targets. Like other ISOL-type facilities, ISAC is limited to the production and delivery of a single RIB at any given time. ARIEL, the Advanced Rare-IsotopE Laboratory, will provide for the production and delivery of, ultimately, two additional RIB, the first produced by photofission on actinide targets using electrons from a new superconducting electron linac and the second by direct and indirect reactions with protons from TRIUMFs main cyclotron. This will allow for the simultaneous delivery of three independent RIB to experimental areas at ARIEL and ISAC. The shift from single-user to multi-user operation will introduce significant technical and operational challenges that RIB facilities have not yet had to address. Almost all aspects of facility operation will become more complex as the first RIB from ARIEL targets become available.

  2. [Lyme disease: an update].

    PubMed

    García Meléndez, Martha Elena; Skinner Taylor, Cassandra; Salas Alanís, Julio César; Ocampo Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is an emerging infection caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. It is the most common vector-borne disease in the USA and Europe, and it is transmitted to humans through the bite of ticks of the genus Ixodes. Its animal reservoirs are the white-tailed deer, the white-footed mouse, and other small mammals. It is considered the new "great imitator", with its diagnosis being a major challenge. Traditionally it is divided into four stages, early localized disease, early disseminated, late disease, and the post-Lyme syndrome. Clinical manifestations may be both cutaneous and systemic, and can have cardiovascular, neurological, and musculoskeletal involvement. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings and can be confirmed by serologic studies (ELISA and Western Blot). The best preventive method is to avoid exposure to vectors. The aim of treatment with antibiotics (doxycycline and cephalosporins) is to relieve symptoms and prevent sequelae.

  3. Multiple correlation computer program determines relationships between several independent and dependent variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaspar, H.; Newsbaum, J. B.

    1967-01-01

    Relationships between independent and dependent variables are determined by multiple correlation computer program. This is applied to research and experimental design and development of complex hardware and components that require test programs.

  4. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    You may get Lyme disease when you are bitten by a tick that has been infected with the germ (bacteria) that causes Lyme ... I have a tick bite, will I always get Lyme disease? Can I get Lyme disease even if I ...

  5. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S.; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P.; Marques, Adriana R.

    2016-01-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen’s possible immune evasion mechanisms. PMID:26718339

  6. Epitope-Specific Evolution of Human B Cell Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE Protein from Early to Late Stages of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacek, Elzbieta; Tang, Kevin S; Komorowski, Lars; Ajamian, Mary; Probst, Christian; Stevenson, Brian; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-02-01

    Most immunogenic proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, are known or expected to contain multiple B cell epitopes. However, the kinetics of the development of human B cell responses toward the various epitopes of individual proteins during the course of Lyme disease has not been examined. Using the highly immunogenic VlsE as a model Ag, we investigated the evolution of humoral immune responses toward its immunodominant sequences in 90 patients with a range of early to late manifestations of Lyme disease. The results demonstrate the existence of asynchronous, independently developing, Ab responses against the two major immunogenic regions of the VlsE molecule in the human host. Despite their strong immunogenicity, the target epitopes were inaccessible to Abs on intact spirochetes, suggesting a lack of direct immunoprotective effect. These observations document the association of immune reactivity toward specific VlsE sequences with different phases of Lyme disease, demonstrating the potential use of detailed epitope mapping of Ags for staging of the infection, and offer insights regarding the pathogen's possible immune evasion mechanisms.

  7. No Geographic Correlation between Lyme Disease and Death Due to 4 Neurodegenerative Disorders, United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Perea, Anna E; Pastula, Daniel M; Mead, Paul S

    2015-11-01

    Associations between Lyme disease and certain neurodegenerative diseases have been proposed, but supportive evidence for an association is lacking. Similar geographic distributions would be expected if 2 conditions were etiologically linked. Thus, we compared the distribution of Lyme disease cases in the United States with the distributions of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), and Parkinson disease; no geographic correlations were identified. Lyme disease incidence per US state was not correlated with rates of death due to ALS, MS, or Parkinson disease; however, an inverse correlation was detected between Lyme disease and Alzheimer disease. The absence of a positive correlation between the geographic distribution of Lyme disease and the distribution of deaths due to Alzheimer disease, ALS, MS, and Parkinson disease provides further evidence that Lyme disease is not associated with the development of these neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. New insights into Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Brandon N; Gherezghiher, Teshome B; Hilario, Jennifer D; Kellermann, Gottfried H

    2015-08-01

    Lyme borreliosis is transmitted through the bite of a tick that is infected by the bacterial spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Clinical manifestation of the disease can lead to heart conditions, neurological disorders, and inflammatory disorders. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of oxidative stress and intracellular communication in Lyme borreliosis patients. Mitochondrial superoxide and cytosolic ionized calcium was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Lyme borreliosis patients and healthy controls. Mitochondrial superoxide levels were significantly higher (p<0.0001) in Lyme borreliosis patients (n=32) as compared to healthy controls (n=30). Significantly low (p<0.0001) levels of cytosolic ionized calcium were also observed in Lyme borreliosis patients (n=11) when compared to healthy controls (n=11). These results indicate that there is an imbalance of reactive oxygen species and cytosolic calcium in Lyme borreliosis patients. The results further suggest that oxidative stress and interrupted intracellular communication may ultimately contribute to a condition of mitochondrial dysfunction in the immune cells of Lyme borreliosis patients.

  9. Nervous system Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-06-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis or radiculoneuritis occur in up to 15% of patients with untreated Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Presentations of multifocal PNS involvement can range from painful monoradiculitis to confluent mononeuropathy multiplex. Serologic testing is highly accurate after 4 to 6 weeks of infection. In CNS infection, production of anti-Bburgdorferi antibody is often demonstrable in CSF. Oral antimicrobials are microbiologically curative in virtually all patients, including acute European neuroborreliosis. Severe cases may require parenteral treatment. The fatigue and cognitive symptoms seen in some patients with extra-neurological disease are neither evidence of CNS infection nor specific to Lyme disease.

  10. Epidemiology of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Mead, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne illness in North America and Europe. The etiologic agent, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, is transmitted to humans by certain species of Ixodes ticks, which are found widely in temperate regions of the Northern hemisphere. Clinical features are diverse, but death is rare. The risk of human infection is determined by the geographic distribution of vector tick species, ecologic factors that influence tick infection rates, and human behaviors that promote tick bite. Rates of infection are highest among children 5 to 15 years old and adults older than 50 years.

  11. Perspectives on "chronic Lyme disease".

    PubMed

    Baker, Phillip J

    2008-07-01

    There is much controversy about the treatment of Lyme disease with respect to 2 poorly defined entities: "chronic Lyme disease" and "posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome." In the absence of direct evidence that these conditions are the result of a persistent infection, some mistakenly advocate extended antibiotic therapy (>/=6 months), which can do great harm and has resulted in at least 1 death. The purpose of this brief report is to review what is known from clinical research about these conditions to assist both practicing physicians and lawmakers in making sound and safe decisions with respect to treatment.

  12. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. PMID:6516450

  13. The emergence of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Steere, Allen C.; Coburn, Jenifer; Glickstein, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Since its identification nearly 30 years ago, Lyme disease has continued to spread, and there have been increasing numbers of cases in the northeastern and north central US. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes infection by migration through tissues, adhesion to host cells, and evasion of immune clearance. Both innate and adaptive immune responses, especially macrophage- and antibody-mediated killing, are required for optimal control of the infection and spirochetal eradication. Ecological conditions favorable to the disease, and the challenge of prevention, predict that Lyme disease will be a continuing public health concern. PMID:15085185

  14. The emergence of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C; Coburn, Jenifer; Glickstein, Lisa

    2004-04-01

    Since its identification nearly 30 years ago, Lyme disease has continued to spread, and there have been increasing numbers of cases in the northeastern and north central US. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, causes infection by migration through tissues, adhesion to host cells, and evasion of immune clearance. Both innate and adaptive immune responses, especially macrophage- and antibody-mediated killing, are required for optimal control of the infection and spirochetal eradication. Ecological conditions favorable to the disease, and the challenge of prevention, predict that Lyme disease will be a continuing public health concern.

  15. Lyme Borreliosis and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  16. Lyme borreliosis and skin.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Biju; Chatterjee, Manas

    2013-05-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness which is caused by the strains of spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and transmitted by the tick, Ixodes. Though very commonly reported from the temperate regions of the world, the incidence has increased worldwide due to increasing travel and changing habitats of the vector. Few cases have been reported from the Indian subcontinent too. Skin manifestations are the earliest to occur, and diagnosing these lesions followed by appropriate treatment, can prevent complications of the disease, which are mainly neurological. The three main dermatological manifestations are erythema chronicum migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. Many other dermatological conditions including morphea, lichen sclerosus and lately B cell lymphoma, have been attributed to the disease. Immunofluorescence and polymerase reaction tests have been developed to overcome the problems for diagnosis. Culture methods are also used for diagnosis. Treatment with Doxycycline is the mainstay of management, though prevention is of utmost importance. Vaccines against the condition are still not very successful. Hence, the importance of recognising the cutaneous manifestations early, to prevent systemic complications which can occur if left untreated, can be understood. This review highlights the cutaneous manifestations of Lyme borreliosis and its management. PMID:23723463

  17. Nervous system Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the multisystem infectious disease caused by the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi involves the nervous system in 10-15% of affected individuals. Manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and mononeuropathy multiplex. Encephalopathy, identical to that seen in many systemic inflammatory diseases, can occur during active systemic infection. It is not specific to Lyme disease and only rarely is evidence of nervous system infection. Diagnosis of systemic disease is based on demonstration of specific antibodies in peripheral blood by means of two-tier testing with an ELISA and Western blot. Central nervous system infection often results in specific antibody production in the CSF, demonstrable by comparing spinal fluid to blood serologies. Treatment is straightforward and curative in most instances. Many patients can be treated effectively with oral antibiotics such as doxycycline; in severe CNS infection parenteral treatment with ceftriaxone or other similar agents is highly effective. Treatment should usually be for 2 to at most 4 weeks. Longer treatment adds no therapeutic benefit but does add substantial risk.

  18. Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the four planes of development and the periods of creation and crystallization within each plane. Identifies the type of independence that should be achieved by the end of the first two planes of development. Maintains that it is through individual work on the environment that one achieves independence. (KB)

  19. Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2011-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10% to 15% of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.

  20. Laboratory aspects of Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G

    1988-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (Lyme disease), a common tick-borne disorder of people and domestic animals in North America and Europe, is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Following the discovery and initial propagation of this agent in 1981 came revelations that other tick-associated infectious disorders are but different forms of Lyme borreliosis. A challenge for the clinician and microbiology laboratory is confirmation that a skin rash, a chronic meningitis, an episode of myocarditis, or an arthritic joint is the consequence of B. burgdorferi infection. The diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis may be established by (i) directly observing the spirochete in host fluid or tissue, (ii) recovering the etiologic spirochete from the patient in culture medium or indirectly through inoculation of laboratory animals, or (iii) carrying out serologic tests with the patient's serum or cerebrospinal fluid. The last method, while lacking in discriminatory power, is the most efficacious diagnostic assay for most laboratories at present. Images PMID:3069200

  1. Epidemiology of European Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, S; Granström, M; Gray, J S; Stanek, G

    1998-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis occurs throughout Europe and is particularly prevalent in the east. In a small proportion of untreated cases serious sequelae may occur, but Lyme borreliosis alone does not cause death. Clinical and serological diagnosis can still be problematic and the various genomospecies may cause different disease manifestations as well as differing immunological responses. However, considerable progress has been made in standardising case definitions and serological testing and interpretation. Few countries have official reporting systems for Lyme borreliosis and most figures on incidence are extrapolated from serodiagnosis data and seroprevalence studies. Geographical variations in incidence seem to correlate with the prevalence of infected ticks, which are mainly associated with varied deciduous forest. The complex ecology of Lyme borreliosis makes it difficult to implement preventive measures, so improving public knowledge of risk factors and methods for personal protection remain the best option at present.

  2. Lyme disease. A Canadian perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L.; Costero, A.

    1993-01-01

    Lyme disease is an expanding community health issue in the United States. This has led to greater public awareness in Canada, although the disease remains rare here. We review the biology of ticks and show how feeding patterns are relevant to disease transmission. Diagnosing Lyme disease is sometimes problematic, but treatment can be effective, particularly in the early stages. Preventive measures are aimed at avoiding tick contact and early tick removal. Images Figure 1 PMID:8489644

  3. "Capitalizing on Sport": Sport, Physical Education and Multiple Capitals in Scottish Independent Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, John; Lingard, Bob; Weiner, Gaby; Forbes, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on a research study into the existence and use of different forms of capital--including social, cultural and physical capital--in three independent schools in Scotland. We were interested in understanding how these forms of capital work to produce and reproduce "advantage" and "privilege". Analysis is framed by a multiple capitals…

  4. Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ Health care providers Educational materials Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir It ... ONE 7(1): e29914. HHS Special Webinar on Lyme Disease Persistence frame support disabled and/or not supported ...

  5. Datafish Multiphase Data Mining Technique to Match Multiple Mutually Inclusive Independent Variables in Large PACS Databases.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Brendan P; Klochko, Chad; Halabi, Safwan; Siegal, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective data mining has tremendous potential in research but is time and labor intensive. Current data mining software contains many advanced search features but is limited in its ability to identify patients who meet multiple complex independent search criteria. Simple keyword and Boolean search techniques are ineffective when more complex searches are required, or when a search for multiple mutually inclusive variables becomes important. This is particularly true when trying to identify patients with a set of specific radiologic findings or proximity in time across multiple different imaging modalities. Another challenge that arises in retrospective data mining is that much variation still exists in how image findings are described in radiology reports. We present an algorithmic approach to solve this problem and describe a specific use case scenario in which we applied our technique to a real-world data set in order to identify patients who matched several independent variables in our institution's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) database. PMID:26572132

  6. Datafish Multiphase Data Mining Technique to Match Multiple Mutually Inclusive Independent Variables in Large PACS Databases.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Brendan P; Klochko, Chad; Halabi, Safwan; Siegal, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective data mining has tremendous potential in research but is time and labor intensive. Current data mining software contains many advanced search features but is limited in its ability to identify patients who meet multiple complex independent search criteria. Simple keyword and Boolean search techniques are ineffective when more complex searches are required, or when a search for multiple mutually inclusive variables becomes important. This is particularly true when trying to identify patients with a set of specific radiologic findings or proximity in time across multiple different imaging modalities. Another challenge that arises in retrospective data mining is that much variation still exists in how image findings are described in radiology reports. We present an algorithmic approach to solve this problem and describe a specific use case scenario in which we applied our technique to a real-world data set in order to identify patients who matched several independent variables in our institution's picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) database.

  7. Lyme disease and current aspects of immunization

    PubMed Central

    Kamradt, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne multisystem disease that affects primarily the skin, nervous system, heart and joints. At least three species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, namely Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii, can cause the disease. This review will focus mainly on the pathophysiology of Lyme arthritis, the long-term outcome of Lyme disease, and the recently licensed vaccine against Lyme disease. PMID:11879534

  8. Nervous system lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, a multisystem spirochetal infection, continues to be the subject of considerable debate, but not controversy. Recent years have seen improvements in diagnostic tools, better understanding of pathophysiology, and increasing evidence of efficacy of standard treatment regimens. Nervous system involvement is particularly confusing to patients and many physicians. A rational approach based on objective findings can clarify the cause and dictate the best treatment of patients' difficulties. Diagnosis for all but the earliest cases rests on the combination of likely contact with infected Ixodes ticks and laboratory confirmation of exposure to the causative organism, Borrelia burgdorferi (two-tier serology, combining ELISA with a confirmatory Western blot). Treatment is generally with oral antimicrobials such as doxycycline. Parenteral regimens are usually necessary only for the most severe cases.

  9. Treatment of Lyme borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis in humans. This inflammatory disease can affect the skin, the peripheral and central nervous system, the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system and rarely the eyes. Early stages are directly associated with viable bacteria at the site of inflammation. The pathogen-host interaction is complex and has been elucidated only in part. B. burgdorferi is highly susceptible to antibiotic treatment and the majority of patients profit from this treatment. Some patients develop chronic persistent disease despite repeated antibiotics. Whether this is a sequel of pathogen persistence or a status of chronic auto-inflammation, auto-immunity or a form of fibromyalgia is highly debated. Since vaccination is not available, prevention of a tick bite or chemoprophylaxis is important. If the infection is manifest, then treatment strategies should target not only the pathogen by using antibiotics but also the chronic inflammation by using anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:20067594

  10. Lyme borreliosis in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Strle, F

    1999-12-01

    Basic epidemiological findings on Lyme borreliosis in Slovenia are presented. Data on vertebrate reservoir hosts are relatively modest. The presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato was demonstrated in about 20% of deer and 15-41% of examined small mammals. The presence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato was found by polymerase chain reaction in one half of 34 examined small mammals. Ixodes ricinus ticks have been found infected in all geographical regions of Slovenia examined till now. The highest infection rate was detected in the central part of Slovenia where almost 50% of adult ticks and one third of nymphs were positive by culture. The first isolation of B. burgdorferi sensu lato from material of Slovene patients succeeded in 1988 while the first isolates from ticks were obtained as late as 1993. The source material of human isolates has been skin, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, as well as synovial tissue and fluid. Thus far four Borrelia species were found by isolation to cause disease in humans: B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, and B. bissettii. The majority of typed isolates belong to B. afzelii, but B. garinii slightly predominates among strains cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. Lyme borreliosis has been mandatory reportable in Slovenia for the last 11 years. It is the most common tick-borne disease and is present all over the country. The incidence has been increasing. In 1997 155/100,000 cases were recorded; in some regions the incidence was even substantially higher. The disease affects both sexes (as a rule more often women than men) and all age groups. The incidence is the highest in persons 30-50 years of age, followed by children aged 6-15 years. Erythema migrans is by far the most common recorded manifestation. PMID:10652723

  11. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  12. Pharmacist initiation of postexposure doxycycline for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anita N; Orr, K Kelly; Bratberg, Jeffrey P; Silverblatt, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To enhance public access to prophylaxis for Lyme disease following an identified Ixodes scapularis tick bite through pharmacist-initiated antibiotic therapy and to assess patient satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service provided. SETTING Independent community pharmacy in Charlestown, RI, from May to October 2012. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Under a collaborative practice agreement, trained pharmacists at an independent pharmacy identified patients eligible for postexposure antibiotic prophylaxis following attachment and removal of an I. scapularis tick (commonly known as a deer tick) and dispensed two 100 mg tablets of doxycycline. Patients were included if they were 18 years or older, provided informed consent, had an estimated time of tick attachment of 36 hours or more, had the tick removed within 72 hours of visit, denied contraindications to doxycycline therapy, and reported telephone access for follow-up. Patients enrolled in the study protocol were given counseling related to doxycycline, signs and symptoms of Lyme disease, and future tick prevention strategies. PRACTICE INNOVATION Pharmacist initiation of doxycycline prophylaxis has not been described in the literature previously. Successful pharmacist initiation of antibiotic prophylaxis may have broader implications for states with endemic Lyme disease or other infectious disease public health concerns. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient self-reported adverse outcomes and satisfaction with the pharmacy-based service. RESULTS Eight patients enrolled in the study and completed the follow-up survey. The results indicated a high level of satisfaction with the pharmacy services provided, with no reports of the subsequent development of Lyme disease symptoms or major adverse events. CONCLUSION The project has expanded to three community pharmacy sites in southern Rhode Island based on this experience. Similar pharmacy-based collaborative practice models should be considered in highly endemic Lyme disease

  13. Gender Differences in Childhood Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Tveitnes, Dag; Øymar, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many neurological diseases show differences between genders. We studied gender differences in childhood Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) in an endemic area of Lyme borreliosis in Norway. Methods. In a population based study, all children (<14 years of age) with symptoms suspicious of LNB, including all children with acute facial nerve palsy, were evaluated for LNB by medical history, clinical examination, blood tests, and lumbar puncture. LNB was diagnosed according to international criteria. Results. 142 children were diagnosed with LNB during 2001–2009. Facial nerve palsy was more common in girls (86%) than in boys (62%) (p < 0.001), but headache and/or neck stiffness as the only symptom was more common in boys (30%) than in girls (10%) (p = 0.003). The girls were younger than boys and had a shorter duration of symptoms, but boys had a higher level of pleocytosis than girls. In a multivariate analysis, both gender and having headache and neck stiffness were associated with a higher level of pleocytosis. Conclusion. Girls and boys have different clinical presentations of LNB, and boys have a higher level of inflammation than girls independent of the clinical presentation. PMID:26576072

  14. Conspicuous impacts of inconspicuous hosts on the Lyme disease epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Dustin; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2007-01-01

    Emerging zoonotic pathogens are a constant threat to human health throughout the world. Control strategies to protect public health regularly fail, due in part to the tendency to focus on a single host species assumed to be the primary reservoir for a pathogen. Here, we present evidence that a diverse set of species can play an important role in determining disease risk to humans using Lyme disease as a model. Host-targeted public health strategies to control the Lyme disease epidemic in North America have focused on interrupting Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss) transmission between blacklegged ticks and the putative dominant reservoir species, white-footed mice. However, B. burgdorferi ss infects more than a dozen vertebrate species, any of which could transmit the pathogen to feeding ticks and increase the density of infected ticks and Lyme disease risk. Using genetic and ecological data, we demonstrate that mice are neither the primary host for ticks nor the primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi ss, feeding 10% of all ticks and 25% of B. burgdorferi-infected ticks. Inconspicuous shrews feed 35% of all ticks and 55% of infected ticks. Because several important host species influence Lyme disease risk, interventions directed at a multiple host species will be required to control this epidemic. PMID:18029304

  15. Impact of biodiversity and seasonality on Lyme-pathogen transmission.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yijun; Wu, Jianhong; Wu, Xiaotian

    2014-11-28

    Lyme disease imposes increasing global public health challenges. To better understand the joint effects of seasonal temperature variation and host community composition on the pathogen transmission, a stage-structured periodic model is proposed by integrating seasonal tick development and activity, multiple host species and complex pathogen transmission routes between ticks and reservoirs. Two thresholds, one for tick population dynamics and the other for Lyme-pathogen transmission dynamics, are identified and shown to fully classify the long-term outcomes of the tick invasion and disease persistence. Seeding with the realistic parameters, the tick reproduction threshold and Lyme disease spread threshold are estimated to illustrate the joint effects of the climate change and host community diversity on the pattern of Lyme disease risk. It is shown that climate warming can amplify the disease risk and slightly change the seasonality of disease risk. Both the "dilution effect" and "amplification effect" are observed by feeding the model with different possible alternative hosts. Therefore, the relationship between the host community biodiversity and disease risk varies, calling for more accurate measurements on the local environment, both biotic and abiotic such as the temperature and the host community composition.

  16. Post-Lyme disease syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dąbek, Józefa; Cieślik, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    About 10% of patients with Lyme disease continue to experience musculoskeletal pain and cognitive dysfunction after recommended antibiotic treatment. This condition is called post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLDS) or post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. These two terms are used interchangeably. The pathogenesis of PLDS has been controversial. The hypothesis that patients with PLDS may harbor hidden reservoirs of Borrelia burgdorferi after their initial antibiotic treatment is difficult to accept. The prospective, double-blind studies contradict this point of view. Also, recently published research applying xenodiagnosis to PLDS supports the opinion that PLDS most likely has an autoimmune background. Lengthy courses of antibiotics are not justified in patients with PLDS because of the lack of benefit, and they are fraught with hazards. Most patients with PLDS recover from persistent symptoms with time. However, it can take months before they feel completely well. PMID:27407225

  17. Recognising and understanding Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere and its incidence is rising, leading to increased public health concerns. It is important to understand the nature of the disease because this defines the limitations of current understanding and knowledge. Significant uncertainties in diagnostics and treatment remain. There is an important role for the nurse in raising awareness, giving advice on prevention and correct tick removal, and in recognising signs of Lyme disease to assist access to prompt medical attention. Increased awareness, further research, improved diagnostics and advances in therapeutics are urgently required. PMID:25182921

  18. Recognising and understanding Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere and its incidence is rising, leading to increased public health concerns. It is important to understand the nature of the disease because this defines the limitations of current understanding and knowledge. Significant uncertainties in diagnostics and treatment remain. There is an important role for the nurse in raising awareness, giving advice on prevention and correct tick removal, and in recognising signs of Lyme disease to assist access to prompt medical attention. Increased awareness, further research, improved diagnostics and advances in therapeutics are urgently required.

  19. Generalizability in two clinical trials of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the generalizability of two National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials in patients with chronic Lyme disease and to determine whether selection factors resulted in the unfavorable outcomes. Design Epidemiologic review of the generalizability of two trials conducted by Klempner et al. This paper considers whether the study group was representative of the general chronic Lyme disease population. Results In their article in The New England Journal of Medicine, Klempner et al. failed to discuss the limitations of their clinical trials. This epidemiologic review argues that their results are not generalizable to the overall Lyme disease population. The treatment failure reported by the authors may be the result of enrolling patients who remained ill after an average of 4.7 years and an average of 3 previous courses of treatment. The poor outcome cited in these trials may be explained by having selected patients who had undergone delayed treatment or multiple treatments unsuccessfully. These selection factors were not addressed by the studies' authors, nor have they been discussed by reviewers. The trials have been over-interpreted by the NIH and widely publicized in a press release. The results have been extrapolated to other groups of Lyme disease patients by commentators, by a case discussant in an influential medical journal, and by health insurance companies to deny antibiotic treatment. Conclusion The Klempner et al. trials are assumed to be internally valid based on a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) design. However, this review argues that the trials have limited generalizability beyond the select group of patients with characteristics like those in the trial. Applying the findings to target populations with characteristics that differ from those included in these trials is inappropriate and may limit options for chronic Lyme disease patients who might benefit from antibiotic treatment

  20. Relaxing the independent censoring assumption in the Cox proportional hazards model using multiple imputation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; White, Ian R; Seaman, Shaun; Evans, Hannah; Baisley, Kathy; Carpenter, James

    2014-11-30

    The Cox proportional hazards model is frequently used in medical statistics. The standard methods for fitting this model rely on the assumption of independent censoring. Although this is sometimes plausible, we often wish to explore how robust our inferences are as this untestable assumption is relaxed. We describe how this can be carried out in a way that makes the assumptions accessible to all those involved in a research project. Estimation proceeds via multiple imputation, where censored failure times are imputed under user-specified departures from independent censoring. A novel aspect of our method is the use of bootstrapping to generate proper imputations from the Cox model. We illustrate our approach using data from an HIV-prevention trial and discuss how it can be readily adapted and applied in other settings. PMID:25060703

  1. Lyme Disease Comes to Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Describes one summer camp's plan for dealing with Lyme disease. Describes the disease and the deer tick. Recommends avoiding tick exposure through clothing, frequent examination, showers, and avoiding high grass and brushy areas, and using chemical insect repellents and chemicals to kill ticks in deer mouse nests. (DHP)

  2. Forest fragmentation and Lyme disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vectorborne disease in the United States. It is associated with human exposure to infected Ixodes ticks which exist even in degraded forest and herbaceous habitat. We provide an overview of the epidemiology, ecology and landscape charact...

  3. [Post-Lyme disease syndrome].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Jurkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    Lyme disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacteria, spirochete of the Borrelia type. Skin, nervous system, musculoskeletal system and heart may be involved in the course of the disease. The prognosis for properly treated Lyme disease is usually good. However, in about 5% of patients so called Post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLSD) develops. It is defined as a syndrome of subjective symptoms persisting despite proper treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The most common symptoms include: fatigue, muscle and joint pain, and problems with memory and concentration. Pathogenesis of PLDS remains unknown. The differential diagnosis should include neurological, rheumatic and mental diseases. Till now there is no causative treatment of PLDS. In relieving symptom rehabilitation, painkillers, anti-inflammatory and antidepressants medicines are recommended. Emotional and psychological supports are also necessary. Non-specific symptoms reported by patients with post- Lyme disease syndrome raise the suspicion of other pathologies. This can lead to misdiagnosis and implementation of unnecessary, potentially harmful to the patient's therapy. An increase in tick-borne diseases needs to increase physicians awareness of these issues.

  4. [Winged scapula in lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Rausch, V; Königshausen, M; Gessmann, J; Schildhauer, T A; Seybold, D

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the case of a young patient with one-sided winged scapula and lyme borreliosis. This disease can be very delimitating in daily life. If non-operative treatment fails, dynamic or static stabilization of the scapula can be a therapeutic option.

  5. [Post-Lyme disease syndrome].

    PubMed

    Błaut-Jurkowska, Justyna; Jurkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    Lyme disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacteria, spirochete of the Borrelia type. Skin, nervous system, musculoskeletal system and heart may be involved in the course of the disease. The prognosis for properly treated Lyme disease is usually good. However, in about 5% of patients so called Post-Lyme disease syndrome (PLSD) develops. It is defined as a syndrome of subjective symptoms persisting despite proper treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi infection. The most common symptoms include: fatigue, muscle and joint pain, and problems with memory and concentration. Pathogenesis of PLDS remains unknown. The differential diagnosis should include neurological, rheumatic and mental diseases. Till now there is no causative treatment of PLDS. In relieving symptom rehabilitation, painkillers, anti-inflammatory and antidepressants medicines are recommended. Emotional and psychological supports are also necessary. Non-specific symptoms reported by patients with post- Lyme disease syndrome raise the suspicion of other pathologies. This can lead to misdiagnosis and implementation of unnecessary, potentially harmful to the patient's therapy. An increase in tick-borne diseases needs to increase physicians awareness of these issues. PMID:27000820

  6. The Positive Predictive Value of Lyme Elisa for the Diagnosis of Lyme Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, Susan C; Pollock, Nira R; Branda, John A; Gordon, Caroline D; Gordon, Catherine R; Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2015-11-01

    By using a Lyme enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we demonstrated that high ELISA index values are strongly predictive of Lyme disease. In children with clinical presentations consistent with Lyme disease, ELISA index values ≥3.0 had a positive predictive value of 99.4% (95% confidence interval: 98.1-99.8%) for Lyme disease, making a supplemental Western immunoblot potentially unnecessary.

  7. Scintigraphic evaluation of Lyme disease: Gallium-67 imaging of Lyme myositis

    SciTech Connect

    Kengen, R.A.; v.d. Linde, M.; Sprenger, H.G.; Piers, D.A. )

    1989-10-01

    A patient suffering from Lyme disease had cardiac conduction abnormalities, symptoms of arthritis, and myalgia. A Ga-67 image showed evidence of endomyocarditis, but intense skeletal muscle uptake pointed to Lyme myositis. Reference is made to two other case reports of Lyme myositis.

  8. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Corbin, Andrew B; Perry, Blair W; Andrew, Audra L; Pasquesi, Giulia I M; Smith, Eric N; Jezkova, Tereza; Boback, Scott M; Booth, Warren; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    Boa is a Neotropical genus of snakes historically recognized as monotypic despite its expansive distribution. The distinct morphological traits and color patterns exhibited by these snakes, together with the wide diversity of ecosystems they inhabit, collectively suggest that the genus may represent multiple species. Morphological variation within Boa also includes instances of dwarfism observed in multiple offshore island populations. Despite this substantial diversity, the systematics of the genus Boa has received little attention until very recently. In this study we examined the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of Boa populations using mitochondrial sequences and genome-wide SNP data obtained from RADseq. We analyzed these data at multiple geographic scales using a combination of phylogenetic inference (including coalescent-based species delimitation) and population genetic analyses. We identified extensive population structure across the range of the genus Boa and multiple lines of evidence for three widely-distributed clades roughly corresponding with the three primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. We also find both mitochondrial and nuclear support for independent origins and parallel evolution of dwarfism on offshore island clusters in Belize and Cayos Cochinos Menor, Honduras.

  9. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses reveal multiple species of Boa and independent origins of insular dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Adams, Richard H; Corbin, Andrew B; Perry, Blair W; Andrew, Audra L; Pasquesi, Giulia I M; Smith, Eric N; Jezkova, Tereza; Boback, Scott M; Booth, Warren; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-09-01

    Boa is a Neotropical genus of snakes historically recognized as monotypic despite its expansive distribution. The distinct morphological traits and color patterns exhibited by these snakes, together with the wide diversity of ecosystems they inhabit, collectively suggest that the genus may represent multiple species. Morphological variation within Boa also includes instances of dwarfism observed in multiple offshore island populations. Despite this substantial diversity, the systematics of the genus Boa has received little attention until very recently. In this study we examined the genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships of Boa populations using mitochondrial sequences and genome-wide SNP data obtained from RADseq. We analyzed these data at multiple geographic scales using a combination of phylogenetic inference (including coalescent-based species delimitation) and population genetic analyses. We identified extensive population structure across the range of the genus Boa and multiple lines of evidence for three widely-distributed clades roughly corresponding with the three primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. We also find both mitochondrial and nuclear support for independent origins and parallel evolution of dwarfism on offshore island clusters in Belize and Cayos Cochinos Menor, Honduras. PMID:27241629

  10. WAIS-III and WMS-III performance in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Keilp, John G; Corbera, Kathy; Slavov, Iordan; Taylor, Michael J; Sackeim, Harold A; Fallon, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the nature and degree of intellectual and memory deficits in chronic Lyme disease. In this study, 81 participants with rigorously diagnosed chronic Lyme disease were administered the newest revisions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-III), and compared to 39 nonpatients. On the WAIS-III, Lyme disease participants had poorer Full Scale and Performance IQ's. At the subtest level, differences were restricted to Information and the Processing Speed subtests. On the WMS-III, Lyme disease participants performed more poorly on Auditory Immediate, Immediate, Auditory Delayed, Auditory Recognition Delayed, and General Memory indices. Among WMS-III subtests, however, differences were restricted to Logical Memory (immediate and delayed) and Family Pictures (delayed only), a Visual Memory subtest. Discriminant analyses suggest deficits in chronic Lyme are best characterized as a combination of memory difficulty and diminished processing speed. Deficits were modest, between one-third and two-thirds of a standard deviation, consistent with earlier studies. Depression severity had a weak relationship to processing speed, but little other association to test performance. Deficits in chronic Lyme disease are consistent with a subtle neuropathological process affecting multiple performance tasks, although further work is needed to definitively rule out nonspecific illness effects.

  11. Variability in results from negative binomial models for Lyme disease measured at different spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phoebe; Waller, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease has been the subject of many studies due to increasing incidence rates year after year and the severe complications that can arise in later stages of the disease. Negative binomial models have been used to model Lyme disease in the past with some success. However, there has been little focus on the reliability and consistency of these models when they are used to study Lyme disease at multiple spatial scales. This study seeks to explore how sensitive/consistent negative binomial models are when they are used to study Lyme disease at different spatial scales (at the regional and sub-regional levels). The study area includes the thirteen states in the Northeastern United States with the highest Lyme disease incidence during the 2002-2006 period. Lyme disease incidence at county level for the period of 2002-2006 was linked with several previously identified key landscape and climatic variables in a negative binomial regression model for the Northeastern region and two smaller sub-regions (the New England sub-region and the Mid-Atlantic sub-region). This study found that negative binomial models, indeed, were sensitive/inconsistent when used at different spatial scales. We discuss various plausible explanations for such behavior of negative binomial models. Further investigation of the inconsistency and sensitivity of negative binomial models when used at different spatial scales is important for not only future Lyme disease studies and Lyme disease risk assessment/management but any study that requires use of this model type in a spatial context.

  12. Dispelling the chronic Lyme disease myth.

    PubMed

    Kemperman, Melissa M; Bakken, Johan S; Kravitz, Gary R

    2008-07-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness endemic to Minnesota that can have potentially severe complications. As the incidence of Lyme disease continues to increase, it is important for physicians in Minnesota to become familiar with its clinical aspects, including the concept of "chronic Lyme disease." Chronic Lyme disease is a misnomer that is often applied to patients with nonspecific presentations who may or may not have a history of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent that causes Lyme disease. When a patient does present with persistent nonspecific symptoms attributed to chronic Lyme disease, clinicians should ascertain the presence of objective manifestations, obtain laboratory results, and get a history of tick exposure. If active infection with B. burgdorferi is unlikely, they should avoid prescribing empiric antibiotic therapy and instead thoroughly evaluate the patient for other possible causes of the complaints and recommend appropriate care.

  13. A Presentation of Lyme Disease: Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Burcu; İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, Özlem M; Alabaz, Derya; Beşen, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-transmitted spirochete, B. burgdorferi. It can present with both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations, including aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, Bell's palsy and other cranial neuropathies, radiculoneuritis, and myelitis. However, pseudotumor cerebri associated with Lyme disease is rare. Here, we report a eight-year-old girl with the unusual manifestation of pseudotumor cerebri associated Lyme disease. PMID:27411423

  14. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  15. Unilateral phrenic nerve lesion in Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among a variety of more common differential diagnoses, the aetiology of acute respiratory failure includes Lyme neuroborreliosis. Case presentation We report an 87-years old huntsman with unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as a consequence of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Conclusion Although Lyme neuroborreliosis is a rare cause of diaphragmatic weakness, it should be considered in the differential workup because of its potentially treatable nature. PMID:23327473

  16. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Joyce L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and is also seen in areas of Europe and Asia. The growing deer and Ixodes species tick populations in many areas underscore the importance of clinicians to properly recognize and treat the different stages of Lyme disease. Controversy regarding the cause and management of persistent symptoms following treatment of Lyme disease persists and is highlighted in this review.

  17. Extraction of Neural Activity from In Vivo Optical Recordings Using Multiple Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Sakagami, Masanori; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Katura, Takusige; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Naoki

    A multiple independent component analysis (ICA) method based on the noisy time-delayed decorrelation algorithm is described that overcomes the problems and improves the usefulness of conventional ICA, which is commonly used for extracting the actual neural activity from data measured using optical recording with a voltage-sensitive dye to visualize neural activities in cortical areas as two-dimensional images. The problems with conventional ICA extraction include the lack of an a priori guarantee that the solution will be appropriate, the linear mixing of mutually independent random variables although the mixtures are not random variables but time signals in many applications, and the general requirement for repetitive calculation of large matrices. Application of multiple ICA to the extraction of neural activities in the guinea pig auditory cortex evoked by both click sounds and pure tones from optical recordings made using a voltage sensitive dye demonstrated that it effectively removes pulsatile and respiratory components from the measurement data and extracts neural activities from the optical recordings.

  18. Lyme arthritis of the pediatric ankle.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Amiethab; Walrath, Jessica; Hennrikus, William

    2014-10-01

    Lyme arthritis results from acute inflammation caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The number of cases per year has been rising since 2006, with a majority of patients being affected in the northeastern United States. Development of Lyme arthritis is of particular importance to the orthopedic surgeon because Lyme arthritis often presents as an acute episode of joint swelling and tenderness and may be confused with bacterial septic arthritis. Considering the vast difference in treatment management between these 2 pathologies, differentiating between them is of critical importance. Septic arthritis often needs to be addressed surgically, whereas Lyme arthritis can be treated with oral antibiotics alone. Laboratory testing for Lyme disease often results in a delay in diagnosis because many laboratories batch-test Lyme specimens only a few times per week because of increased expense. The authors present a case of Lyme arthritis in the pediatric ankle in an endemic region. No clear algorithm exists to delineate between septic arthritis and Lyme arthritis of the joint. Improved clinical guidelines for the identification and diagnosis of Lyme arthritis of the ankle are important so that appropriate antibiotics can be used and surgery can be avoided.

  19. Reliable pre-eclampsia pathways based on multiple independent microarray data sets.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kaoru; Kondoh, Eiji; Chigusa, Yoshitsugu; Ujita, Mari; Murakami, Ryusuke; Mogami, Haruta; Brown, J B; Okuno, Yasushi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2015-02-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a multifactorial disorder characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations. Gene expression profiling of preeclamptic placenta have provided different and even opposite results, partly due to data compromised by various experimental artefacts. Here we aimed to identify reliable pre-eclampsia-specific pathways using multiple independent microarray data sets. Gene expression data of control and preeclamptic placentas were obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. Single-sample gene-set enrichment analysis was performed to generate gene-set activation scores of 9707 pathways obtained from the Molecular Signatures Database. Candidate pathways were identified by t-test-based screening using data sets, GSE10588, GSE14722 and GSE25906. Additionally, recursive feature elimination was applied to arrive at a further reduced set of pathways. To assess the validity of the pre-eclampsia pathways, a statistically-validated protocol was executed using five data sets including two independent other validation data sets, GSE30186, GSE44711. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed for genes in a panel of potential pre-eclampsia pathways using placentas of 20 women with normal or severe preeclamptic singleton pregnancies (n = 10, respectively). A panel of ten pathways were found to discriminate women with pre-eclampsia from controls with high accuracy. Among these were pathways not previously associated with pre-eclampsia, such as the GABA receptor pathway, as well as pathways that have already been linked to pre-eclampsia, such as the glutathione and CDKN1C pathways. mRNA expression of GABRA3 (GABA receptor pathway), GCLC and GCLM (glutathione metabolic pathway), and CDKN1C was significantly reduced in the preeclamptic placentas. In conclusion, ten accurate and reliable pre-eclampsia pathways were identified based on multiple independent microarray data sets. A pathway-based classification may be a worthwhile approach to elucidate the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

  20. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-06-15

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner, similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4 s-2 h) and flow rates (0.10-63 μl min(-1)) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system.

  1. Multiple independent autonomous hydraulic oscillators driven by a common gravity head

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Lesher-Perez, Sasha Cai; Takayama, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Self-switching microfluidic circuits that are able to perform biochemical experiments in a parallel and autonomous manner similar to instruction-embedded electronics, are rarely implemented. Here, we present design principles and demonstrations for gravity-driven, integrated, microfluidic pulsatile flow circuits. With a common gravity-head as the only driving force, these fluidic oscillator arrays realize a wide range of periods (0.4 s – 2 h) and flow rates (0.10 – 63 μL min−1) with completely independent timing between the multiple oscillator sub-circuits connected in parallel. As a model application, we perform systematic, parallel analysis of endothelial cell elongation response to different fluidic shearing patterns generated by the autonomous microfluidic pulsed flow generation system. PMID:26073884

  2. Sexual transmission of Lyme disease: challenging the tickborne disease paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Middelveen, Marianne J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. In this article, we explore the clinical, epidemiological and experimental evidence for sexual transmission of Lyme disease in animal models and humans. Although the likelihood of sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete remains speculative, the possibility of Lyme disease transmission via intimate human contact merits further study.

  3. Late and chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Donta, Sam T

    2002-03-01

    This article reviews the late and chronic manifestations of Lyme disease. Special attention is given to the chronic manifestations of the disease, detailing its pathogenesis, clinical spectrum, and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis. Based on experimental evidence and experience, approaches to the successful treatment of the late and chronic disease are outlined. Much additional work is needed to improve the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, its diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Chronic polyneuropathy and Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Mygland, A; Skarpaas, T; Ljøstad, U

    2006-11-01

    Infection of the peripheral nervous system with Borrelia burgdorferi can present as a cranial neuropathy or radiculopathy with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and intrathecal antibody production against B. burgdorferi, or as an asymmetric peripheral neuropathy with acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA) and normal CSF findings. According to North American studies, it can also present as a symmetric chronic polyneuropathy without ACA or other Lyme manifestations. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies in patients presenting with isolated chronic polyneuropathy (PN) in a European region with high incidence of Lyme disease. Sera from 209 PN patients and 247 healthy blood donors from Vest-Agder County, Norway, were examined. Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies were detected in 43 (21%) PN patients and in 45 (18%) healthy blood donors (P = 0.553). The prevalence of B. burgdorferi antibodies was similar (P = 0.311) in cryptogenic PN (24/102, 24%) and PNs of identified etiologies (19/107, 18%). PN patients with B. burgdorferi antibodies had normal spinal fluid white cell count and they did not differ clinically or electrophysiologically from PN patients without antibodies. None of 20 antibody-positive PN patients responded to antimicrobial treatment. The study shows that, in Europe, chronic distal PN without ACA or other Lyme manifestations is very rarely caused by a B. burgdorferi infection.

  5. Musculoskeletal manifestations of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Steere, A C

    1995-04-24

    Musculoskeletal involvement, particularly arthritis, is a common feature of Lyme disease. Early in the illness, patients may experience migratory musculoskeletal pain in joints, bursae, tendons, muscle, or bone in one or a few locations at a time, frequently lasting only hours or days in a given location. Weeks to months later, after the development of a marked cellular and humoral immune response to the spirochete, untreated patients often have intermittent or chronic monoarticular or oligoarticular arthritis-primarily in large joints, especially the knee-during a period of several years. The diagnosis of Lyme arthritis is usually based on the presence of this characteristic clinical picture, exposure in an endemic area, and an elevated immunoglobulin G antibody response to Borrelia burgdorferi. In addition, spirochetal DNA can often be detected in joint fluid by polymerase chain reaction. Lyme arthritis can usually be treated successfully with 1-month courses of oral doxycycline or amoxicillin or with 2- to 4-week courses of intravenous ceftriaxone. However, patients with certain genetic and immune markers may have persistent arthritis, despite treatment with oral or intravenous antibiotics. B. burgdorferi may occasionally trigger fibromyalgia, a chronic pain syndrome with diffuse joint and muscle symptoms. This syndrome does not appear to respond to antibiotic therapy.

  6. How Does Independent Practice of Multiple-Criteria Text Influence the Reading Performance and Development of Second Graders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheatham, Jennifer P.; Allor, Jill H.; Roberts, J. Kyle

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of independent practice of multiple-criteria text that targeted high-frequency words, decodability, and meaningfulness. Second-grade students, including at-risk students, were randomly assigned within classroom to a treatment group that read multiple-criteria text ("n" = 34), or contrast group that read…

  7. Lyme neuroborreliosis-epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Koedel, Uwe; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium, is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. The clinical presentation varies with disease stage, and neurological manifestations (often referred to as Lyme neuroborreliosis) are reported in up to 12% of patients with Lyme disease. Most aspects of the epidemiology, clinical manifestation and treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis are well known and accepted; only the management of so-called chronic Lyme disease is surrounded by considerable controversy. This term is used for disparate patient groups, including those who have untreated late-stage infection (for example, late neuroborreliosis), those with subjective symptoms that persist after treatment (termed 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome' [PTLDS]), and those with unexplained subjective complaints that may or may not be accompanied by positive test results for B. burgdorferi infection in serum (here called 'chronic Lyme disease'). The incidence of PTLDS is still a matter of debate, and its pathogenesis is unclear, but there is evidence that these patients do not have ongoing B. burgdorferi infection and, thus, do not benefit from additional antibiotic therapy. Chronic Lyme disease lacks an accepted clinical definition, and most patients who receive this diagnosis have other illnesses. Thus, a careful diagnostic work-up is needed to ensure proper treatment.

  8. Sunburn and Lyme Disease: Two Preventable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlicin, Karen M.

    1995-01-01

    Stresses the importance of educating campers and staff about the dangers of overexposure to the sun and the transmission of Lyme disease. Discusses the importance of using an appropriate sunscreen and avoiding outdoor activities during peak hours of sunlight. Discusses how Lyme disease is transmitted, the life cycle of a tick, and how to remove…

  9. Lyme neuroborreliosis-epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Koedel, Uwe; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacterium, is the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. The clinical presentation varies with disease stage, and neurological manifestations (often referred to as Lyme neuroborreliosis) are reported in up to 12% of patients with Lyme disease. Most aspects of the epidemiology, clinical manifestation and treatment of Lyme neuroborreliosis are well known and accepted; only the management of so-called chronic Lyme disease is surrounded by considerable controversy. This term is used for disparate patient groups, including those who have untreated late-stage infection (for example, late neuroborreliosis), those with subjective symptoms that persist after treatment (termed 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome' [PTLDS]), and those with unexplained subjective complaints that may or may not be accompanied by positive test results for B. burgdorferi infection in serum (here called 'chronic Lyme disease'). The incidence of PTLDS is still a matter of debate, and its pathogenesis is unclear, but there is evidence that these patients do not have ongoing B. burgdorferi infection and, thus, do not benefit from additional antibiotic therapy. Chronic Lyme disease lacks an accepted clinical definition, and most patients who receive this diagnosis have other illnesses. Thus, a careful diagnostic work-up is needed to ensure proper treatment. PMID:26215621

  10. Chronic Lyme; diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, U; Mygland, Å

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we aim to discuss the definition, clinical and laboratory features, diagnostics, and management of chronic Lyme. Chronic Lyme is a rare condition caused by long-lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). The most common manifestations are progressive encephalitis, myelitis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans with or without neuropathy, and arthritis. Chronic Lyme is not considered to present with isolated subjective symptoms. Direct detection of Bb has low yield in most manifestations of chronic Lyme, while almost 100% of the cases are seropositive, that is, have detectable Bb IgG antibodies in serum. Detection of Bb antibodies only with Western blot technique and not with ELISA and detection of Bb IgM antibodies without simultaneous detection of Bb IgG antibodies should be considered as seronegativity in patients with long-lasting symptoms. Patients with chronic Lyme in the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) have, with few exceptions, pleocytosis and production of Bb antibodies in their cerebrospinal fluid. Strict guidelines should be applied in diagnostics of chronic Lyme, and several differential diagnoses, including neurological disease, rheumatologic disease, post-Lyme disease syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and psychiatric disease, should be considered in the diagnostic workup. Antibiotic treatment with administration route and dosages according to current guidelines are recommended. Combination antimicrobial therapy or antibiotic courses longer than 4 weeks are not recommended. Patients who attribute their symptoms to chronic Lyme on doubtful basis should be offered a thorough and systematic diagnostic approach, and an open and respectful dialogue. PMID:23190290

  11. Optimization of sampling effort for a fishery-independent survey with multiple goals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Binduo; Zhang, Chongliang; Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping; Chen, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Fishery-independent surveys are essential for collecting high quality data to support fisheries management. For fish populations with low abundance and aggregated distribution in a coastal ecosystem, high intensity bottom trawl surveys may result in extra mortality and disturbance to benthic community, imposing unnecessarily large negative impacts on the populations and ecosystem. Optimization of sampling design is necessary to acquire cost-effective sampling efforts, which, however, may not be straightforward for a survey with multiple goals. We developed a simulation approach to evaluate and optimize sampling efforts for a stratified random survey with multiple goals including estimation of abundance indices of individual species and fish groups and species diversity indices. We compared the performances of different sampling efforts when the target estimation indices had different spatial variability over different survey seasons. This study suggests that sampling efforts in a stratified random survey can be reduced while still achieving relatively high precision and accuracy for most indices measuring abundance and biodiversity, which can reduce survey mortality. This study also shows that optimal sampling efforts for a stratified random design may vary with survey objectives. A postsurvey analysis, such as this study, can improve survey designs to achieve the most important survey goals.

  12. Singlet oxygen signatures are detected independent of light or chloroplasts in response to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mor, Avishai; Koh, Eugene; Weiner, Lev; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Sibony-Benyamini, Hadas; Fluhr, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The production of singlet oxygen is typically associated with inefficient dissipation of photosynthetic energy or can arise from light reactions as a result of accumulation of chlorophyll precursors as observed in fluorescent (flu)-like mutants. Such photodynamic production of singlet oxygen is thought to be involved in stress signaling and programmed cell death. Here we show that transcriptomes of multiple stresses, whether from light or dark treatments, were correlated with the transcriptome of the flu mutant. A core gene set of 118 genes, common to singlet oxygen, biotic and abiotic stresses was defined and confirmed to be activated photodynamically by the photosensitizer Rose Bengal. In addition, induction of the core gene set by abiotic and biotic selected stresses was shown to occur in the dark and in nonphotosynthetic tissue. Furthermore, when subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses in the dark, the singlet oxygen-specific probe Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green detected rapid production of singlet oxygen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root. Subcellular localization of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green fluorescence showed its accumulation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the nucleus, suggesting several compartments as the possible origins or targets for singlet oxygen. Collectively, the results show that singlet oxygen can be produced by multiple stress pathways and can emanate from compartments other than the chloroplast in a light-independent manner. The results imply that the role of singlet oxygen in plant stress regulation and response is more ubiquitous than previously thought.

  13. Visuospatial Attention to Single and Multiple Objects Is Independently Impaired in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Norton, Daniel J; Nguyen, Victoria A; Lewis, Michaela F; Reynolds, Gretchen O; Somers, David C; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with deficits in visuospatial attention. It is as yet unknown whether these attentional deficits begin at a perceptual level or instead reflect disruptions in oculomotor or higher-order processes. In the present study, non-demented individuals with PD and matched normal control adults (NC) participated in two tasks requiring sustained visuospatial attention, both based on a multiple object tracking paradigm. Eye tracking was used to ensure central fixation. In Experiment 1 (26 PD, 21 NC), a pair of identical red dots (one target, one distractor) rotated randomly for three seconds at varied speeds. The task was to maintain the identity of the sole target, which was labeled prior to each trial. PD were less accurate than NC overall (p = .049). When considering only trials where fixation was maintained, however, there was no significant group difference, suggesting that the deficit's origin is closely related to oculomotor processing. To determine whether PD had additional impairment in multifocal attention, in Experiment 2 (25 PD, 15 NC), two targets were presented along with distractors at a moderate speed, along with a control condition in which dots remained stationary. PD were less accurate than NC for moving (p = 0.02) but not stationary targets. This group difference remained significant when considering only trials where fixation was maintained, suggesting the source of the PD deficit was independent from oculomotor processing. Taken together, the results implicate separate mechanisms for single vs. multiple object tracking deficits in PD. PMID:26963388

  14. Visuospatial Attention to Single and Multiple Objects Is Independently Impaired in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Daniel J.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Lewis, Michaela F.; Reynolds, Gretchen O.; Somers, David C.; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with deficits in visuospatial attention. It is as yet unknown whether these attentional deficits begin at a perceptual level or instead reflect disruptions in oculomotor or higher-order processes. In the present study, non-demented individuals with PD and matched normal control adults (NC) participated in two tasks requiring sustained visuospatial attention, both based on a multiple object tracking paradigm. Eye tracking was used to ensure central fixation. In Experiment 1 (26 PD, 21 NC), a pair of identical red dots (one target, one distractor) rotated randomly for three seconds at varied speeds. The task was to maintain the identity of the sole target, which was labeled prior to each trial. PD were less accurate than NC overall (p = .049). When considering only trials where fixation was maintained, however, there was no significant group difference, suggesting that the deficit’s origin is closely related to oculomotor processing. To determine whether PD had additional impairment in multifocal attention, in Experiment 2 (25 PD, 15 NC), two targets were presented along with distractors at a moderate speed, along with a control condition in which dots remained stationary. PD were less accurate than NC for moving (p = 0.02) but not stationary targets. This group difference remained significant when considering only trials where fixation was maintained, suggesting the source of the PD deficit was independent from oculomotor processing. Taken together, the results implicate separate mechanisms for single vs. multiple object tracking deficits in PD. PMID:26963388

  15. Sinus Pause in Association with Lyme Carditis

    PubMed Central

    Dibs, Samer R.; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis. PMID:26175640

  16. Neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Westervelt, Holly James; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    Lyme disease is currently the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The disease is multisystemic, and chronic disease, in particular, may be associated with neuropsychological deficits. However, to date, only a few empirical studies exist, which examine the neuropsychological sequelae associated with chronic Lyme disease. A review of the literature shows that the deficits observed in adults with chronic Lyme disease are generally consistent with the deficits that can be seen in processes with primarily frontal systems involvement. These observations are generally consistent with neuroradiologic findings. The clinical presentation in chronic Lyme disease and the nature of the neuropsychological deficits are discussed, as are several central issues in understanding neuropsychological functioning in chronic Lyme disease, such as the impact of chronic illness, response to treatment, and the relationship between neuropsychological performance and depression, fatigue, and neurological indicators of disease.

  17. Sinus pause in association with Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Oktay, A Afsin; Dibs, Samer R; Friedman, Harvey

    2015-06-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent tick-borne disease in the United States. It is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Cardiac involvement is seen in 4% to 10% of patients with Lyme disease. The principal manifestation of Lyme carditis is self-limited conduction system disease, with predominant involvement of the atrioventricular node. On rare occasions, Lyme carditis patients present with other conduction system disorders such as bundle branch block, intraventricular conduction delay, and supraventricular or ventricular tachycardia. We report the unusual case of a 59-year-old man who presented with new-onset symptomatic sinus pauses one month after hiking in upstate New York. To our knowledge, this is the first case report from North America that describes the relationship between symptomatic sinus pause and Lyme carditis.

  18. Lyme disease: neurology, neurobiology, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2014-05-01

    The Lyme disease controversy can be largely linked to the misconception that neurobehavioral effects of illness constitute evidence of nervous system infection. Appropriate differentiation between neuroborreliosis (nervous system Borrelia burgdorferi infection) and Lyme encephalopathy (altered nervous system function in individuals with systemic but not nervous system infection)-or encephalopathies of other etiologies-would lessen the controversy considerably, as the attribution of nonspecific symptoms to supposed ongoing central nervous system infection is a major factor perpetuating the debate. Epidemiologic considerations suggest that the entities referred to as "posttreatment Lyme disease" and "chronic Lyme disease" may not actually exist but rather reflect anchoring bias, linking common, nonspecific symptoms to an antecedent medical event. On the other hand, there are data suggesting possible mechanisms by which posttreatment Lyme disease could occur.

  19. Treatment and prevention of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials have ascertained the efficiency of antibiotics in treating erythema migrans, the hallmark of early stage Lyme borreliosis. Oral amoxicillin and doxycycline are first-line treatment options, though phenoxymethylpenicillin, cefuroxime axetil and azithromycin are alternative second-line options. Treatments for secondary and tertiary Lyme borreliosis are more poorly documented, and antibiotics are not always effective. This is due to the unique pathophysiology of late Lyme borreliosis, which involves not only bacterial infection, but also immunological response. Since there is no completely reliable method of diagnosis, it is difficult to choose the proper treatment and to evaluate treatment efficacy. However, numerous studies have shown that ceftriaxone and doxycycline are the 2 most efficient antibiotics, particularly in Lyme arthritis and in neuroborreliosis. In late Lyme borreliosis, these antibiotics are less efficient, and different treatment schemes with variations in dosage or duration did not produce convincing results.

  20. The behavior of multiple independent managers and ecological traits interact to determine prevalence of weeds.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Shaun R; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2013-04-01

    Management of damaging invasive plants is often undertaken by multiple decision makers, each managing only a small part of the invader's population. As weeds can move between properties and re-infest eradicated sites from unmanaged sources, the dynamics of multiple decision makers plays a significant role in weed prevalence and invasion risk at the landscape scale. We used a spatially explicit agent-based simulation to determine how individual agent behavior, in concert with weed population ecology, determined weed prevalence. We compared two invasive grass species that differ in ecology, control methods, and costs: Nassella trichotoma (serrated tussock) and Eragrostis curvula (African love grass). The way decision makers reacted to the benefit of management had a large effect on the extent of a weed. If benefits of weed control outweighed the costs, and either net benefit was very large or all agents were very sensitive to net benefits, then agents tended to act synchronously, reducing the pool of infested agents available to spread the weed. As N. trichotoma was more damaging than E. curvula and had more effective control methods, agents chose to manage it more often, which resulted in lower prevalence of N. trichotoma. A relatively low number of agents who were intrinsically less motivated to control weeds led to increased prevalence of both species. This was particularly apparent when long-distance dispersal meant each infested agent increased the invasion risk for a large portion of the landscape. In this case, a small proportion of land mangers reluctant to control, regardless of costs and benefits, could lead to the whole landscape being infested, even when local control stopped new infestations. Social pressure was important, but only if it was independent of weed prevalence, suggesting that early access to information, and incentives to act on that information, may be crucial in stopping a weed from infesting large areas. The response of our model to both

  1. IP-MSA: Independent order of progressive multiple sequence alignments using different substitution matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boraik, Aziz Nasser; Abdullah, Rosni; Venkat, Ibrahim

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential process for many biological sequence analyses. There are many algorithms developed to solve MSA, but an efficient computation method with very high accuracy is still a challenge. Progressive alignment is the most widely used approach to compute the final MSA. In this paper, we present a simple and effective progressive approach. Based on the independent order of sequences progressive alignment which proposed in QOMA, this method has been modified to align the whole sequences to maximize the score of MSA. Moreover, in order to further improve the accuracy of the method, we estimate the similarity of any pair of input sequences by using their percent identity, and based on this measure, we choose different substitution matrices during the progressive alignment. In addition, we have included horizontal information to alignment by adjusting the weights of amino acid residues based on their neighboring residues. The experimental results have been tested on popular benchmark of global protein sequences BAliBASE 3.0 and local protein sequences IRMBASE 2.0. The results of the proposed approach outperform the original method in QOMA in terms of sum-of-pair score and column score by up to 14% and 7% respectively.

  2. Erythropoietin-independent regeneration of erythroid progenitor cells following multiple injections of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Wagemaker, G; Visser, T P

    1980-09-01

    It wa shown previously that colony formation in vitro by early erythroid progenitor cells (BFUe) requires sequential stimulation with a specific glycoprotein termed BFA and erythropoietin (EP). The action exerted by BFA was characterized as induction of proliferation in BFUe resulting after several cell divisions in EP-responsive progeny. The present study is directed at detection of EP-independent regulation of erythroid progenitor cells in vivo. Haemopoietic regeneration was induced by multiple administrations of hydroxyurea (HU). The femoral regeneration patterns of haemopoietic stem cells (CFUs), granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFUgm) and erythroid progenitor cells (BFUe, day 3 BFUe and CFUe) were studied in hypertransfused mice in comparison to nontransfused controls. The results show that (1) the phase of exponential regeneration of none of the cell populations studied is affected by hypertransfusion; (2) each of these cell populations exhibit a distinct regeneration pattern, indicating that they behave as separate functional entities; and (3) the three erythroid cell populations are suppressed by hypertransfusion in the post-exponential phase of regeneration in contrast to CFUs and CFUgm. The results support a two-regulator model of erythropoiesis. PMID:7459981

  3. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  4. Report for simultaneous, multiple independently steered beam study for Airborne Electronically Steerable Phased Array (AESPA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts of an array for the formation of multiple, simultaneous, independently pointed beams for satellite communication links were investigated through tradeoffs of various approaches which were conceived as possible solutions to the problem. After the preferred approach was selected, a more detailed design was configured and is presented as a candidate system that should be given further consideration for development leading to a preliminary design. This array uses an attenuator and a phase shifter with every element. The aperture excitation necessary to form the four beams is calculated and then placed across the array using these devices. Pattern analysis was performed for two beam and four beam cases with numerous patterns being presented. Parameter evaluation shown includes pointing accuracy and beam shape, sidelobe characteristics, gain control, and beam normalization. It was demonstrated that a 4 bit phase shifter and a 6 bit, 30 dB attenuator were sufficient to achieve adequate pattern performances. The phase amplitude steered multibeam array offers the flexibility of 1 to 4 beams with an increase in gain of 6 dB if only one beam is selected.

  5. A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model and grid independence study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model is presented. The near-wall model is based on the classical Kolmogorov-Prandtl turbulence hypothesis and the semi-empirical logarithmic law of the wall. In the two-layer model presented, the computational domain of the conservation of mass equation and the mean momentum equation penetrated up to the wall, where no slip boundary condition has been prescribed; and the near wall boundary of the turbulence equations has been located at the fully turbulent region, yet very close to the wall, where the standard wall function method has been applied. Thus, the conservation of mass constraint can be satisfied more rigorously in the two-layer model than in the standard wall function method. In most of the two-layer turbulence models, the number of grid points to be used inside the near-wall layer posed the issue of computational efficiency. The present finite element computational results showed that the grid independent solutions were obtained with as small as two grid points, i.e., one quadratic element, inside the near wall layer. Comparison of the computational results obtained by using the two-layer model and those obtained by using the wall function method is also presented.

  6. [Lyme disease: how widespread is the problem?].

    PubMed

    van der Horst, Henriëtte E

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease is the cause of a lot of anxiety and discussion. Patients are demanding more preventive actions to avoid tick bites, and earlier and better diagnosis of Lyme disease. However, only a minority of people bitten by a tick go on to develop Lyme disease. Although physician delay may lead to a late diagnosis of disseminated Lyme disease, these patients are still treatable and even in bad cases, symptoms will subside within a few years. While we know that serious complications of late disseminated Lyme, e.g. neuroborreliosis, are very rare, there is still uncertainty about how often Lyme disease occurs, and how often the diagnosis is delayed. The high prevalence of seropositive people in the population suggests that many people clear the infection without any symptoms and without any treatment. Some decades ago mononucleosis infectiosa also had a bad reputation but this largely disappeared when it became clear that recovery is the rule. Lyme disease may also shed its reputation once the facts are known.

  7. Vesicular erythema migrans: an atypical and easily misdiagnosed form of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Mazori, Daniel R; Orme, Charisse M; Mir, Adnan; Meehan, Shane A; Neimann, Andrea L

    2015-08-15

    Erythema migrans is the initial sign in the majority of patients infected with Borrelia, the genus of spirochetes that causes Lyme disease. Early identification and treatment decrease the risk of progression to later stages of disease. Although a "bull's eye" appearance owing to lesional clearing is considered classic for erythema migrans, this feature is surprisingly often lacking among patients in the United States. Furthermore, cutaneous Lyme disease can exhibit a wide range of morphologic variability in a minority of patients. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with Lyme disease in which the presence of atypical vesicular features, in conjunction with the initial absence of clearing, resulted in multiple misdiagnoses and delayed treatment. We also review the literature on the epidemiology and management of erythema migrans for cases in which the diagnosis may pose a challenge.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis.

  9. Update on lyme disease: the hidden epidemic.

    PubMed

    Savely, Virginia R

    2008-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Diagnosis is problematic for many reasons, including unsatisfactory laboratory tests and confusion about test interpretation. When Lyme disease is diagnosed early, treatment is usually successful with oral antibiotics. Unfortunately, the diagnosis is often missed, allowing the infection to disseminate and affect every body system. When Lyme disease affects the central nervous system, it is often treated with intravenous antibiotics in the home setting. Infusion nurses who are experienced with the myriad symptoms and treatment challenges of these complex patients will be a reassuring asset to patients and physicians alike.

  10. Treatment trials for post-Lyme disease symptoms revisited.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S; Baker, Phillip J; Shapiro, Eugene D; Marques, Adriana; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Halperin, John J; Wormser, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    The authors of 4 National Institutes of Health-sponsored antibiotic treatment trials of patients with persistent unexplained symptoms despite previous antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease determined that retreatment provides little if any benefit and carries significant risk. Two groups recently provided an independent reassessment of these trials and concluded that prolonged courses of antibiotics are likely to be helpful. We have carefully considered the points raised by these groups, along with our own critical review of the treatment trials. On the basis of this analysis, the conclusion that there is a meaningful clinical benefit to be gained from retreatment of such patients with parenteral antibiotic therapy cannot be justified. PMID:23764268

  11. Development of a Multiantigen Panel for Improved Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Michael W.; Mao, Rong; Delanoy, Michelle; Flanagan, John J.; Binder, Steven R.; Rebman, Alison W.; Montoya, Jose G.; Soloski, Mark J.; Steere, Allen C.; Dattwyler, Raymond J.; Arnaboldi, Paul M.; Aucott, John N.

    2015-01-01

    The current standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States is serologic detection of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tiered testing algorithm; however, this scheme has limited sensitivity for detecting early Lyme disease. Thus, there is a need to improve diagnostics for Lyme disease at the early stage, when antibiotic treatment is highly efficacious. We examined novel and established antigen markers to develop a multiplex panel that identifies early infection using the combined sensitivity of multiple markers while simultaneously maintaining high specificity by requiring positive results for two markers to designate a positive test. Ten markers were selected from our initial analysis of 62 B. burgdorferi surface proteins and synthetic peptides by assessing binding of IgG and IgM to each in a training set of Lyme disease patient samples and controls. In a validation set, this 10-antigen panel identified a higher proportion of early-Lyme-disease patients as positive at the baseline or posttreatment visit than two-tiered testing (87.5% and 67.5%, respectively; P < 0.05). Equivalent specificities of 100% were observed in 26 healthy controls. Upon further analysis, positivity on the novel 10-antigen panel was associated with longer illness duration and multiple erythema migrans. The improved sensitivity and comparable specificity of our 10-antigen panel compared to two-tiered testing in detecting early B. burgdorferi infection indicates that multiplex analysis, featuring the next generation of markers, could advance diagnostic technology to better aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating early Lyme disease. PMID:26447113

  12. Development of a Multiantigen Panel for Improved Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi Infection in Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Lauren J; Panas, Michael W; Mao, Rong; Delanoy, Michelle; Flanagan, John J; Binder, Steven R; Rebman, Alison W; Montoya, Jose G; Soloski, Mark J; Steere, Allen C; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Arnaboldi, Paul M; Aucott, John N; Robinson, William H

    2015-12-01

    The current standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease in the United States is serologic detection of antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tiered testing algorithm; however, this scheme has limited sensitivity for detecting early Lyme disease. Thus, there is a need to improve diagnostics for Lyme disease at the early stage, when antibiotic treatment is highly efficacious. We examined novel and established antigen markers to develop a multiplex panel that identifies early infection using the combined sensitivity of multiple markers while simultaneously maintaining high specificity by requiring positive results for two markers to designate a positive test. Ten markers were selected from our initial analysis of 62 B. burgdorferi surface proteins and synthetic peptides by assessing binding of IgG and IgM to each in a training set of Lyme disease patient samples and controls. In a validation set, this 10-antigen panel identified a higher proportion of early-Lyme-disease patients as positive at the baseline or posttreatment visit than two-tiered testing (87.5% and 67.5%, respectively; P < 0.05). Equivalent specificities of 100% were observed in 26 healthy controls. Upon further analysis, positivity on the novel 10-antigen panel was associated with longer illness duration and multiple erythema migrans. The improved sensitivity and comparable specificity of our 10-antigen panel compared to two-tiered testing in detecting early B. burgdorferi infection indicates that multiplex analysis, featuring the next generation of markers, could advance diagnostic technology to better aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating early Lyme disease.

  13. Isolation of live Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochaetes from patients with undefined disorders and symptoms not typical for Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, N; Golovchenko, M; Vancova, M; Clark, K; Grubhoffer, L; Oliver, J H

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a multisystem disorder with a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, caused by spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. It is an infectious disease that can be successfully cured by antibiotic therapy in the early stages; however, the possibility of the appearance of persistent signs and symptoms of disease following antibiotic treatment is recognized. It is known that Lyme borreliosis mimics multiple diseases that were never proven to have a spirochaete aetiology. Using complete modified Kelly-Pettenkofer medium we succeeded in cultivating live B. burgdorferi sensu lato spirochaetes from samples taken from people who suffered from undefined disorders, had symptoms not typical for Lyme borreliosis, but who had undergone antibiotic treatment due to a suspicion of having Lyme disease even though they were seronegative. We report the first recovery of live B. burgdorferi sensu stricto from residents of southeastern USA and the first successful cultivation of live Borrelia bissettii-like strain from residents of North America. Our results support the fact that B. bissettii is responsible for human Lyme borreliosis worldwide along with B. burgdorferi s.s. The involvement of new spirochaete species in Lyme borreliosis changes the understanding and recognition of clinical manifestations of this disease.

  14. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  15. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    PubMed

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children. PMID:25332678

  16. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children

    PubMed Central

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children. PMID:25332678

  17. Beware of Ticks … & Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the killed bacteria and a geneti- cally engineered (recombinant) vac- cine. Talk to your veterinarian, since vaccinating against Lyme disease may not be appropriate for all dogs. There is no vaccine for cats, which do not seem to be ...

  18. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    PubMed

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children.

  19. Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi , in Syrian hamsters. J Parasitol 85: 426-30. Moody KD, ... that enables public health officials to look for trends and take actions to reduce disease and improve ...

  20. Design of Experiments with Multiple Independent Variables: A Resource Management Perspective on Complete and Reduced Factorial Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Linda M.; Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze

    2009-01-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct an experiment with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy.…

  1. Multiple independent constraints help resolve net ecosystem carbon exchange under nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, P. E.; Metcalfe, D.; Oren, R.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude, spatial distribution, and variability of land net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) are important determinants of the trajectory of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Independent observational constraints provide important clues regarding NEE and its component fluxes, with information available at multiple spatial scales: from cells, to leaves, to entire organisms and collections of organisms, to complex landscapes and up to continental and global scales. Experimental manipulations, ecosystem observations, and process modeling all suggest that the components of NEE (photosynthetic gains, and respiration and other losses) are controlled in part by the availability of mineral nutrients, and that nutrient limitation is a common condition in many biomes. Experimental and observational constraints at different spatial scales provide a complex and sometimes puzzling picture of the nature and degree of influence of nutrient availability on carbon cycle processes. Photosynthetic rates assessed at the cellular and leaf scales are often higher than the observed accumulation of carbon in plant and soil pools would suggest. We infer that a down-regulation process intervenes between carbon uptake and plant growth under conditions of nutrient limitation, and several down-regulation mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested. A recent evaluation of two alternative hypotheses for down-regulation in the light of whole-plant level flux estimates indicates that some plants take up and store extra carbon, releasing it to the environment again on short time scales. The mechanism of release, either as additional autotrophic respiration or as exudation belowground is unclear, but has important consequences for long-term ecosystem state and response to climate change signals. Global-scale constraints from atmospheric concentration and isotopic composition data help to resolve this question, ultimately focusing attention on land use fluxes as the most uncertain

  2. Human Lyme disease vaccines: past and future concerns.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Dean T; Munson, Erik L; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2009-05-01

    The development of a vaccine for Lyme disease was intensely pursued in the 1990s. However, citing a lack of demand, the first human Lyme disease vaccine was withdrawn from the market less than 5 years after its approval. The public's concerns about the vaccine's safety also likely contributed to the withdrawal of the vaccine. Nearly a decade later, no vaccine for human Lyme disease exists. The expansion of Lyme disease's endemic range, as well as the difficulty of diagnosing infection and the disease's steady increase in incidence in the face of proven preventative measures, make the pursuit of a Lyme disease vaccine a worthwhile endeavor. Many believe that the negative public perception of the Lyme disease vaccine will have tarnished any future endeavors towards its development. Importantly, many of the drawbacks of the Lyme disease vaccine were apparent or foreseeable prior to its approval. These pitfalls must be confronted before the construction of a new, effective and safe human Lyme disease vaccine.

  3. Tick Talk: Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Tick Talk Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease When warm weather arrives, you might get the ... mainly in the mid-Atlantic and southern states. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness. It’s ...

  4. Lyme disease: a case report of a 17-year-old male with fatal Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Esther C; Vail, Eric; Kleinman, George; Lento, Patrick A; Li, Simon; Wang, Guiqing; Limberger, Ronald; Fallon, John T

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a systemic infection commonly found in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, and north-central regions of the United States. Of the many systemic manifestations of Lyme disease, cardiac involvement is uncommon and rarely causes mortality. We describe a case of a 17-year-old adolescent who died unexpectedly after a 3-week viral-like syndrome. Postmortem examination was remarkable for diffuse pancarditis characterized by extensive infiltrates of lymphocytes and focal interstitial fibrosis. In the cardiac tissue, Borrelia burgdorferi was identified via special stains, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction. The findings support B. burgdorferi as the causative agent for his fulminant carditis and that the patient suffered fatal Lyme carditis. Usually, Lyme carditis is associated with conduction disturbances and is a treatable condition. Nevertheless, few cases of mortality have been reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare example of fatal Lyme carditis in an unsuspected patient.

  5. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-07-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs.

  6. The increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Catherine; Leonard, Erin; Koffi, Jules Konan; Pelcat, Yann; Peregrine, Andrew; Chilton, Neil; Rochon, Kateryn; Lysyk, Tim; Lindsay, L. Robbin; Ogden, Nicholas Hume

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of Lyme disease in Canada due to range expansion of the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. The objectives of this article are to i) raise public awareness with the help of veterinarians on the emerging and expanding risk of Lyme disease across Canada, ii) review the key clinical features of Lyme disease in dogs, and iii) provide recommendations for veterinarians on the management of Lyme disease in dogs. PMID:26130829

  7. What Teachers Need to Know about Lyme Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Lysandra

    2009-01-01

    Although widely misunderstood, Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector borne disease in the United States. Children are the most at-risk group for Lyme disease, which can impact every system in the body. It can produce the musculo-skeletal, neurologic, psychiatric, opthalmologic, and cardiac symptoms. The symptoms of Lyme disease can have a…

  8. Geographic Distribution and Expansion of Human Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Kugeler, Kiersten J; Farley, Grace M; Forrester, Joseph D; Mead, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease occurs in specific geographic regions of the United States. We present a method for defining high-risk counties based on observed versus expected number of reported human Lyme disease cases. Applying this method to successive periods shows substantial geographic expansion of counties at high risk for Lyme disease.

  9. An Unrecognized Rash Progressing to Lyme Carditis: Important Features and Recommendations Regarding Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shawn; Singla, Montish

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report of 46-year-old man with no medical history, who complained of extreme fatigue, near-syncope, and palpitations. He initially presented in complete heart block. A transvenous pacemaker was placed in the emergency department, and he was started empirically on Ceftriaxone for Lyme disease. He was admitted and over the course of the next few days, his rhythm regressed to Mobitz type I first-degree atrioventricular block and then to normal sinus rhythm. This case report highlights some important features regarding Lyme carditis, a rare presentation of early disseminated Lyme disease (seen in a few weeks to months after the initial tick bite). In 25%-30% of patients, the characteristic targetoid rash may not be seen, a likely culprit of the disease not being detected early and progressing to disseminated disease. The most common cardiac complaint of Lyme disease is palpitations, occurring in 6.6% of patients, which may not accurately reflect progression into disseminated Lyme disease because it is a nonspecific finding. Conduction abnormality, occurring in 1.8% of patients, is a more specific finding of Borrelia invading cardiac tissue. Finally, this case report highlights a recommendation that patients with confirmed Lyme disease or those presenting with cardiac abnormalities or symptoms who have an atypical profile for a cardiac event should be screened with a 12-lead electrocardiogram, Lyme serology, and be considered for antibiotic therapy with the possibility of temporary pacing.

  10. [Acute atrioventricular block in chronic Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vince; Zima, Endre; Gellér, László; Merkely, Béla

    2010-09-26

    The tick bite transmitted Lyme disease is one of the most common antropozoonosis, about 10 000 new infections are reported in Hungary each year. The progress and clinical presentation can vary, and carditis can occur in later stages. A serologically verified Lyme disease caused third degree atrioventricular block in young male presenting with presyncope. Based on the tick-bites mentioned a few weeks prior to hospital admission, Lyme carditis was considered with the administration of antibiotics and monitor observation. Typical skin lesions were not recognized and laboratory findings showed no pathology. An electrophysiological study recorded a predominant supra-His atrioventricular block. Total regression of conduction could be detected later and the serological tests established an underlying Lyme disease. Currently no definite treatment recommendation is available for the potentially reversible Lyme carditis. The tick bite seemed to be the key on our way to diagnosis; however, serological tests proved the disease to be older than one year. A detailed medical history and serological tests are essential in identifying the cause and pacemaker implantation can be avoided.

  11. The antibody response in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Craft, J. E.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Shrestha, M.; Fischer, D. K.; García-Blanco, M.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    We determined the antibody response against the Ixodes dammini spirochete in Lyme disease patients by indirect immunofluorescence and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The specific IgM response became maximal three to six weeks after disease onset, and then declined, although titers sometimes remained elevated during later disease. Specific IgM levels correlated directly with total serum IgM. The specific IgG response, often delayed initially, was nearly always present during neuritis and arthritis, and frequently remained elevated after months of remission. Although results obtained by indirect immunofluorescence and the ELISA were similar, the ELISA was more sensitive and specific. Cross-reactive antibodies from patients with other spirochetal infections were blocked by absorption of sera with Borrelia hermsii, but titers of Lyme disease sera were also decreased. To further characterize the specificity of the humoral immune response against the I. dammini spirochete, 35S-methionine-labeled spirochetal antigens were identified by immunoprecipitation with sera from Lyme arthritis patients. These polypeptides had molecular weights of 62, 60, 47, 37, 22, 18, and 15 kDa, and were not recognized by control sera. We conclude that the ELISA, without absorption, is the best method to assay the humoral immune response in Lyme disease, and we have identified methionine-containing spirochetal polypeptides that may be important in Lyme arthritis. PMID:6393607

  12. Diagnosis and management of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F; Riedel, David J; Talwani, Rohit; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2012-06-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Transmission occurs primarily through the bite of an infected deer tick (Ixodes scapularis). Identification of an erythema migrans rash following a tick bite is the only clinical manifestation sufficient to make the diagnosis of Lyme disease in the absence of laboratory confirmation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tier serologic testing protocol using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay initially, followed by the more specific Western blot to confirm the diagnosis when the assay samples are positive or equivocal. The treatment of Lyme disease is determined mainly by the clinical manifestations of the disease. Doxycycline is often the preferred agent for oral treatment because of its activity against other tick-borne illnesses. Preventive measures include avoiding areas with high tick burdens, wearing protective clothing, using tick repellants (e.g., diethyltoluamide [DEET]), performing frequent body checks and bathing following outdoor activities, and instituting environmental landscape modifications (e.g., grass mowing, deer exclusion fencing) to reduce the tick burden. Although there is controversy regarding treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome and chronic Lyme disease, there is no biologic or clinical trial evidence indicating that prolonged antibiotic therapy is of benefit. PMID:22962880

  13. Diagnosis and management of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F; Riedel, David J; Talwani, Rohit; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2012-06-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Transmission occurs primarily through the bite of an infected deer tick (Ixodes scapularis). Identification of an erythema migrans rash following a tick bite is the only clinical manifestation sufficient to make the diagnosis of Lyme disease in the absence of laboratory confirmation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a two-tier serologic testing protocol using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay initially, followed by the more specific Western blot to confirm the diagnosis when the assay samples are positive or equivocal. The treatment of Lyme disease is determined mainly by the clinical manifestations of the disease. Doxycycline is often the preferred agent for oral treatment because of its activity against other tick-borne illnesses. Preventive measures include avoiding areas with high tick burdens, wearing protective clothing, using tick repellants (e.g., diethyltoluamide [DEET]), performing frequent body checks and bathing following outdoor activities, and instituting environmental landscape modifications (e.g., grass mowing, deer exclusion fencing) to reduce the tick burden. Although there is controversy regarding treatment of post-Lyme disease syndrome and chronic Lyme disease, there is no biologic or clinical trial evidence indicating that prolonged antibiotic therapy is of benefit.

  14. Lyme borreliosis in 2005, 30 years after initial observations in Lyme Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Steere, Allen C

    2006-11-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Afzelius described a patient with an expanding skin lesion, called erythema migrans, which is now known to be the initial skin manifestation of Lyme borreliosis. Approximately 70 years later, in 1976, epidemiologic evaluation of a cluster of children with arthritis in Lyme, Connecticut led to a complete description of the infection. During the subsequent years, investigators in a number of countries have made remarkable strides in the elucidation of this tick-borne spirochetal infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current status of Lyme borreliosis, including areas in which knowledge of the infection is still incomplete.

  15. Texas Occurrence of Lyme Disease and Its Neurological Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Dandashi, Jad A; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Dayawansa, Samantha; Fonkem, Ekokobe; Huang, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. The culprits behind Lyme disease are the Borrelia species of bacteria. In the USA, Borrelia burgdorferi causes the majority of cases, while in Europe and Asia Borrelia afzelii and Borrelia garinii carry the greatest burden of disease. The clinical manifestations of Lyme disease have been identified as early localized, early disseminated, and late chronic. The neurological effects of Lyme disease include both peripheral and central nervous systems involvement, including focal nerve abnormalities, cranial neuropathies, painful radiculoneuritis, meningitis, and/or toxic metabolic encephalopathy, known as Lyme encephalopathy. Given the geographic predominance of Lyme disease in the Northeast and Midwest of the USA, no major studies have been conducted regarding Southern states. Between 2005 and 2014, the Center for Disease Control has reported 582 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Texas. Because of the potential for increased incidence and prevalence in Texas, it has become essential for research and clinical efforts to be diverted to the region. The Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Lyme Lab has been investigating the ecology of Lyme disease in Texas and developing a pan-specific serological test for Lyme diagnosis. This report aimed to exposure materials and raise awareness of Lyme disease to healthcare providers. PMID:27478852

  16. Chronic Lyme disease and the 'Axis of Evil'.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2008-12-01

    Lyme disease is a controversial illness, and the existence of chronic Lyme disease induced by persistent infection with the Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the subject of continued debate. A recent publication defined the 'Axis of Evil' in this controversy as physicians who treat patients with needlessly prolonged courses of antibiotics, 'specialty laboratories' that perform 'inaccurate' Lyme testing and the internet, which promotes 'Lyme hysteria'. We examine the 'Axis of Evil' components in the context of diagnostic and therapeutic challenges for Lyme disease patients and their physicians, and we present an evidence-based refutation to this misguided view. Despite its virulent nature, the 'Axis of Evil' perspective is a useful starting point to resolve the controversy over Lyme disease.

  17. [The Health Council of the Netherlands' advice on Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Verbon, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about Lyme disease. At the initiative of the Dutch Association for Lyme Patients, the Lower House of the Dutch Parliament requested a report on Lyme disease. The Health Council of the Netherlands advised standardization of Lyme serology in all Dutch laboratories as soon as possible. Standardization of diagnostic serological tests was strongly recommended. Studies into new tests which discriminate between active disease and past infection were recommended. Patients with Lyme disease were divided in those with Lyme specific and non-specific symptoms and duration of symptoms. Treatment advice was given for each of these 6 patient categories with a prominent role for the decision of the attending physician. Additionally it was advised to set up specialized treatment centers with a multidisciplinary approach. The report clearly shows the problems in care for Lyme patients from the perspective of both patients and physicians, but is cautious in the solutions offered. PMID:23859114

  18. On the Adaptive Control of the False Discovery Rate in Multiple Testing with Independent Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamini, Yoav; Hochberg, Yosef

    2000-01-01

    Presents an adaptive approach to multiple significance testing based on the procedure of Y. Benjamini and Y. Hochberg (1995) that first estimates the number of true null hypotheses and then uses that estimate in the Benjamini and Hochberg procedure. Uses the new procedure in examples from educational and behavioral studies and shows its control of…

  19. Optic neuropathy in children with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, H; Hedges, T R; Steere, A C

    2001-08-01

    Involvement of the optic nerve, either because of inflammation or increased intracranial pressure, is a rare manifestation of Lyme disease. Of the 4 children reported here with optic nerve abnormalities, 2 had decreased vision months after disease onset attributable to optic neuritis, and 1 had headache and diplopia early in the infection because of increased intracranial pressure associated with Lyme meningitis. In these 3 children, optic nerve involvement responded well to intravenous ceftriaxone therapy. The fourth child had headache and visual loss attributable to increased intracranial pressure and perhaps also to optic neuritis. Despite treatment with ceftriaxone and steroids, he had persistent increased intracranial pressure leading to permanent bilateral blindness. Clinicians should be aware that neuro-ophthalmologic involvement of Lyme disease may have significant consequences. If increased intracranial pressure persists despite antibiotic therapy, measures must be taken quickly to reduce the pressure.

  20. Lyme carditis. Electrophysiologic and histopathologic study

    SciTech Connect

    Reznick, J.W.; Braunstein, D.B.; Walsh, R.L.; Smith, C.R.; Wolfson, P.M.; Gierke, L.W.; Gorelkin, L.; Chandler, F.W.

    1986-11-01

    To further define the nature of Lyme carditis, electrophysiologic study and endomyocardial biopsy were performed in a patient with Lyme disease, whose principal cardiac manifestation was high-degree atrioventricular block. Intracardiac recording demonstrated supra-Hisian block and complete absence of an escape mechanism. Gallium 67 scanning demonstrated myocardial uptake, and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy revealed active lymphocytic myocarditis. A structure compatible with a spirochetal organism was demonstrated in one biopsy specimen. It is concluded that Lyme disease can produce active myocarditis, as suggested by gallium 67 imaging and confirmed by endomyocardial biopsy. Furthermore, the presence of high-grade atrioventricular block in this disease requires aggressive management with temporary pacemaker and corticosteroid therapy.

  1. Contributions of societal and geographical environments to "chronic Lyme disease": the psychopathogenesis and aporology of a new "medically unexplained symptoms" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Leonard H; Hassett, Afton L

    2002-08-01

    Lyme disease is a relatively well-described infectious disease with multisystem manifestations. Because of confusion over conflicting reports, anxiety related to vulnerability to disease, and sensationalized and inaccurate lay media coverage, a new syndrome, "chronic Lyme disease," has become established. Chronic Lyme disease is the most recent in a continuing series of "medically unexplained symptoms" syndromes. These syndromes, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and multiple chemical sensitivity, meet the need for a societally and morally acceptable explanation for ill-defined symptoms in the absence of objective physical and laboratory findings. We describe factors involved in the psychopathogenesis of chronic Lyme disease and focus on the confusion and insecurity these patients feel, which gives rise to an inability to adequately formulate and articulate their health concerns and to deal adequately with their medical needs, a state of disorganization termed aporia.

  2. [The variable spectrum of cutaneous Lyme borreliosis. Diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, H

    2012-05-01

    Lyme borreliosis can affect almost all human organs. Erythema migrans is the first and most frequent manifestation in 80-90% of patients in the early stage of localized skin infection. Besides the typical clinical appearance, many atypical variants can be observed. The solitary borrelial lymphocytoma is much less common and occurs mostly in children. Due to improvement in the early recognition of Lyme borreliosis, the diagnosis is made in the disseminated and late stage in only 10-20% of patients. Multiple erythemata migrantia indicating the hematogenous dissemination of B. burgdorferi remain frequently unrecognized. Late stages of infection feature chronic plasma-cell rich cutaneous inflammation and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans in its edematous to atrophic forms. Cultivation or DNA detection of B. burgdorferi in skin biopsies are options to prove unusual skin manifestations. Serological detection of Borrelia-specific IgG- and IgM antibodies should be performed according to the two step protocol with ELISA and immunoassay according to the criteria of the MIQ 12. Serological tests have limited utility for follow-up. Antibiotic therapy is very effective if performed according to evidence-based protocols, such as the AWMF guidelines. PMID:22573314

  3. [Lyme-Arthritis--a case report].

    PubMed

    von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease is a serious infectious disease which, if untreated, does not recover and leads to further complications that might be severe. This exemplary case report describes a possible secondary Borrelia infection. It underlines that early antibiotic therapy in the correct dosage is essential. Furthermore, problems are discussed that might occur in context of the decision process concerning the best antibiotic substance and the optimal application route. Last but not least, possible problems associated with the discharge from hospital are discussed. In conclusion, early diagnosis together with an on-time optimal antibiotic therapy are fundamental in the clinical management of Lyme disease.

  4. Lyme disease: a review for the otolaryngologist.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, D; Sataloff, R T

    1994-11-01

    Lyme disease is an important consideration in the differential diagnosis of patients seen by the otolaryngologist. Facial paralysis is the most common sign. The otolaryngologist may also see patients with temporal mandibular joint pain, cervical lymphadenopathy, facial pain, headache, tinnitis, vertigo, decreased hearing, otalgia and sore throat. The incidence is increasing and known to be endemic to certain areas of the United States and abroad. This paper reviews the various ways Lyme disease appears to the otolaryngologist. Three cases along with a discussion including epidemiology, vector, animal host relationship, clinical manifestations and pathophysiology are included. The literature is reviewed and the treatment discussed. PMID:7828475

  5. [Lyme-Arthritis--a case report].

    PubMed

    von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease is a serious infectious disease which, if untreated, does not recover and leads to further complications that might be severe. This exemplary case report describes a possible secondary Borrelia infection. It underlines that early antibiotic therapy in the correct dosage is essential. Furthermore, problems are discussed that might occur in context of the decision process concerning the best antibiotic substance and the optimal application route. Last but not least, possible problems associated with the discharge from hospital are discussed. In conclusion, early diagnosis together with an on-time optimal antibiotic therapy are fundamental in the clinical management of Lyme disease. PMID:27348897

  6. [The dilemma with Lyme borreliosis in the dog with particular consideration of "Lyme nephritis"].

    PubMed

    Gerber, Bernhard; Eichenberger, S; Haug, K; Wittenbrink, M M

    2009-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is the most commonly reported tick-transmitted infectious disease in the northern hemisphere in humans. Certain diseases are associated with Lyme borreliosis in the dog as well, but only intermittent lameness with articular swelling, lymphadenomegaly, fever, and anorexia were experimentally documented. Lyme borreliosis is considered an over diagnosed disease. The term "Lyme nephritis" was introduced for dogs with characteristic renal lesions and typical clinical signs, in which antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi were found. Different studies have been aimed at showing a relation between renal disease and B. burgdorferi infection; however, this was not possible until now. Reasons for the uncertainty of the effects of B. burgdorferi in the dog are the high prevalence of circulating antibodies, the unspecific clinical picture and the inaccuracy of serologic tests.

  7. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  8. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  9. Identification of multiple independent susceptibility loci in the HLA region in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Travis; Coit, Patrick; Adler, Adam; Yilmaz, Vuslat; Aksu, Kenan; Düzgün, Nursen; Keser, Gokhan; Cefle, Ayse; Yazici, Ayten; Ergen, Andac; Alpsoy, Erkan; Salvarani, Carlo; Casali, Bruno; Kötter, Ina; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Wijmenga, Cisca; Direskeneli, Haner; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-03-01

    Behçet's disease is an inflammatory disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers and significant organ involvement. Localizing the genetic association between HLA-B*51 and Behçet's disease and exploring additional susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are complicated by the strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. We genotyped 8,572 variants in the extended HLA locus and carried out imputation and meta-analysis of 24,834 variants in 2 independent Behçet's disease cohorts from 2 ancestry groups. Genotyped SNPs were used to infer classical HLA alleles in the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. Our data suggest that the robust HLA-B*51 association in Behçet's disease is explained by a variant located between the HLA-B and MICA genes (rs116799036: odds ratio (OR) = 3.88, P = 9.42 × 10(-50)). Three additional independent genetic associations within PSORS1C1 (rs12525170: OR = 3.01, P = 3.01 × 10(-26)), upstream of HLA-F-AS1 (rs114854070: OR = 1.95, P = 7.84 × 10(-14)) and with HLA-Cw*1602 (OR = 5.38, P = 6.07 × 10(-18)) were also identified and replicated.

  10. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  11. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25482812

  12. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells. PMID:25119109

  13. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Won Han, Sang; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-08-13

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol-3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  14. Independently Gated Multiple Substates of an Epithelial Chloride-Channel Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Arthur L.; Dillard, Margaret; Gaido, Marcia

    1993-06-01

    We have purified a protein from Necturus maculosus gallbladder cells that forms chloride channels in an artificial membrane. The same protein apparently can form channels that are highly selective for chloride but can have conductances varying from 9 to about 150 pS. The high-conductance channels are blocked by the monoclonal antibody used to purify the protein, but this antibody has no effect on the 9-pS channels. The observation that gating of the low- and high-conductance states is independent and that the antibody affects only the latter has implications regarding the control of chloride conductance in cell membranes and the different types of channels described in those cells.

  15. Multiple vacuoles in impaired tonoplast trafficking3 mutants are independent organelles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiameng; Han, Sang Won; Munnik, Teun; Rojas-Pierce, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Plant vacuoles are essential and dynamic organelles, and mechanisms of vacuole biogenesis and fusion are not well characterized. We recently demonstrated that Wortmannin, an inhibitor of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K), induces the fusion of plant vacuoles both in roots of itt3/vti11 mutant alleles and in guard cells of wild type Arabidopsis and Fava bean. Here we used Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to demonstrate that the vacuoles in itt3/vti11 are independent organelles. Furthermore, we used fluorescent protein reporters that bind specifically to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) or PtdIns(4)P to show that Wortmannin treatments that induce the fusion of vti11 vacuoles result in the loss of PtdIns(3)P from cellular membranes. These results provided supporting evidence for a critical role of PtdIns(3)P in vacuole fusion in roots and guard cells.

  16. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Spectra Information from Multiple Independent Astrophysics Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Likelihood (ML) statistical theory required to estimate spectra information from an arbitrary number of astrophysics data sets produced by vastly different science instruments is developed in this paper. This theory and its successful implementation will facilitate the interpretation of spectral information from multiple astrophysics missions and thereby permit the derivation of superior spectral information based on the combination of data sets. The procedure is of significant value to both existing data sets and those to be produced by future astrophysics missions consisting of two or more detectors by allowing instrument developers to optimize each detector's design parameters through simulation studies in order to design and build complementary detectors that will maximize the precision with which the science objectives may be obtained. The benefits of this ML theory and its application is measured in terms of the reduction of the statistical errors (standard deviations) of the spectra information using the multiple data sets in concert as compared to the statistical errors of the spectra information when the data sets are considered separately, as well as any biases resulting from poor statistics in one or more of the individual data sets that might be reduced when the data sets are combined.

  17. Scalable time-correlated photon counting system with multiple independent input channels.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Rahn, Hans-Jürgen; Röhlicke, Tino; Kell, Gerald; Nettels, Daniel; Hillger, Frank; Schuler, Ben; Erdmann, Rainer

    2008-12-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting continues to gain importance in a wide range of applications. Most prominently, it is used for time-resolved fluorescence measurements with sensitivity down to the single molecule level. While the primary goal of the method used to be the determination of fluorescence lifetimes upon optical excitation by short light pulses, recent modifications and refinements of instrumentation and methodology allow for the recovery of much more information from the detected photons, and enable entirely new applications. This is achieved most successfully by continuously recording individually detected photons with their arrival time and detection channel information (time tagging), thus avoiding premature data reduction and concomitant loss of information. An important property of the instrumentation used is the number of detection channels and the way they interrelate. Here we present a new instrument architecture that allows scalability in terms of the number of input channels while all channels are synchronized to picoseconds of relative timing and yet operate independent of each other. This is achieved by means of a modular design with independent crystal-locked time digitizers and a central processing unit for sorting and processing of the timing data. The modules communicate through high speed serial links supporting the full throughput rate of the time digitizers. Event processing is implemented in programmable logic, permitting classical histogramming, as well as time tagging of individual photons and their temporally ordered streaming to the host computer. Based on the time-ordered event data, any algorithms and methods for the analysis of fluorescence dynamics can be implemented not only in postprocessing but also in real time. Results from recently emerging single molecule applications are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  18. Multiple independent IgE epitopes on the highly allergenic grass pollen allergen Phl p 5

    PubMed Central

    Levin, M; Rotthus, S; Wendel, S; Najafi, N; Källström, E; Focke-Tejkl, M; Valenta, R; Flicker, S; Ohlin, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Group 5 allergens are small proteins that consist of two domains. They belong to the most potent respiratory allergens. Objective To determine the binding sites and to study allergic patients' IgE recognition of the group 5 allergen (Phl p 5) from timothy grass pollen using human monoclonal IgE antibodies that have been isolated from grass pollen allergic patients. Methods Using recombinant isoallergens, fragments, mutants and synthetic peptides of Phl p 5, as well as peptide-specific antibodies, the interaction of recombinant human monoclonal IgE and Phl p 5 was studied using direct binding and blocking assays. Cross-reactivity of monoclonal IgE with group 5 allergens in several grasses was studied and inhibition experiments with patients' polyclonal IgE were performed. Results Monoclonal human IgE showed extensive cross-reactivity with group 5 allergens in several grasses. Despite its small size of 29 kDa, four independent epitope clusters on isoallergen Phl p 5.0101, two in each domain, were recognized by human IgE. Isoallergen Phl p 5.0201 carried two of these epitopes. Inhibition studies with allergic patients' polyclonal IgE suggest the presence of additional IgE epitopes on Phl p 5. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance Our results reveal the presence of a large number of independent IgE epitopes on the Phl p 5 allergen explaining the high allergenic activity of this protein and its ability to induce severe allergic symptoms. High-density IgE recognition may be a general feature of many potent allergens and form a basis for the development of improved diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergic disease. PMID:25262820

  19. Application of multi-resolution modality independent elastography for detection of multiple anomalous objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jao J.; Barnes, Stephanie L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2006-03-01

    This work extends a recently realized inverse problem technique of extracting soft tissue elasticity information via non-rigid model-based image registration. The algorithm uses the elastic properties of the tissue in a biomechanical model to achieve maximal similarity between image data acquired under different states of loading. A new multi-resolution, non-linear optimization framework has been employed which allows for improved performance and object detection. Prior studies have demonstrated successful reconstructions from images of a tissue-like thin membrane phantom with a single embedded inclusion that was significantly stiffer than its surroundings. For this investigation, a similar phantom was fabricated with two stiff inclusions to test the effectiveness of this method in discriminating multiple smaller objects. Elasticity values generated from both simulation and real data testing scenarios provided sufficient contrast for detection and good quantitative localization of the inclusion areas.

  20. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation, determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs, representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties, depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveals that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  1. Water uptake is independent of the inferred composition of secondary aerosols derived from multiple biogenic VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarra, M. R.; Good, N.; Wyche, K. P.; Hamilton, J. F.; Monks, P. S.; Lewis, A. C.; McFiggans, G. B.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that the water uptake properties derived from sub- and super-saturated measurements of chamber-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles are independent of their degree of oxidation determined using both online and offline methods. SOA particles are formed from the photooxidation of five structurally different biogenic VOCs representing a broad range of emitted species and their corresponding range of chemical reactivity: α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, limonene, myrcene and linalool. The fractional contribution of mass fragment 44 to the total organic signal (f44) is used to characterise the extent of oxidation of the formed SOA as measured online by an aerosol mass spectrometer. Results illustrate that the values of f44 are dependent on the precursor, the extent of photochemical ageing as well as on the initial experimental conditions. SOA generated from a single biogenic precursor should therefore not be used as a general proxy for biogenic SOA. Similarly, the generated SOA particles exhibit a range of hygroscopic properties depending on the precursor, its initial mixing ratio and photochemical ageing. The activation behaviour of the formed SOA particles show no temporal trends with photochemical ageing. The average κ values derived from the HTDMA and CCNc are generally found to cover the same range for each precursor under two different initial mixing ratio conditions. A positive correlation is observed between the hygroscopicity of particles of a single size and f44 for α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, linalool and myrcene, but not for limonene SOA. The investigation of the generality of this relationship reveal that α-pinene, limonene, linalool and myrcene are all able to generate particles with similar hygroscopicity (κHTDMA ~0.1) despite f44 exhibiting a relatively wide range of values (~4 to 11%). Similarly, κCCN is found to be independent of f44. The same findings are also true when sub- and super-saturated water uptake

  2. Antibody Testing and Lyme Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Eleanor H.; Rand, Peter W.

    2005-01-01

    Lyme disease test results for >9,000 dogs were collected from participating veterinary clinics. Testing was conducted by using the IDEXX 3Dx kit, used widely by Maine veterinarians to screen clinically normal dogs during heartworm season. This study demonstrates how this test can be a valuable public health disease surveillance tool. PMID:15890128

  3. Lyme Disease: A Challenge for Outdoor Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitcombe, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Describes signs and symptoms of Lyme disease; life cycle and feeding habits of the deer tick (Ixodes dammini), which transmits the spirochete bacterium; tick control measures; outdoor precautions; and veterinary considerations. Discusses the disease's potential impact on outdoor education, and suggests a reasoned, nonhysterical approach. Contains…

  4. Lyme Disease: Implications for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbit, Maryanne Drake; Willis, Dawn

    1990-01-01

    Lyme disease may be one of the most commonly misdiagnosed diseases of this decade. Health educators should be knowledgeable about this new disease and be able to share with the public information about prevention, early signs and symptoms, and treatment of the disease (Author/IAH)

  5. Gallium-positive Lyme disease myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, L.I.; Welch, P.; Fisher, N.

    1985-09-01

    In the course of a work-up for fever of unknown origin associated with intermittent arrhythmias, a gallium scan was performed which revealed diffuse myocardial uptake. The diagnosis of Lyme disease myocarditis subsequently was confirmed by serologic titers. One month following recovery from the acute illness, the abnormal myocardial uptake completely resolved.

  6. Lyme disease in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bhatia, Ajay; Woodham, Sarah; Rakowicz, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, while still an uncommon disease in the UK, is on the increase. Case numbers have increased by 3.6-fold since 2001, with over 950 cases reported by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) in 2011, compared with less than 500 cases annually pre-2004. HPA indications of the true incidence are suggested to be closer to 3000 cases/year, of which around 82% of cases are indigenously acquired. Three genospecies, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelli and Borrelia garinii, represent the predominant pathogenic variants in the UK. Erythema migrans is the commonest manifestation, occurring in 60%-91% of cases. In the UK, neuroborelliosis is the most common complication, while myocarditis is unusual, and death from either conduction disease or carditis is extremely rare. The role of Borrelia infection in chronic dilated cardiomyopathy in the UK remains unproven. Controversy over the existence of either 'chronic Lyme disease' and/or 'post-Lyme disease syndrome' continues unabated. National medical societies, patient advocacy groups, insurance companies, lawyers, doctors, the private health medical sector and scientific journals have all become embroiled in this bitter controversy. New developments include diagnostic tests able to detect Lyme disease at an earlier stage, shorter durations of antibiotic therapy and potential advances in vaccines against Borrelia.

  7. Lyme disease: diagnostic issues and controversies.

    PubMed

    Aguero-Rosenfeld, Maria E; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of Lyme disease is a controversial topic. Most practitioners and scientists recognize that Lyme disease is associated with certain objective clinical manifestations supported by laboratory evidence of infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (the etiologic agent). There are others, however, who believe that patients with Lyme disease may have a wide variety of entirely nonspecific symptoms without any objective clinical manifestation and that laboratory evidence of infection by B. burgdorferi is not required to support the diagnosis. In reality, this perspective is not evidence based and would inevitably lead to innumerable misdiagnoses, given the high frequency of medically unexplained symptoms, such as fatigue and musculoskeletal pains, in the general population. Although those espousing this viewpoint do not believe that a positive laboratory test is required, nevertheless, they often seek out and promote alternative, unapproved testing methods that frequently provide false-positive results to justify their diagnosis. Herein, we provide a brief overview of Lyme disease testing, emphasizing current usage and limitations. We also discuss the use of nonvalidated procedures and the prospects for a reduction in such testing practices in the future.

  8. Lyme disease in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, Simon W; Bhatia, Ajay; Woodham, Sarah; Rakowicz, Wojtek

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, while still an uncommon disease in the UK, is on the increase. Case numbers have increased by 3.6-fold since 2001, with over 950 cases reported by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) in 2011, compared with less than 500 cases annually pre-2004. HPA indications of the true incidence are suggested to be closer to 3000 cases/year, of which around 82% of cases are indigenously acquired. Three genospecies, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelli and Borrelia garinii, represent the predominant pathogenic variants in the UK. Erythema migrans is the commonest manifestation, occurring in 60%-91% of cases. In the UK, neuroborelliosis is the most common complication, while myocarditis is unusual, and death from either conduction disease or carditis is extremely rare. The role of Borrelia infection in chronic dilated cardiomyopathy in the UK remains unproven. Controversy over the existence of either 'chronic Lyme disease' and/or 'post-Lyme disease syndrome' continues unabated. National medical societies, patient advocacy groups, insurance companies, lawyers, doctors, the private health medical sector and scientific journals have all become embroiled in this bitter controversy. New developments include diagnostic tests able to detect Lyme disease at an earlier stage, shorter durations of antibiotic therapy and potential advances in vaccines against Borrelia. PMID:24198341

  9. Multiple independent transpositions of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, M D; Fleischer, R C

    1996-12-24

    Transpositions of mtDNA sequences to the nuclear genome have been documented in a wide variety of individual taxa, but little is known about their taxonomic frequency or patterns of variation. We provide evidence of nuclear sequences homologous to the mtDNA control region in seven species of diving ducks (tribe Aythyini). Phylogenetic analysis places each nuclear sequence as a close relative of the mtDNA haplotypes of the specie(s) in which it occurs, indicating that they derive from six independent transposition events, all occurring within the last approximately 1.5 million years. Relative-rate tests and comparison of intraspecific variation in nuclear and mtDNA sequences confirm the expectation of a greatly reduced rate of evolution in the nuclear copies. By representing mtDNA haplotypes from ancestral populations, nuclear insertions may be valuable in some phylogenetic analyses, but they also confound the accurate determination of mtDNA sequences. In particular, our data suggest that the presumably nonfunctional but more slowly evolving nuclear sequences often will not be identifiable by changes incompatible with function and may be preferentially amplified by PCR primers based on mtDNA sequences from related taxa. PMID:8986794

  10. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  11. Multiple independent colonization of the Canary Islands by the winged grasshopper genus Sphingonotus Fieber, 1852.

    PubMed

    Husemann, Martin; Deppermann, Jana; Hochkirch, Axel

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic archipelagos represent ideal systems to study processes of colonization, differentiation and speciation. The Canary Islands are one of the best studied archipelagos, being composed of seven main islands with a well-known geological history. Most taxa have colonized these islands stepwise from the African or Iberian mainland from east to west, following their geological origin as well as the predominating wind direction and ocean currents. Furthermore, within-island radiations have been reported for several taxa. The grasshopper genus Sphingonotus is species-rich and occurs with nine fully winged species on the Canary Islands, seven of which are endemic to single or few islands. We inferred a phylogeny of these species and their North African and Iberian relatives based upon sequences of three mitochondrial genes and one nuclear gene of 136 specimens. Surprisingly, our results suggest that almost all Sphingonotus species colonized the archipelago independently from the mainland and nearly no inter-island colonization occurred. Despite their strong flight capabilities, only one pair of endemic species are closely related (S. sublaevis from Gran Canary and S. pachecoi from Lanzarote). Moreover, no within-island speciation events were detected. We hypothesize that passive wind dispersal from the African mainland was the main driver of the colonization process and that most Sphingonotus species are not able to cover inter-island distances by active flight. This, together with strong intrageneric niche overlap might explain the lack of within-island speciation in this taxon.

  12. Individual differences in ensemble perception reveal multiple, independent levels of ensemble representation.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Jason; Brady, Timothy F; Alvarez, George A

    2015-04-01

    Ensemble perception, including the ability to "see the average" from a group of items, operates in numerous feature domains (size, orientation, speed, facial expression, etc.). Although the ubiquity of ensemble representations is well established, the large-scale cognitive architecture of this process remains poorly defined. We address this using an individual differences approach. In a series of experiments, observers saw groups of objects and reported either a single item from the group or the average of the entire group. High-level ensemble representations (e.g., average facial expression) showed complete independence from low-level ensemble representations (e.g., average orientation). In contrast, low-level ensemble representations (e.g., orientation and color) were correlated with each other, but not with high-level ensemble representations (e.g., facial expression and person identity). These results suggest that there is not a single domain-general ensemble mechanism, and that the relationship among various ensemble representations depends on how proximal they are in representational space. PMID:25844624

  13. Multiple independent defective suppressor-mutator transposon insertions in Arabidopsis: a tool for functional genomics.

    PubMed Central

    Tissier, A F; Marillonnet, S; Klimyuk, V; Patel, K; Torres, M A; Murphy, G; Jones, J D

    1999-01-01

    A new system for insertional mutagenesis based on the maize Enhancer/Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm) element was introduced into Arabidopsis. A single T-DNA construct carried a nonautonomous defective Spm (dSpm) element with a phosphinothricin herbicide resistance (BAR) gene, a transposase expression cassette, and a counterselectable gene. This construct was used to select for stable dSpm transpositions. Treatments for both positive (BAR) and negative selection markers were applicable to soil-grown plants, allowing the recovery of new transpositions on a large scale. To date, a total of 48,000 lines in pools of 50 have been recovered, of which approximately 80% result from independent insertion events. DNA extracted from these pools was used in reverse genetic screens, either by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers from the transposon and the targeted gene or by the display of insertions whereby inverse PCR products of insertions from the DNA pools are spotted on a membrane that is then hybridized with the probe of interest. By sequencing PCR-amplified fragments adjacent to insertion sites, we established a sequenced insertion-site database of 1200 sequences. This database permitted a comparison of the chromosomal distribution of transpositions from various T-DNA locations. PMID:10521516

  14. Genetic code deviations in the ciliates: evidence for multiple and independent events.

    PubMed Central

    Tourancheau, A B; Tsao, N; Klobutcher, L A; Pearlman, R E; Adoutte, A

    1995-01-01

    In several species of ciliates, the universal stop codons UAA and UAG are translated into glutamine, while in the euplotids, the glutamine codon usage is normal, but UGA appears to be translated as cysteine. Because the emerging position of this monophyletic group in the eukaryotic lineage is relatively late, this deviant genetic code represents a derived state of the universal code. The question is therefore raised as to how these changes arose within the evolutionary pathways of the phylum. Here, we have investigated the presence of stop codons in alpha tubulin and/or phosphoglycerate kinase gene coding sequences from diverse species of ciliates scattered over the phylogenetic tree constructed from 28S rRNA sequences. In our data set, when deviations occur they correspond to in frame UAA and UAG coding for glutamine. By combining these new data with those previously reported, we show that (i) utilization of UAA and UAG codons occurs to different extents between, but also within, the different classes of ciliates and (ii) the resulting phylogenetic pattern of deviations from the universal code cannot be accounted for by a scenario involving a single transition to the unusual code. Thus, contrary to expectations, deviations from the universal genetic code have arisen independently several times within the phylum. PMID:7621837

  15. Anomalous independence of multiple exciton generation on different group IV-VI quantum dot architectures.

    PubMed

    Trinh, M Tuan; Polak, Leo; Schins, Juleon M; Houtepen, Arjan J; Vaxenburg, Roman; Maikov, Georgy I; Grinbom, Gal; Midgett, Aaron G; Luther, Joseph M; Beard, Matthew C; Nozik, Arthur J; Bonn, Mischa; Lifshitz, Efrat; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2011-04-13

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in PbSe quantum dots (QDs), PbSe(x)S(1-x) alloy QDs, PbSe/PbS core/shell QDs, and PbSe/PbSe(y)S(1-y) core/alloy-shell QDs was studied with time-resolved optical pump and probe spectroscopy. The optical absorption exhibits a red-shift upon the introduction of a shell around a PbSe core, which increases with the thickness of the shell. According to electronic structure calculations this can be attributed to charge delocalization into the shell. Remarkably, the measured quantum yield of MEG, the hot exciton cooling rate, and the Auger recombination rate of biexcitons are similar for pure PbSe QDs and core/shell QDs with the same core size and varying shell thickness. The higher density of states in the alloy and core/shell QDs provide a faster exciton cooling channel that likely competes with the fast MEG process due to a higher biexciton density of states. Calculations reveal only a minor asymmetric delocalization of holes and electrons over the entire core/shell volume, which may partially explain why the Auger recombination rate does not depend on the presence of a shell. PMID:21348493

  16. Multiple independent insertions of 5S rRNA genes in the spliced-leader gene family of trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Beauparlant, Marc A; Drouin, Guy

    2014-02-01

    Analyses of the 5S rRNA genes found in the spliced-leader (SL) gene repeat units of numerous trypanosome species suggest that such linkages were not inherited from a common ancestor, but were the result of independent 5S rRNA gene insertions. In trypanosomes, 5S rRNA genes are found either in the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes or in independent tandemly repeated units. Given that trypanosome species where 5S rRNA genes are within the tandemly repeated units coding for SL genes are phylogenetically related, one might hypothesize that this arrangement is the result of an ancestral insertion of 5S rRNA genes into the tandemly repeated SL gene family of trypanosomes. Here, we use the types of 5S rRNA genes found associated with SL genes, the flanking regions of the inserted 5S rRNA genes and the position of these insertions to show that most of the 5S rRNA genes found within SL gene repeat units of trypanosome species were not acquired from a common ancestor but are the results of independent insertions. These multiple 5S rRNA genes insertion events in trypanosomes are likely the result of frequent founder events in different hosts and/or geographical locations in species having short generation times.

  17. Update on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, L T; Klempner, M S

    2001-01-01

    With our better understanding of Lyme disease, we now know it is not the "great imitator" of disease it once was thought to be. Limited, identifiable syndromes can be related to Lyme disease. Most of the disease's manifestations resolve without treatment. Treatment with standard antibiotics is very effective at preventing the development of long-term sequelae. The Lyme disease vaccine is safe and effective at preventing transmission of Lyme disease. Future improvements in the care of patients with Lyme disease should focus on identifying the etiology and most effective therapies for patients with posttreatment chronic Lyme disease syndrome, determining the safety and efficacy of vaccination in children, and developing second generation vaccines with improved efficacy and dosing schedules, possibly through the addition of antigens expressed in the human host.

  18. Rac regulation of transformation, gene expression, and actin organization by multiple, PAK-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Westwick, J K; Lambert, Q T; Clark, G J; Symons, M; Van Aelst, L; Pestell, R G; Der, C J

    1997-01-01

    Rac1 and RhoA are members of the Rho family of Ras-related proteins and function as regulators of actin cytoskeletal organization, gene expression, and cell cycle progression. Constitutive activation of Rac1 and RhoA causes tumorigenic transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, and their functions may be required for full Ras transformation. The effectors by which Rac1 and RhoA mediate these diverse activities, as well as the interrelationship between these events, remain poorly understood. Rac1 is distinct from RhoA in its ability to bind and activate the p65 PAK serine/threonine kinase, to induce lamellipodia and membrane ruffling, and to activate the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). To assess the role of PAK in Rac1 function, we identified effector domain mutants of Rac1 and Rac1-RhoA chimeric proteins that no longer bound PAK. Surprisingly, PAK binding was dispensable for Rac1-induced transformation and lamellipodium formation, as well as activation of JNK, p38, and serum response factor (SRF). However, the ability of Rac1 to bind to and activate PAK correlated with its ability to stimulate transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter. Furthermore, Rac1 activation of JNK or SRF, or induction of lamellipodia, was neither necessary nor sufficient for Rac1 transforming activity. Finally, the signaling pathways that mediate Rac1 activation of SRF or JNK were distinct from those that mediate Rac1 induction of lamellipodia. Taken together, these observations suggest that Rac1 regulates at least four distinct effector-mediated functions and that multiple pathways may contribute to Rac1-induced cellular transformation. PMID:9032259

  19. False Positive Lyme Disease IgM Immunoblots in Children.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Lipsett, Susan C; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2016-07-01

    In our cross-sectional sample of 7289 serologic tests for Lyme disease, we identified 167 instances of a positive IgM immunoblot but a negative IgG immunoblot test result. Considering that only 71% (95% CI 64%-78%) of patients had Lyme disease, a positive IgM immunoblot alone should be interpreted with caution to avoid over-diagnosis of Lyme disease.

  20. Lyme Disease: What the Wilderness Provider Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Vakkalanka, J Priyanka; Holstege, Christopher P; Mead, Paul S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is the most common vectorborne disease in the United States. Prognosis after initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy is typically good if treated early. Wilderness providers caring for patients who live in or travel to high-incidence Lyme disease areas should be aware of the basic biology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of Lyme disease.

  1. Methods to Prevent Tick Bites and Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Nick H; Lindsay, L Robbin; Schofield, Steven W

    2015-12-01

    Current approaches for prevention of tick bites, Lyme disease, and other tick-borne diseases are described. Particular attention is paid to 4 risk-reduction strategies: (i) avoiding risk areas; (ii) personal protective measures that reduce the risk of tick bites or transmission of the agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi; (iii) reducing the number of infected ticks in the environment; and (iv) use of prophylactic antibiotic treatments following a bite to prevent clinical Lyme disease.

  2. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  3. Lyme Disease Presenting as a Spontaneous Knee Effusion.

    PubMed

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Suslavich, Kaytelin; Curry, Emily J

    2015-11-01

    Musculoskeletal complaints, which are frequently associated with Lyme disease, often prompt patients to see a physician. In particular, transient episodes of spontaneous knee effusion are common early in the progression of Lyme disease, and, if left untreated, 60% of patients diagnosed with the disease develop Lyme arthritis. This disease is easily treated with antibiotics; therefore, inclusion of Lyme disease in the differential diagnosis as a potential cause of a spontaneous knee effusion can prevent the development of more severe symptoms associated with the disease. However, the time required to receive test results and the inconsistencies between serum and synovial tests can complicate diagnosis of the disease.

  4. A CD138-independent strategy to detect minimal residual disease and circulating tumour cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Muz, Barbara; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Luderer, Micah John; King, Justin; Vij, Ravi; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-04-01

    CD138 (also termed SDC1) has been the gold-standard surface marker to detect multiple myeloma (MM) cells for decades; however, drug-resistant residual and circulating MM cells were shown to have lower expression of this marker. In this study, we have shown that residual MM cells following bortezomib treatment are hypoxic. This combination of drug exposure and hypoxia down-regulates their CD138 expression, thereby making this marker unsuitable for detecting residual or other hypoxic MM cells, such as circulating tumour cells, in MM. Hence, we developed an alternative biomarker set which detects myeloma cells independent of their hypoxic and CD138 expression status in vitro, in vivo and in primary MM patients. The new markers were able to identify a clonal CD138-negative population as minimal residual disease in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of MM patients. Further investigation to characterize the role of this population as a prognostic marker in MM is warranted.

  5. γδ T Cells and dendritic cells in refractory Lyme arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Divan, Ali; Budd, Ralph C.; Tobin, Richard P.; Newell-Rogers, M. Karen

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infection transmitted by tick vectors with an incidence of up to 300,000 individuals/yr in the United States. The primary treatments are oral or i.v. antibiotics. Despite treatment, some individuals do not recover and have prolonged symptoms affecting multiple organs, including the nervous system and connective tissues. Inflammatory arthritis is a common symptom associated with Lyme pathology. In the past decades, γδ T cells have emerged as candidates that contribute to the transition from innate to adaptive responses. These cells are also differentially regulated within the synovia of patients affected by RLA. Here, we review and discuss potential cellular mechanisms involving γδ T cells and DCs in RLA. TLR signaling and antigen processing and presentation will be the key concepts that we review in aid of understanding the impact of γδ T cells in RLA. PMID:25605869

  6. γδ T Cells and dendritic cells in refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Divan, Ali; Budd, Ralph C; Tobin, Richard P; Newell-Rogers, M Karen

    2015-04-01

    Lyme disease is a multisystem infection transmitted by tick vectors with an incidence of up to 300,000 individuals/yr in the United States. The primary treatments are oral or i.v. antibiotics. Despite treatment, some individuals do not recover and have prolonged symptoms affecting multiple organs, including the nervous system and connective tissues. Inflammatory arthritis is a common symptom associated with Lyme pathology. In the past decades, γδ T cells have emerged as candidates that contribute to the transition from innate to adaptive responses. These cells are also differentially regulated within the synovia of patients affected by RLA. Here, we review and discuss potential cellular mechanisms involving γδ T cells and DCs in RLA. TLR signaling and antigen processing and presentation will be the key concepts that we review in aid of understanding the impact of γδ T cells in RLA. PMID:25605869

  7. Fine-scale mapping of 8q24 locus identifies multiple independent risk variants for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zheng, Wei; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Milne, Roger L; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Zhao, Zhiguo; Guo, Xingyi; Benitez, Javier; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dork, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Grip, Mervi; Guenel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Torres, Diana; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olson, Janet E; Orr, Nick; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Peterlongo, Paolo; Choudary Putti, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hou, Ming-Feng; Shrubsole, Matha J; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony; Hwang Teo, Soo; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Therese; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Har Yip, Cheng; Zamora, Pilar M; Zheng, Ying; Floris, Giuseppe; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong

    2016-09-15

    Previous genome-wide association studies among women of European ancestry identified two independent breast cancer susceptibility loci represented by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs13281615 and rs11780156 at 8q24. A fine-mapping study across 2.06 Mb (chr8:127,561,724-129,624,067, hg19) in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium was conducted. Three additional independent association signals in women of European ancestry, represented by rs35961416 (OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.93-0.97, conditional p = 5.8 × 10(-6) ), rs7815245 (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.91-0.96, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-6) ) and rs2033101 (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.02-1.07, conditional p = 1.1 × 10(-4) ) were found. Integrative analysis using functional genomic data from the Roadmap Epigenomics, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project, the Cancer Genome Atlas and other public resources implied that SNPs rs7815245 in Signal 3, and rs1121948 in Signal 5 (in linkage disequilibrium with rs11780156, r(2)  = 0.77), were putatively functional variants for two of the five independent association signals. The results highlighted multiple 8q24 variants associated with breast cancer susceptibility in women of European ancestry. PMID:27087578

  8. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  9. Singlet Oxygen Signatures Are Detected Independent of Light or Chloroplasts in Response to Multiple Stresses1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Avishai; Koh, Eugene; Weiner, Lev; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Sibony-Benyamini, Hadas; Fluhr, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The production of singlet oxygen is typically associated with inefficient dissipation of photosynthetic energy or can arise from light reactions as a result of accumulation of chlorophyll precursors as observed in fluorescent (flu)-like mutants. Such photodynamic production of singlet oxygen is thought to be involved in stress signaling and programmed cell death. Here we show that transcriptomes of multiple stresses, whether from light or dark treatments, were correlated with the transcriptome of the flu mutant. A core gene set of 118 genes, common to singlet oxygen, biotic and abiotic stresses was defined and confirmed to be activated photodynamically by the photosensitizer Rose Bengal. In addition, induction of the core gene set by abiotic and biotic selected stresses was shown to occur in the dark and in nonphotosynthetic tissue. Furthermore, when subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses in the dark, the singlet oxygen-specific probe Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green detected rapid production of singlet oxygen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root. Subcellular localization of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green fluorescence showed its accumulation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the nucleus, suggesting several compartments as the possible origins or targets for singlet oxygen. Collectively, the results show that singlet oxygen can be produced by multiple stress pathways and can emanate from compartments other than the chloroplast in a light-independent manner. The results imply that the role of singlet oxygen in plant stress regulation and response is more ubiquitous than previously thought. PMID:24599491

  10. 77 FR 6465 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge, mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme... INFORMATION: The Old Saybrook-Old Lyme RR Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old...

  11. Lyme disease. Recognising and treating erythema migrans.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne bacterial infection caused by Borrelia spirochetes. The first stage of infection involves a characteristic skin lesion, erythema migrans. Erythema migrans is a ring-shaped skin lesion, centred on the bite, which expands outwards. It usually appears within two weeks after a bite from an infected tick. If left untreated, the infection sometimes extends or progresses over a period of months or years, leading to potentially severe neurological, articular, cutaneous and cardiac complications. How is erythema migrans associated with Lyme disease recognised and managed? We conducted a systematic review of the literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. This review does not address the complications of Lyme disease. Diagnosis of erythema migrans is based on clinical findings in a patient with a possible or confirmed recent tick bite. Serological tests are not useful at this stage of the infection. Antibiotics shown to be active in vitro also proved effective in non-comparative trials. In randomised trials, amoxicillin, doxycycline, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone had similar efficacy, clearing signs and symptoms in about 90% of patients, with a relapse rate of less than 5% at 6 months. Azithromycin, clarithromycin, erythromycin, three macrolide antibiotics, appear to have lower efficacy. Doxycycline should not be used to treat pregnant or breast-feeding women, or children under 8 years old, due to a risk of tooth and bone disorders in children. In practice, a diagnosis of erythema migrans should be borne in mind when a patient presents with recent history of a possible or confirmed tick bite and skin lesions suggestive of erythema migrans. Oral amoxicillin or doxycycline will prevent progression of the infection to the potentially severe, later stages of Lyme disease. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified after a tick bite, even in an endemic area, as the risk of infection is low. It is best to monitor the skin around the bite and

  12. Lyme disease: case report of persistent Lyme disease from Pulaski County, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, James R; King, Scott; Case, Matthew; Santo, Arben

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman from Pulaski, Virginia, presented to a local clinic with headaches, fever, generalized joint pain, excessive thirst and fluid intake, and a progressing rash on her back. On physical examination, she had a large circular red rash on her back with a bull's-eye appearance, 16 × 18 cm in diameter. Serologic tests confirmed a diagnosis of Lyme disease. The patient could recall a walk through the woods 3 weeks prior, although she never noticed a tick on her body. Following a prolonged course of antibiotics, this case report presents a patient with ongoing symptoms consistent with post-treatment Lyme disease.

  13. Lyme disease: case report of persistent Lyme disease from Pulaski County, Virginia.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, James R; King, Scott; Case, Matthew; Santo, Arben

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman from Pulaski, Virginia, presented to a local clinic with headaches, fever, generalized joint pain, excessive thirst and fluid intake, and a progressing rash on her back. On physical examination, she had a large circular red rash on her back with a bull's-eye appearance, 16 × 18 cm in diameter. Serologic tests confirmed a diagnosis of Lyme disease. The patient could recall a walk through the woods 3 weeks prior, although she never noticed a tick on her body. Following a prolonged course of antibiotics, this case report presents a patient with ongoing symptoms consistent with post-treatment Lyme disease. PMID:24353444

  14. Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Geeta; Didier, Peter J.; England, John D.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Martin, Dale S.; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2016-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, affects both peripheral and central nervous systems. We assessed a causal role for inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis pathogenesis by evaluating the induced inflammatory changes in the central nervous system, spinal nerves, and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of rhesus macaques that were inoculated intrathecally with live B. burgdorferi and either treated with dexamethasone or meloxicam (anti-inflammatory drugs) or left untreated. ELISA of cerebrospinal fluid showed significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, chemokine ligand 2, and CXCL13 and pleocytosis in all infected animals, except dexamethasone-treated animals. Cerebrospinal fluid and central nervous system tissues of infected animals were culture positive for B. burgdorferi regardless of treatment. B. burgdorferi antigen was detected in the DRG and dorsal roots by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. Histopathology revealed leptomeningitis, vasculitis, and focal inflammation in the central nervous system; necrotizing focal myelitis in the cervical spinal cord; radiculitis; neuritis and demyelination in the spinal roots; and inflammation with neurodegeneration in the DRG that was concomitant with significant neuronal and satellite glial cell apoptosis. These changes were absent in the dexamethasone-treated animals. Electromyography revealed persistent abnormalities in F-wave chronodispersion in nerve roots of a few infected animals; which were absent in dexamethasone-treated animals. These results suggest that inflammation has a causal role in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme neuroborreliosis. PMID:25892509

  15. The clinical evolution of Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steere, A C; Schoen, R T; Taylor, E

    1987-11-01

    To determine the clinical evolution of Lyme arthritis, 55 patients who did not receive antibiotic therapy for erythema chronicum migrans were followed longitudinally for a mean duration of 6 years. Of the 55 patients, 11 (20%) had no subsequent manifestations of Lyme disease. From 1 day to 8 weeks after disease onset, 10 of the patients (18%) began to have brief episodes of joint, periarticular, or musculoskeletal pain for as long as 6 years, but they never developed objective joint abnormalities. From 4 days to 2 years after disease onset, 28 (51%) had one episode or began to have intermittent attacks of frank arthritis, primarily in large joints; a few had polyarticular movement. The total number of these patients who continued to have recurrences decreased by 10% to 20% each year. The remaining 6 patients (11%) developed chronic synovitis later in the illness; of these, 2 (4%) had erosions, and 1 (2%), permanent joint disability. The spectrum of Lyme arthritis ranges from subjective joint pain, to intermittent attacks of arthritis, to chronic erosive disease.

  16. 5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Steere, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late stage infection with the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, usually beginning months after the initial tick bite. However, in some patients, including most of those seen today, the earlier phases of the infection are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation of the disease. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in one or a few large joints, especially the knee, usually over a period of several years, without prominent systemic manifestations. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid PCR testing for B. burgdorferi DNA is often positive prior to treatment, but it is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after antibiotic therapy. Responses to oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment are generally excellent, although a small percentage of patients have persistent synovitis after 2-3 months of oral and IV antibiotics, which usually then responds to anti-inflammatory therapies, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), or synovectomy. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. PMID:25999223

  17. Lyme borreliosis: A neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhelw, Rehab A; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; Samir, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causal organism of Lyme borreliosis. In Egypt, available data about the occurrence of Lyme disease are scarce and no structured studies documented the presence of Lyme borreliosis in Egyptian animals and tick reservoirs verifying its zoonotic evidence. Besides, no successful trials to isolate B. burgdorferi from clinical samples have occurred. This study was conducted to investigate B. burgdorferi infection as an emerging zoonosis neglected in Egypt. A total number of 92 animals, tick and human companion specimens were collected and subjected for culture, PCR and/or serodetection. B. burgdorferi has been detected and isolated from Egyptian animal breeds. We also detected the presence of outer surface protein A gene of B. burgdorferi by PCR as well as anti-B. burgdorferi IgM by ELISA in human contacts who were suffering from fever of unknown origin. This report represents the first systematic study on animals associated with patients suffering from febrile illness to confirm the emerging of such neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

  18. Lyme borreliosis: A neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhelw, Rehab A; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; Samir, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causal organism of Lyme borreliosis. In Egypt, available data about the occurrence of Lyme disease are scarce and no structured studies documented the presence of Lyme borreliosis in Egyptian animals and tick reservoirs verifying its zoonotic evidence. Besides, no successful trials to isolate B. burgdorferi from clinical samples have occurred. This study was conducted to investigate B. burgdorferi infection as an emerging zoonosis neglected in Egypt. A total number of 92 animals, tick and human companion specimens were collected and subjected for culture, PCR and/or serodetection. B. burgdorferi has been detected and isolated from Egyptian animal breeds. We also detected the presence of outer surface protein A gene of B. burgdorferi by PCR as well as anti-B. burgdorferi IgM by ELISA in human contacts who were suffering from fever of unknown origin. This report represents the first systematic study on animals associated with patients suffering from febrile illness to confirm the emerging of such neglected zoonosis in Egypt. PMID:25239124

  19. Is Gulf War Syndrome actually chronic Lyme disease?

    PubMed

    Owen, David C

    2005-01-01

    Symptoms of Gulf War Syndrome and chronic Lyme disease are very similar. Lyme disease is a condition which can be difficult to diagnose since one of the main features of the condition, the erythema migrans rash, may be absent or overlooked and serological testing for Lyme disease may be falsely negative. Symptoms of Lyme disease may not became apparent until years after exposure to the causative organism. Military personnel during training in the field are at risk of tick bites and it may be that those who developed Gulf War Syndrome entered the conflict with latent Lyme disease. There has been no systematic examination of Gulf War Syndrome sufferers for chronic Lyme disease and it is hypothesized that chronic Lyme disease has been overlooked as a cause of Gulf War Syndrome. To address this it is suggested that sufferers of Gulf War Syndrome or similar illnesses should be examined by physicians who have experience diagnosing and treating large numbers of patients with Lyme disease.

  20. Infection in rabbits with the Lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, A. N.; Steere, A. C.; Brownstein, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Of 33 rabbits inoculated with Lyme disease spirochetes, two developed erythema chronicum migrans at the site of inoculation. Spirochetes were seen in skin biopsies of one of the lesions with immunoperoxidase and Warthin-Starry stains. Spirochetes were also recovered from the blood of two additional rabbits two weeks post-inoculation. These findings are characteristic of early Lyme disease in humans. PMID:6393613

  1. TOWARDS LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR REDUCING LYME DISEASE RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incidence of Lyme disease in the United States continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quanti...

  2. A Lyme Disease Case Study and Individualized Healthcare Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Roberta

    2003-01-01

    The Atlantic and Pacific coasts are the boundaries of Lyme disease with the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States continuing to report the majority of cases. New reported cases of Lyme disease doubled from 1991 to 2001 according to statistics published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2002). Within that…

  3. The Lyme disease vaccine--a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Shen, Angela K; Mead, Paul S; Beard, Charles B

    2011-02-01

    Lyme disease, which is caused by the spirochetal agent Borrelia burgdoferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. In 1998, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a recombinant Lyme disease vaccine that was later voluntarily withdrawn from the market by the manufacturer. Current Lyme disease prevention efforts focus on a combination of methods and approaches, including area acaricides, landscape management, host-targeted interventions, management of deer populations, and personal protective measures, such as the use of insect repellant and tick checks. Although these methods are generally safe and relatively inexpensive, the primary limitations of these methods are that their effectiveness has been difficult to demonstrate conclusively and that rates of compliance are generally poor. An effective human Lyme disease vaccine that has been adequately evaluated in the highest-risk population groups could be very beneficial in preventing Lyme disease; however, it would need to meet high standards regarding safety, efficacy, cost, and public acceptance.

  4. Cross-reactivity between Lyme and syphilis screening assays: Lyme disease does not cause false-positive syphilis screens.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Glenn; LeBlanc, Jason; Heinstein, Charles; Roberts, Catherine; Lindsay, Robbin; Hatchette, Todd F

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of Lyme disease and syphilis in the same geographic area prompted an assessment of screening test cross-reactivity. This study supports the previously described cross-reactivity of Lyme screening among syphilis-positive sera and reports evidence against the possibility of false-positive syphilis screening tests resulting from previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

  5. Lyme disease: a rigorous review of diagnostic criteria and treatment.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Keen, Carl L; Huntley, Arthur C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-02-01

    Lyme disease was originally identified in Lyme, Connecticut, based upon an unusual cluster of what appeared to be patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It was subsequently identified as a new clinical entity originally called Lyme arthritis based on the observation that arthritis was a major clinical feature. However, Lyme arthritis is now called Lyme disease based upon the understanding that the clinical features include not only arthritis, but also potential cardiac, dermatologic and neurologic findings. Lyme disease typically begins with an erythematous rash called erythema migrans (EM). Approximately 4-8% of patients develop cardiac, 11% develop neurologic and 45-60% of patients manifest arthritis. The disease is transmitted following exposure to a tick bite containing a spirochete in a genetically susceptible host. There is considerable data on spirochetes, including Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the original bacteria identified in this disease. Lyme disease, if an organism had not been identified, would be considered as a classic autoimmune disease and indeed the effector mechanisms are similar to many human diseases manifest as loss of tolerance. The clinical diagnosis is highly likely based upon appropriate serology and clinical manifestations. However, the serologic features are often misinterpreted and may have false positives if confirmatory laboratory testing is not performed. Antibiotics are routinely and typically used to treat patients with Lyme disease, but there is no evidence that prolonged or recurrent treatment with antibiotics change the natural history of Lyme disease. Although there are animal models of Lyme disease, there is no system that faithfully recapitulates the human disease. Further research on the effector mechanisms that lead to pathology in some individuals should be further explored to develop more specific therapy.

  6. Climate, Deer, Rodents, and Acorns as Determinants of Variation in Lyme-Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Canham, Charles D; Oggenfuss, Kelly; Winchcombe, Raymond J; Keesing, Felicia

    2006-01-01

    Risk of human exposure to vector-borne zoonotic pathogens is a function of the abundance and infection prevalence of vectors. We assessed the determinants of Lyme-disease risk (density and Borrelia burgdorferi-infection prevalence of nymphal Ixodes scapularis ticks) over 13 y on several field plots within eastern deciduous forests in the epicenter of US Lyme disease (Dutchess County, New York). We used a model comparison approach to simultaneously test the importance of ambient growing-season temperature, precipitation, two indices of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) abundance, and densities of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), and acorns ( Quercus spp.), in both simple and multiple regression models, in predicting entomological risk. Indices of deer abundance had no predictive power, and precipitation in the current year and temperature in the prior year had only weak effects on entomological risk. The strongest predictors of a current year's risk were the prior year's abundance of mice and chipmunks and abundance of acorns 2 y previously. In no case did inclusion of deer or climate variables improve the predictive power of models based on rodents, acorns, or both. We conclude that interannual variation in entomological risk of exposure to Lyme disease is correlated positively with prior abundance of key hosts for the immature stages of the tick vector and with critical food resources for those hosts. PMID:16669698

  7. Climate, deer, rodents, and acorns as determinants of variation in lyme-disease risk.

    PubMed

    Ostfeld, Richard S; Canham, Charles D; Oggenfuss, Kelly; Winchcombe, Raymond J; Keesing, Felicia

    2006-06-01

    Risk of human exposure to vector-borne zoonotic pathogens is a function of the abundance and infection prevalence of vectors. We assessed the determinants of Lyme-disease risk (density and Borrelia burgdorferi-infection prevalence of nymphal Ixodes scapularis ticks) over 13 y on several field plots within eastern deciduous forests in the epicenter of US Lyme disease (Dutchess County, New York). We used a model comparison approach to simultaneously test the importance of ambient growing-season temperature, precipitation, two indices of deer (Odocoileus virginianus) abundance, and densities of white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), and acorns (Quercus spp.), in both simple and multiple regression models, in predicting entomological risk. Indices of deer abundance had no predictive power, and precipitation in the current year and temperature in the prior year had only weak effects on entomological risk. The strongest predictors of a current year's risk were the prior year's abundance of mice and chipmunks and abundance of acorns 2 y previously. In no case did inclusion of deer or climate variables improve the predictive power of models based on rodents, acorns, or both. We conclude that interannual variation in entomological risk of exposure to Lyme disease is correlated positively with prior abundance of key hosts for the immature stages of the tick vector and with critical food resources for those hosts.

  8. Unique expression of chronic Lyme disease and Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction to doxycycline therapy in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Haney, Chad; Nahata, Milap C

    2016-07-20

    I am a 24-year-old male who was diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease after 4 years of multiple, non-specific symptoms. I have written this case as first author with my faculty mentor listed as the coauthor. The objective of this report is to highlight the experience with doxycycline treatment. In 2007, at around age 19 years, I had an acute onset of sore throat, tonsillitis, low-grade fever, stiff upper back and neck muscles, migraines and severely stiff, cracking jaw joints. This led to >24 medical visits, multitudes of tests and examinations, and exploratory surgery over the next 3 years. In 2011, a Lyme-literate medical doctor (LLMD) diagnosed me with chronic Lyme disease. I started taking doxycycline 100 mg by mouth every 12 hours, leading to atypical sequences of events deemed a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction by a LLMD. This case highlights the unique clinical expression of chronic Lyme disease and the Jarisch-Herxheimer response to doxycycline.

  9. Unique expression of chronic Lyme disease and Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction to doxycycline therapy in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Haney, Chad; Nahata, Milap C

    2016-01-01

    I am a 24-year-old male who was diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease after 4 years of multiple, non-specific symptoms. I have written this case as first author with my faculty mentor listed as the coauthor. The objective of this report is to highlight the experience with doxycycline treatment. In 2007, at around age 19 years, I had an acute onset of sore throat, tonsillitis, low-grade fever, stiff upper back and neck muscles, migraines and severely stiff, cracking jaw joints. This led to >24 medical visits, multitudes of tests and examinations, and exploratory surgery over the next 3 years. In 2011, a Lyme-literate medical doctor (LLMD) diagnosed me with chronic Lyme disease. I started taking doxycycline 100 mg by mouth every 12 hours, leading to atypical sequences of events deemed a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction by a LLMD. This case highlights the unique clinical expression of chronic Lyme disease and the Jarisch-Herxheimer response to doxycycline. PMID:27440843

  10. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Álvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; van Altena, Anne M; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Marchand, Loic Le; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; van Os, Theo A M; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Paillerets, Brigitte Bressac-de; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Åke; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    TERT-locus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and leucocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the iCOGs chip, we analysed ~480 TERT-locus SNPs in breast (n=103,991), ovarian (n=39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (11,705) cancer cases and controls. 53,724 participants have leucocyte telomere measures. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. Peak 1 SNP rs2736108 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=5.8×10−7), reduced estrogen receptor negative (ER-negative) (P=1.0×10−8) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.1×10−5) breast cancer risks, and altered promoter-assay signal. Peak 2 SNP rs7705526 minor allele associates with longer telomeres (P=2.3×10−14), increased low malignant potential ovarian cancer risk (P=1.3×10−15) and increased promoter activity. Peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 minor alleles increase ER-negative (P=1.2×10−12) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P=1.6×10−14) breast and invasive ovarian (P=1.3×10−11) cancer risks, but not via altered telomere length. The cancer-risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690 respectively increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice-variant. PMID:23535731

  11. Light-effect transistor (LET) with multiple independent gating controls for optical logic gates and optical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmon, Jason; Rai, Satish; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Weilie; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Modern electronics are developing electronic-optical integrated circuits, while their electronic backbone, e.g. field-effect transistors (FETs), remains the same. However, further FET down scaling is facing physical and technical challenges. A light-effect transistor (LET) offers electronic-optical hybridization at the component level, which can continue Moore’s law to quantum region without requiring a FET’s fabrication complexity, e.g. physical gate and doping, by employing optical gating and photoconductivity. Multiple independent gates are therefore readily realized to achieve unique functionalities without increasing chip space. Here we report LET device characteristics and novel digital and analog applications, such as optical logic gates and optical amplification. Prototype CdSe-nanowire-based LETs show output and transfer characteristics resembling advanced FETs, e.g. on/off ratios up to ~1.0x106 with a source-drain voltage of ~1.43 V, gate-power of ~260 nW, and subthreshold swing of ~0.3 nW/decade (excluding losses). Our work offers new electronic-optical integration strategies and electronic and optical computing approaches.

  12. Design of experiments with multiple independent variables: a resource management perspective on complete and reduced factorial designs.

    PubMed

    Collins, Linda M; Dziak, John J; Li, Runze

    2009-09-01

    An investigator who plans to conduct an experiment with multiple independent variables must decide whether to use a complete or reduced factorial design. This article advocates a resource management perspective on making this decision, in which the investigator seeks a strategic balance between service to scientific objectives and economy. Considerations in making design decisions include whether research questions are framed as main effects or simple effects; whether and which effects are aliased (confounded) in a particular design; the number of experimental conditions that must be implemented in a particular design and the number of experimental subjects the design requires to maintain the desired level of statistical power; and the costs associated with implementing experimental conditions and obtaining experimental subjects. In this article 4 design options are compared: complete factorial, individual experiments, single factor, and fractional factorial. Complete and fractional factorial designs and single-factor designs are generally more economical than conducting individual experiments on each factor. Although relatively unfamiliar to behavioral scientists, fractional factorial designs merit serious consideration because of their economy and versatility.

  13. Time-independent description of rapidly driven systems in the presence of friction: Multiple scale perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Ray Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim

    2012-03-01

    The dynamics of a classical system driven by a rapidly oscillating field (with frequency ω) in the presence of friction has been investigated using the multiple scale perturbation theory (MSPT). By exploiting the idea of separation of time scales, the slow motion has been computed in a systematic expansion in the inverse of ω to the order ω-3. This perturbation series can be viewed as a generalization of the calculation presented by Landau and Lifshitz for Kapitza's pendulum (where the point of suspension is moved periodically) in the presence of friction. The radiation induced dynamics of the system is found to be described by an effective time-independent potential with friction that controls the slow motion. The explicit appearance of friction in our computed effective potential is a manifestation of the dynamical effect due to the fast motion. The present study demonstrates that MSPT can be used to understand and predict the classical dynamics of a driven system in the presence of friction.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome of Patients with Acute Lyme Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Robert P.; Pasternack, Mark S.; Elias, Susan; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Gilmore, Edward C.; McCarthy, Carol; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-05

    Acute Lyme disease results from transmission of and infection by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi following a tick bite. During acute infection, bacteria can disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to the development of Lyme meningitis. Here we have analyzed pooled cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowing for a deep view into the proteome for a cohort of patients with early-disseminated Lyme disease and CSF inflammation leading to the identification of proteins that reflect host responses, which are distinct for subjects with acute Lyme disease. Additionally, we analyzed individual patient samples and quantified changes in protein abundance employing label-free quantitative mass spectrometry based methods. The measured changes in protein abundances reflect the impact of acute Lyme disease on the CNS as presented in CSF. We have identified 89 proteins that differ significantly in abundance in patients with acute Lyme disease. A number of the differentially abundant proteins have been found to be localized to brain synapse and thus constitute important leads for better understanding of the neurological consequence of disseminated Lyme disease.

  15. Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection status is an independent risk factor for multiple myeloma patients after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liu, Junru; Huang, Beihui; Zheng, Dong; Chen, Mei; Zhou, Zhenhai; Xu, Duorong; Zou, Waiyi

    2013-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and its impact on survival and to provide a clinical reference for monitoring and treating HBV during and after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A retrospective analysis of HBV infections was performed in 70 MM patients who received a sequential bortezomib-containing induction therapy and ASCT in our department from June 2006 to February 2012. Among the 70 patients in our study, 11 cases (15.7 %) were hepatitis B surface antigen positive (HBsAg+), and 23 cases (33.3 %) were hepatitis B core antibody positive (HBcAb+). Eight cases were HBsAg, hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), and HBcAb positive, while one case was HBsAg, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBcAb positive. The median follow-up times for the HBsAg+ group and the HBsAg-negative (HBsAg-) group were 27.0 (7.6-85.2) months and 28.7 (7.1-111.0) months, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg+ group were 90.9, 80.8, and 34.6 %, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.2 months (95 % CI, 24.8-37.6). The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates of the HBsAg- group were 98.2, 94, and 84.6 %, respectively, while the median survival time was not yet available. There was a statistically significant difference (p=0.008) in the overall survival rate between the two groups. By Cox regression analysis, we found that the HBsAg+ status was a prognostic factor, which could independently influence the overall survival rate for ASCT. In conclusion, the HBsAg+ status is an independent risk factor for patients with MM receiving ASCT. The application of standard antiviral treatment might help to overcome this risk factor. PMID:23436046

  17. Deer, predators, and the emergence of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Taal; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Mangel, Marc; Wilmers, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America, and both the annual incidence and geographic range are increasing. The emergence of Lyme disease has been attributed to a century-long recovery of deer, an important reproductive host for adult ticks. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that Lyme disease risk may now be more dynamically linked to fluctuations in the abundance of small-mammal hosts that are thought to infect the majority of ticks. The continuing and rapid increase in Lyme disease over the past two decades, long after the recolonization of deer, suggests that other factors, including changes in the ecology of small-mammal hosts may be responsible for the continuing emergence of Lyme disease. We present a theoretical model that illustrates how reductions in small-mammal predators can sharply increase Lyme disease risk. We then show that increases in Lyme disease in the northeastern and midwestern United States over the past three decades are frequently uncorrelated with deer abundance and instead coincide with a range-wide decline of a key small-mammal predator, the red fox, likely due to expansion of coyote populations. Further, across four states we find poor spatial correlation between deer abundance and Lyme disease incidence, but coyote abundance and fox rarity effectively predict the spatial distribution of Lyme disease in New York. These results suggest that changes in predator communities may have cascading impacts that facilitate the emergence of zoonotic diseases, the vast majority of which rely on hosts that occupy low trophic levels. PMID:22711825

  18. Deer, predators, and the emergence of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Levi, Taal; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Mangel, Marc; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2012-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America, and both the annual incidence and geographic range are increasing. The emergence of Lyme disease has been attributed to a century-long recovery of deer, an important reproductive host for adult ticks. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that Lyme disease risk may now be more dynamically linked to fluctuations in the abundance of small-mammal hosts that are thought to infect the majority of ticks. The continuing and rapid increase in Lyme disease over the past two decades, long after the recolonization of deer, suggests that other factors, including changes in the ecology of small-mammal hosts may be responsible for the continuing emergence of Lyme disease. We present a theoretical model that illustrates how reductions in small-mammal predators can sharply increase Lyme disease risk. We then show that increases in Lyme disease in the northeastern and midwestern United States over the past three decades are frequently uncorrelated with deer abundance and instead coincide with a range-wide decline of a key small-mammal predator, the red fox, likely due to expansion of coyote populations. Further, across four states we find poor spatial correlation between deer abundance and Lyme disease incidence, but coyote abundance and fox rarity effectively predict the spatial distribution of Lyme disease in New York. These results suggest that changes in predator communities may have cascading impacts that facilitate the emergence of zoonotic diseases, the vast majority of which rely on hosts that occupy low trophic levels. PMID:22711825

  19. Deer, predators, and the emergence of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Levi, Taal; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Mangel, Marc; Wilmers, Christopher C

    2012-07-01

    Lyme disease is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America, and both the annual incidence and geographic range are increasing. The emergence of Lyme disease has been attributed to a century-long recovery of deer, an important reproductive host for adult ticks. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that Lyme disease risk may now be more dynamically linked to fluctuations in the abundance of small-mammal hosts that are thought to infect the majority of ticks. The continuing and rapid increase in Lyme disease over the past two decades, long after the recolonization of deer, suggests that other factors, including changes in the ecology of small-mammal hosts may be responsible for the continuing emergence of Lyme disease. We present a theoretical model that illustrates how reductions in small-mammal predators can sharply increase Lyme disease risk. We then show that increases in Lyme disease in the northeastern and midwestern United States over the past three decades are frequently uncorrelated with deer abundance and instead coincide with a range-wide decline of a key small-mammal predator, the red fox, likely due to expansion of coyote populations. Further, across four states we find poor spatial correlation between deer abundance and Lyme disease incidence, but coyote abundance and fox rarity effectively predict the spatial distribution of Lyme disease in New York. These results suggest that changes in predator communities may have cascading impacts that facilitate the emergence of zoonotic diseases, the vast majority of which rely on hosts that occupy low trophic levels.

  20. The diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Bair, G O

    1992-09-01

    Lyme disease has probably been reported for at least 80 years, with the cause unknown until the discovery of the Ixodes ricinus complex tick-borne spirochete B. burgdorferi. The incidence of diagnosed cases appears to be increasing in Kansas and elsewhere. A negative laboratory test does not exclude the possibility of the disease. At present, no accurate laboratory screen for the illness is available. The diagnosis must be considered when acute or chronic clinical manifestations reviewed in this paper appear in patients. Additional clinical criteria and modified CDC guidelines are proposed to help clinicians determine who should be treated. Current treatment recommendations are presented. PMID:1447864

  1. Lyme Disease Coinfections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Adam J; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease in North America is caused by infection with the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus ticks. These ticks also have the potential to transmit a rapidly expanding list of other pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, deer tick (Powassan) virus, Borrelia miyamotoi, and the Ehrlichia muris-like organism. Coinfections with B burgdorferi and these other agents are often difficult to diagnose and may go untreated, and thus contribute significantly to patient morbidity and mortality from tick-borne infections. PMID:26593260

  2. Lyme Disease Coinfections in the United States.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Adam J; Pritt, Bobbi S

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease in North America is caused by infection with the spirochetal bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted by Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes pacificus ticks. These ticks also have the potential to transmit a rapidly expanding list of other pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and parasites, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, deer tick (Powassan) virus, Borrelia miyamotoi, and the Ehrlichia muris-like organism. Coinfections with B burgdorferi and these other agents are often difficult to diagnose and may go untreated, and thus contribute significantly to patient morbidity and mortality from tick-borne infections.

  3. Ecology and Epidemiology of Lyme Borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Schotthoefer, Anna M; Frost, Holly M

    2015-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic, tick-borne disease that infects humans worldwide. The disease is currently recognized as the most common vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. Disease is caused by several genospecies of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. Humans are at high risk of infection in regions where highly competent reservoirs are the primary hosts for the subadult stages of the tick, in contrast to regions where less competent or refractory animals feed ticks. Human infections are also most frequently associated with spring and summer months when the nymph stage of the tick is active.

  4. Multiple independent variants at the TERT locus are associated with telomere length and risks of breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bojesen, Stig E; Pooley, Karen A; Johnatty, Sharon E; Beesley, Jonathan; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Edwards, Stacey L; Pickett, Hilda A; Shen, Howard C; Smart, Chanel E; Hillman, Kristine M; Mai, Phuong L; Lawrenson, Kate; Stutz, Michael D; Lu, Yi; Karevan, Rod; Woods, Nicholas; Johnston, Rebecca L; French, Juliet D; Chen, Xiaoqing; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F; Maranian, Melanie J; Ghoussaini, Maya; Ahmed, Shahana; Baynes, Caroline; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Lush, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Françis; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Despierre, Evelyn; Risch, Harvey A; González-Neira, Anna; Rossing, Mary Anne; Pita, Guillermo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Alvarez, Nuria; Larson, Melissa C; Fridley, Brooke L; Schoof, Nils; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cicek, Mine S; Peto, Julian; Kalli, Kimberly R; Broeks, Annegien; Armasu, Sebastian M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Braaf, Linde M; Winterhoff, Boris; Nevanlinna, Heli; Konecny, Gottfried E; Lambrechts, Diether; Rogmann, Lisa; Guénel, Pascal; Teoman, Attila; Milne, Roger L; Garcia, Joaquin J; Cox, Angela; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hein, Rebecca; Sawyer, Elinor J; Haiman, Christopher A; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Andrulis, Irene L; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hopper, John L; Odunsi, Kunle; Lindblom, Annika; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Simard, Jacques; Lurie, Galina; Fasching, Peter A; Carney, Michael E; Radice, Paolo; Wilkens, Lynne R; Swerdlow, Anthony; Goodman, Marc T; Brauch, Hiltrud; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hillemanns, Peter; Winqvist, Robert; Dürst, Matthias; Devilee, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Pelttari, Liisa M; Zheng, Wei; Leminen, Arto; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bunker, Clareann H; Kristensen, Vessela; Ness, Roberta B; Muir, Kenneth; Edwards, Robert; Meindl, Alfons; Heitz, Florian; Matsuo, Keitaro; du Bois, Andreas; Wu, Anna H; Harter, Philipp; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Hosono, Satoyo; Kang, Daehee; Nakanishi, Toru; Hartman, Mikael; Yatabe, Yasushi; Hamann, Ute; Karlan, Beth Y; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Gaborieau, Valerie; Jensen, Allan; Eccles, Diana; Høgdall, Estrid; Shen, Chen-Yang; Brown, Judith; Woo, Yin Ling; Shah, Mitul; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Luben, Robert; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Czene, Kamila; Vierkant, Robert A; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Vachon, Celine; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Levine, Douglas A; Rudolph, Anja; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Iversen, Edwin; Nickels, Stefan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Cramer, Daniel W; Gibson, Lorna; Terry, Kathryn L; Fletcher, Olivia; Vitonis, Allison F; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Poole, Elizabeth M; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Liu, Jianjun; Bandera, Elisa V; Li, Jingmei; Olson, Sara H; Humphreys, Keith; Orlow, Irene; Blomqvist, Carl; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Salvesen, Helga B; Muranen, Taru A; Wik, Elisabeth; Brouwers, Barbara; Krakstad, Camilla; Wauters, Els; Halle, Mari K; Wildiers, Hans; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Mulot, Claire; Aben, Katja K; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Altena, Anne Mvan; Truong, Thérèse; Massuger, Leon F A G; Benitez, Javier; Pejovic, Tanja; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Hoatlin, Maureen; Zamora, M Pilar; Cook, Linda S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Kelemen, Linda E; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Le, Nhu D; Sohn, Christof; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Cybulski, Cezary; Henderson, Brian E; Menkiszak, Janusz; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Le Marchand, Loic; Yang, Hannah P; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Knight, Julia A; Høgdall, Claus K; Apicella, Carmel; Gore, Martin; Tsimiklis, Helen; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C; Jager, Agnes; den Ouweland, Ans M Wvan; Brown, Robert; Martens, John W M; Flanagan, James M; Kriege, Mieke; Paul, James; Margolin, Sara; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Severi, Gianluca; Whittemore, Alice S; Baglietto, Laura; McGuire, Valerie; Stegmaier, Christa; Sieh, Weiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Labrèche, France; Gao, Yu-Tang; Goldberg, Mark S; Yang, Gong; Dumont, Martine; McLaughlin, John R; Hartmann, Arndt; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Phelan, Catherine M; Lux, Michael P; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peissel, Bernard; Sellers, Thomas A; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jones, Michael; Ramus, Susan J; Orr, Nick; Menon, Usha; Pearce, Celeste L; Brüning, Thomas; Pike, Malcolm C; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Pylkäs, Katri; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kauppila, Saila; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Seynaeve, Caroline; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Ditsch, Nina; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Stram, Daniel O; van den Berg, David; Yip, Cheng Har; Ikram, M Kamran; Teh, Yew-Ching; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Miao, Hui; Iau, Philip Tsau-Choong; Teo, Yik Ying; McKay, James; Shapiro, Charles; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Fountzilas, George; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Healey, Catherine S; Luccarini, Craig; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Offit, Kenneth; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Garber, Judy; Narod, Steven A; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tihomirova, Laima; Arun, Banu K; Campbell, Ian; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, Kees E P; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Collée, J Margriet; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Hooning, Maartje J; Rookus, Matti A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Os, Theo A Mvan; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Fineberg, Elena; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M John; Platte, Radka; Davidson, Rosemarie; Ellis, Steve D; Cole, Trevor; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Buecher, Bruno; Damiola, Francesca; Faivre, Laurence; Frenay, Marc; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Caron, Olivier; Giraud, Sophie; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valérie; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Gronwald, Jacek; Byrski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Bonanni, Bernardo; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Rhiem, Kerstin; Niederacher, Dieter; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Sutter, Christian; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Borg, Ake; Melin, Beatrice; Rantala, Johanna; Soller, Maria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Salani, Ritu; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Robson, Mark; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Foretova, Lenka; Savage, Sharon A; Lester, Jenny; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Olswold, Curtis; Cunningham, Julie M; Slager, Susan; Pankratz, Vernon S; Dicks, Ed; Lakhani, Sunil R; Couch, Fergus J; Hall, Per; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Reddel, Roger R; Goode, Ellen L; Greene, Mark H; Easton, Douglas F; Berchuck, Andrew; Antoniou, Antonis C; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M

    2013-04-01

    TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOGs, we analyzed ∼480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 × 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 × 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 × 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 × 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 × 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 × 10(-14)) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 × 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant. PMID:23535731

  5. Synergistic and independent actions of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Shuxin; Dou, Yongchao; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Xuemei; Yu, Bin; Ren, Guodong

    2015-04-01

    All types of small RNAs in plants, piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals and a subset of siRNAs in Drosophila and C. elegans are subject to HEN1 mediated 3' terminal 2'-O-methylation. This modification plays a pivotal role in protecting small RNAs from 3' uridylation, trimming and degradation. In Arabidopsis, HESO1 is a major enzyme that uridylates small RNAs to trigger their degradation. However, U-tail is still present in null hen1 heso1 mutants, suggesting the existence of (an) enzymatic activities redundant with HESO1. Here, we report that UTP: RNA uridylyltransferase (URT1) is a functional paralog of HESO1. URT1 interacts with AGO1 and plays a predominant role in miRNA uridylation when HESO1 is absent. Uridylation of miRNA is globally abolished in a hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant, accompanied by an extensive increase of 3'-to-5' trimming. In contrast, disruption of URT1 appears not to affect the heterochromatic siRNA uridylation. This indicates the involvement of additional nucleotidyl transferases in the siRNA pathway. Analysis of miRNA tailings in the hen1 heso1 urt1 triple mutant also reveals the existence of previously unknown enzymatic activities that can add non-uridine nucleotides. Importantly, we show HESO1 may also act redundantly with URT1 in miRNA uridylation when HEN1 is fully competent. Taken together, our data not only reveal a synergistic action of HESO1 and URT1 in the 3' uridylation of miRNAs, but also independent activities of multiple terminal nucleotidyl transferases in the 3' tailing of small RNAs and an antagonistic relationship between uridylation and trimming. Our results may provide further insight into the mechanisms of small RNA 3' end modification and stability control. PMID:25928341

  6. Multiple Independent Emergences of Type 2 Vaccine-Derived Polioviruses during a Large Outbreak in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jing; Jorba, Jaume; Bukbuk, David; Adu, Festus; Gumede, Nicksy; Pate, Muhammed Ali; Abanida, Emmanuel Ade; Gasasira, Alex; Iber, Jane; Chen, Qi; Vincent, Annelet; Chenoweth, Paul; Henderson, Elizabeth; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Naeem, Asif; Umami, Rifqiyah Nur; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Baba, Marycelin; Adeniji, Adekunle; Williams, A. J.; Kilpatrick, David R.; Oberste, M. Steven; Wassilak, Steven G.; Tomori, Oyewale; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen

    2013-01-01

    Since 2005, a large poliomyelitis outbreak associated with type 2 circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (cVDPV2) has occurred in northern Nigeria, where immunization coverage with trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) has been low. Phylogenetic analysis of P1/capsid region sequences of isolates from each of the 403 cases reported in 2005 to 2011 resolved the outbreak into 23 independent type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) emergences, at least 7 of which established circulating lineage groups. Virus from one emergence (lineage group 2005-8; 361 isolates) was estimated to have circulated for over 6 years. The population of the major cVDPV2 lineage group expanded rapidly in early 2009, fell sharply after two tOPV rounds in mid-2009, and gradually expanded again through 2011. The two major determinants of attenuation of the Sabin 2 oral poliovirus vaccine strain (A481 in the 5′-untranslated region [5′-UTR] and VP1-Ile143) had been replaced in all VDPV2 isolates; most A481 5′-UTR replacements occurred by recombination with other enteroviruses. cVDPV2 isolates representing different lineage groups had biological properties indistinguishable from those of wild polioviruses, including efficient growth in neuron-derived HEK293 cells, the capacity to cause paralytic disease in both humans and PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice, loss of the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and the capacity for sustained person-to-person transmission. We estimate from the poliomyelitis case count and the paralytic case-to-infection ratio for type 2 wild poliovirus infections that ∼700,000 cVDPV2 infections have occurred during the outbreak. The detection of multiple concurrent cVDPV2 outbreaks in northern Nigeria highlights the risks of cVDPV emergence accompanying tOPV use at low rates of coverage in developing countries. PMID:23408630

  7. Isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from mammals in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Loken, K I; Wu, C C; Johnson, R C; Bey, R F

    1985-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes were isolated from the kidneys of two Peromyscus spp. trapped in Minnesota in September and October 1983. No spirochetes were isolated from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), red backed voles (Clethrionomys gapperi), or shrews (Sorexy cinereus and Blarina brevicauda). This is the first report of the isolation of the Lyme disease spirochete from the midwestern United States and isolations from these animals, which were free of ticks, suggest that the Lyme disease spirochete may persist in animal organs for months. PMID:4001130

  8. An Investigation of the Relationship of Intellective and Personality Variables to Success in an Independent Study Science Course Through the Use of a Modified Multiple Regression Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Michael; Feldhusen, John F.

    This is an empirical study of selected learner characteristics and their relation to academic success, as indicated by course grades, in a structured independent study learning program. This program, called the Audio-Tutorial System, was utilized in an undergraduate college course in the biological sciences. By use of multiple regression analysis,…

  9. Tetracycline therapy for chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Donta, S T

    1997-07-01

    Two hundred seventy-seven patients with chronic Lyme disease were treated with tetracycline for 1 to 11 months (mean, 4 months); the outcomes for these patients were generally good. Overall, 20% of the patients were cured; 70% of the patients' conditions improved, and treatment failed for 10% of the patients. Improvement frequently did not take place for several weeks; after 2 months of treatment, 33% of the patients' conditions were significantly improved (degree of improvement, 75%-100%), and after 3 months of treatment, 61% of the patients' conditions were significantly improved. Treatment outcomes for seronegative patients (20% of all patients) were similar to those for seropositive patients. Western immunoblotting showed reactions to one or more Borrelia burgdorferi-specific proteins for 65% of the patients for whom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were negative. Whereas age, sex, and prior erythema migrans were not correlated with better or worse treatment outcomes, a history of longer duration of symptoms or antibiotic treatment was associated with longer treatment times to achieve improvement and cure. These results support the use of longer courses of treatment in the management of patients with chronic Lyme disease. Controlled trials need to be conducted to validate these observations.

  10. Evolving perspectives on lyme borreliosis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Jlh; Middelveen, Mj; Klein, D; Sperling, Fah

    2012-01-01

    With cases now documented in every province, Lyme borreliosis (LB) is emerging as a serious public health risk in Canada. Controversy over the contribution of LB to the burden of chronic disease is maintained by difficulty in capturing accurate Canadian statistics, especially early clinical cases of LB. The use of dogs as sentinel species demon-strates that potential contact with Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes, as detected by C6 peptide, extends across the country. Dissemination of infected ticks by migratory birds and rapid establishment of significant levels of infection have been well described. Canadian public health response has focused on identification of established populations of the tick vectors, Ixodes scapularis and I. pacificus, on the assumption that these are the only important vectors of the disease across Canada. Strains of B. burgdorferi circulating in Canada and the full range of their reservoir species and coinfections remain to be explored. Ongoing surveys and historical records demonstrate that Borrelia-positive Ixodes species are regu-larly present in regions of Canada that have previously been considered to be outside of the ranges of these species in re-cent modeling efforts. We present data demonstrating that human cases of LB are found across the nation. Consequently, physician education and better early diagnoses are needed to prevent long term sequelae. An international perspective will be paramount for developing improved Canadian guidelines that recognize the complexity and diversity of Lyme borreliosis.

  11. Signaling through CD14 attenuates the inflammatory response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Benhnia, Mohammed Rafii-El-Idrissi; Wroblewski, Danielle; Akhtar, Muhammad Naveed; Patel, Raina A; Lavezzi, Wendy; Gangloff, Sophie C; Goyert, Sanna M; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D; Sellati, Timothy J

    2005-02-01

    Lyme disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder caused by the spirochetal bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi. In vitro evidence suggests that binding of spirochetal lipoproteins to CD14, a pattern recognition receptor expressed on monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells, is a critical requirement for cellular activation and the subsequent release of proinflammatory cytokines that most likely contribute to symptomatology and clinical manifestations. To test the validity of this notion, we assessed the impact of CD14 deficiency on Lyme disease in C3H/HeN mice. Contrary to an anticipated diminution in pathology, CD14(-/-) mice exhibited more severe and persistent inflammation than did CD14(+/+) mice. This disparity reflects altered gene regulation within immune cells that may engender the higher bacterial burden and serum cytokine levels observed in CD14(-/-) mice. Comparing their in vitro stimulatory activity, live spirochetes, but not lysed organisms, were a potent CD14-independent stimulus of cytokine production, triggering an exaggerated response by CD14(-/-) macrophages. Collectively, our in vivo and in vitro findings support the provocative notion that: 1) pattern recognition by CD14 is entirely dispensable for elaboration of an inflammatory response to B. burgdorferi, and 2) CD14-independent signaling pathways are inherently more destructive than CD14-dependent pathways. Continued study of CD14-independent signaling pathways may provide mechanistic insight into the inflammatory processes that underlie development of chronic inflammation.

  12. The clinical spectrum and treatment of Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Steere, A. C.; Malawista, S. E.; Bartenhagen, N. H.; Spieler, P. N.; Newman, J. H.; Rahn, D. W.; Hutchinson, G. J.; Green, J.; Snydman, D. R.; Taylor, E.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease was recognized as a separate entity because of close geographic clustering of affected children in Lyme, Connecticut, with what was thought to be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It then became apparent that Lyme disease is a complex, multisystem disorder. The illness usually begins in summer with erythema chronicum migrans and associated symptoms (stage 1). Weeks to months later, some patients develop neurologic or cardiac abnormalities (stage 2), and weeks to years later, many patients develop intermittent attacks of arthritis (stage 3), which may become chronic, with erosion of cartilage and bone. Patients with severe and prolonged illness have an increased frequency of the B-cell alloantigen, DR2. For patients with early Lyme disease, tetracycline appears to be the most effective drug, then penicillin, and finally erythromycin. High-dose intravenous penicillin is effective for the later stages of the disease. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PLATE I PLATE II PMID:6516448

  13. 100. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 102. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 104. Connecticut River Bridge draw span. Old Lyme, New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. Connecticut River Bridge draw span. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 103. Connecticut River Bridge draw span. Old Lyme, New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. Connecticut River Bridge draw span. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 96. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 101. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 98. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  20. 97. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 99. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. Connecticut River Bridge. Old Lyme, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 106.89. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  2. Close to home: a history of Yale and Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Elbaum-Garfinkle, Shana

    2011-06-01

    Yale scientists played a pivotal role in the discovery of Lyme disease and are credited as the first to recognize, name, characterize, and treat the affliction. Today, Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States, affecting approximately 20,000 people each year, with the incidence having doubled in the past 10 years [1]. Lyme disease is the result of a bacterial infection transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected deer tick, which typically results in a skin rash at the site of attack. While most cases, when caught early, are easily treated by antibiotic therapy, delayed treatment can lead to serious systemic side effects involving the joints, heart, and central nervous system. Here we review Yale's role in the discovery and initial characterization of Lyme disease and how those early discoveries are crucial to our current understanding of the disease.

  3. Chronic lyme disease: psychogenic fantasy or somatic infection?

    PubMed

    Mervine, Phyllis

    2003-02-01

    Sigal and Hassett published an article about Lyme disease in the EHP Supplements (Sigal and Hassett 2002), suggesting that chronic Lyme disease is "psychogenic." I do not think that Sigal and Hassett, non-psychiatrists, are qualified to speak about psychiatric matters. I, however, actually have had the disease, which they characterize as "medically unexplained," for over 25 years and have 15 years of experience as a patient advocate and educator. I beg to differ.

  4. Chronic lyme disease: psychogenic fantasy or somatic infection?

    PubMed Central

    Mervine, Phyllis

    2003-01-01

    Sigal and Hassett published an article about Lyme disease in the EHP Supplements (Sigal and Hassett 2002), suggesting that chronic Lyme disease is "psychogenic." I do not think that Sigal and Hassett, non-psychiatrists, are qualified to speak about psychiatric matters. I, however, actually have had the disease, which they characterize as "medically unexplained," for over 25 years and have 15 years of experience as a patient advocate and educator. I beg to differ. PMID:12573917

  5. Sera from patients with chronic Lyme disease protect mice from Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Bockenstedt, L K; Barthold, S W; Chen, M; Tao, H; Ali-Salaam, P; Telford, S R; Flavell, R A

    1994-03-01

    Sera from selected patients with Lyme disease in different stages were used to passively immunize mice against Borrelia burgdorferi challenge to determine if human antibodies could protect the animals from infection. Sera from 2 patients with late-stage Lyme disease that contained strong antibody reactivity to proteins in B. burgdorferi lysates, including antibodies to the outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B, partly protected mice from infection after challenge with a small inoculum (10(2)) of B. burgdorferi. Mice immunized with sera from either of these 2 patients developed significantly fewer infections from the borreliae (patient 1 serum, 5%; patient 2 serum, 25%) relative to control mice (patient 1 serum, 90%; patient 2 serum, 74%). In contrast, sera from 2 patients with early or late Lyme disease that lacked antibodies reactive to OspA and OspB did not confer protection. Immunity appeared to be related, at least in part, to the presence of a strong humoral response to the Osps. These results suggest that during prolonged infection, some patients develop an immune response that may be partly protective against reinfection with B. burgdorferi. Therefore, although most patients do not mount a strong humoral response to the Osps during natural infection, vaccination with an Osp may elicit protective immunity.

  6. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-03-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully.

  7. Assessing peridomestic entomological factors as predictors for Lyme disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connally, N.P.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Mather, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    The roles of entomologic risk factors, including density of nymphal blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis), prevalence of nymphal infection with the etiologic agent (Borrelia burgdorferi), and density of infected nymphs, in determining the risk of human Lyme disease were assessed at residences in the endemic community of South Kingstown, RI. Nymphs were sampled between May and July from the wooded edge around 51 and 47 residential properties in 2002 and 2003, respectively. Nymphs were collected from all residences sampled. Tick densities, infection rates, and densities of infected nymphs were all significantly higher around homes reporting Lyme disease histories in 2003, while only infection rates were significantly higher in 2002. However, densities of infected nymphs did not significantly predict the probability of Lyme disease at a residence (by logistic regression) in either year. There were no significant differences in entomologic risk factors between homes with state-confirmed Lyme disease histories and homes with self-reported cases (not reported to the state health department). Therefore, although entomologic risk factors tended to be higher at residences with cases of Lyme disease, entomological indices, in the absence of human behavior measures, were not useful predictors of Lyme disease at the scale of individual residences in a tick-endemic community.

  8. Vaccination against Lyme disease: Are we ready for it?

    PubMed Central

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Luytjes, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the Northern hemisphere and is caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. A first sign of Borrelia infection is a circular skin rash, erythema migrans, but it can develop to more serious manifestations affecting skin, nervous system, joints, and/or heart. The marked increase in Lyme disease incidence over the past decades, the severity of the disease, and the associated high medical costs of, in particular, the persistent forms of Lyme disease requires adequate measures for control. Vaccination would be the most effective intervention for prevention, but at present no vaccine is available. In the 1990s, 2 vaccines against Lyme disease based on the OspA protein from the predominant Borrelia species of the US showed to be safe and effective in clinical phase III studies. However, failed public acceptance led to the demise of these monovalent OspA-based vaccines. Nowadays, public seem to be more aware of the serious health problems that Lyme disease can cause and seem more ready for the use of a broadly protective vaccine. This article discusses several aspects that should be considered to enable the development and implementation of a vaccine to prevent Lyme disease successfully. PMID:26337648

  9. Lyme disease diagnosis and treatment: lessons from the AIDS epidemic.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R B; Johnson, L

    2010-12-01

    Lyme disease is a controversial tick-borne illness that is estimated to be four times more common than AIDS in the United States. This paper outlines the challenges overcome in the healthcare response to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the development of sensitive laboratory tests for the AIDS virus, and the promotion of long-term combination antimicrobial regimens to effectively treat HIV disease. We suggest that similar challenges need to be overcome before the chronic form of Lyme disease can be successfully treated. Currently, diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease is hindered by the lack of a uniform case definition that adequately reflects the clinical presentation of the disease, poor laboratory test sensitivity, and high treatment failure rates using short-term monotherapy. Consequently the optimal treatment for patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease remains undefined. Although antibiotic monotherapy has been successful in treating early Lyme disease, the use of combination antibiotic therapy modelled on HIV treatment appears to be more effective for patients with persistent symptoms of tick-borne infection. Resolution of the controversy surrounding Lyme disease should lead to improved diagnosis and treatment modelled on the approach to HIV disease.

  10. Novel Diagnosis of Lyme Disease: Potential for CAM Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hebroni, Frank; Raphael, Yaniv; Erde, Jonathan; Raxlen, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD) is the most common tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere, producing a wide range of disabling effects on multiple human targets, including the skin, the nervous system, the joints and the heart. Insufficient clinical diagnostic methods, the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment along with the pervasive nature of infection impel the development and establishment of new clinical diagnostic tools with increased accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The goal of this article is 4-fold: (i) to detail LD infection and pathology, (ii) to review prevalent diagnostic methods, emphasizing inherent problems, (iii) to introduce the usage of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) in clinical diagnostics and (iv) to underscore the relevance of a novel comprehensive LD diagnostic approach to practitioners of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). Utilization of this analytical method will increase the accuracy of the diagnostic process and abridge the time to treatment, with antibiotics, herbal medicines and nutritional supplements, resulting in improved quality of care and disease prognosis. PMID:18955246

  11. Prevention of lyme disease: promising research or sisyphean task?

    PubMed

    Krupka, Michal; Zachova, Katerina; Weigl, Evzen; Raska, Milan

    2011-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Spirochaetes) is a group of at least 12 closely related species, some of which are responsible for chronic zoonotic infection that may cause Lyme disease. The only experimentally confirmed vector transmitting Borrelia to mammals is the Ixodes ticks. Borrelia is a highly adapted pathogen that can survive in the host organism in spite of the intense immune responses. Some patients have chronic long-lasting complications despite antibiotic therapy, probably due to adverse effects of the immune responses. A preventive vaccine against this bacterium has not been available due to the relatively broad spectrum and antigenic variability of Borrelia-surface lipoproteins and the different epitope recognition by experimental animals and humans. Although a human vaccine was marketed in the USA, it has been already pulled off the market. In addition, this vaccine was effective only in the USA, where the only pathogenic species is B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Recent data indicate that a broadly effective vaccine will to be composed of a mixture of several antigens or multiple epitopes.

  12. Chronic Lyme disease arthritis: review of the literature and report of a case of wrist arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scerpella, T A; Engber, W D

    1992-05-01

    A case of Lyme arthritis with advanced degenerative changes localized to the midcarpal joint was treated with a limited wrist arthrodesis with relief of pain and improved function. Chronic Lyme arthritis occurs as the third stage of Lyme disease. Serologic testing and a history of a characteristic rash may be helpful in the diagnosis. Radiographic and histopathologic findings are nonspecific, with both degenerative and inflammatory characteristics. Intravenous antibiotics provide an effective treatment of chronic Lyme arthritis.

  13. Recovery of Lyme disease spirochetes from patients.

    PubMed Central

    Steere, A. C.; Grodzicki, R. L.; Craft, J. E.; Shrestha, M.; Kornblatt, A. N.; Malawista, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the summer of 1982, we have cultured patient specimens for Lyme disease spirochetes. Of 118 patients cultured, four specimens yielded spirochetes: two from blood, one from a skin biopsy specimen of erythema chronicum migrans (ECM), and one from cerebrospinal fluid. All four isolates appeared identical when examined with a monoclonal antibody. However, attempts to recover the spirochete from synovium or synovial fluid were unsuccessful. In addition, the organism could not be visualized in skin or synovial biopsy specimens using the avidin-biotin peroxidase complex detection system. Thus, the current yield in culturing spirochetes from patients is quite low, and it is not yet known whether the organism is still alive later in the disease when arthritis is present. PMID:6393606

  14. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  15. An unusual presentation of Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Kitto, L; McKenna, C

    2015-01-01

    Back pain is a common symptom among patients presenting to the acute medical unit. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man with a brief history of fatigue and severe back pain, unresponsive to escalating doses of opiate analgesia. Blood tests and imaging studies were unremarkable and a functional diagnosis was considered. Several weeks into his admission he developed a lower motor neurone facial nerve palsy. He was treated with antibiotics for an incidental finding of a hospital-acquired pneumonia on imaging, which remarkably led to the resolution of his facial palsy and allowed a dramatic reduction in analgesia. This triggered further investigations; identifying Lyme neuroborreliosis as the cause of his symptoms. PMID:25745648

  16. A nonlocal spatial model for Lyme disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiao; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of a nonlocal and time-delayed reaction-diffusion model for Lyme disease with a spatially heterogeneous structure. In the case of a bounded domain, we first prove the existence of the positive steady state and a threshold type result for the disease-free system, and then establish the global dynamics for the model system in terms of the basic reproduction number. In the case of an unbound domain, we obtain the existence of the disease spreading speed and its coincidence with the minimal wave speed. At last, we use numerical simulations to verify our analytic results and investigate the influence of model parameters and spatial heterogeneity on the disease infection risk.

  17. Swimming Dynamics of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vig, Dhruv K.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, swims by undulating its cell body in the form of a traveling flat wave, a process driven by rotating internal flagella. We study B. burgdorferi’s swimming by treating the cell body and flagella as linearly elastic filaments. The dynamics of the cell are then determined from the balance between elastic and resistive forces and moments. We find that planar, traveling waves only exist when the flagella are effectively anchored at both ends of the bacterium and that these traveling flat waves rotate as they undulate. The model predicts how the undulation frequency is related to the torque from the flagellar motors and how the stiffness of the cell body and flagella affect the undulations and morphology.

  18. DNA characterization of Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G. P.; Steigerwalt, A. G.; Johnson, S.; Barbour, A. G.; Steere, A. C.; Robinson, I. M.; Brenner, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes (LDS) have phenotypic characteristics of both treponemes and borreliae. To ascertain whether one or more species of LDS exist, as well as their taxonomic status, we determined the DNA base (G + C) content for three strains of LDS, the DNA relatedness of ten strains isolated in the United States or Europe, and the DNA relatedness of LDS to other spirochetes. The G + C content of the three LDS strains was 28.1-29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borellia hermsii (30.6 mol %) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol %) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies of nine LDS strains to a reference strain isolated from human blood revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0-1.0 percent, indicating the strains were one species. Similarly, relatedness values of seven strains to the reference strain were high: 58-98 percent (mean, 71 percent) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50-93 percent (mean, 69 percent) in 65 degrees C reactions. Labeled DNA from B. hermsii was 30-40 percent related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees C reactions and 8-10 percent related in 65 degrees C reactions. In contrast, DNA from the reference LDS strain showed relatedness of only 1 percent to DNAs of two leptospires and only 16 percent to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. We conclude that LDS are a single species, genetically unlike treponemes or leptospires, which belong in the genus Borrelia. PMID:6516455

  19. Genetic structure reveals a history of multiple independent origins followed by admixture in the allopolyploid weed Salsola ryanii.

    PubMed

    Welles, Shana R; Ellstrand, Norman C

    2016-08-01

    It has recently become clear that many invasive species have evolved in situ via hybridization or polyploidy from progenitors which themselves are introduced species. For species formed by hybridization or polyploidy, genetic diversity within the newly formed species is influenced by the number of independent evolutionary origins of the species. For recently formed species, an analysis of genetic structure can provide insight into the number of independent origin events involved in the formation of the species. For a putative invasive allopolyploid species, the number of origins involved in the species formation, the genetic diversity present within these origins, and the level of gene flow between independent origins determines the genetic composition of the neospecies. Here we analyze the genetic structure of the newly formed allopolyploid species, Salsola ryanii, a tumbleweed which evolved within the last 20-100 years in California. We utilize the genetic structure analysis to determine that this new species is the result of at least three independent allopolyplodization events followed by gene flow between the descendants of independent origins. PMID:27468305

  20. 76 FR 35978 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Connecticut River, Old Lyme, CT... of the Amtrak Railroad Bridge at mile 3.4, across the Connecticut River at Old Lyme, Connecticut. The... INFORMATION: The Amtrak Railroad Bridge, across the Connecticut River at mile 3.4, at Old Lyme,...

  1. Lyme neuroborreliosis in a patient treated with TNF-alpha inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Merkac, Maja Ivartnik; Tomazic, Janez; Strle, Franc

    2015-12-01

    A 57-year-old woman, receiving TNF-alpha inhibitor adalimumab for psoriasis, presented with early Lyme neuroborreliosis (Bannwarth's syndrome). Discontinuation of adalimumab and 14-day therapy with ceftriaxone resulted in a smooth course and favorable outcome of Lyme borreliosis. This is the first report on Lyme neuroborreliosis in a patient treated with TNF-alpha inhibitor.

  2. Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease - Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Adriana R.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and Europe. Culture for B. burgdorferi is not routinely available. PCR can be helpful in synovial fluid of patients with Lyme arthritis. The majority of laboratory tests performed for the diagnosis of Lyme disease are based on detection of the antibody responses against B. burgdorferi in serum. The sensitivity of antibody-based tests increases with the duration of the infection, and patients who present very early in their illness are more likely to have a negative result. Patients with erythema migrans should receive treatment based on the clinical diagnosis. The current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for serodiagnosis of Lyme disease is a 2-tiered algorithm, an initial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) followed by separate IgM and IgG Western blots if the first EIA test result is positive or borderline. The IgM result is only relevant for patients with illness duration of less than a month. While the 2-tier algorithm works well for later stages of the infection, it has low sensitivity during early infection. A major advance has been the discovery of VlsE and its C6 peptide as markers of antibody response in Lyme disease. Specificity is extremely important in Lyme disease testing, as the majority of tests are being performed in situations with low likelihood of the disease, a situation where a positive result is more likely to be a false positive. Current assays do not distinguish between active and inactive infection, and patients may continue to be seropositive for years. There is a need to simplify the testing algorithm for Lyme disease, improving sensitivity in early disease while still maintaining high specificity and providing information about the stage of infection. The development of a point of care assay and biomarkers for active infection would be major advances for the field. PMID:25999225

  3. Update on persistent symptoms associated with Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carlos R.; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Lyme disease, caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne illness in the United States. The pathogenesis, ecology, and epidemiology of Lyme disease have been well described, and antimicrobial treatment is very effective. There has been controversy about whether infection can persist and cause chronic symptoms despite treatment with antimicrobials. This review summarizes recent studies that have addressed this issue. Recent findings The pathogenesis of persistent nonspecific symptoms in patients who were treated for Lyme disease is poorly understood, and the validity of results of attempts to demonstrate persistent infection with B. burgdorferi has not been established. One study attempted to use xenodiagnosis to detect B. burgdorferi in patients who have been treated for Lyme disease. Another study assessed whether repeated episodes of erythema migrans were due to the same or different strains of B. burgdorferi. A possible cause of persistent arthritis in some treated patients is slow clearance of nonviable organisms that may lead to prolonged inflammation. The results of all of these studies continue to provide evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist in patients who receive conventional antimicrobial treatment for Lyme disease. Summary Patients with persistent symptoms possibly associated with Lyme disease often provide a challenge for clinicians. Recent studies have provided additional evidence that viable B. burgdorferi do not persist after conventional treatment with antimicrobials, indicating that ongoing symptoms in patients who received conventional treatment for Lyme disease should not be attributed to persistent active infection. Video abstract http://links.lww.com/MOP/A23 PMID:25490690

  4. Unorthodox Alternative Therapies Marketed to Treat Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Shapiro, Eugene D.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Baker, Phillip J.; Halperin, John J.; McSweegan, Edward; Wormser, Gary P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some patients with medically unexplained symptoms or alternative medical diagnoses suspect that they chronically suffer from the tick-borne infection Lyme disease. These patients are commonly targeted by providers of alternative therapies. This study was designed to identify and characterize the range of unorthodox alternative therapies advertised to patients with a diagnosis of Lyme disease. Methods. Internet searches using the Google search engine were performed to identify the websites of clinics and services that marketed nonantimicrobial therapies for Lyme disease. We subsequently used the PubMed search engine to identify any scientific studies evaluating such treatments for Lyme disease. Websites were included in our review so long as they advertised a commercial, nonantimicrobial product or service that specifically mentioned utility for Lyme disease. Websites with patient testimonials (such as discussion groups) were excluded unless the testimonial appeared as marketing on a commercial site. Results. More than 30 alternative treatments were identified, which fell into several broad categories: these included oxygen and reactive oxygen therapy; energy and radiation-based therapies; nutritional therapy; chelation and heavy metal therapy; and biological and pharmacological therapies ranging from certain medications without recognized therapeutic effects on Borrelia burgdorgeri to stem cell transplantation. Review of the medical literature did not substantiate efficacy or, in most cases, any rationale for the advertised treatments. Conclusions. Providers of alternative therapies commonly target patients who believe they have Lyme disease. The efficacy of these unconventional treatments for Lyme disease is not supported by scientific evidence, and in many cases they are potentially harmful. PMID:25852124

  5. Lyme disease: a growing threat to urban populations.

    PubMed

    Steere, A C

    1994-03-29

    Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, which is caused by three groups of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is transmitted in North America, Europe, and Asia by ticks of the Ixodes ricinus complex. The primary areas around the world that are now affected by Lyme disease are near the terminal moraine of the glaciers 15,000 years ago. The emergence of Lyme disease in the United States in this century is thought to have occurred because of ecological conditions favorable for deer. From 1982 through 1991, 40,195 cases occurring in 47 states were reported to the Centers for Disease Control, but enzootic cycles of B. burgdorferi have been identified in only 19 states. During the last several decades, the disease has spread to new areas and has caused focal outbreaks, including locations near Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. Lyme disease is like syphilis in its multisystem involvement, occurrence in stages, and mimicry of other diseases. Diagnosis of late neurologic abnormalities of the disorder has created the most difficulty. A recent phenomenon is that a number of poorly understood conditions, such as chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia, are misdiagnosed as "chronic Lyme disease." Part of the reason for misdiagnosis is due to problems associated with diagnostic tests. The various manifestations of Lyme disease can usually be treated successfully with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin, except for objective neurologic manifestations, which seem to require intravenous therapy. Vector control of thick-borne diseases has been difficult and, therefore, reduction of the risk of infection has been limited primarily to personal protection measures.

  6. Lyme disease: a growing threat to urban populations.

    PubMed Central

    Steere, A C

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, which is caused by three groups of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is transmitted in North America, Europe, and Asia by ticks of the Ixodes ricinus complex. The primary areas around the world that are now affected by Lyme disease are near the terminal moraine of the glaciers 15,000 years ago. The emergence of Lyme disease in the United States in this century is thought to have occurred because of ecological conditions favorable for deer. From 1982 through 1991, 40,195 cases occurring in 47 states were reported to the Centers for Disease Control, but enzootic cycles of B. burgdorferi have been identified in only 19 states. During the last several decades, the disease has spread to new areas and has caused focal outbreaks, including locations near Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. Lyme disease is like syphilis in its multisystem involvement, occurrence in stages, and mimicry of other diseases. Diagnosis of late neurologic abnormalities of the disorder has created the most difficulty. A recent phenomenon is that a number of poorly understood conditions, such as chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia, are misdiagnosed as "chronic Lyme disease." Part of the reason for misdiagnosis is due to problems associated with diagnostic tests. The various manifestations of Lyme disease can usually be treated successfully with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin, except for objective neurologic manifestations, which seem to require intravenous therapy. Vector control of thick-borne diseases has been difficult and, therefore, reduction of the risk of infection has been limited primarily to personal protection measures. PMID:8146126

  7. Concordant species delimitation from multiple independent evidence: A case study with the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Caudata: Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunke; Murphy, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data are widely used to delimit species. However, owing to its strict maternal inheritance in most species, mtDNA tracks female dispersion and dispersal only. The accuracy of mtDNA-derived species delimitation is often not explicitly tested using other independent evidence, such as nuclear DNA (nDNA) data, morphological data, or ecological data. Because species are independent evolutionary lineages that can form testable hypotheses, we present a multi-evidence case study on species delimitation that combines statistical approaches with spatially explicit ecological analysis. Montane salamanders of the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Salamandridae) from southeastern China exhibit conservative morphology and variable color patterning that impede species diagnosis. Recent studies proposed splitting P. brevipes into four species based on deep mtDNA divergence but also found discordance between mtDNA and nDNA trees. In this study, we test evolutionary independence of these hypothesized species lineages using two coalescent-based Bayesian methods (Bayes factor and BP&P). Despite significant conflict between mtDNA gene tree and the species phylogeny, the results reinforce the inference of at least four species in the complex as opposed to the one species recognized for over 130 years. Correlative ecological niche modeling and statistical analysis of environmental data indicate that suitable habitats for each species are isolated by incompatible intervening lowland regions, so the likelihood of gene flow among species is very low, which means species lineages should maintain their evolutionary independence. We demonstrate that concordance among independent evidence confirms species status, which forms the basis for accurate assessment of regional biodiversity. PMID:26119130

  8. Concordant species delimitation from multiple independent evidence: A case study with the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Caudata: Salamandridae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunke; Murphy, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data are widely used to delimit species. However, owing to its strict maternal inheritance in most species, mtDNA tracks female dispersion and dispersal only. The accuracy of mtDNA-derived species delimitation is often not explicitly tested using other independent evidence, such as nuclear DNA (nDNA) data, morphological data, or ecological data. Because species are independent evolutionary lineages that can form testable hypotheses, we present a multi-evidence case study on species delimitation that combines statistical approaches with spatially explicit ecological analysis. Montane salamanders of the Pachytriton brevipes complex (Salamandridae) from southeastern China exhibit conservative morphology and variable color patterning that impede species diagnosis. Recent studies proposed splitting P. brevipes into four species based on deep mtDNA divergence but also found discordance between mtDNA and nDNA trees. In this study, we test evolutionary independence of these hypothesized species lineages using two coalescent-based Bayesian methods (Bayes factor and BP&P). Despite significant conflict between mtDNA gene tree and the species phylogeny, the results reinforce the inference of at least four species in the complex as opposed to the one species recognized for over 130 years. Correlative ecological niche modeling and statistical analysis of environmental data indicate that suitable habitats for each species are isolated by incompatible intervening lowland regions, so the likelihood of gene flow among species is very low, which means species lineages should maintain their evolutionary independence. We demonstrate that concordance among independent evidence confirms species status, which forms the basis for accurate assessment of regional biodiversity.

  9. Clinical determinants of Lyme borreliosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, anaplasmosis, and ehrlichiosis in an Australian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Background Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis. This spirochete, along with Babesia, Bartonella, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and the Rickettsia spp. are recognized tick-borne pathogens. In this study, the clinical manifestation of these zoonoses in Australia is described. Methods The clinical presentation of 500 patients over the course of 5 years was examined. Evidence of multisystem disease and cranial nerve neuropathy was sought. Supportive laboratory evidence of infection was examined. Results Patients from every state of Australia presented with a wide range of symptoms of disease covering multiple systems and a large range of time intervals from onset. Among these patients, 296 (59%) were considered to have a clinical diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis and 273 (54% of the 500) tested positive for the disease, the latter not being a subset of the former. In total, 450 (90%) had either clinical evidence for or laboratory proof of borrelial infection, and the great majority of cases featured neurological symptoms involving the cranial nerves, thus mimicking features of the disease found in Europe and Asia, as distinct from North America (where extracutaneous disease is principally an oligoarticular arthritis). Only 83 patients (17%; number [n]=492) reported never leaving Australia. Of the 500 patients, 317 (63%) had clinical or laboratory-supported evidence of coinfection with Babesia or Bartonella spp. Infection with A. phagocytophilum was detected in three individuals, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis was detected in one individual who had never traveled outside Australia. In the cohort, 30 (11%; n=279) had positive rickettsial serology. Conclusion The study suggests that there is a considerable presence of borreliosis in Australia, and a highly significant burden of coinfections accompanying borreliosis transmission. The concept sometimes advanced of a “Lyme-like illness” on the continent needs to be re-examined as the clinical interplay between

  10. The Psychoimmunology of Lyme/Tick-Borne Diseases and its Association with Neuropsychiatric Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Bransfield, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Disease progression of neuropsychiatric symptoms in Lyme/tick-borne diseases can be better understood by greater attention to psychoimmunology. Although there are multiple contributors that provoke and weaken the immune system, infections and persistent infections are significant causes of pathological immune reactions. Immune mediated ef-fects are a significant contributor to the pathophysiological processes and disease progression. These immune effects in-clude persistent inflammation with cytokine effects and molecular mimicry and both of these mechanisms may be present at the same time in persistent infections. Sickness syndrome associated with interferon treatment and autoimmune limbic encephalopathies are models to understand inflammatory and molecular mimicry effects upon neuropsychiatric symp-toms. Progressive inflammatory reactions have been proposed as a model to explain disease progression in depression, psychosis, dementia, epilepsy, autism and other mental illnesses and pathophysiological changes have been associated with oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, changes in homocysteine metabolism and altered tryptophan catabolism. Lyme dis-ease has been associated with the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IL-18 and interferon-gamma, the chemokines CXCL12 and CXCL13 and increased levels proinflammatory lipoproteins. Borrelia burgdorferi surface gly-colipids and flagella antibodies appear to elicit anti-neuronal antibodies and anti-neuronal antibodies and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins can disseminate from the periphery to inflame the brain. Autism spectrum disorders associated with Lyme/tick-borne diseases may be mediated by a combination of inflammatory and molecular mimicry mechanisms. Greater interaction is needed between infectious disease specialists, immunologists and psychiatrists to benefit from this awareness and to further understand these mechanisms. PMID:23091569

  11. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%–15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  12. Lysosomal β-glucuronidase regulates Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Kenneth K.C.; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; Chen, Xinjian; Zachary, James F.; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most prevalent arthropod-borne illness in the United States and remains a clinical and social challenge. The spectrum of disease severity among infected patients suggests that host genetics contribute to pathogenic outcomes, particularly in patients who develop arthritis. Using a forward genetics approach, we identified the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUSB), a member of a large family of coregulated lysosomal enzymes, as a key regulator of Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Severely arthritic C3H mice possessed a naturally occurring hypomorphic allele, Gusbh. C57BL/6 mice congenic for the C3H Gusb allele were prone to increased Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Radiation chimera experiments revealed that resident joint cells drive arthritis susceptibility. C3H mice expressing WT Gusb as a transgene were protected from severe Lyme arthritis. Importantly, the Gusbh allele also exacerbated disease in a serum transfer model of rheumatoid arthritis. A known GUSB function is the prevention of lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Development of Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis in Gusbh-expressing mice was associated with heightened accumulation of GAGs in joint tissue. We propose that GUSB modulates arthritis pathogenesis by preventing accumulation of proinflammatory GAGs within inflamed joint tissue, a trait that may be shared by other lysosomal exoglycosidases. PMID:24334460

  13. Successful vaccination for Lyme disease: a novel mechanism?

    PubMed

    Exner, M

    2001-09-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the aetiologic agent of Lyme disease, which is a multi-system disorder resulting from the transmission of organisms from an infected tick. According to the US Centers for Disease Control, the incidence of Lyme disease in the US has increased 25-fold since national surveillance began and the geographical spread of Lyme disease causing spirochetes would indicate that the annual number of cases will continue to rise. Humoral immunity has been shown to play a role in protection and this has spurred efforts towards developing a Lyme disease vaccine. A number of protective immunogens have been characterised to date, but due to the heterogeneity of Lyme disease Borreliae, no single molecule has proven to be completely effective as a vaccinogen. This review will describe the immunogens that have been used to protect against B. burgdorferi infection, with a focus on the inherent challenges involved with providing successful immunity to B. burgdorferi. In addition, the promising aspects and the limitations of each protective immunogen will be discussed. PMID:11728214

  14. Will Culling White-Tailed Deer Prevent Lyme Disease?

    PubMed

    Kugeler, K J; Jordan, R A; Schulze, T L; Griffith, K S; Mead, P S

    2016-08-01

    White-tailed deer play an important role in the ecology of Lyme disease. In the United States, where the incidence and geographic range of Lyme disease continue to increase, reduction of white-tailed deer populations has been proposed as a means of preventing human illness. The effectiveness of this politically sensitive prevention method is poorly understood. We summarize and evaluate available evidence regarding the effect of deer reduction on vector tick abundance and human disease incidence. Elimination of deer from islands and other isolated settings can have a substantial impact on the reproduction of blacklegged ticks, while reduction short of complete elimination has yielded mixed results. To date, most studies have been conducted in ecologic situations that are not representative to the vast majority of areas with high human Lyme disease risk. Robust evidence linking deer control to reduced human Lyme disease risk is lacking. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend deer population reduction as a Lyme disease prevention measure, except in specific ecologic circumstances.

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease.

  16. Chronic Lyme disease: misconceptions and challenges for patient management.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, causes both specific and nonspecific symptoms. In untreated chronic infection, specific manifestations such as a relapsing large-joint oligoarthritis can persist for years, yet subside with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Nervous system involvement occurs in 10%-15% of untreated patients and typically involves lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, and/or mononeuritis multiplex; in some rare cases, patients have parenchymal inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Nervous system infection is similarly highly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, including oral doxycycline. Nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, perceived cognitive slowing, headache, and others occur in patients with Lyme disease and are indistinguishable from comparable symptoms occurring in innumerable other inflammatory states. There is no evidence that these nonspecific symptoms reflect nervous system infection or damage, or that they are in any way specific to or diagnostic of this or other tick-borne infections. When these symptoms occur in patients with Lyme disease, they typically also subside after antimicrobial treatment, although this may take time. Chronic fatigue states have been reported to occur following any number of infections, including Lyme disease. The mechanism underlying this association is unclear, although there is no evidence in any of these infections that these chronic posttreatment symptoms are attributable to ongoing infection with B. burgdorferi or any other identified organism. Available appropriately controlled studies indicate that additional or prolonged courses of antimicrobial therapy do not benefit patients with a chronic fatigue-like state after appropriately treated Lyme disease. PMID:26028977

  17. Will Culling White-Tailed Deer Prevent Lyme Disease?

    PubMed

    Kugeler, K J; Jordan, R A; Schulze, T L; Griffith, K S; Mead, P S

    2016-08-01

    White-tailed deer play an important role in the ecology of Lyme disease. In the United States, where the incidence and geographic range of Lyme disease continue to increase, reduction of white-tailed deer populations has been proposed as a means of preventing human illness. The effectiveness of this politically sensitive prevention method is poorly understood. We summarize and evaluate available evidence regarding the effect of deer reduction on vector tick abundance and human disease incidence. Elimination of deer from islands and other isolated settings can have a substantial impact on the reproduction of blacklegged ticks, while reduction short of complete elimination has yielded mixed results. To date, most studies have been conducted in ecologic situations that are not representative to the vast majority of areas with high human Lyme disease risk. Robust evidence linking deer control to reduced human Lyme disease risk is lacking. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend deer population reduction as a Lyme disease prevention measure, except in specific ecologic circumstances. PMID:26684932

  18. Longterm decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in a patient with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Burrascano, Joseph; Winger, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. In a previous report we described a decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in patients with chronic Lyme disease. We have now identified a patient with chronic relapsing and remitting symptoms of Lyme disease who had decreased levels of CD57 lymphocytes over 10 years. This observation represents the longest duration of an immunologic abnormality ever documented in chronic Lyme disease. The CD57 lymphocyte subset appears to be a useful marker of longterm infection with the Lyme disease spirochete.

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi stimulation of chemokine secretion by cells of monocyte lineage in patients with Lyme arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Joint fluid in patients with Lyme arthritis often contains high levels of CCL4 and CCL2, which are chemoattractants for monocytes and some T cells, and CXCL9 and CXCL10, which are chemoattractants for CD4+ and CD8+ T effector cells. These chemokines are produced primarily by cells of monocyte lineage in TH1-type immune responses. Our goal was to begin to learn how infection with Borrelia burgdorferi leads to the secretion of these chemokines, using patient cell samples. We hypothesized that B. burgdorferi stimulates chemokine secretion from monocytes/macrophages in multiple ways, thereby linking innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 24 Lyme arthritis patients were stimulated with B. burgdorferi, interferon (IFN)-γ, or both, and the levels of CCL4, CCL2, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were measured in culture supernatants. CD14+ monocytes/macrophages from PBMC and synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) were stimulated in the same way, using available samples. CXCR3, the receptor for CXCL9 and CXCL10, and CCR5, the receptor for CCL4, were assessed on T cells from PBMC and SFMC. Results In patients with Lyme arthritis, B. burgdorferi but not IFN-γ induced PBMC to secrete CCL4 and CCL2, and B. burgdorferi and IFN-γ each stimulated the production of CXCL9 and CXCL10. However, with the CD14+ cell fraction, B. burgdorferi alone stimulated the secretion of CCL4; B. burgdorferi and IFN-γ together induced CCL2 secretion, and IFN-γ alone stimulated the secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10. The percentage of T cells expressing CXCR3 or CCR5 was significantly greater in SFMC than PBMC, confirming that TH1 effector cells were recruited to inflamed joints. However, when stimulated with B. burgdorferi or IFN-γ, SFMC and PBMC responded similarly. Conclusions B. burgdorferi stimulates PBMC or CD14+ monocytes/macrophages directly to secrete CCL4, but spirochetal stimulation of other intermediate cells, which are present in PBMC

  20. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as a potential sentinel for human Lyme disease in Indiana.

    PubMed

    Raizman, E A; Holland, J D; Shukle, J T

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the potential of white-tailed deer (WTD) (Odocoileus virginianus) to be a sentinel for human cases of Lyme disease (LD) in Indiana using location data from a 3-year survey of approximately 3400 hunted deer with associated tick Ixodes scapularis and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) data. Data on human LD cases at the county level were obtained from the Indiana Department of Health. All data were assigned to county centroids to match the resolution of the LD data before creating optimized trend surfaces for LD incidence, hunted deer count, Ixodes scapularis and Bb prevalence. To determine whether LD was spatially associated with the areas of high densities of deer, deer with Ixodes scapularis and deer with ticks infected with Bb, we used spatial analysis with distance indices (SADIE). The SADIE analysis found significant spatial association between LD and the distribution of three organismal predictor variables, that is, WTD, Ixodes ticks and Bb. Lyme disease incident rate varied between 0.08 cases per 10,000 habitants (Johnson county) and 5.9 cases per 10,000 habitants (Warren county). In conclusion, WTD can be used as an accurate and cost-effective sentinel for human LD. This method will permit public health workers to identify potentially endemic areas independently of human case reports.

  1. Precipitation and the occurrence of lyme disease in the Northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Bunnell, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of Lyme disease is a growing concern in the United States, and various studies have been performed to understand the factors related to Lyme disease occurrence. In the United States, Lyme disease has occurred most frequently in the northeastern United States. Positive correlations between the number of cases of Lyme disease reported in the northeastern United States during the 1992-2002 period indicate that late spring/early summer precipitation was a significant climate factor affecting the occurrence of Lyme disease. When late spring/early summer precipitation was greater than average, the occurrence of Lyme disease was above average, possibly due to increased tick activity and survival rate during wet conditions. Temperature did not seem to explain the variability in Lyme disease reports for the northeastern United States. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  2. Multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in chronic lymphocytic leukemia are mostly derived from independent clones

    PubMed Central

    Plevova, Karla; Francova, Hana Skuhrova; Burckova, Katerina; Brychtova, Yvona; Doubek, Michael; Pavlova, Sarka; Malcikova, Jitka; Mayer, Jiri; Tichy, Boris; Pospisilova, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, usually a monoclonal disease, multiple productive immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements are identified sporadically. Prognostication of such cases based on immunoglobulin heavy variable gene mutational status can be problematic, especially if the different rearrangements have discordant mutational status. To gain insight into the possible biological mechanisms underlying the origin of the multiple rearrangements, we performed a comprehensive immunogenetic and immunophenotypic characterization of 31 cases with the multiple rearrangements identified in a cohort of 1147 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. For the majority of cases (25/31), we provide evidence of the co-existence of at least two B lymphocyte clones with a chronic lymphocytic leukemia phenotype. We also identified clonal drifts in serial samples, likely driven by selection forces. More specifically, higher immunoglobulin variable gene identity to germline and longer complementarity determining region 3 were preferred in persistent or newly appearing clones, a phenomenon more pronounced in patients with stereotyped B-cell receptors. Finally, we report that other factors, such as TP53 gene defects and therapy administration, influence clonal selection. Our findings are relevant to clonal evolution in the context of antigen stimulation and transition of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:24038023

  3. Genome and Phylogenetic Analyses of Trypanosoma evansi Reveal Extensive Similarity to T. brucei and Multiple Independent Origins for Dyskinetoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M.; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei. PMID:25568942

  4. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    PubMed Central

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  5. Therapeutic passive vaccination against chronic Lyme disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, W; Stehle, T; Museteanu, C; Siebers, A; Gern, L; Kramer, M; Wallich, R; Simon, M M

    1997-11-11

    Passive and active immunization against outer surface protein A (OspA) has been successful in protecting laboratory animals against subsequent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Antibodies (Abs) to OspA convey full protection, but only when they are present at the time of infection. Abs inactivate spirochetes within the tick and block their transmission to mammals, but do not affect established infection because of the loss of OspA in the vertebrate host. Our initial finding that the presence of high serum titers of anti-OspC Abs (5 to 10 microg/ml) correlates with spontaneous resolution of disease and infection in experimentally challenged immunocompetent mice suggested that therapeutic vaccination with OspC may be feasible. We now show that polyclonal and monospecific mouse immune sera to recombinant OspC, but not to OspA, of B. burgdorferi resolve chronic arthritis and carditis and clear disseminated spirochetes in experimentally infected C.B.-17 severe combined immunodeficient mice in a dose-dependent manner. This was verified by macroscopical and microscopical examination of affected tissues and recultivation of spirochetes from ear biopsies. Complete resolution of disease and infection was achieved, independent of whether OspC-specific immune sera (10 microg OspC-specific Abs) were repeatedly given (4x in 3- to 4-day intervals) before the onset (day 10 postinfection) or at the time of fully established arthritis and carditis (days 19 or 60 postinfection). The results indicate that in mice spirochetes constitutively express OspC and are readily susceptible to protective OspC-specific Abs throughout the infection. Thus, an OspC-based vaccine appears to be a candidate for therapy of Lyme disease.

  6. Testing for shared biogeographic history in the lower Central American freshwater fish assemblage using comparative phylogeography: concerted, independent, or multiple evolutionary responses?

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Justin C; Johnson, Jerald B

    2014-01-01

    A central goal of comparative phylogeography is determining whether codistributed species experienced (1) concerted evolutionary responses to past geological and climatic events, indicated by congruent spatial and temporal patterns (“concerted-response hypothesis”); (2) independent responses, indicated by spatial incongruence (“independent-response hypothesis”); or (3) multiple responses (“multiple-response hypothesis”), indicated by spatial congruence but temporal incongruence (“pseudocongruence”) or spatial and temporal incongruence (“pseudoincongruence”). We tested these competing hypotheses using DNA sequence data from three livebearing fish species codistributed in the Nicaraguan depression of Central America (Alfaro cultratus, Poecilia gillii, and Xenophallus umbratilis) that we predicted might display congruent responses due to co-occurrence in identical freshwater drainages. Spatial analyses recovered different subdivisions of genetic structure for each species, despite shared finer-scale breaks in northwestern Costa Rica (also supported by phylogenetic results). Isolation-with-migration models estimated incongruent timelines of among-region divergences, with A. cultratus and Xenophallus populations diverging over Miocene–mid-Pleistocene while P. gillii populations diverged over mid-late Pleistocene. Approximate Bayesian computation also lent substantial support to multiple discrete divergences over a model of simultaneous divergence across shared spatial breaks (e.g., Bayes factor [B10] = 4.303 for Ψ [no. of divergences] > 1 vs. Ψ = 1). Thus, the data support phylogeographic pseudoincongruence consistent with the multiple-response hypothesis. Model comparisons also indicated incongruence in historical demography, for example, support for intraspecific late Pleistocene population growth was unique to P. gillii, despite evidence for finer-scale population expansions in the other taxa. Empirical tests for phylogeographic congruence

  7. Spatial and Temporal Emergence Pattern of Lyme Disease in Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Kolivras, Korine N.; Hong, Yili; Duan, Yuanyuan; Seukep, Sara E.; Prisley, Stephen P.; Campbell, James B.; Gaines, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of infectious diseases over the past several decades has highlighted the need to better understand epidemics and prepare for the spread of diseases into new areas. As these diseases expand their geographic range, cases are recorded at different geographic locations over time, making the analysis and prediction of this expansion complicated. In this study, we analyze spatial patterns of the disease using a statistical smoothing analysis based on areal (census tract level) count data of Lyme disease cases in Virginia from 1998 to 2011. We also use space and space–time scan statistics to reveal the presence of clusters in the spatial and spatiotemporal distribution of Lyme disease. Our results confirm and quantify the continued emergence of Lyme disease to the south and west in states along the eastern coast of the United States. The results also highlight areas where education and surveillance needs are highest. PMID:25331806

  8. Novel microbial virulence factor triggers murine lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2013-03-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected "neutrophil-recruiting" chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis.

  9. Lyme neuroborreliosis presenting as Alice in Wonderland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Binalsheikh, Ibrahim M; Griesemer, David; Wang, Sonya; Alvarez-Altalef, Rebeca

    2012-03-01

    We describe a 7-year-old boy with Alice in Wonderland syndrome associated with Lyme disease. He presented with metamorphopsia and auditory hallucinations in the absence of previous tick bites or other signs of Lyme disease. The boy never developed clinical seizures, and electroencephalograms during these spells indicated no epileptic activity. There was no history of migraine. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging produced normal results. Lyme serology tested positive in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. He was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for 3 weeks, with complete resolution of signs. This case report is the first, to our knowledge, of neuroborreliosis presenting as Alice in Wonderland syndrome with complete resolution of findings after intravenous antibiotic treatment. PMID:22353296

  10. Vaccination against Lyme disease: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Embers, Monica E.; Narasimhan, Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato bacteria transmitted to humans and domestic animals by the bite of an Ixodes spp. tick (deer tick). Despite improvements in diagnostic tests and public awareness of Lyme disease, the reported cases have increased over the past decade to approximately 30,000 per year. Limitations and failed public acceptance of a human vaccine, comprised of the outer surface A (OspA) lipoprotein of B. burgdorferi, led to its demise, yet current research has opened doors to new strategies for protection against Lyme disease. In this review we discuss the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi, and the unique opportunities it poses to block infection or transmission at different levels. We present the correlates of protection for this infectious disease, the pros and cons of past vaccination strategies, and new paradigms for future vaccine design that would include elements of both the vector and the pathogen. PMID:23407755

  11. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O’Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health. PMID:21867956

  12. Lyme arthritis. Spirochetes found in synovial microangiopathic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Y. E.; Duray, P. H.; Steere, A. C.; Kashgarian, M.; Buza, J.; Malawista, S. E.; Askenase, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    In 17 patients with Lyme disease, synovial specimens, obtained by synovectomy or needle biopsy, showed nonspecific villous hypertrophy, synovial cell hyperplasia, prominent microvasculature, lymphoplasmacellular infiltration, and sometimes lymphoid follicles. The larger surgically obtained specimens also showed striking deposition of fibrin in synovial stroma and a form of endarteritis obliterans. In 2 patients, spirochetes were seen in and around blood vessels by the Dieterle silver stain. Compared with 55 cases of other synovial disease, obliterative microvascular lesions were seen only in Lyme synovia, but marked stromal deposition of fibrin seemed nonspecific. These findings imply that the Lyme spirochete may survive for years in affected synovium and may be directly responsible for the microvascular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3966535

  13. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O'Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health.

  14. Methods for control of tick vectors of Lyme Borreliosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaenson, T.G.T.; Fish, D.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Gray, J.S.; Mather, T.N.; Piesman, J.

    1991-01-01

    During the IVth International Conference on Lyme Borreliosis in Stockholm, 1990, a workshop on control of Lyme disease vectors briefly reviewed: basic ecological principles for tick control; biocontrol of ticks; chemical control, including the use of repellents and use of permethrin-treated rodent nest material; tick control by habitat modification; and reduction of tick host availability. It was concluded that, although much research work remains, Lyme borreliosis is to a large extent a preventable infection. Avoidance of heavily tick-infested areas, personal protection using proper clothing, and prompt removal of attached ticks remain the most effective protective measures. Many other prophylactic measures are available and could be efficiently integrated into schemes to reduce the abundance of vectors. However, since the ecology of the infection varies greatly between different localities it may be necessary to apply different combinations of control methods in different endemic regions.

  15. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  16. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement.

  17. Vaccination against Lyme disease: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Embers, Monica E; Narasimhan, Sukanya

    2013-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a zoonotic disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato bacteria transmitted to humans and domestic animals by the bite of an Ixodes spp. tick (deer tick). Despite improvements in diagnostic tests and public awareness of Lyme disease, the reported cases have increased over the past decade to approximately 30,000 per year. Limitations and failed public acceptance of a human vaccine, comprised of the outer surface A (OspA) lipoprotein of B. burgdorferi, led to its demise, yet current research has opened doors to new strategies for protection against Lyme disease. In this review we discuss the enzootic cycle of B. burgdorferi, and the unique opportunities it poses to block infection or transmission at different levels. We present the correlates of protection for this infectious disease, the pros and cons of past vaccination strategies, and new paradigms for future vaccine design that would include elements of both the vector and the pathogen.

  18. [Lyme disease acrodermitis chronica atrophicans: misleading vascular signs].

    PubMed

    Blaise, S; Fiandrino, G; Satger, B; Carpentier, P-H

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans is a tertiary form of Lyme borrelliosis. It occurs at least six months, but also up to several years, after a tick bite. This rare condition is probably underestimated because of the difficult diagnosis. Clinical presentations of acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans are quite variable depending upon the duration of the disease. Complimentary explorations are difficult to interpret and rarely specific. Only rare configurations allow formal diagnosis of Borrelia burgdoferi infection. We present a patient who exhibited an atypical clinical presentation of Lyme disease acrodermatitis chronic atrophicans. The clinical outcome was quite favorable with treatment, confirming the diagnosis. Such treatments, which are well tolerated and highly effective, are essential since an untreated disease can lead to potentially severe neurological involvement. PMID:24698204

  19. Clustering of Two Genes Putatively Involved in Cyanate Detoxification Evolved Recently and Independently in Multiple Fungal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, M. Holly; McGary, Kriston L.; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Slot, Jason C.; Geiser, David M.; Sink, Stacy; O’Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC’s closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture. PMID:25663439

  20. Clustering of two genes putatively involved in cyanate detoxification evolved recently and independently in multiple fungal lineages.

    PubMed

    Elmore, M Holly; McGary, Kriston L; Wisecaver, Jennifer H; Slot, Jason C; Geiser, David M; Sink, Stacy; O'Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-03-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC's closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture.

  1. Lyme arthritis in Southern Norway - an endemic area for Lyme Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite Southern Norway is an endemic area for Lyme borreliosis there is a lack of data on Lyme arthritis (LA). In the literature controversies exist if acute LA can develop into chronic arthritis. Our objective was to identify and characterize patients with LA in Southern Norway and explore disease course after antibiotic treatment. Methods Patients aged 20 years or older with arthritis and a positive serology for Borrelia burgdorferi infection (IgG and/or IgM) suspected of having LA were consecutively recruited either from general practitioners or from hospital departments. Results From January 2007 to December 2010 a total of 27 patients were assessed. Mean (range) age was 56 years (41–80) and mean symptom duration prior to inclusion was 11.2 weeks (1 day – 2 years). Definite LA was diagnosed in 16 patients, probable LA in 5 patients and 6 patients were concluded to have other arthritis disorders. Among the 21 LA patients 20 had mono-arthritis (knee 18, ankle 2) and 1 had polyarthritis. All LA patients responded favourable to antibiotic treatment and none of the patients developed chronic arthritis after long term follow up, not even in LA patients who had intraarticular glucocorticosteroid (GC) injection prior to antibiotic treatment. Conclusions Our data shows that LA in Southern Norway is a benign disease which successfully can be treated with antibiotics even in patients treated with GC prior to antibiotics. PMID:24708707

  2. Nervous system Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease, and none of the above.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, causes nervous system involvement in 10-15 % of identified infected individuals. Not unlike the other well-known spirochetosis, syphilis, infection can be protracted, but is microbiologically curable in virtually all patients, regardless of disease duration. Diagnosis relies on 2-tier serologic testing, which after the first 4-6 weeks of infection is both highly sensitive and specific. After this early, acute phase, serologic testing should rely only on IgG reactivity. Nervous system involvement most commonly presents with meningitis, cranial neuritis and radiculoneuritis, but can also present with a broader array of peripheral nervous system manifestations. Central nervous system infection typically elicits a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and, often, intrathecal production of specific antibody, findings that should not be expected in disease not affecting the CNS. Treatment with recommended courses of oral or, when necessary, parenteral antibiotics is highly effective. The attribution of chronic, non-specific symptoms to "chronic Lyme disease", in the absence of specific evidence of ongoing B. burgdorferi infection, is inappropriate and unfortunate, leading not only to unneeded treatment and its associated complications, but also to missed opportunities for more appropriate management of patients' often disabling symptoms.

  3. Nervous system Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease, and none of the above.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2016-03-01

    Lyme borreliosis, infection with the tick-borne spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, causes nervous system involvement in 10-15 % of identified infected individuals. Not unlike the other well-known spirochetosis, syphilis, infection can be protracted, but is microbiologically curable in virtually all patients, regardless of disease duration. Diagnosis relies on 2-tier serologic testing, which after the first 4-6 weeks of infection is both highly sensitive and specific. After this early, acute phase, serologic testing should rely only on IgG reactivity. Nervous system involvement most commonly presents with meningitis, cranial neuritis and radiculoneuritis, but can also present with a broader array of peripheral nervous system manifestations. Central nervous system infection typically elicits a cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and, often, intrathecal production of specific antibody, findings that should not be expected in disease not affecting the CNS. Treatment with recommended courses of oral or, when necessary, parenteral antibiotics is highly effective. The attribution of chronic, non-specific symptoms to "chronic Lyme disease", in the absence of specific evidence of ongoing B. burgdorferi infection, is inappropriate and unfortunate, leading not only to unneeded treatment and its associated complications, but also to missed opportunities for more appropriate management of patients' often disabling symptoms. PMID:26377699

  4. Complement split products c3a and c4a in chronic lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R B; Savely, V R; Motanya, N C; Giclas, P C

    2009-01-01

    Complement split products C3a and C4a are reportedly elevated in patients with acute Lyme disease. We have now examined these immunologic markers in patients with chronic Lyme disease compared to appropriate disease controls. The study population consisted of 29 healthy controls, 445 patients with chronic Lyme disease, 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and six patients with AIDS. The Lyme disease patients were divided according to predominant musculoskeletal symptoms (324 patients) or predominant neurologic symptoms (121 patients). C3a and C4a levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. All patients with chronic Lyme disease and AIDS had normal C3a levels compared to controls, whereas patients with SLE had significantly increased levels of this marker. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease and AIDS patients had significantly increased levels of C4a compared to either controls, patients with predominant neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease or SLE patients. Response to antibiotic therapy in chronic Lyme disease was associated with a significant decrease in the C4a level, whereas lack of response was associated with a significant increase in this marker. In contrast, AIDS patients had persistently increased C4a levels despite antiretroviral therapy. Lyme patients with positive single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans had significantly lower C4a levels compared to Lyme patients with normal SPECT scan results. Patients with predominant musculoskeletal symptoms of Lyme disease have normal C3a and increased C4a levels. This pattern differs from the increase in both markers seen in acute Lyme disease, and C4a changes correlate with the response to therapy in chronic Lyme disease. C4a appears to be a valuable immunologic marker in patients with persistent symptoms of Lyme disease.

  5. Tick saliva represses innate immunity and cutaneous inflammation in a murine model of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Kern, Aurélie; Collin, Elody; Barthel, Cathy; Michel, Chloé; Jaulhac, Benoît; Boulanger, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an arthropod-borne disease transmitted by the Ixodes tick. This spirochetal infection is first characterized by a local cutaneous inflammation, the erythema migrans. The skin constitutes a key interface in the development of the disease. During Borrelia inoculation, tick saliva affects the innate and adaptive immunity of the vertebrate host skin. Some key mediators of innate immunity such as antimicrobial peptides (cathelicidin and defensin families) have been identified as important initiators of skin inflammation. We analyzed the role of tick saliva on integumental innate immunity using different protocols of Borrelia infection, via syringe or direct tick transmission. When syringe inoculation was used, Borrelia triggered skin inflammation with induction of CRAMP, the mouse cathelicidin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. However, when Borrelia was transmitted directly via the tick, we observed a significant repression of inflammatory genes, suggesting a critical role of tick saliva in skin innate immunity. For all the protocols tested, a peak of intense Borrelia multiplication occurred in the skin between days 5 and 15, before bacterial dissemination to target organs. We conclude that Borrelia pathogens specifically use the tick saliva to facilitate their transmission to the host and that the skin constitutes an essential interface in the development of Lyme disease.

  6. Proof that chronic lyme disease exists.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The evidence continues to mount that Chronic Lyme Disease (CLD) exists and must be addressed by the medical community if solutions are to be found. Four National Institutes of Health (NIH) trials validated the existence and severity of CLD. Despite the evidence, there are physicians who continue to deny the existence and severity of CLD, which can hinder efforts to find a solution. Recognizing CLD could facilitate efforts to avoid diagnostic delays of two years and durations of illness of 4.7 to 9 years described in the NIH trials. The risk to society of emerging antibiotic-resistant organisms should be weighed against the societal risks associated with failing to treat an emerging population saddled with CLD. The mixed long-term outcome in children could also be examined. Once we accept the evidence that CLD exists, the medical community should be able to find solutions. Medical professionals should be encouraged to examine whether: (1) innovative treatments for early LD might prevent CLD, (2) early diagnosis of CLD might result in better treatment outcomes, and (3) more effective treatment regimens can be developed for CLD patients who have had prolonged illness and an associated poor quality of life.

  7. Role of Adrenomedullin in Lyme Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Marre, Meghan L.; Darcy, Courtney T.; Yinh, Janeth; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Steere, Allen C.; Hu, Linden T.

    2010-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi stimulates a strong inflammatory response during infection of a mammalian host. To understand the mechanisms of immune regulation employed by the host to control this inflammatory response, we focused our studies on adrenomedullin, a peptide produced in response to bacterial stimuli that exhibits antimicrobial activity and regulates inflammatory responses by modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Specifically, we investigated the effect of B. burgdorferi on the expression of adrenomedullin as well as the ability of adrenomedullin to dampen host inflammatory responses to the spirochete. The concentration of adrenomedullin in the synovial fluid of untreated Lyme arthritis patients was elevated compared with that in control osteoarthritis patient samples. In addition, coculture with B. burgdorferi significantly increased the expression of adrenomedullin in RAW264.7 macrophages through MyD88-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)-, and p38-dependent signaling cascades. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous adrenomedullin to B. burgdorferi-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages resulted in a significant decrease in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that B. burgdorferi increases the production of adrenomedullin, which in turn negatively regulates the B. burgdorferi-stimulated inflammatory response. PMID:20921145

  8. Role of adrenomedullin in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Marre, Meghan L; Darcy, Courtney T; Yinh, Janeth; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Steere, Allen C; Hu, Linden T

    2010-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi stimulates a strong inflammatory response during infection of a mammalian host. To understand the mechanisms of immune regulation employed by the host to control this inflammatory response, we focused our studies on adrenomedullin, a peptide produced in response to bacterial stimuli that exhibits antimicrobial activity and regulates inflammatory responses by modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Specifically, we investigated the effect of B. burgdorferi on the expression of adrenomedullin as well as the ability of adrenomedullin to dampen host inflammatory responses to the spirochete. The concentration of adrenomedullin in the synovial fluid of untreated Lyme arthritis patients was elevated compared with that in control osteoarthritis patient samples. In addition, coculture with B. burgdorferi significantly increased the expression of adrenomedullin in RAW264.7 macrophages through MyD88-, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)-, and p38-dependent signaling cascades. Furthermore, the addition of exogenous adrenomedullin to B. burgdorferi-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages resulted in a significant decrease in the induction of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that B. burgdorferi increases the production of adrenomedullin, which in turn negatively regulates the B. burgdorferi-stimulated inflammatory response.

  9. Lyme disease associated neuroretinitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Vanya, Melinda; Fejes, Imre; Jako, Maria; Tula, Areta; Terhes, Gabriella; Janaky, Marta; Bartfai, Gyorgy

    2015-12-01

    We describe a rare case of Lyme disease complicated by unilateral neuroretinitis in the right eye. We report a case of a 27-year-old woman with blurred vision on her right eye. Because of the suspicion of optic neuritis (multiplex sclerosis) neurological examination was ordered. Surprisingly, computer tomography of the brain revealed incomplete empty sella, which generally results not monocular, but bilateral optic nerve swelling. Opthalmological examination (ophthalmoscopy and optical coherence tomography) indicated not only monocular optic nerve, but retinal oedema next to the temporal part of the right optic disk. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) demonstrated no P100 latency delay and mild differences between the amplitudes of the responses of the left and right eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated the swelling of the optic nerve head and oedematous retina at the temporal part of the disk. Suspicion of an inflammatory cause of visual disturbance blood tests was ordered. Doxycycline treatment was ordered till the result of the blood test arrived. The Western blot and ELISA test were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. Following one week corticosteroide and ceftriaxone treatments, the patient displayed a clinical improvement. Unilateral neuroretinitis with optic disk swelling due to neuroborreliosis is a rare complication and in many cases it is difficult to distinguish between inflammatory and ischemic lesions. Further difficulty in the diagnosis can occur when intracranial alterations such as empty sella is demonstrated by CT examination.

  10. Lyme carditis in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Matthew F; Thorn, Coben

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a 68-year-old man with a history of liver transplant and of chronic immunosuppression therapy who presented to the emergency department (ED) for fevers and worsening fatigue for two days. On further investigation, the patient was found to have a new first-degree heart block on his electrocardiograph. Coupled with the history of a recent tick bite, the patient was diagnosed with vector-borne carditis. Although the patient's titers for various vectors remained negative, due to a long history of immunosuppression, he was treated for Lyme disease and his heart block completely resolved with antibiotic treatment. We describe details of the case as well as discuss the impacts of immunosuppression on vector-borne disease. Immunosuppressed patients represent a special population and can present with chief complaints made even more complicated by their medical history, and this case illustrates the importance of being mindful of how immunosuppression can affect a patient's presentation. As the efficacy of antirejection medications improved, the ED may see an increasing number of patients with solid organ transplants. A greater understanding of this special patient population is key to formulating optimal treatment plans. PMID:24083037

  11. Lyme disease: pathogenesis and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Simon, M M; Bauer, Y; Zhong, W; Hofmann, H; Wallich, R

    1999-12-01

    Research of recent years on Lyme disease has greatly increased our understanding on antigenic structures and genotypic variability of the aetiological agent, Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu lato, as well as on mechanisms underlying host-parasite interactions and induction/mode of action of protective immune responses. A vaccine formula on the basis of the outer surface lipoprotein A (OspA), previously developed in our laboratory, has successfully been tested in a clinical trial involving nearly 10,000 subjects in the USA. The OspA vaccine is unique in that it protects the mammalian host from infection by eliminating spirochaetes from the vector, but does not cure an established disease. This is because spirochaetes express OspA exclusively in the tick, but not when transmitted into the vertebrate host. For Europe, a more complex vaccine formula is required in order to achieve full protection. This is due to the higher degree of heterogeneity of OspA molecules among isolates of B. burgdorferi in Europe and the inability of the monovalent vaccine to convey complete cross-protection.

  12. [Bilateral peripheral facial paralysis secondary to Lyme disease].

    PubMed

    Zapater Latorre, E; Castillo Ruiz, A; Alba García, J R; Armengot Carceller, M; Sancho Rieger, J; Basterra Alegría, J

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral facial paralisis (SBFP) occurs in 0.3-2% of all facial paralisis. We report a case of SBFP in association with Lyme disease. A review of literature about SBFP is made, studing specially the one caused by Borrelia burgdorferi. We present a diagnostic guideline of SBFP. Suspect diagnosis of Lyme disease is based on clinical and epidemiological criteria. Culture isolation of this bacteria is difficult, therefore serologic testing is required. Neuroborreliosis treatment is intravenous Ceftriaxone or Cefotaxime. Oral Doxycycline is useful in the treatment of neuritis without central nervous system involvement.

  13. Alternatives to Serologic Testing for Diagnosis of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Capraro, Gerald A

    2015-12-01

    Although serologic testing remains the gold standard for laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease, the antibody response may take several weeks to increase greater than the limit of detection. Because of this extended time frame, it is necessary to identify new diagnostic methods for earlier diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Lyme disease. Alternative diagnostic modalities, such as Borrelia culture or nucleic acid amplification testing, may be beneficial in specific clinical scenarios. In early phases of acute infection, before the development of an immune response, detection of Borrelia DNA from clinical specimens may help establish the diagnosis sooner than serologic methods.

  14. Issues in the diagnosis and treatment of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Donta, Sam T

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification of the causative organism more than 30 years ago, there remain questions about the di-agnosis and treatment of Lyme Disease. In this article, what is known about the disease will be reviewed, and approaches to the successful diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease described. In considering the diagnosis of Lyme disease, a major problem is the inability of documenting the existence and location of the bacteria. After the initial transfer of the bacteria from the Ixodes tick into the person, the spirochetes spread locally, but after an initial bacteremic phase, the organisms can no longer be reliably found in body fluids. The bacteria are proba-bly present in subcutaneous sites and intracellular loci. Currently, the use of circulating antibodies directed against spe-cific antigens of the Lyme borrelia are the standard means to diagnose the disease, but specific antibodies are not an ade-quate means to assess the presence or absence of the organism. What is needed is a more Lyme-specific antigen as a more definitive adjunct to the clinical diagnosis. As for the treatment of Lyme disease, the earliest phase is generally easily treated. But it is the more chronic form of the disease that is plagued with lack of information, frequently leading to erroneous recommendations about the type and du-ration of treatments. Hence, often cited recommendations about the duration of treatment, eg four weeks is adequate treatment, have no factual basis to support that recommendation, often leading to the conclusion that there is another, per-haps psychosomatic reason, for the continuing symptoms. B. burgdorferi is sensitive to various antibiotics, including pe-nicillins, tetracyclines, and macrolides, but there are a number of mitigating factors that affect the clinical efficacy of these antibiotics, and these factors are addressed. The successful treatment of Lyme disease appears to be dependent on the use of specific antibiotics over a sufficient period of

  15. The adenovirus E1A protein targets the SAGA but not the ADA transcriptional regulatory complex through multiple independent domains.

    PubMed

    Shuen, Michael; Avvakumov, Nikita; Walfish, Paul G; Brandl, Chris J; Mymryk, Joe S

    2002-08-23

    Expression of the adenovirus E1A protein in the simple eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits growth. We tested four regions of E1A that alter growth and transcription in mammalian cells for their effects in yeast when expressed as fusions to the Gal4p DNA binding domain. Expression of the N-terminal/conserved region (CR) 1 or CR3, but not of the CR2 or the C-terminal portion of E1A, inhibited yeast growth. Growth inhibition was relieved by deletion of the genes encoding the yGcn5p, Ngg1p, or Spt7p components of the SAGA transcriptional regulatory complex, but not the Ahc1p component of the related ADA complex, indicating that the N-terminal/CR1 and CR3 regions of E1A target the SAGA complex independently. Expression of the pCAF acetyltransferase, a mammalian homologue of yGcn5p, also suppressed growth inhibition by either portion of E1A. Furthermore, the N-terminal 29 residues and the CR3 portion of E1A interacted independently with yGcn5p and pCAF in vitro. Thus, two separate regions of E1A target the yGcn5p component of the SAGA transcriptional activation complex. A subregion of the N-terminal/CR1 fragment spanning residues 30-69 within CR1 also inhibited yeast growth in a SAGA-dependent fashion. However, this region did not interact with yGcn5p or pCAF, suggesting that it makes a third contact with another SAGA component. Our results provide a new model system to elucidate mechanisms by which E1A and the SAGA complex regulate transcription and growth. PMID:12070146

  16. Multiple Independent Retroelement Insertions in the Promoter of a Stress Response Gene Have Variable Molecular and Functional Effects in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Merenciano, Miriam; Ullastres, Anna; González, Josefa

    2016-01-01

    Promoters are structurally and functionally diverse gene regulatory regions. The presence or absence of sequence motifs and the spacing between the motifs defines the properties of promoters. Recent alternative promoter usage analyses in Drosophila melanogaster revealed that transposable elements significantly contribute to promote diversity. In this work, we analyzed in detail one of the transposable element insertions, named FBti0019985, that has been co-opted to drive expression of CG18446, a candidate stress response gene. We analyzed strains from different natural populations and we found that besides FBti0019985, there are another eight independent transposable elements inserted in the proximal promoter region of CG18446. All nine insertions are solo-LTRs that belong to the roo family. We analyzed the sequence of the nine roo insertions and we investigated whether the different insertions were functionally equivalent by performing 5’-RACE, gene expression, and cold-stress survival experiments. We found that different insertions have different molecular and functional consequences. The exact position where the transposable elements are inserted matters, as they all showed highly conserved sequences but only two of the analyzed insertions provided alternative transcription start sites, and only the FBti0019985 insertion consistently affects CG18446 expression. The phenotypic consequences of the different insertions also vary: only FBti0019985 was associated with cold-stress tolerance. Interestingly, the only previous report of transposable elements inserting repeatedly and independently in a promoter region in D. melanogaster, were also located upstream of a stress response gene. Our results suggest that functional validation of individual structural variants is needed to resolve the complexity of insertion clusters. PMID:27517860

  17. 2  ×  2 multiple-input multiple-output optical-wireless integration system based on optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature modulator.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel and simple 2×2 multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) optical-wireless integration system, in which optical independent-sideband modulation enabled by an in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) modulator, instead of optical polarization multiplexing, is used to assist the simultaneous generation of two wireless millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signals. Software-based digital signal processing is used to generate the driving signal for the I/Q modulator, the output of which is two independent single-sideband optical vector signals located at two sides of a large central optical carrier. Based on our proposed 2×2 MIMO optical-wireless integration system, we experimentally demonstrate the simultaneous generation and 2×2 MIMO wireless delivery of two independent 40-GHz quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) wireless mm-wave signals. Each 40-GHz QPSK wireless mm-wave signal can carry up to 4-Gbaud transmitter data with a bit-error ratio less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  18. Multiple introductions of salmonid alphavirus from a wild reservoir have caused independent and self-sustainable epizootics in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Marius; Gjerset, Britt; Hansen, Tove; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes infections in farmed Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout in Europe. Genetic diversity exists among SAV strains from farmed fish and six subtypes have been proposed based on genetic distance. Here, we used six full-genome sequences and 71 partial sequences of the structural ORF to estimate the evolutionary rate of SAV. The rate, 2.13×10(-4) nt substitutions per site per year, was further used to date evolutionary events in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. The comparison of these dates with known historical events suggested that all six subtypes diverged prior to the twentieth century, earlier than the first attempts to introduce and farm rainbow trout in Europe. The subtypes must therefore have existed in a wild reservoir, as yet unidentified. The strains of each subtype, with the exception of subtype 2, have a common ancestor that existed after the 1970s - the start of modern farming of Atlantic salmon. These ancestors are likely to represent the independent introductions to farmed fish populations from the wild reservoir. The subtypes have developed subsequently into self-sustainable epizootics. The most parsimonious phylogeographic reconstruction suggested that the location of the wild reservoir is in or around the North Sea. After the initial introductions to aquaculture, further transmission of SAV was likely related to the industry infrastructure. This was exemplified by the finding of genetically identical subtype 2 and 3 strains separated by large geographical distances, as well as genetically distinct co-circulating lineages within the same geographical area.

  19. Ancient and novel small RNA pathways compensate for the loss of piRNAs in multiple independent nematode lineages.

    PubMed

    Sarkies, Peter; Selkirk, Murray E; Jones, John T; Blok, Vivian; Boothby, Thomas; Goldstein, Bob; Hanelt, Ben; Ardila-Garcia, Alex; Fast, Naomi M; Schiffer, Phillip M; Kraus, Christopher; Taylor, Mark J; Koutsovoulos, Georgios; Blaxter, Mark L; Miska, Eric A

    2015-02-01

    Small RNA pathways act at the front line of defence against transposable elements across the Eukaryota. In animals, Piwi interacting small RNAs (piRNAs) are a crucial arm of this defence. However, the evolutionary relationships among piRNAs and other small RNA pathways targeting transposable elements are poorly resolved. To address this question we sequenced small RNAs from multiple, diverse nematode species, producing the first phylum-wide analysis of how small RNA pathways evolve. Surprisingly, despite their prominence in Caenorhabditis elegans and closely related nematodes, piRNAs are absent in all other nematode lineages. We found that there are at least two evolutionarily distinct mechanisms that compensate for the absence of piRNAs, both involving RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs). Whilst one pathway is unique to nematodes, the second involves Dicer-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation, hitherto unknown in animals, and bears striking similarity to transposon-control mechanisms in fungi and plants. Our results highlight the rapid, context-dependent evolution of small RNA pathways and suggest piRNAs in animals may have replaced an ancient eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase pathway to control transposable elements.

  20. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-08-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future.

  1. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-08-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future. PMID:27432456

  2. Recent independent emergence of multiple multidrug-resistant Serratia marcescens clones within the United Kingdom and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Moradigaravand, Danesh; Boinett, Christine J.; Martin, Veronique; Peacock, Sharon J.; Parkhill, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for a wide range of nosocomial infections. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains is an increasing danger to public health. To design effective means to control the dissemination of S. marcescens, an in-depth analysis of the population structure and variation is required. Utilizing whole-genome sequencing, we characterized the population structure and variation, as well as the antimicrobial resistance determinants, of a systematic collection of antimicrobial-resistant S. marcescens associated with bloodstream infections in hospitals across the United Kingdom and Ireland between 2001 and 2011. Our results show that S. marcescens is a diverse species with a high level of genomic variation. However, the collection was largely composed of a limited number of clones that emerged from this diverse background within the past few decades. We identified potential recent transmissions of these clones, within and between hospitals, and showed that they have acquired antimicrobial resistance determinants for different beta-lactams, ciprofloxacin, and tetracyclines on multiple occasions. The expansion of these multidrug-resistant clones suggests that the treatment of S. marcescens infections will become increasingly difficult in the future. PMID:27432456

  3. Multiple elements in human beta-globin locus control region 5' HS 2 are involved in enhancer activity and position-independent, transgene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Caterina, J J; Ciavatta, D J; Donze, D; Behringer, R R; Townes, T M

    1994-01-01

    The human beta-globin Locus Control Region (LCR) has two important activities. First, the LCR opens a 200 kb chromosomal domain containing the human epsilon-, gamma- and beta-globin genes and, secondly, these sequences function as a powerful enhancer of epsilon-, gamma- and beta-globin gene expression. Erythroid-specific, DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) mark sequences that are critical for LCR activity. Previous experiments demonstrated that a 1.9 kb fragment containing the 5' HS 2 site confers position-independent expression in transgenic mice and enhances human beta-globin gene expression 100-fold. Further analysis of this region demonstrates that multiple sequences are required for maximal enhancer activity; deletion of SP1, NF-E2, GATA-1 or USF binding sites significantly decrease beta-globin gene expression. In contrast, no single site is required for position-independent transgene expression; all mice with site-specific mutations in 5' HS 2 express human beta-globin mRNA regardless of the site of transgene integration. Apparently, multiple combinations of protein binding sites in 5' HS 2 are sufficient to prevent chromosomal position effects that inhibit transgene expression. PMID:8152905

  4. Evidence for Independent Genetic Control of the Multiple Forms of Maize Endosperm Branching Enzymes and Starch Synthases 12

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Charles D.; Preiss, Jack

    1981-01-01

    Soluble starch synthase and starch-branching enzymes in extracts from kernels of four maize genotypes were compared. Extracts from normal (nonmutant) maize were found to contain two starch synthases and three branching enzyme fractions. The different fractions could be distinguished by chromatographic properties and kinetic properties under various assay conditions. Kernels homozygous for the recessive amylose-extender (ae) allele were missing branching enzyme IIb. In addition, the citrate-stimulated activity of starch synthase I was reduced. This activity could be regenerated by the addition of branching enzyme to this fraction. No other starch synthase fractions were different from normal enzymes. Extracts from kernels homozygous for the recessive dull (du) allele were found to contain lower branching enzyme IIa and starch synthase II activities. Other fractions were not different from the normal enzymes. Analysis of extracts from kernels of the double mutant ae du indicated that the two mutants act independently. Branching enzyme IIb was absent and the citrate-stimulated reaction of starch synthase I was reduced but could be regenerated by the addition of branching enzyme (ae properties) and both branching enzyme IIa and starch synthase II were greatly reduced (du properties). Starch from ae and du endosperms contains higher amylose (66 and 42%, respectively) than normal endosperm (26%). In addition, the amylopectin fraction of ae starch is less highly branched than amylopectin from normal or du starch. The above observations suggest that the alterations of the starch may be accounted for by changes in the soluble synthase and branching enzyme fractions. PMID:16661824

  5. Spatial analysis of the distribution of Lyme disease in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Kitron, U; Kazmierczak, J J

    1997-03-15

    Surveillance measures for human cases of Lyme disease in Wisconsin were compared and associated with tick distribution and vegetation coverage. During 1991-1994, 1,759 confirmed human cases of Lyme disease reported to the Wisconsin Division of Health were assigned a county of residence, but only 329 (19%) could be assigned with certainty a county of exposure. Distributions of cases by county of exposure and residence were often consistent from year to year. Tick distribution in 46 of 72 Wisconsin counties was mapped based on collections by researchers, statewide surveys of infested deer, and submissions from the public. Satellite data were used to calculate a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for each county. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to map distributions of human Lyme disease cases, ticks, and degree of vegetation cover. Human case distribution by county of exposure was significantly correlated with tick distribution; both were positively correlated with high NDVI values in spring and fall, when wooded vegetation could be distinguished from agricultural crops in the satellite image. Statistical analysis of spatial patterns using a measure of spatial autocorrelation indicated that counties with most human cases and ticks were clustered in parts of western Wisconsin. A map delineating the counties with highest risk for Lyme disease transmission was generated based on numbers of exposed human cases and tick concentrations. PMID:9063347

  6. [Epidemiology of Lyme borreliosis in French-speaking Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Nahimana, I; Gern, L; Péter, O; Praz, G; Moosmann, Y; Francioli, P

    2000-10-14

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of cases and the clinical aspects of Lyme borreliosis in French-speaking Switzerland. From July 1996 to December 1997, all laboratories performing serological tests for Lyme borreliosis sent a questionnaire to the treating physicians whenever the tests were positive. In addition, the physicians who diagnosed a case on clinical grounds only were also asked to report these cases. During this period, 1460 positive serological tests were recorded among approximately 10,360 performed (14%). A total of 775 questionnaires were returned (53%). In 3/4 of the cases, the test was ordered because of an acute clinical manifestation or a tick bite. The rest related to chronic symptoms or follow-up. In 504 cases (65%), diagnosis was considered certain or probable. These were erythema migrans in 46%, clinical manifestations of stage II in 33% (26 facial palsy, 20 acute arthritis, 5 benign cutaneous lymphocytoma) and chronic symptoms in 21% (23 acrodermatitis, 26 neuropathies, and 8 arthritis). The adjusted incidence, estimated on the basis of the treating physician's place of residence, ranged from 9/100,000 in Valais to 95/100,000 in Neuchâtel. This study indicates that Lyme borreliosis is a diagnosis frequently looked for and established in French-speaking Switzerland. Although erythema migrans is the main clinical manifestation, symptoms of stage II and III indicate that Lyme borreliosis is also responsible for relatively major systemic morbidity.

  7. [Presentation of the Environmental-Health Prize 1997: Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Molina, C

    1998-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an infectious disease, with multisystem involvement, due to a spirochete known as Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted to humans by ticks; its recent emergence is, in part, the consequence of reforestation and the rise in deer and rodents populations. The prevention and the treatment of this disease are well standardized, the main risk being its misdiagnosis.

  8. Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Human Risk of Lyme Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Percent forest-herbaceous edge repeatedly explained most of the variability in reported Lyme disease rates within a rural-to-urban study gradient across central Maryland and southeastern Pennsylvania. A one-percent increase in forest-herbaceous edge was associated with an increas...

  9. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Starr, J Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J; Mead, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000-2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months.

  10. Biased T-Cell Antigen Receptor Repertoire in Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roessner, Karen; Trivedi, Harsh; Gaur, Lakshmi; Howard, Diantha; Aversa, John; Cooper, Sheldon M.; Sigal, Leonard H.; Budd, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    A common concern with many autoimmune diseases of unknown etiology is the extent to which tissue T-lymphocyte infiltrates, versus a nonspecific infiltrate, reflect a response to the causative agent. Lyme arthritis can histologically resemble rheumatoid synovitis, particularly the prominent infiltration by T lymphocytes. This has raised speculation about whether Lyme synovitis represents an ongoing response to the causative spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, or rather a self-perpetuating autoimmune reaction. In an effort to answer this question, the present study examined the repertoire of infiltrating T cells in synovial fluid from nine Lyme arthritis patients, before and after stimulation with B. burgdorferi. Using a highly sensitive and consistent quantitative PCR technique, a comparison of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) β-chain variable (Vβ) repertoires of the peripheral blood and synovial fluid showed a statistically significant increase in expression of Vβ2 and Vβ6 in the latter. This is remarkably similar to our previous findings in studies of rheumatoid arthritis and to other reports on psoriatic skin lesions. However, stimulation of synovial fluid T cells with B. burgdorferi provoked active proliferation but not a statistically significant increase in expression of any TCR Vβ, including Vβ2 and Vβ6. Collectively, the findings suggest that the skewing of the TCR repertoire of fresh synovial fluid in Lyme arthritis may represent more a synovium-tropic or nonspecific inflammatory response, similar to that occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, rather than a specific Borrelia reaction. PMID:9488400

  11. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction Caused by Chronic Lyme Neuroborreliosis. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schefte, David F; Nordentoft, Tyge

    2015-07-30

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is often classified as idiopathic. The condition is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity, and treatment options are often unsatisfactory. A case of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction in a 66-year-old woman, presenting with back and abdominal pain, urinary retention and severe constipation is described. The patient lived in an area in which Lyme disease is endemic and had been bitten by ixodes ticks. Intrathecal synthesis of anti-borrelia IgM and IgG and lymphocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid was found, consistent with chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis since symptoms had lasted for more than six months. The patient's gastrointestinal function recovered and the pain subsided significantly following treatment with antibiotics. Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) often results in palsy, but rarely affects the autonomic nervous system. Three patients have been described with intestinal pseudoobstruction due to acute LNB. However, this is the first described case of intestinal pseudoobstruction due to chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. LNB must be suspected in patients with intestinal pseudoobstruction, in particular in patients who have been bitten by an ixodes tick and in patients living in an endemic area. PMID:26130639

  12. Spirochete antigens persist near cartilage after murine Lyme borreliosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Bockenstedt, Linda K; Gonzalez, David G; Haberman, Ann M; Belperron, Alexia A

    2012-07-01

    An enigmatic feature of Lyme disease is the slow resolution of musculoskeletal symptoms that can continue after treatment, with some patients developing an inflammatory arthritis that becomes refractory to antibiotic therapy. Using intravital microscopy and the mouse model of Lyme borreliosis, we observed that Borrelia burgdorferi antigens, but not infectious spirochetes, can remain adjacent to cartilage for extended periods after antibiotic treatment. B. burgdorferi was not recovered by culture or xenodiagnosis with ticks after antibiotic treatment of WT mice and all but one of the immunodeficient mice with heightened pathogen burden due to impaired TLR responsiveness. Amorphous GFP+ deposits were visualized by intravital microscopy in the entheses of antibiotic-treated mice infected with GFP-expressing spirochetes and on the ear cartilage surface in sites where immunofluorescence staining detected spirochete antigens. Naive mice were not infected by tissue transplants from antibiotic-treated mice even though transplants contained spirochete DNA. Tissue homogenates from antibiotic-treated mice induced IgG reactive with B. burgdorferi antigens after immunization of naive mice and stimulated TNF-α production from macrophages in vitro. This is the first direct demonstration that inflammatory B. burgdorferi components can persist near cartilaginous tissue after treatment for Lyme disease. We propose that these deposits could contribute to the development of antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

  13. Management of tick bites and lyme disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graeme N; Gemmill, Ian; Moore, Kieran M

    2012-11-01

    Lyme disease results from the bite of a black-legged tick, populations of which have now become established in parts of Nova Scotia, southeastern Quebec, southern Ontario from the Thousand Islands through the geographic regions on the north shore of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie, southeastern Manitoba, and British Columbia's Lower Mainland, Fraser Valley, and Vancouver Island. It takes more than 24 hours of attachment to transfer the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to the bitten animal or human. The diagnosis of Lyme disease is primarily clinical, with early Lyme disease characterized by a skin lesion (erythema migrans, a bull's-eye rash), which expands out from the site of the tick bite, and is often accompanied by influenza-like symptoms, arthralgia, myalgia, and fever. These signs and symptoms can present anywhere from three to 30 days after the tick bite. The management of pregnant women with a tick bite or suspected Lyme disease should be similar to that of non-pregnant adults, except that doxycyline, the first line antibiotic of choice, should not be used in pregnant women because of risk of permanent tooth discolouration and possible impact on bone formation in the fetus. An algorithm for the management of tick bites in pregnancy is presented. Clinical, serological, and epidemiological studies have all failed to demonstrate a causal association between infection with B. burgdorferi and any adverse pregnancy outcomes regardless of whether maternal exposure occurs before conception or during pregnancy itself.

  14. First Case of Lyme Arthritis Involving a Prosthetic Knee Joint.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F; Oliverio, James A

    2016-04-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States. Arthritis is usually a mani-festation of late dis-ease but has not been associated with cases of periprosthetic joint infections. We report on a patient who was first diagnosed with periprosthetic joint infection and subsequently Lyme arthritis. PMID:27419168

  15. Lyme disease risk in dogs in New Brunswick.

    PubMed

    Bjurman, Natalie K; Bradet, Gina; Lloyd, Vett K

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in New Brunswick dogs. Testing of 699 serum samples from dogs across the province revealed a 6% province-wide seropositivity, more than 6 times higher than that found in 2008. The rapid increase in seropositivity indicates increased Lyme disease risk to both canine and human health. PMID:27587892

  16. Lyme Disease in Hispanics, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. Andrew; Kugeler, Kiersten J.; Mead, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Hispanics comprise a growing portion of the US population and might have distinct risk factors for tickborne diseases. During 2000–2013, a total of 5,473 Lyme disease cases were reported among Hispanics through national surveillance. Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanics to have signs of disseminated infection and onset during fall months. PMID:26889721

  17. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  18. A Case of Chronic Progressive Lyme Encephalitis as a Manifestation of Late Lyme Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Roman, Matthew; Shah, Disha; Zaretskaya, Marina; Yassin, Mohamed H.

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old female living in Europe presented with gait ataxia, dizziness, and bilateral hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed non-specific white matter changes. The patient’s condition gradually deteriorated over two years without diagnosis. The patient continued to decline cognitively and neurologically with worsening ataxia and upper motor neuron signs. Repeat MRI showed worsening white matter changes. Lumbar puncture, not previously done, showed positive Lyme testing. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone resulted in marked neurological improvement. Four years after symptom, the patient has short-term memory deficits and chronic fatigue, but is otherwise neurologically, cognitively, and functionally intact. Follow up MRI findings remain largely unchanged. Because cases of intraparenchymal or encephalopathic neuroborreliosis in America are lacking, so are treatment options. We present a rare case and discuss our experience with antibiotic treatment. This case lends evidence to define optimal treatment of this disease, imperative for hastening neurological recovery. PMID:25568755

  19. A case of chronic progressive lyme encephalitis as a manifestation of late lyme neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Roman, Matthew; Shah, Disha; Zaretskaya, Marina; Yassin, Mohamed H

    2014-11-19

    A 54-year-old female living in Europe presented with gait ataxia, dizziness, and bilateral hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed non-specific white matter changes. The patient's condition gradually deteriorated over two years without diagnosis. The patient continued to decline cognitively and neurologically with worsening ataxia and upper motor neuron signs. Repeat MRI showed worsening white matter changes. Lumbar puncture, not previously done, showed positive Lyme testing. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone resulted in marked neurological improvement. Four years after symptom, the patient has short-term memory deficits and chronic fatigue, but is otherwise neurologically, cognitively, and functionally intact. Follow up MRI findings remain largely unchanged. Because cases of intraparenchymal or encephalopathic neuroborreliosis in America are lacking, so are treatment options. We present a rare case and discuss our experience with antibiotic treatment. This case lends evidence to define optimal treatment of this disease, imperative for hastening neurological recovery. PMID:25568755

  20. DNA characterization of the spirochete that causes Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, G P; Steigerwalt, A G; Johnson, S E; Barbour, A G; Steere, A C; Robinson, I M; Brenner, D J

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease, a tick-borne disease long recognized in Europe but only recently recognized in the United States, was shown in 1982-1983 to be caused by a spirochete, the Lyme disease spirochete. Whether one or more species of the spirochete exists is unknown, as is its taxonomic status. To answer these questions, we determined (i) the DNA base (guanidine-plus-cytosine) content for five strains; (ii) the DNA relatedness of 10 strains from Europe or the United States (isolated from ticks, humans, and a mouse) by DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite assay at 50 and 65 degrees C); and (iii) the DNA relatedness to other pathogenic spirochetes. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the Lyme disease spirochete strains was 27.5 to 29.0 mol%, most similar to those of Borrelia hermsii (30.6 mol%) and Treponema hyodysenteriae (25.6 mol%) among the other spirochetes tested. DNA hybridization studies with 32P-labeled DNA from Lyme disease spirochete strain TLO-005, a human blood isolate, revealed divergence (unpaired bases) within related nucleotide sequences of only 0.0 to 1.0% for all nine Lyme disease spirochete strains tested for relatedness to TLO-005. Relatedness values of seven strains to TLO-005 were 58 to 98% (mean, 71%) in 50 degrees C reactions and 50 to 93% (mean, 69%) in 65 degrees C reactions. Two other strains, from which very low yields of DNA were obtained, showed less relatedness (36 to 50 degrees C, 38 to 47% at 65 degrees C). These were nonetheless considered to belong to the same species because of the low amount of divergence in the sequences related to TLO-005 and the absence of decreased relatedness in reactions done at 65 degrees Celsius compared with those done at 50 degrees Celsius. DNA from strain TLO-005 showed relatedness of 1% to DNAs of two leptospires and 16% relatedness to DNA from T. hyodysenteriae. B. hermsii DNA was 30 to 40% related to three Lyme disease spirochete strains in 50 degrees Celsius reactions. Divergence in these reactions was 16

  1. Association of immune response to endothelial cell growth factor with early disseminated and late manifestations of Lyme disease but not posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kevin S; Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary P; Marques, Adriana R; Alaedini, Armin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor has been recently proposed as a potential autoantigen in manifestations of Lyme disease that are thought to involve immune-mediated mechanisms. Our findings indicate that a humoral immune response to this protein is not associated with posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome.

  2. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  3. Community health nurses' knowledge of Lyme disease: implications for surveillance and community education.

    PubMed

    Capps, P A; Pinger, R R; Russell, K M; Wood, M L

    1999-01-01

    A statewide assessment was conducted to determine the general knowledge and professional practices about Lyme disease (LD) of local health department nurses. The study sample included 226 nurses practicing in 80 health departments in Indiana. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using group independent t tests. Findings showed that nurses were most knowledgeable about personal protection against LD and least knowledgeable about symptoms, case definition, and reporting criteria. Nonbaccalaureate degreed nurses scored significantly higher on questions about LD than the baccalaureate or master's prepared nurses. Results point to the need for better dissemination of LD information among public health nurses, expanded LD education for the public, and further development of LD surveillance activities.

  4. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful “designer drug” treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

  5. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful "designer drug" treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:27672336

  6. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful “designer drug” treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:27672336

  7. Lyme disease: the promise of Big Data, companion diagnostics and precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Johnson, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has become a major worldwide epidemic. Recent studies based on Big Data registries show that >300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease each year in the USA, and up to two-thirds of individuals infected with B. burgdorferi will fail conventional 30-year-old antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease. In addition, animal and human evidence suggests that sexual transmission of the Lyme spirochete may occur. Improved companion diagnostic tests for Lyme disease need to be implemented, and novel treatment approaches are urgently needed to combat the epidemic. In particular, therapies based on the principles of precision medicine could be modeled on successful "designer drug" treatment for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus infection featuring targeted protease inhibitors. The use of Big Data registries, companion diagnostics and precision medicine will revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease.

  8. Lyme disease: an increasing health risk for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Hahn, D B; Pinger, R R; Hahn, E J

    1987-08-01

    Lyme disease, a bacterial infection with noticeable short-term and serious long-term consequences, is the most common tick-borne disease. First described in 1977, Lyme disease poses a significant health threat to school-age children exposed to the tick vector primarily in three specific regions of the United States. This article describes Lyme disease and its clinical signs and symptoms, and discusses the school nurse's role in identification, management, and prevention of this new health risk.

  9. A tale of two syndromes: Lyme disease preceding postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Adam M; Kluger, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is poorly understood. However, it has been suggested that altered immune activity or denervation of the autonomic system following illness may be an important trigger. Patients infected with Lyme disease have a small incidence of post-Lyme disease syndrome that share similar characteristics to POTS. We report a short series of two women who present with persistent symptoms of orthostatic intolerance consistent with POTS after treated Lyme disease.

  10. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000–2014

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Paul M.; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K.; Gaines, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods. We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results. There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions. The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  11. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K; Gaines, David N

    2015-12-01

    Background.  The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods.  We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results.  There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years. PMID:26550580

  12. Persisting complaints attributed to chronic Lyme disease: possible mechanisms and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Sigal, L H

    1994-04-01

    A better understanding of the natural history of Lyme disease and of possible causes for persisting symptoms other than active infection is needed to optimize management of patients with persistent symptoms. Review of patients seen at a Lyme disease referral center and of the immunologic and clinical literature on Lyme disease suggests most symptoms that persist after therapy can be explained by one or more of seven proposed pathogenetic mechanisms, only one of which includes active ongoing infection. Individualization of care and reanalysis of patients problems are crucial if misdiagnosis and overtreatment of Lyme disease are to be avoided.

  13. A controlled study of cognitive deficits in children with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Tager, F A; Fallon, B A; Keilp, J; Rissenberg, M; Jones, C R; Liebowitz, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although neurologic Lyme disease is known to cause cognitive dysfunction in adults, little is known about its long-term sequelae in children. Twenty children with a history of new-onset cognitive complaints after Lyme disease were compared with 20 matched healthy control subjects. Each child was assessed with measures of cognition and psychopathology. Children with Lyme disease had significantly more cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Cognitive deficits were still found after controlling for anxiety, depression, and fatigue. Lyme disease in children may be accompanied by long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, resulting in psychosocial and academic impairments. Areas for further study are discussed.

  14. Neuropsychological deficits in Lyme disease patients with and without other evidence of central nervous system pathology.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R F; Jones-Woodward, L; Workman, K; Steere, A C; Logigian, E L; Meadows, M E

    1999-01-01

    A small percentage of Lyme patients develop mild to moderate encephalopathic symptoms months to years after diagnosis and treatment. Their symptoms typically include fatigue, memory loss, sleep disturbance, and depression. However, the etiology of this syndrome remains controversial. It is generally thought that Lyme patients with abnormal cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) have a neurological basis to their illness. To further examine this question, we compared Lyme patients with evidence of abnormal CSF, intrathecal antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi, elevated protein, or a positive polymerase chain reaction for B. burgdorferi DNA (n = 14); Lyme patients with normal CSF (n = 18); and healthy controls (n = 15) on a battery of neuropsychological and personality tests. Although both Lyme groups reported memory problems, only the Lyme group with abnormal CSF had measurable memory deficits. Both Lyme groups had higher depression scores than the normal control group, although depression was not correlated with memory scores. It appears that Lyme patients with abnormal CSF may have a neurological basis to their illness, whereas affective symptoms, common to many chronic disorders, may predispose other Lyme patients to the perception of cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Geographic Expansion of Lyme Disease in the Southeastern United States, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Nigrovic, Lise E; Auwaerter, Paul G; Fowler, Vance G; Ruffin, Felicia; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Reber, Jodi; Williams, Carl; Broyhill, James; Pan, William K; Gaines, David N

    2015-12-01

    Background.  The majority of Lyme disease cases in the United States are acquired on the east coast between northern Virginia and New England. In recent years the geographic extent of Lyme disease has been expanding, raising the prospect of Lyme disease becoming endemic in the southeast. Methods.  We collected confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease from 2000 through 2014 from the Virginia Department of Health and North Carolina Department of Public Health and entered them in a geographic information system. We performed spatial and spatiotemporal cluster analyses to characterize Lyme disease expansion. Results.  There was a marked increase in Lyme disease cases in Virginia, particularly from 2007 onwards. Northern Virginia experienced intensification and geographic expansion of Lyme disease cases. The most notable area of expansion was to the southwest along the Appalachian Mountains with development of a new disease cluster in the southern Virginia mountain region. Conclusions.  The geographic distribution of Lyme disease cases significantly expanded in Virginia between 2000 and 2014, particularly southward in the Virginia mountain ranges. If these trends continue, North Carolina can expect autochthonous Lyme disease transmission in its mountain region in the coming years.

  16. Tocilizumab Efficacy in a Patient with Positive Anti-CCP Chronic Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Julianna; Rosner, Itzhak; Rimar, Doron; Kaly, Lisa; Rozenbaum, Michael; Boulman, Nina; Slobodin, Gleb

    2016-01-01

    Context: Lyme arthritis, a manifestation of tick-borne Lyme disease, can prove to be refractory to classic treatment. Case Report: We present a case of a 48-year-old male, diagnosed with chronic Lyme arthritis, refractory to recurrent and prolonged courses of doxycycline, ceftriaxone, as well as hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate. The patient responded partially to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha blockade by etanercept and, finally, entered long-term remission after his treatment was switched to tocilizumab. Conclusion: Off label treatment by biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs can be considered in selected patients with severe antibiotic-resistant Lyme arthritis.C. PMID:27213145

  17. Three sudden cardiac deaths associated with Lyme carditis - United States, November 2012-July 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-12-13

    Lyme disease is a multisystem illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochete transmitted by certain species of Ixodes ticks. Approximately 30,000 confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease were reported in the United States in 2012, primarily from high-incidence states in the Northeast (Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont) and upper Midwest (Minnesota and Wisconsin). Common manifestations include cutaneous, neurologic, and rheumatologic signs and symptoms. Symptomatic infection of the heart is rare in recognized Lyme disease cases and usually resolves promptly with appropriate antibiotic therapy. Nonetheless, cardiac involvement occasionally can cause life-threatening cardiac conduction abnormalities. During November 2012-July 2013, one woman and two men (ranging in age from 26 to 38 years) from high-incidence Lyme disease states experienced sudden cardiac death and, on postmortem examination, were found to have evidence of Lyme carditis. The three deaths were investigated by the Connecticut Department of Public Health, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, New Hampshire Department of Public Health, New York State Department of Health, and CDC. Donated corneas from two decedents had been transplanted to three recipients before the diagnosis of Lyme disease was established, but no evidence of disease transmission was found. Although death from Lyme carditis is rare, it should be considered in cases of sudden cardiac death in patients from high-incidence Lyme disease regions. Reducing exposure to ticks is the best method for preventing Lyme disease and other tickborne infections.

  18. Intentions to receive a potentially available Lyme disease vaccine in an urban sample

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Joshua; Kusz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The only human Lyme disease vaccine of LYMErix was voluntarily removed from the market in the United States in 2002 for a number of reasons. A new human Lyme disease vaccine is currently being developed. We would like any future approved human Lyme disease vaccine to be of interest and marketable to consumers. Methods: We surveyed 714 participants to determine variables associated with intentions to receive a Lyme disease vaccine. Predictor variables included demographics, protection motivational theory, Lyme disease knowledge, Lyme disease preventive behaviors, beliefs and perceived health. Results: We found in multivariate linear regression analyses that Asian/Asian American race/ethnicity (p < 0.001), South Asian race/ethnicity (p = 0.01) and coping appraisal variables of response efficacy (p < 0.001) and self-efficacy (p < 0.001) were each significantly associated with increased intentions. The belief that vaccines are typically not safe was significantly associated with decreased intentions (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Asian/Asian American and South Asian race/ethnicities have a strong interest in receiving a Lyme disease vaccine. Although pharmaceutical companies may benefit by advertising a Lyme disease vaccine to Asian/Asian Americans and South Asians, marketers need to address and use approaches to interest those from other race/ethnicities. Also, marketers need to address the erroneous belief that vaccines are typically not safe in order to interest those with such beliefs to use a Lyme disease vaccine. PMID:27551427

  19. Adaptation and Evaluation of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Model for Lyme Disease Prevention.

    PubMed

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Gern, Lise; Michel, Pascal; Ravel, André; Hongoh, Valérie; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Milord, François; Bélanger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Designing preventive programs relevant to vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease (LD) can be complex given the need to include multiple issues and perspectives into prioritizing public health actions. A multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) model was previously used to rank interventions for LD prevention in Quebec, Canada, where the disease is emerging. The aim of the current study was to adapt and evaluate the decision model constructed in Quebec under a different epidemiological context, in Switzerland, where LD has been endemic for the last thirty years. The model adaptation was undertaken with a group of Swiss stakeholders using a participatory approach. The PROMETHEE method was used for multi-criteria analysis. Key elements and results of the MCDA model are described and contrasted with the Quebec model. All criteria and most interventions of the MCDA model developed for LD prevention in Quebec were directly transferable to the Swiss context. Four new decision criteria were added, and the list of proposed interventions was modified. Based on the overall group ranking, interventions targeting human populations were prioritized in the Swiss model, with the top ranked action being the implementation of a large communication campaign. The addition of criteria did not significantly alter the intervention rankings, but increased the capacity of the model to discriminate between highest and lowest ranked interventions. The current study suggests that beyond the specificity of the MCDA models developed for Quebec and Switzerland, their general structure captures the fundamental and common issues that characterize the complexity of vector-borne disease prevention. These results should encourage public health organizations to adapt, use and share MCDA models as an effective and functional approach to enable the integration of multiple perspectives and considerations in the prevention and control of complex public health issues such as Lyme disease or other vector

  20. Adaptation and Evaluation of a Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Model for Lyme Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Aenishaenslin, Cécile; Gern, Lise; Michel, Pascal; Ravel, André; Hongoh, Valérie; Waaub, Jean-Philippe; Milord, François; Bélanger, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Designing preventive programs relevant to vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease (LD) can be complex given the need to include multiple issues and perspectives into prioritizing public health actions. A multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA) model was previously used to rank interventions for LD prevention in Quebec, Canada, where the disease is emerging. The aim of the current study was to adapt and evaluate the decision model constructed in Quebec under a different epidemiological context, in Switzerland, where LD has been endemic for the last thirty years. The model adaptation was undertaken with a group of Swiss stakeholders using a participatory approach. The PROMETHEE method was used for multi-criteria analysis. Key elements and results of the MCDA model are described and contrasted with the Quebec model. All criteria and most interventions of the MCDA model developed for LD prevention in Quebec were directly transferable to the Swiss context. Four new decision criteria were added, and the list of proposed interventions was modified. Based on the overall group ranking, interventions targeting human populations were prioritized in the Swiss model, with the top ranked action being the implementation of a large communication campaign. The addition of criteria did not significantly alter the intervention rankings, but increased the capacity of the model to discriminate between highest and lowest ranked interventions. The current study suggests that beyond the specificity of the MCDA models developed for Quebec and Switzerland, their general structure captures the fundamental and common issues that characterize the complexity of vector-borne disease prevention. These results should encourage public health organizations to adapt, use and share MCDA models as an effective and functional approach to enable the integration of multiple perspectives and considerations in the prevention and control of complex public health issues such as Lyme disease or other vector

  1. Action Potential-Independent and Nicotinic Receptor-Mediated Concerted Release of Multiple Quanta at Hippocampal CA3–Mossy Fiber Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Geeta; Grybko, Michael; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2009-01-01

    Presynaptic action potential-independent transmitter release is a potential means of information transfer across synapses. We show that in the hippocampal mossy fiber boutons, activation of the α7-subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) results in a large increase in the amplitude of spontaneous events, resulting from concerted release of multiple quanta from the mossy fiber boutons. This amplitude increase is abolished at low temperatures. Activation of α7-nAChRs causes a rise in intraterminal calcium at mossy fiber boutons, involving ryanodine receptors. Regulation of concerted release requires the subsequent activation of presynaptic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Activation of CaMKII is required to drive presynaptic action potential-independent transmission at the mossy fiber–CA3 pyramidal cell synapse. The effects of α7-nAChR activation are mediated by biologically relevant doses of nicotine. Our results demonstrate a novel form of synaptic plasticity mediated by presynaptic α7-nAChRs and store calcium that is temporally different and might respond to a different history of synaptic activity than that mediated by incoming action potentials. PMID:18322100

  2. Time-Independent and Time-Dependent Rheological Characterization of Dispersions with Varying Contents of Chickpea Flour and Gum Arabic Employing the Multiple Loop Experiments.

    PubMed

    J, Shanthilal; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2016-08-01

    The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) flour dispersions as the model system with different contents of flour (37% to 43%) and gum arabic (0% to 5%) were subjected to multiple loop experiments for simultaneous determination of the time-independent and time-dependent rheological characteristics. The Herschel-Bulkley model was suitable (0.993 ≤ r ≤ 0.999) to relate the time-independent characteristics linking shear stress and shear rate data for the individual upward and downward curves. The yield stress, consistency index, and apparent viscosity increased with the increasing flour and/or gum contents while flow behavior index (n) decreased. The yield stress generally decreased with the number of loops but n increased. In the individual loop tests, the n values for the decreasing shear stress/shear rate curves were always higher than corresponding increasing curves meaning a shift toward Newtonian characteristics. The time-independent properties (yield stress, apparent viscosity, consistency index, and n), the time-dependent characteristics like the area of the loop, and liquid characteristics like pourability and the nonoral sensory attributes (viscosity, spreadability, and tackiness) were individually predicted by artificial neural networks wherein the root mean square errors were between 3.6% and 17.2%. The sensory assessment indicated that the desirable parameters for a free-flowing and easily pourable spherical chickpea batter droplets occurred when the average pourability and spreadability values were 6.9 and 5.9, respectively. The normalized indices for these 2 parameters indicated that the batter having 40% flour and 2% gum contents was most suitable exhibiting a deviation of only 10% from the ideal sensory scores; these values were 40% and 0% to 3%, and 43% and 0%, respectively exhibiting up to 20% deviation. PMID:27331658

  3. Time-Independent and Time-Dependent Rheological Characterization of Dispersions with Varying Contents of Chickpea Flour and Gum Arabic Employing the Multiple Loop Experiments.

    PubMed

    J, Shanthilal; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2016-08-01

    The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) flour dispersions as the model system with different contents of flour (37% to 43%) and gum arabic (0% to 5%) were subjected to multiple loop experiments for simultaneous determination of the time-independent and time-dependent rheological characteristics. The Herschel-Bulkley model was suitable (0.993 ≤ r ≤ 0.999) to relate the time-independent characteristics linking shear stress and shear rate data for the individual upward and downward curves. The yield stress, consistency index, and apparent viscosity increased with the increasing flour and/or gum contents while flow behavior index (n) decreased. The yield stress generally decreased with the number of loops but n increased. In the individual loop tests, the n values for the decreasing shear stress/shear rate curves were always higher than corresponding increasing curves meaning a shift toward Newtonian characteristics. The time-independent properties (yield stress, apparent viscosity, consistency index, and n), the time-dependent characteristics like the area of the loop, and liquid characteristics like pourability and the nonoral sensory attributes (viscosity, spreadability, and tackiness) were individually predicted by artificial neural networks wherein the root mean square errors were between 3.6% and 17.2%. The sensory assessment indicated that the desirable parameters for a free-flowing and easily pourable spherical chickpea batter droplets occurred when the average pourability and spreadability values were 6.9 and 5.9, respectively. The normalized indices for these 2 parameters indicated that the batter having 40% flour and 2% gum contents was most suitable exhibiting a deviation of only 10% from the ideal sensory scores; these values were 40% and 0% to 3%, and 43% and 0%, respectively exhibiting up to 20% deviation.

  4. A case-control study to examine HLA haplotype associations in patients with posttreatment chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary H; Wade, Karen; Trevino, Richard P; Tang, Jianming; Kaslow, Richard A; Schmid, Christopher

    2005-09-15

    In a comparison of 95 patients with systemic symptoms that persisted after antibiotic treatment for acute Lyme disease (posttreatment chronic Lyme disease) and 104 control subjects without such symptoms after antibiotic treatment, we sought associations between human leukocyte antigen class II (DRB1 and DQB1) markers and posttreatment chronic Lyme disease. No strong association between posttreatment chronic Lyme disease and any class II allele or genotype was found.

  5. Geographic Variation in the Relationship between Human Lyme Disease Incidence and Density of Infected Host-Seeking Ixodes scapularis Nymphs in the Eastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Kim M.; Eisen, Rebecca J.; Mead, Paul S.; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland; Hoen, Anne G.; Barbour, Alan G.; Hamer, Sarah; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Prevention and control of Lyme disease is difficult because of the complex biology of the pathogen's (Borrelia burgdorferi) vector (Ixodes scapularis) and multiple reservoir hosts with varying degrees of competence. Cost-effective implementation of tick- and host-targeted control methods requires an understanding of the relationship between pathogen prevalence in nymphs, nymph abundance, and incidence of human cases of Lyme disease. We quantified the relationship between estimated acarological risk and human incidence using county-level human case data and nymphal prevalence data from field-derived estimates in 36 eastern states. The estimated density of infected nymphs (mDIN) was significantly correlated with human incidence (r = 0.69). The relationship was strongest in high-prevalence areas, but it varied by region and state, partly because of the distribution of B. burgdorferi genotypes. More information is needed in several high-prevalence states before DIN can be used for cost-effectiveness analyses. PMID:22665620

  6. Geographic variation in the relationship between human Lyme disease incidence and density of infected host-seeking Ixodes scapularis nymphs in the Eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Kim M; Eisen, Rebecca J; Mead, Paul S; Piesman, Joseph; Fish, Durland; Hoen, Anne G; Barbour, Alan G; Hamer, Sarah; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A

    2012-06-01

    Prevention and control of Lyme disease is difficult because of the complex biology of the pathogen's (Borrelia burgdorferi) vector (Ixodes scapularis) and multiple reservoir hosts with varying degrees of competence. Cost-effective implementation of tick- and host-targeted control methods requires an understanding of the relationship between pathogen prevalence in nymphs, nymph abundance, and incidence of human cases of Lyme disease. We quantified the relationship between estimated acarological risk and human incidence using county-level human case data and nymphal prevalence data from field-derived estimates in 36 eastern states. The estimated density of infected nymphs (mDIN) was significantly correlated with human incidence (r = 0.69). The relationship was strongest in high-prevalence areas, but it varied by region and state, partly because of the distribution of B. burgdorferi genotypes. More information is needed in several high-prevalence states before DIN can be used for cost-effectiveness analyses.

  7. Beta-naphthoflavone causes an AhR-independent inhibition of invasion and intracellular multiplication of Listeria monocytogenes in murine hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported a heretofore unknown role for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in host resistance to listeriosis in mice. Hepatocytes are an important site for Listeria monocytogenes multiplication in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether activation of AhR in TIB73 murine embryonic hepatocytes affects the ingestion and intracellular multiplication of L. monocytogenes. Treatment of TIB73 cells with the AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone (BNF) significantly inhibited the ingestion and intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes. The inhibitory effects of BNF were dose-dependent and correlated with up-regulation of CYP1A1. Surprisingly, pretreatment with AhR antagonists (3′-MNF or α-naphthoflavone) or knocking-down of AhR with siRNA did not abolish the inhibitory effects of BNF. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of BNF on invasion and intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes by BNF were observed in AhR-deficient (CRL-2710), or ARNT-dysfunctional (CRL-2717) Hepa cells. We also observed similar inhibitory effects of BNF treatment using primary hepatocytes recovered from AhR+/- or AhR-/- mice. Moreover, the prototypic AhR agonist 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) did not inhibit the invasion and intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes in TIB73 cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that ROS, but not TNF-α or iNOS, plays an important role in mediating BNF-induced inhibition. In conclusion, BNF caused an AhR-independent inhibition of ingestion and intracellular multiplication of L. monocytogenes in murine hepatocytes, mediated in part by production of ROS. PMID:19715752

  8. ELISA screening for Lyme disease in children with chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, N A; Hegazy, I H; el-Sawy, E H

    1995-08-01

    One hundred patients, aged 6-15 years and presented to El-Shatby University Children's Hospital with chronic/recurrent arthritis and skin lesions suggestive of erythema chronicum migrans (ECM), were investigated for presence of IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi flagellum antigen ELISA test. Four cases yielded positive serum samples which were true positive cases as they showed negative Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Ticks collected from domestic animals from the houses of serologically positive patients were found belonging to hard tick: Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Based on clinical ground, only one case was strongly suspected to have Lyme disease due to the presence of the distinctive skin lesion (ECM) while the other three cases were not diagnosed till the results of serological test. This study provides serological evidence concerning the presence of Lyme disease in Egypt. Further efforts of identify its prevalence, various clinical presentations, vectors and animal hosts are warranted.

  9. Ecological niche modeling of lyme disease in British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mak, Sunny; Morshed, Muhammad; Henry, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the geographic distribution and model the ecological niche for Borrelia burgdorferi (Johnson, Schmidt, Hyde, Steigerwaldt & Brenner), Ixodes pacificus (Cooley & Kohls), and Ixodes angustus (Neumann), the bacterium and primary tick vectors for Lyme disease, in British Columbia (BC), Canada. We employed a landscape epidemiology approach using geographic information systems mapping and ecological niche modeling (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-set Prediction) to identify geographical areas of disease transmission risk. Forecasted optimal ecological niche areas for B. burgdorferi are focused along the coast of Vancouver Island, the southwestern coast of the BC mainland, and in valley systems of interior BC roughly along and below the N51 degree line of latitude. These findings have been used to increase public and physician awareness of Lyme disease risk, and prioritize future field sampling for ticks in BC. PMID:20180315

  10. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits. PMID:26414102

  11. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kowacs, Pedro André; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Pinto, Maria Cristina Araujo; Yoshinari, Natalino Hagime

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI) or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas. PMID:23857618

  12. Vaccination against Lyme disease caused by diverse Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Fikrig, E; Telford, S R; Wallich, R; Chen, M; Lobet, Y; Matuschka, F R; Kimsey, R B; Kantor, F S; Barthold, S W; Spielman, A; Flavell, R A

    1995-01-01

    Diversity and mutations in the genes for outer surface proteins (Osps) A and B of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi), the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, suggests that a monovalent OspA or OspB vaccine may not provide protection against antigenically variable naturally occurring B. burgdorferi. We now show that OspA or OspB immunizations protect mice from tick-borne infection with heterogeneous B. burgdorferi from different geographic regions. This result is in distinct contrast to in vitro killing analyses and in vivo protection studies using syringe injections of B. burgdorferi as the challenge inoculum. Evaluations of vaccine efficacy against Lyme disease and other vector-borne infections should use the natural mode of transmission and not be predicated on classification systems or assays that do not rely upon the vector to transmit infection.

  13. Lyme borreliosis: reviewing potential vaccines, clinical aspects and health economics.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a multisystem infectious disease with a growing burden in many parts of North America, Asia and Europe. Persistent infection of LB can usually be treated effectively with antibiotic therapy, but it may be followed by post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome. Therefore, it is important to begin with treatment in the early phase of the disease. Vaccination shows potential as the most effective way of preventing LB and reducing its burden in these continents. It is concluded that there is a need for continuous effort in research from all perspectives on LB, especially regarding prevention with novel vaccines, their development, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. This review may help to further develop (cost-) effective strategies for prevention and control of the disease to reduce its burden and achieve population-wide health benefits.

  14. CCL19 as a Chemokine Risk Factor for Posttreatment Lyme Disease Syndrome: a Prospective Clinical Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Aucott, John N; Soloski, Mark J; Rebman, Alison W; Crowder, Lauren A; Lahey, Lauren J; Wagner, Catriona A; Robinson, William H; Bechtold, Kathleen T

    2016-09-01

    Approximately 10% to 20% of patients optimally treated for early Lyme disease develop persistent symptoms of unknown pathophysiology termed posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The objective of this study was to investigate associations between PTLDS and immune mediator levels during acute illness and at several time points following treatment. Seventy-six participants with physician-documented erythema migrans and 26 healthy controls with no history of Lyme disease were enrolled. Sixty-four cytokines, chemokines, and inflammatory markers were measured at each visit for a total of 6 visits over 1 year. An operationalized definition of PTLDS incorporating symptoms and functional impact was applied at 6 months and 1 year following treatment completion, and clinical outcome groups were defined as the return-to-health, symptoms-only, and PTLDS groups. Significance analysis of microarrays identified 7 of the 64 immune mediators to be differentially regulated by group. Generalized logit regressions controlling for potential confounders identified posttreatment levels of the T-cell chemokine CCL19 to be independently associated with clinical outcome group. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified a CCL19 cutoff of >111.67 pg/ml at 1 month following treatment completion to be 82% sensitive and 83% specific for later PTLDS. We speculate that persistently elevated CCL19 levels among participants with PTLDS may reflect ongoing, immune-driven reactions at sites distal to secondary lymphoid tissue. Our findings suggest the relevance of CCL19 both during acute infection and as an immunologic risk factor for PTLDS during the posttreatment phase. Identification of a potential biomarker predictor for PTLDS provides the opportunity to better understand its pathophysiology and to develop early interventions in the context of appropriate and specific clinical information. PMID:27358211

  15. Absence of lipopolysaccharide in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Rothenberg, R J; Barbour, A G

    1987-01-01

    We were unable to demonstrate the presence of the classic enterobacterium-type lipopolysaccharide in the cells of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi B31. This finding was primarily based on chemical analysis and the absence of free lipid A upon mild acid hydrolysis of the appropriate cell extracts. These results do not preclude the possible existence of an unusual lipopolysaccharide-like compound(s) in B. burgdorferi. Images PMID:3623705

  16. Serum inflammatory mediators as markers of human Lyme disease activity.

    PubMed

    Soloski, Mark J; Crowder, Lauren A; Lahey, Lauren J; Wagner, Catriona A; Robinson, William H; Aucott, John N

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are key signaling molecules that orchestrate the trafficking of immune cells, direct them to sites of tissue injury and inflammation and modulate their states of activation and effector cell function. We have measured, using a multiplex-based approach, the levels of 58 immune mediators and 7 acute phase markers in sera derived from of a cohort of patients diagnosed with acute Lyme disease and matched controls. This analysis identified a cytokine signature associated with the early stages of infection and allowed us to identify two subsets (mediator-high and mediator-low) of acute Lyme patients with distinct cytokine signatures that also differed significantly (p<0.0005) in symptom presentation. In particular, the T cell chemokines CXCL9 (MIG), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL19 (MIP3B) were coordinately increased in the mediator-high group and levels of these chemokines could be associated with seroconversion status and elevated liver function tests (p = 0.027 and p = 0.021 respectively). There was also upregulation of acute phase proteins including CRP and serum amyloid A. Consistent with the role of CXCL9/CXCL10 in attracting immune cells to the site of infection, CXCR3+ CD4 T cells are reduced in the blood of early acute Lyme disease (p = 0.01) and the decrease correlates with chemokine levels (p = 0.0375). The levels of CXCL9/10 did not relate to the size or number of skin lesions but elevated levels of serum CXCL9/CXCL10 were associated with elevated liver enzymes levels. Collectively these results indicate that the levels of serum chemokines and the levels of expression of their respective chemokine receptors on T cell subsets may prove to be informative biomarkers for Lyme disease and related to specific disease manifestations.

  17. Psychological states and neuropsychological performances in chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Elkins, L E; Pollina, D A; Scheffer, S R; Krupp, L B

    1999-01-01

    The neuropsychiatric sequelae of chronic Lyme disease remains unclear. This study sought to characterize the psychological status of a group of participants who met criteria for post-Lyme syndrome (PLS). These measures were then used to examine the influence of psychological status on neuropsychological performances. Thirty PLS participants completed a structured psychiatric interview, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Lyme Symptom Checklist, and a battery of neuropsychological tests. As a group, the PLS participants did not appear to have an elevated incidence of psychiatric disorders, and psychiatric history was not useful for understanding neuropsychological performances or symptom reports. The mood of the PLS participants was characterized by lowered levels of positive affect (PA) and typical levels of negative affect. This combination can be distinguished from depression and is consistent with previous findings of affect patterns in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome. PA was also linked to both total symptom severity and severity of cognitive complaints, but not to duration of illness, neurological manifestations at initial diagnosis, or treatment history. Relative to published normative data, neuropsychological performances were not in the impaired range on any measure. Neither psychological status nor symptom report were useful for understanding any aspect of cognitive functioning. It is concluded that decreased PA is the most useful marker of psychological functioning in PLS.

  18. Autoimmune mechanisms in antibiotic treatment-resistant lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Steere, A C; Gross, D; Meyer, A L; Huber, B T

    2001-05-01

    In about 10% of patients with Lyme arthritis in the United States, joint inflammation persists for months or even several years after the apparent eradication of the spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, from the joint with antibiotic treatment. We propose a model of molecular mimicry affecting genetically susceptible individuals to explain this treatment-resistant course. The majority of patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis have HLA-DRB1*0401 or related alleles, and the severity and duration of their arthritis correlate with cellular and humoral immune responses to outer-surface protein A OspA) of the spirochete. Using an algorithm, the immunodominant epitope of OspA presented by the DRB1*0401 molecule was predicted to be located at aa 165-173. In a search of the Genetics Computer Group gene bank, only one human protein was identified, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (hLFA-1), that had sequence homology with OspA(165-173)and predicted binding in the DRB1*0401 molecule. Synovial fluid T cells from most patients with treatment-resistant arthritis responded to both OspA and hLFA-1, whereas those from patients with other forms of chronic inflammatory arthritis did not. Molecular mimicry between a dominant T cell epitope of OspA and hLFA-1 may be an important factor in the persistence of joint inflammation in genetically susceptible patients with treatment-resistant Lyme arthritis.

  19. Stroke as an Unusual First Presentation of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Almoussa, Mohamad; Goertzen, Angelika; Fauser, Barbara; Zimmermann, Christoph W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Lyme neuroborreliosis is a nervous system infection caused by spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi with diverse neurological complications. Stroke due to cerebral vasculitis is a rare consequence of neuroborreliosis and has been described in just a few case reports. Case Presentation. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old patient who presented with discrete left-sided hemiparesis and amnestic cognitive impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a thalamic infarct, and serological and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests confirmed the diagnosis of active neuroborreliosis. The antibiotic treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone for three weeks led to an improvement of the symptoms and remarkable regression of radiological findings, but not to full recovery of the amnestic cognitive disorder. Conclusion. Lyme neuroborreliosis should be suspected in patients with cerebrovascular events without obvious risk factors, especially those living in endemic areas such as northern Europe or those who have been exposed to ticks and those with clinical or radiological findings suggesting Lyme neuroborreliosis, in order to establish the diagnosis and start a proper antibiotic therapy.

  20. Acute Lyme Neuroborreliosis With Transient Hemiparesis and Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Lienhard, Reto; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Erard, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Nervous system involvement in Lyme disease often mimics other conditions and thus represents a diagnostic challenge, especially in an emergency department setting. We report a case of a female teenager presenting with sudden-onset aphasia and transient right-sided faciobrachial hemiplegia, along with headache and agitation. Ischemia, vasculitis, or another structural lesion was excluded by brain imaging. Toxicologic evaluation results were negative. Cerebral perfusion computed tomography and electroencephalography showed left parietotemporal brain dysfunction. Lumbar puncture result, although atypical, suggested bacterial infection and intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated. Finally, microbiological cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed Lyme neuroborreliosis, showing specific intrathecal antibody production and high level of C-X-C motif chemokine 13. The patient rapidly recovered. To our knowledge, this report for the first time illustrates that acute-onset language and motor symptoms may be directly related to Lyme neuroborreliosis. Neuroborreliosis may mimic other acute neurologic events such as stroke and should be taken into diagnostic consideration even in the absence of classic symptoms and evolution.

  1. Genotypic Variation and Mixtures of Lyme Borrelia in Ixodes Ticks from North America and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Chris D.; Matthews, Heather E.; Schutzer, Steven; Rounds, Megan A.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Nolte, Oliver; Campbell, Scott R.; Phillipson, Curtis A.; Li, Feng; Sampath, Ranga; Ecker, David J.; Eshoo, Mark W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lyme disease, caused by various species of Borrelia, is transmitted by Ixodes ticks in North America and Europe. Studies have shown the genotype of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) or the species of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) affects the ability of the bacteria to cause local or disseminated infection in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a multilocus PCR electrospray mass spectrometry assay to determine the species and genotype Borrelia from ticks collected in New York, Connecticut, Indiana, Southern Germany, and California and characterized isolates from parts of the United States and Europe. These analyses identified 53 distinct genotypes of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto with higher resolution than ospC typing. Genotypes of other members of the B. burgdorferi sensu lato complex were also identified and genotyped including B. afzelii, B. garinii, B. lusitaniae, B. spielmanii, and B. valaisiana. While each site in North America had genotypes unique to that location, we found genotypes shared between individual regions and two genotypes found across the United States. Significant B. burgdorferi s.s. genotypic diversity was observed between North America and Europe: only 6.6% of US genotypes (3 of 45) were found in Europe and 27% of the European genotypes (3 of 11) were observed in the US. Interestingly, 39% of adult Ixodes scapularis ticks from North America were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.s. and 22.2% of Ixodes ricinus ticks from Germany were infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi s.l. Conclusions/Significance The presence of multiple Borrelia genotypes in ticks increases the probability that a person will be infected with more than one genotype of B. burgdorferi, potentially increasing the risks of disseminated Lyme disease. Our study indicates that the genotypic diversity of Borrelia in ticks in both North America and Europe is higher then previously reported and can have

  2. Independent and joint associations between multiple measures of the built and social environment and physical activity in a multi-ethnic urban community.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Amy; Mentz, Graciela; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Israel, Barbara A; Max, Paul; Zenk, Shannon N; Wineman, Jean; Marans, Robert W

    2013-10-01

    Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of a number of health outcomes, yet fewer than half of adults in the United States report recommended levels of physical activity. Analyses of structural characteristics of the built environment as correlates of physical activity have yielded mixed results. We examine associations between multiple aspects of urban neighborhood environments and physical activity in order to understand their independent and joint effects, with a focus on the extent to which the condition of the built environment and indicators of the social environment modify associations between structural characteristics and physical activity. We use data from a stratified, multi-stage proportional probability sample of 919 non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White, and Hispanic adults in an urban community, observational data from their residential neighborhoods, and census data to examine independent and joint associations of structural characteristics (e.g., street network connectivity), their condition (e.g., sidewalk condition), and social environments (e.g., territoriality) with physical activity. Our findings suggest that sidewalk condition is associated with physical activity, above and beyond structural characteristics of the built environment. Associations between some structural characteristics of the built environment and physical activity were conditional upon street condition, physical deterioration, and the proportion of parks and playgrounds in good condition. We found modest support for the hypothesis that associations between structural characteristics and physical activity are modified by aspects of the social environment. Results presented here point to the value of and need for understanding and addressing the complexity of factors that contribute to the relationships between the built and social environments and physical activity, and in turn, obesity and co-morbidities. Bringing together urban planners, public health

  3. MO-C-17A-06: Online Adaptive Re-Planning to Account for Independent Motions Between Multiple Targets During Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F; Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional independent motions between multiple targets in radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer, and to study the dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning method to account for these variations. Methods: Ninety five diagnostic-quality daily CTs acquired for 9 lung cancer patients treated with IGRT using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. On each daily CT set, contours of the targets (GTV, CTV, or involved nodes) and organs at risk were generated by populating the planning contours using an auto-segmentation tool (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing. For each patient, an IMRT plan was generated based on the planning CT with a prescription dose of 60 Gy in 2Gy fractions. Three plans were generated and compared for each daily CT set: an IGRT (repositioning) plan by copying the original plan with the required shifts, an online adaptive plan by rapidly modifying the aperture shapes and segment weights of the original plan to conform to the daily anatomy, and a new fully re-optimized plan based on the daily CT using a planning system (Panther, Prowess). Results: The daily deviations of the distance between centers of masses of the targets from the plans varied daily from -10 to 8 mm with an average −0.9±4.1 mm (one standard deviation). The average CTV V100 are 99.0±0.7%, 97.9±2.8%, 99.0±0.6%, and 99.1±0.6%, and the lung V20 Gy 928±332 cc, 944±315 cc, 917±300 cc, and 891±295 cc for the original, repositioning, adaptive, and re-optimized plans, respectively. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests show that the adaptive plans are statistically significantly better than the repositioning plans and comparable with the reoptimized plans. Conclusion: There exist unpredictable, interfractional, relative volume changes and independent motions between multiple targets during lung cancer RT which cannot be accounted for by the current IGRT repositioning but can be corrected by the online adaptive replanning method.

  4. Methods for evaluating Lyme disease risks using geographic information systems and geospatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, M C; Mather, T N

    1996-09-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted borreliosis of humans and domestic animals emerging as one of the most significant threats to public health in north temperate regions of the world. However, despite a myriad of studies into symptomology, causes, and treatment of the disease, few researchers have addressed the spatial aspects of Lyme disease transmission. Using statewide data collected in Rhode Island (United States) as a test case, we demonstrated that exposure to deer ticks and the risk of contracting Lyme disease occurs mostly in the peridomestic environment. A Geographic Information System model was developed indicating a strong association among Lyme disease in humans, the degree of nymphal blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis Say, abundance in the environment, and prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in ticks. In contrast, occurrence of plant communities suitable for sustaining I. scapularis populations (forests) was not predictive of Lyme disease risk. Instead, we observed a highly significant spatial trend for decreasing number of ticks and incident cases of Lyme disease with increasing latitude. Geostatistics were employed for modeling spatial autocorrelation of tick densities. These findings were combined to create a model that predicts Lyme disease transmission risk, thereby demonstrating the utility of incorporating geospatial modeling techniques in studying the epidemiology of Lyme disease. PMID:8840676

  5. Enhancing Lyme Disease Surveillance by Using Administrative Claims Data, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen G.; Dunn, John R.; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is underreported in the United States. We used insurance administrative claims data to determine the value of such data in enhancing case ascertainment in Tennessee during January 2011–June 2013. Although we identified ≈20% more cases of Lyme disease (5/year), the method was resource intensive and not sustainable in this low-incidence state. PMID:26291336

  6. Lyme Disease in West Virginia: An Assessment of Distribution and Clinicians' Knowledge of Disease and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarah; Parker, David; Mark-Carew, Miguella; White, Robert; Fisher, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease case misclassification, a top public health concern, may be attributed to the current disconnect between clinical diagnosis and surveillance. This study examines Lyme disease distribution in West Virginia (WV) and determines clinicians' knowledge of both disease and surveillance. Lyme disease surveillance data for 2013 were obtained from the WV Bureau for Public Health. A validated survey, distributed to clinicians at an academic medical center, assessed clinicians' knowledge of disease diagnosis and surveillance. There were 297 adult Lyme disease cases of which 83 were confirmed. Clinician survey responses resulted in a correct response rate of 70% for Lyme disease knowledge questions. Fewer than half of all clinicians were aware of the surveillance criteria for confirming Lyme disease cases. Neither medical specialty nor previous treatment of patients with Lyme disease were significantly associated with clinicians' knowledge of the disease. Clinicians in WV are familiar with symptoms and clinical management of Lyme disease. However, they are less knowledgeable about diagnosis and public health surveillance comprising reporting and confirming cases of the disease. Clinicians and public health authorities should collaborate more closely to promote education and awareness as a key step to successfully reducing the burden of Lymne disease. PMID:27491103

  7. Proceedings of the 2nd workshop on lyme disease in the Southeast

    SciTech Connect

    Apperson, C.S.; Levine, J.F.; Snoddy, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    This volume provides author prepared abstracts of oral presentation at the Second Workshop on Lyme Disease in the Southeast head in Raleigh, North Carolina September 7-9, 1993. The 33 presentations covered various aspects of the epidemic including geographical distribution of various species of ticks, transmission risks, Lyme Disease epidemiology, and taxonomic aspects.

  8. Lyme Disease in West Virginia: An Assessment of Distribution and Clinicians' Knowledge of Disease and Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarah; Parker, David; Mark-Carew, Miguella; White, Robert; Fisher, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease case misclassification, a top public health concern, may be attributed to the current disconnect between clinical diagnosis and surveillance. This study examines Lyme disease distribution in West Virginia (WV) and determines clinicians' knowledge of both disease and surveillance. Lyme disease surveillance data for 2013 were obtained from the WV Bureau for Public Health. A validated survey, distributed to clinicians at an academic medical center, assessed clinicians' knowledge of disease diagnosis and surveillance. There were 297 adult Lyme disease cases of which 83 were confirmed. Clinician survey responses resulted in a correct response rate of 70% for Lyme disease knowledge questions. Fewer than half of all clinicians were aware of the surveillance criteria for confirming Lyme disease cases. Neither medical specialty nor previous treatment of patients with Lyme disease were significantly associated with clinicians' knowledge of the disease. Clinicians in WV are familiar with symptoms and clinical management of Lyme disease. However, they are less knowledgeable about diagnosis and public health surveillance comprising reporting and confirming cases of the disease. Clinicians and public health authorities should collaborate more closely to promote education and awareness as a key step to successfully reducing the burden of Lymne disease.

  9. Effects of landscape fragmentation and climate on Lyme disease incidence in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phoebe Minh; Waller, Lance

    2013-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne illness in the United States, and incidences are increasing steadily year after year. This study explores the influence of landscape (e.g., land use pattern and landscape fragmentation) and climatic factors (e.g., temperature and precipitation) at a regional scale on Lyme disease incidence. The study area includes thirteen states in the Northeastern United States. Lyme disease incidence at county level for the period of 2002-2006 was linked with several key landscape and climatic variables in a negative binomial regression model. Results show that Lyme disease incidence has a relatively clear connection with regional landscape fragmentation and temperature. For example, more fragmentation between forests and residential areas results in higher local Lyme disease incidence. This study also indicates that, for the same landscape, some landscape variables derived at a particular scale show a clearer connection to Lyme disease than do others. In general, the study sheds more light on connections between Lyme disease incidence and climate and landscape patterns at the regional scale. Integrating findings of this regional study with studies at a local scale will further refine understanding of the pattern of Lyme disease as well as increase our ability to predict, prevent, and respond to disease.

  10. The Prevalence and Incidence of Clinical and Asymptomatic Lyme Borreliose in a Population at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahrer, Heinz; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Blood samples and questionnaires from 950 Swiss orienteers revealed positive antibodies for Lyme borreliosis in 248 (26.1%) of subjects, compared to 3.9-6.0% in 2 control groups. Six months later a second blood sample from 755 participants showed that 45 had seroconverted from negative to positive. Although positive Lyme seriology was common,…

  11. Diagnostic use of the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay in confirming active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases.

    PubMed

    Puri, Basant K; Segal, Daniel Rm; Monro, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out an independent evaluation of the proposition that the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (LTT-MELISA) may be diagnostically useful in the confirmation of active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases. Blood samples from 54 patients consecutively presenting to a British center with clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis were tested for this disease by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) Western blots and by LTT-MELISA. Forty-five of these patients had Western blot results which were negative for both IgM and IgG by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); of these patients, 19 (42%) were LTT-MELISA-positive. Two of the patients who had IgM positive results by the CDC criteria were LTT-MELISA-negative. It is concluded that, for putative European-acquired Lyme borreliosis infections, it would be sensible to carry out both the LTT-MELISA and Western blot assay. PMID:25664127

  12. Diagnostic use of the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay in confirming active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Basant K; Segal, Daniel RM; Monro, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out an independent evaluation of the proposition that the lymphocyte transformation test-memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (LTT-MELISA) may be diagnostically useful in the confirmation of active Lyme borreliosis in clinically and serologically ambiguous cases. Blood samples from 54 patients consecutively presenting to a British center with clinical suspicion of Lyme borreliosis were tested for this disease by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) Western blots and by LTT-MELISA. Forty-five of these patients had Western blot results which were negative for both IgM and IgG by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); of these patients, 19 (42%) were LTT-MELISA-positive. Two of the patients who had IgM positive results by the CDC criteria were LTT-MELISA-negative. It is concluded that, for putative European-acquired Lyme borreliosis infections, it would be sensible to carry out both the LTT-MELISA and Western blot assay. PMID:25664127

  13. Ancestral state reconstruction reveals multiple independent evolution of diagnostic morphological characters in the "Higher Oribatida" (Acari), conflicting with current classification schemes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    complex pattern of multiple independent gains (and losses). Thus, the observed pattern largely conflicts with current morphological classifications of the Circumdehiscentiae, suggesting that the current taxonomic classification schemes are not appropriate, apart from a recently proposed subdivision into 24 superfamilies. PMID:20701742

  14. Physician preferences in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ziska, M H; Donta, S T; Demarest, F C

    1996-01-01

    To assess physician preferences in the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease, questionnaires were sent to physicians in various Lyme disease endemic areas in the U.S. Seventy-eight responses were analyzed. Both ELISA and Western blot were ordered by 86% of responders. Fifty percent of responders believed that 25% or more of patients who have Lyme disease were seronegative. The treatment was influenced by physician specialty. Antibiotic treatment for tick bite was prescribed by 20% of responders. Erythema migrans rash was treated by all responders without serologic confirmation. The median treatment duration of erythema migrans was 4 weeks. For post-erythema migrans Lyme disease, 43% of responders treat 3 months or more; for chronic Lyme disease, 57% of responders treat 3 months or more. Our survey documents significant differences between published recommendations and actual practices. Physician education and clinical trials are needed to clarify the reasons for these differences.

  15. Point: antibiotic therapy is not the answer for patients with persisting symptoms attributable to lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Auwaerter, Paul G

    2007-07-15

    It is not well understood why some patients develop a subjective syndrome that includes considerable fatigue, musculoskeletal aches, and neurocognitive dysfunction after receiving standard antibiotic courses for the treatment of Lyme disease. Some practitioners use the term "chronic Lyme disease" and order prolonged courses of oral and parenteral antibiotics, believing that persistent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi is responsible. However, well-performed prospective studies have found neither evidence of chronic infection nor a benefit worthy of long-term antibiotic therapy for these patients. Such extended antibiotic therapy poses hazards and cannot be viewed as acceptable. The term "chronic Lyme disease" should be discarded as misleading; rather, the term "post-Lyme disease syndrome" better reflects the postinfectious nature of this condition. Further research is necessary to understand possible mechanisms of these chronic symptoms following Lyme disease as well as to find effective therapies.

  16. Clinical evidence for rapid transmission of Lyme disease following a tickbite.

    PubMed

    Hynote, Eleanor D; Mervine, Phyllis C; Stricker, Raphael B

    2012-02-01

    Lyme disease transmission to humans by Ixodes ticks is thought to require at least 36-48 h of tick attachment. We describe 3 cases in which transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, appears to have occurred in less than 24 h based on the degree of tick engorgement, clinical signs of acute infection, and immunologic evidence of acute Lyme disease. Health care providers and individuals exposed to ticks should be aware that transmission of Lyme disease may occur more rapidly than animal models suggest. A diagnosis of Lyme disease should not be ruled out based on a short tick attachment time in a subject with clinical evidence of B. burgdorferi infection.

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi arthritis-associated locus Bbaa1 regulates Lyme arthritis and K/B×N serum transfer arthritis through intrinsic control of type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Lochhead, Robert B; Paquette, Jackie K; Zachary, James F; Weis, John H; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

    2014-12-15

    Localized upregulation of type I IFN was previously implicated in development of Borrelia burgdorferi-induced arthritis in C3H mice, and was remarkable due to its absence in the mildly arthritic C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Independently, forward genetics analysis identified a quantitative trait locus on Chr4, termed B. burgdorferi-associated locus 1 (Bbaa1), that regulates Lyme arthritis severity and includes the 15 type I IFN genes. Involvement of Bbaa1 in arthritis development was confirmed in B6 mice congenic for the C3H allele of Bbaa1 (B6.C3-Bbaa1), which developed more severe Lyme arthritis and K/B×N model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than did parental B6 mice. Administration of a type I IFN receptor blocking mAb reduced the severity of both Lyme arthritis and RA in B6.C3-Bbaa1 mice, formally linking genetic elements within Bbaa1 to pathological production of type I IFN. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Bbaa1 congenic mice implicated this locus as a regulator of type I IFN induction and downstream target gene expression. Bbaa1-mediated regulation of IFN-inducible genes was upstream of IFN receptor-dependent amplification; however, the overall magnitude of the response was dependent on autocrine/paracrine responses to IFN-β. In addition, the Bbaa1 locus modulated the functional phenotype ascribed to bone marrow-derived macrophages: the B6 allele promoted expression of M2 markers, whereas the C3H allele promoted induction of M1 responses. This report identifies a genetic locus physically and functionally linked to type I IFN that contributes to the pathogenesis of both Lyme and RA.

  18. Robustness evaluation of a computer-aided detection system for pulmonary embolism (PE) in CTPA using independent test set from multiple institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Kuriakose, Jean W.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Patel, Smita

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for assisting radiologists in detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) images. The CAD system includes stages of pulmonary vessel segmentation, prescreening of PE candidates and false positive (FP) reduction to identify suspicious PEs. The system was trained with 59 CTPA PE cases collected retrospectively from our patient files (UM set) with IRB approval. Five feature groups containing 139 features that characterized the intensity texture, gradient, intensity homogeneity, shape, and topology of PE candidates were initially extracted. Stepwise feature selection guided by simplex optimization was used to select effective features for FP reduction. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier was formulated to differentiate true PEs from FPs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of our CAD system using an independent test set of CTPA cases. The test set consists of 50 PE cases from the PIOPED II data set collected by multiple institutions with access permission. A total of 537 PEs were manually marked by experienced thoracic radiologists as reference standard for the test set. The detection performance was evaluated by freeresponse receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis. The FP classifier obtained a test Az value of 0.847 and the FROC analysis indicated that the CAD system achieved an overall sensitivity of 80% at 8.6 FPs/case for the PIOPED test set.

  19. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Québec

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, Jessica; Tessier, Nathalie; Millien, Virginie; Lapointe, Francois-Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations. PMID:26633555

  20. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Québec.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Jessica; Tessier, Nathalie; Millien, Virginie; Lapointe, Francois-Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations. PMID:26633555

  1. Phylogeographic Structure of the White-Footed Mouse and the Deer Mouse, Two Lyme Disease Reservoir Hosts in Québec.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Jessica; Tessier, Nathalie; Millien, Virginie; Lapointe, Francois-Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Modification of a species range is one of many consequences of climate change and is driving the emergence of Lyme disease in eastern Canada. The primary reservoir host of the bacteria responsible for Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, is the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), whose range is rapidly shifting north into southern Québec. The deer mouse, P. maniculatus, is occurring over most Québec province and is a less competent host for B. burgdorferi. Here, we compared the phylogeographic structure of both Peromyscus species in Québec. Using a combination of multiple mitochondrial DNA markers and phylogeographic methods, we detected an ongoing and rapid expansion of P. leucopus, while P. maniculatus appears more stable. Haplotype and populations networks indicated that populations of P. maniculatus exhibit more genetic structure than P. leucopus across the study area. Furthermore, significant and consistent genetic divergences between populations of the two species on both sides of the St. Lawrence River suggest that distinct lineages of P. leucopus and P. maniculatus with different ancestral origins colonized Southern Québec following the Last Glacial Maximum. The phylogeographic structure of pathogens is expected to mirror the structure observed in their reservoir hosts. As different strains of Borrelia burgdorferi may be associated with different levels of pathogenicity and immune responses of their hosts, our results are helpful at better understanding the pattern of spread of Lyme disease in a zone of emergence, and associated risk for human populations.

  2. Multiple Independent Loci at Chromosome 15q25.1 Affect Smoking Quantity: a Meta-Analysis and Comparison with Lung Cancer and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Nancy L.; Culverhouse, Robert C.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Cannon, Dale S.; Chen, Xiangning; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Han, Shizhong; Han, Younghun; Keskitalo-Vuokko, Kaisu; Kong, Xiangyang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Ma, Jennie Z.; Short, Susan E.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Sun, Lingwei; Wang, Yufei; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Breslau, Naomi; Broderick, Peter; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Jingchun; Heath, Andrew C.; Heliövaara, Markku; Hoft, Nicole R.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Niu, Tianhua; Payne, Thomas J.; Peltonen, Leena; Pergadia, Michele L.; Rice, John P.; Sherva, Richard; Spitz, Margaret R.; Sun, Juzhong; Wang, Jen C.; Weiss, Robert B.; Wheeler, William; Witt, Stephanie H.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Caporaso, Neil E.; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Eisen, Tim; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gelernter, Joel; Houlston, Richard; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kraft, Peter; Leppert, Mark F.; Li, Ming D.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pillai, Sreekumar; Rietschel, Marcella; Rujescu, Dan; Schwartz, Ann; Amos, Christopher I.; Bierut, Laura J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, genetic association findings for nicotine dependence, smoking behavior, and smoking-related diseases converged to implicate the chromosome 15q25.1 region, which includes the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit genes. In particular, association with the nonsynonymous CHRNA5 SNP rs16969968 and correlates has been replicated in several independent studies. Extensive genotyping of this region has suggested additional statistically distinct signals for nicotine dependence, tagged by rs578776 and rs588765. One goal of the Consortium for the Genetic Analysis of Smoking Phenotypes (CGASP) is to elucidate the associations among these markers and dichotomous smoking quantity (heavy versus light smoking), lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We performed a meta-analysis across 34 datasets of European-ancestry subjects, including 38,617 smokers who were assessed for cigarettes-per-day, 7,700 lung cancer cases and 5,914 lung-cancer-free controls (all smokers), and 2,614 COPD cases and 3,568 COPD-free controls (all smokers). We demonstrate statistically independent associations of rs16969968 and rs588765 with smoking (mutually adjusted p-values<10−35 and <10−8 respectively). Because the risk alleles at these loci are negatively correlated, their association with smoking is stronger in the joint model than when each SNP is analyzed alone. Rs578776 also demonstrates association with smoking after adjustment for rs16969968 (p<10−6). In models adjusting for cigarettes-per-day, we confirm the association between rs16969968 and lung cancer (p<10−20) and observe a nominally significant association with COPD (p = 0.01); the other loci are not significantly associated with either lung cancer or COPD after adjusting for rs16969968. This study provides strong evidence that multiple statistically distinct loci in this region affect smoking behavior. This study is also the first report of association between rs588765

  3. Some thoughts on error-contributions to reconstruct 3D coseismic displacement field using the model of combining multiple independent InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Jingfa; Luo, Yi

    2012-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has proved an immensely powerful tool in studying earthquakes with millimetre-scale accuracy at a high spatial resolution. However, each interferogram records only the component of displacement in the direction of the satellite line of sight (LOS). Thus previous InSAR studies of displacement due to earthquakes were generally limited to one or two components of the surface displacement field. Three- dimensional (3D) surface displacement maps can provide a more comprehensive understanding of source geometry associated with earthquake. By combining interferograms from multiple look angles, it is possible to constrain the three-dimensional components of displacement [Jung et al., 2011; Wright, et al., 2004; Hong et al., 2010]. In this work, we take 2008 Gaize Ms6.9 earthquake (Tibet) for example, derive LOS surface displacement from several paths of ENVISAT ASAR images (Image mode: Track 348, descending pass; Track 341, 427, and 155, ascending pass. ScanSAR mode: Track 341, 112, 155, and 384, ascending pass), and reconstruct the 3D coseismic displacement field with the model named multiple independent InSAR with different viewing angles. Because it is difficult to distinguish tectonic signal from phase noise (eg. orbital errors, atmospheric errors, and unwrapping errors), these error-contributions may be propagated to the 3D coseismic components (vertical, north, east). In addition, for ENVISAT ASAR, it is worth notice that the radar antenna is fixed with respect to the current satellite, which may lead to different LOS observations with nearly identical viewing angles in parallel passes. Thus, when inverting 3D components with least square solution, InSAR observation errors may be magnified by the ill-conditioned system of equations in the solution. Although the ill-conditioned system of equations may result in bad solution, some InSAR observation errors can be detected by the system. In our study, we will introduce the

  4. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Michele D.; Fox, Andrew D.; Merlo, Daniel; Johnson, Laura J.; Giuffrida, Lauren; Calvert, Sarah E.; Akkermann, Rainer; Ma, Gerry Z. M.; Perera, Ashwyn A.; Gresle, Melissa M.; Laverick, Louise; Foo, Grace; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J.; Spelman, Timothy; Jordan, Margaret A.; Baxter, Alan G.; Foote, Simon; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Field, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients. PMID:26990204

  5. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

    PubMed

    Binder, Michele D; Fox, Andrew D; Merlo, Daniel; Johnson, Laura J; Giuffrida, Lauren; Calvert, Sarah E; Akkermann, Rainer; Ma, Gerry Z M; Perera, Ashwyn A; Gresle, Melissa M; Laverick, Louise; Foo, Grace; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Spelman, Timothy; Jordan, Margaret A; Baxter, Alan G; Foote, Simon; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Field, Judith

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients. PMID:26990204

  6. CKS1B, overexpressed in aggressive disease, regulates multiple myeloma growth and survival through SKP2- and p27Kip1-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fenghuang; Colla, Simona; Wu, Xiaosong; Chen, Bangzheng; Stewart, James P; Kuehl, W Michael; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D

    2007-06-01

    Overexpression of CKS1B, a gene mapping within a minimally amplified region between 153 to 154 Mb of chromosome 1q21, is linked to a poor prognosis in multiple myeloma (MM). CKS1B binds to and activates cyclin-dependent kinases and also interacts with SKP2 to promote the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of p27(Kip1). Overexpression of CKS1B or SKP2 contributes to increased p27(Kip1) turnover, cell proliferation, and a poor prognosis in many tumor types. Using 4 MM cell lines harboring MAF-, FGFR3/MMSET-, or CCND1-activating translocations, we show that lentiviral delivery of shRNA directed against CKS1B resulted in ablation of CKS1B mRNA and protein with concomitant stabilization of p27(Kip1), cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Although shRNA-mediated knockdown of SKP2 and forced expression of a nondegradable form of p27(Kip1) (p27(T187A)) led to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis was modest. Of importance, while knockdown of SKP2 or overexpression of p27(T187A) induced cell cycle arrest in KMS28PE, an MM cell line with biallelic deletion of CDKN1B/p27(Kip1), CKS1B ablation induced strong apoptosis. These data suggest that CKS1B influences myeloma cell growth and survival through SKP2- and p27(Kip1)-dependent and -independent mechanisms and that therapeutic strategies aimed at abolishing CKS1B function may hold promise for the treatment of high-risk disease for which effective therapies are currently lacking.

  7. Distribution and presentation of Lyme borreliosis in Scotland - analysis of data from a national testing laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mavin, S; Watson, E J; Evans, R

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the distribution of laboratory-confirmed cases of Lyme borreliosis in Scotland and the clinical spectrum of presentations within NHS Highland. Methods General demographic data (age/sex/referring Health Board) from all cases of Lyme borreliosis serologically confirmed by the National Lyme Borreliosis Testing Laboratory from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2013 were analysed. Clinical features of confirmed cases were ascertained from questionnaires sent to referring clinicians within NHS Highland during the study period. Results The number of laboratory-confirmed cases of Lyme borreliosis in Scotland peaked at 440 in 2010. From 2008 to 2013 the estimated average annual incidence was 6.8 per 100,000 (44.1 per 100,000 in NHS Highland). Of 594 questionnaires from NHS Highland patients: 76% had clinically confirmed Lyme borreliosis; 48% erythema migrans; 17% rash, 25% joint, 15% neurological and 1% cardiac symptoms. Only 61% could recall a tick bite. Conclusion The incidence of Lyme borreliosis may be stabilising in Scotland but NHS Highland remains an area of high incidence. Lyme borreliosis should be considered in symptomatic patients that have had exposure to ticks and not just those with a definite tick bite.

  8. Multiple sulfur and carbon isotope composition of sediments from the Belingwe Greenstone Belt (Zimbabwe): A biogenic methane regulation on mass independent fractionation of sulfur during the Neoarchean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomazo, Christophe; Nisbet, Euan G.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.; Peters, Marc; Strauss, Harald

    2013-11-01

    To explore the linkage between mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation (MIF-S) and δ13Corg excursions during the Neoarchean, as well as the contemporary redox state and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur, we report the results of a detailed carbon and multiple sulfur (δ34S, δ33S, δ36S) isotopic study of the ∼2.7 Ga Manjeri and ∼2.65 Ga Cheshire formations of the Ngezi Group (Belingwe Greenstone Belt, Zimbabwe). Multiple sulfur isotope data show non-zero Δ33S and Δ36S values for sediments older than 2.4 Ga (i.e. prior to the Great Oxidation Event, GOE), indicating MIF-S thought to be associated with low atmospheric oxygen concentration. However, in several 2.7-2.5 Ga Neoarchean localities, small-scale variations in MIF-S signal (magnitude) seem to correlate with negative excursion in δ13Corg, possibly reflecting a global connection between the relative reaction rate of different MIF-S source reaction and sulfur exit channels and the biogenic flux of methane into the atmosphere during periods of localized, microbiologically mediated, shallow surface-water oxygenation. The Manjeri Formation black shales studied here display a wide range of δ13Corg between -35.4‰ and -16.2‰ (average of -30.3 ± 6.0‰, 1σ), while the Cheshire Formation shales have δ13Corg between -47.7‰ and -35.1‰ (average -41.3 ± 3‰, 1σ). The δ34S values of sedimentary sulfides from Manjeri Formation vary between -15.15‰ and +2.37‰ (average -1.71 ± 4.76‰, 1σ), showing very small and mostly negative Δ33S values varying from -0.58‰ to 0.87‰ (average 0.02 ± 0.43‰, 1σ). Cheshire Formation black shale sulfide samples measured in this study have δ34S values ranging from -2.11‰ to 2.39‰ (average 0.25 ± 1.08‰, 1σ) and near zero and solely positive Δ33S anomalies between 0.14‰ and 1.17‰ (average 0.56 ± 0.29‰, 1σ). Moreover, Δ36S/Δ33S in the two formations are comparable with a slope of -1.38 (Manjeri Formation) and -1.67 (Cheshire

  9. Development of a Metabolic Biosignature for Detection of Early Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Claudia R.; Ashton, Laura V.; Wormser, Gary P.; Hess, Ann M.; Delorey, Mark J.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Schriefer, Martin E.; Belisle, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Early Lyme disease patients often present to the clinic prior to developing a detectable antibody response to Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent. Thus, existing 2-tier serology-based assays yield low sensitivities (29%–40%) for early infection. The lack of an accurate laboratory test for early Lyme disease contributes to misconceptions about diagnosis and treatment, and underscores the need for new diagnostic approaches. Methods. Retrospective serum samples from patients with early Lyme disease, other diseases, and healthy controls were analyzed for small molecule metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A metabolomics data workflow was applied to select a biosignature for classifying early Lyme disease and non-Lyme disease patients. A statistical model of the biosignature was trained using the patients' LC-MS data, and subsequently applied as an experimental diagnostic tool with LC-MS data from additional patient sera. The accuracy of this method was compared with standard 2-tier serology. Results. Metabolic biosignature development selected 95 molecular features that distinguished early Lyme disease patients from healthy controls. Statistical modeling reduced the biosignature to 44 molecular features, and correctly classified early Lyme disease patients and healthy controls with a sensitivity of 88% (84%–95%), and a specificity of 95% (90%–100%). Importantly, the metabolic biosignature correctly classified 77%–95% of the of serology negative Lyme disease patients. Conclusions. The data provide proof-of-concept that metabolic profiling for early Lyme disease can achieve significantly greater (P < .0001) diagnostic sensitivity than current 2-tier serology, while retaining high specificity. PMID:25761869

  10. Of mice and men: lyme disease and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Granter, Scott R; Bernstein, Aaron; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    The current rapid rate of species extinction and loss of biodiversity occurring throughout the world has the potential to exact far-reaching adverse impacts on human health in many ways, including increasing the risk of infectious disease transmission. Here, we use Lyme disease as a model to illustrate how loss of biodiversity in the community of vertebrates may lead to increased transmission of zoonotic pathogens in humans. We also illustrate how preserving biodiversity has the potential to reduce the prevalence of human infectious disease more generally.

  11. Borrelia miyamotoi Disease: Neither Lyme Disease Nor Relapsing Fever.

    PubMed

    Telford, Sam R; Goethert, Heidi K; Molloy, Philip J; Berardi, Victor P; Chowdri, Hanumara Ram; Gugliotta, Joseph L; Lepore, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi disease (BMD) is a newly recognized borreliosis globally transmitted by ticks of the Ixodes persulcatus species complex. Once considered to be a tick symbiont with no public health implications, B miyamotoi is increasingly recognized as the agent of a nonspecific febrile illness often misdiagnosed as acute Lyme disease without rash, or as ehrlichiosis. The frequency of its diagnosis in the northeastern United States is similar to that of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. A diagnosis of BMD is confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of acute blood samples, or by seroconversion using a recombinant glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme immunoassay. BMD is successfully treated with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin. PMID:26593262

  12. Of mice and men: lyme disease and biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Granter, Scott R; Bernstein, Aaron; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    The current rapid rate of species extinction and loss of biodiversity occurring throughout the world has the potential to exact far-reaching adverse impacts on human health in many ways, including increasing the risk of infectious disease transmission. Here, we use Lyme disease as a model to illustrate how loss of biodiversity in the community of vertebrates may lead to increased transmission of zoonotic pathogens in humans. We also illustrate how preserving biodiversity has the potential to reduce the prevalence of human infectious disease more generally. PMID:25544324

  13. [The clinical and serological manifestations of Lyme disease in Russia].

    PubMed

    Anan'eva, L P; Skripnikova, I A; Barskova, V G; Steere, A C

    1995-01-01

    Out of 86 Lyme's disease patients with a history of migrating erythema nervous system, cardiovascular and articular involvement was observed in 27, 6 and 43% of cases. Acrodermatitis was diagnosed in 2% of patients. Affection of locomotor system manifested with acute arthritis episodes or pains in major joints. 11 patients of 12 examined at arthritis onset showed elevated titer of anti-Borrelia IgG antibodies. Serologically, of 80 patients with arthritis or arthralgia without prior migrating erythema 6 demonstrated antibodies to 5 and more Borrelia polypeptides.

  14. Expression of public idiotypes in patients with Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Axford, J S; Watts, R A; Long, A A; Isenberg, D A; Steere, A C

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Joints are often affected in Lyme disease and in some instances this may be due to immune autoreactivity. To characterise further the immune response in this disease investigations were carried out to determine the expression of three public idiotypes on serum immunoglobulins in patients with Lyme disease during the development of varying degrees of arthritis. METHODS: The expression of idiotypes (Ids) 16/6, BEG2, and PR4, first identified on monoclonal antibodies to DNA, was determined by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serial blood samples from 12 patients with Lyme disease over a mean period of six years during the development of a variety of arthritic symptoms, and in serum samples from healthy control subjects and control subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus. RESULTS: Expression of serum IgM or IgG public Ids 16/6 and BEG2 was significantly increased in patients with Lyme disease. IgA Id 16/6 expression, in contrast, was significantly increased only during episodes of arthritis and was also related to its severity. IgM and IgG Id 16/6 expression was related to their respective total immunoglobulin concentration and, in the case of IgM, to the level of IgM antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi, whereas similar findings were not apparent with IgA antibodies. This may indicate that the IgA response is related to the pathogenesis of arthritis, especially as total IgA and IgA Id 16/6 levels were found to increase over the duration of disease. Sequential analysis of antibodies also showed restriction in the expression of Id 16/6 as it was never found on all immunoglobulin isotypes at the same time, and Id PR4 was never expressed. Ids 16/6 and BEG2 expression, however, may be associated as seven patients expressed these idiotypes simultaneously. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate the use of public idiotypes in the immune response against B burgdorferi, which may be restricted in terms of idiotype class and isotype expression, and a

  15. Post-treatment lyme syndrome and central sensitization.

    PubMed

    Batheja, Shweta; Nields, Jenifer A; Landa, Alla; Fallon, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Central sensitization is a process that links a variety of chronic pain disorders that are characterized by hypersensitivity to noxious stimuli and pain in response to non-noxious stimuli. Among these disorders, treatments that act centrally may have greater efficacy than treatments acting peripherally. Because many individuals with post-treatment Lyme syndrome (PTLS) have a similar symptom cluster, central sensitization may be a process mediating or exacerbating their sensory processing. This article reviews central sensitization, reports new data on sensory hyperarousal in PTLS, explores the potential role of central sensitization in symptom chronicity, and suggests new directions for neurophysiologic and treatment research. PMID:24026711

  16. Borrelia miyamotoi Disease: Neither Lyme Disease Nor Relapsing Fever.

    PubMed

    Telford, Sam R; Goethert, Heidi K; Molloy, Philip J; Berardi, Victor P; Chowdri, Hanumara Ram; Gugliotta, Joseph L; Lepore, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi disease (BMD) is a newly recognized borreliosis globally transmitted by ticks of the Ixodes persulcatus species complex. Once considered to be a tick symbiont with no public health implications, B miyamotoi is increasingly recognized as the agent of a nonspecific febrile illness often misdiagnosed as acute Lyme disease without rash, or as ehrlichiosis. The frequency of its diagnosis in the northeastern United States is similar to that of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. A diagnosis of BMD is confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of acute blood samples, or by seroconversion using a recombinant glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase enzyme immunoassay. BMD is successfully treated with oral doxycycline or amoxicillin.

  17. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Casjens, Sherwood R.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Dunn, John J.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.; Schutzer, Steve E.

    2011-01-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04. PMID:22123755

  18. Health Care Costs, Utilization and Patterns of Care following Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adrion, Emily R.; Aucott, John; Lemke, Klaus W.; Weiner, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lyme disease is the most frequently reported vector borne infection in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control have estimated that approximately 10% to 20% of individuals may experience Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome – a set of symptoms including fatigue, musculoskeletal pain, and neurocognitive complaints that persist after initial antibiotic treatment of Lyme disease. Little is known about the impact of Lyme disease or post-treatment Lyme disease symptoms (PTLDS) on health care costs and utilization in the United States. Objectives 1) to examine the impact of Lyme disease on health care costs and utilization, 2) to understand the relationship between Lyme disease and the probability of developing PTLDS, 3) to understand how PTLDS may impact health care costs and utilization. Methods This study utilizes retrospective data on medical claims and member enrollment for persons aged 0-64 years who were enrolled in commercial health insurance plans in the United States between 2006-2010. 52,795 individuals treated for Lyme disease were compared to 263,975 matched controls with no evidence of Lyme disease exposure. Results Lyme disease is associated with $2,968 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 2,807-3,128, p<.001) and 87% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 86%-89%, p<.001) over a 12-month period, and is associated with 4.77 times greater odds of having any PTLDS-related diagnosis, as compared to controls (95% CI: 4.67-4.87, p<.001). Among those with Lyme disease, having one or more PTLDS-related diagnosis is associated with $3,798 higher total health care costs (95% CI: 3,542-4,055, p<.001) and 66% more outpatient visits (95% CI: 64%-69%, p<.001) over a 12-month period, relative to those with no PTLDS-related diagnoses. Conclusions Lyme disease is associated with increased costs above what would be expected for an easy to treat infection. The presence of PTLDS-related diagnoses after treatment is associated with significant health care

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an effective adjunctive treatment for chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Chen, Yen-Wen; Kao, Tseng-Hui; Kao, Hsin-Kuo; Lee, Yu-Chin; Cheng, Jui-Chun; Wang, Jia-Horng

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States, but it is relatively rare in Taiwan. Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotic agents, but approximately 20% of these patients experience persistent or intermittent subjective symptoms, so-called chronic Lyme disease (CLD). The mechanisms of CLD remain unclear and the symptoms related to CLD are difficult to manage. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was applied in CLD therapy in the 1990s. However, reported information regarding the effectiveness of HBOT for CLD is still limited. Here, we present a patient with CLD who was successfully treated with HBOT.

  20. Lyme disease: a unique human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, S. E.; Steere, A. C.; Hardin, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Lyme disease is a complex immune-mediated multi-system disorder that is infectious in origin and inflammatory or "rheumatic" in expression. Through its epidemiologic characteristics, large numbers of a seasonally synchronized patient population are readily available for prospective study. Lyme disease has a known clinical onset ("zero time"), marked by the characteristic expanding skin lesion, erythema chronicum migrans, and a clearly defined pre-articular phase. At least some manifestations of the disorder are responsive to antibiotics, and the causative agent--a spirochete--is now known. These advantages make Lyme disease unique as a human model for an infectious etiology of rheumatic disease. PMID:6516449

  1. Whole-Genome Sequences of Two Borrelia afzelii and Two Borrelia garinii Lyme Disease Agent Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Casjens, S.R.; Dunn, J.; Mongodin, E. F.; Qiu, W.-G.; Luft, B. J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Schutzer, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Human Lyme disease is commonly caused by several species of spirochetes in the Borrelia genus. In Eurasia these species are largely Borrelia afzelii, B. garinii, B. burgdorferi, and B. bavariensis sp. nov. Whole-genome sequencing is an excellent tool for investigating and understanding the influence of bacterial diversity on the pathogenesis and etiology of Lyme disease. We report here the whole-genome sequences of four isolates from two of the Borrelia species that cause human Lyme disease, B. afzelii isolates ACA-1 and PKo and B. garinii isolates PBr and Far04.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an effective adjunctive treatment for chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Chen, Yen-Wen; Kao, Tseng-Hui; Kao, Hsin-Kuo; Lee, Yu-Chin; Cheng, Jui-Chun; Wang, Jia-Horng

    2014-05-01

    Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States, but it is relatively rare in Taiwan. Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotic agents, but approximately 20% of these patients experience persistent or intermittent subjective symptoms, so-called chronic Lyme disease (CLD). The mechanisms of CLD remain unclear and the symptoms related to CLD are difficult to manage. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) was applied in CLD therapy in the 1990s. However, reported information regarding the effectiveness of HBOT for CLD is still limited. Here, we present a patient with CLD who was successfully treated with HBOT. PMID:24726678

  3. Lyme carditis: a clinical presentation and long time follow-up.

    PubMed

    Midttun, M; Lebech, A M; Hansen, K; Videbaek, J

    1997-01-01

    The acute disease and a follow-up carried out up to 7 years after definite Lyme carditis in 6 patients is described. At the time of diagnosis all 6 patients had 2-3 degrees AV block, 4 patients presented with syncopes, and 1 revealed episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. The diagnosis of Lyme carditis was confirmed by Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgM and IgG antibody determinations in consecutive serum samples. All patients were treated with antibiotics. At follow-up, a clinical examination, a 2D and M-mode echocardiogram, and an exercise test did not reveal sequelae to Lyme carditis.

  4. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 in two families with acromegaly/gigantism is independent of mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I gene.

    PubMed

    Gadelha, M R; Prezant, T R; Une, K N; Glick, R P; Moskal, S F; Vaisman, M; Melmed, S; Kineman, R D; Frohman, L A

    1999-01-01

    Familial acromegaly/gigantism occurring in the absence of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-1) or the Carney complex has been reported in 18 families since the biochemical diagnosis of GH excess became available, and the genetic defect is unknown. In the present study we examined 2 unrelated families with isolated acromegaly/gigantism. In family A, 3 of 4 siblings were affected, with ages at diagnosis of 19, 21, and 23 yr. In family B, 5 of 13 siblings exhibited the phenotype and were diagnosed at 13, 15, 17, 17, and 24 yr of age. All 8 affected patients had elevated basal GH levels associated with high insulin-like growth factor I levels and/or nonsuppressible serum GH levels during an oral glucose tolerance test. GHRH levels were normal in affected members of family A. An invasive macroadenoma was found in 6 subjects, and a microadenoma was found in 1 subject from family B. The sequence of the GHRH receptor complementary DNA in 1 tumor from family A was normal. There was no history of consanguinity in either family, and the past medical history and laboratory results excluded MEN-1 and the Carney complex in all affected and unaffected screened subjects. Five of 8 subjects have undergone pituitary surgery to date, and paraffin-embedded pituitary blocks were available for analysis. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 11q13 was studied by comparing microsatellite polymorphisms of leukocyte and tumor DNA using PYGM (centromeric) and D11S527 (telomeric), markers closely linked to the MEN-1 tumor suppressor gene. All tumors exhibited a loss of heterozygosity at both markers. Sequencing of the MEN-1 gene revealed no germline mutations in either family, nor was a somatic mutation found in tumor DNA from one subject in family A. The integrity of the MEN-1 gene in this subject was further supported by demonstration of the presence of MEN-1 messenger ribonucleic acid, as assessed by RT-PCR. These data indicate that loss of heterozygosity in these affected family

  5. Reactivity of neuroborreliosis patients (Lyme disease) to cardiolipin and gangliosides.

    PubMed

    García Moncó, J C; Wheeler, C M; Benach, J L; Furie, R A; Lukehart, S A; Stanek, G; Steere, A C

    1993-07-01

    A subset of patients (50%) with neuroborreliosis (Lyme disease) showed IgG reactivity to cardiolipin in solid phase ELISA. In addition, a subset of patients with neuroborreliosis (29%) and syphilis (59%) had IgM reactivity to gangliosides with a Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminal sequence (GM1, GD1b, and asialo GM1). Anti-ganglioside IgM antibodies were significantly more frequent in these two groups of patients compared to patients with cutaneous and articular Lyme disease, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and normal controls. Correlative evidence and adsorption experiments indicated that antibodies to cardiolipin had separate specificities from those directed against the gangliosides. IgM antibodies to Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac gangliosides appeared to have similar specificities since these were positively correlated and inhibitable by cross adsorption assays. Given the clinical associations of patients with neuroborreliosis and syphilis with IgM reactivity to gangliosides sharing the Gal(beta 1-3) GalNac terminus, we suggest that these antibodies could represent a response to injury in neurological disease or a cross reactive event caused by spirochetes.

  6. Co-feeding transmission in Lyme disease pathogens.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, Maarten J

    2015-02-01

    This review examines the phenomenon of co-feeding transmission in tick-borne pathogens. This mode of transmission is critical for the epidemiology of several tick-borne viruses but its importance for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis, is still controversial. The molecular mechanisms and ecological factors that facilitate co-feeding transmission are therefore examined with particular emphasis on Borrelia pathogens. Comparison of climate, tick ecology and experimental infection work suggests that co-feeding transmission is more important in European than North American systems of Lyme borreliosis, which potentially explains why this topic has gained more traction in the former continent than the latter. While new theory shows that co-feeding transmission makes a modest contribution to Borrelia fitness, recent experimental work has revealed new ecological contexts where natural selection might favour co-feeding transmission. In particular, co-feeding transmission might confer a fitness advantage in the Darwinian competition among strains in mixed infections. Future studies should investigate the ecological conditions that favour the evolution of this fascinating mode of transmission in tick-borne pathogens.

  7. Bpur, the Lyme Disease Spirochete's PUR Domain Protein

    PubMed Central

    Jutras, Brandon L.; Chenail, Alicia M.; Carroll, Dustin W.; Miller, M. Clarke; Zhu, Haining; Bowman, Amy; Stevenson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The PUR domain is a nucleic acid-binding motif found in critical regulatory proteins of higher eukaryotes and in certain species of bacteria. During investigations into mechanisms by which the Lyme disease spirochete controls synthesis of its Erp surface proteins, it was discovered that the borrelial PUR domain protein, Bpur, binds with high affinity to double-stranded DNA adjacent to the erp transcriptional promoter. Bpur was found to enhance the effects of the erp repressor protein, BpaB. Bpur also bound single-stranded DNA and RNA, with relative affinities RNA > double-stranded DNA > single-stranded DNA. Rational site-directed mutagenesis of Bpur identified amino acid residues and domains critical for interactions with nucleic acids, and it revealed that the PUR domain has a distinct mechanism of interaction with each type of nucleic acid ligand. These data shed light on both gene regulation in the Lyme spirochete and functional mechanisms of the widely distributed PUR domain. PMID:23846702

  8. Testing practices and volume of non-Lyme tickborne diseases in the United States.

    PubMed

    Connally, Neeta P; Hinckley, Alison F; Feldman, Katherine A; Kemperman, Melissa; Neitzel, David; Wee, Siok-Bi; White, Jennifer L; Mead, Paul S; Meek, James I

    2016-02-01

    Large commercial laboratories in the United States were surveyed regarding the number of specimens tested for eight tickborne diseases in 2008. Seven large commercial laboratories reported testing a total of 2,927,881 specimens nationally (including Lyme disease). Of these, 495,585 specimens (17%) were tested for tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. In addition to large commercial laboratories, another 1051 smaller commercial, hospital, and government laboratories in four states (CT, MD, MN, and NY) were surveyed regarding tickborne disease testing frequency, practices, and results. Ninety-two of these reported testing a total of 10,091 specimens for four tickborne diseases other than Lyme disease. We estimate the cost of laboratory diagnostic testing for non-Lyme disease tickborne diseases in 2008 to be $9.6 million. These data provide a baseline to evaluate trends in tickborne disease test utilization and insight into the burden of these diseases.

  9. Avidity determination of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies in Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rauer, S; Beitlich, P; Neubert, U; Rasiah, C; Kaiser, R

    2001-01-01

    The avidity indices of Borrelia burgdorferi-specific IgG antibodies were estimated using ELISA in sera from patients with different stages of Lyme disease. In addition, sera from healthy students with proof of borrelial-specific IgG antibodies from standard serology were tested. Low avidity indices were detected predominantly in sera from patients with early-stage Lyme disease [erythema migrans (EM); n = 25]. High avidity indices were found in healthy students (n = 72) and in most of the patients with neuroborreliosis (NB; n = 44) and chronic late-stage Lyme disease [acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA); n = 36]. In conclusion, early-stage Lyme disease (EM) could be differentiated from advanced and chronic stages (NB, ACA) and from "seropositive" healthy persons using avidity determination in the majority of patients in this study.

  10. Experimental Lyme disease in rabbits: spirochetes found in erythema migrans and blood.

    PubMed Central

    Kornblatt, A N; Steere, A C; Brownstein, D G

    1984-01-01

    In attempts to produce experimental Lyme disease, 33 rabbits were inoculated with Lyme spirochetes by tick feeding or from tick organ homogenates or cultures. Two rabbits developed erythema chronicum migrans at the site of inoculation, in one instance 2 days after injection of a tick organ homogenate and in the other instance, 17 days after feeding of infected Ixodes dammini ticks. Spirochetes were seen in skin biopsy specimens of the second lesion with Warthin-Starry and immunoperoxidase stains. Spirochetes were also recovered from blood cultures of two additional rabbits 2 weeks post-inoculation. These findings are characteristic of early Lyme disease in humans and give additional support for the spirochetal etiology of Lyme disease. Images PMID:6480108

  11. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul; Schriefer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%-40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%-100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics.

  12. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%–40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%–100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  13. Ecological and inhost factors promoting distinct parasite life-history strategies in Lyme borreliosis.

    PubMed

    Haven, James; Magori, Krisztian; Park, Andrew W

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the ecology and evolution of tick-borne parasites is the foundation for preventing and managing tick-borne diseases. Tick-borne diseases such as Lyme borreliosis, are an emerging health threat in America, Europe, and Asia. Certain strains of Borrelia burgdorferi (the etiological agent of Lyme borreliosis) sampled in nature appear to be rapidly cleared by murine hosts. These strains, unlike their inhost-persistent counterparts, are unlikely to manifest severe disease. Their emergence and abundance in North America is unclear. Understanding why strains adopt a persistent or rapid-clearing phenotype is a crucial question in Lyme biology. Using dynamic, data-driven infectivity profiles in a competitive, two-strain mathematical model, we show that these phenotypes are differentially favored under distinct ecological conditions (i.e. vector phenology). We argue these two phenotypes represent distinct parasite life-history strategies, impacting regional Lyme disease severity across North America.

  14. Current Guidelines, Common Clinical Pitfalls, and Future Directions for Laboratory Diagnosis of Lyme Disease, United States.

    PubMed

    Moore, Andrew; Nelson, Christina; Molins, Claudia; Mead, Paul; Schriefer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the United States, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted to humans by blacklegged ticks. Patients with an erythema migrans lesion and epidemiologic risk can receive a diagnosis without laboratory testing. For all other patients, laboratory testing is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, but proper interpretation depends on symptoms and timing of illness. The recommended laboratory test in the United States is 2-tiered serologic analysis consisting of an enzyme-linked immunoassay or immunofluorescence assay, followed by reflexive immunoblotting. Sensitivity of 2-tiered testing is low (30%-40%) during early infection while the antibody response is developing (window period). For disseminated Lyme disease, sensitivity is 70%-100%. Specificity is high (>95%) during all stages of disease. Use of other diagnostic tests for Lyme disease is limited. We review the rationale behind current US testing guidelines, appropriate use and interpretation of tests, and recent developments in Lyme disease diagnostics. PMID:27314832

  15. 5-hydroxytryptamine and Lyme disease. Opportunity for a novel therapy to reduce the cerebellar tremor?

    PubMed

    Maximov, G K; Maximov, K G; Chokoeva, A A; Lotti, T; Wollina, U; Patterson, J W; Guarneri, C; Tana, C; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Kanazawa, N; Tchernev, G

    2016-01-01

    Lyme boreliosis is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burdorferi, which is transmitted by ticks. A 59 year-old woman developed pyrexia, strong headaches, ataxia, dysarthria and tremor of the limbs after a tick bite. She was unable to work and eat on her own. She was hospitalized three times and diagnosed with cerebellar intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis and a central lesion of the left facial nerve. There were no pyramidal, sensory or psychiatric disturbances. The brain MRI showed multifocal leucoencephalopathy with many hyperintense areas in both hemispheres, as well as in the left superior pedunculus cerebellaris. Diagnosis was confirmed by serologic examination. Treatment with cephtriaxone, doxycycline, methylprednisolone, cephixime and ciprofloxacine was administered without effect on the tremor, ataxia and horizontal gaze paralysis. Treatment was then administered with 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) in increased doses. The result of the three-month treatment with 5-HT was a gradual diminution of the tremor and the ataxia and an increase in the ability to eat, walk and work independently. PMID:27373127

  16. Experiences of patients identifying with chronic Lyme disease in the healthcare system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Lyme disease is a term that describes a constellation of persistent symptoms in patients with or without evidence of previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Patients labeled as having chronic Lyme disease have a substantial clinical burden. Little is known about chronic Lyme disease patient experiences in the healthcare system and their relationships with healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to gather insights about the experiences of patients who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease in the United States healthcare system. Methods Qualitative, phenomenological study in 12 adult participants who identified themselves as having chronic Lyme disease. Semi-structured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted, 60–90 minutes in length, focusing on perceptions of disease burden and of their healthcare providers, using the dimensions of the Health Belief Model. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes in the categories of beliefs/understanding, personal history/narrative, consequences/limitations, management, and influences on care. Results Enrollment continued until theoretical saturation was obtained. Four major themes emerged from participants’ descriptions of their experiences and perceptions: 1) changes in health status and the social impact of chronic Lyme disease, 2) doubts about recovery and the future, 3) contrasting doctor-patient relationships, 4) and the use of unconventional therapies to treat chronic Lyme disease. Conclusions Participants reported a significant decline in health status associated with chronic Lyme disease and were often unsatisfied with care in conventional settings. Negative experiences were associated with reports of dismissive, patronizing, and condescending attitudes. Positive experiences were associated with providers who were reported to be attentive, optimistic, and supportive. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of CAM therapies were common. Actively

  17. Forward genetic approaches for elucidation of novel regulators of Lyme arthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Kenneth K.C.; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients experiencing natural infection with Borrelia burgdorferi display a spectrum of associated symptoms and severity, strongly implicating the impact of genetically determined host factors in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Herein, we provide a summary of the host genetic factors that have been demonstrated to influence the severity and chronicity of Lyme arthritis symptoms, and a review of the resources available, current progress, and added value of a forward genetic approach for identification of novel genetic regulators. PMID:24926442

  18. Did Garin and Bujadoux Actually Report a Case of Lyme Radiculoneuritis?

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P; Wormser, Vanessa

    2016-04-01

    A 1922 report by Garin and Bujadoux is widely regarded as describing the first case of neurologic Lyme borreliosis. Although the patient reported had a tick bite followed by the development of a rash and radiculoneuritis, there were a number of highly atypical features, raising the question of whether the patient, in fact, had neurologic Lyme borreliosis. The paper may not deserve the historic recognition that it has received. PMID:27419161

  19. Detection of Borreliae in Archived Sera from Patients with Clinically Suspect Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William; Shearer, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two—one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis. PMID:24619223

  20. An Examination of the Demographic and Environmental Variables Correlated with Lyme Disease Emergence in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Seukep, Sara E; Kolivras, Korine N; Hong, Yili; Li, Jie; Prisley, Stephen P; Campbell, James B; Gaines, David N; Dymond, Randel L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the United States' most significant vector-borne illness. Virginia, on the southern edge of the disease's currently expanding range, has experienced an increase in Lyme disease both spatially and temporally, with steadily increasing rates over the past decade and disease spread from the northern to the southwestern part of the state. This study used a Geographic Information System and a spatial Poisson regression model to examine correlations between demographic and land cover variables, and human Lyme disease from 2006 to 2010 in Virginia. Analysis indicated that herbaceous land cover is positively correlated with Lyme disease incidence rates. Areas with greater interspersion between herbaceous and forested land were also positively correlated with incidence rates. In addition, income and age were positively correlated with incidence rates. Levels of development, interspersion of herbaceous and developed land, and population density were negatively correlated with incidence rates. Abundance of forest fragments less than 2 hectares in area was not significantly correlated. Our results support some findings of previous studies on ecological variables and Lyme disease in endemic areas, but other results have not been found in previous studies, highlighting the potential contribution of new variables as Lyme disease continues to emerge southward. PMID:26163019

  1. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Old Lyme Quadrangle, New London and Middlesex Counties, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Scott, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Old Lyme quadrangle consists of Neoproterozoic and Permian gneisses and granites of the Gander and Avalon terranes, Silurian metasedimentary rocks of the Merrimack terrane, and Silurian to Devonian metasedimentary rocks of uncertain origin. The Avalon terrane rocks crop out within the Selden Neck block, and the Gander terrane rocks crop out within the Lyme dome. The Silurian to Devonian rocks crop out between these two massifs. Previous mapping in the Old Lyme quadrangle includes the work by Lawrence Lundgren, Jr. Lundgren's work provides an excellent resource for rock descriptions and detailed modal analyses of rock units that will not be duplicated in this current report. New research that was not covered in detail by Lundgren is the focus of this report and includes (1) evaluation of the rocks in the core of the Lyme dome in an effort to subdivide units in this area; (2) structural analysis of foliations and folds in and around the Lyme dome; (3) geochronology of selected units within the Lyme dome; and (4) analysis of joints and the fracture properties of the rocks.

  2. An Examination of the Demographic and Environmental Variables Correlated with Lyme Disease Emergence in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Seukep, Sara E; Kolivras, Korine N; Hong, Yili; Li, Jie; Prisley, Stephen P; Campbell, James B; Gaines, David N; Dymond, Randel L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the United States' most significant vector-borne illness. Virginia, on the southern edge of the disease's currently expanding range, has experienced an increase in Lyme disease both spatially and temporally, with steadily increasing rates over the past decade and disease spread from the northern to the southwestern part of the state. This study used a Geographic Information System and a spatial Poisson regression model to examine correlations between demographic and land cover variables, and human Lyme disease from 2006 to 2010 in Virginia. Analysis indicated that herbaceous land cover is positively correlated with Lyme disease incidence rates. Areas with greater interspersion between herbaceous and forested land were also positively correlated with incidence rates. In addition, income and age were positively correlated with incidence rates. Levels of development, interspersion of herbaceous and developed land, and population density were negatively correlated with incidence rates. Abundance of forest fragments less than 2 hectares in area was not significantly correlated. Our results support some findings of previous studies on ecological variables and Lyme disease in endemic areas, but other results have not been found in previous studies, highlighting the potential contribution of new variables as Lyme disease continues to emerge southward.

  3. Seroprevalence of Lyme disease and associated risk factors in rural population of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiangfeng; Lyu, Yanning; Jiang, Yi; Tian, Lili; Li, Xinyu; Lin, Changying; Sun, Yulan; Guan, Zengzhi; Zhang, Xiuchun; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey of 801 local residents from 28 villages was conducted to assess the seroprevalence of Lyme disease and to identify the risk factors of becoming seropositive for Lyme disease in the northern suburb of Beijing. Forty-one serum samples were positive for IgG against B burgdorferi and the seroprevalence was 5.1% (41/801), indicating that Lyme disease is endemic in the rural population. In the multivariable analysis, sowing and harvesting in summer (OR, 2.377, 95% CI, 1.233-4.583), weed in the yard (OR, 1.914, 95% CI, 1.003-3.655) were positively associated with Lyme disease, while wearing protective clothes (OR, 0.173, 95% CI, 0.041-0.732) was negatively associated with Lyme disease. People living in the area are easily infected just near the house or in the cropland. They were barely diagnosed and cured. Without clear tick knowledge, the people are at high risk of exposure to tick bite and Lyme disease.

  4. Detection of borreliae in archived sera from patients with clinically suspect Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William; Shearer, David M

    2014-03-11

    The diagnoses of Lyme disease based on clinical manifestations, serological findings and detection of infectious agents often contradict each other. We tested 52 blind-coded serum samples, including 20 pre-treatment and 12 post-treatment sera from clinically suspect Lyme disease patients, for the presence of residual Lyme disease infectious agents, using nested PCR amplification of a signature segment of the borrelial 16S ribosomal RNA gene for detection and direct DNA sequencing of the PCR amplicon for molecular validation. These archived sera were split from the samples drawn for the 2-tier serology tests performed by a CDC-approved laboratory, and are used as reference materials for evaluating new diagnostic reagents. Of the 12 post-treatment serum samples, we found DNA evidence of a novel borrelia of uncertain significance in one, which was also positive for the 2-tier serology test. The rest of the post-treatment sera and all 20 control sera were PCR-negative. Of the 20 pre-treatment sera from clinically suspect early Lyme disease patients, we found Borrelia miyamotoi in one which was 2-tier serology-negative, and a Borrelia burgdorferi in two-one negative and one positive for 2-tier serology. We conclude that a sensitive and reliable DNA-based test is needed to support the diagnosis of Lyme disease and Lyme disease-like borreliosis.

  5. Fall and rise of Lyme disease and other Ixodes tick-borne infections in North America and Europe.

    PubMed

    Barbour, A G

    1998-01-01

    Lyme disease is a spirochaetal infection with acute and chronic manifestations. Lyme disease and other infections transmitted by Ixodes species ticks are increasing in temperate and Holarctic regions of the Northern hemisphere. These zoonotic infections are most commonly acquired in suburban residential areas and outdoor recreation areas close to cities. Different enzootic cycles, which include a variety of large and small mammals as well as migratory birds, maintain and distribute in nature the Borrelia species that cause Lyme disease. The rise in cases of Lyme disease and the other Ixodes tick-borne infections is, in part, the consequence of reforestation and the increase in deer populations in developed countries. PMID:10326291

  6. The Heterogeneity, Distribution, and Environmental Associations of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato, the Agent of Lyme Borreliosis, in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    James, Marianne C.; Gilbert, Lucy; Bowman, Alan S.; Forbes, Ken J.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an emerging infectious human disease caused by the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex of bacteria with reported cases increasing in many areas of Europe and North America. To understand the drivers of disease risk and the distribution of symptoms, which may improve mitigation and diagnostics, here we characterize the genetics, distribution, and environmental associations of B. burgdorferi s.l. genospecies across Scotland. In Scotland, reported Lyme borreliosis cases have increased almost 10-fold since 2000 but the distribution of B. burgdorferi s.l. is so far unstudied. Using a large survey of over 2200 Ixodes ricinus tick samples collected from birds, mammals, and vegetation across 25 sites we identified four genospecies: Borrelia afzelii (48%), Borrelia garinii (36%), Borrelia valaisiana (8%), and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (7%), and one mixed genospecies infection. Surprisingly, 90% of the sequence types were novel and, importantly, up to 14% of samples were mixed intra-genospecies co-infections, suggesting tick co-feeding, feeding on multiple hosts, or multiple infections in hosts. B. garinii (hosted by birds) was considerably more genetically diverse than B. afzelii (hosted by small mammals), as predicted since there are more species of birds than small mammals and birds can import strains from mainland Europe. Higher proportions of samples contained B. garinii and B. valaisiana in the west, while B. afzelii and B. garinii were significantly more associated with mixed/deciduous than with coniferous woodlands. This may relate to the abundance of transmission hosts in different regions and habitats. These data on the genetic heterogeneity within and between Borrelia genospecies are a first step to understand pathogen spread and could help explain the distribution of patient symptoms, which may aid local diagnosis. Understanding the environmental associations of the pathogens is critical for rational policy making for disease risk

  7. Diversifying forest communities may change Lyme disease risk: extra dimension to the dilution effect in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruyts, Sanne C; Ampoorter, Evy; Coipan, Elena C; Baeten, Lander; Heylen, Dieter; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-09-01

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies complex and transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In North America only one pathogenic genospecies occurs, in Europe there are several. According to the dilution effect hypothesis (DEH), formulated in North America, nymphal infection prevalence (NIP) decreases with increasing host diversity since host species differ in transmission potential. We analysed Borrelia infection in nymphs from 94 forest stands in Belgium, which are part of a diversification gradient with a supposedly related increasing host diversity: from pine stands without to oak stands with a shrub layer. We expected changing tree species and forest structure to increase host diversity and decrease NIP. In contrast with the DEH, NIP did not differ between different forest types. Genospecies diversity however, and presumably also host diversity, was higher in oak than in pine stands. Infected nymphs tended to harbour Borrelia afzelii infection more often in pine stands while Borrelia garinii and Borrelia burgdorferi ss. infection appeared to be more prevalent in oak stands. This has important health consequences, since the latter two cause more severe disease manifestations. We show that the DEH must be nuanced for Europe and should consider the response of multiple pathogenic genospecies. PMID:27173094

  8. The association between tick-borne infections, Lyme borreliosis and autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Bransfield, Robert C; Wulfman, Jeffrey S; Harvey, William T; Usman, Anju I

    2008-01-01

    Chronic infectious diseases, including tick-borne infections such as Borrelia burgdorferi may have direct effects, promote other infections and create a weakened, sensitized and immunologically vulnerable state during fetal development and infancy leading to increased vulnerability for developing autism spectrum disorders. A dysfunctional synergism with other predisposing and contributing factors may contribute to autism spectrum disorders by provoking innate and adaptive immune reactions to cause and perpetuate effects in susceptible individuals that result in inflammation, molecular mimicry, kynurenine pathway changes, increased quinolinic acid and decreased serotonin, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and excitotoxicity that impair the development of the amygdala and other neural structures and neural networks resulting in a partial Klüver-Bucy Syndrome and other deficits resulting in autism spectrum disorders and/or exacerbating autism spectrum disorders from other causes throughout life. Support for this hypothesis includes multiple cases of mothers with Lyme disease and children with autism spectrum disorders; fetal neurological abnormalities associated with tick-borne diseases; similarities between tick-borne diseases and autism spectrum disorder regarding symptoms, pathophysiology, immune reactivity, temporal lobe pathology, and brain imaging data; positive reactivity in several studies with autistic spectrum disorder patients for Borrelia burgdorferi (22%, 26% and 20-30%) and 58% for mycoplasma; similar geographic distribution and improvement in autistic symptoms from antibiotic treatment. It is imperative to research these and all possible causes of autism spectrum disorders in order to prevent every preventable case and treat every treatable case until this disease has been eliminated from humanity. PMID:17980971

  9. Predicted outcomes of vaccinating wildlife to reduce human risk of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Kimberly; Fish, Durland; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-07-01

    Vaccination efforts for Lyme disease prevention in humans have focused on wildlife reservoirs to target the causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, for elimination in vector ticks. Multiple host species are involved in the transmission and maintenance of the bacterium, but not all host species can be vaccinated effectively. To evaluate vaccinating a subset of hosts in the context of host-tick interactions, we constructed and evaluated a dynamic model of B. burgdorferi transmission in mice. Our analyses indicate that on average, a mouse-targeted vaccine is expected to proportionally reduce infection prevalence among ticks by 56%. However, relative to mouse vaccination, human risk of exposure is dominated by the number of tick bites received per person, the proportion of tick blood meals taken from the highly reservoir-competent white-footed mouse relative to other hosts, and the average number of tick bites per mouse. Variation in these factors reduces the predictability of vaccination outcomes. Additionally, contributions of nonmouse hosts to pathogen maintenance preclude elimination of B. burgdorferi through mouse vaccination alone. Our findings indicate that to increase the impact of wildlife vaccination, reducing tick populations by acaricide application, in addition to targeting additional reservoir-competent host species, should be employed.

  10. Diversifying forest communities may change Lyme disease risk: extra dimension to the dilution effect in Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruyts, Sanne C; Ampoorter, Evy; Coipan, Elena C; Baeten, Lander; Heylen, Dieter; Sprong, Hein; Matthysen, Erik; Verheyen, Kris

    2016-09-01

    Lyme disease is caused by bacteria of the Borrelia burgdorferi genospecies complex and transmitted by Ixodid ticks. In North America only one pathogenic genospecies occurs, in Europe there are several. According to the dilution effect hypothesis (DEH), formulated in North America, nymphal infection prevalence (NIP) decreases with increasing host diversity since host species differ in transmission potential. We analysed Borrelia infection in nymphs from 94 forest stands in Belgium, which are part of a diversification gradient with a supposedly related increasing host diversity: from pine stands without to oak stands with a shrub layer. We expected changing tree species and forest structure to increase host diversity and decrease NIP. In contrast with the DEH, NIP did not differ between different forest types. Genospecies diversity however, and presumably also host diversity, was higher in oak than in pine stands. Infected nymphs tended to harbour Borrelia afzelii infection more often in pine stands while Borrelia garinii and Borrelia burgdorferi ss. infection appeared to be more prevalent in oak stands. This has important health consequences, since the latter two cause more severe disease manifestations. We show that the DEH must be nuanced for Europe and should consider the response of multiple pathogenic genospecies.

  11. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology. PMID:20380218

  12. Independence Is.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickney, Sharon

    This workbook is designed to help participants of the Independence Training Program (ITP) to achieve a definition of "independence." The program was developed for teenage girls. The process for developing the concept of independence consists of four steps. Step one instructs the participant to create an imaginary situation where she is completely…

  13. Chronic Lyme disease: it's not all in our heads.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Robert G

    2003-02-01

    Those of us with chronic Lyme disease are not at all confused, as suggested by Sigal and Hassett (2002). We know from years of experience that we have real, specific symptoms that are usually painful and disabling and include severe headaches, crippling arthritis, and heart palpitations, which lead to serious heart disease. Many of us know that our symptoms are kept in check while we are on antibiotics, but they painfully reappear when the antibiotics are withdrawn. Just because the medical community cannot detect a specific causative bacterium and managed health care companies want to maximize profits doesn't mean that those of us afflicted with this terrible condition are delusional and not truly benefiting from antibiotic treatment. We are not all crazy; we are sick and we should not be required to prove it to get medical care.

  14. Chronic Lyme disease: in defense of the scientific enterprise.

    PubMed

    Baker, Phillip J

    2010-11-01

    There is no better example of a relentless attack on evidence-based biomedical research and the integrity of outstanding scientists than that associated with the treatment of a poorly defined condition called "chronic Lyme disease." Here, a scientifically naive general population, the lay press, and legislators, who in most instances are unable to evaluate and judge scientific evidence properly, have been misled by patient advocate groups to believe that extended antibiotic therapy is the best and only solution to this condition. This has resulted in the unprecedented intrusion of government and the legal systems into the practice of medicine and scientific research. Because there is no clinical evidence that this condition is due to a persistent infection, advocating extended antibiotic therapy is not justified and has been shown to be harmful and of no benefit.

  15. Chronic Lyme disease: it's not all in our heads.

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Those of us with chronic Lyme disease are not at all confused, as suggested by Sigal and Hassett (2002). We know from years of experience that we have real, specific symptoms that are usually painful and disabling and include severe headaches, crippling arthritis, and heart palpitations, which lead to serious heart disease. Many of us know that our symptoms are kept in check while we are on antibiotics, but they painfully reappear when the antibiotics are withdrawn. Just because the medical community cannot detect a specific causative bacterium and managed health care companies want to maximize profits doesn't mean that those of us afflicted with this terrible condition are delusional and not truly benefiting from antibiotic treatment. We are not all crazy; we are sick and we should not be required to prove it to get medical care. PMID:12573918

  16. Migratory Passerine Birds as Reservoirs of Lyme Borreliosis in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Comstedt, Pär; Bergström, Sven; Olsen, Björn; Garpmo, Ulf; Marjavaara, Lisette; Mejlon, Hans; Barbour, Alan G.

    2006-01-01

    To define the role of birds as reservoirs and disseminators of Borrelia spirochetes, we characterized tick infestation and reservoir competence of migratory passerine birds in Sweden. A total of 1,120 immature Ixodes ricinus ticks were removed from 13,260 birds and assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Borrelia, followed by DNA sequencing for species and genotype identification. Distributions of ticks on birds were aggregated, presumably because of varying encounters with ticks along migratory routes. Lyme borreliosis spirochetes were detected in 160 (14%) ticks. Borrelia garinii was the most common species in PCR-positive samples and included genotypes associated with human infections. Infestation prevalence with infected ticks was 5 times greater among ground-foraging birds than other bird species, but the 2 groups were equally competent in transmitting Borrelia. Migratory passerine birds host epidemiologically important vector ticks and Borrelia species and vary in effectiveness as reservoirs on the basis of their feeding behavior. PMID:16836825

  17. The seroepidemiology of Lyme borreliosis in zoo animals in Germany.

    PubMed Central

    Stoebel, K.; Schoenberg, A.; Streich, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted the first seroepidemiological study to evaluate the exposure of zoo animals to Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. in German zoos and wildlife parks. A total of 1487 individuals representing 148 ungulate and carnivore species belonging to 19 families were examined using a non-species dependent ELISA. Specific antibodies were detected in 154 (10.4%) animals; 168 (11.3%) sera produced borderline results. The percentage of seropositive individuals was related to species and origin (zoo), and increased with age of the animals. Sex and season did not influence seroprevalence. Examination of 600 ticks (Ixodes ricinus; caught from vegetation in the zoos) by darkfield microscopy and indirect immunofluorescence technique revealed infection rates within the range typical for Central Europe. The results substantiate that there is an infection risk for zoo animals. A differential diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis should be taken into account in case of suspicious clinical symptoms and possible contact to ticks. PMID:14596540

  18. SUSPECTED LYME BORRELIOSIS IN A CAPTIVE ADULT CHIMPANZEE (PAN TROGLODYTES).

    PubMed

    Wack, Allison N; Holland, Cynthia J; Lopez, Job E; Schwan, Tom G; Bronson, Ellen

    2015-06-01

    An 18-yr-old female captive-born chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) presented with an intermittent history of inappetence, lethargy, and lower limb stiffness. No notable abnormalities were found on exam or complete blood cell count and serum biochemistry analysis. Serologic testing was strongly positive via indirect fluorescent antibody testing and Western blot for Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with doxycycline was initiated, and a clinical response was seen within 1 wk. Convalescent serum exhibited an eightfold increase in titer. Serologic testing was performed on several conspecifics with banked serum; while some low positive titers were present and presumed indicative of past exposure, no titer was elevated to the extent of the affected chimpanzee during its course of disease. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of suspected Lyme borreliosis in a great ape species, and the case originates from an area of the United States with a high incidence of human borreliosis.

  19. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  20. Versatile roles of CspA orthologs in complement inactivation of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Claudia; Koenigs, Arno; Siegel, Corinna; Hallström, Teresia; Skerka, Christine; Wallich, Reinhard; Zipfel, Peter F; Kraiczy, Peter

    2014-01-01

    CspA of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi represents a key molecule in immune evasion, protecting borrelial cells from complement-mediated killing. As previous studies focused almost exclusively on CspA of B. burgdorferi, here we investigate the different binding capacities of CspA orthologs of Borrelia burgdorferi, B. afzelii, and B. spielmanii for complement regulator factor H and plasminogen and their ability to inhibit complement activation by either binding these host-derived plasma proteins or independently by direct interaction with components involved in formation of the lethal, pore-like terminal complement complex. To further examine their function in serum resistance in vivo, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain was used to generate spirochetes, ectopically producing functional CspA orthologs. Irrespective of their species origin, all three CspA orthologs impart resistance to complement-mediated killing when produced in a serum-sensitive B. garinii surrogate strain. To analyze the inhibitory effect on complement activation and to assess the potential to inactivate C3b by binding of factor H and plasminogen, recombinant CspA orthologs were also investigated. All three CspA orthologs simultaneously bound factor H and plasminogen but differed in regard to their capacity to inactivate C3b via bound plasmin(ogen) and inhibit formation of the terminal complement complex. CspA of B. afzelii binds plasmin(ogen) and inhibits the terminal complement complex more efficiently than CspA of B. burgdorferi and B. spielmanii. Taken together, CspA orthologs of serum-resistant Lyme disease spirochetes act as multifunctional evasion molecules that inhibit complement on two central activation levels, C3b generation and assembly of the terminal complement complex.