Science.gov

Sample records for multiple kinematic edges

  1. Distinguishing dark matter stabilization symmetries using multiple kinematic edges and cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Toharia, Manuel; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2010-07-01

    We emphasize that the stabilizing symmetry for dark matter (DM) particles does not have to be the commonly used parity (Z2) symmetry. We therefore examine the potential of the colliders to distinguish models with parity stabilized DM from models in which the DM is stabilized by other symmetries. We often take the latter to be a Z3 symmetry for illustration. We focus on signatures where a single particle, charged under the DM stabilization symmetry decays into the DM and standard model (SM) particles. Such a Z3-charged mother particle can decay into one or two DM particles along with the same SM particles. This can be contrasted with the decay of a Z2-charged mother particle, where only one DM particle appears. Thus, if the intermediate particles in these decay chains are off-shell, then the reconstructed invariant mass of the SM particles exhibits two kinematic edges for the Z3 case but only one for the Z2 case. For the case of on-shell intermediate particles, distinguishing the two symmetries requires more than the kinematic edges. In this case, we note that certain decay chain topologies of the mother particle which are present for the Z3 case (but absent for the Z2 case) generate a cusp in the invariant mass distribution of the SM particles. We demonstrate that this cusp is generally invariant of the various spin configurations. We further apply these techniques within the context of explicit models.

  2. Distinguishing dark matter stabilization symmetries using multiple kinematic edges and cusps

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Kim, Doojin; Toharia, Manuel; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2010-07-01

    We emphasize that the stabilizing symmetry for dark matter (DM) particles does not have to be the commonly used parity (Z{sub 2}) symmetry. We therefore examine the potential of the colliders to distinguish models with parity stabilized DM from models in which the DM is stabilized by other symmetries. We often take the latter to be a Z{sub 3} symmetry for illustration. We focus on signatures where a single particle, charged under the DM stabilization symmetry decays into the DM and standard model (SM) particles. Such a Z{sub 3}-charged mother particle can decay into one or two DM particles along with the same SM particles. This can be contrasted with the decay of a Z{sub 2}-charged mother particle, where only one DM particle appears. Thus, if the intermediate particles in these decay chains are off-shell, then the reconstructed invariant mass of the SM particles exhibits two kinematic edges for the Z{sub 3} case but only one for the Z{sub 2} case. For the case of on-shell intermediate particles, distinguishing the two symmetries requires more than the kinematic edges. In this case, we note that certain decay chain topologies of the mother particle which are present for the Z{sub 3} case (but absent for the Z{sub 2} case) generate a cusp in the invariant mass distribution of the SM particles. We demonstrate that this cusp is generally invariant of the various spin configurations. We further apply these techniques within the context of explicit models.

  3. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  4. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  5. Dissecting new physics models through kinematic edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Abhishek M.; Maitra, Ushoshi

    2017-02-01

    Kinematic edges in the invariant mass distributions of different final state particles are typically a signal of new physics. In this work we propose a scenario wherein these edges could be utilized in discriminating between different classes of models. To this effect, we consider the resonant production of a heavy Higgs like resonance (H1) as a case study. Such states are a characteristic feature of many new physics scenarios beyond the standard model (SM). In the event of a discovery, it is essential to identify the true nature of the underlying theory. In this work we propose a channel, H1→t2t , where t2 is a vectorlike gauge singlet top-partner that decays into W b , Z t , h t . Invariant mass distributions constructed out of these final states are characterized by the presence of kinematic edges, which are unique to the topology under consideration. Further, since all the final state particles are SM states, the position in the edges of these invariant mass distributions can be used to exclusively determine the masses of the resonances. Observation of these features are meant to serve as a trigger, thereby mandating a more detailed analysis in a particular direction of parameter space. The absence of these edge like features, in the specific invariant mass distributions considered here, in minimal versions of supersymmetric models (MSSM) also serves as a harbinger of such non-MSSM-like scenarios.

  6. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  7. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  8. Kinematically redundant arm formulations for coordinated multiple arm implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Quiocho, Leslie J.; Cleghorn, Timothy F.

    1990-01-01

    Although control laws for kinematically redundant robotic arms were presented as early as 1969, redundant arms have only recently become recognized as viable solutions to limitations inherent to kinematically sufficient arms. The advantages of run-time control optimization and arm reconfiguration are becoming increasingly attractive as the complexity and criticality of robotic systems continues to progress. A generalized control law for a spatial arm with 7 or more degrees of freedom (DOF) based on Whitney's resolved rate formulation is given. Results from a simulation implementation utilizing this control law are presented. Furthermore, results from a two arm simulation are presented to demonstrate the coordinated control of multiple arms using this formulation.

  9. Multiple cooperating manipulators: The case of kinematically redundant arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ian D.; Freeman, Robert A.; Marcus, Steven I.

    1989-01-01

    Existing work concerning two or more manipulators simultaneously grasping and transferring a common load is continued and extended. Specifically considered is the case of one or more arms being kinematically redundant. Some existing results in the modeling and control of single redundant arms and multiple manipulators are reviewed. The cooperating situation is modeled in terms of a set of coordinates representing object motion and internal object squeezing. Nominal trajectories in these coordinates are produced via actuator load distribution algorithms introduced previously. A controller is developed to track these desired object trajectories while making use of the kinematic redundancy to additionally aid the cooperation and coordination of the system. It is shown how the existence of kinematic redundancy within the system may be used to enhance the degree of cooperation achievable.

  10. Loops and multiple edges in modularity maximization of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafieri, Sonia; Hansen, Pierre; Liberti, Leo

    2010-04-01

    The modularity maximization model proposed by Newman and Girvan for the identification of communities in networks works for general graphs possibly with loops and multiple edges. However, the applications usually correspond to simple graphs. These graphs are compared to a null model where the degree distribution is maintained but edges are placed at random. Therefore, in this null model there will be loops and possibly multiple edges. Sharp bounds on the expected number of loops, and their impact on the modularity, are derived. Then, building upon the work of Massen and Doye, but using algebra rather than simulation, we propose modified null models associated with graphs without loops but with multiple edges, graphs with loops but without multiple edges and graphs without loops nor multiple edges. We validate our models by using the exact algorithm for clique partitioning of Grötschel and Wakabayashi.

  11. TWO-DIMENSIONAL KINEMATICS OF THE EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXY ESO 379-006

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R. F.; Repetto, P.; Martos, M.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.; Amram, P.; Hernandez, O.

    2013-05-15

    We present a kinematical study of the nearly edge-on galaxy ESO 379-006 that shows the existence of extraplanar ionized gas. With Fabry-Perot spectroscopy at H{alpha}, we study the kinematics of ESO 379-006 using velocity maps and position-velocity diagrams parallel to the major and to the minor axis of the galaxy. We build the rotation curve of the disk and discuss the role of projection effects due to the fact of viewing this galaxy nearly edge-on. The twisting of the isovelocities in the radial velocity field of the disk of ESO 379-006 as well as the kinematical asymmetries found in some position-velocity diagrams parallel to the minor axis of the galaxy suggest the existence of deviations to circular motions in the disk that can be modeled and explained with the inclusion of a radial inflow probably generated by a bar or by spiral arms. We succeeded in detecting extraplanar diffuse ionized gas in this galaxy. At the same time, from the analysis of position-velocity diagrams, we found some evidence that the extraplanar gas could lag in rotation velocity with respect to the midplane rotation.

  12. Gas Kinematics In and Around Edge-on Galaxies from MaNGA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, D.

    2016-06-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) is a massive Integral Field Unit survey of a large number of relatively nearby galaxies that started in 2014 as a part of SDSS-IV at the Apache Point Observatory. After the first year of observations MaNGA has obtained IFU spectra of about a thousand of objects, with several dozens of edge-on galaxies among them. The two-dimensional spectra help us constrain parameters of galactic components with superior rotation curves. There is a significant fraction of galaxies in which the extra-planar gas emission is confidently detected. The extra-planar gas velocity fields in several galaxies show signs of lagging rotation with respect to the gas motion close to the galactic plane. We show progress of MaNGA survey in observations of edge-on galaxies and discuss their impact on our understanding of gas kinematics in and around spiral galaxies after finishing the survey.

  13. Orbital kinematics of edge-on bars with and without supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Caleb; Valluri, Monica; Shen, Juntai; Debattista, Victor P.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of external disk galaxies with bars frequently show boxy or peanut shaped bulges, which have a distinct X-shaped structure when the system is viewed edge-on. Such features are also well documented in N-body simulations, where they arise from the buckling of the bar. The precise nature of the orbits that create this structure is still uncertain. Some studies argue that the bulge/X-shape structure is formed and supported by resonant 2:1 "banana" orbit family, while other argue that they arise from 5:3 "brezel" orbits. Here we examine a set of N-body models of a barred disk galaxy (with and without a central black hole). We generate 2-D maps of projected kinematics both for specific orbit families as well as the full simulation of the bars at different orientations. By examining the line-of-sight velocities, velocity dispersions and 3rd and 4th Gauss-Hermite polynomials we attempt to deduce the type of orbits most likely to produce the X-shaped features. We also generate mock kinematics for the Milky Way bar and predict the kinematical features associated with the X-shape that will be observed with upcoming stellar surveys.

  14. Multilateral Telecoordinated Control of Multiple Robots With Uncertain Kinematics.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Di-Hua; Xia, Yuanqing

    2017-06-06

    This paper addresses the telecoordinated control of multiple robots in the simultaneous presence of asymmetric time-varying delays, nonpassive external forces, and uncertain kinematics/dynamics. To achieve the control objective, a neuroadaptive controller with utilizing prescribed performance control and switching control technique is developed, where the basic idea is to employ the concept of motion synchronization in each pair of master-slave robots and among all slave robots. By using the multiple Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals method, the state-independent input-to-output practical stability of the closed-loop system is established. Compared with the previous approaches, the new design is straightforward and easier to implement and is applicable to a wider area. Simulation results on three pairs of three degrees-of-freedom robots confirm the theoretical findings.

  15. Quantitative Analysis Of Sperm Motion Kinematics From Real-Time Video-Edge Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Russell O...; Katz, David F.

    1988-02-01

    A new model of sperm swimming kinematics, which uses signal processing methods and multivariate statistical techniques to identify individual cell-motion parameters and unique cell populations, is presented. Swimming paths of individual cells are obtained using real-time, video-edge digitization. Raw paths are adaptively filtered to identify average paths, and measurements of space-time oscillations about average paths are made. Time-dependent frequency information is extracted from spatial variations about average paths using harmonic analysis. Raw-path and average-path measures such as curvature, curve length, and straight-line length, and measures of oscillations about average paths such as time-dependent amplitude and frequency variations, are used in a multivariate, cluster analysis to identify unique cell populations. The entire process, including digitization of sperm video images, is computer-automated. Preliminary results indicate that this method of tracking, digitization, and kinematic analysis accurately identifies unique cell subpopulations, including: the relative numbers of cells in each subpopulation, how subpopulations differ, and the extent and significance of such differences. With appropriate work, this approach may be useful for clinical discrimination between normal and abnormal semen specimens.

  16. Spectral CT Using Multiple Balanced K-Edge Filters

    PubMed Central

    Rakvongthai, Yothin; Worstell, William; Fakhri, Georges El; Bian, Junguo; Lorsakul, Auranuch; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Our goal is to validate a spectral CT system design that uses a conventional X-ray source with multiple balanced K-edge filters. By performing a simultaneously synthetic reconstruction in multiple energy bins, we obtained a good agreement between measurements and model expectations for a reasonably complex phantom. We performed simulation and data acquisition on a phantom containing multiple rods of different materials using a NeuroLogica CT scanner. Five balanced K-edge filters including Molybdenum, Cerium, Dysprosium, Erbium, and Tungsten were used separately proximal to the X-ray tube. For each sinogram bin, measured filtered vector can be defined as a product of a transmission matrix, which is determined by the filters and is independent of the imaging object, and energy-binned intensity vector. The energy-binned sinograms were then obtained by inverting the transmission matrix followed by a multiplication of the filter measurement vector. For each energy bin defined by two consecutive K-edges, a synthesized energy-binned attenuation image was obtained using filtered back-projection reconstruction. The reconstructed attenuation coefficients for each rod obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with the corresponding simulated results. Furthermore, the reconstructed attenuation coefficients for a given energy bin, agreed with National Institute of Standards and Technology reference values when beam hardening within the energy bin is small. The proposed cost-effective system design using multiple balanced K-edge filters can be used to perform spectral CT imaging at clinically relevant flux rates using conventional detectors and integrating electronics. PMID:25252276

  17. Geomorphic signal of active faulting at the northern edge of Lut Block: Insights on the kinematic scenario of Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, Gabriele; Della Seta, Marta; Rossetti, Federico; Nozaem, Reza; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Cosentino, Domenico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Recent works documented Neogene to Quaternary dextral strike-slip tectonics along the Kuh-e-Sarhangi and Kuh-e-Faghan intraplate strike-slip faults at the northern edge of the Lut Block of Central Iran, previously thought to be dominated by sinistral strike-slip deformation. This work focuses on the evidence of Quaternary activity of one of these fault systems, in order to provide new spatiotemporal constraints on their role in the active regional kinematic scenario. Through geomorphological and structural investigation, integrated with optically stimulated luminescence dating of three generations of alluvial fans and fluvial terraces (at ~53, ~25, and ~6 ka), this study documents (i) the topographic inheritance of the long-term (Myr) punctuated history of fault nucleation, propagation, and exhumation along the northern edge of Lut Block; (ii) the tectonic control on drainage network evolution, pediment formation, fluvial terraces, and alluvial fan architecture; (iii) the minimum Holocene age of Quaternary dextral strike-slip faulting; and (iv) the evidence of Late Quaternary fault-related uplift localized along the different fault strands. The documented spatial and temporal constraints on the active dextral strike-slip tectonics at the northern edge of Lut Block provide new insights on the kinematic model for active faulting in Central Iran, which has been reinterpreted in an escape tectonic scenario.

  18. KRISTINA: Kinematic rib-based structural system for innovative adaptive trailing edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, R.; Amoroso, F.; Magnifico, M.; Dimino, I.; Concilio, A.

    2016-04-01

    Nature teaches that the flight of the birds succeeds perfectly since they are able to change the shape of their wings in a continuous manner. The careful observation of this phenomenon has re-introduced in the recent research topics the study of "metamorphic" wing structures; these innovative architectures allow for the controlled wing shape adaptation to different flight conditions with the ultimate goal of getting desirable improvements such as the increase of aerodynamic efficiency or load control effectiveness. In this framework, the European research project SARISTU aimed at combining morphing and smart ideas to the leading edge, the trailing edge and the winglet of a large commercial airplane (EASA CS25 category) while assessing integrated technologies validation through high-speed wind tunnel test on a true scale outer wing segment. The design process of the adaptive trailing edge (ATED) addressed by SARISTU is here outlined, from the conceptual definition of the camber-morphing architecture up to the assessment of the device executive layout. Rational design criteria were implemented in order to preliminarily define ATED structural layout and the general configuration of the embedded mechanisms enabling morphing under the action of aerodynamic loads. Advanced FE analyses were then carried out and the robustness of adopted structural arrangements was proven in compliance with applicable airworthiness requirements.

  19. Evidence for edge effects on multiple levels in tallgrass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, M.; Johnson, D.H.; Faaborg, J.

    2000-01-01

    We tested how edges affect nest survival and predator distribution in a native tallgrass prairie system in southwestern Missouri using artificial nests, natural nests of Dickcissels (Spiza americana) and Henslow's Sparrows (Ammodramus henslowii), and mammal track stations. Survival of artificial nests was lower within 30 m of forest edge. Nesting success of Dickcissels and Henslow's Sparrows was lower within 50 m to a shrubby edge than at greater distances, whereas fates of nests were not related to distances to roads, agricultural fields, or forests. Evidence from clay eggs placed in artificial nests indicated that mid-sized carnivores were the major predators within 30 m of forest edges. Furthermore, mid-sized carnivores visited track stations most frequently within 50 m of forest edges. Because proximity of woody habitat explained more variation in nest survival and mammal activity than did fragment size, it appears that edge effects were more pronounced than area effects. Edge effects appeared to be caused mainly by greater exposure of nests to midsized carnivores. We argue that, based on edge avoidance behavior, 'grassland-interior' species such as the Henslow's Sparrow respond to edge effects mainly by a decrease in density, whereas habitat generalists such as the Dickcissel are affected mainly by a decrease in nesting success.

  20. Motor abundance contributes to resolving multiple kinematic task constraints

    PubMed Central

    G, Gera; SMSF, Freitas; ML, Latash; K, Monahan; G, Schöner; JP, Scholz

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the use of motor abundance during the transport and placing of objects that required either precise or minimal orientation to the target. Analyses across repetitions of the structure of joint configuration variance relative to the position and orientation constraints were performed using the Uncontrolled Manifold (UCM) approach. Results indicated that the orientation constraint did not affect stability of the hand's spatial trajectory. Orientation was weakly stabilized during the late transport phase independent of the orientation constraint, indicating no default synergy stabilizing orientation. Stabilization of orientation for conditions most requiring it for successful insertion of the object was present primarily during the adjustment phase. The results support the hypothesis that a major advantage of a control scheme that utilizes motor abundance is the ability to resolve multiple task constraints simultaneously without undue interference among them. PMID:20237405

  1. Ultrasound image edge detection based on a novel multiplicative gradient and Canny operator.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yinfei; Zhou, Yali; Zhou, Hao; Gong, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    To achieve the fast and accurate segmentation of ultrasound image, a novel edge detection method for speckle noised ultrasound images was proposed, which was based on the traditional Canny and a novel multiplicative gradient operator. The proposed technique combines a new multiplicative gradient operator of non-Newtonian type with the traditional Canny operator to generate the initial edge map, which is subsequently optimized by the following edge tracing step. To verify the proposed method, we compared it with several other edge detection methods that had good robustness to noise, with experiments on the simulated and in vivo medical ultrasound image. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm has higher speed for real-time processing, and the edge detection accuracy could be 75% or more. Thus, the proposed method is very suitable for fast and accurate edge detection of medical ultrasound images. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  3. Effect of rhythmic auditory stimulation on gait kinematic parameters of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, M; Sohrabi, M; Taheri Torbati, HR; Nikkhah, K; NaeimiKia, M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to examine the effect of rhythmic auditory stimulation on gait kinematic parameters of patients with multiple sclerosis. Subjects and Methods: In this study, 18 subjects, comprising 4 males and 14 females with Multiple Sclerosis with expanded disability status scale of 3 to 6 were chosen. Subjects were selected by available and targeted sampling and were randomly divided into two experimental (n = 9) and control (n = 9) groups. Exercises were gait with rhythmic auditory stimulation by a metronome device, in addition to gait without stimulation for the experimental and control groups, respectively. Training was carried out for 3 weeks, with 30 min duration for each session 3 times a week. Stride length, stride time, double support time, cadence and gait speed were measured by motion analysis device. Results: There was a significant difference between stride length, stride time, double support time, cadence and gait speed in the experimental group, before and after the training. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in the enhancement of stride length, stride time, cadence and gait speed in favor of the experimental group. While this difference was not significant for double support time. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that rhythmic auditory stimulation is an effective rehabilitation method to improve gait kinematic parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:28255373

  4. Fast Algorithm and Application of Wavelet Multiple-scale Edge Detection Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Likai; Yang, Min; Tong, Qiang; Zhang, Yue

    This paper focuses on the algorithm theory of the two-dimensional wavelet transform which is used for image edge detection. To simplify the algorithm, the author propounds to turn the two-dimensional dyadic wavelet to one dimensional dyadic wavelet that can be divided into product. We can use the filter to achieve the wavelet multiple scale edge detection quickly. Simultaneously, the process that the wavelet transform used for the multiple-scale edge detection is discussed in detail. Finally, the algorithm can be applied to vehicle license image detection and. Compared with the results of the Sobel, Canny and the others, this algorithm shows great feasibility and the effectiveness.

  5. The Relative Kinematics of Galaxy Emission and Multiple Gas Phases in z~0.5 Extended Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Chris

    2014-02-01

    We request two nights to use the ESI echellette to obtain spatially resolved emission-line spectra for 20 intermediate redshift galaxies in support of our Cycle-21 NASA/HST COS program (110 orbits). We aim to understand the all-important gas cycles of galaxies by undertaking the first comprehensive campaign directly comparing the multi-phase gas kinematics, chemical enrichment, and spatial geometry of the circumgalactic medium (gaseous halos) to the kinematics, morphologies, star formation rates, and metallicities of the host galaxies. The unique, unprecedented, detailed scope of our program will provide highly sought observational constraints on cutting-edge galaxy evolution theory and hydrodynamic cosmological simulations.

  6. Execution Time Optimization Analysis on Multiple Algorithms Performance of Moving Object Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Syed Zahurul; Islam, Syed Zahidul; Jidin, Razali; Ali, Mohd. Alauddin Mohd.

    2010-06-01

    Computer vision and digital image processing comprises varieties of applications, where some of these used in image processing include convolution, edge detection as well as contrast enhancement. This paper analyzes execution time optimization analysis between Sobel and Canny image processing algorithms in terms of moving objects edge detection. Sobel and Canny edge detection algorithms have been described with pseudo code and detailed flow chart and implemented in C and MATLAB respectively on different platforms to evaluate performance and execution time for moving cars. It is shown that Sobel algorithm is very effective in case of moving multiple cars and blurs images with efficient execution time. Moreover, convolution operation of Canny takes 94-95% time of total execution time with thin and smooth but redundant edges. This also makes more robust of Sobel to detect moving cars edges.

  7. Effect of walking on sand on gait kinematics in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Maayken E L; Barr, Christopher J; McLoughlin, James V; Crotty, Maria

    2017-08-01

    Walking in the real-world involves negotiating challenging or uneven surfaces, including sand. This can be challenging for people with Multiple Sclerosis (PWMS) due to motor deficits affecting the lower extremities. The study objective was to characterise kinematic gait adaptations made by PWMS when walking on sand and describe any immediate post-adaptation effects. 17 PWMS (mean age 51.4 ± 5.5, Disease Steps 2.4 ± 1.0), and 14 age-and gender matched healthy adults (HA) took part in a case-control study. 3D gait analysis was conducted using an eight-camera Vicon motion capture system. Each participant completed walking trials over level ground (baseline), sand (gait adaptation response), and again level ground (post-adaptation). Spatiotemporal data and kinematic data for the hip knee and ankle were recorded. At baseline PWMS showed significantly less total lower limb flexion (p<0.05) compared to HA. PWMS adapted to walking on sand by significantly increasing hip and knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion (p<0.05) during swing, resulting in an overall 23° greater total lower limb flexion (p<0.05), reaching values within normal range. During the return to level ground walking values of temporal-spatial and kinematic parameters returned towards baseline values. PWMS adapted to walking on sand by increasing lower limb flexion during swing, and returned to their gait pattern to near baseline levels, in a manner similar to but with values not equalling HA. Further work is required to determine whether this mode of walking has potential to act as a gait retraining strategy to increase flexion of the lower limb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffusivity in multiple sclerosis lesions: At the cutting edge?

    PubMed

    Klistorner, Alexander; Wang, Chenyu; Fofanova, Vera; Barnett, Michael H; Yiannikas, Con; Parratt, John; You, Yuyi; Graham, Stuart L

    2016-01-01

    Radial Diffusivity (RD) has been suggested as a promising biomarker associated with the level of myelination in MS lesions. However, the level of RD within the lesion is affected not only by loss of myelin sheaths, but also by the degree of tissue destruction. This may lead to exaggeration of diffusivity measures, potentially masking the effect of remyelination. To test the hypothesis that the T2 hyperintense lesion edge that extends beyond the T1 hypointense lesion core is less affected by tissue loss, and therefore a more appropriate target for imaging biomarker development targeting de- and re-myelination. Pre- and post-gadolinium (Gd) enhanced T1, T2 and DTI images were acquired from 75 consecutive RRMS patients. The optic radiation (OR) was identified in individual patients using a template-based method. T2 lesions were segmented into T1-hypointense and T1-isointense areas and lesion masks intersected with the OR. Average Radial, Axial and Mean diffusivity (RD, AD and MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated for lesions of the entire brain and the OR. In addition, Gd enhancing lesions were excluded from the analysis. 86% of chronic T2 lesions demonstrated hypointense areas on T1-weighted images, which typically occupied the central part of each T2 lesion, taking about 40% of lesional volume. The T1-isointense component of the T2 lesion was most commonly seen as a peripheral ring of relatively constant thickness ("T2-rim"). While changes of diffusivity between adjacent normal appearing white matter and the "T2-rim" demonstrated a disproportionally high elevation of RD compare to AD, the increase of water diffusion was largely isointense between the "T2-rim" and T1-hypointense parts of the lesion. Distinct patterns of diffusivity within the central and peripheral components of MS lesions suggest that axonal loss dominates in the T1 hypointense core. The effects of de/remyelination may be more readily detected in the "T2-rim", where there is relative

  9. Multiple kinematical populations in Vela OB2 from Gaia DR1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Prisinzano, L.; Jeffries, R. D.; Sacco, G. G.; Randich, S.; Micela, G.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Recent results using radial-velocity measurements from the Gaia-ESO Survey have led to the discovery of multiple kinematic populations across the Vela OB2 association. We present here a proper-motion study of the same region. Aims: Our aim is to test whether or not the radial-velocity populations have a counterpart in proper-motion space, and if so, how the two sets of kinematical data complement each other. Methods: This work is based on parallaxes and proper motions from the TGAS catalogue, as part of Gaia DR1. Results: Two distinct proper-motion populations are found dispersed across 5 degrees (or 30 pc at their likely distances). Their detailed correspondence to the radial-velocity populations could not be tested because of the paucity of common objects. However, compelling indications are found that one of the new proper-motion populations consists mostly of members of the young cluster NGC 2547, and the other is related to the γ2 Vel cluster. Constraints on the age of the two populations, both of which appear to be only 10-35 Myr old, and their possible mutual interactions within the last 1.5 Myr are discussed.

  10. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-05-04

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach.

  11. Multichannel surface EMG based estimation of bilateral hand kinematics during movements at multiple degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Muceli, Silvia; Jiang, Ning; Farina, Dario

    2010-01-01

    The paper proposes a method to estimate wrist kinematics from surface EMG signals for proportional and simultaneous control of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs). The approach is based on the concurrent detection of surface EMG signals from forearm muscles and hand kinematics of both limbs during mirrored bilateral movements in free space which involve the simultaneous activation of wrist flexion/extension, radial/ulnar deviation and forearm pronation/supination. The estimation was based on one multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for each DOF. The three MLPs were trained to estimate angular displacements corresponding to the three DOFs. The average coefficient of determination between the true and the predicted angular displacement was 82.7 ± 2.9% (80.9 ± 3.4%) for flexion/extension, 75.0 ± 3.8% (72.6 ± 9.4%) for radial/ulnar deviation, 76.6 ± 11.8% (75.1 ± 11.7%) for pronation/supination for the ipsi-lateral (contra-lateral) hand. The scheme represents a step forward towards the simultaneous control of DOFs and thus a more natural prosthetic control.

  12. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  13. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-07-13

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms.

  14. Areas influenced by multiple edges and their implications in fragmented landscapes

    Treesearch

    Qinglin Li; Jiquan Chen; Bo Song; Jacob L. LaCroix; Mary K. Breese; John A. Radmacher

    2007-01-01

    We introduced a new approach for delineating areas of multiple edge influence (AMEI) within a fragmented landscape using a geographic information system (GIS). AMEI was defined as the interface that is affected by more than two neighboring patch types. We decomposed AMEI into three components: AMEI1, the area where one patch type meets a different patch type; AMEI2,...

  15. Edge effects in graphene nanostructures: From multiple reflection expansion to density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurm, Jürgen; Richter, Klaus; Adagideli, Inanç

    2011-08-01

    We study the influence of different edge types on the electronic density of states of graphene nanostructures. To this end we develop an exact expansion for the single-particle Green’s function of ballistic graphene structures in terms of multiple reflections from the system boundary, which allows for a natural treatment of edge effects. We first apply this formalism to calculate the average density of states of graphene billiards. While the leading term in the corresponding Weyl expansion is proportional to the billiard area, we find that the contribution that usually scales with the total length of the system boundary differs significantly from what one finds in semiconductor-based, Schrödinger-type billiards: The latter term vanishes for armchair and infinite-mass edges and is proportional to the zigzag edge length, highlighting the prominent role of zigzag edges in graphene. We then compute analytical expressions for the density of states oscillations and energy levels within a trajectory-based semiclassical approach. We derive a Dirac version of Gutzwiller’s trace formula for classically chaotic graphene billiards and further obtain semiclassical trace formulas for the density of states oscillations in regular graphene cavities. We find that edge-dependent interference of pseudospins in graphene crucially affects the quantum spectrum.

  16. K-edge ratio method for identification of multiple nanoparticulate contrast agents by spectral CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, H; Ay, M R; Shiran, M B; Soltanian-Zadeh, H

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recently introduced energy-sensitive X-ray CT makes it feasible to discriminate different nanoparticulate contrast materials. The purpose of this work is to present a K-edge ratio method for differentiating multiple simultaneous contrast agents using spectral CT. Methods: The ratio of two images relevant to energy bins straddling the K-edge of the materials is calculated using an analytic CT simulator. In the resulting parametric map, the selected contrast agent regions can be identified using a thresholding algorithm. The K-edge ratio algorithm is applied to spectral images of simulated phantoms to identify and differentiate up to four simultaneous and targeted CT contrast agents. Results: We show that different combinations of simultaneous CT contrast agents can be identified by the proposed K-edge ratio method when energy-sensitive CT is used. In the K-edge parametric maps, the pixel values for biological tissues and contrast agents reach a maximum of 0.95, whereas for the selected contrast agents, the pixel values are larger than 1.10. The number of contrast agents that can be discriminated is limited owing to photon starvation. For reliable material discrimination, minimum photon counts corresponding to 140 kVp, 100 mAs and 5-mm slice thickness must be used. Conclusion: The proposed K-edge ratio method is a straightforward and fast method for identification and discrimination of multiple simultaneous CT contrast agents. Advances in knowledge: A new spectral CT-based algorithm is proposed which provides a new concept of molecular CT imaging by non-iteratively identifying multiple contrast agents when they are simultaneously targeting different organs. PMID:23934964

  17. Design and analysis of rotor systems with multiple trailing edge flaps and resonant actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    The purpose of this thesis is to develop piezoelectric resonant actuation systems and new active control methods utilizing the multiple trailing-edge flaps' configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control. An aeroelastic model is developed for a composite rotor blade with multiple trailing-edge flaps. The rotor blade airloads are calculated using quasi-steady blade element aerodynamics with a free wake model for rotor inflow. A compressible unsteady aerodynamics model is employed to accurately predict the incremental trailing edge flap airloads. Both the finite wing effect and actuator saturation for trailing-edge flaps are also included in an aeroelastic analysis. For a composite articulated rotor, a new active blade loads control method is developed and tested numerically. The concept involves straightening the blade by introducing dual trailing edge flaps. The objective function, which includes vibratory hub loads, bending moment harmonics and active flap control inputs, is minimized by an integrated optimal control/optimization process. A numerical simulation is performed for the steady-state forward flight of an advance ratio of 0.35. It is demonstrated that through straightening the rotor blade, which mimics the behavior of a rigid blade, both the bending moments and vibratory hub loads can be significantly reduced by 32% and 57%, respectively. An active vibration control method is developed and analyzed for a hingeless rotor. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant actuation system. Each resonant actuation system could yield high authority, while operating at a single frequency. Parametric studies are conducted to explore the finite wing effect of trailing-edge flaps and actuator saturation. A numerical simulation has been performed for the steady-state forward flight (mu = 0.15 ˜ 0.35). It is demonstrated that multiple trailing-edge flap configuration with the resonant actuation

  18. Excitonic localization at macrostep edges in AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Mengjun; Qin, Zhixin; Zhang, Lisheng; Han, Tianyang; Wang, Mingxing; Xu, Fujun; Wang, Xinqiang; Yu, Tongjun; Fang, Zheyu; Shen, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Double peaks at wavelength of 276 and 290 nm are observed for AlGaN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Cathodoluminescence (CL) mappings identify that the emission at 290 nm originates from the macrostep edges. Potential minima induced by local variation of QW thickness and Ga incorporation are found along the step edges, where quantum wires (QWRs) are formed. The lateral advance rate of macrostep (∼310 nm/h) is obtained by investigating the distribution of QWRs. Temperature-dependent CL spectrum suggest that thermal quenching for 290 nm emission is dramatically suppressed compared with that for conventional QWs emission, which shows excitonic localization characteristics of QWRs.

  19. Inaccuracy in the treatment of multiple-order diffraction by secondary-edge-source methods.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jason E

    2013-06-01

    Existing secondary-edge-source methods based on the Biot-Tolstoy solution for diffraction from an infinite wedge compute multiple-order diffraction by cascading the integration over secondary sources used to determine first-order diffraction from the edge. It is demonstrated here that this approach errs in some important cases because it neglects slope-diffraction contributions. This error is illustrated by considering the case of an infinite slit in a thin, hard screen. Comparisons with measurements for this case and analytical solutions for the case of a circular aperture in a thin, hard screen are used as a basis to gauge the magnitude of the error.

  20. A Study of Optical Edge Enhancement with Incoherent Light and Electronic Edge Enhancement as a Possible Visual Prothesis for Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this investigation is to study the effects of multiple sclerosis on the human visual system and perform a preliminary analysis for a...electronic edge enhancement. Multiple sclerosis subjects were tested along with a controlled group for visual acuity improvement. It is hoped this

  1. Representation of limb kinematics in Purkinje cell simple spike discharge is conserved across multiple tasks

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Angela L.; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Pasalar, Siavash; Hendrix, Claudia M.

    2011-01-01

    Encoding of movement kinematics in Purkinje cell simple spike discharge has important implications for hypotheses of cerebellar cortical function. Several outstanding questions remain regarding representation of these kinematic signals. It is uncertain whether kinematic encoding occurs in unpredictable, feedback-dependent tasks or kinematic signals are conserved across tasks. Additionally, there is a need to understand the signals encoded in the instantaneous discharge of single cells without averaging across trials or time. To address these questions, this study recorded Purkinje cell firing in monkeys trained to perform a manual random tracking task in addition to circular tracking and center-out reach. Random tracking provides for extensive coverage of kinematic workspaces. Direction and speed errors are significantly greater during random than circular tracking. Cross-correlation analyses comparing hand and target velocity profiles show that hand velocity lags target velocity during random tracking. Correlations between simple spike firing from 120 Purkinje cells and hand position, velocity, and speed were evaluated with linear regression models including a time constant, τ, as a measure of the firing lead/lag relative to the kinematic parameters. Across the population, velocity accounts for the majority of simple spike firing variability (63 ± 30% of Radj2), followed by position (28 ± 24% of Radj2) and speed (11 ± 19% of Radj2). Simple spike firing often leads hand kinematics. Comparison of regression models based on averaged vs. nonaveraged firing and kinematics reveals lower Radj2 values for nonaveraged data; however, regression coefficients and τ values are highly similar. Finally, for most cells, model coefficients generated from random tracking accurately estimate simple spike firing in either circular tracking or center-out reach. These findings imply that the cerebellum controls movement kinematics, consistent with a forward internal model that

  2. Distance statistics in quadrangulations with no multiple edges and the geometry of minbus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouttier, J.; Guitter, E.

    2010-05-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the distance-dependent two-point function for quadrangulations with no multiple edges. Various discrete observables measuring this two-point function are computed and analyzed in the limit of large maps. For large distances and in the scaling regime, we recover the same universal scaling function as for general quadrangulations. We then explore the geometry of §§lsquo§§§minimal neck baby universes§§rsquo§§§ (minbus), which are the outgrowths to be removed from a general quadrangulation to transform it into a quadrangulation with no multiple edges, the §§lsquo§§§mother universe§§rsquo§§§. We give a number of distance-dependent characterizations of minbus, such as the two-point function inside a minbu or the law for the distance from a random point to the mother universe.

  3. Band-edge absorption coefficients from photoluminescence in semiconductor multiple quantum wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kost, Alan; Zou, Yao; Dapkus, P. D.; Garmire, Elsa; Lee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    A novel approach to determining absorption coefficients in thin films using luminescence is described. The technique avoids many of the difficulties typically encountered in measurements of thin samples, Fabry-Perot effects, for example, and can be applied to a variety of materials. The absorption edge for GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structures, with quantum well widths ranging from 54 to 193 A is examined. Urbach (1953) parameters and excitonic linewidths are tabulated.

  4. POSSIBLE STELLAR STREAMS IN THE EDGE-ON SPIRAL NGC 891 DISCOVERED FROM KINEMATICS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Mendez, Roberto H. E-mail: mendez@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-12-10

    We have found 125 planetary nebulae (PNs) in NGC 891, using an [O III] {lambda}5007 on-band/off-band filter technique with the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) at the Cassegrain focus of the Subaru telescope, Mauna Kea. Radial velocities were measured for all detected sources, using a method of slitless spectroscopy which we briefly describe. The radial velocities allow us to study the motions of different stellar populations in NGC 891. The PN kinematics show rotation at large distances from the galactic plane. Of particular interest is the strong asymmetry of PN distribution at large height, which we interpret as two possible stellar streams that could be orbiting the galaxy at large angles to the main structure. These streams, if real, are probably remnants of a previous minor merging episode. This idea finds support in recent reports of clump-like, incompletely mixed structures from deep HST/ACS images of this galaxy.

  5. Medium to Long Range Kinematic GPS Positioning with Position-Velocity-Acceleration Model Using Multiple Reference Stations

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Park, Chi Ho; Han, Joong-hee; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain precise kinematic global positioning systems (GPS) in medium to large scale networks, the atmospheric effects from tropospheric and ionospheric delays need to be properly modeled and estimated. It is also preferable to use multiple reference stations to improve the reliability of the solutions. In this study, GPS kinematic positioning algorithms are developed for the medium to large-scale network based on the position-velocity-acceleration model. Hence, the algorithm can perform even in cases where the near-constant velocity assumption does not hold. In addition, the estimated kinematic accelerations can be used for the airborne gravimetry. The proposed algorithms are implemented using Kalman filter and are applied to the in situ airborne GPS data. The performance of the proposed algorithms is validated by analyzing and comparing the results with those from reference values. The results show that reliable and comparable solutions in both position and kinematic acceleration levels can be obtained using the proposed algorithms. PMID:26184215

  6. Development of a kinematic 3D carpal model to analyze in vivo soft-tissue interaction across multiple static postures.

    PubMed

    Marai, G; Crisco, Joseph J; Laidlaw, David H

    2009-01-01

    We developed a subject-specific kinematic model to analyze in vivo soft-tissue interaction in the carpus in static, unloaded postures. The bone geometry was extracted from a reference computed tomography volume image. The soft-tissue geometry, including cartilage and ligament tissues, was computationally modeled based on kinematic constraints; the constraints were extracted from multiple computed tomography scans corresponding to different carpal postures. The data collected in vivo was next coupled with numerical simulation in order to analyze the role of soft-tissues in different postures. The resulting model extends the state of biomechanical modeling by incorporating soft-tissue constraints across the carpus range of motion, while successfully using only physiological constraints. The model results suggest that soft-tissue wrapping constraints have substantial impact on carpus stability.

  7. Multiple leading edge vortices of unexpected strength in freely flying hawkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Engel, Sophia; Kelber, Almut; Heerenbrink, Marco Klein; Hedenström, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The Leading Edge Vortex (LEV) is a universal mechanism enhancing lift in flying organisms. LEVs, generally illustrated as a single vortex attached to the wing throughout the downstroke, have not been studied quantitatively in freely flying insects. Previous findings are either qualitative or from flappers and tethered insects. We measure the flow above the wing of freely flying hawkmoths and find multiple simultaneous LEVs of varying strength and structure along the wingspan. At the inner wing there is a single, attached LEV, while at mid wing there are multiple LEVs, and towards the wingtip flow separates. At mid wing the LEV circulation is ~40% higher than in the wake, implying that the circulation unrelated to the LEV may reduce lift. The strong and complex LEV suggests relatively high flight power in hawmoths. The variable LEV structure may result in variable force production, influencing flight control in the animals. PMID:24253180

  8. Singular Values of Products of Ginibre Random Matrices, Multiple Orthogonal Polynomials and Hard Edge Scaling Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, Arno B. J.; Zhang, Lun

    2014-12-01

    Akemann, Ipsen and Kieburg recently showed that the squared singular values of products of M rectangular random matrices with independent complex Gaussian entries are distributed according to a determinantal point process with a correlation kernel that can be expressed in terms of Meijer G-functions. We show that this point process can be interpreted as a multiple orthogonal polynomial ensemble. We give integral representations for the relevant multiple orthogonal polynomials and a new double contour integral for the correlation kernel, which allows us to find its scaling limits at the origin (hard edge). The limiting kernels generalize the classical Bessel kernels. For M = 2 they coincide with the scaling limits found by Bertola, Gekhtman, and Szmigielski in the Cauchy-Laguerre two-matrix model, which indicates that these kernels represent a new universality class in random matrix theory.

  9. Exploring the alpha cluster structure of nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematics technique for multiple alpha decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Natowitz, J. B.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Wuenschel, S.; Liu, X.

    2014-03-01

    We explored alpha clustering in 24Mg using the reaction 20Ne+α and the Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique. 20Ne beams of energy 3.7 AMeV and 11 AMeV were delivered by the K150 cyclotron at Texas A&M University. The reaction chamber was filled with 4He gas at a pressure sufficient to stop the beam before the detectors. The energy of the light reaction products was measured by three silicon detector telescopes. The time relative to the cyclotron radiofrequency was also measured. For the first time the TTIK method was used to study both single and multiple α-particle decays. New results were obtained on elastic resonant α scattering, as well as on inelastic processes leading to high excitation energy systems decaying by multiple α-particle emission. Preliminary results will be shown on events with α-multiplicity one and two.

  10. Edge-to-Edge Technique to Minimize Ovelapping of Multiple Bioresorbable Scaffolds Plus Drug Eluting Stents in Revascularization of Long Diffuse Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rigatelli, Gianluca; Avvocata, Fabio Dell'; Ronco, Federico; Giordan, Massimo; Roncon, Loris; Caprioglio, Francesco; Grassi, Giuseppe; Faggian, Giuseppe; Cardaioli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    Implantation of Drug Eluting Stents (DES) plus bioresorbable scaffolds (BVS) in very long diffuse left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) disease may be problematic because of multiple devices overlapping. We sought to assess the short and mid-tern outcomes of combined implantation of DES and BVS using a novel "edge-to-edge" technique in patients with diffuse LAD disease. Patients with long diffuse LAD disease were enrolled in a prospective registry from 1st August 2014 to 1st August 2015 and treated with IVUS-aided percutaneous coronary intervention using a DES plus a single or multiple BVS using a novel "edge-to-edge" technique. Clinical follow up and invasive follow up driven by clinical justification was performed. Twenty-three patients (5 females, mean age 59.1± 9.1 years) were enrolled. Mean length of LAD disease was 73.1 ± 20.6 mm. Mean number of DES and BVS implanted was 1.2 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 1.3, respectively. At a mean follow-up of 11.3 ± 3.8 months, no stent thrombosis or MACE were observed. Angiographic and IVUS follow-up at a mean of 6.6 ± 0.7 months showed no significant angiographic restenosis and no appreciable stent gaps. In revascularization of long diffuse disease of the LAD, the edge-to-edge implantation technique appears to be feasible resulting in no restenosis or thrombosis on the short-term follow-up. (J Interven Cardiol 2016;29:275-284). © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of line-edge roughness on multiple-gate tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo Young

    2017-04-01

    The influence of fin-line-edge roughness (fin-LER) and gate-LER on multiple-gate (MG) tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) has been investigated compared with MG MOSFETs by using full three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation. From simulation results, two interesting results have been observed. First, MG TFETs show much less severe gate-LER than MG MOSFETs, which means that only fin-LER can be considered when evaluating the total LER of MG TFETs. Second, TFETs show ∼3× more LER improvement than MOSFETs when their structures are changed from double-gate (DG) to triple-gate (TG) ones. Our findings provide the useful design guidelines of variation-tolerant TFETs.

  12. Response of an orthotropic half-plane subjected to transient anti-plane loading with multiple edge cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayatollahi, M.

    2017-05-01

    This study deals with the problem of multiple edge cracks in an elastic orthotropic half-plane under transient loading. The dislocation solution is utilized to derive integral equations for multiple interacting edge cracks in an orthotropic half-plane. These equations are solved numerically thereby obtaining the dislocation density function on the crack faces and stress intensity factors at crack tips. Numerical results are obtained to illustrate the variation of the dynamic stress intensity factors as a function of crack length and material properties.

  13. Finite element analysis of head-neck kinematics during motor vehicle accidents: analysis in multiple planes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ee Chon; Zhang, Qing Hang; Huang, Russel C

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a detailed three-dimensional head-neck (C0-C7) finite element (FE) model developed previously based on the actual geometry of a human cadaver specimen was used. Five simulation analyses were performed to investigate the kinematic responses of the head-neck complex under rear-end, front, side, rear- and front-side impacts. Under rear-end and front impacts, it was predicted that the global and intervertebral rotations of the head-neck in the sagittal plane displayed nearly symmetric curvatures about the frontal plane. The primary sagittal rotational angles of the neck under direct front and rear-end impact conditions were higher than the primary frontal rotational angles under other side impact conditions. The analysis predicted early S-shaped and subsequent C-shaped curvatures of the head-neck complex in the sagittal plane under front and rear-end impact, and in the frontal plane under side impact. The head-neck complex flexed laterally in one direction with peak magnitude of larger than 22 degrees and a duration of about 130 ms before flexing in the opposite direction under both side and rear-side impact, compared to the corresponding values of about 15 degrees and 105 ms under front-side impact. The C0-C7 FE model has reasonably predicted the effects of impact direction in the primary sagittal and frontal segmental motion and curvatures of the head-neck complex under various impact conditions.

  14. Multiple deformation at the western edge of the Carolina slate belt, north-central North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbard, J.P.; Shell, G.S.; Wilkins, J.K. ); Samson, S.; Wortman, G. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    In north-central North Carolina, volcanic-plutonic rocks of the Carolina slate belt are separated from gneisses of the Milton belt to the west by a wide, ENE-trending, polygenetic structural zone. Within a portion of this zone, the Country Line Creek complex (CLCC) forms the western edge of the slate belt. Rocks of the CLCC span a wide age range and include mafic and granitoid gneisses with subordinate pelitic schist, granitoid pegmatite, and a concordant sheet-like intrusion, the Yanceyville metagranite. The complex is heterogeneously deformed and metamorphosed. Along the SE margin of the structural zone, steeply-dipping, strongly foliated biotite granitoid and mafic gneisses of the complex appear to be intruded by the Roxboro metagranite of the Carolina slate belt. To the NW, in more interior portions of the zone, the CLCC is affected by multiphase foliations and folds that record a dextral oblique normal shear event. Here, the Yanceyville metagranite is affected by a strong foliation that is folded. A preliminary new date on the Roxboro pluton of ca. 545 Ma, indicates a Late Precambrian or older timing of deformation along the SE margin of the zone. In contrast, a preliminary, ca. 340 Ma, age on the Yanceyville metagranite indicates multiple stage Late Paleozoic deformation for interior portions of the zone. Regional structural and isotopic data hint that the Precambrian deformation may record initial interactions between the Milton and Carolina slate belts. Subsequently, this contact was reactivated during Alleghanian orogenesis.

  15. Kinematic reduction of reaction-diffusion fronts with multiplicative noise: derivation of stochastic sharp-interface equations.

    PubMed

    Rocco, A; Ramírez-Piscina, L; Casademunt, J

    2002-05-01

    We study the dynamics of generic reaction-diffusion fronts, including pulses and chemical waves, in the presence of multiplicative noise. We discuss the connection between the reaction-diffusion Langevin-like field equations and the kinematic (eikonal) description in terms of a stochastic moving-boundary or sharp-interface approximation. We find that the effective noise is additive and we relate its strength to the noise parameters in the original field equations, to first order in noise strength, but including a partial resummation to all orders which captures the singular dependence on the microscopic cutoff associated with the spatial correlation of the noise. This dependence is essential for a quantitative and qualitative understanding of fluctuating fronts, affecting both scaling properties and nonuniversal quantities. Our results predict phenomena such as the shift of the transition point between the pushed and pulled regimes of front propagation, in terms of the noise parameters, and the corresponding transition to a non-Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class. We assess the quantitative validity of the results in several examples including equilibrium fluctuations and kinetic roughening. We also predict and observe a noise-induced pushed-pulled transition. The analytical predictions are successfully tested against rigorous results and show excellent agreement with numerical simulations of reaction-diffusion field equations with multiplicative noise.

  16. Exploring clustering in alpha-conjugate nuclei using the thick target inverse kinematic technique for multiple alpha emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbui, M.; Hagel, K.; Gauthier, J.; Wuenschel, S.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Zheng, H.; Giuliani, G.; Rapisarda, G.; Kim, E.-J.; Liu, X.; Natowitz, J. B.; Desouza, R. T.; Hudan, S.; Fang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Searching for alpha cluster states analogous to the 12C Hoyle state in heavier alpha-conjugate nuclei can provide tests of the existence of alpha condensates in nuclear matter. Such states are predicted for 16O, 20Ne, 24Mg, etc. at excitation energies slightly above the decay threshold. The Thick Target Inverse Kinematics (TTIK) technique can be successfully used to study the breakup of excited self-conjugate nuclei into many alpha particles. The reaction 20Ne + α at 11 and 13 AMeV was studied at Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. Here the TTIK method was used to study both single α-particle emission and multiple α-particle decays. Due to the limited statistics, only events with alpha multiplicity up to three were analyzed. The analysis of the three α-particle emission data allowed the identification of the Hoyle state and other 12C excited states decaying into three alpha particles. The results will be shown and compared with other data available in the literature. Another experiment is planned in August 2015 to study the system 28Si + α at 15 AMeV. Preliminary results will be shown. Supported by the U.S. DOE and the Robert A. Welch Foundation, Grant No. A0330.

  17. Continued Kinematic and Photometric Investigations of Hierarchical Solar-type Multiple Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Mason, Brian D.; Marinan, Anne D.

    2017-03-01

    We observed 15 of the solar-type binaries within 67 pc of the Sun previously observed by the Robo-AO system in the visible, with the PHARO near-infrared camera and the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system on the 5 m Hale telescope. The physical status of the binaries is confirmed through common proper motion and detection of orbital motion. In the process, we detected a new candidate companion to HIP 95309. We also resolved the primary of HIP 110626 into a close binary, making that system a triple. These detections increase the completeness of the multiplicity survey of the solar-type stars within 67 pc of the Sun. Combining our observations of HIP 103455 with archival astrometric measurements and RV measurements, we are able to compute the first orbit of HIP 103455, showing that the binary has a 68 year period. We place the components on a color–magnitude diagram and discuss each multiple system individually.

  18. Multiple-scattering calculations of the uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Rehr, J.J.; Bucher, J.J.

    1995-11-15

    A theoretical study of the uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) is presented for several uranium compounds, including oxides, intermetallics, uranyl fluoride, and {alpha}-uranium. Calculations were performed using FEFF6, an {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code that includes the most important features of current theories. The results, which account for both the fine structure {chi} and the atomiclike background {mu}{sub 0} of the absorption coefficient {mu}, are compared to new and previously measured experimental spectra, reavealing very good agreement for most systems. For several compounds, a more detailed theoretical analysis determined the influence of cluster size and scattering order upon the calculated spectra. Results indicate that MS paths and scattering paths that include rather distant atoms make significant contributions for UO{sub 2}, whereas XANES for crystals with lower symmetry and density can be modeled using only shorter single-scattering paths. In most cases, assumption of a screened final state in the calculation gives better agreement with experiment than use of an unscreened final state. The successful modeling of spectra for a variety of different uranium compounds, with differing spectral features, indicates that the semirelativistic treatment of XANES used here is adequate even for heavy elements. The well-known resonance, observed experimentally for uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) compounds {approx}15 eV above the white line, is successfully modeled here for the first time, using multiple-scattering paths within the O-U-O axial bonds. Overlapping muffin-tin spheres were required in the calculation, probably as a result of the short uranyl axial bonds.

  19. Structure determination by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) at the Pr L III edge

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Sandra; Hellmig, Michael; Liu, Sunbin; Weiss, Manfred S.; Wahl, Markus C.; Mueller, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The use of longer X-ray wavelengths in macromolecular crystallography has grown significantly over the past few years. The main reason for this increased use of longer wavelengths has been to utilize the anomalous signal from sulfur, providing a means for the experimental phasing of native proteins. Here, another possible application of longer X-ray wavelengths is presented: MAD at the L III edges of various lanthanide compounds. A first experiment at the L III edge of Pr was conducted on HZB MX beamline BL14.2 and resulted in the successful structure determination of the C-terminal domain of a spliceosomal protein. This experiment demonstrates that L III edges of lanthanides constitute potentially attractive targets for long-wavelength MAD experiments. PMID:22869138

  20. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Funsten, Herbert O.

    2016-11-05

    Here in this paper, we present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.

  1. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J.-C.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.

    2016-11-01

    We present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiple noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.

  2. Hydrated structure of Ag(I) ion from symmetry-dependent, K- and L-edge XAFS multiple scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Fulton, John L; Kathmann, Shawn M; Schenter, Gregory K; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam

    2009-12-17

    Details of the first-shell water structure about Ag(+) are reported from a corefinement of the K- and L(2)-edge multiple scattering signal in the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Detailed fits of the Ag K-edge data that include the contributions from multiple scattering processes in the hydrated ion structure cannot distinguish between models containing tetrahedral symmetry versus those containing collinear O-Ag-O bonds. However, we show that the multiple scattering oscillations at the L(2)-edges have distinctly different phase and amplitude functions than at the K-edge. These phase and amplitude functions depend not only on the symmetry of the multiple scattering paths but also on the nature of the final state electronic wave function probed by the dipole-allowed transition. Hence the multiple scattering portions of K- and L(2)-edge spectra provide independent measurements of the local symmetry--not a redundant measurement as is commonly believed. On the basis of the enhanced information content obtained by the simultaneous assessment of both the K- and L(2)-edges, we report that the hydrated Ag(+) structure contains five or six water molecules in the first shell with a significant number of nearly collinear and 90 degrees O-Ag-O bond angles. Finally, the K- and L(2)-edge spectra are used to benchmark the hydration structure that is generated from both DFT-based and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Simulated first-shell structures are compared to the experimental structures.

  3. Drift paths of ions composing multiple-nose spectral structures near the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    DOE PAGES

    Ferradas, C. P.; Zhang, J. -C.; Spence, H. E.; ...

    2016-11-05

    Here in this paper, we present a case study of the H+, He+, and O+ multiple-nose structures observed by the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument on board Van Allen Probe A over one complete orbit on 28 September 2013. Nose structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. We find that the multiple noses are intrinsically associated with variations in the solar wind. Backward ion drift path tracings show new details of the drift trajectories of these ions; i.e., multiplemore » noses are formed by ions with a short drift time from the assumed source location to the inner region and whose trajectories (1) encircle the Earth different number of times or (2) encircle the Earth equal number of times but with different drift time, before reaching the observation site.« less

  4. Multiple pre-edge structures in Cu K -edge x-ray absorption spectra of high- Tc cuprates revealed by high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougoussis, C.; Rueff, J.-P.; Calandra, M.; D'Astuto, M.; Jarrige, I.; Ishii, H.; Shukla, A.; Yamada, I.; Azuma, M.; Takano, M.

    2010-06-01

    Using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy and state-of-the-art electronic structure calculations we demonstrate that the pre-edge region at the Cu K edge of high- Tc cuprates is composed of several excitations invisible in standard x-ray absorption spectra. We consider in detail the case of Ca2-xCuO2Cl2 and show that the many pre-edge excitations (two for c -axis polarization, four for in-plane polarization and out-of-plane incident x-ray momentum) are dominated by off-site transitions and intersite hybridization. This demonstrates the relevance of approaches beyond the single-site model for the description of the pre edges of correlated materials. Finally, we show the occurrence of a doubling of the main edge peak that is most visible when the polarization is along the c axis. This doubling, that has not been seen in any previous absorption data in cuprates, is not reproduced by first-principles calculations. We suggest that this peak is due to many-body charge-transfer excitations while all the other visible far-edge structures are single particle in origin. Our work indicates that previous interpretations of the Cu K -edge x-ray absorption spectra in high- Tc cuprates can be profitably reconsidered.

  5. Unconfined, melt edge electrospinning from multiple, spontaneous, self-organized polymer jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Curtis, Colin K.; Muthuraman Thoppey, Nagarajan; Bochinski, Jason R.; Gorga, Russell E.; Clarke, Laura I.

    2014-12-01

    Commercial grade polyethylene is melt electrospun from a thin film of unconfined molten polymer on a heated, electrically-grounded plate. Under the influence of an applied electric field, the melt spontaneously forms fingering perturbations at the plate edge which then evolve into emitting fiber-forming jets. Jet-to-jet spacing (˜5 mm), which is dependent on the applied voltage amplitude, is in agreement with estimates from a simple theoretical treatment. The broad applicability of the approach is verified by spinning a second polymer—polycaprolactone. In both cases, the fabricated fibers are similar in quality to those obtained under needle melt electrospinning; however for this method, there are no nozzles to clog and an enhanced production rate up to 80 mg min-1 is achieved from approximately 20-25 simultaneous parallel jets. The process of jet formation, effective flow rates, cone-jet diameters, as well as limits on jet density and differences with polymer type are compared with theoretical models. This particular approach allows facile, high throughput micro- and nano-fiber formation from a wide variety of thermoplastics and other high viscosity fluids without the use of solvents or the persistent issues of clogging and pumping that hamper traditional methods, resulting in mechanically strong meso-scale fibers highly desirable for industrial applications.

  6. Diagnosis and management of smoldering multiple myeloma: the razor's edge between clonality and cancer.

    PubMed

    Muchtar, Eli; Kumar, Shaji K; Magen, Hila; Gertz, Morie A

    2018-02-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is a rare plasma cell disorder, and as the disease is asymptomatic, diagnosis is often incidental. SMM is characterized by increased marrow infiltration by clonal plasma cells and/or elevated serum M-protein in the absence of a myeloma-defining event (MDE). In recent years, SMM has gained increased attention owing to a broadening of the criteria for MDE, which include apart from the CRAB criteria, three additional parameters. Survival advantage may be offered by early treatment in the high-risk subset, based on a single trial. In this review, we assess the risk factors and models for progression to multiple myeloma. A review of our diagnostic and management approaches to SMM is presented.

  7. Historical comparisons reveal multiple drivers of decadal change of an ecosystem engineer at the range edge.

    PubMed

    Firth, Louise B; Mieszkowska, Nova; Grant, Lisa M; Bush, Laura E; Davies, Andrew J; Frost, Matthew T; Moschella, Paula S; Burrows, Michael T; Cunningham, Paul N; Dye, Stephen R; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    Biogenic reefs are important for habitat provision and coastal protection. Long-term datasets on the distribution and abundance of Sabellaria alveolata (L.) are available from Britain. The aim of this study was to combine historical records and contemporary data to (1) describe spatiotemporal variation in winter temperatures, (2) document short-term and long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of S. alveolata and discuss these changes in relation to extreme weather events and recent warming, and (3) assess the potential for artificial coastal defense structures to function as habitat for S. alveolata. A semi-quantitative abundance scale (ACFOR) was used to compare broadscale, long-term and interannual abundance of S. alveolata near its range edge in NW Britain. S. alveolata disappeared from the North Wales and Wirral coastlines where it had been abundant prior to the cold winter of 1962/1963. Population declines were also observed following the recent cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Extensive surveys in 2004 and 2012 revealed that S. alveolata had recolonized locations from which it had previously disappeared. Furthermore, it had increased in abundance at many locations, possibly in response to recent warming. S. alveolata was recorded on the majority of artificial coastal defense structures surveyed, suggesting that the proliferation of artificial coastal defense structures along this stretch of coastline may have enabled S. alveolata to spread across stretches of unsuitable natural habitat. Long-term and broadscale contextual monitoring is essential for monitoring responses of organisms to climate change. Historical data and gray literature can be invaluable sources of information. Our results support the theory that Lusitanian species are responding positively to climate warming but also that short-term extreme weather events can have potentially devastating widespread and lasting effects on organisms. Furthermore, the proliferation of

  8. Historical comparisons reveal multiple drivers of decadal change of an ecosystem engineer at the range edge

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Louise B; Mieszkowska, Nova; Grant, Lisa M; Bush, Laura E; Davies, Andrew J; Frost, Matthew T; Moschella, Paula S; Burrows, Michael T; Cunningham, Paul N; Dye, Stephen R; Hawkins, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic reefs are important for habitat provision and coastal protection. Long-term datasets on the distribution and abundance of Sabellaria alveolata (L.) are available from Britain. The aim of this study was to combine historical records and contemporary data to (1) describe spatiotemporal variation in winter temperatures, (2) document short-term and long-term changes in the distribution and abundance of S. alveolata and discuss these changes in relation to extreme weather events and recent warming, and (3) assess the potential for artificial coastal defense structures to function as habitat for S. alveolata. A semi-quantitative abundance scale (ACFOR) was used to compare broadscale, long-term and interannual abundance of S. alveolata near its range edge in NW Britain. S. alveolata disappeared from the North Wales and Wirral coastlines where it had been abundant prior to the cold winter of 1962/1963. Population declines were also observed following the recent cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Extensive surveys in 2004 and 2012 revealed that S. alveolata had recolonized locations from which it had previously disappeared. Furthermore, it had increased in abundance at many locations, possibly in response to recent warming. S. alveolata was recorded on the majority of artificial coastal defense structures surveyed, suggesting that the proliferation of artificial coastal defense structures along this stretch of coastline may have enabled S. alveolata to spread across stretches of unsuitable natural habitat. Long-term and broadscale contextual monitoring is essential for monitoring responses of organisms to climate change. Historical data and gray literature can be invaluable sources of information. Our results support the theory that Lusitanian species are responding positively to climate warming but also that short-term extreme weather events can have potentially devastating widespread and lasting effects on organisms. Furthermore, the proliferation of

  9. THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE UV LEGACY SURVEY OF GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: THE INTERNAL KINEMATICS OF THE MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN NGC 2808

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, A.; Anderson, J.; Marel, R. P. van der; Vesperini, E.; Hong, J.; Piotto, G.; Milone, A. P.; Marino, A. F.; Bedin, L. R.; Renzini, A.; Cassisi, S.; D’Antona, F.

    2015-09-01

    Numerous observational studies have revealed the ubiquitous presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters and cast many difficult challenges for the study of the formation and dynamical history of these stellar systems. In this Letter we present the results of a study of the kinematic properties of multiple populations in NGC 2808 based on high-precision Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements. In a recent study, Milone et al. identified five distinct populations (A–E) in NGC 2808. Populations D and E coincide with the helium-enhanced populations in the middle and the blue main sequences (mMS and bMS) previously discovered by Piotto et al.; populations A–C correspond to the redder main sequence that, in Piotto et al., was associated with the primordial stellar population. Our analysis shows that, in the outermost regions probed (between about 1.5 and 2 times the cluster half-light radius), the velocity distribution of populations D and E is radially anisotropic (the deviation from an isotropic distribution is significant at the ∼3.5σ level). Stars of populations D and E have a smaller tangential velocity dispersion than those of populations A–C, while no significant differences are found in the radial velocity dispersion. We present the results of a numerical simulation showing that the observed differences between the kinematics of these stellar populations are consistent with the expected kinematic fingerprint of the diffusion toward the cluster outer regions of stellar populations initially more centrally concentrated.

  10. Multi-long-slit Spectroscopy For Kinematic Studies. II. Initial Results For The Edge-on Galaxies NGC891 And NGC4244

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiehae; Cisneros, S.; Wu, C.; Patterson, M.; Walterbos, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present results of observations of the edge-on galaxies NGC891 and NGC4244 using a multi-long-slit setup on the DIS spectrograph on the ARC 3.5m telescope. In combination with a 25A H-alpha filter, 16 slits of 2" by 4.5' could be observed simultaneously over a 4' by 4.5' field of view. The spectral resolution is 4 Anstrom. In the case of NGC891 we have obtained a deep spectrum of the Northern half of the halo, while for NGC4244 we obtained spectra with the slits oriented parallel to the major axis and a second exposure with the slits perpendicular to the major axis. In the case of NGC 891, the data were obtained to test the accuracy of our velocity measurements by comparison with previous observations, although we also do expand on the spatial coverage of ionized gas in the halo. For NGC4244, deep optical imaging has not shown a very extended diffuse ionized gas halo, and here our goal is to use the spectroscopic data to improve upon the limits set in the imaging studies. We present the results of these tests and discuss other implementations of the multi-long-slit setup. One of these is the possibility to perform deep spectroscopic searches for detection of ionized gas in galaxy halos through use of up to 45 slits when using a lower resolution grating. This research was supported by an award from Research Corporation.

  11. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  12. Use of L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize multiple valence states of 3 d transition metals; a new probe for mineralogical and geochemical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressey, G.; Henderson, C. M. B.; van der Laan, G.

    1993-07-01

    2 p ( L 2,3) X-ray absorption spectra are presented for a range of minerals to demonstrate the usefulness of L-edge spectroscopy as a symmetry- and valenceselective probe. 2 p XAS provides a sensitive fingerprint of the electronic states of 3 d transition metals and can be applied to phases containing mixtures of such elements. Calculated spectra for 3 d n → 2 p 5 3 d n+1 transitions provide a basis for the interpretation of the measured spectra. Thus, in principle, multiple valence states of a particular 3 d metal can be precisely characterized from a single L-edge spectrum. Examples of vanadium L-edge spectra are presented for a range of minerals; these complex spectra hold information concerning the presence of vanadium in multiple valence states. The Cu L-edge spectrum of sulvanite (Cu3 VS4) indicates the presence of both Cu+ and Cu2+; the V L-edge spectrum of the same sample shows that both V2+ and V5+ are present. Spectral simulations representing mixtures of Fe d 5 and Fe d 6 states are used to quantify Fe3+/ ∑Fe in a spinel, a glass, and an amphibole, all of which contain Fe as a major component. To illustrate the sensitivity of 2 p XAS in a dilute system, the Fe L-edge spectrum of amethyst ( α-SiO2: Fe) has been recorded; this spectrum shows that ˜68% of the Fe in amethyst is Fe2+, and ˜32% is Fe3+. Although previous studies on amethyst using other spectroscopic methods cite evidence for Fe4+, there is no indication in the L-edge spectrum for Fe4+ in amethyst. Comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra not only allows the valence states of 3 d ions to be recognised, but also provides site-symmetry information and crystal field parameters for each ion site.

  13. Experimental evidence of transition between dynamical and kinematical diffraction regimes in ion-implanted Si observed through X-ray multiple-beam diffraction mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calligaris, Guilherme A.; Lang, Rossano; Bettini, Jefferson; dos Santos, Adenilson O.; Cardoso, Lisandro P.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the dependence of a Laue diffraction streak on the crystalline perfection of Xe-implanted Si(001) substrates is presented, based on the observation in the X-ray multiple diffraction (XRMD) mappings, as an experimental evidence of the transition between dynamical and kinematical diffraction regimes. A direct observation of the implanted region by transmission electron microscopy revealed an amorphous Si layer, which recrystallizes into a heavily twinned and faulted microstructure after thermal treatment at 800 °C. Besides the lattice damages, the annealing induces the formation of Xe bubbles. Both singularly affect the XRMD pattern, primarily the four-fold streaks profile of the ( 000 ) ( 002 ) ( 1 1 ¯ 1 ¯ ) ( 1 1 ¯ 3 ) four-beam simultaneous case when compared with the pristine Si pattern, highlighting the intra- and inter-block diffractions and the role played by the primary extinction effect. Such features provide information on the dominant diffraction regime. The findings are also discussed and compared to the conventional reciprocal space mappings via the asymmetric Si(113) reflection.

  14. Validation and Structural Analysis of the Kinematics Concept Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, A.; Wagner, C.; Hofer, S. I.; Stem, E.; Vaterlaus, A.

    2017-01-01

    The kinematics concept test (KCT) is a multiple-choice test designed to evaluate students' conceptual understanding of kinematics at the high school level. The test comprises 49 multiple-choice items about velocity and acceleration, which are based on seven kinematic concepts and which make use of three different representations. In the first part…

  15. Experimental studies of ion flow near the sheath edge in multiple ion species plasma including argon, xenon and neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severn, Greg; Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-05-01

    The Bohm sheath criterion was studied with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in three ion species plasmas using two tunable diode lasers. It was found in the first LIF studies of three ion species plasma (Yip et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 050703) in which krypton was added to a mixture of argon and xenon plasma confined in a multidipole, dc hot filament discharge, that the addition of krypton served to turn off instability enhanced collisional friction (IEF) found in two ion species plasma (Yip et al 2010 Phys. Plasmas). In this study, neon, a less massive atomic gas than argon was added. Argon and xenon ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) were measured at the sheath-presheath boundary near a negatively biased boundary plate, and the Ne+ density was systematically increased. We found in both cases that once the added ion density significantly exceeded the density of the other two ions, IVDF measurements consistent with the absence of the instability were obtained, and the measured ion sheath edge speeds tended toward their individual Bohm velocities. For all other relative concentrations, the ions reached the sheath edge neither at their Bohm speeds nor the ion sound speed of the system, consistent, qualitatively, with the action of the IEF.

  16. Robust design of multiple trailing edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction: A multi-objective bat algorithm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Rajnish; Ganguli, Ranjan; Seetharama Bhat, M.

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine an optimal trailing edge flap configuration and flap location to achieve minimum hub vibration levels and flap actuation power simultaneously. An aeroelastic analysis of a soft in-plane four-bladed rotor is performed in conjunction with optimal control. A second-order polynomial response surface based on an orthogonal array (OA) with 3-level design describes both the objectives adequately. Two new orthogonal arrays called MGB2P-OA and MGB4P-OA are proposed to generate nonlinear response surfaces with all interaction terms for two and four parameters, respectively. A multi-objective bat algorithm (MOBA) approach is used to obtain the optimal design point for the mutually conflicting objectives. MOBA is a recently developed nature-inspired metaheuristic optimization algorithm that is based on the echolocation behaviour of bats. It is found that MOBA inspired Pareto optimal trailing edge flap design reduces vibration levels by 73% and flap actuation power by 27% in comparison with the baseline design.

  17. Edge-based lightweight image encryption using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yushu; Xiao, Di; Wen, Wenying; Tian, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    In some special multimedia applications, only the regions with semantic information should be provided better protection whereas the other smooth regions can be free of encryption. However, most of the existing multimedia security schemes only consider bits and pixels rather than semantic information during their encryption. Motivated by this, we propose an edge-based lightweight image encryption scheme using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform. An image is first carried out by the edge detection based on advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to assess data significance in the image. The detection output is a binary image, in which a “1” reflects the detected pixel whereas a “0” is opposite. Both the detected image and the original image are divided into non-overlapping pixel blocks in the same way, respectively. Whether each block is encrypted or not depends on the significance judged by the corresponding detected block. The significant block is performed by reversible hidden transform followed by multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform parameters and orders of these two transforms are determined by a two dimensional cross chaotic map. Experiment results show the significant contour features of an image that have been largely hidden only by encrypting about half pixels in the average sense. The keys are extremely sensitive and the proposed scheme can resist noise attack to some extent.

  18. An application of the edge effect in measuring accessibility to multiple food retailer types in Southwestern Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trends in food retailing associated with the consolidation of smaller-format retailers into fewer, larger-format supercentres have left some rural areas with fewer sources of nutritious, affordable food. Access to nutritious, affordable food is essential for good dietary habits and combating health issues such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Many studies on food environments use inaccurate or incomplete methods for locating food retailers, which may be responsible for mischaracterising food deserts. This study uses databases of every residence in and every food retailer in and around Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada. Residences were geocoded to their precise address, and network analysis techniques were performed in a geographic information system (GIS) to determine distances between every residence and different types of food retailers (grocery stores, fast food, fruit and vegetable sources, grocery stores plus fruit and vegetable sources, variety stores), both when considering and neglecting facilities outside the area of study, to account for a deficiency in analysis termed the 'edge effect'. Results Analysis of household accessibility to food outlets by neighbourhood socioeconomic distress level indicated that residents in the most distressed neighbourhoods tended to have better accessibility to all types of food retailers. In the most distressed neighbourhoods, 79 percent of residences were within walking distance of a grocery store, compared to only 10 percent in the least distressed neighbourhoods. When the edge effect was neglected, 37 percent of distance estimates proved inaccurate. Average accessibility to all food retailer types improved dramatically when food outlets adjacent to the study area were considered, thereby controlling for the edge effect. Conclusion By neglecting to consider food retailers just outside study area boundaries, previous studies may significantly over-report the actual distance necessary to

  19. An application of the edge effect in measuring accessibility to multiple food retailer types in southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Richard C; Gilliland, Jason A; Arku, Godwin

    2011-05-15

    Trends in food retailing associated with the consolidation of smaller-format retailers into fewer, larger-format supercentres have left some rural areas with fewer sources of nutritious, affordable food. Access to nutritious, affordable food is essential for good dietary habits and combating health issues such as type-2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Many studies on food environments use inaccurate or incomplete methods for locating food retailers, which may be responsible for mischaracterising food deserts. This study uses databases of every residence in and every food retailer in and around Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada. Residences were geocoded to their precise address, and network analysis techniques were performed in a geographic information system (GIS) to determine distances between every residence and different types of food retailers (grocery stores, fast food, fruit and vegetable sources, grocery stores plus fruit and vegetable sources, variety stores), both when considering and neglecting facilities outside the area of study, to account for a deficiency in analysis termed the 'edge effect'. Analysis of household accessibility to food outlets by neighbourhood socioeconomic distress level indicated that residents in the most distressed neighbourhoods tended to have better accessibility to all types of food retailers. In the most distressed neighbourhoods, 79 percent of residences were within walking distance of a grocery store, compared to only 10 percent in the least distressed neighbourhoods. When the edge effect was neglected, 37 percent of distance estimates proved inaccurate. Average accessibility to all food retailer types improved dramatically when food outlets adjacent to the study area were considered, thereby controlling for the edge effect. By neglecting to consider food retailers just outside study area boundaries, previous studies may significantly over-report the actual distance necessary to travel for food. Research on

  20. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  1. Ni K-Edge XANES Analyses of Residual Ni Catalyst in Carbon Nanofiber Using Full Multiple Scattering Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiro, Mayuko; Ohminami, Kenryo; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Fujikawa, Takashi; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2007-02-02

    Residual Ni species after Ni removal treatment of carbon nanofibers have been investigated by use of XAFS analyses. Most of the Ni impurities are in Ni monomer which is located on defects in carbon nanofibers. The XAFS analyses combined with the multiple scattering theory give useful information on nano-structures of small amount species. Molecular orbital calculation also support the results from the XAFS analyses.

  2. Multiple mobility edges in a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction in presence of electric field: Controlled electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Srilekha; Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic behavior of a 1D Aubry chain with Hubbard interaction is critically analyzed in presence of electric field. Multiple energy bands are generated as a result of Hubbard correlation and Aubry potential, and, within these bands localized states are developed under the application of electric field. Within a tight-binding framework we compute electronic transmission probability and average density of states using Green's function approach where the interaction parameter is treated under Hartree-Fock mean field scheme. From our analysis we find that selective transmission can be obtained by tuning injecting electron energy, and thus, the present model can be utilized as a controlled switching device.

  3. Leonardian fluid mechanics. Part 1: History of kinematics. Part 2: Inception of modern kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macagno, E.

    1991-08-01

    A history of kinematics is given. Empirical kinematics, theoretical kinematics, experimental kinematics, the inception of modern kinematics, kinematics before and after Ampere, and Ampere's contribution are discussed.

  4. Boundary kinematic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, Andreas; Sully, James; Uhlemann, Christoph F.; Walker, Devin G. E.

    2017-08-01

    We extend kinematic space to a simple scenario where the state is not fixed by conformal invariance: the vacuum of a conformal field theory with a boundary (bCFT). We identify the kinematic space associated with the boundary operator product expansion (bOPE) as a subspace of the full kinematic space. In addition, we establish representations of the corresponding bOPE blocks in a dual gravitational description. We show how the new kinematic dictionary and the dynamical data in bOPE allows one to reconstruct the bulk geometry. This is evidence that kinematic space may be a useful construction for understanding bulk physics beyond just kinematics.

  5. Cutting edge genomics reveal new insights into tumour development, disease progression and therapeutic impacts in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ankit K; Hewett, Duncan R; Fink, J Lynn; Grady, John P; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2017-07-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a haematological malignancy characterised by the clonal expansion of plasma cells (PCs) within the bone marrow. Despite advances in therapy, MM remains a largely incurable disease with a median survival of 6 years. In almost all cases, the development of MM is preceded by the benign PC condition Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS). Recent studies show that the transformation of MGUS to MM is associated with complex genetic changes. Understanding how these changes contribute to evolution will present targets for clinical intervention. We discuss three models of MM evolution; the linear, the expansionist and the intraclonal heterogeneity models. Of particular interest is the intraclonal heterogeneity model. Here, distinct populations of MM PCs carry differing combinations of genetic mutations. Acquisition of additional mutations can contribute to subclonal lineages where "driver" mutations may influence selective pressure and dominance, and "passenger" mutations are neutral in their effects. Furthermore, studies show that clinical intervention introduces additional selective pressure on tumour cells and can influence subclone survival, leading to therapy resistance. This review discusses how Next Generation Sequencing approaches are revealing critical insights into the genetics of MM development, disease progression and treatment. MM disease progression will illuminate possible mechanisms underlying the tumour. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Edge remap for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R.; Love, Edward; Robinson, Allen C.; Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-12-01

    We review the edge element formulation for describing the kinematics of hyperelastic solids. This approach is used to frame the problem of remapping the inverse deformation gradient for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) simulations of solid dynamics. For hyperelastic materials, the stress state is completely determined by the deformation gradient, so remapping this quantity effectively updates the stress state of the material. A method, inspired by the constrained transport remap in electromagnetics, is reviewed, according to which the zero-curl constraint on the inverse deformation gradient is implicitly satisfied. Open issues related to the accuracy of this approach are identified. An optimization-based approach is implemented to enforce positivity of the determinant of the deformation gradient. The efficacy of this approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  7. Edge Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Chien-Chi

    2015-08-03

    Edge Bioinformatics is a developmental bioinformatics and data management platform which seeks to supply laboratories with bioinformatics pipelines for analyzing data associated with common samples case goals. Edge Bioinformatics enables sequencing as a solution and forward-deployed situations where human-resources, space, bandwidth, and time are limited. The Edge bioinformatics pipeline was designed based on following USE CASES and specific to illumina sequencing reads. 1. Assay performance adjudication (PCR): Analysis of an existing PCR assay in a genomic context, and automated design of a new assay to resolve conflicting results; 2. Clinical presentation with extreme symptoms: Characterization of a known pathogen or co-infection with a. Novel emerging disease outbreak or b. Environmental surveillance

  8. Kinematic space and wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-dong; Chen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The kinematic space could play a key role in constructing the bulk geometry from dual CFT. In this paper, we study the kinematic space from geometric points of view, without resorting to differential entropy. We find that the kinematic space could be intrinsically defined in the embedding space. For each oriented geodesic in the Poincaré disk, there is a corresponding point in the kinematic space. This point is the tip of the causal diamond of the disk whose intersection with the Poincaré disk determines the geodesic. In this geometric construction, the causal structure in the kinematic space can be seen clearly. Moreover, we find that every transformation in the SL(2,R) leads to a geodesic in the kinematic space. In particular, for a hyperbolic transformation defining a BTZ black hole, it is a timelike geodesic in the kinematic space. We show that the horizon length of the static BTZ black hole could be computed by the geodesic length of corresponding points in the kinematic space. Furthermore, we discuss the fundamental regions in the kinematic space for the BTZ blackhole and multi-boundary wormholes.

  9. A paradigm shift in patterning foundation from frequency multiplication to edge-placement accuracy: a novel processing solution by selective etching and alternating-material self-aligned multiple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ting; Liu, Hongyi; Chen, Yijian

    2016-03-01

    Overlay errors, cut/block and line/space critical-dimension (CD) variations are the major sources of the edge-placement errors (EPE) in the cut/block patterning processes of complementary lithography when IC technology is scaled down to sub-10nm half pitch (HP). In this paper, we propose and discuss a modular technology to reduce the EPE effect by combining selective etching and alternating-material (dual-material) self-aligned multiple patterning (altSAMP) processes. Preliminary results of altSAMP process development and material screening experiment are reported and possible material candidates are suggested. A geometrical cut-process yield model considering the joint effect of overlay errors, cut-hole and line CD variations is developed to analyze its patterning performance. In addition to the contributions from the above three process variations, the impacts of key control parameters (such as cut-hole overhang and etching selectivity) on the patterning yield are examined. It is shown that the optimized altSAMP patterning process significantly improves the patterning yield compared with conventional SAMP processes, especially when the half pitch of device patterns is driven down to 7 nm and below.

  10. The kinematic footprints of five stellar streams in Andromeda's halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Ibata, R.; Irwin, M.; Koch, A.; Letarte, B.; Martin, N.; Collins, M.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Rich, R. M.; Trethewey, D.; Ferguson, A.; Huxor, A.; Tanvir, N.

    2008-11-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of five stellar streams (`A', `B', `Cr', `Cp' and `D') as well as the extended star cluster, EC4, which lies within Stream`C', all discovered in the halo of M31 from our Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam survey. These spectroscopic results were initially serendipitous, making use of our existing observations from the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, and thereby emphasizing the ubiquity of tidal streams that account for ~70 per cent of the M31 halo stars in the targeted fields. Subsequent spectroscopy was then procured in Stream`C' and Stream`D' to trace the velocity gradient along the streams. Nine metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -0.7) stars at vhel = -349.5kms-1,σv,corr ~ 5.1 +/- 2.5km s-1 are proposed as a serendipitous detection of Stream`Cr', with follow-up kinematic identification at a further point along the stream. Seven metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~-1.3) stars confined to a narrow, 15 km s-1 velocity bin centred at vhel = -285.6, σv,corr = 4.3+1.7-1.4 km s-1 represent a kinematic detection of Stream`Cp', again with follow-up kinematic identification further along the stream. For the cluster EC4, candidate member stars with average [Fe/H] ~-1.4, are found at vhel = -282 suggesting it could be related to Stream`Cp'. No similarly obvious cold kinematic candidate is found for Stream`D', although candidates are proposed in both of two spectroscopic pointings along the stream (both at ~ -400km s-1). Spectroscopy near the edge of Stream`B' suggests a likely kinematic detection at vhel ~ -330, σv,corr ~ 6.9km s-1, while a candidate kinematic detection of Stream`A' is found (plausibly associated to M33 rather than M31) with vhel ~ -170, σv,corr = 12.5km s-1. The low dispersion of the streams in kinematics, physical thickness and metallicity makes it hard to reconcile with a scenario whereby these stream structures as an ensemble are related to the giant southern stream. We conclude that the M31 stellar

  11. Full multiple scattering analysis of XANES at the Cd L3 and O K edges in CdO films combined with a soft-x-ray emission investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Demchenko, I. N.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chernyshova, M.; Yu, K. M.; Speaks, D. T.; Olalde-Velasco, P.; Hemmers, O.; Walukiewicz, W.; Derkachova, A.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.

    2010-07-05

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the cadmium L3 and oxygen K edges for CdO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition method, is interpreted within the real-space multiple scattering formalism, FEFF code. The features in the experimental spectra are well reproduced by calculations for a cluster of about six and ten coordination shells around the absorber for L3 edge of Cd and K edge of O, respectively. The calculated projected electronic density of states is found to be in good agreement with unoccupied electronic states in experimental data and allows to conclude that the orbital character of the lowest energy of the conductive band is Cd-5s-O-2p. The charge transfer has been quantified and not purely ionic bonding has been found. Combined XANES and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements allow us to determine the direct and indirect band gap of investigated CdO films to be {approx}2.4-eV and {approx}0.9-eV, respectively.

  12. Edge Detection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  13. A Novel Algorithm for the Generation of Distinct Kinematic Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medapati, Sreenivasa Reddy; Kuchibhotla, Mallikarjuna Rao; Annambhotla, Balaji Srinivasa Rao

    2016-07-01

    Generation of distinct kinematic chains is an important topic in the design of mechanisms for various industrial applications i.e., robotic manipulator, tractor, crane etc. Many researchers have intently focused on this area and explained various processes of generating distinct kinematic chains which are laborious and complex. It is desirable to enumerate the kinematic chains systematically to know the inherent characteristics of a chain related to its structure so that all the distinct chains can be analyzed in depth, prior to the selection of a chain for a purpose. This paper proposes a novel and simple method with set of rules defined to eliminate isomorphic kinematic chains generating distinct kinematic chains. Also, this method simplifies the process of generating distinct kinematic chains even at higher levels i.e., 10-link, 11-link with single and multiple degree of freedom.

  14. Gait alterations can reduce the risk of edge loading.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; Meyer, Christophe; De Groote, Friedl; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-06-01

    Following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty, edge loading (i.e., loading near the edge of a prosthesis cup) can increase wear and lead to early revision. The position and coverage angle of the prosthesis cup influence the risk of edge loading. This study investigates the effect of altered gait patterns, more specific hip, and pelvis kinematics, on the orientation of hip contact force and the consequent risk of antero-superior edge loading using muscle driven simulations of gait. With a cup orientation of 25° anteversion and 50° inclination and a coverage angle of 168°, many gait patterns presented risk of edge loading. Specifically at terminal double support, 189 out of 405 gait patterns indicated a risk of edge loading. At this time instant, the high hip contact forces and the proximity of the hip contact force to the edge of the cup indicated the likelihood of the occurrence of edge loading. Although the cup position contributed most to edge loading, altering kinematics considerably influenced the risk of edge loading. Increased hip abduction, resulting in decreasing hip contact force magnitude, and decreased hip extension, resulting in decreased risk on edge loading, are gait strategies that could prevent edge loading. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1069-1076, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Studies on the Structural Transformation of Pt Clusters with Adsorbed Hydrogen on α-Al2O3(0001) Using Multiple Scattering Approach to Pt L3-edge Polarized X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectra for the Pt Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Kunihiro

    1998-03-01

    The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) or the Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study with polarization dependence is useful for determining the structures of the metal clusters. We have calculated Pt L3-edge XANES spectra for various structures of Pt clusters with adsorbed hydrogen, such as the one-layer-thick raft, and the hemispherical and spherical structures on α-Al2O3(0001), using the full multiple scattering approach. Comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results have yielded important information. With an increase in the spherically symmetric character of Pt clusters, the influence of Pt-support interaction on the XANES spectra decreases, that is, the hydrogen-Pt interaction plays a dominant role in such cases. We expect that Pt clusters with the one-layer-thick raft, or hemispherical structures are on the top site of surface oxygen atoms.

  16. Habitual Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy Improves Gait Kinematics and Walking Performance, but Not Patient-Reported Functional Outcomes, of People with Multiple Sclerosis who Present with Foot-Drop

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Marietta L.; Hooper, Julie E.; Cowan, Paula; Weller, Belinda B.; Mercer, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Background People with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) often experience a disturbed gait function such as foot-drop. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the medium term effects of using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) to treat foot-drop over a period 12 weeks on gait and patient reported outcomes of pwMS. Methods and Findings Nine pwMS aged 35 to 64 (2 males, 7 females) were assessed on four occasions; four weeks before baseline, at baseline and after six weeks and twelve weeks of FES use. Joint kinematics and performance on the 10 meter and 2 minute walk tests (10WT, 2 minWT) were assessed with and without FES. Participants also completed the MS walking Scale (MSWS), MS impact scale (MSIS29), Fatigue Severity Score (FSS) and wore an activity monitor for seven days after each assessment. Compared to unassisted walking, FES resulted in statistically significant improvements in peak dorsiflexion in swing (p = 0.006), 10MWT (p = 0.006) and 2 minWT (p = 0.002). Effect sizes for the training effect, defined as the change from unassisted walking at baseline to that at 12 weeks, indicated improved ankle angle at initial contact (2.6°, 95% CI −1° to 4°, d = 0.78), and a decrease in perceived exertion over the 2 min walking tests (−1.2 points, 95% CI −5.7 to 3.4, d = −0.86). Five participants exceeded the Minimally Detectable Change (MDC) for a training effect on the 10mWT, but only two did so for the 2 minWT. No effects of the use of FES for 12 weeks were found for MSWS, MSIS29, FSS or step count. Conclusion Although FES to treat foot-drop appears to offer the potential for a medium term training effect on ankle kinematics and walking speed, this was not reflected in the patient reported outcomes. This observed lack of relationship between objective walking performance and patient reported outcomes warrants further investigation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01977287 PMID:25133535

  17. Inverse Kinematics of Concentric Tube Steerable Needles

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    Prior papers have introduced steerable needles composed of precurved concentric tubes. The curvature and extent of these needles can be controlled by the relative rotation and translation of the individual tubes. Under certain assumptions on the geometry and design of these needles, the forward kinematics problem can be solved in closed form by means of algebraic equations. The inverse kinematics problem, however, is not as straightforward owing to the nonlinear map between relative tube displacements and needle tip configuration as well as to the multiplicity of solutions as the number of tubes increases. This paper presents a general approach to solving the inverse kinematics problem using a pseudoinverse solution together with gradients of nullspace potential functions to enforce geometric and mechanical constraints. PMID:23685532

  18. Dislocation kinematics: a molecular dynamics study in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oren, E.; Yahel, E.; Makov, G.

    2017-02-01

    The kinematics and kinetics of edge and screw dislocations in FCC materials were studied by molecular dynamics, with Cu as a case study. It was found that with increasing stress screw dislocations enter into the transonic regime continuously and that they remain stable up to a velocity of about 2.2 km s-1. Edge dislocations are limited by the transverse sound velocity at low stresses and discontinuously cross into the transonic regime at higher stresses. For sufficiently long edge dislocations, the subsonic-transonic transition is initiated by an athermal nucleation process. Finally, an expression for the velocity dependence of the dislocation mobility was derived.

  19. The brown dwarf kinematics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jackie K.

    2010-10-01

    Brown dwarfs are a recent addition to the plethora of objects studied in Astronomy. With theoretical masses between 13 and 75 MJupiter , they lack sustained stable Hydrogen burning so they never join the stellar main sequence. They have physical properties similar to both planets and low-mass stars so studies of their population inform on both. The distances and kinematics of brown dwarfs provide key statistical constraints on their ages, moving group membership, absolute brightnesses, evolutionary trends, and multiplicity. Yet, until my thesis, fundamental measurements of parallax and proper motion were made for only a relatively small fraction of the known population. To address this deficiency, I initiated the Brown Dwarf Kinematics (BDKP). Over the past four years I have re-imaged the majority of spectroscopically confirmed field brown dwarfs (or ultracool dwarfs---UCDs) and created the largest proper motion catalog for ultracool dwarfs to date. Using new astrometric information I examined population characteristics such as ages calculated from velocity dispersions and correlations between kinematics and colors. Using proper motions, I identified several new wide co-moving companions and investigated binding energy (and hence formation) limitations as well as the frequency of hierarchical companions. Concurrently over the past four years I have been conducting a parallax survey of 84 UCDs including those showing spectral signatures of youth, metal-poor brown dwarfs, and those within 20 pc of the Sun. Using absolute magnitude relations in J,H, and K, I identified overluminous binary candidates and investigated known flux-reversal binaries. Using current evolutionary models, I compared the MK vs J-K color magnitude diagram to model predictions and found that the low-surface gravity dwarfs are significantly red-ward and underluminous of predictions and a handful of late-type T dwarfs may require thicker clouds to account for their scatter.

  20. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  1. The Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the edge (running diagonally from the lower left to the upper right) of a trough, which is part of a large pit crater complex in Noachis Terra. This type of trough forms through the collapse of surface materials into the subsurface, and often begins as a series of individual pit craters. Over time, continued collapse increases the diameter of individual pits until finally, adjacent pits merge to form a trough such as the one captured in this image. The deep shadowed area is caused in part by an overhang; layered rock beneath this overhang is less resistant to erosion, and thus has retreated tens of meters backward, beneath the overhang. A person could walk up inside this 'cave' formed by the overhanging layered material.

    Location near: 47.0oS, 355.7oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  2. Qualitative Kinematics of Linkages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    links and the connections between them, the following algorithm computes an envisionment for that system . lotatioa(P1,P2) - CCV lotatioa(P1,P2) CCV...1988 Appendix A : Slider-Crank Envisionment Each qualitative state consists of a kinematic state representing the orientation of each link, and a...8 +++ 6 -- . f. 6 000 , 7 --0 7 ++0 8 +- -+ > 1 000 1 +0+ 8 000 8 000 7 --0 7 000 8 --- m 8 +++ Appendix B : Drag-Link Envisionment Kinematic State

  3. Kinematics and wing shape across flight speed in the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae.

    PubMed

    Von Busse, Rhea; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2012-12-15

    The morphology and kinematics of a flying animal determines the resulting aerodynamic lift through the regulation of the speed of the air moving across the wing, the wing area and the lift coefficient. We studied the detailed three-dimensional wingbeat kinematics of the bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, flying in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (0-7 m/s), to determine how factors affecting the lift production vary across flight speed and within wingbeats. We found that the wing area, the angle of attack and the camber, which are determinants of the lift production, decreased with increasing speed. The camber is controlled by multiple mechanisms along the span, including the deflection of the leg relative to the body, the bending of the fifth digit, the deflection of the leading edge flap and the upward bending of the wing tip. All these measures vary throughout the wing beat suggesting active or aeroelastic control. The downstroke Strouhal number, St(d), is kept relatively constant, suggesting that favorable flow characteristics are maintained during the downstroke, across the range of speeds studied. The St(d) is kept constant through changes in the stroke plane, from a strongly inclined stroke plane at low speeds to a more vertical stroke plane at high speeds. The mean angular velocity of the wing correlates with the aerodynamic performance and shows a minimum at the speed of maximum lift to drag ratio, suggesting a simple way to determine the optimal speed from kinematics alone. Taken together our results show the high degree of adjustments that the bats employ to fine tune the aerodynamics of the wings and the correlation between kinematics and aerodynamic performance.

  4. Competing edge networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mark; Grindrod, Peter

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a model for a pair of nonlinear evolving networks, defined over a common set of vertices, subject to edgewise competition. Each network may grow new edges spontaneously or through triad closure. Both networks inhibit the other's growth and encourage the other's demise. These nonlinear stochastic competition equations yield to a mean field analysis resulting in a nonlinear deterministic system. There may be multiple equilibria; and bifurcations of different types are shown to occur within a reduced parameter space. This situation models competitive communication networks such as BlackBerry Messenger displacing SMS; or instant messaging displacing emails.

  5. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  6. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  7. Kinematics of Tape Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes mathematics of the nonliner relationships between a constant-speed, capstan-driven magnetic tape transport mechanism and a constant-angular-velocity take-up reel. The relationship, derived from the sum of a partial, serves in recognition of a finite tape. Thickness can serve as an example of rotational kinematics. (Author/SK)

  8. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  9. Multiplicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    practice as a "[descent] into that inner circle of the Inferno where the damned endlessly degate multiplicity for sentencing." United States v. Barnard...select the charges to be brought in a particular case"). 19 Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. 161, 165 (1977). 20 Whalen v. United States, 445 U.S. at 689. 21...parte Lange, 8-5 U.S. (19 Wall.) 163 (1874). Cf. Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. at 165 ("once the legislature has acted courts may not impose more than one

  10. Validation and structural analysis of the kinematics concept test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberger, A.; Wagner, C.; Hofer, S. I.; Stern, E.; Vaterlaus, A.

    2017-06-01

    The kinematics concept test (KCT) is a multiple-choice test designed to evaluate students' conceptual understanding of kinematics at the high school level. The test comprises 49 multiple-choice items about velocity and acceleration, which are based on seven kinematic concepts and which make use of three different representations. In the first part of this article we describe the development and the validation process of the KCT. We applied the KCT to 338 Swiss high school students who attended traditional teaching in kinematics. We analyzed the response data to provide the psychometric properties of the test. In the second part we present the results of a structural analysis of the test. An exploratory factor analysis of 664 student answers finally uncovered the seven kinematics concepts as factors. However, the analysis revealed a hierarchical structure of concepts. At the higher level, mathematical concepts group together, and then split up into physics concepts at the lower level. Furthermore, students who seem to understand a concept in one representation have difficulties transferring the concept to similar problems in another representation. Both results have implications for teaching kinematics. First, teaching mathematical concepts beforehand might be beneficial for learning kinematics. Second, instructions have to be designed to teach students the change between different representations.

  11. Inverse Kinematic Analysis of Human Hand Thumb Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Tascau, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan; Menyhardt, Karoly; Rosu, Serban; Rusu, Lucian; Vigaru, Cosmina

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with a kinematic model of the thumb of the human hand. The proposed model has 3 degrees of freedom being able to model the movements of the thumb tip with respect to the wrist joint centre. The kinematic equations are derived based on Denavit-Hartenberg Convention and solved in both direct and inverse way. Inverse kinematic analysis of human hand thumb model reveals multiple and connected solutions which are characteristic to nonlinear systems when the number of equations is greater than number of unknowns and correspond to natural movements of the finger.

  12. The Photometric and Kinematic Structure of Face-on Disk Galaxies. III. Kinematic Inclinations from Hα Velocity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained Hα velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i kin = 23° for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20° and 6% at 30°. Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical "face-on" Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15° and 5% at 30°. This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  13. Kinematics of robot manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The theory and methodology of design of general-purpose machines that may be controlled by a computer to perform all the tasks of a set of special-purpose machines is the focus of modern machine design research. These seventeen contributions chronicle recent activity in the analysis and design of robot manipulators that are the prototype of these general-purpose machines. They focus particularly on kinematics, the geometry of rigid-body motion, which is an integral part of machine design theory. The challenges to kinematics researchers presented by general-purpose machines such as the manipulator are leading to new perspectives in the design and control of simpler machines with two, three, and more degrees of freedom. Researchers are rethinking the uses of gear trains, planar mechanisms, adjustable mechanisms, and computer controlled actuators in the design of modern machines.

  14. Kinematic Stirling Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, J. R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Computer program developed for analyzing thermodynamic characteristics of kinematic Stirling engine. Computes time-varying piston positions, pressures, and gas temperatures in each of gas-control volumes into which engine working space is divided. Engine performance characterized by calculations of power and efficiency (both indicated and brake). Inputs to code are engine geometrical parameter, engine-operating conditions, and indexes that specify various options available.

  15. Edge-Aware BMA Filters.

    PubMed

    Guang Deng

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous research in edge-aware filters which have found many applications in computer vision and image processing. In this paper, we propose a principled-approach for the development of edge-aware filters. The proposed approach is based on two well-established principles: 1) optimal parameter estimation and 2) Bayesian model averaging (BMA). Using this approach, we formulate the problem of filtering a pixel in a local pixel patch as an optimal estimation problem. Since a pixel belongs to multiple local patches, there are multiple estimates of the same pixel. We combine these estimates into a final estimate using BMA. We demonstrate the versatility of this approach by developing a family of BMA filters based on different settings of cost functions and log-likelihood and log-prior functions. We also present a new interpretation of the guided filter and develop a BMA guided filter which includes the guided filter as a special case. We show that BMA filters can produce similar smoothing results as those of the state-of-the-art edge-aware filters. Two BMA filters are computationally as efficient as the guided filter which is one of the fastest edge-aware filters. We also demonstrate that the BMA guided filter is better than the guided filter in preserving sharp edges. A new feature of the BMA guided filter is that the filtered image is similar to that produced by a clustering process.

  16. Edge location to subpixel values in digital imagery.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, A J; Mitchell, O R

    1984-02-01

    A new method for locating edges in digital data to subpixel values and which is invariant to additive and multiplicative changes in the data is presented. For one-dimensional edge patterns an ideal edge is fit to the data by matching moments. It is shown that the edge location is related to the so-called ``Christoffel numbers.'' Also presented is the study of the effect of additive noise on edge location. The method is extended to include two-dimensional edge patterns where a line equation is derived to locate an edge. This in turn is compared with the standard Hueckel edge operator. An application of the new edge operator as an edge detector is also provided and is compared with Sobel and Hueckel edge detectors in presence and absence of noise.

  17. APOGEE Kinematics. I. Overview of the Kinematics of the Galactic Bulge as Mapped By APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, M.; Zasowski, G.; Johnson, J. A.; Athanassoula, E.; Majewski, S. R.; García Pérez, A. E.; Bird, J.; Nidever, D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Sobeck, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    We present the stellar kinematics across the Galactic bulge and into the disk at positive longitudes from the SDSS-III APOGEE spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way. APOGEE includes extensive coverage of the stellar populations of the bulge along the midplane and near-plane regions. From these data, we have produced kinematic maps of 10,000 stars across longitudes of 0° < l < 65°, and primarily across latitudes of | b| < 5° in the bulge region. The APOGEE data reveal that the bulge is cylindrically rotating across all latitudes and is kinematically hottest at the very center of the bulge, with the smallest gradients in both kinematic and chemical space inside the innermost region (| l,b| ) < (5°, 5°). The results from APOGEE show good agreement with data from other surveys at higher latitudes and a remarkable similarity to the rotation and dispersion maps of barred galaxies viewed edge-on. The thin bar that is reported to be present in the inner disk within a narrow latitude range of | b| < 2° appears to have a corresponding signature in [{Fe}/{{H}}] and [α /{Fe}]. Stars with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -0.5 have dispersion and rotation profiles that are similar to that of N-body models of boxy/peanut bulges. There is a smooth kinematic transition from the thin bar and boxy bulge (l,| b| ) < (15°, 12°) out to the disk for stars with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -1.0, and the chemodynamics across (l, b) suggests that the stars in the inner Galaxy with [{Fe}/{{H}}] > -1.0 originate in the disk.

  18. Real-time edge tracking using a tactile sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Alan D.; Volpe, Richard; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1989-01-01

    Object recognition through the use of input from multiple sensors is an important aspect of an autonomous manipulation system. In tactile object recognition, it is necessary to determine the location and orientation of object edges and surfaces. A controller is proposed that utilizes a tactile sensor in the feedback loop of a manipulator to track along edges. In the control system, the data from the tactile sensor is first processed to find edges. The parameters of these edges are then used to generate a control signal to a hybrid controller. Theory is presented for tactile edge detection and an edge tracking controller. In addition, experimental verification of the edge tracking controller is presented.

  19. Edge detecting new physics the Voronoi way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Kim, Doojin; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2016-05-01

    Edge detection is an important tool in the search for and exploration of physics beyond the standard model. Ideally one would be able to perform edge detection in a relatively model-independent way, however most analyses rely on more detailed properties (i.e. “shapes” or likelihood distributions) of the variable(s) of interest. We therefore present a sketch of how edge detection can be accomplished using Voronoi tessellations, focusing on the case of two-dimensional distributions for simplicity. After deriving some useful properties of the Voronoi tessellations of simplified distributions containing edges, we propose several algorithms for tagging the Voronoi cells in the vicinity of kinematic edges in real data and show that the efficiency of our methods is improved by the addition of a few Voronoi relaxation steps via Lloyd's method. Our results suggest specifically that Voronoi-based methods should be useful for relatively model-independent edge detection, and, more generally, that the wider adaptation of Voronoi tessellations may be useful in collider physics.

  20. Kinematic Downsizing at z ˜ 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Raymond C.; Kassin, Susan A.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Guo, Yicheng; Pacifici, Camilla; Koekemoer, Anton; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a survey of the internal kinematics of 49 star-forming galaxies at z˜ 2 in the CANDELS fields with the Keck/MOSFIRE spectrograph, Survey in the near-Infrared of Galaxies with Multiple position Angles (SIGMA). Kinematics (rotation velocity V rot and gas velocity dispersion {σ }g) are measured from nebular emission lines which trace the hot ionized gas surrounding star-forming regions. We find that by z˜ 2, massive star-forming galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}⊙ ≳ 10.2) have assembled primitive disks: their kinematics are dominated by rotation, they are consistent with a marginally stable disk model, and they form a Tully-Fisher relation. These massive galaxies have values of {V}{rot}/{σ }g that are factors of 2-5 lower than local well-ordered galaxies at similar masses. Such results are consistent with findings by other studies. We find that low-mass galaxies ({log} {M}* /{M}⊙ ≲ 10.2) at this epoch are still in the early stages of disk assembly: their kinematics are often dominated by gas velocity dispersion and they fall from the Tully-Fisher relation to significantly low values of V rot. This “kinematic downsizing” implies that the process(es) responsible for disrupting disks at z˜ 2 have a stronger effect and/or are more active in low-mass systems. In conclusion, we find that the period of rapid stellar mass growth at z˜ 2 is coincident with the nascent assembly of low-mass disks and the assembly and settling of high-mass disks.

  1. Decoding intentions from movement kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Andrea; Koul, Atesh; Ansuini, Caterina; Capozzi, Francesca; Becchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    How do we understand the intentions of other people? There has been a longstanding controversy over whether it is possible to understand others’ intentions by simply observing their movements. Here, we show that indeed movement kinematics can form the basis for intention detection. By combining kinematics and psychophysical methods with classification and regression tree (CART) modeling, we found that observers utilized a subset of discriminant kinematic features over the total kinematic pattern in order to detect intention from observation of simple motor acts. Intention discriminability covaried with movement kinematics on a trial-by-trial basis, and was directly related to the expression of discriminative features in the observed movements. These findings demonstrate a definable and measurable relationship between the specific features of observed movements and the ability to discriminate intention, providing quantitative evidence of the significance of movement kinematics for anticipating others’ intentional actions. PMID:27845434

  2. Topological edge states of bound photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Maxim A.; Poddubny, Alexander N.

    2017-05-01

    We predict the existence of interaction-driven edge states of bound two-photon quasiparticles in a dimer periodic array of nonlinear optical cavities. The energy spectrum of photon pairs is dramatically richer than in the noninteracting case or in a simple lattice, featuring collapse and revival of multiple edge and bulk modes as well as edge states in continuum. We link the edge-state existence to the two-photon quantum walk graph connectivity. Our results offer a route to control quantum entanglement and provide insights into the physics of many-body topological states.

  3. Evaluation of automated statistical shape model based knee kinematics from biplane fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baka, Nora; Kaptein, Bart L.; Giphart, J. Erik; Staring, Marius; de Bruijne, Marleen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P.F.; Valstar, Edward

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art fluoroscopic knee kinematic analysis methods require the patient-specific bone shapes segmented from CT or MRI. Substituting the patient-specific bone shapes with personalizable models, such as statistical shape models (SSM), could eliminate the CT/MRI acquisitions, and thereby decrease costs and radiation dose (when eliminating CT). SSM based kinematics, however, have not yet been evaluated on clinically relevant joint motion parameters. Therefore, in this work the applicability of SSM-s for computing knee kinematics from biplane fluoroscopic sequences was explored. Kinematic precision with an edge based automated bone tracking method using SSM-s was evaluated on 6 cadaver and 10 in-vivo fluoroscopic sequences. The SSMs of the femur and the tibia-fibula were created using 61 training datasets. Kinematic precision was determined for medial-lateral tibial shift, anterior-posterior tibial drawer, joint distraction-contraction, flexion, tibial rotation and adduction. The relationship between kinematic precision and bone shape accuracy was also investigated. The SSM based kinematics resulted in sub-millimeter (0.48–0.81 mm) and approximately one degree (0.69–0.99°) median precision on the cadaveric knees compared to bone-marker-based kinematics. The precision on the in-vivo datasets was comparable to the cadaveric sequences when evaluated with a semi-automatic reference method. These results are promising, though further work is necessary to reach the accuracy of CT-based kinematics. We also demonstrated that a better shape reconstruction accuracy does not automatically imply a better kinematic precision. This result suggests that the ability of accurately fitting the edges in the fluoroscopic sequences has a larger role in determining the kinematic precision than the overall 3D shape accuracy. PMID:24207131

  4. Shot-put kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, R.

    2005-11-01

    The problem of the optimum throw in the shot-put discipline is analysed by relaxing the assumption that the height H, from which the athlete releases the shot, does not depend on the angle θ which the arm of the putter makes with the horizontal axis. In this context, the kinematics of the shot-put is studied and results are compared with the traditional analysis, which considers the height H, the angle θ and the modulus V0 of the initial velocity of the metal sphere as independent parameters.

  5. Variability in static alignment and kinematics for kinematically aligned TKA.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Willy; Twiggs, Joshua; Kolos, Elizabeth; Roe, Justin; Fritsch, Brett; Dickison, David; Liu, David; Salmon, Lucy; Miles, Brad; Howell, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) significantly improves pain and restores a considerable degree of function. However, improvements are needed to increase patient satisfaction and restore kinematics to allow more physically demanding activities that active patients consider important. The aim of our study was to compare the alignment and motion of kinematically and mechanically aligned TKAs. A patient specific musculoskeletal computer simulation was used to compare the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral kinematics between mechanically aligned and kinematically aligned TKA in 20 patients. When kinematically aligned, femoral components on average resulted in more valgus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to surgical transepicondylar axis whereas tibia component on average resulted in more varus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to tibial AP rotational axis. With kinematic alignment, tibio-femoral motion displayed greater tibial external rotation and lateral femoral flexion facet centre (FFC) translation with knee flexion than mechanical aligned TKA. At the patellofemoral joint, patella lateral shift of kinematically aligned TKA plateaued after 20 to 30° flexion while in mechanically aligned TKA it decreased continuously through the whole range of motion. Kinematic alignment resulted in greater variation than mechanical alignment for all tibio-femoral and patello-femoral motion. Kinematic alignment places TKA components patient specific alignment which depends on the preoperative state of the knee resulting in greater variation in kinematics. The use of computational models has the potential to predict which alignment based on native alignment, kinematic or mechanical, could improve knee function for patient's undergoing TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Collision avoidance of a multiple degree of redundancy manipulator operating through a window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zghal, H.; Dubey, R. V.; Euler, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of collision-free operation of a multiple-degree-of-redundancy manipulator operating through a window is addressed. An efficient gradient projection optimization scheme is presented for the kinematic control of manipulators with multiple degrees of redundancy. This scheme was developed for dextrous robotic and telerobotic applications in space station construction as well as in congested shop floor environment. A performance criterion is defined to maximize the shortest distances between the manipulator links and the edges of the window. Effectiveness of this scheme and the validity of the performance criterion are verified through simulations of the seven-degree-of-freedom NASA Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator.

  7. Predicting Human Protein Subcellular Locations by the Ensemble of Multiple Predictors via Protein-Protein Interaction Network with Edge Clustering Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Pufeng; Wang, Lusheng

    2014-01-01

    One of the fundamental tasks in biology is to identify the functions of all proteins to reveal the primary machinery of a cell. Knowledge of the subcellular locations of proteins will provide key hints to reveal their functions and to understand the intricate pathways that regulate biological processes at the cellular level. Protein subcellular location prediction has been extensively studied in the past two decades. A lot of methods have been developed based on protein primary sequences as well as protein-protein interaction network. In this paper, we propose to use the protein-protein interaction network as an infrastructure to integrate existing sequence based predictors. When predicting the subcellular locations of a given protein, not only the protein itself, but also all its interacting partners were considered. Unlike existing methods, our method requires neither the comprehensive knowledge of the protein-protein interaction network nor the experimentally annotated subcellular locations of most proteins in the protein-protein interaction network. Besides, our method can be used as a framework to integrate multiple predictors. Our method achieved 56% on human proteome in absolute-true rate, which is higher than the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:24466278

  8. Kinematics of Strong Discontinuities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, K.; Nguyen, G.; Sulsky, D.

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) provides a detailed view of the Arctic ice cover. When processed with the RADARSAT Geophysical Processor System (RGPS), it provides estimates of sea ice motion and deformation over large regions of the Arctic for extended periods of time. The deformation is dominated by the appearance of linear kinematic features that have been associated with the presence of leads. The RGPS deformation products are based on the assumption that the displacement and velocity are smooth functions of the spatial coordinates. However, if the dominant deformation of multiyear ice results from the opening, closing and shearing of leads, then the displacement and velocity can be discontinuous. This presentation discusses the kinematics associated with strong discontinuities that describe possible jumps in displacement or velocity. Ice motion from SAR data are analyzed using this framework. It is assumed that RGPS cells deform due to the presence of a lead. The lead orientation is calculated to optimally account for the observed deformation. It is shown that almost all observed deformation can be represented by lead opening and shearing. The procedure used to reprocess motion data to account for leads will be described and applied to regions of the Beaufort Sea. The procedure not only provides a new view of ice deformation, it can be used to obtain information about the presence of leads for initialization and/or validation of numerical simulations.

  9. Enhancement of Kinematic Accelerations by Wavenumber Correlation Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Kwon, Jay Hyoun

    2016-01-01

    To obtain kinematic accelerations with high accuracy and reliability, multiple Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers with a single antenna can be used for airborne gravimetry. The data collected from each receiver can be processed for kinematic accelerations that may be combined using simple averaging. Here, however, uncorrelated errors from instrument errors in each receiver also will be included that degrade the final solutions. Therefore, in this study, the wavenumber correlation filter (WCF) is applied to extract only the higher positively correlated wavenumber components of the kinematic accelerations for the enhancement of the final solution. The in situ airborne GPS data from two receivers were wavenumber-correlation-filtered to show about 0.07835 Gal improvement in accuracy relative to the solution from the raw kinematic accelerations. PMID:27608026

  10. Correlation Between University Students' Kinematic Achievement and Learning Styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çirkinoǧlu, A. G.; Dem&ircidot, N.

    2007-04-01

    In the literature, some researches on kinematics revealed that students have many difficulties in connecting graphs and physics. Also some researches showed that the method used in classroom affects students' further learning. In this study the correlation between university students' kinematics achieve and learning style are investigated. In this purpose Kinematics Achievement Test and Learning Style Inventory were applied to 573 students enrolled in general physics 1 courses at Balikesir University in the fall semester of 2005-2006. Kinematics Test, consists of 12 multiple choose and 6 open ended questions, was developed by researchers to assess students' understanding, interpreting, and drawing graphs. Learning Style Inventory, a 24 items test including visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles, was developed and used by Barsch. The data obtained from in this study were analyzed necessary statistical calculations (T-test, correlation, ANOVA, etc.) by using SPSS statistical program. Based on the research findings, the tentative recommendations are made.

  11. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  13. Kinematics in CTB 80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, H.; Strom, R. G.

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents data describing the radial kinematics of the core of the complex object CTB 80, believed to be a supernova remnant. The radial velocity of the CTB 80 was found to extend between -130 and 95 km/sec (LSR), with the emission being brightest and most concentrated in filaments around -30 km/sec, and weaker at higher velocities. The character of the position-velocity diagrams was found to be consistent with models of expanding ellipsoidal shells. A comparison with these models indicated a short dimension for the core along the line of sight, and favors a momentum-driven expansion. This type of expansion is indicative of a neutron star excitation for the core of CTB 80, as opposed to a normal supernova shock.

  14. Rattlesnake strike behavior: kinematics

    PubMed

    Kardong; v

    1998-03-01

    The predatory behavior of rattlesnakes includes many distinctive preparatory phases leading to an extremely rapid strike, during which venom is injected. The rodent prey is then rapidly released, removing the snake's head from retaliation by the prey. The quick action of the venom makes possible the recovery of the dispatched prey during the ensuing poststrike period. The strike is usually completed in less than 0.5 s, placing a premium on an accurate strike that produces no significant errors in fang placement that could result in poor envenomation and subsequent loss of the prey. To clarify the basis for effective strike performance, we examined the basic kinematics of the rapid strike using high-speed film analysis. We scored numerous strike variables. Four major results were obtained. (1) Neurosensory control of the strike is based primarily upon sensory inputs via the eyes and facial pits to launch the strike, and upon tactile stimuli after contact. Correction for errors in targeting occurs not by a change in strike trajectory, but by fang repositioning after the jaws have made contact with the prey. (2) The rattlesnake strike is based upon great versatility and variation in recruitment of body segments and body postures. (3) Forces generated during acceleration of the head are transferred to posterior body sections to decelerate the head before contact with the prey, thereby reducing impact forces upon the snake's jaws. (4) Body acceleration is based on two patterns of body displacement, one in which acute sections of the body open like a gate, the other in which body segments flow around postural curves similar to movements seen during locomotion. There is one major implication of these results: recruitment of body segments, launch postures and kinematic features of the strike may be quite varied from strike to strike, but the overall predatory success of each strike by a rattlesnake is very consistent.

  15. Nanoindentation near the edge

    Treesearch

    J.E. Jakes; C.R. Frihart; J.F. Beecher; R.J. Moon; P.J. Resto; Z.H. Melgarejo; O.M. Saurez; H. Baumgart; A.A. Elmustafa; D.S. Stone

    2009-01-01

    Whenever a nanoindent is placed near an edge, such as the free edge of the specimen or heterophase interface intersecting the surface, the elastic discontinuity associated with the edge produces artifacts in the load-depth data. Unless properly handled in the data analysis, the artifacts can produce spurious results that obscure any real trends in properties as...

  16. South China Sea kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J. C.; Gao, J.; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.; Ding, W.; Yeh, Y. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic modeling shows that the age of the youngest South China Sea (SCS) oceanic crust is controversial (e.g. 15.5 Ma (Briais et al., JGR 1993) and 20.5 Ma (Barckhausen et al., MPG 2014)). Recently, Sibuet et al. (Tectonophysics 2016) pointed out that post-spreading magmatic activity ( 8-13 Ma) largely masks the spreading fabric, in particular near the previously identified E-W portion of the extinct ridge axis of the East sub-basin. Their compilation of available swath bathymetric data shows that, if post-spreading volcanics hide the seafloor spreading magnetic fabric mostly along and near the extinct spreading axis, the whole SCS is globally characterized by rift directions following three directions: N055°in the youngest portion of the SCS, N065° and N085° in the oldest portions of the SCS, suggesting the extinct ridge axis is N055° trending instead of E-W. We present an updated version of the whole SCS structural sketch based on previously published swath bathymetric trends and new detailed magnetic lineations trends compiled from an extremely dense set of magnetic data. The new structural sketch shows: - The distribution of conjugate kinematic domains, - The early opening of the NW and East sub-basins, before a jump of the rift axis, - A second ridge jump in the East basin, - The different expressions of the post-spreading magmatism in the East and SW sub-basins. In the East sub-basin, crustal magmatic intrusions led to the formation of extrusive basalts associated with the presence of numerous volcanoes (Wang et al., Geological Journal 2016). In the SW sub-basin, crustal magmatic intrusions deformed and uplifted the already formed oceanic crust and oldest overlying sediments, resulting in the formation of a double post-spreading ridge belt previously identified as the shoulders of the extinct spreading rift axis. This preliminary work will be used to identify magnetic lineations not polluted by the post-spreading magmatism. The unfolded Manila trench

  17. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  18. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace.

  19. Kinematic foot types in youth with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Krzak, Joseph J.; Corcos, Daniel M.; Damiano, Diane L.; Graf, Adam; Hedeker, Donald; Smith, Peter A.; Harris, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated kinematic variability of the foot and ankle segments exists during gait among individuals with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Clinicians have previously addressed such variability by developing classification schemes to identify subgroups of individuals based on their kinematics. Objective To identify kinematic subgroups among youth with equinovarus secondary to CP using 3-dimensional multi-segment foot and ankle kinematics during locomotion as inputs for principal component analysis (PCA), and K-means cluster analysis. Methods In a single assessment session, multi-segment foot and ankle kinematics using the Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM) were collected in 24 children/adolescents with equinovarus and 20 typically developing children/adolescents. Results PCA was used as a data reduction technique on 40 variables. K-means cluster analysis was performed on the first six principal components (PCs) which accounted for 92% of the variance of the dataset. The PCs described the location and plane of involvement in the foot and ankle. Five distinct kinematic subgroups were identified using K-means clustering. Participants with equinovarus presented with variable involvement ranging from primary hindfoot or forefoot deviations to deformtiy that included both segments in multiple planes. Conclusion This study provides further evidence of the variability in foot characteristics associated with equinovarus secondary to hemiplegic CP. These findings would not have been detected using a single segment foot model. The identification of multiple kinematic subgroups with unique foot and ankle characteristics has the potential to improve treatment since similar patients within a subgroup are likely to benefit from the same intervention(s). PMID:25467429

  20. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  1. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  2. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmann, J. F.; Thiele, S. T.; Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilise the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a~link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential-fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  3. THE PHOTOMETRIC AND KINEMATIC STRUCTURE OF FACE-ON DISK GALAXIES. III. KINEMATIC INCLINATIONS FROM H{alpha} VELOCITY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A. E-mail: mab@astro.wisc.edu

    2013-05-01

    Using the integral field unit DensePak on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope we have obtained H{alpha} velocity fields of 39 nearly face-on disks at echelle resolutions. High-quality, uniform kinematic data and a new modeling technique enabled us to derive accurate and precise kinematic inclinations with mean i{sub kin} = 23 Degree-Sign for 90% of these galaxies. Modeling the kinematic data as single, inclined disks in circular rotation improves upon the traditional tilted-ring method. We measure kinematic inclinations with a precision in sin i of 25% at 20 Degree-Sign and 6% at 30 Degree-Sign . Kinematic inclinations are consistent with photometric and inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations when the sample is culled of galaxies with kinematic asymmetries, for which we give two specific prescriptions. Kinematic inclinations can therefore be used in statistical ''face-on'' Tully-Fisher studies. A weighted combination of multiple, independent inclination measurements yield the most precise and accurate inclination. Combining inverse Tully-Fisher inclinations with kinematic inclinations yields joint probability inclinations with a precision in sin i of 10% at 15 Degree-Sign and 5% at 30 Degree-Sign . This level of precision makes accurate mass decompositions of galaxies possible even at low inclination. We find scaling relations between rotation speed and disk-scale length identical to results from more inclined samples. We also observe the trend of more steeply rising rotation curves with increased rotation speed and light concentration. This trend appears to be uncorrelated with disk surface brightness.

  4. Treadmill Kinematics Baseline Data Collection

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-12

    PHOTO DATE: 5-12-11 LOCATION: Building 261 - Room 138 SUBJECT: Expedition 29 Preflight Training with Dan Burbank during Treadmill Kinematics Baseline Data Collection. WORK ORDER: 2011-1214 PHOTOGRAPHER: Lauren Harnett

  5. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry, obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.

  6. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  7. Tensor networks from kinematic space

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; ...

    2016-07-20

    We point out that the MERA network for the ground state of a 1+1-dimensional conformal field theory has the same structural features as kinematic space — the geometry of CFT intervals. In holographic theories kinematic space becomes identified with the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. We argue that in these settings MERA is best viewed as a discretization of the space of bulk geodesics rather than of the bulk geometry itself. As a test of this kinematic proposal, we compare the MERA representation of the thermofield-double state with the space of geodesics in the two-sided BTZ geometry,more » obtaining a detailed agreement which includes the entwinement sector. In conclusion, we discuss how the kinematic proposal can be extended to excited states by generalizing MERA to a broader class of compression networks.« less

  8. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  9. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  10. Improved kinematic options in ALEGRA.

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Grant V.; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2003-12-01

    Algorithms for higher order accuracy modeling of kinematic behavior within the ALEGRA framework are presented. These techniques improve the behavior of the code when kinematic errors are found, ensure orthonormality of the rotation tensor at each time step, and increase the accuracy of the Lagrangian stretch and rotation tensor update algorithm. The implementation of these improvements in ALEGRA is described. A short discussion of issues related to improving the accuracy of the stress update procedures is also included.

  11. The Edge of Jupiter

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-19

    This enhanced color Jupiter image, taken by the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft, showcases several interesting features on the apparent edge (limb) of the planet. Prior to Juno's fifth flyby over Jupiter's mysterious cloud tops, members of the public voted on which targets JunoCam should image. This picture captures not only a fascinating variety of textures in Jupiter's atmosphere, it also features three specific points of interest: "String of Pearls," "Between the Pearls," and "An Interesting Band Point." Also visible is what's known as the STB Spectre, a feature in Jupiter's South Temperate Belt where multiple atmospheric conditions appear to collide. JunoCam images of Jupiter sometimes appear to have an odd shape. This is because the Juno spacecraft is so close to Jupiter that it cannot capture the entire illuminated area in one image -- the sides get cut off. Juno acquired this image on March 27, 2017, at 2:12 a.m. PDT (5:12 a.m. EDT), as the spacecraft performed a close flyby of Jupiter. When the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 12,400 miles (20,000 kilometers) from the planet. This enhanced color image was created by citizen scientist Bjorn Jonsson. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21389

  12. Leading-edge flow criticality as a governing factor in leading-edge vortex initiation in unsteady airfoil flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Kiran; Granlund, Kenneth; Ol, Michael V.; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Edwards, Jack R.

    2017-08-01

    A leading-edge suction parameter (LESP) that is derived from potential flow theory as a measure of suction at the airfoil leading edge is used to study initiation of leading-edge vortex (LEV) formation in this article. The LESP hypothesis is presented, which states that LEV formation in unsteady flows for specified airfoil shape and Reynolds number occurs at a critical constant value of LESP, regardless of motion kinematics. This hypothesis is tested and validated against a large set of data from CFD and experimental studies of flows with LEV formation. The hypothesis is seen to hold except in cases with slow-rate kinematics which evince significant trailing-edge separation (which refers here to separation leading to reversed flow on the aft portion of the upper surface), thereby establishing the envelope of validity. The implication is that the critical LESP value for an airfoil-Reynolds number combination may be calibrated using CFD or experiment for just one motion and then employed to predict LEV initiation for any other (fast-rate) motion. It is also shown that the LESP concept may be used in an inverse mode to generate motion kinematics that would either prevent LEV formation or trigger the same as per aerodynamic requirements.

  13. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-07

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible.

  14. Tasting edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Lydéric

    2007-02-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  15. Kinematics of Saturn's spokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Garneau, G. W.; Terrile, R. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 2 images of Saturn's rings have been analyzed for spoke activity. More than 80 and 40 different spokes have been measured at the morning and at the evening ansa, respectively. Higher rate of spoke formation has been found at 145 + or 15 deg SLS and at 305 + or - 15 deg SLS which persisted for at least 3 Saturn revolutions. Higher spoke activity (formation and growth in width) by more than a factor 3 has been observed over the nightside hemisphere of Saturn than over the dayside hemisphere. The age distribution (i.e., time from radial formation until observation, assuming Keplerian shear) of the leading (old) edges of spokes has its maximum at approximately 9,000 s and 6,000 s for spokes observed at the morning ansa and at the evening ansa, respectively. The highest spoke age observed is approximately 20,000 s.

  16. Edge enhancement improves disruptive camouflage by emphasising false edges and creating pictorial relief

    PubMed Central

    Egan, John; Sharman, Rebecca J.; Scott-Brown, Kenneth C.; Lovell, Paul George

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive colouration is a visual camouflage composed of false edges and boundaries. Many disruptively camouflaged animals feature enhanced edges; light patches are surrounded by a lighter outline and/or a dark patches are surrounded by a darker outline. This camouflage is particularly common in amphibians, reptiles and lepidopterans. We explored the role that this pattern has in creating effective camouflage. In a visual search task utilising an ultra-large display area mimicking search tasks that might be found in nature, edge enhanced disruptive camouflage increases crypsis, even on substrates that do not provide an obvious visual match. Specifically, edge enhanced camouflage is effective on backgrounds both with and without shadows; i.e. this is not solely due to background matching of the dark edge enhancement element with the shadows. Furthermore, when the dark component of the edge enhancement is omitted the camouflage still provided better crypsis than control patterns without edge enhancement. This kind of edge enhancement improved camouflage on all background types. Lastly, we show that edge enhancement can create a perception of multiple surfaces. We conclude that edge enhancement increases the effectiveness of disruptive camouflage through mechanisms that may include the improved disruption of the object outline by implying pictorial relief. PMID:27922058

  17. Edge enhancement improves disruptive camouflage by emphasising false edges and creating pictorial relief.

    PubMed

    Egan, John; Sharman, Rebecca J; Scott-Brown, Kenneth C; Lovell, Paul George

    2016-12-06

    Disruptive colouration is a visual camouflage composed of false edges and boundaries. Many disruptively camouflaged animals feature enhanced edges; light patches are surrounded by a lighter outline and/or a dark patches are surrounded by a darker outline. This camouflage is particularly common in amphibians, reptiles and lepidopterans. We explored the role that this pattern has in creating effective camouflage. In a visual search task utilising an ultra-large display area mimicking search tasks that might be found in nature, edge enhanced disruptive camouflage increases crypsis, even on substrates that do not provide an obvious visual match. Specifically, edge enhanced camouflage is effective on backgrounds both with and without shadows; i.e. this is not solely due to background matching of the dark edge enhancement element with the shadows. Furthermore, when the dark component of the edge enhancement is omitted the camouflage still provided better crypsis than control patterns without edge enhancement. This kind of edge enhancement improved camouflage on all background types. Lastly, we show that edge enhancement can create a perception of multiple surfaces. We conclude that edge enhancement increases the effectiveness of disruptive camouflage through mechanisms that may include the improved disruption of the object outline by implying pictorial relief.

  18. On Edge Exchangeable Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, Svante

    2017-06-01

    We study a recent model for edge exchangeable random graphs introduced by Crane and Dempsey; in particular we study asymptotic properties of the random simple graph obtained by merging multiple edges. We study a number of examples, and show that the model can produce dense, sparse and extremely sparse random graphs. One example yields a power-law degree distribution. We give some examples where the random graph is dense and converges a.s. in the sense of graph limit theory, but also an example where a.s. every graph limit is the limit of some subsequence. Another example is sparse and yields convergence to a non-integrable generalized graphon defined on (0,∞).

  19. Kinematics of Haro 11: The miniature Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, G.; Marquart, T.; Cumming, R. J.; Fathi, K.; Bergvall, N.; Adamo, A.; Amram, P.; Hayes, M.

    2015-11-01

    Luminous blue compact galaxies are among the most active galaxies in the local Universe in terms of their star formation rate per unit mass. They are rare at the current cosmic epoch, but were more abundant in the past and may be seen as the local analogues of higher red shift Lyman break galaxies. Studies of their kinematics is key to understanding what triggers their unusually active star formation. In this work, we investigate the kinematics of stars and ionised gas in Haro 11, one of the most luminous blue compact galaxies in the local Universe. Previous works have indicated that many of these galaxies may be triggered by galaxy mergers. We have employed Fabry-Perot interferometry, long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy to explore the kinematics of Haro 11. We target the near-infrared calcium triplet, and use cross-correlation and penalised pixel fitting techniques to derive the stellar velocity field and velocity dispersion. We analyse ionised gas through emission lines from hydrogen, [O iii], and [S iii]. When spectral resolution and signal to noise allows, we investigate the line profile in detail and identify multiple velocity components when present. The spectra reveal a complex velocity field whose components, both stellar and gaseous, we attempt to disentangle. We find that to first order, the velocity field and velocity dispersions derived from stars and ionised gas agree. Hence the complexities reveal real dynamical disturbances providing further evidence for a merger in Haro 11. Through decomposition of emission lines, we find evidence for kinematically distinct components, for instance, a tidal arm. The ionised gas velocity field can be traced to large galactocentric radii, and shows significant velocity dispersion even far out in the halo. If interpreted as virial motions, this indicates that Haro 11 may have a mass of ~1011 M⊙. Haro 11 shows many resemblances with the famous Antennae galaxies both morphologically and

  20. In Vivo Healthy Knee Kinematics during Dynamic Full Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Dunbar, Nicholas J.; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics' data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses. PMID:23509767

  1. In vivo healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Dunbar, Nicholas J; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics' data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  2. Supersonic Leading Edge Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslov, Anatoly A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of leading edge boundary layer receptivity for imposed stream disturbances. Studies were conducted in the supersonic T-325 facility at ITAM and include data for both sharp and blunt leading edges. The data are in agreement with existing theory and should provide guidance for the development of more complete theories and numerical computations of this phenomena.

  3. The Edge, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, 1999

    1999-01-01

    "The Edge" is a Canadian publication for youth. The mandate of the Edge is to support and celebrate all career journeys embraced by youth. This issue contains career profile articles covering three jobs: crane operator, indoor climbing instructor, and product certification tester. Career trends and the state of today's workplace are also…

  4. Study of human body: Kinematics and kinetics of a martial arts (Silat) performers using 3D-motion capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Ahmad Afiq Sabqi Awang; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Azraai, Nur Zaidi

    2015-04-01

    The Interest in this studies of human kinematics goes back very far in human history drove by curiosity or need for the understanding the complexity of human body motion. To find new and accurate information about the human movement as the advance computing technology became available for human movement that can perform. Martial arts (silat) were chose and multiple type of movement was studied. This project has done by using cutting-edge technology which is 3D motion capture to characterize and to measure the motion done by the performers of martial arts (silat). The camera will detect the markers (infrared reflection by the marker) around the performer body (total of 24 markers) and will show as dot in the computer software. The markers detected were analyzing using kinematic kinetic approach and time as reference. A graph of velocity, acceleration and position at time,t (seconds) of each marker was plot. Then from the information obtain, more parameters were determined such as work done, momentum, center of mass of a body using mathematical approach. This data can be used for development of the effectiveness movement in martial arts which is contributed to the people in arts. More future works can be implemented from this project such as analysis of a martial arts competition.

  5. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iannuzzi, Francesca; Athanassoula, E.

    2015-07-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disc galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrized up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the mid-plane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second buckling and find that this phenomenon spurs an additional set of even deeper minima in the fourth moment. Finally, we show how the results evolve when inclining the disc away from perfectly edge-on and face-on. The behaviour of stars born during the course of the simulations is discussed and confronted to that of the pre-existing disc. The general aim of our study is providing a handle to identify boxy/peanut structures and their properties in latest generation Integral Field Unit observations of nearby disc galaxies.

  6. Kinematic Hardening: Characterization, Modeling and Impact on Springback Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, J. L.; Bouvier, S.; Jomaa, M.; Billardon, R.

    2007-05-17

    The constitutive modeling of the materials' mechanical behavior, usually carried out using a phenomenological constitutive model, i.e., a yield criterion associated to the isotropic and kinematic hardening laws, is of paramount importance in the FEM simulation of the sheet metal forming processes, as well as in the springback prediction. Among others, the kinematic behavior of the yield surface plays an essential role, since it is indispensable to describe the Bauschinger effect, i.e., the materials' answer to the multiple tension-compression cycles to which material points are submitted during the forming process. Several laws are usually used to model and describe the kinematic hardening, namely: a) the Prager's law, which describes a linear evolution of the kinematic hardening with the plastic strain rate tensor b) the Frederick-Armstrong non-linear kinematic hardening, basically a non-linear law with saturation; and c) a more advanced physically-based law, similar to the previous one but sensitive to the strain path changes. In the present paper a mixed kinematic hardening law (linear + non-linear behavior) is proposed and its implementation into a static fully-implicit FE code is described. The material parameters identification for sheet metals using different strategies, and the classical Bauschinger loading tests (i.e. in-plane forward and reverse monotonic loading), are addressed, and their impact on springback prediction evaluated. Some numerical results concerning the springback prediction of the Numisheet'05 Benchmark no. 3 are briefly presented to emphasize the importance of a correct modeling and identification of the kinematic hardening behavior.

  7. Are static and dynamic kinematics comparable after total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Saevarsson, Stefan K; Romeo, Carolina I; Anglin, Carolyn

    2013-04-05

    Knee kinematics provide information about how the femoral, tibial and patellar bones or prosthetic components move relative to each other. Accurate knowledge of kinematics is valuable for implant design, comparisons between designs or surgical techniques, and to identify differences between patients with good and poor outcomes. Both static and dynamic imaging techniques have been used to evaluate kinematics. In general, static imaging is used to capture better quality images or to capture views that cannot be acquired by dynamic imaging, whereas dynamic imaging is used to capture real-life movements. How well static kinematics represent dynamic kinematics is subject to frequent debate and has not been adequately addressed, especially after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We compared the static and dynamic weightbearing kinematics of 10 female subjects after TKA. Using the same clinical scanner for both methods, static images were taken using our standard protocol, sequential-biplane radiographs at multiple flexion angles, as well as with dynamic video fluoroscopy during a step up activity. The static method can reliably measure all 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) after TKA, however only seven were compared due to the poorer out-of-plane reliability in the single-plane dynamic imaging. No differences were found between the static and dynamic kinematics for nine out of ten subjects. For one subject, however, a difference of 5-8° in internal/external tibial rotation was found. The research question, study purpose and the advantages and disadvantages of each method need to be considered when determining which imaging method to use.

  8. Continuum Gyrokinetic Edge New Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M. R.; Hittinger, J. A.; Dorf, M.; Cohen, R.; Ghosh, D.; Lee, W.; Reynolds, C.

    2016-05-02

    COGENT is a simulation code that models the plasma evolution in the edge region of a tokamak fusion reactor, from the open field line scrape-off layer, across the separatrix, and into the core. The model is based on the 4D gyrokinetic closure of the kinetic equations for a plasma coupled to an electrostatic potential field. The background magnetic field is prescribed either analytically or generated from experimental data, and the grid is aligned with magnetic flux surfaces. Multiple collision operator options are provided, from Krook to fully nonlinear Fokker-Planck.

  9. Observations and kinematic modeling of neutral hydrogen in spiral galaxies: Implications for disk-halo flows and accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschaechner, Laura Kristina

    Recent realizations concerning kinematic measurements of extra-planar layers in nearby galaxies may provide important clues to the origin of such layers and thereby the growth and evolution of galaxy disks. In particular, observations have shown a decrease in rotation speed with height (lags) in the extra-planar layers of multiple galaxies, leading to various models which attempt to understand this gradient in terms of disk-halo flows and accretion of primordial gas. In this thesis we present deep observations and detailed kinematic models of neutral hydrogen (HI) in five nearby, edge-on spiral galaxies (NGC 4244, NGC 4565, NGC 4302, NGC 3044 and NGC 4013) observed with the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. These models provide insight concerning both the morphology and kinematics of HI above and within the disk, especially in terms of their lags. Characterization of the magnitude and radial variation of lags aids in determining whether extra-planar HI originates in the plane of the disk (as described in galactic fountain-type models) or is accreted. In these galaxies we find substantial extra- planar Hi is not ubiquitous, while lags appear to be so. Furthermore, the lags we measure are steeper than those produced by purely ballistic effects, indicating that additional physical effects must be at work. In every (with the exception of NGC 4013) galaxy we model, a radial shallowing of the lag is observed, starting at approximately half of R25, and reaching its lowest magnitude near R25. Combining our sample with results from the literature, we see no clear connection between the presence of extra-planar Hi and star formation, nor do we see any connection between lag magnitude and star formation. Our findings provide constraints for theoretical scenarios which we will describe.

  10. KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC EVIDENCE FOR A BAR IN NGC 2683

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Zagursky, Matthew J.; McGaugh, Stacy S. E-mail: mzagursk@umd.edu

    2009-10-15

    We present optical long-slit and SparsePak Integral Field Unit emission line spectroscopy along with optical broadband and near-IR images of the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 2683. We find a multi-valued, figure-of-eight velocity structure in the inner 45'' of the long-slit spectrum and twisted isovelocity contours in the velocity field. We also find, regardless of wavelength, that the galaxy isophotes are boxy. We argue that taken together, these kinematic and photometric features are evidence for the presence of a bar in NGC 2683. We use our data to constrain the orientation and strength of the bar.

  11. Assessment of representational competence in kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, P.; Müller, A.; Kuhn, J.

    2017-06-01

    A two-tier instrument for representational competence in the field of kinematics (KiRC) is presented, designed for a standard (1st year) calculus-based introductory mechanics course. It comprises 11 multiple choice (MC) and 7 multiple true-false (MTF) questions involving multiple representational formats, such as graphs, pictures, and formal (mathematical) expressions (1st tier). Furthermore, students express their answer confidence for selected items, providing additional information (2nd tier). Measurement characteristics of KiRC were assessed in a validation sample (pre- and post-test, N =83 and N =46 , respectively), including usefulness for measuring learning gain. Validity is checked by interviews and by benchmarking KiRC against related measures. Values for item difficulty, discrimination, and consistency are in the desired ranges; in particular, a good reliability was obtained (KR 20 =0.86 ). Confidence intervals were computed and a replication study yielded values within the latter. For practical and research purposes, KiRC as a diagnostic tool goes beyond related extant instruments both for the representational formats (e.g., mathematical expressions) and for the scope of content covered (e.g., choice of coordinate systems). Together with the satisfactory psychometric properties it appears a versatile and reliable tool for assessing students' representational competency in kinematics (and of its potential change). Confidence judgments add further information to the diagnostic potential of the test, in particular for representational misconceptions. Moreover, we present an analytic result for the question—arising from guessing correction or educational considerations—of how the total effect size (Cohen's d ) varies upon combination of two test components with known individual effect sizes, and then discuss the results in the case of KiRC (MC and MTF combination). The introduced method of test combination analysis can be applied to any test comprising

  12. Kinematics of KPG 390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we present scanning Fabry-Perot Hα observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/9 obtained with the PUMA Fabry-Perot interferometer. We derived velocity fields, various kinematic parameters and rotation curves for both galaxies. Our kinematical results together with the fact that dust lanes have been detected in both galaxies, as well as the analysis of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis, allowed us to determine that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  13. Kinematic sensitivity of robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vuskovic, Marko I.

    1989-01-01

    Kinematic sensitivity vectors and matrices for open-loop, n degrees-of-freedom manipulators are derived. First-order sensitivity vectors are defined as partial derivatives of the manipulator's position and orientation with respect to its geometrical parameters. The four-parameter kinematic model is considered, as well as the five-parameter model in case of nominally parallel joint axes. Sensitivity vectors are expressed in terms of coordinate axes of manipulator frames. Second-order sensitivity vectors, the partial derivatives of first-order sensitivity vectors, are also considered. It is shown that second-order sensitivity vectors can be expressed as vector products of the first-order sensitivity vectors.

  14. The digital step edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The facet model was used to accomplish step edge detection. The essence of the facet model is that any analysis made on the basis of the pixel values in some neighborhood has its final authoritative interpretation relative to the underlying grey tone intensity surface of which the neighborhood pixel values are observed noisy samples. Pixels which are part of regions have simple grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Pixels which have an edge in them have complex grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Specially, an edge moves through a pixel only if there is some point in the pixel's area having a zero crossing of the second directional derivative taken in the direction of a non-zero gradient at the pixel's center. To determine whether or not a pixel should be marked as a step edge pixel, its underlying grey tone intensity surface was estimated on the basis of the pixels in its neighborhood.

  15. Distributed electromechanical actuation system design for a morphing trailing edge wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimino, I.; Diodati, G.; Concilio, A.; Volovick, A.; Zivan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation flight control actuation technology will be based on "more electric" concepts to ensure benefits in terms of efficiency, weight and maintenance. This paper is concerned with the design of an un-shafted distributed servo-electromechanical actuation system, suited for morphing trailing edge wings of large commercial aircraft. It aims at producing small wing camber variations in the range between -5° and +5° in cruise, to enable aerodynamic efficiency improvements. The deployment kinematics is based on multiple "direct-drive" actuation, each made of light-weight compact lever mechanisms, rigidly connected to compliant ribs and sustained by load-bearing motors. Navier-Stokes computations are performed to estimate the pressure distribution over the interested wing region and the resulting hinge moments. These transfer to the primary structure via the driving mechanism. An electro-mechanical Matlab/Simulink model of the distributed actuation architecture is developed and used as a design tool, to preliminary evaluate the complete system performance. Implementing a multi-shaft strategy, each actuator is sized for the torque acting on the respective adaptive rib, following the effect of both the aerodynamic pressure and the morphing skin stiffness. Elastic trailing edge rotations and power needs are evaluated in operative conditions. Focus is finally given to the key challenges of the proposed concept: targeting quantifiable performance improvements while being compliant to the demanding requirements in terms of reliability and safety.

  16. Edge wave visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K.; Nguyen, Truong X.

    1991-01-01

    Scattering mechanisms that involve edge waves are addressed. The behavior of edge waves and their interaction with flat, perfectly conducting plates are depicted in the time domain through a visualization of surface currents that flow on the surface, as an incident Gaussian pulse of energy washes over the surface. Viewing these surface currents allows a very clear physical interpretation and appreciation of the scattering process.

  17. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  18. Essential kinematics for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Alonzo

    1994-05-01

    A short tutorial on Homogeneous Transforms is presented covering the triple interpretation of a homogeneous transform as an operator, a coordinate frame, and a coordinate transform. The operator transform duality is derived and its use in the Denavit Hartenberg convention is explained. Forward, inverse, and differential kinematics are derived for a simple manipulator to illustrate concepts. A standard set of coordinate frames is proposed for wheeled mobile robots. It is shown that the RPY transform serves the same purpose as the DH matrix in this case. It serves to interface with vehicle position estimation systems of all kinds, to control and model pan/tilt mechanisms and stabilized platforms, and to model the rigid transforms from place to place on the vehicle. Forward and inverse kinematics and the Euler angle rate to the angular velocity transform are derived for the RPY transform. Projective kinematics for ideal video cameras and laser rangefinders, and the imaging Jacobian relating world space and image space is derived. Finally, the kinematics of the Ackerman steer vehicle is presented for reference purposes. This report is both a tutorial and a reference for the transforms used in the RANGER vehicle controller. It is both because the models keep evolving and it was necessary to provide the tools, mechanisms, and discipline required to continue the evolution.

  19. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  20. Kinematic analysis of the ARID manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L

    1992-01-01

    The kinematic structure of the ARID manipulator lends itself to simple forward and inverse kinematics analysis. The purpose of this paper is to fully document and verify an existing analysis. The symbolic software package MATHEMATICA was used to produce and verify the equations presented here. In the analysis to follow, the standard Devenit-Hartenberg kinematic parameters of the ARID were employed.

  1. The Edge supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosta, Roxana; Bilbija, Dushan; Deutsch, Marc; Gallant, David; Rose, Don; Shreve, Gene; Smario, David; Suffredini, Brian

    1992-01-01

    As intercontinental business and tourism volumes continue their rapid expansion, the need to reduce travel times becomes increasingly acute. The Edge Supersonic Transport Aircraft is designed to meet this demand by the year 2015. With a maximum range of 5750 nm, a payload of 294 passengers and a cruising speed of M = 2.4, The Edge will cut current international flight durations in half, while maintaining competitive first class, business class, and economy class comfort levels. Moreover, this transport will render a minimal impact upon the environment, and will meet all Federal Aviation Administration Part 36, Stage III noise requirements. The cornerstone of The Edge's superior flight performance is its aerodynamically efficient, dual-configuration design incorporating variable-geometry wingtips. This arrangement combines the benefits of a high aspect ratio wing at takeoff and low cruising speeds with the high performance of an arrow-wing in supersonic cruise. And while the structural weight concerns relating to swinging wingtips are substantial, The Edge looks to ever-advancing material technologies to further increase its viability. Heeding well the lessons of the past, The Edge design holds economic feasibility as its primary focus. Therefore, in addition to its inherently superior aerodynamic performance, The Edge uses a lightweight, largely windowless configuration, relying on a synthetic vision system for outside viewing by both pilot and passengers. Additionally, a fly-by-light flight control system is incorporated to address aircraft supersonic cruise instability. The Edge will be produced at an estimated volume of 400 aircraft and will be offered to airlines in 2015 at $167 million per transport (1992 dollars).

  2. Deployable antenna kinematics using tensegrity structure design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Byron Franklin

    With vast changes in spacecraft development over the last decade, a new, cheaper approach was needed for deployable kinematic systems such as parabolic antenna reflectors. Historically, these mesh-surface reflectors have resembled folded umbrellas, with incremental redesigns utilized to save packaging size. These systems are typically over-constrained designs, the assumption being that high reliability necessary for space operations requires this level of conservatism. But with the rapid commercialization of space, smaller launch platforms and satellite buses have demanded much higher efficiency from all space equipment than can be achieved through this incremental approach. This work applies an approach called tensegrity to deployable antenna development. Kenneth Snelson, a student of R. Buckminster Fuller, invented Tensegrity structures in 1948. Such structures use a minimum number of compression members (struts); stability is maintain using tension members (ties). The novelty introduced in this work is that the ties are elastic, allowing the struts to extend or contract, and in this way changing the surface of the antenna. Previously, the University of Florida developed an approach to quantify the stability and motion of parallel manipulators. This approach was applied to deployable, tensegrity, antenna structures. Based on the kinematic analyses for the 3-3 (octahedron) and 4-4 (square anti-prism) structures, the 6-6 (hexagonal anti-prism) analysis was completed which establishes usable structural parameters. The primary objective for this work was to prove the stability of this class of deployable structures, and their potential application to space structures. The secondary objective is to define special motions for tensegrity antennas, to meet the subsystem design requirements, such as addressing multiple antenna-feed locations. This work combines the historical experiences of the artist (Snelson), the mathematician (Ball), and the space systems engineer

  3. Adaptable edge quality metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Robin N.; Chang, Dunkai K.

    1990-09-01

    A new quality metric for evaluating edges detected by digital image processing algorithms is presented. The metric is a weighted sum of measures of edge continuity smoothness thinness localization detection and noisiness. Through a training process we can design weights which optimize the metric for different users and applications. We have used the metric to compare the results of ten edge detectors when applied to edges degraded by varying degrees of blur and varying degrees and types of noise. As expected the more optimum Difference-of-Gaussians (DOG) and Haralick methods outperform the simpler gradient detectors. At high signal-to-noise (SNR) ratios Haralick''s method is the best choice although it exhibits a sudden drop in performance at lower SNRs. The DOG filter''s performance degrades almost linearly with SNR and maintains a reasonably high level at lower SNRs. The same relative performances are observed as blur is varied. For most of the detectors tested performance drops with increasing noise correlation. Noise correlated in the same direction as the edge is the most destructive of the noise types tested.

  4. The kinematics of σ-drop bulges from spectral synthesis modelling of a hydrodynamical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portaluri, Elisa; Debattista, Victor P.; Fabricius, Maximillian; Cole, David R.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Drory, Niv; Rowe, Andrew; Morelli, Lorenzo; Pizzella, Alessandro; Dalla Bontà, Elena

    2017-01-01

    A minimum in stellar velocity dispersion is often observed in the central regions of disc galaxies. To investigate the origin of this feature, known as a σ-drop, we analyse the stellar kinematics of a high-resolution N-body + smooth particle hydrodynamical simulation, which models the secular evolution of an unbarred disc galaxy. We compared the intrinsic mass-weighted kinematics to the recovered luminosity-weighted ones. The latter were obtained by analysing synthetic spectra produced by a new code, SYNTRA, that generates synthetic spectra by assigning a stellar population synthesis model to each star particle based on its age and metallicity. The kinematics were derived from the synthetic spectra as in real spectra to mimic the kinematic analysis of real galaxies. We found that the recovered luminosity-weighted kinematics in the centre of the simulated galaxy are biased to higher rotation velocities and lower velocity dispersions due to the presence of young stars in a thin and kinematically cool disc, and are ultimately responsible for the σ-drop. Our procedure for building mock observations and thus recovering the luminosity-weighted kinematics of the stars in a galaxy simulation is a powerful tool that can be applied to a variety of scientific questions, such as multiple stellar populations in kinematically-decoupled cores and counter-rotating components, and galaxies with both thick and thin disc components.

  5. The kinematics of σ-drop bulges from spectral synthesis modelling of a hydrodynamical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portaluri, Elisa; Debattista, Victor P.; Fabricius, Maximillian; Cole, David R.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Drory, Niv; Rowe, Andrew; Morelli, Lorenzo; Pizzella, Alessandro; Dalla Bontà, Elena

    2017-05-01

    A minimum in stellar velocity dispersion is often observed in the central regions of disc galaxies. To investigate the origin of this feature, known as a σ-drop, we analyse the stellar kinematics of a high-resolution N-body + smooth particle hydrodynamical simulation, which models the secular evolution of an unbarred disc galaxy. We compared the intrinsic mass-weighted kinematics to the recovered luminosity-weighted ones. The latter were obtained by analysing synthetic spectra produced by a new code, syntra, that generates synthetic spectra by assigning a stellar population synthesis model to each star particle based on its age and metallicity. The kinematics were derived from the synthetic spectra as in real spectra to mimic the kinematic analysis of real galaxies. We found that the recovered luminosity-weighted kinematics in the centre of the simulated galaxy are biased to higher rotation velocities and lower velocity dispersions due to the presence of young stars in a thin and kinematically cool disc, and are ultimately responsible for the σ-drop. Our procedure for building mock observations and thus recovering the luminosity-weighted kinematics of the stars in a galaxy simulation is a powerful tool that can be applied to a variety of scientific questions, such as multiple stellar populations in kinematically decoupled cores and counter-rotating components, and galaxies with both thick and thin disc components.

  6. Exploring MaNGA's kinematic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijmans, Anne-Marie; MaNGA Team

    2016-01-01

    Different galaxy formation processes leave different imprints on the gas and stellar kinematic patterns for a galaxy. With MaNGA, we now have after one year of observations an unprecedented sample of 1400 nearby galaxies for which we can study gas and stellar kinematics in much detail, based on integral-field spectroscopy. We are measuring kinematic quantities such as LambdaR (angular momentum) and their (possible) correlations with other galaxy properties such as mass, morphology and environment. By quantifying the kinematic (sub)structures in velocity and dispersion maps, we will construct a kinematic galaxy classification that can be linked to their formation processes.

  7. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  8. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  9. High Speed Edge Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokop, Norman F (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Analog circuits for detecting edges in pixel arrays are disclosed. A comparator may be configured to receive an all pass signal and a low pass signal for a pixel intensity in an array of pixels. A latch may be configured to receive a counter signal and a latching signal from the comparator. The comparator may be configured to send the latching signal to the latch when the all pass signal is below the low pass signal minus an offset. The latch may be configured to hold a last negative edge location when the latching signal is received from the comparator.

  10. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattione, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  11. Kinematic dynamos in spheroidal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivers, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is solved numerically for a spheroidal conducting fluid of possibly large aspect ratio with an insulating exterior. The solution method uses solenoidal representations of the magnetic field and the velocity by spheroidal toroidal and poloidal fields in a non-orthogonal coordinate system. Scaling of coordinates and fields to a spherical geometry leads to a modified form of the kinematic dynamo problem with a geometric anisotropic diffusion and an anisotropic current-free condition in the exterior, which is solved explicitly. The scaling allows the use of well-developed spherical harmonic techniques in angle. Dynamo solutions are found for three axisymmetric flows in oblate spheroids with semi-axis ratios 1≤a/c≤25. For larger aspect ratios strong magnetic fields may occur in any region of the spheroid, depending on the flow, but the external fields for all three flows are weak and concentrated near the axis or periphery of the spheroid.

  12. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  13. Kinematic Tests of Small Arms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-15

    needed measurements can be made. g. In order to make these calculations, software should be able to output these positional values over time into a...other means, and (b) measuring the impulse and recoil of small- caliber weapons by a laser displacement measurement system, HSV, displacement...transducers, or other means. 15. SUBJECT TERMS kinematic, small arms, recoil measurements , laser tracking system 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  14. Of cilium and flagellum kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Hansen, Joshua C.

    2009-11-01

    The kinematics of propulsion of small animals such as paramecium and spermatozoa is considered. Larger scale models of the cilium and flagellum have been built and a four-motor apparatus has been constructed to reproduce their known periodic motions. The cilium model has transverse deformational ability in one plane only, while the flagellum model has such ability in two planes. When the flagellum model is given a push-pull in one diametral plane, instead of transverse deflection in one plane, it forms a coil. Berg & Anderson's postulation (Nature 245 1973) that a flagellum rotates, is recalled. The kinematics of cilia of paramecium, of the whipping motion of the spermatozoa flagella, and of the flapping motion (rolling and pitching) of the pectoral fins of much larger animals such penguins, have been reproduced in the same basic paramecium apparatus. The results suggest that each of the tiny individual paramecium propulsors have the intrinsic dormant kinematic and structural building blocks to optimize into higher Reynolds number propulsors. A synthetic hypothesis on how small might have become large is animated.

  15. Kinematic top analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Cobal-Grassman, M.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    We present an update of the top quark analysis using kinematic techniques in {rho}{ovr string {rho}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We reported before on a study which used 19.3 pb{sup -1} of data from the 1992-93 collider run, but now we use a larger data sample of 67 pb{sup -1}. First, we analyze the total transverse energy of the hard collision in W+{ge}3 jet events, showing the likely presence of a t{ovr string t} component in the event sample. Next, we compare in more detail the kinematic structure of W+{ge}3 jet events with expectations for top pair production and with background processes, predominantly direct W+ jet production. We again find W+{ge}3 jet events which cannot be explained in terms of background, but show kinematic features as expected from top. These events also show evidence for beauty quarks. The findings confirm the observation of top events made earlier in the data of the 1992-93 collider run.

  16. White dwarf kinematics versus mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Phinney, E. Sterl

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between the kinematics and mass of young (<3 × 108 yr) white dwarfs using proper motions. Our sample is taken from the colour-selected catalogues of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Palomar-Green Survey, both of which have spectroscopic temperature and gravity determinations. We find that the dispersion decreases with increasing white dwarf mass. This can be explained as a result of less scattering by objects in the Galactic disc during the shorter lifetime of their more massive progenitors. A direct result of this is that white dwarfs with high mass have a reduced scale height, and hence their local density is enhanced over their less massive counterparts. In addition, we have investigated whether the kinematics of the highest mass white dwarfs (>0.95 M⊙) are consistent with the expected relative contributions of single star evolution and mergers. We find that the kinematics are consistent with the majority of high-mass white dwarfs being formed through single star evolution.

  17. Lumbar spine visualisation based on kinematic analysis from videofluoroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Nixon, M S; Allen, R

    2003-04-01

    Low back pain is a significant problem and its cost is enormous to society. However, diagnosis of the underlying causes remains problematic despite extensive study. Reasons for this arise from the deep-rooted situation of the spine and also from its structural complexity. Clinicians have to mentally convert 2-D image information into a 3-D form to gain a better understanding of structural integrity. Therefore, visualisation and animation may be helpful for understanding, diagnosis and for guiding therapy. Some low back pain originates from mechanical disorders, and study of the spine kinematics may provide an insight into the source of the problem. Digital videofluoroscopy was used in this study to provide 2-D image sequences of the spine in motion, but the images often suffer due to noise, exacerbated by the very low radiation dosage. Thus determining vertebrae position within the image sequence presents a considerable challenge. This paper describes a combination of spine kinematic measurements with a solid model of the human lumbar spine for visualisation of spine motion. Since determination of the spine kinematics provides the foundation and vertebral extraction is at the core, this is discussed in detail. Edge detection is a key feature of segmentation and it is shown that phase congruency performs better than most established methods with the rather low-grade image sequences from fluoroscopy. The Hough transform is then applied to determine the positions of vertebrae in each frame of a motion sequence. In the Hough transform, Fourier descriptors are used to represent the vertebral shapes. The results show that the Hough transform is a very promising technique for vertebral extraction from videofluoroscopic images. A dynamic visualisation package has been developed in order to view the moving lumbar spine from any angle and viewpoint. Wire frame models of the vertebrae were built by using CT images from the Visible Human Project and these models are scaled to

  18. Influence of kinematic parameters on result efficiency in javelin throw.

    PubMed

    Saratlija, Predrag; Zagorac, Nebojsa; Babić, Vesna

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the research was to define the influence of the kinematic parameters in the javelin throw success in the top junior athletes at the European Junior Athletics Championships in Novi Sad. A set, consisting of 17 kinematic variables, was applied on a sample of 16 athletes, and the same variables were registered at the 2009 Novi Sad European Junior Championships. The criteria variable was the achieved throw length (javelin throw). The subjects were represented by 113 successful javelin throws. The results of the chosen kinematic variables correlation analysis showed the existence of multiple significant relations between the observed variables. Based on the observed kinematic variables correlation analysis, the next conclusion can be made: the javelin release speed has the most important role, followed by the fast front support leg placing. The results are expected and logical, and can be used in kinesiology practice, especially in the process of young throwers' technique learning and in development of motor abilities relevant for this athletic discipline.

  19. Spiral galaxy HI models, rotation curves and kinematic classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Theresa B. V.

    Although galaxy interactions cause dramatic changes, galaxies also continue to form stars and evolve when they are isolated. The dark matter (DM) halo may influence this evolution since it generates the rotational behaviour of galactic disks which could affect local conditions in the gas. Therefore we study neutral hydrogen kinematics of non-interacting, nearby spiral galaxies, characterising their rotation curves (RC) which probe the DM halo; delineating kinematic classes of galaxies; and investigating relations between these classes and galaxy properties such as disk size and star formation rate (SFR). To generate the RCs, we use GalAPAGOS (by J. Fiege). My role was to test and help drive the development of this software, which employs a powerful genetic algorithm, constraining 23 parameters while using the full 3D data cube as input. The RC is here simply described by a tanh-based function which adequately traces the global RC behaviour. Extensive testing on artificial galaxies show that the kinematic properties of galaxies with inclination >40 degrees, including edge-on galaxies, are found reliably. Using a hierarchical clustering algorithm on parametrised RCs from 79 galaxies culled from literature generates a preliminary scheme consisting of five classes. These are based on three parameters: maximum rotational velocity, turnover radius and outer slope of the RC. To assess the relationship between DM content and the kinematic classes, we generate mass models for 10 galaxies from the THINGS and WHISP surveys, and J. Irwin's sample. In most cases mass models using GalAPAGOS RCs were similar to those using traditional "tilted-ring'' method RCs. The kinematic classes are mainly distinguished by their rotational velocity. We confirm correlations between increasing velocity and B-magnitude, optical disk size, and find earlier type galaxies among the strong rotators. SFR also increases with maximum rotational velocity. Given our limited subsample, we cannot discern a

  20. Swords with Blunt Edges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2004-01-01

    Many U.S. educators now wonder whether they're teachers or targets. This mentality stems from the specter of their school being sanctioned for failing the state accountability tests mandated under No Child Left Behind (NCLB). According to this author, most of those tests are like blunt-edged swords: They function badly in two directions. While…

  1. The Inner Urban Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferebee, Ann; Carpenter, Edward K.

    1974-01-01

    In this article, renewal of the inner urban edge is discussed. Norfolk (Virginia) is attempting to blur the difference between old and new neighbor hoods through zoning and architectural controls. Cincinnati (Ohio) is developing an environmentally sound hillside design. Reading (Pennsylvania) is utilizing old railyards for greenbelts of hiking and…

  2. Edge control in CNC polishing, paper 2: simulation and validation of tool influence functions on edges.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Walker, David; Yu, Guoyu; Sayle, Andrew; Messelink, Wilhelmus; Evans, Rob; Beaucamp, Anthony

    2013-01-14

    Edge mis-figure is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues for manufacturing the segments of extremely large telescopes, which can dominate key aspects of performance. A novel edge-control technique has been developed, based on 'Precessions' polishing technique and for which accurate and stable edge tool influence functions (TIFs) are crucial. In the first paper in this series [D. Walker Opt. Express 20, 19787-19798 (2012)], multiple parameters were experimentally optimized using an extended set of experiments. The first purpose of this new work is to 'short circuit' this procedure through modeling. This also gives the prospect of optimizing local (as distinct from global) polishing for edge mis-figure, now under separate development. This paper presents a model that can predict edge TIFs based on surface-speed profiles and pressure distributions over the polishing spot at the edge of the part, the latter calculated by finite element analysis and verified by direct force measurement. This paper also presents a hybrid-measurement method for edge TIFs to verify the simulation results. Experimental and simulation results show good agreement.

  3. A Synthetic Genetic Edge Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Salis, Howard; Simpson, Zachary B.; Chevalier, Aaron A.; Levskaya, Anselm; Marcotte, Edward M.; Voigt, Christopher A.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Edge detection is a signal processing algorithm common in artificial intelligence and image recognition programs. We have constructed a genetically encoded edge detection algorithm that programs an isogenic community of E.coli to sense an image of light, communicate to identify the light-dark edges, and visually present the result of the computation. The algorithm is implemented using multiple genetic circuits. An engineered light sensor enables cells to distinguish between light and dark regions. In the dark, cells produce a diffusible chemical signal that diffuses into light regions. Genetic logic gates are used so that only cells that sense light and the diffusible signal produce a positive output. A mathematical model constructed from first principles and parameterized with experimental measurements of the component circuits predicts the performance of the complete program. Quantitatively accurate models will facilitate the engineering of more complex biological behaviors and inform bottom-up studies of natural genetic regulatory networks. PMID:19563759

  4. A synthetic genetic edge detection program.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Jeffrey J; Salis, Howard M; Simpson, Zachary Booth; Chevalier, Aaron A; Levskaya, Anselm; Marcotte, Edward M; Voigt, Christopher A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2009-06-26

    Edge detection is a signal processing algorithm common in artificial intelligence and image recognition programs. We have constructed a genetically encoded edge detection algorithm that programs an isogenic community of E. coli to sense an image of light, communicate to identify the light-dark edges, and visually present the result of the computation. The algorithm is implemented using multiple genetic circuits. An engineered light sensor enables cells to distinguish between light and dark regions. In the dark, cells produce a diffusible chemical signal that diffuses into light regions. Genetic logic gates are used so that only cells that sense light and the diffusible signal produce a positive output. A mathematical model constructed from first principles and parameterized with experimental measurements of the component circuits predicts the performance of the complete program. Quantitatively accurate models will facilitate the engineering of more complex biological behaviors and inform bottom-up studies of natural genetic regulatory networks.

  5. Superpixel edges for boundary detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, Mary M.; Koch, Mark W.

    2016-07-12

    Various embodiments presented herein relate to identifying one or more edges in a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image comprising a plurality of superpixels. Superpixels sharing an edge (or boundary) can be identified and one or more properties of the shared superpixels can be compared to determine whether the superpixels form the same or two different features. Where the superpixels form the same feature the edge is identified as an internal edge. Where the superpixels form two different features, the edge is identified as an external edge. Based upon classification of the superpixels, the external edge can be further determined to form part of a roof, wall, etc. The superpixels can be formed from a speckle-reduced SAR image product formed from a registered stack of SAR images, which is further segmented into a plurality of superpixels. The edge identification process is applied to the SAR image comprising the superpixels and edges.

  6. Shape of patch edges affects edge permeability for meadow voles.

    PubMed

    Nams, Vilis O

    2012-09-01

    Human development typically fragments natural habitats into patches, affecting population and metapopulation dynamics via changes in animal behavior. Emigration from one habitat patch to another has a large effect on population and metapopulation dynamics. One factor that affects emigration is permeability of patch edges. This study looks at the effects of edge shape (convex, concave, and straight) on edge permeability for meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).. I tested five hypotheses for responses of animal movement to patch shape: (1) neutral edge response; (2) edge attraction; (3) edge avoidance; (4) time-minimizing, in which an animal attempts to minimize the time spent in inhospitable matrix, and thus travels as far as possible in the patch before crossing the edge; and (5) protection, in which an animal attempts to maximize protection while in the inhospitable matrix by keeping the patch close by. These hypotheses were tested by an experimental manipulation of meadow vole habitats. A strip was mowed with different edge shapes through an old field, and vole response was measured by tracking plates. Voles crossed edges at concave treatments twice as often compared to convex and straight shapes. Hypotheses (2) and (5) were supported. Although edge attraction causes a passive effect of a decrease in edge-crossing at concavities, this effect was eclipsed by the active effect of voles choosing to cross at concavities. The results can be generalized to edge tortuosity in general. Conservation biologists should consider edge shapes when exploring the effects of habitat fragmentation on animal populations.

  7. Edge detection by nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yiu-fai

    1994-07-01

    We demonstrate how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, our scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step-edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  8. Effective Hamiltonian for edge states in graphene.

    DOE PAGES

    Deshpande, H.; Winkler, R.

    2017-06-03

    Edge states in topological insulators (TIs) disperse symmetrically about one of the time-reversal invariant momenta Lambda in the Brillouin zone (BZ) with protected degeneracies at Lambda. Commonly TIs are distinguished from trivial insulators by the values of one or multiple topological invariants that require an analysis of the bulk band structure across the BZ. We propose an effective two-band Hamiltonian for the electronic states in graphene based on a Taylor expansion of the tight-binding Hamiltonian about the time-reversal invariant M point at the edge of the BZ. This Hamiltonian provides a faithful description of the protected edge states for bothmore » zigzag and armchair ribbons, though the concept of a BZ is not part of such an effective model. We show that the edge states are determined by a band inversion in both reciprocal and real space, which allows one to select Lambda for the edge states without affecting the bulk spectrum.« less

  9. Surgical gesture classification from video and kinematic data.

    PubMed

    Zappella, Luca; Béjar, Benjamín; Hager, Gregory; Vidal, René

    2013-10-01

    Much of the existing work on automatic classification of gestures and skill in robotic surgery is based on dynamic cues (e.g., time to completion, speed, forces, torque) or kinematic data (e.g., robot trajectories and velocities). While videos could be equally or more discriminative (e.g., videos contain semantic information not present in kinematic data), they are typically not used because of the difficulties associated with automatic video interpretation. In this paper, we propose several methods for automatic surgical gesture classification from video data. We assume that the video of a surgical task (e.g., suturing) has been segmented into video clips corresponding to a single gesture (e.g., grabbing the needle, passing the needle) and propose three methods to classify the gesture of each video clip. In the first one, we model each video clip as the output of a linear dynamical system (LDS) and use metrics in the space of LDSs to classify new video clips. In the second one, we use spatio-temporal features extracted from each video clip to learn a dictionary of spatio-temporal words, and use a bag-of-features (BoF) approach to classify new video clips. In the third one, we use multiple kernel learning (MKL) to combine the LDS and BoF approaches. Since the LDS approach is also applicable to kinematic data, we also use MKL to combine both types of data in order to exploit their complementarity. Our experiments on a typical surgical training setup show that methods based on video data perform equally well, if not better, than state-of-the-art approaches based on kinematic data. In turn, the combination of both kinematic and video data outperforms any other algorithm based on one type of data alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Real-time oriented edge detection via difference of shifted image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kiseon; Jin, Moonyong; Hwang, Daegyu; Yoon, Sook; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-12-01

    We propose a novel oriented edge detection method called Difference of Shifted Image (DoSI) which has only subtractions between neighborhood pixels using padding-based shifting operation. Firstly, we can more quickly extract an oriented edge component in each direction from 8-neighborhoods using DoSI because there are no multiplications. Then, we can make a final edge map using all edge components by taking maximum value per each pixel. Moreover, we propose various types of oriented edge operators based on the Prewitt, Sobel and Laplacian. They are achieved by combinations of some oriented edge components obtained from DoSI. They have similar performance to existing edge operators based on convolution operations and also their procedures can be implemented in parallel. The experimental results show that the proposed edge detection methods requires less computation time than convolution-based methods and most of them are similar in edge description ability to the existing oriented edge operators.

  11. Playing Along the Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-13

    Strands and arches of plasma streamed above the edge of the Sun for over a day, pulled by powerful magnetic forces (Aug. 11-12, 2016). The tug and pull of material heated to about 60,000 degrees C. was viewed in extreme ultraviolet light. This kind of dynamic flow of materials is rather common, though this grouping was larger than most. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17913

  12. Kinematic correction for roller skewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is developed for high-speed cylindrical roller bearings. This stabilization requires race and roller crowning to product changes in the rolling geometry as the roller shifts axially. These changes put a reverse skew in the rolling elements by changing the rolling taper. Twelve basic possible bearing modifications are identified in this paper. Four have single transverse convex curvature in the rollers while eight have rollers with compound transverse curvature composed of a central cylindrical band of constant radius surrounded by symmetric bands with both slope and transverse curvature.

  13. Kinematically complete chemical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, S.; Stei, M.; Otto, R.; Hlavenka, P.; Mikosch, J.; Eichhorn, C.; Lourderaj, U.; Zhang, J. X.; Hase, W. L.; Weidemüller, M.; Wester, R.

    2009-11-01

    Kinematically complete studies of molecular reactions offer an unprecedented level of insight into the dynamics and the different mechanisms by which chemical reactions occur. We have developed a scheme to study ion-molecule reactions by velocity map imaging at very low collision energies. Results for the elementary nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reaction Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- are presented and compared to high-level direct dynamics trajectory calculations. Furthermore, an improved design of the crossed-beam imaging spectrometer with full three-dimensional measurement capabilities is discussed and characterization measurements using photoionization of NH3 and photodissociation of CH3I are presented.

  14. On steady kinematic helical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, I. A.; Loper, D. E.

    The equations governing steady kinematic helical dynamos are studied, using the formalism of Benton (1979), when the flow has no radial component (in cylindrical coordinates). It is shown that all solutions must decay exponentially to zero at large distances, s, from the axis of the helix. When the flow depends on s only it is shown that a necessary condition for dynamo action is that the flow possesses components along both the primary and secondary helices. It is also found that periodic motion of one mode along the primary helix cannot support dynamo action even if the field is composed of mean and periodic parts.

  15. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  16. Can the reliability of three-dimensional running kinematics be improved using functional joint methodology?

    PubMed

    Pohl, Michael B; Lloyd, Chandra; Ferber, Reed

    2010-10-01

    Traditional three-dimensional gait analyses require the skilled palpation of anatomical landmarks to identify joint parameters and produce reliable joint kinematics. Functional methods have been developed to help improve the reliability and validity of identifying joint kinematic parameters. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a functional method could improve the between-day reliability of joint kinematics during running compared to a traditional manual marker placement method. It was hypothesised that the functional technique would result in greater within- and between-tester reliability. An eight-camera motion analysis system was used to evaluate the reliability of 3D lower extremity kinematics during running for both a functional and a manual marker placement technique. Reliability of the waveform shape, amplitude and offset of the kinematic curves was assessed using the coefficient of multiple correlation, range of motion and root mean square error respectively. The functional joint methodology did not improve the within- and between-tester reliability in terms of kinematic curve shape, amplitude or offset compared to the manual placement technique. When experienced examiners are used to place the anatomical markers together with a lean subject sample, functional methods may not improve the day-to-day reliability of three-dimensional gait kinematics over traditional marker placement techniques. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Peter

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  18. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  19. Artefact-reduced kinematics measurement using a geometric finger model with mixture-prior particle filtering.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheung-Wen; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin; Sun, Yung-Nien

    2013-01-01

    It is challenging to measure the finger's kinematics of underlying bones in vivo. This paper presents a new method of finger kinematics measurement, using a geometric finger model and several markers deliberately stuck on skin surface. Using a multiple-view camera system, the optimal motion parameters of finger model were estimated using the proposed mixture-prior particle filtering. This prior, consisting of model and marker information, avoids generating improper particles for achieving near real-time performance. This method was validated using a planar fluoroscopy system that worked simultaneously with photographic system. Ten male subjects with asymptomatic hands were investigated in experiments. The results showed that the kinematic parameters could be estimated more accurately by the proposed method than by using only markers. There was 20-40% reduction in skin artefacts achieved for finger flexion/extension. Thus, this profile system can be developed as a tool of reliable kinematics measurement with good applicability for hand rehabilitation.

  20. Edge waves: theories past and present.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R S

    2007-09-15

    The problem of edge waves as an example within classical water-wave theory is described by presenting an overview of some of the theories that have been offered for this phenomenon. The appropriate governing equations and boundary conditions are formulated, and then the important discoveries of Stokes and Ursell, concerning the travelling edge wave, are presented. (We do not address the corresponding problem of standing waves.) Thus, the linear problem and its spectrum are constructed; in addition, we also present the linear long-wave approximation to the problem, as well as Whitham's weakly nonlinear extension to Stokes' original theory. All these discussions are based on the same formulation of the problem, allowing an immediate comparison of the results, whether this be in terms of different approximations or whether the theory be for an irrotational flow or not. Gerstner's exact solution of the water-wave problem is then briefly described, together with a transformation that produces an exact solution of the full equations for the edge wave. The form of this solution is then used as the basis for a multiple-scale description of the edge wave over a slowly varying depth; this leads to a version of the shallow-water equations which has an exact solution that corresponds to the edge wave. Some examples of the theoretical predictions for the run-up pattern are presented. We conclude with three variants of nonlinear model equations that may prove useful in the study of edge waves and, particularly, the interaction of different modes.

  1. Wavelet Multiscale Edge Detection Using An ADALINE Neural Network To Match Up Edge Indicators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-14

    the WMED is modified to use an ADALINE (ADAptive LInear NEuron) neural network that adapts to match up edge indicators across multiple wavelet levels...The ADALINE uses the least mean squared (LMS) learning rule to minimize the mean square error. The LMS algorithm is able to optimize the decision...boundaries of the network. This makes the boundaries more effective in the presence of noise. This paper will test the capability of the ADALINE to match up the edge indicators in noisy two-dimensional sidescan imagery.

  2. Kinematic Event Patterns in Speech: Special Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbury, John R.; Severson, Elizabeth J.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from a new analysis of synchronous acoustic and fleshpoint-kinematic data, recorded from 53 normal young-adult speakers of American English, are reported. The kinematic data represent speech-related actions of the tongue blade and dorsum, both lips, and the mandible, during the test words, "special" and "problem," and were drawn from an…

  3. Dust destruction and kinematics in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolovy, Susan R.; Herter, Terry; Gull, George E.; Pirger, Bruce; Vogt, Nicole P.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of the 34.815 micron (SiII) line and continuum emission from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy obtained with the KAO Echelle Grating Spectrograph (KEGS) in June 1993. The SiII emission, which has been spectrally resolved at 64 km/s and spatially resolved at 10 arcsec, in kinematically consistent with the motions of ionized and neutral gas interior to the circumnuclear disk (CND). In addition, the emission in the (SiII) line as well as the continuum extends northward along the 'northern arm' past the inner edge of the CND. A peak in the (SiII) line/continuum ratio is observed at approx. 25 arcsec W and 75 arcsec N of Sgr A* with a large velocity dispersion. This may be an indication of dust destruction via cloud-cloud collisions.

  4. Dust destruction and kinematics in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolovy, Susan R.; Herter, Terry; Gull, George E.; Pirger, Bruce; Vogt, Nicole P.

    1995-01-01

    We present observations of the 34.815 micron (SiII) line and continuum emission from the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy obtained with the KAO Echelle Grating Spectrograph (KEGS) in June 1993. The SiII emission, which has been spectrally resolved at 64 km/s and spatially resolved at 10 arcsec, in kinematically consistent with the motions of ionized and neutral gas interior to the circumnuclear disk (CND). In addition, the emission in the (SiII) line as well as the continuum extends northward along the 'northern arm' past the inner edge of the CND. A peak in the (SiII) line/continuum ratio is observed at approx. 25 arcsec W and 75 arcsec N of Sgr A* with a large velocity dispersion. This may be an indication of dust destruction via cloud-cloud collisions.

  5. Automated kinematic generator for surgical robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, David L; Dixon, Warren E; Pin, François G

    2004-01-01

    Unlike traditional assembly line robotic systems that have a fixed kinematic structure associated with a single tool for a structured task, next-generation robotic surgical assist systems will be required to use an array of end-effector tools. Once a robot is connected with a tool, the kinematic equations of motion are altered. Given the need to accommodate evolving surgical challenges and to alleviate the restrictions imposed by the confined minimally invasive environment, new surgical tools may resemble small flexible snakes rather than rigid, cable driven instruments. Connecting to these developing articulated tools will significantly alter the overall kinematic structure of a robotic system. In this paper we present a technique for real-time automated generation and evaluation of manipulator kinematic equations that exhibits the combined advantages of existing methods-speed and flexibility to kinematic change--without their disadvantages.

  6. Photometric and kinematic studies of extragalactic globular cluster systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowell, Jessica

    Globular clusters (GCs) are old, luminous, compact collections of stars found in galaxy halos that formed during the early stages of galaxy formation. Because of this, GCs serve as excellent tracers of the formation, structure, and merger history of their host galaxies. My dissertation will examine both the photometric and kinematic properties of GC systems and their relationship to their host galaxies. In the first section, I will present the analysis of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055. I will discuss the photometric methods used to detect GCs using wide-field BVR imaging and to quantify the global properties of the system such as the total number of GCs and their radial distribution. My results for these two GC systems were compared to those of other galaxies. I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). I measured the radial velocities of GCs in these two galaxies, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and mass-to-light (M/L) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). For both galaxies, I found that the M/L profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of my data. I also looked for evidence of rotation in the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. I examined the velocity dispersion profile of each GC system and found kinematic differences between the red and blue GC subpopulations. Finally, I compared my results to mass estimates for these galaxies from other kinematic tracers and considered them in the context of galaxy formation models.

  7. Life on the edge: gastrointestinal parasites from the forest edge and interior primate groups.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Colin A; Speirs, Michaela L; Gillespie, Thomas R; Holland, Timothy; Austad, Kiersten M

    2006-04-01

    Humans are responsible for massive changes to primate habitats, and one unanticipated consequence of these alterations may be changes in host-parasite interactions. Edges are a ubiquitous aspect of human disturbance to forest landscapes. Here we examine how changes associated with the creation of edges in Kibale National Park, Uganda, alter the parasite community that is supported by two species of African colobines: the endangered red colobus (Piliocolobus tephrosceles) and the black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza). An analysis of 822 fecal samples from edge and forest interior groups revealed no difference in the richness of parasite communities (i.e., the number of parasite species recovered from the host's fecal sample). However, for both species the proportion of individuals with multiple infections was greater in edge than forest interior groups. The prevalence of specific parasites also varied between edge and forest interior groups. Oesophagostomum sp., a potentially deleterious parasite, was 7.4 times more prevalent in red colobus on the edge than in those in the forest interior, and Entamoeba coli was four times more prevalent in red colobus on the edge than in animals from the forest interior. Environmental contamination with parasites (measured as parasite eggs/gm feces) by red colobus from the edge and forest interior differed in a similar fashion to prevalence for red colobus, but it did not differ for black-and-white colobus. For example, egg counts of Oesophagostomum sp. were 10 times higher in red colobus from the edge than in those from the interior. The less severe infections in the black-and-white colobus relative to the red colobus may reflect the fact that black-and-white colobus raid agricultural crops while red colobus do not. This nutritional gain may facilitate a more effective immune response to parasites by the black-and-white colobus. The fact that animals on the edge are likely not nutritionally stressed raises an intriguing

  8. Molecular outflow launched beyond the disk edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F. O.; Girart, J. M.; Caselli, P.; Franco, G. A. P.; Zhao, B.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Evans, M. G.; Ricci, L.

    2017-07-01

    One of the long-standing problems of star formation is the excess of angular momentum of the parent molecular cloud. In the classical picture, a fraction of angular momentum of the circumstellar material is removed by the magneto-centrifugally driven disk wind that is launched from a wide region throughout the disk. In this work, we investigate the kinematics in the envelope-disk transition zone of the Class I object BHB07-11, in the B59 core. For this purpose, we used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in extended configuration to observe the thermal dust continuum emission (λ0 1.3 mm) and molecular lines (CO, C18O and H2CO), which are suitable tracers of disk, envelope, and outflow dynamics at a spatial resolution of 30 AU. We report a bipolar outflow that was launched at symmetric positions with respect to the disk ( 80 AU in radius), but was concentrated at a distance of 90-130 AU from the disk center. The two outflow lobes had a conical shape and the gas inside was accelerating. The large offset of the launching position coincided with the landing site of the infall materials from the extended spiral structure (seen in dust) onto the disk. This indicates that bipolar outflows are efficiently launched within a narrow region outside the disk edge. We also identify a sharp transition in the gas kinematics across the tip of the spiral structure, which pinpoints the location of the so-called centrifugal barrier.

  9. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we present new results of detailed kinematic analyses of these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (˜300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we produce velocity fields and dispersion maps using different spatial and spectral resolution representations of the data in order to attempt derivation of an inclination-corrected rotation curve. While both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make multiple position-velocity cuts across each galaxy to determine the maximum circular rotation velocity (≤ 30 km-1 for the survey population). Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are contextualized on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  10. Bayesian kinematic earthquake source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, S. E.; Simons, M.; Beck, J. L.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J. E.; Chowdhury, F.; Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Ortega, F. H.

    2009-12-01

    Most coseismic, postseismic, and interseismic slip models are based on highly regularized optimizations which yield one solution which satisfies the data given a particular set of regularizing constraints. This regularization hampers our ability to answer basic questions such as whether seismic and aseismic slip overlap or instead rupture separate portions of the fault zone. We present a Bayesian methodology for generating kinematic earthquake source models with a focus on large subduction zone earthquakes. Unlike classical optimization approaches, Bayesian techniques sample the ensemble of all acceptable models presented as an a posteriori probability density function (PDF), and thus we can explore the entire solution space to determine, for example, which model parameters are well determined and which are not, or what is the likelihood that two slip distributions overlap in space. Bayesian sampling also has the advantage that all a priori knowledge of the source process can be used to mold the a posteriori ensemble of models. Although very powerful, Bayesian methods have up to now been of limited use in geophysical modeling because they are only computationally feasible for problems with a small number of free parameters due to what is called the "curse of dimensionality." However, our methodology can successfully sample solution spaces of many hundreds of parameters, which is sufficient to produce finite fault kinematic earthquake models. Our algorithm is a modification of the tempered Markov chain Monte Carlo (tempered MCMC or TMCMC) method. In our algorithm, we sample a "tempered" a posteriori PDF using many MCMC simulations running in parallel and evolutionary computation in which models which fit the data poorly are preferentially eliminated in favor of models which better predict the data. We present results for both synthetic test problems as well as for the 2007 Mw 7.8 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake, the latter of which is constrained by InSAR, local high

  11. Computing of the Theoretical Value of Roughness Parameter Rz when Turning with Helical Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šajgalík, Michal; Martikáň, Anton; Czán, Andrej; Pile, Jozef; Holubják, Jozef; Mrázik, Jozef

    2016-12-01

    This article describes process of computing and identifying of the value of roughness parameter Rz deduced from basic kinematic and geometric characteristics of turning technology of machining with tool with helical cutting edge. The final mathematical formula is deduced from graphic sketch of turning process and consequently identified using all the known geometric and kinematic parameters. This formula can be used to theoretic evaluation of geometric and cutting parameters influence on the quality of machined surface determined by roughness characteristic of theoretic parameter Rz.

  12. Fabrication of ultra-fine nanostructures using edge transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mianqi; Li, Fengwang; Cao, Tingbing

    2012-03-01

    The exploration of new methods and techniques for application in diverse fields, such as photonics, microfluidics, biotechnology and flexible electronics is of increasing scientific and technical interest for multiple uses over distance of 10-100 nm. This article discusses edge transfer printing -- a series of unconventional methods derived from soft lithography for nanofabrication. It possesses the advantages of easy fabrication, low-cost and great serviceability. In this paper, we show how to produce exposed edges and use various materials for edge transfer printing, while nanoskiving, nanotransfer edge printing and tunable cracking for nanogaps are introduced. Besides this, different functional materials, such as metals, inorganic semiconductors and polymers, as well as localised heating and charge patterning, are described here as unconventional ``inks'' for printing. Edge transfer printing, which can effectively produce sub-100 nm scale ultra-fine structures, has broad applications, including metallic nanowires as nanoelectrodes, semiconductor nanowires for chemical sensors, heterostructures of organic semiconductors, plasmonic devices and so forth.

  13. Effective Hamiltonian for protected edge states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R.; Deshpande, H.

    2017-06-01

    Edge states in topological insulators (TIs) disperse symmetrically about one of the time-reversal invariant momenta Λ in the Brillouin zone (BZ) with protected degeneracies at Λ . Commonly TIs are distinguished from trivial insulators by the values of one or multiple topological invariants that require an analysis of the bulk band structure across the BZ. We propose an effective two-band Hamiltonian for the electronic states in graphene based on a Taylor expansion of the tight-binding Hamiltonian about the time-reversal invariant M point at the edge of the BZ. This Hamiltonian provides a faithful description of the protected edge states for both zigzag and armchair ribbons, though the concept of a BZ is not part of such an effective model. We show that the edge states are determined by a band inversion in both reciprocal and real space, which allows one to select Λ for the edge states without affecting the bulk spectrum.

  14. Edge states and skyrmion dynamics in nanostripes of frustrated magnets

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, A. O.; Mostovoy, M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations recently discovered in chiral magnets. Their small size, topological protection and the ease with which they can be manipulated by electric currents generated much interest in using skyrmions for information storage and processing. Recently, it was suggested that skyrmions with additional degrees of freedom can exist in magnetically frustrated materials. Here, we show that dynamics of skyrmions and antiskyrmions in nanostripes of frustrated magnets is strongly affected by complex spin states formed at the stripe edges. These states create multiple edge channels which guide the skyrmion motion. Non-trivial topology of edge states gives rise to complex current-induced dynamics, such as emission of skyrmion–antiskyrmion pairs. The edge-state topology can be controlled with an electric current through the exchange of skyrmions and antiskyrmions between the edges of a magnetic nanostructure. PMID:28240226

  15. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  16. Edge states and skyrmion dynamics in nanostripes of frustrated magnets.

    PubMed

    Leonov, A O; Mostovoy, M

    2017-02-27

    Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations recently discovered in chiral magnets. Their small size, topological protection and the ease with which they can be manipulated by electric currents generated much interest in using skyrmions for information storage and processing. Recently, it was suggested that skyrmions with additional degrees of freedom can exist in magnetically frustrated materials. Here, we show that dynamics of skyrmions and antiskyrmions in nanostripes of frustrated magnets is strongly affected by complex spin states formed at the stripe edges. These states create multiple edge channels which guide the skyrmion motion. Non-trivial topology of edge states gives rise to complex current-induced dynamics, such as emission of skyrmion-antiskyrmion pairs. The edge-state topology can be controlled with an electric current through the exchange of skyrmions and antiskyrmions between the edges of a magnetic nanostructure.

  17. The effect of direction on cursor moving kinematics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ling-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Yung; Lu, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Ming-Chung; Chu, Chi-Nung

    2012-01-01

    There have been only few studies to substantiate the kinematic characteristics of cursor movement. In this study, a quantitative experimental research method was used to explore the effect of moving direction on the kinematics of cursor movement in 24 typical young persons using our previously developed computerized measuring program. The results of multiple one way repeated measures ANOVAs and post hoc LSD tests demonstrated that the moving direction had effects on average velocity, movement time, movement unit and peak velocity. Moving leftward showed better efficiency than moving rightward, upward and downward from the kinematic evidences such as velocity, movement unit and time. Moreover, the unique pattern of the power spectral density (PSD) of velocity (strategy for power application) explained why the smoothness was still maintained while moving leftward even under an unstable situation with larger momentum. Moreover, the information from this cursor moving study can guide us to relocate the toolbars and icons in the window interface, especially for individuals with physical disabilities whose performances are easily interrupted while controlling the cursor in specific directions.

  18. On the numerical kinematic analysis of general parallel robotic manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Lichun Tommy Wang; Chih Cheng Chen . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    The paper presents a systematic approach for the numerical kinematic analysis of general parallel robotic manipulators. This approach consists of two parts. The first part deals with the structural analysis. Based on graph theory and the Depth First Search algorithm, a method for identifying and orientating the independent kinematic loops of the robot is developed. This method not only facilitates the assignment of the local coordinate systems attached to the robot, but also arranges them in the correct order to allow efficient recursive coordinate transformation. The second part of this approach deals with the displacement analysis. A set of recursion formulae is first developed for computing the forward coordinate transformations, and these formulae are then adopted in a two-phase computational algorithm to obtain the numerical solutions to the direct and the inverse kinematics problems. The two-phase algorithm developed in this paper is not only insensitive to the initial approximation of the solution vector, but also gives a rapid convergence rate. Furthermore, it is also useful for finding multiple solutions for the robot as well as for continuous trajectory planning, as shown by the numerical examples presented in this paper.

  19. Kinematics and hydrodynamics of linear acceleration in eels, Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D

    2004-12-22

    The kinematics and hydrodynamics of routine linear accelerations were studied in American eels, Anguilla rostrata, using high-speed video and particle image velocimetry. Eels were examined both during steady swimming at speeds from 0.6 to 1.9 body lengths (L) per second and during accelerations from -1.4 to 1.3 L s(-2). Multiple regression of the acceleration and steady swimming speed on the body kinematics suggests that eels primarily change their tail-tip velocity during acceleration. By contrast, the best predictor of steady swimming speed is body wave speed, keeping tail-tip velocity an approximately constant fraction of the swimming velocity. Thus, during steady swimming, Strouhal number does not vary with speed, remaining close to 0.32, but during acceleration, it deviates from the steady value. The kinematic changes during acceleration are indicated hydrodynamically by axial fluid momentum in the wake. During steady swimming, the wake consists of lateral jets of fluid and has minimal net axial momentum, which reflects a balance between thrust and drag. During acceleration, those jets rotate to point downstream, adding axial momentum to the fluid. The amount of added momentum correlates with the acceleration, but is greater than the necessary inertial force by 2.8+/-0.6 times, indicating a substantial acceleration reaction.

  20. pPXF: Penalized Pixel-Fitting stellar kinematics extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2012-10-01

    pPXF is an IDL (and free GDL or FL) program which extracts the stellar kinematics or stellar population from absorption-line spectra of galaxies using the Penalized Pixel-Fitting method (pPXF) developed by Cappellari & Emsellem (2004, PASP, 116, 138). Additional features implemented in the pPXF routine include: Optimal template: Fitted together with the kinematics to minimize template-mismatch errors. Also useful to extract gas kinematics or derive emission-corrected line-strengths indexes. One can use synthetic templates to study the stellar population of galaxies via "Full Spectral Fitting" instead of using traditional line-strengths.Regularization of templates weights: To reduce the noise in the recovery of the stellar population parameters and attach a physical meaning to the output weights assigned to the templates in term of the star formation history (SFH) or metallicity distribution of an individual galaxy.Iterative sigma clipping: To clean the spectra from residual bad pixels or cosmic rays.Additive/multiplicative polynomials: To correct low frequency continuum variations. Also useful for calibration purposes.

  1. Kinematics and hydrodynamics of linear acceleration in eels, Anguilla rostrata.

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.

    2004-01-01

    The kinematics and hydrodynamics of routine linear accelerations were studied in American eels, Anguilla rostrata, using high-speed video and particle image velocimetry. Eels were examined both during steady swimming at speeds from 0.6 to 1.9 body lengths (L) per second and during accelerations from -1.4 to 1.3 L s(-2). Multiple regression of the acceleration and steady swimming speed on the body kinematics suggests that eels primarily change their tail-tip velocity during acceleration. By contrast, the best predictor of steady swimming speed is body wave speed, keeping tail-tip velocity an approximately constant fraction of the swimming velocity. Thus, during steady swimming, Strouhal number does not vary with speed, remaining close to 0.32, but during acceleration, it deviates from the steady value. The kinematic changes during acceleration are indicated hydrodynamically by axial fluid momentum in the wake. During steady swimming, the wake consists of lateral jets of fluid and has minimal net axial momentum, which reflects a balance between thrust and drag. During acceleration, those jets rotate to point downstream, adding axial momentum to the fluid. The amount of added momentum correlates with the acceleration, but is greater than the necessary inertial force by 2.8+/-0.6 times, indicating a substantial acceleration reaction. PMID:15615678

  2. Are shrubland birds edge specialists?

    PubMed

    Schlossberg, Scott; King, David I

    2008-09-01

    In studies of forest fragmentation, birds of scrubby, early-successional habitats are considered edge specialists. Because these birds are assumed to thrive in fragmented, edge-dominated areas, their landscape ecology has received little attention from ecologists. With populations of shrubland birds declining throughout the eastern United States, the question of whether or not these birds really prefer edge habitats has important conservation implications. We used a meta-analysis to test how edges affect the abundance of shrubland birds in early-successional habitats. We analyzed data for 17 species from seven studies that compared the abundances of birds in the interiors and edges of regenerating clearcuts surrounded by mature forest. The meta-analysis clearly showed that shrubland birds avoid edges. All 17 species tested had higher abundances in patch centers than along edges, and edge effects were significant for 8 of 17 species. The key implication of this result is that small or irregular patches, dominated by edge, are unlikely to provide suitable habitat for shrubland birds. Thus, management for these declining species should involve providing large patches and minimizing edges. These findings demonstrate the importance of testing widely accepted ecological classifications and the need to view landscape ecology from the perspective of non-forest wildlife.

  3. Modulation of leading edge vorticity and aerodynamic forces in flexible flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Deng, Xinyan; Sane, Sanjay P

    2011-09-01

    In diverse biological flight systems, the leading edge vortex has been implicated as a flow feature of key importance in the generation of flight forces. Unlike fixed wings, flapping wings can translate at higher angles of attack without stalling because their leading edge vorticity is more stable than the corresponding fixed wing case. Hence, the leading edge vorticity has often been suggested as the primary determinant of the high forces generated by flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary to modulate the size and strength of the leading edge vorticity independently of the gross kinematics while simultaneously monitoring the forces generated by the wing. In a recent study, we observed that forces generated by wings with flexible trailing margins showed a direct dependence on the flexural stiffness of the wing. Based on that study, we hypothesized that trailing edge flexion directly influences leading edge vorticity, and thereby the magnitude of aerodynamic forces on the flexible flapping wings. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the flows on wings of varying flexural stiffness using a custom 2D digital particle image velocimetry system, while simultaneously monitoring the magnitude of the aerodynamic forces. Our data show that as flexion decreases, the magnitude of the leading edge vorticity increases and enhances aerodynamic forces, thus confirming that the leading edge vortex is indeed a key feature for aerodynamic force generation in flapping flight. The data shown here thus support the hypothesis that camber influences instantaneous aerodynamic forces through modulation of the leading edge vorticity.

  4. On the Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-04

    In today's image, Mercury's horizon cuts a striking edge against the stark blackness of space. On the right, sunlight harshly brings the landscape into relief while on the left, the surface is shrouded in the darkness of night. This image was acquired as part of MDIS's limb imaging campaign. Once per week, MDIS captures images of Mercury's limb, with an emphasis on imaging the southern hemisphere limb. These limb images provide information about Mercury's shape and complement measurements of topography made by the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) of Mercury's northern hemisphere. Date acquired: January 20, 2015 Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 64084239 Image ID: 7831084 Instrument: Wide Angle Camera (WAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) WAC filter: 7 (748 nanometers) Center Latitude: -54.45° Center Longitude: 90.52° E Center Resolution: 401 meters/pixel http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19192

  5. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  6. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy

  7. The influence of lower extremity postures on kinematics and injuries of cyclists in vehicle side collisions.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Koji; Yamada, Hidefumi; Mizuguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Daisuke; Han, Yong; Hitosugi, Masahito

    2016-08-17

    A cyclist assumes various cyclic postures of the lower extremities while pushing the pedals in a rotary motion while pedaling. In order to protect cyclists in collisions, it is necessary to understand what influence these postures have on the global kinematics and injuries of the cyclist. Finite element (FE) analyses using models of a cyclist, bicycle, and car were conducted. In the simulations, the Total Human Model of Safety (THUMS) occupant model was employed as a cyclist, and the simulation was set up such that the cyclist was hit from its side by a car. Three representative postures of the lower extremities of the cyclist were examined, and the kinematics and injury risk of the cyclist were compared to those obtained by a pedestrian FE model. The risk of a lower extremity injury was assessed based on the knee shear displacement and the tibia bending moment. When the knee position of the cyclist was higher than the hood leading edge, the hood leading edge contacted the leg of the cyclist, and the pelvis slid over the hood top and the wrap-around distance (WAD) of the cyclist's head was large. The knee was shear loaded by the hood leading edge, and the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptured. The tibia bending moment was less than the injury threshold. When the cyclist's knee position was lower than the hood leading edge, the hood leading edge contacted the thigh of the cyclist, and the cyclist rotated with the femur as the pivot point about the hood leading edge. In this case, the head impact location of the cyclist against the car was comparable to that of the pedestrian collision. The knee shear displacement and the tibia bending moment were less than the injury thresholds. The knee height of the cyclist relative to the hood leading edge affected the global kinematics and the head impact location against the car. The loading mode of the lower extremities was also dependent on the initial positions of the lower extremities relative to the car structures. In

  8. Ordered kinematic endpoints for 5-body cascade decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Matthew D.

    2016-12-01

    We present expressions for the kinematic endpoints of 5-body cascade decay chains proceeding through all possible combinations of 2-body and 3-body decays, with one stable invisible particle in the final decay stage. When an invariant mass can be formed in multiple ways by choosing different final state particles from a common vertex, we introduce techniques for finding the sub-leading endpoints for all indistinguishable versions of the invariant mass. In contrast to short decay chains, where sub-leading endpoints are linearly related to the leading endpoints, we find that in 5-body decays, they provide additional independent constraints on the mass spectrum.

  9. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements. PMID:27412813

  10. Edge phonons in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, H. B.; Villegas, C. E. P.; Bahamon, D. A.; Muraca, D.; Castro Neto, A. H.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Rocha, A. R.; Pimenta, M. A.; de Matos, C. J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Black phosphorus has recently emerged as a new layered crystal that, due to its peculiar and anisotropic crystalline and electronic band structures, may have important applications in electronics, optoelectronics and photonics. Despite the fact that the edges of layered crystals host a range of singular properties whose characterization and exploitation are of utmost importance for device development, the edges of black phosphorus remain poorly characterized. In this work, the atomic structure and behaviour of phonons near different black phosphorus edges are experimentally and theoretically studied using Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Polarized Raman results show the appearance of new modes at the edges of the sample, and their spectra depend on the atomic structure of the edges (zigzag or armchair). Theoretical simulations confirm that the new modes are due to edge phonon states that are forbidden in the bulk, and originated from the lattice termination rearrangements.

  11. The discriminant capabilities of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics in classifying successful and failed compensatory stepping responses by young adults.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeremy R; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Hurt, Christopher P; Grabiner, Mark D

    2012-01-03

    This study evaluated the discriminant capability of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics to classify successful and failed compensatory stepping responses. In addition, the shared variance between stability measures, step kinematics, and trunk kinematics is reported. The stability measures included the anteroposterior distance (d) between the body center of mass and the stepping limb toe, the margin of stability (MOS), as well as time-to-boundary considering velocity (TTB(v)), velocity and acceleration (TTB(a)), and MOS (TTB(MOS)). Kinematic measures included trunk flexion angle and angular velocity, step length, and the time after disturbance onset of recovery step completion. Fourteen young adults stood on a treadmill that delivered surface accelerations necessitating multiple forward compensatory steps. Thirteen subjects fell from an initial disturbance, but recovered from a second, identical disturbance. Trunk flexion velocity at completion of the first recovery step and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second step had the greatest overall classification of all measures (92.3%). TTB(v) and TTB(a) at completion of both steps had the greatest classification accuracy of all stability measures (80.8%). The length of the first recovery step (r ≤ 0.70) and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second recovery step (r ≤ -0.54) had the largest correlations with stability measures. Although TTB(v) and TTB(a) demonstrated somewhat smaller discriminant capabilities than trunk kinematics, the small correlations between these stability measures and trunk kinematics (|r| ≤ 0.52) suggest that they reflect two important, yet different, aspects of a compensatory stepping response.

  12. Cerebellar compartments for the processing of kinematic and kinetic information related to hindlimb stepping.

    PubMed

    Valle, M S; Bosco, G; Poppele, R E

    2017-08-23

    We previously showed that proprioceptive sensory input from the hindlimbs to the anterior cerebellar cortex of the cat may not be simply organized with respect to a body map, but it may also be distributed to multiple discrete functional areas extending beyond classical body map boundaries. With passive hindlimb stepping movements, cerebellar activity was shown to relate to whole limb kinematics as does the activity of dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT) neurons. For DSCT activity, whole limb kinematics provides a solid functional framework within which information about limb forces, such as those generated during active stepping, may also be embedded. In this study, we investigated this idea for the spinocerebellar cortex activity by examining the activity of cerebellar cortical neurons during both passive bipedal hindlimb stepping and active stepping on a treadmill. Our results showed a functional compartmentalization of cerebellar responses to hindlimb stepping movements depending on the two types of stepping and strong relationships between neural activities and limb axis kinematics during both. In fact, responses to passive and active stepping were generally different, but in both cases their waveforms were related strongly to the limb axis kinematics. That is, the different stepping conditions modified the kinematics representation without producing different components in the response waveforms. In sum, cerebellar activity was consistent with a global kinematics framework serving as a basis upon which detailed information about limb mechanics and/or about individual limb segments might be imposed.

  13. Investigating The Kinematics of Canids and Felids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, D.

    2016-12-01

    For all organisms, metabolic energy is critical for survival. While moving efficiently is a necessity for large carnivores, the influence of kinematics on energy demand remains poorly understood. We measured the kinematics of dogs, wolves, and pumas to detect any differences in their respective energy expenditures. Using 22 kinematic parameters measured on 78 videos, we used one-way ANOVAs and paired T-tests to compare 5 experimental treatments among gaits in dogs (n=11 in 3 breed groups), wolves (n=2), and pumas (n=2). Across the measured parameters, we found greater kinematic similarity than expected among dog breeds and no trend in any of the 22 parameters regarding the effect of steepness on locomotion mechanics. Similarly, treadmill kinematics were nearly identical to those measured during outdoor movement. However, in 3 inches of snow, we observed significant differences (p<0.05) in 5 of the 22 parameters for one wolf. When comparing canids (wolves and dogs) to a felid (pumas), we found that pumas and dogs are the most kinematically distinct (differing in 13 of 22 parameters, compared with 5 of 22 for wolves and pumas). Lastly, compared with wolves, walking pumas had larger head angles (p=0.0025), forelimb excursion angles (p=0.0045), and hindlimb excursion angles (p=0.0327). After comparing the energetics of pumas and dogs with their respective kinematics, we noted that less dynamic kinematics result in energy savings. Through tracking the locations and gait behavior of large carnivores, novel sensor technology can reveal how indoor kinematics applies to wild animals and improve the conservation of these species.

  14. Anisotropic superconductivity driven by kinematic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. A.

    2000-11-01

    We have analysed the effect of kinematic pairing on the symmetry of superconducting order parameter for a square lattice in the frame of the strongly correlated Hubbard model. It is argued that in the first perturbation order the kinematic interaction renormalizes the Hubbard-I dispersions and provides at low doping the mixed singlet (s + s*)-wave superconductivity, giving way at higher doping to the triplet p-wave superconductivity. The obtained phase diagram depends only on the hopping integral parameter. The influence of the Coulomb repulsion on the kinematic superconducting pairing has been estimated. The (s + s*)-wave gap and the thermodynamic critical magnetic field have been derived.

  15. Kinematic Analysis Procedures In Biomechanics Cinematography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Anne E.

    1982-02-01

    The key to kinetic analysis procedures via cinematography is the determination of the kinematics of the situation under analysis. Calculation of kinematic parameters of a body, namely, its displacement, velocity, and acceleration, is dependent on the precise and accurate location of points in two- or three-dimensional space. To insure optimal precision (reliability) and accuracy (validity) of the resulting kinematic data, consideration must be given to the selection and implementation of appropriate photographic procedures, as well as to data reduction procedures that will minimize errors.

  16. Kinematic hardening in creep of Zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Radan; Deuble, Dietmar

    2016-10-01

    Results of biaxial creep tests with stress changes on Zircaloy-2 tube samples are presented. A Hollomon-type viscoplastic strain hardening model is extended by the Armstrong-Frederic nonlinear kinematic hardening law, resulting in a mixed (i.e. isotropic and kinematic) strain hardening model. The creep tests with stress changes and similar tests published in the literature are simulated by the models. It is shown that introduction of the kinematic strain hardening in the viscoplastic strain hardening model is sufficient to describe the creep transients following stress drops, stress reversals and stress removals.

  17. Kinematic determinants of human locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, N A; Bianchi, L; Lacquaniti, F

    1996-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to find kinematic patterns that are invariant across the normal range of locomotion speeds. Subjects walked at different, freely chosen speeds ranging from 0.9 to 2.1 m s-1, while motion and ground reaction forces on the right side of the body were recorded in three-dimensional space. 2. The time course of the anatomical angles of flexion-extension at the hip and ankle was variable not only across subjects, but even from trial to trial in the same subject. By contrast, the time course of the changes in the angles of elevation of each limb segment (pelvis, thigh, shank and foot) relative to the vertical was stereotyped across subjects. 3. To compare the waveforms across speeds, data were scaled in time relative to gait cycle duration. The pattern of ground reaction forces was highly speed dependent. Several distinct families of curves could be recognized in the flexion-extension angles at the hip and ankle. Instead, the waveforms of global length and elevation of the limb, elevation angles of all limb segments and flexion-extension at the knee were invariant with speed. 4. When gait trajectories at all speeds are plotted in the position space defined by the elevation angles of the limb segments, they describe regular loops on a plane. The statistical characteristics of these angular covariations were quantified by means of principal component analysis. The first two principal components accounted together for > 99% of the total experimental variance, and were quantitatively comparable in all subjects. 5. This constraint of planar covariation of the elevation angles is closely reminiscent of that previously described for the control of posture. The existence of laws of intersegmental co-ordination, common to the control of posture and locomotion, presumably assures the maintenance of dynamic equilibrium during forward progression, and the anticipatory adaptation to potentially destabilizing factors by means of co-ordinated kinematic

  18. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  19. The Facilitator's Edge: Group Sessions for Edge-ucators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handcock, Helen

    The Facilitator's Edge is a workshop series based on the life/work messages of The Edge magazine. The workshops are deigned to help educators, youth workers, and their career practitioners facilitate conscious career building. This manual consists of five group sessions, each focusing on a different career-building theme. "Megatrends and…

  20. A kinematic unifying theory of microstructures in subglacial tills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, J.; van der Meer, J. J. M.; Ravier, E.

    2016-10-01

    A key aspect of all subglacial tills is the nature and form of microstructures present. Microstructures are symptomatic of repeated deformation phases prior to, during, and after emplacement. Critical to understanding microstructures in subglacial tills are the probable interrelationship that exists between all of these structures. In analyzing subglacial tills a kinematic deformation relationship can be observed existing between all microstructures. Based upon the rheological conditions at the ice basal interface, a close evolving paleo-strain link can be established that relates levels of deformation to all subglacial till microstructures. As subglacial till undergoes strain during transport and emplacement involving fluctuating conditions of porewater content, percentage of clays present, and changing thermal circumstances, a series of microstructures sequentially evolve. Initially, brittle edge-to-edge grain events occur, followed by grains stack development, often allied closely in time, with microshear formation as the sediment deforms, and is consequently followed by the development of ductile rotation structures. Likewise, deformation bands, shear zone formation, and typically "isolated" domains form. As strain and other factors vary over time so many of these microstructures may be obliterated, altered, or re-oriented. Much remains to be understood regarding paleo-strain conditions and subglacial deformation but a first step has been establishing this temporal sequence of microstructure stage development and thus achieving a theory that unifies these disparate microstructures observed in all subglacial tills.

  1. Edge-edge interactions in stacked graphene nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Jia, Xiaoting; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dresselhaus, M; Meunier, V.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) studies show the dynamics of small graphene platelets on larger graphene layers. The platelets move nearly freely to eventually lock in at well-defined positions close to the edges of the larger underlying graphene sheet. While such movement is driven by a shallow potential energy surface described by an interplane interaction, the lock-in position occurs by via edge-edge interactions of the platelet and the graphene surface located underneath. Here we quantitatively study this behavior using van der Waals density functional calculations. Local interactions at the open edges are found to dictate stacking configurations that are different from Bernal (AB) stacking. These stacking configurations are known to be otherwise absent in edge-free two-dimensional (2D) graphene. The results explain the experimentally observed platelet dynamics and provide a detailed account of the new electronic properties of these combined systems.

  2. Giant edge state splitting at atomically precise graphene zigzag edges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyong; Talirz, Leopold; Pignedoli, Carlo A.; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Fasel, Roman; Ruffieux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Zigzag edges of graphene nanostructures host localized electronic states that are predicted to be spin-polarized. However, these edge states are highly susceptible to edge roughness and interaction with a supporting substrate, complicating the study of their intrinsic electronic and magnetic structure. Here, we focus on atomically precise graphene nanoribbons whose two short zigzag edges host exactly one localized electron each. Using the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope, the graphene nanoribbons are transferred from the metallic growth substrate onto insulating islands of NaCl in order to decouple their electronic structure from the metal. The absence of charge transfer and hybridization with the substrate is confirmed by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, which reveals a pair of occupied/unoccupied edge states. Their large energy splitting of 1.9 eV is in accordance with ab initio many-body perturbation theory calculations and reflects the dominant role of electron–electron interactions in these localized states. PMID:27181701

  3. Kinematic dynamo of inertial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreman, Wietze; Le Gal, Patrice; Le Dizes, Stephane

    2008-11-01

    Inertial waves are natural oscillatory tridimensional perturbations in rapidly rotating flows. They can be driven to high amplitudes by an external oscillatory forcing such as precession, or by a parametric instability such as in the elliptical instability. Inertial waves were observed in a MHD-flow (Gans, 1971, JFM ; Kelley et al., 2008, GAFD) and could be responsable of dynamo action. For travelling waves, a constructive alpha-effect was identified (Moffatt, 1970, JFM), but it does not apply to confined inertial wave flows. Yet, recent numerical work demonstrated that precession driven MHD flows can sustain magnetic fields (Tilgner, 2005, POF; Wu & Roberts, 2008, GAFD). This motivates us to study more precisely how inertial waves can exhibit dynamo action. Using a numerical code in cylindrical geometry, we find that standing inertial waves can generate a kinematic dynamo. We show that the dynamo-action results from a second order interaction of the diffusive eigenmodes of the magnetic field with the inertial wave. Scaling laws are obtained, which allows us to to apply the results to flows of geophysical interest.

  4. Milky Way halo gas kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of high resolution, short wavelength absorption data taken by IUE toward high latitude O and B stars are presented in a discussion of the large scale kinematic properties of Milky Way Halo gas. An analysis of these data demonstrates that: (1) the obsrved absorption widths (FWHM) of Si II are very large, ranging up to 150 Km/s for the most distant halo star; this is much larger than is generally appreciated from optical data; (2) the absorption is observed to be systematically negative in radial velocity, indicating that cool material is, on the whole, flowing toward the disk of the galaxy; (3) there is some evidence for asymmetry between the northern and southern galactic hemispheres, in accordance with the HI 21 cm data toward the galactic poles; (4) low column density gas with highly negative radial LSR velocity (V less than -70 km/s) can be found toward stars beyond 1-3 kpc in the northern galactic hemisphere in all four quadrants of galactic longitude; and (5) only the profiles toward stars in the direction of known high velocity HI features show a clear two component structure.

  5. Applying Clustering to Statistical Analysis of Student Reasoning about Two-Dimensional Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springuel, R. Padraic; Wittman, Michael C.; Thompson, John R.

    2007-01-01

    We use clustering, an analysis method not presently common to the physics education research community, to group and characterize student responses to written questions about two-dimensional kinematics. Previously, clustering has been used to analyze multiple-choice data; we analyze free-response data that includes both sketches of vectors and…

  6. Saybolt universal viscosity converted to kinematic

    SciTech Connect

    Anaya, C.; Bermudez, O.

    1987-09-21

    This article describes a program for personal and handheld computers, written in Basic, which has been developed for the conversion of Saybolt universal viscosity in Saybolt Universal Seconds (SSU or SUS) to kinematic viscosity in centistokes (cSt), at any selected temperature. It was developed using the mathematical relationship presented in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard D2161-82. In the standard, an equation is presented to convert kinematic viscosity to Saybolt universal viscosity, but nothing is presented to convert from Saybolt to kinematic because it is necessary to find the roots of a nonexplicit function. There are several numerical methods that can be used to determine the roots of the nonexplicit function, and therefore, convert Saybolt universal viscosity to kinematic viscosity. In the program, the first iteration of the second-order Newton-Raphson method is followed by the Wegstein method as a convergence accelerator.

  7. Widely tunable edge emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlet, Gert; Wesstrom, Jan-Olof; Rigole, Pierre-Jean; Broberg, Bjoern

    2001-11-01

    We will present the current state-of-the-art in widely tunable edge emitting lasers for WDM applications. Typical applications for a tunable laser will be discussed, and the different types of tunable lasers available today will be compared with respect to the requirements posed by these applications. We will focus on the DBR-type tunable lasers - DBR, SG-DBR and GCSR - which at present seem to be the only tunable lasers mature enough for real-life applications. Their main advantages are that they are all monolithic, with no moving parts, and can be switched from one frequency to the other very rapidly since the tuning is based on carrier injection and not on thermal or mechanical changes. We will briefly discuss the working principle of each of these devices, and present typical performance characteristics. From a manufacturing point of view, rapid characterization of the lasers is crucial; therefore an overview will be given of different characterization schemes that have recently been proposed. For the end user, reliability is the prime issue. We will show results of degradation studies on these lasers and outline how the control electronics that drive the laser can compensate for any frequency drift. Finally, we will also discuss the impact of the requirement for rapid frequency switching on the design of the control electronics.

  8. Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow A. Z. Escudero, Ja. Álvarez, L. Leija. Center of Research and Advanced Studies of the IPN...replacement above elbow are serial mechanisms driven by a DC motor and they include only one active articulation for the elbow [1]. Parallel mechanisms...are rather scarce [2]. The inverse kinematics model of a 3-degree of freedom parallel prosthetic elbow mechanism is reported. The mathematical

  9. Wing Leading Edge Debris Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Jerman, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    This is a slide presentation showing the Left Wing Leading Edge (WLE) heat damage observations: Heavy "slag" deposits on select RCC panels. Eroded and knife-edged RCC rib sections. Excessive overheating and slumping of carrier panel tiles. Missing or molten attachment bolts but intact bushing. Deposit mainly on "inside" RCC panel. Deposit on some fractured RCC surface

  10. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  11. Improved Edge Performance in MRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorey, Aric; Jones, Andrew; Durnas, Paul; Tricard, Marc

    2004-01-01

    The fabrication of large segmented optics requires a polishing process that can correct the figure of a surface to within a short distance from its edges-typically, a few millimeters. The work here is to develop QED's Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) precision polishing process to minimize residual edge effects.

  12. The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Loucks, C.S.; Selleck, C.B.

    1990-08-01

    The Robotic Edge Finishing Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is developing four areas of technology required for automated deburring, chamfering, and blending of machined edges: (1) the automatic programming of robot trajectories and deburring processes using information derived from a CAD database, (2) the use of machine vision for locating the workpiece coupled with force control to ensure proper tool contact, (3) robotic deburring, blending, and machining of precision chamfered edges, and (4) in-process automated inspection of the formed edge. The Laboratory, its components, integration, and results from edge finishing experiments to date are described here. Also included is a discussion of the issues regarding implementation of the technology in a production environment. 24 refs., 17 figs.

  13. Three-dimensional kinematics of wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Rao, S S; Bontrager, E L; Gronley, J K; Newsam, C J; Perry, J

    1996-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) biomechanical model was used to determine upper extremity kinematics of 16 male subjects with low-level paraplegia while performing wheelchair propulsion (WCP). A six-camera VICON motion analysis system was used to acquire the coordinate data of ten anatomic markers. Joint axes for the wrist and elbow were defined along with the planes of motion for the upper arm (humerus) and trunk. The group's mean and standard deviation profiles were graphed for eight of the nine rotations measured during WCP. Variability in the intercycle and intersubject movement patterns were calculated using the root mean square standard deviation (RMS sigma) and the coefficient of variation (CV). Motion pattern similarities were quantified using the coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC). The intercycle (Nc > or = 6) motion patterns of individual subjects were highly consistent, similar, and repeatable during WCP. This was confirmed by low CVc values (3-31%), high CMCc values (0.724-0.996) and RMS sigma c values below 3.2 degrees. For the group, mean values of the propulsion velocity, cadence, and propulsion cycle duration were 89.7 m/min, 66.1 pushes/min, and 0.96 s, respectively. Humeral plane and rotation showed large excursions (76.1-81.6 degrees), while trunk lean and forearm carrying angle displayed relatively small ranges of motion (5.5-10.9 degrees). The intersubject (N3 = 16) motion patterns were less similar compared to individual intercycle patterns. This was evidenced by higher CVc values (12-128%) and lower CMC3 values (0.418-0.935). Intersubject humeral patterns were the most consistent while trunk lean was the least consistent. Intersubject root mean square standard deviations (RMS sigma c) were more than three times the corresponding intercycle values for all nine rotations.

  14. Butterfly edge effects are predicted by a simple model in a complex landscape.

    PubMed

    Ries, Leslie; Sisk, Thomas D

    2008-05-01

    Edge responses have been studied for decades and form a critical component of our understanding of how organisms respond to landscape structure and habitat fragmentation. Until recently, however, the lack of a general, conceptual framework has made it difficult to make sense of the patterns and variability reported in the edge literature. We present a test of an edge effects model which predicts that organisms should avoid edges with less-preferred habitat, show increased abundance near edges with preferred habitat or habitat containing complementary resources, and show no response to edges with similar-quality habitat that offers only supplementary resources. We tested the predictions of this model against observations of the edge responses of 15 butterfly species at 12 different edge types within a complex, desert riparian landscape. Observations matched model predictions more than would be expected by chance for the 211 species/edge combinations tested over 3 years of study. In cases where positive or negative edge responses were predicted, observed responses matched those predictions 70% of the time. While the model tends to underpredict neutral results, it was rare that an observed edge response contradicted that predicted by the model. This study also supported the two primary ecological mechanisms underlying the model, although not equally. We detected a positive relationship between habitat preferences and the slope of the observed edge response, suggesting that this basic life history trait underlies edge effects and influences their magnitude. Empirical evidence also suggested the presence of complementary resources underlies positive edge responses, but only when completely confined to the adjacent habitat. This multi-species test of a general edge effects model at multiple edge types shows that resource-based mechanisms can explain many edge responses and that a modest knowledge of life history attributes and resource availability is sufficient for

  15. In vivo kinematic evaluation and design considerations related to high flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Argenson, Jean-Noël A; Scuderi, Giles R; Komistek, Richard D; Scott, W Norman; Kelly, Michael A; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2005-02-01

    In designing a posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (TKA) it is preferable that when the cam engages the tibial spine the contact point of the cam move down the tibial spine. This provides greater stability in flexion by creating a greater jump distance and reduces the stress on the tibial spine. In order to eliminate edge loading of the femoral component on the posterior tibial articular surface, the posterior femoral condyles need to be extended. This provides an ideal femoral contact with the tibial articular surface during high flexion angles. To reduce extensor mechanism impingement in deep flexion, the anterior margin of the tibial articular component should be recessed. This provides clearance for the patella and patella tendon. An in vivo kinematic analysis that determined three dimensional motions of the femorotibial joint was performed during a deep knee bend using fluoroscopy for 20 subjects having a TKA designed for deep flexion. The average weight-bearing range-of-motion was 125 degrees . On average, TKA subjects experienced 4.9 degrees of normal axial rotation and all subjects experienced at least -4.4 mm of posterior femoral rollback. It is assumed that femorotibial kinematics can play a major role in patellofemoral kinematics. In this study, subjects implanted with a high-flexion TKA design experienced kinematic patterns that were similar to the normal knee. It can be hypothesized that forces acting on the patella were not substantially increased for TKA subjects compared with the normal subjects.

  16. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  17. Edge-on Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has imaged an unusual edge-on galaxy, revealing remarkable details of its warped dusty disc and showing how colliding galaxies trigger the birth of new stars.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), is online at http://heritage.stsci.edu and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc. The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. During observations of the galaxy, the camera passed a milestone, taking its 100,000th image since shuttle astronauts installed it in Hubble in 1993.

    The dust and spiral arms of normal spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, look flat when seen edge- on. The new image of the galaxy ESO 510-G13 shows an unusual twisted disc structure, first seen in ground-based photographs taken at the European Southern Observatory in Chile. ESO 510-G13 lies in the southern constellation Hydra, some 150 million light-years from Earth. Details of the galaxy's structure are visible because interstellar dust clouds that trace its disc are silhouetted from behind by light from the galaxy's bright, smooth central bulge.

    The strong warping of the disc indicates that ESO 510-G13 has recently collided with a nearby galaxy and is in the process of swallowing it. Gravitational forces distort galaxies as their stars, gas, and dust merge over millions of years. When the disturbances die out, ESO 510-G13 will be a single galaxy.

    The galaxy's outer regions, especially on the right side of the image, show dark dust and bright clouds of blue stars. This indicates that hot, young stars are forming in the twisted disc. Astronomers believe star formation may be triggered when galaxies collide and their interstellar clouds are compressed.

    The Hubble Heritage Team used WFPC2 to observe ESO 510-G13 in April 2001. Pictures obtained through blue, green, and red filters were combined to make this color-composite image, which emphasizes the contrast between the dusty

  18. Diagnosing phenotypes of single-sample individuals by edge biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanwei; Zeng, Tao; Liu, Xiaoping; Chen, Luonan

    2015-06-01

    Network or edge biomarkers are a reliable form to characterize phenotypes or diseases. However, obtaining edges or correlations between molecules for an individual requires measurement of multiple samples of that individual, which are generally unavailable in clinical practice. Thus, it is strongly demanded to diagnose a disease by edge or network biomarkers in one-sample-for-one-individual context. Here, we developed a new computational framework, EdgeBiomarker, to integrate edge and node biomarkers to diagnose phenotype of each single test sample. By applying the method to datasets of lung and breast cancer, it reveals new marker genes/gene-pairs and related sub-networks for distinguishing earlier and advanced cancer stages. Our method shows advantages over traditional methods: (i) edge biomarkers extracted from non-differentially expressed genes achieve better cross-validation accuracy of diagnosis than molecule or node biomarkers from differentially expressed genes, suggesting that certain pathogenic information is only present at the level of network and under-estimated by traditional methods; (ii) edge biomarkers categorize patients into low/high survival rate in a more reliable manner; (iii) edge biomarkers are significantly enriched in relevant biological functions or pathways, implying that the association changes in a network, rather than expression changes in individual molecules, tend to be causally related to cancer development. The new framework of edge biomarkers paves the way for diagnosing diseases and analyzing their molecular mechanisms by edges or networks in one-sample-for-one-individual basis. This also provides a powerful tool for precision medicine or big-data medicine. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  19. ESIM: Edge Similarity for Screen Content Image Quality Assessment.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhangkai; Ma, Lin; Zeng, Huanqiang; Chen, Jing; Cai, Canhui; Ma, Kai-Kuang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an accurate full-reference image quality assessment (IQA) model developed for assessing screen content images (SCIs), called the edge similarity (ESIM), is proposed. It is inspired by the fact that the human visual system (HVS) is highly sensitive to edges that are often encountered in SCIs; therefore, essential edge features are extracted and exploited for conducting IQA for the SCIs. The key novelty of the proposed ESIM lies in the extraction and use of three salient edge features-i.e., edge contrast, edge width, and edge direction. The first two attributes are simultaneously generated from the input SCI based on a parametric edge model, while the last one is derived directly from the input SCI. The extraction of these three features will be performed for the reference SCI and the distorted SCI, individually. The degree of similarity measured for each above-mentioned edge attribute is then computed independently, followed by combining them together using our proposed edge-width pooling strategy to generate the final ESIM score. To conduct the performance evaluation of our proposed ESIM model, a new and the largest SCI database (denoted as SCID) is established in our work and made to the public for download. Our database contains 1800 distorted SCIs that are generated from 40 reference SCIs. For each SCI, nine distortion types are investigated, and five degradation levels are produced for each distortion type. Extensive simulation results have clearly shown that the proposed ESIM model is more consistent with the perception of the HVS on the evaluation of distorted SCIs than the multiple state-of-the-art IQA methods.

  20. Global/local analysis of laminated composite plates using variable kinematic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, D. H., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element modeling methodology is developed for the hierarchical, global/local analysis of laminated composite plates. The method incorporates a new variable kinematics, displacement-based, finite element that is developed using a multiple assumed displacement field approach. The variable kinematic elements provide a great degree of flexibility in defining the transverse (through thickness) variation of the assumed displacement field. The resulting finite element model permits different subregions of the computational domain to be described by different mathematical models. Enforcing displacement continuity along subregion boundaries requires only the specification of certain homogeneous essential boundary conditions, thus avoiding the inconvenience of multi-point constraints, penalty function methods, or special transition elements.

  1. Kinematics of the SgrB2(N-LMH) Molecular Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Pedelty, J. A.; Boboltz, D. A.; Liu, S.-Y.; Snyder, L. E.; Palmer, Patrick; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.

    2003-01-01

    Ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) emission and absorption have been imaged with the Very Large Array (VLA) toward SgrB2(N-LMH) by means of the 5(sub 15)-4(sub 14) rotational transition at 43.5 GHz (lambda approx. 7 mm). The 1.5" x 1.4" VLA beam shows two principal sources of ethyl cyanide emission: an unresolved source approx. 5" north of the LMH that is kinematically consistent with simple expansion, contraction, or small-scale turbulence, and the resolved LMH core source itself that shows kinematics indicating an edge-on rotating disk that extends 23" (approx. 0.1 pc) in the approximate east-west direction. A search for the 7(sub 07)-6(sub 06) rotational transition of the amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) at 43.7 GHz toward SgrB2(N-LMH) gave negative results.

  2. Measuring wing kinematics, flight trajectory and body attitude during forward flight and turning maneuvers in dragonflies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zeng, Lijiang; Liu, Hao; Yin, Chunyong

    2003-02-01

    A robust technique for determining the wing kinematics, body position and attitude of a free-flight dragonfly is described. The new method is based on a projected comb-fringe technique combined with the natural landmarks on a dragonfly, allowing us to establish the local body-centered coordinate system with high accuracy, and to measure the body attitude at any instant. The kinematic parameters, including wingbeat frequency, flapping angle, angle of attack, torsional angle and camber deformation, required no assumptions to be made with respect to wing geometry, deformability (except the assumption of rigid leading edges) or bilateral wing symmetry. Two typical flight behaviors, forward flight and turning maneuvers, of dragonflies Polycanthagyna melanictera Selys were measured and analyzed.

  3. Surgical revision after percutaneous mitral valve repair by edge-to-edge device: when the strategy fails in the highest risk surgical population.

    PubMed

    Alozie, Anthony; Westphal, Bernd; Kische, Stephan; Kaminski, Alexander; Paranskaya, Liliya; Bozdag-Turan, Ilkay; Ortak, Jasmin; Schubert, Jochen; Steinhoff, Gustav; Ince, Hüseyin

    2014-07-01

    Percutaneous edge-to-edge devices for non-surgical repair of mitral valve regurgitation are under clinical evaluation in high-risk patients deemed not suitable for conventional surgery. To address guidelines for initial therapy decision, we here report on 13 cases of surgery after failed percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair or attempted repair, and discuss methodology and prognostic factors for operative outcome in this high-risk situation. Thirteen patients referred to our cardiothoracic unit after failed percutaneous mitral valve repair or attempted repair using the edge-to-edge technique, were treated surgically for mitral valve failure between June 2010 and December 2012. Pathology of mitral valve before and after interventional mitral valve repair (especially prevalent mode of failure) was evaluated and classified for each individual patient by echocardiography and intraoperative direct visualization. Number of implanted edge-to-edge devices were identified. Preoperative risk scores were matched with intraoperative observations and histopathological findings of valve tissue. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were analysed with respect to mitral valve and patient-related data. Three of 10 patients were referred with severe mitral valve regurgitation/stenosis after initially successful percutaneous edge-to-edge therapy or attempted therapy. In 3 patients, ≥ 2 edge-to-edge devices were implanted leading to very tight edge-to-edge leaflet connection and fibrosis. All patients underwent successful surgical mitral valve replacement and concomitant complete cardiac surgery (CABG, aortic or tricuspid valve surgery, ASD closure and pulmonary vein isolation for atrial fibrillation). The likelihood of repair was reduced with respect to multiple edge-to-edge technology. One device could not be harvested surgically because of embolization. One patient died on the second postoperative day due to sepsis with multiple organ failure. The remaining 12 patients

  4. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  5. Red edge measurements for remotely sensing plant chlorophyll content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Dockray, M.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the wavelength of the maximum slope of the red edge of leaf reflectance spectra, Lambda(re), as an indication of plant chlorophyll status was examined in the laboratory for single leaves of several species. Lambda(re) for each sample was determined by derivative reflectance spectroscopy. A high positive correlation was found between Lambda(re) and leaf chlorophyll content for all species, although there were some differences in the quantitative nature of the relationship for plants of different types. The position of the red edge was found to be unaffected by simulated change in ground cover, but multiple leaf layers produced a shift in its position. Appropriate spectral measurements and processing for obtaining useful information from the red edge are discussed, and the potential of the red edge in relation to other spectral measurements is considered.

  6. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  7. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-04-07

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail.

  8. High-speed x-ray video demonstrates significant skin movement errors with standard optical kinematics during rat locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Jay M.; Chang, Young-Hui

    2009-01-01

    The sophistication of current rodent injury and disease models outpaces that of the most commonly used behavioral assays. The first objective of this study was to measure rat locomotion using high-speed x-ray video to establish an accurate baseline for rat hindlimb kinematics. The second objective was to quantify the kinematics errors due to skin movement artefacts by simultaneously recording and comparing hindlimb kinematics derived from skin markers and from direct visualization of skeletal landmarks. Joint angle calculations from skin-derived kinematics yielded errors as high as 39° in the knee and 31° in the hip around paw contact with respect to the x-ray data. Triangulation of knee position from the ankle and hip skin markers provided closer, albeit still inaccurate, approximations of bone-derived, x-ray kinematics. We found that soft tissue movement errors are the result of multiple factors, the most impressive of which is overall limb posture. Treadmill speed had surprisingly little effect on kinematics errors. These findings illustrate the significance and context of skin movement error in rodent kinematics. PMID:19900476

  9. High-speed X-ray video demonstrates significant skin movement errors with standard optical kinematics during rat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Jay M; Chang, Young-Hui

    2010-01-30

    The sophistication of current rodent injury and disease models outpaces that of the most commonly used behavioral assays. The first objective of this study was to measure rat locomotion using high-speed X-ray video to establish an accurate baseline for rat hindlimb kinematics. The second objective was to quantify the kinematics errors due to skin movement artefacts by simultaneously recording and comparing hindlimb kinematics derived from skin markers and from direct visualization of skeletal landmarks. Joint angle calculations from skin-derived kinematics yielded errors as high as 39 degrees in the knee and 31 degrees in the hip around paw contact with respect to the X-ray data. Triangulation of knee position from the ankle and hip skin markers provided closer, albeit still inaccurate, approximations of bone-derived, X-ray kinematics. We found that soft tissue movement errors are the result of multiple factors, the most impressive of which is overall limb posture. Treadmill speed had surprisingly little effect on kinematics errors. These findings illustrate the significance and context of skin movement error in rodent kinematics. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinematic parameters that influence the aesthetic perception of beauty in contemporary dance.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Carlota; Castañer, Marta; Jofre, Toni; Morey, Gaspar; Reverter, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Some experiments have stablished that certain kinematic parameters can influence the subjective aesthetic perception of the dance audience. Neave, McCarty, Freynik, Caplan, Hönekopp, and Fink (2010, Biology Letters 7 221-224) reported eleven movement parameters in non-expert male dancers, showing a significant positive correlation with perceived dance quality. We aim to identify some of the kinematic parameters of expert dancers' movements that influence the subjective aesthetic perception of observers in relation to specific skills of contemporary dance. Four experienced contemporary dancers performed three repetitions of four dance-related motor skills. Motion was captured by a VICON-MX system. The resulting 48 animations were viewed by 108 observers. The observers judged beauty using a semantic differential. The data were then subjected to multiple factor analysis. The results suggested that there were strong associations between higher beauty scores and certain kinematic parameters, especially those related to amplitude of movement.

  11. Incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo for autonomous robotic capture of non-cooperative space debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Gangqi; Zhu, Z. H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposed a new incremental inverse kinematics based vision servo approach for robotic manipulators to capture a non-cooperative target autonomously. The target's pose and motion are estimated by a vision system using integrated photogrammetry and EKF algorithm. Based on the estimated pose and motion of the target, the instantaneous desired position of the end-effector is predicted by inverse kinematics and the robotic manipulator is moved incrementally from its current configuration subject to the joint speed limits. This approach effectively eliminates the multiple solutions in the inverse kinematics and increases the robustness of the control algorithm. The proposed approach is validated by a hardware-in-the-loop simulation, where the pose and motion of the non-cooperative target is estimated by a real vision system. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed estimation approach for the target and the incremental control strategy for the robotic manipulator.

  12. KINEMATIC AND SPATIAL SUBSTRUCTURE IN NGC 2264

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario; Fűrész, Gabor

    2015-04-15

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular ({sup 13}CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation.

  13. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  14. A comparison of acromion marker cluster calibration methods for estimating scapular kinematics during upper extremity ergometry.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R Tyler; Nicholson, Kristen F; Rapp, Elizabeth A; Johnston, Therese E; Richards, James G

    2016-05-03

    Accurate measurement of joint kinematics is required to understand the musculoskeletal effects of a therapeutic intervention such as upper extremity (UE) ergometry. Traditional surface-based motion capture is effective for quantifying humerothoracic motion, but scapular kinematics are challenging to obtain. Methods for estimating scapular kinematics include the widely-reported acromion marker cluster (AMC) which utilizes a static calibration between the scapula and the AMC to estimate the orientation of the scapula during motion. Previous literature demonstrates that including additional calibration positions throughout the motion improves AMC accuracy for single plane motions; however this approach has not been assessed for the non-planar shoulder complex motion occurring during UE ergometry. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of single, dual, and multiple AMC calibration methods during UE ergometry. The orientations of the UE segments of 13 healthy subjects were recorded with motion capture. Scapular landmarks were palpated at eight evenly-spaced static positions around the 360° cycle. The single AMC method utilized one static calibration position to estimate scapular kinematics for the entire cycle, while the dual and multiple AMC methods used two and four static calibration positions, respectively. Scapulothoracic angles estimated by the three AMC methods were compared with scapulothoracic angles determined by palpation. The multiple AMC method produced the smallest RMS errors and was not significantly different from palpation about any axis. We recommend the multiple AMC method as a practical and accurate way to estimate scapular kinematics during UE ergometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Oscillations at B Ring Edge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-01

    This image obtained by NASA Cassini spacecraft of the outer edge of Saturn?s B ring, reveals the combined effects of a tugging moon and oscillations that can naturally occur in disks like Saturn rings and spiral galaxies.

  16. Fast tracking using edge histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, Przemyslaw

    1997-04-01

    This paper proposes a new algorithm for tracking objects and objects boundaries. This algorithm was developed and applied in a system used for compositing computer generated images and real world video sequences, but can be applied in general in all tracking systems where accuracy and high processing speed are required. The algorithm is based on analysis of histograms obtained by summing along chosen axles pixels of edge segmented images. Edge segmentation is done by spatial convolution using gradient operator. The advantage of such an approach is that it can be performed in real-time using available on the market hardware convolution filters. After edge extraction and histograms computation, respective positions of maximums in edge intensity histograms, in current and previous frame, are compared and matched. Obtained this way information about displacement of histograms maximums, can be directly converted into information about changes of target boundaries positions along chosen axles.

  17. Edge Fracture in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, Ewan J.; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Fielding, Suzanne M.

    2017-07-01

    We study theoretically the edge fracture instability in sheared complex fluids, by means of linear stability analysis and direct nonlinear simulations. We derive an exact analytical expression for the onset of edge fracture in terms of the shear-rate derivative of the fluid's second normal stress difference, the shear-rate derivative of the shear stress, the jump in shear stress across the interface between the fluid and the outside medium (usually air), the surface tension of that interface, and the rheometer gap size. We provide a full mechanistic understanding of the edge fracture instability, carefully validated against our simulations. These findings, which are robust with respect to choice of rheological constitutive model, also suggest a possible route to mitigating edge fracture, potentially allowing experimentalists to achieve and accurately measure flows stronger than hitherto possible.

  18. Edge Fracture in Complex Fluids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Ewan J; Kusumaatmaja, Halim; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2017-07-14

    We study theoretically the edge fracture instability in sheared complex fluids, by means of linear stability analysis and direct nonlinear simulations. We derive an exact analytical expression for the onset of edge fracture in terms of the shear-rate derivative of the fluid's second normal stress difference, the shear-rate derivative of the shear stress, the jump in shear stress across the interface between the fluid and the outside medium (usually air), the surface tension of that interface, and the rheometer gap size. We provide a full mechanistic understanding of the edge fracture instability, carefully validated against our simulations. These findings, which are robust with respect to choice of rheological constitutive model, also suggest a possible route to mitigating edge fracture, potentially allowing experimentalists to achieve and accurately measure flows stronger than hitherto possible.

  19. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  20. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Read, Tyson J. G.; Segre, Paolo S.; Middleton, Kevin M.; Altshuler, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  1. Estimating feedforward vs. feedback control of speech production through kinematic analyses of unperturbed articulatory movements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang S.; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the contributions of feedforward vs. feedback control systems in speech articulation, we analyzed the correspondence between initial and final kinematics in unperturbed tongue and jaw movements for consonant-vowel (CV) and vowel-consonant (VC) syllables. If movement extents and endpoints are highly predictable from early kinematic information, then the movements were most likely completed without substantial online corrections (feedforward control); if the correspondence between early kinematics and final amplitude or position is low, online adjustments may have altered the planned trajectory (feedback control) (Messier and Kalaska, 1999). Five adult speakers produced CV and VC syllables with high, mid, or low vowels while movements of the tongue and jaw were tracked electromagnetically. The correspondence between the kinematic parameters peak acceleration or peak velocity and movement extent as well as between the articulators' spatial coordinates at those kinematic landmarks and movement endpoint was examined both for movements across different target distances (i.e., across vowel height) and within target distances (i.e., within vowel height). Taken together, results suggest that jaw and tongue movements for these CV and VC syllables are mostly under feedforward control but with feedback-based contributions. One type of feedback-driven compensatory adjustment appears to regulate movement duration based on variation in peak acceleration. Results from a statistical model based on multiple regression are presented to illustrate how the relative strength of these feedback contributions can be estimated. PMID:25426056

  2. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot.

    PubMed

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Tørholm, Søren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Segmented CT data from one healthy subject was used to create a template Glasgow-Maastricht foot model (GM-model). Following this, the template was scaled to produce subject-specific models for five additional healthy participants using a surface scan of the foot and ankle. Forty-three skin mounted markers, mainly positioned around the foot and ankle, were used to capture the stance phase of the right foot of the six healthy participants during walking. The GM-model was then applied to calculate the intrinsic foot kinematics. Distinct motion patterns where found for all joints. The variability in outcome depended on the location of the joint, with reasonable results for sagittal plane motions and poor results for transverse plane motions. The results of the GM-model were comparable with existing literature, including bone pin studies, with respect to the range of motion, motion pattern and timing of the motion in the studied joints. This novel model is the most complete kinematic model to date. Further evaluation of the model is warranted.

  3. Solution of Inverse Kinematics for 6R Robot Manipulators With Offset Wrist Based on Geometric Algebra.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongtao; Yang, Wenyu; Yang, Zhen

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present an efficient method based on geometric algebra for computing the solutions to the inverse kinematics problem (IKP) of the 6R robot manipulators with offset wrist. Due to the fact that there exist some difficulties to solve the inverse kinematics problem when the kinematics equations are complex, highly nonlinear, coupled and multiple solutions in terms of these robot manipulators stated mathematically, we apply the theory of Geometric Algebra to the kinematic modeling of 6R robot manipulators simply and generate closed-form kinematics equations, reformulate the problem as a generalized eigenvalue problem with symbolic elimination technique, and then yield 16 solutions. Finally, a spray painting robot, which conforms to the type of robot manipulators, is used as an example of implementation for the effectiveness and real-time of this method. The experimental results show that this method has a large advantage over the classical methods on geometric intuition, computation and real-time, and can be directly extended to all serial robot manipulators and completely automatized, which provides a new tool on the analysis and application of general robot manipulators.

  4. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio; Furuya, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance.

  5. Kinematic and dynamic analysis of an anatomically based knee joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kok-Meng; Guo, Jiajie

    2010-05-07

    This paper presents a knee-joint model to provide a better understanding on the interaction between natural joints and artificial mechanisms for design and control of rehabilitation exoskeletons. The anatomically based knee model relaxes several commonly made assumptions that approximate a human knee as engineering pin-joint in exoskeleton design. Based on published MRI data, we formulate the kinematics of a knee-joint and compare three mathematical approximations; one model bases on two sequential circles rolling a flat plane; and the other two are mathematically differentiable ellipses-based models with and without sliding at the contact. The ellipses-based model taking sliding contact into accounts shows that the rolling-sliding ratio of a knee-joint is not a constant but has an average value consistent with published measurements. This knee-joint kinematics leads to a physically more accurate contact-point trajectory than methods based on multiple circles or lines, and provides a basis to derive a knee-joint kinetic model upon which the effects of a planar exoskeleton mechanism on the internal joint forces and torque during flexion can be numerically investigated. Two different knee-joint kinetic models (pin-joint approximation and anatomically based model) are compared against a condition with no exoskeleton. The leg and exoskeleton form a closed kinematic chain that has a significant effect on the joint forces in the knee. Human knee is more tolerant than pin-joint in negotiating around a singularity but its internal forces increase with the exoskeleton mass-to-length ratio. An oversimplifying pin-joint approximation cannot capture the finite change in the knee forces due to the singularity effect.

  6. Generic robotic kinematic generator for virtual environment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Piguet, Laurent; Baur, Charles

    1996-12-01

    The expansion of robotic systems' performance, as well as the need for such machines to work in complex environments (hazardous, small, distant, etc.), involves the need for user interfaces which permit efficient teleoperation. Virtual Reality based interfaces provide the user with a new method for robot task planning and control: he or she can define tasks in a very intuitive way by interacting with a 3D computer generated representation of the world, which is continuously updated thanks to multiple sensors fusion and analysis. The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has successfully tested different kinds of teleoperations. In the early 90s, a transatlantic teleoperation of a conventional robot manipulator with a vision feedback system to update the virtual world was achieved. This approach was then extended to perform teleoperation of several mobile robots (Khepera, Koala) as well as to control microrobots used for microsystems' assembly in the micrometer range. One of the problems encountered with such an approach is the necessity to program a specific kinematic algorithm for each kind of manipulator. To provide a more general solution, we started a project aiming at the design of a 'kinematic generator' (CINEGEN) for the simulation of generic serial and parallel mechanical chains. With CINEGEN, each manipulator is defined with an ascii file description and its attached graphics files; inserting a new manipulator simply requires a new description file, and none of the existing tools require modification. To have a real time behavior, we have chosen a numerical method based on the pseudo-Jacobian method to generate the inverse kinematics of the robot. The results obtained with an object-oriented implementation on a graphic workstation are presented in this paper.

  7. Kinematic Origins of Motor Inconsistency in Expert Pianists

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Kenta; Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart; Miyazaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    For top performers, including athletes and musicians, even subtle inconsistencies in rhythm and force during movement production decrease the quality of performance. However, extensive training over many years beginning in childhood is unable to perfect dexterous motor performance so that it is without any error. To gain insight into the biological mechanisms underlying the subtle defects of motor actions, the present study sought to identify the kinematic origins of inconsistency of dexterous finger movements in musical performance. Seven highly-skilled pianists who have won prizes at international piano competitions played a short sequence of tones with the right hand at a predetermined tempo. Time-varying joint angles of the fingers were recorded using a custom-made data glove, and the timing and velocity of the individual keystrokes were recorded from a digital piano. Both ridge and stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated an association of the inter-trial variability of the inter-keystroke interval (i.e., rhythmic inconsistency) with both the rotational velocity of joints of the finger used for a keystroke (i.e., striking finger) and the movement independence between the striking and non-striking fingers. This indicates a relationship between rhythmic inconsistency in musical performance and the dynamic features of movements in not only the striking finger but also the non-striking fingers. In contrast, the inter-trial variability of the key-descending velocity (i.e., loudness inconsistency) was associated mostly with the kinematic features of the striking finger at the moment of the keystroke. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the rhythmic and loudness inconsistencies. The results suggest distinct kinematic origins of inconsistencies in rhythm and loudness in expert musical performance. PMID:27537686

  8. A Kinematic Calibration Process for Flight Robotic Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Curtis L.; Robinson, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) robotic arm is ten times more massive than any Mars robotic arm before it, yet with similar accuracy and repeatability positioning requirements. In order to assess and validate these requirements, a higher-fidelity model and calibration processes were needed. Kinematic calibration of robotic arms is a common and necessary process to ensure good positioning performance. Most methodologies assume a rigid arm, high-accuracy data collection, and some kind of optimization of kinematic parameters. A new detailed kinematic and deflection model of the MSL robotic arm was formulated in the design phase and used to update the initial positioning and orientation accuracy and repeatability requirements. This model included a higher-fidelity link stiffness matrix representation, as well as a link level thermal expansion model. In addition, it included an actuator backlash model. Analytical results highlighted the sensitivity of the arm accuracy to its joint initialization methodology. Because of this, a new technique for initializing the arm joint encoders through hardstop calibration was developed. This involved selecting arm configurations to use in Earth-based hardstop calibration that had corresponding configurations on Mars with the same joint torque to ensure repeatability in the different gravity environment. The process used to collect calibration data for the arm included the use of multiple weight stand-in turrets with enough metrology targets to reconstruct the full six-degree-of-freedom location of the rover and tool frames. The follow-on data processing of the metrology data utilized a standard differential formulation and linear parameter optimization technique.

  9. Resilience of southwestern Amazon forests to anthropogenic edge effects.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Oliver L; Rose, Sam; Mendoza, Abel Monteagudo; Vargas, Percy Núñez

    2006-12-01

    Anthropogenic edge effects can compromise the conservation value of mature tropical forests. To date most edge-effect research in Amazonia has concentrated on forests in relatively seasonal locations or with poor soils in the east of the basin. We present the first evaluation from the relatively richer soils of far western Amazonia on the extent to which mature forest biomass, diversity, and composition are affected by edges. In a southwestern Amazonian landscape we surveyed woody plant diversity, species composition, and biomass in 88x0.1 ha samples of unflooded forest that spanned a wide range in soil properties and included samples as close as 50 m and as distant as >10 km from anthropogenic edges. We applied Mantel tests, multiple regression on distance matrices, and other multivariate techniques to identify anthropogenic effects before and after accounting for soil factors and spatial autocorrelation. The distance to the nearest edge, access point, and the geographical center of the nearest community ("anthropogenic-distance effects") all had no detectable effect on tree biomass or species diversity. Anthropogenic-distance effects on tree species composition were also below the limits of detection and were negligible in comparison with natural environmental and spatial factors. Analysis of the data set's capacity to detect anthropogenic effects confirmed that the forests were not severely affected by edges, although because our study had few plots within 100 m of forest edges, our confidence in patterns in the immediate vicinity of edges is limited. It therefore appears that the conservation value of most "edge" forests in this region has not yet been compromised substantially. We caution that because this is one case study it should not be overinterpreted, but one explanation for our findings may be that western Amazonian tree species are naturally faster growing and more disturbance adapted than those farther east.

  10. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  11. A novel methodology to reproduce previously recorded six-degree of freedom kinematics on the same diarthrodial joint.

    PubMed

    Moore, Susan M; Thomas, Maribeth; Woo, Savio L-Y; Gabriel, Mary T; Kilger, Robert; Debski, Richard E

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel method to more accurately reproduce previously recorded 6-DOF kinematics of the tibia with respect to the femur using robotic technology. Furthermore, the effect of performing only a single or multiple registrations and the effect of robot joint configuration were investigated. A single registration consisted of registering the tibia and femur with respect to the robot at full extension and reproducing all kinematics while multiple registrations consisted of registering the bones at each flexion angle and reproducing only the kinematics of the corresponding flexion angle. Kinematics of the knee in response to an anterior (134 N) and combined internal/external (+/-10 N m) and varus/valgus (+/-5 N m) loads were collected at 0 degrees , 15 degrees , 30 degrees , 60 degrees , and 90 degrees of flexion. A six axes, serial-articulated robotic manipulator (PUMA Model 762) was calibrated and the working volume was reduced to improve the robot's accuracy. The effect of the robot joint configuration was determined by performing single and multiple registrations for three selected configurations. For each robot joint configuration, the accuracy in position of the reproduced kinematics improved after multiple registrations (0.7+/-0.3, 1.2+/-0.5, and 0.9+/-0.2 mm, respectively) when compared to only a single registration (1.3+/-0.9, 2.0+/-1.0, and 1.5+/-0.7 mm, respectively) (p<0.05). The accuracy in position of each robot joint configuration was unique as significant differences were detected between each of the configurations. These data demonstrate that the number of registrations and the robot joint configuration both affect the accuracy of the reproduced kinematics. Therefore, when using robotic technology to reproduce previously recorded kinematics, it may be necessary to perform these analyses for each individual robotic system and for each diarthrodial joint, as different joints will require the robot to be placed in

  12. Graph Theory Roots of Spatial Operators for Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    bodies, the indexing schemes, etc. The relationship of the underlying structure is intimately connected with efficient, recursive computational algorithms. The results provide the foundational groundwork for a much broader look at the key problems in kinematics and dynamics. The properties of general graphs and trees of nodes and edge were examined, as well as the properties of adjacency matrices that are used to describe graph connectivity. The nilpotency property of such matrices for directed trees was reviewed, and the adjacency matrices were generalized to the notion of block weighted adjacency matrices that support block matrix elements. This leads us to the development of the notion of Spatial Kernel Operator SKO kernels. These kernels provide the basis for the development of SKO resolvent operators.

  13. Photometric and Kinematic Studies of Extragalactic Globular Cluster Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windschitl-Dowell, Jessica L.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are compact, luminous collections of stars created during the early stages of galaxy formation. As a result, the properties of GC systems provide important clues about the formation, merger history, and structure of their host galaxies. In particular, kinematic studies of GCs can be used to investigate the dark matter distribution in galaxy halos and provide observational evidence that can be used to constrain models of galaxy formation. I will present our study of the GC systems of two spiral galaxies, NGC 891 and NGC 1055, and show how we used wide-field BVR imaging from the WIYN 3.5-m telescope to detect the GC population and measure the global properties of the system. We quantified the radial distribution of the GC system and total number of GCs in these galaxies and compared the results to those of other galaxies.I will also present the results of spectroscopic follow-up for two giant galaxies: the S0 galaxy NGC 4594 (M104), and the elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 (M105). Using spectra taken with AAT/AAOmega, WIYN/HYDRA, and MMT/Hectospec, I measured the radial velocities of GCs, and combined them with published results to determine the mass distribution and V-band mass-to-light (M/LV) ratio profile for each galaxy out to large effective radius (7-9 Re). I compared our results to mass estimates from other kinematic tracers and also considered them in the context of galaxy formation models. For both galaxies, I found that the M/LV profiles increase with radius and do not flatten, which suggests that the dark matter halos in these galaxies extend to the edge of our data. I also looked for evidence of rotation within the GC systems, and found that neither system exhibits significant rotation around the host galaxy. Finally, I examined the velocity dispersion of each GC system as a function of radius and found kinematic differences between the red, metal-rich and blue, metal-poor GC subpopulations.

  14. Kinematic analysis of 7-DOF manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth; Long, Mark; Seraji, Homayoun

    1992-01-01

    This article presents a kinematic analysis of seven-degree-of-freedom serial link spatial manipulators with revolute joints. To uniquely determine the joint angles for a given end-effector position and orientation, the redundancy is parameterized by a scalar variable that defines the angle between the arm plane and a reference plane. The forward kinematic mappings from joint space to end-effector coordinates and arm angle and the augmented Jacobian matrix that gives end-effector and arm angle rates as functions of joint rates are presented. Conditions under which the augmented Jacobian becomes singular are also given and are shown to correspond to the arm being either at a kinematically singular configuration or at a nonsingular configuration for which the arm angle ceases to parameterize the redundancy.

  15. Kinematic analysis of 7 DOF anthropomorphic arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz-Delgado, K.; Long, M.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    A kinematic analysis of anthropomorphic seven-degree-of-freedom serial link spatial manipulators with revolute joints is presented. To uniquely determine joint angles for a given end-effector position and orientation, the redundancy is parameterized by a scalar variable which corresponds to the angle between the arm plane and a reference plane. The forward kinematic mappings from joint-space to end-effector coordinates and arm angle and the augmented Jacobian matrix which gives end-effector and arm angle rates as functions of joint rates are given. Conditions under which the augmented Jacobian becomes singular are given and are shown to correspond to the arm being either at a kinematically singular configuration or at a nonsingular configuration for which the arm angle ceases to parameterize the redundancy.

  16. Gas Kinematics in the Multiphase Circumgalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Charlton, Jane C.; Evans, Jessica L.

    2017-03-01

    We use high-resolution Keck, VLT, or Hubble Space Telescope spectra of background quasars to examine the kinematic properties of the multiphase, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium in the outskirts of galaxies at 0.08 < z gal < 1.0, focusing on the low-ionization Mgii and high-ionization Ovi doublets. The absorption kinematics of low-ionization gas in the circumgalactic medium depend strongly on the star formation activity and the location about the host galaxy, where the largest velocity dispersions are associated with blue, face-on galaxies probed along the minor axis. Conversely, high-ionization gas kinematics are independent of galaxy star formation activity and orientation.

  17. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  18. Kinematics of the Most Efficient Cilium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe; Lauga, Eric

    2012-07-01

    In a variety of biological processes, eukaryotic cells use cilia to transport flow. Although cilia have a remarkably conserved internal molecular structure, experimental observations report very diverse kinematics. To address this diversity, we determine numerically the kinematics and energetics of the most efficient cilium. Specifically, we compute the time-periodic deformation of a wall-bound elastic filament leading to transport of a surrounding fluid at minimum energetic cost, where the cost is taken to be the positive work done by all internal molecular motors. The optimal kinematics are found to strongly depend on the cilium bending rigidity through a single dimensionless number, the Sperm number, and closely resemble the two-stroke ciliary beating pattern observed experimentally.

  19. Optimal pumping kinematics of a cilium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe; Lauga, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In a variety of biological processes, eukaryotic cells use cilia to transport flow. Although the internal molecular structure of cilia has been remarkably conserved throughout evolution, experimental observations report qualitatively diverse kinematics in different species. To address this diversity, we have determined numerically the kinematics of the most efficient cilium. Specifically, we have computed the time-periodic deformation of a wall-bound elastic filament leading to transport of a surrounding fluid at minimum energetic cost. Here, the energetic cost is taken to be the sum of positive works done by the internal torques, such that elastic energy is not conservative. The optimal kinematics are found to strongly depend on the cilium bending rigidity through a single dimensionless number, the Sperm number Sp, and closely resemble the two-stroke ciliary beating pattern observed experimentally. We acknowledge supports from the EU (fellowship PIOF-GA-2009-252542 to C.E.) and the NSF (grant CBET-0746285 to E.L.).

  20. Temporal and kinematic consistency predict sequence awareness.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, Molly J; Schieber, Marc H; Mink, Jonathan W

    2016-10-01

    Many human motor skills can be represented as a hierarchical series of movement patterns. Awareness of underlying patterns can improve performance and decrease cognitive load. Subjects (n = 30) tapped a finger sequence with changing stimulus-to-response mapping and a common movement sequence. Thirteen subjects (43 %) became aware that they were tapping a familiar movement sequence during the experiment. Subjects who became aware of the underlying motor pattern tapped with greater kinematic and temporal consistency from task onset, but consistency was not sufficient for awareness. We found no effect of age, musical experience, tapping evenness, or inter-key-interval on awareness of the pattern in the motor response. We propose that temporal or kinematic consistency reinforces a pattern representation, but cognitive engagement with the contents of the sequence is necessary to bring the pattern to conscious awareness. These findings predict benefit for movement strategies that limit temporal and kinematic variability during motor learning.

  1. A kinematic study of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Sato, T.

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its confirmed nature as the remnant of a standard Type Ia supernova from spectroscopy of its light echo, Tycho's supernova remnant is a unique object that can provide a new perspective into thermonuclear supernova explosions. More than 400 years after its discovery as a supernova in November 1572, the remnant is now spread out over an 8 arcminute diameter region in a fairly symmetric, but patchy, shell-like morphology. The remnant's thermal X-ray emission is dominated by a strong Si Kalpha line and also shows line emission from other species such as S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Existing proper motion and X-ray line width measurements indicate that Tycho's Si-rich ejecta shell is expanding at ~4700 km/s. We have taken advantage of the huge number of Si line photons in the 750-ks Chandra ACIS observation from 2009 to make the first direct velocity measurements of ejecta in Tycho. The patchy nature of the ejecta shell allows for identification of red- and blue-shifted clumps of emission from the receding and approaching hemispheres. We use nonequilibrium ionization thermal models to jointly fit both ACIS-S and ACIS-I observations to determine the radial expansion velocity of individual clumps and associated systematic uncertainty. Red-shifted clumps have speeds of 3500-7800 km/s and blue-shifted clumps 1600--5000 km/s with a systematic uncertainty of 500-2000 km/s determined by intercomparison of the ACIS-S and ACIS-I spectral results. From our Chandra radial analysis of surface brightness, centroid energy, and line width, we have confirmed previous line width measurements from Suzaku, but are able to utilize finer radial bins that reveal additional structure in the kinematics of Tycho. In particular the Si and S line widths reach a deep minimum at the position of the peak surface brightness near the remnant's edge and where Doppler broadening from the shell expansion is minimum. From the measured line widths and assuming that Doppler and turbulent broadening can be

  2. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  3. SMACK - SMOOTHING FOR AIRCRAFT KINEMATICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R.

    1994-01-01

    The computer program SMACK (SMoothing for AirCraft Kinematics) is designed to provide flightpath reconstruction of aircraft forces and motions from measurements that are noisy or incomplete. Additionally, SMACK provides a check on instrument accuracy and data consistency. The program can be used to analyze data from flight-test experiments prior to their use in performance, stability and control, or aerodynamic modeling calculations. It can also be used in the analysis of aircraft accidents, where the actual forces and motions may have to be determined from a very limited data set. Application of a state-estimation method for flightpath reconstruction is possible because aircraft forces and motions are related by well-known equations of motion. The task of postflight state estimation is known as a nonlinear, fixed-interval smoothing problem. SMACK utilizes a backward-filter, forward-smoother algorithm to solve the problem. The equations of motion are used to produce estimates that are compared with their corresponding measurement time histories. The procedure is iterative, providing improved state estimates until a minimum squared-error measure is achieved. In the SMACK program, the state and measurement models together represent a finite-difference approximation for the six-degree-of-freedom dynamics of a rigid body. The models are used to generate time histories which are likely to be found in a flight-test measurement set. These include onboard variables such as Euler angles, angular rates, and linear accelerations as well as tracking variables such as slant range, bearing, and elevation. Any bias or scale-factor errors associated with the state or measurement models are appended to the state vector and treated as constant but unknown parameters. The SMACK documentation covers the derivation of the solution algorithm, describes the state and measurement models, and presents several application examples that should help the analyst recognize the potential

  4. Pyrenean orogeny and plate kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, J.-C.; Srivastava, S.; Spakman, W.

    2003-04-01

    The development of the Pyrenees, a range of mountain which lies between Iberia and Eurasia, has remained a subject of much debate between geologists and geophysicists for a long time. The debate concerns about the large amount of compressive motion which geophysicists estimate took place across the Pyrenees based on the plate kinematics of the North Atlantic during the opening of the Bay of Biscay with which geologists differ based on their interpretations of the observations made across the Pyrenees. The geologists maintain that only a limited amount of Aptian-Albian compression can be supported by surface observations while a large amount of strike- slip motion is implied in their models. To find satisfactory answer to this disagreement we have re-examined not only the large amount of magnetic data which exist for the Bay of Biscay but also some of the deep seismic and teleseismic data across the Pyrenees. Our re-examination of magnetic data in the Bay of Biscay has enabled us to identify seafloor spreading anomalies 33o to M3. By combining these anomaly identifications with the existing identification of similar anomalies in the North Atlantic we have derived a position of a mean pole of rotation for the entire opening of the Bay of Biscay whose position is constrained not only by the magnetic anomalies identified in the Bay of Biscay and the North Atlantic but also by the geometry of a triple junction which had remained at the mouth of the Bay of Biscay during this period. Such a pole of rotation implies that about 400 km of shortening took place between the Iberian and Eurasian plates in the Pyrenean domain during the opening of the Bay of Biscay from chrons M0 to 33o time (118 to 80 Ma). Shortening perhaps took place in the form of subduction of the oceanic crust below Eurasia as reflected in the deep seismic ECORS profile shot across the Pyrenees. Careful examination of these data has shown presence of two deep features which dips to the north. Further

  5. Effects of Edge Directions on the Structural Controllability of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yandong; Lao, Songyang; Hou, Lvlin; Small, Michael; Bai, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances indicate that assigning or reversing edge direction can significantly improve the structural controllability of complex networks. For directed networks, approaching the optimal structural controllability can be achieved by detecting and reversing certain "inappropriate" edge directions. However, the existence of multiple sets of "inappropriate" edge directions suggests that different edges have different effects on optimal controllability-that is, different combinations of edges can be reversed to achieve the same structural controllability. Therefore, we classify edges into three categories based on their direction: critical, redundant and intermittent. We then investigate the effects of changing these edge directions on network controllability, and demonstrate that the existence of more critical edge directions implies not only a lower cost of modifying inappropriate edges but also better controllability. Motivated by this finding, we present a simple edge orientation method aimed at producing more critical edge directions-utilizing only local information-which achieves near optimal controllability. Furthermore, we explore the effects of edge direction on the controllability of several real networks.

  6. Effects of Edge Directions on the Structural Controllability of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yandong; Lao, Songyang; Hou, Lvlin; Small, Michael; Bai, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances indicate that assigning or reversing edge direction can significantly improve the structural controllability of complex networks. For directed networks, approaching the optimal structural controllability can be achieved by detecting and reversing certain “inappropriate” edge directions. However, the existence of multiple sets of “inappropriate” edge directions suggests that different edges have different effects on optimal controllability—that is, different combinations of edges can be reversed to achieve the same structural controllability. Therefore, we classify edges into three categories based on their direction: critical, redundant and intermittent. We then investigate the effects of changing these edge directions on network controllability, and demonstrate that the existence of more critical edge directions implies not only a lower cost of modifying inappropriate edges but also better controllability. Motivated by this finding, we present a simple edge orientation method aimed at producing more critical edge directions—utilizing only local information—which achieves near optimal controllability. Furthermore, we explore the effects of edge direction on the controllability of several real networks. PMID:26281042

  7. Kinematics and Control of Robot Manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paden, Bradley Evan

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematics and control of robot manipulators. The contribution to kinematics is a fundamental theorem on the design of manipulators with six revolute joints. The theorem states, roughly speaking, that manipulators which have six revolute joints and are modeled after the human arm are optimal and essentially unique. In developing the mathematical framework to prove this theorem, we define precisely the notions of length of a manipulator, well-connected-workspace, and work-volume. We contribute to control a set of analysis techniques for the design of variable structure (sliding mode) controllers for manipulators. The organization of the dissertation is the following. After introductory remarks in chapter one, the group of proper rigid motions, G, is introduced in chapter two. The tangent bundle of G is introduced and it is shown that the velocity of a rigid body can be represented by an element in the Lie algebra of G (commonly called a twist). Further, rigid motions which are exponentials of twists are used to describe four commonly occurring subproblems in robot kinematics. In chapter three, the exponentials of twists are used to write the forward kinematic map of robot manipulators and the subproblems of chapter two are used to solve the Stanford manipulator and an elbow manipulator. Chapter four focuses on manipulator singularities. Twist coordinates are used to find critical points of the forward kinematic map. The contribution to kinematics is contained in chapter five where a mathematical framework for studying the relationship between the design of 6R manipulators and their performance is developed. Chapter seven contains the contribution to control. The work of A. F. Filippov on differential equations with discontinuous right-hand-side and the work of F. H. Clarke on generalized gradients are combined to obtain a calculus for analyzing nonsmooth gradient systems. The techniques developed are applied to design a simple

  8. KINEMATIC DISTANCES OF GALACTIC PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, A. Y.; Tian, W. W.; Zhu, H.; Wu, D.; Leahy, D. A. E-mail: ayyang@bao.ac.cn

    2016-03-15

    We construct H i absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNs) and their background sources using data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNs, among which 15 objects’ kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNs range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor of two or three smaller than most previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2−00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  9. Kinematic problem of rigid body orientation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, P. K.; Sergeev, A. N.; Chelnokov, Iu. N.

    1991-10-01

    The problem of reducing a coordinate system linked with a rigid body to a reference coordinate system rotating with a specified (programmed) angular velocity is analyzed using a kinematic formulation. The mathematic model of motion includes kinematic equations of the angular motion of a rigid body in nonnormalized quaternions; used as the controls are projections of the absolute angular velocity of body rotation to the coordinate axes. Two kinds of correction are proposed which represent quaternion analogs of the positional and integral corrections. Linear error equations for the orientation control system are obtained for the types of correction proposed here.

  10. Altered Sagittal- and Frontal-Plane Kinematics Following High-Intensity Stepping Training Versus Conventional Interventions in Subacute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Mahtani, Gordhan B; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Connolly, Mark; Holleran, Carey L; Hennessy, Patrick W; Woodward, Jane; Brazg, Gabrielle; Roth, Elliot J; Hornby, T George

    2016-09-15

    Common locomotor deficits observed in people poststroke include decreased speeds and abnormal kinematics, characterized by altered symmetry, reduced sagittal-plane joint excursions, and use of compensatory frontal-plane behaviors during the swing phase of gait. Conventional interventions utilized to mitigate these deficits often incorporate low-intensity, impairment-based or functional exercises focused on normalizing kinematics, although the efficacy of these strategies is unclear. Conversely, higher-intensity training protocols that provide only stepping practice and do not focus on kinematics have demonstrated gains in walking function, although minimal attention toward gait quality may be concerning and has not been assessed. The present study evaluated changes in spatiotemporal and joint kinematics following experimental, high-intensity stepping training compared with conventional interventions. Kinematic data were combined from a randomized controlled trial comparing experimental and conventional training and from a pilot experimental training study. Individuals with gait deficits 1 to 6 months poststroke received up to 40 sessions of either high-intensity stepping training in variable contexts or conventional lower-intensity interventions. Analyses focused on kinematic changes during graded treadmill testing before and following training. Significant improvements in speed, symmetry, and selected sagittal-plane kinematics favored experimental training over conventional training, although increases in compensatory strategies also were observed. Changes in many kinematic patterns were correlated with speed changes, and increased compensatory behaviors were associated with both stride length gains and baseline impairments. Limitations include a small sample size and use of multiple statistical comparisons. Improved speeds and selected kinematics were observed following high-intensity training, although such training also resulted in increased use of compensatory

  11. Calibration of parallel kinematic devices using sequential determination of kinematic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    JOKIEL JR.,BERNHARD; BIEG,LOTHAR F.; ZIEGERT,JOHN C.

    2000-04-06

    In PKM Machines, the Cartesian position and orientation of the tool point carried on the platform is obtained from a kinematic model of the particular machine. Accurate positioning of these machines relies on the accurate knowledge of the parameters of the kinematic model unique to the particular machine. The parameters in the kinematic model include the spatial locations of the joint centers on the machine base and moving platform, the initial strut lengths, and the strut displacements. The strut displacements are readily obtained from sensors on the machine. However, the remaining kinematic parameters (joint center locations, and initial strut lengths) are difficult to determine when these machines are in their fully assembled state. The size and complexity of these machines generally makes it difficult and somewhat undesirable to determine the remaining kinematic parameters by direct inspection such as in a coordinate measuring machine. In order for PKMs to be useful for precision positioning applications, techniques must be developed to quickly calibrate the machine by determining the kinematic parameters without disassembly of the machine. A number of authors have reported techniques for calibration of PKMs (Soons, Masory, Zhuang et. al., Ropponen). In two other papers, the authors have reported on work recently completed by the University of Florida and Sandia National Laboratories on calibration of PKMs, which describes a new technique to sequentially determine the kinematic parameters of an assembled parallel kinematic device. The technique described is intended to be used with a spatial coordinate measuring device such as a portable articulated CMM measuring arm (Romer, Faro, etc.), a Laser Ball Bar (LBB), or a laser tracker (SMX< API, etc.). The material to be presented is as follows: (1) methods to identify the kinematic parameters of 6--6 variant Stewart platform manipulators including joint center locations relative to the workable and spindle nose

  12. Kinematic synthesis of adjustable robotic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuenchom, Thatchai

    1993-01-01

    Conventional hard automation, such as a linkage-based or a cam-driven system, provides high speed capability and repeatability but not the flexibility required in many industrial applications. The conventional mechanisms, that are typically single-degree-of-freedom systems, are being increasingly replaced by multi-degree-of-freedom multi-actuators driven by logic controllers. Although this new trend in sophistication provides greatly enhanced flexibility, there are many instances where the flexibility needs are exaggerated and the associated complexity is unnecessary. Traditional mechanism-based hard automation, on the other hand, neither can fulfill multi-task requirements nor are cost-effective mainly due to lack of methods and tools to design-in flexibility. This dissertation attempts to bridge this technological gap by developing Adjustable Robotic Mechanisms (ARM's) or 'programmable mechanisms' as a middle ground between high speed hard automation and expensive serial jointed-arm robots. This research introduces the concept of adjustable robotic mechanisms towards cost-effective manufacturing automation. A generalized analytical synthesis technique has been developed to support the computational design of ARM's that lays the theoretical foundation for synthesis of adjustable mechanisms. The synthesis method developed in this dissertation, called generalized adjustable dyad and triad synthesis, advances the well-known Burmester theory in kinematics to a new level. While this method provides planar solutions, a novel patented scheme is utilized for converting prescribed three-dimensional motion specifications into sets of planar projections. This provides an analytical and a computational tool for designing adjustable mechanisms that satisfy multiple sets of three-dimensional motion specifications. Several design issues were addressed, including adjustable parameter identification, branching defect, and mechanical errors. An efficient mathematical scheme for

  13. Dissipative effects in fission investigated in complete kinematics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Taïeb, J.; Ramos, D.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Audouin, L.; Ayyad, Y.; Bélier, G.; Boutoux, G.; Casarejos, E.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Gorbinet, T.; Heinz, A.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Paradela, C.; Pellereau, E.; Pietras, B.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D. M.; Simon, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.

    2017-09-01

    The study of dissipative effects in fission has been carried out with fusion-fission reactions by using a limited number of observables, such as the fission probabilities, the mass distribution of the fission fragments, or the neutron multiplicities. However, the large angular momenta gained by the compound nucleus in this kind of reaction could affect the conclusions drawn from such experiments. In this work, we propose to investigate the fission dynamics by the use of spallation reactions on 208Pb because the fissioning systems are produced with low angular momentum, small deformations, and high excitation energies, enhancing the dissipative effects. The complete kinematics measurements of the fission fragments and light-charged particles were performed by the use of the SOFIA setup combined with the inverse kinematics technique, allowing us for the first time a full indentification in atomic and mass number of the two fission fragments. These measurements permit us to define new fission observables for the investigation of the temperature and deformation dependencies of the dissipation parameter.

  14. Centre of mass kinematics of fast bowling in cricket.

    PubMed

    Ferdinands, Rene; Marshall, Robert N; Kersting, Uwe

    2010-09-01

    Kinematic studies have shown that fast bowlers have run-up velocities, based on centre of mass velocity calculations, which are comparable to elite javelin throwers. In this study, 34 fast bowlers (22.3 +/- 3.7 years) of premier grade level and above were tested using a three-dimensional (3-D) motion analysis system (240 Hz). Bowlers were divided into four speed groups: slow-medium, medium, medium-fast, and fast. The mean centre of mass velocity at back foot contact (run-up speed) was 5.3 +/- 0.6 m/s. Centre of mass velocity at back foot contact was significantly faster in the fastest two bowling groups compared to the slow-medium bowling group. In addition, stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that the centre of mass deceleration over the delivery stride phase was the strongest predictor of ball speed in the faster bowling groups. In conclusion, centre of mass kinematics are an important determinant of ball speed generation in fast bowlers. In particular, bowlers able to coordinate their bowling action with periods of centre of mass deceleration may be more likely to generate high ball speed.

  15. Kinematics and kinetics of elite windmill softball pitching.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sherry L; Jones, Deryk G; Guido, John A; Brunet, Michael E

    2006-04-01

    A significant number of time-loss injuries to the upper extremity in elite windmill softball pitchers has been documented. The number of outings and pitches thrown in 1 week for a softball pitcher is typically far in excess of those seen in baseball pitchers. Shoulder stress in professional baseball pitching has been reported to be high and has been linked to pitching injuries. Shoulder distraction has not been studied in an elite softball pitching population. The stresses on the throwing shoulder of elite windmill pitchers are similar to those found for professional baseball pitchers. Descriptive laboratory study. Three-dimensional, high-speed (120 Hz) video data were collected on rise balls from 24 elite softball pitchers during the 1996 Olympic Games. Kinematic parameters related to pitching mechanics and resultant kinetics on the throwing shoulder were calculated. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to relate shoulder stress and pitching mechanics. Shoulder distraction stress averaged 80% of body weight for the Olympic pitchers. Sixty-nine percent of the variability in shoulder distraction can be explained by a combination of 7 parameters related to pitching mechanics. Excessive distraction stress at the throwing shoulder is similar to that found in baseball pitchers, which suggests that windmill softball pitchers are at risk for overuse injuries. Normative information regarding upper extremity kinematics and kinetics for elite softball pitchers has been established.

  16. Relationships between kinematics and undulatory underwater swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Allison J; Pease, David L; Sanders, Ross H

    2017-05-01

    Undulatory underwater swimming (UUS) is one of the major skills contributing to performance in competitive swimming. UUS has two phases- the upbeat is performed by hip extension and knee flexion, and the downbeat is the converse action. The purpose of this study was to determine which kinematic variables of the upbeat and downbeat are associated with prone UUS performance in an elite sample. Ten elite participants were filmed performing three prone 20 m UUS trials. Seven landmarks were manually digitised to calculate eighteen kinematic variables, plus the performance variable- horizontal centre of mass velocity (VCOM). Mean VCOM was significantly correlated with body wave velocity (upbeat r = 0.81, downbeat r = 0.72), vertical toe velocity (upbeat r = 0.71, downbeat r = 0.86), phase duration (upbeat r = -0.79), peak hip angular velocity (upbeat r = 0.73) and mean knee angular velocity (upbeat r = -0.63), all significant at P < 0.05. A multiple stepwise regression model explained 78% of variance in mean VCOM. Peak toe velocity explained 72% of the variance, and mean body wave velocity explained an additional 6%. Elite swimmers should strive for a high peak toe velocity and a fast caudal transfer of momentum to optimise underwater undulatory swimming performance.

  17. On the Edge: Haptic Discrimination of Edge Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Andy L.; Kent, Christopher; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Benton, Christopher P.; Groen, Martin G. M.; Noyes, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of haptic displays (e.g., smart phones and tablets) necessitates a better understanding of the perceptual capabilities of the human haptic system. Haptic displays will soon be capable of locally deforming to create simple 3D shapes. This study investigated the sensitivity of our haptic system to a fundamental component of shapes: edges. A novel set of eight high quality shape stimuli with test edges that varied in sharpness were fabricated in a 3D printer. In a two alternative, forced choice task, blindfolded participants were presented with two of these shapes side by side (one the reference, the other selected randomly from the remaining set of seven) and after actively exploring the test edge of each shape with the tip of their index finger, reported which shape had the sharper edge. We used a model selection approach to fit optimal psychometric functions to performance data, and from these obtained just noticeable differences and Weber fractions. In Experiment 1, participants performed the task with four different references. With sharpness defined as the angle at which one surface meets the horizontal plane, the four JNDs closely followed Weber’s Law, giving a Weber fraction of 0.11. Comparisons to previously reported Weber fractions from other haptic manipulations (e.g. amplitude of vibration) suggests we are sufficiently sensitive to changes in edge sharpness for this to be of potential utility in the design of future haptic displays. In Experiment 2, two groups of participants performed the task with a single reference but different exploration strategies; one was limited to a single touch, the other unconstrained and free to explore as they wished. As predicted, the JND in the free exploration condition was lower than that in the single touch condition, indicating exploration strategy affects sensitivity to edge sharpness. PMID:24023852

  18. Flap-Edge Blowing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Englar, R. J.; Ahuja, K. K.

    2003-01-01

    This Appendix documents the salient results from an effort to mitigate the so-called flap-edge noise generated at the split between a flap edge that is deployed and the undeployed flap. Utilizing a Coanda surface installed at the flap edge, steady blowing was used in an attempt to diminish the vortex strength resulting from the uneven lift distribution. The strength of this lifting vortex was augmented by steady blowing over the deployed flap. The test article for this study was the same 2D airfoil used in the steady blowing program reported earlier (also used in pulsed blowing tests, see Appendix G), however its trailing edge geometry was modified. An exact duplicate of the airfoil shape was made out of fiberglass with no flap, and in the clean configuration. It was attached to the existing airfoil to make an airfoil that has half of its flap deployed and half un-deployed. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the planform showing the two areas where steady blowing was introduced. The flap-edge blowing or the auxiliary blowing was in the direction normal to the freestream velocity vector. Slot heights for the blowing chambers were on the order of 0.0 14 inches.

  19. A study of slanted-edge MTF stability and repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Jackson K. M.

    2015-01-01

    The slanted-edge method of measuring the spatial frequency response (SFR) as an approximation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) has become a well known and widely used image quality testing method over the last 10 years. This method has been adopted by multiple international standards including ISO and IEEE. Nearly every commercially available image quality testing software includes the slanted-edge method and there are numerous open-source algorithms available. This method is one of the most important image quality algorithms in use today. This paper explores test conditions and the impacts they have on the stability and precision of the slanted-edge method as well as details of the algorithm itself. Real world and simulated data are used to validate the characteristics of the algorithm. Details of the target such as edge angle and contrast ratio are tested to determine the impact on measurement under various conditions. The original algorithm defines a near vertical edge so that errors introduced are minor but the theory behind the algorithm requires a perfectly vertical edge. A correction factor is introduced as a way to compensate for this problem. Contrast ratio is shown to have no impact on results in an absence of noise.

  20. Camera-Only Kinematics for Small Lunar Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, E.; Suresh, S.; Whittaker, W.

    2016-11-01

    Knowledge of the kinematic state of rovers is critical. Existing methods add sensors and wiring to moving parts, which can fail and adds mass and volume. This research presents a method to optically determine kinematic state using a single camera.

  1. Detailed stellar and gaseous kinematics of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitsch, Michael; Fabricius, Maximilian; Saglia, Roberto; Bender, Ralf; Williams, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We have collected optical integral field spectroscopic data for M31 with the spectrograph VIRUS-W that result in kinematic maps of unprecedented detail. These reveal the presence of two kinematically distinct gas components.

  2. KINEMATIC DISTANCE ASSIGNMENTS WITH H I ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Using H I absorption spectra from the International Galactic Plane Survey, a new method is implemented to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity for 75 H II regions with known systemic velocities from radio recombination lines. A further 40 kinematic distance determinations are made for H II region candidates without known systemic velocities through an investigation of the presence of H I absorption around the terminal velocity. New kinematic distance determinations can be used to further constrain spiral arm parameters and the location and extent of other structures in the Milky Way disk. H I absorption toward continuum sources beyond the solar circle is also investigated. Follow-up studies of H I at higher resolution than the 1' to 2' of existing Galactic Plane Surveys will provide kinematic distances to many more H II regions on the far side of the Galactic center. On the basis of the velocity channel summation technique developed in this paper, a much larger sample of H II regions will be analyzed in a future paper to remove the near-far distance ambiguity.

  3. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  4. Expertise and attunement to kinematic constraints.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Bruce; Zawi, Khairi; Jackson, Robin C

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments were undertaken to ascertain the extent to which expertise in natural anticipatory tasks is characterised by superior attunement to the biomechanical (kinematic) constraints of the movement pattern being observed. Twelve world-class and twelve non-expert badminton players were required to predict the depth of an opponent's stroke from either video displays or point-light displays of the opposing player's hitting action. The information available within the displays was manipulated through temporal and/or spatial occlusion. Consistent with predictions that can be derived from the constraint-attunement hypothesis (Vicente and Wang, 1998 Psychological Review 105 33-57), experts showed: (i) an unchanged pattern of information pick-up when the display was reduced from video to point-light and only kinematic information was available; (ii) superior information pick-up from kinematic features that non-experts could use; and (iii) attunement to early kinematic information from the lower body to which non-experts were not sensitive. Consistent with predictions that can be derived from a common-coding perspective (Prinz, 1997 European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 9 129-154), the anticipation of stroke depth was facilitated more for experts than non-experts when the perceptual display provided linked segment information reminiscent of the cross-segmental torque transfers that occur during expert movement production.

  5. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Robert J

    2010-12-14

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  6. Stellar Archeology : Chemical Compositions and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, Bayard; Carney, Bruce

    2011-10-01

    The λ-CDM model of cosmology predicts a hierarchical formation mechanism of galaxies, with smaller units accreting to construct larger ones. The detection of merger events in external galaxies is well known, and the detection and analysis of merger remnants in the Milky Way is a key component in piecing together the history of our home galaxy. Statistical analyses of stellar kinematics in the solar neighborhood reveal much kinematic structure in the Galactic disk, but it is not readily apparent whether this structure is extragalactic or dynamical in origin. The most prominent structures are quickly identified as well known moving groups of stars such as the Hercules, Sirius, and Hyades stellar streams. Additionally, a subset of kinematically selected stars observed at McDonald Observatory are members of a stellar stream putatively identified by Amina Helmi as part of a merger remnant. A semi-automated, high resolution spectral analysis is applied to 504 F and G dwarf stars, and the results are amenable to Kolmogorov-Smirnov membership hypothesis testing. In all four cases, the kinematic streams have chemistries roughly consistent with the Galactic disk trends, although the statistical analyses suggest some subtle differences.

  7. Kinematics of foldable discrete space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Exact kinematic description of a NASA proposed prototype foldable-deployable discrete space crane are presented. A computer program is developed which maps the geometry of the crane once controlling parameters are specified. The program uses a building block type approach in which it calculates the local coordinates of each repeating cell and then combines them with respect to a global coordinates system.

  8. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time. However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers.…

  9. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time. However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers.…

  10. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  11. Kinematics and Dynamics of Young Stellar Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, V. G.; Jilinski, E. G.; de la Reza, R.

    2017-07-01

    We describe briefly the application of a dynamical method, based on six-dimensional kinematics of the stars to find the birthplaces and the ages of groups of young stars. We refer also to other possible problems in which the method can find application.

  12. Computer Software & Programing Utilization in Kinematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahraee, Mohammad A.; And Others

    This paper discusses two software packages used in kinematics courses at Purdue University, Calumet (Indiana) and some algorithms written by students for cam design. The first software package, 4BAR, requires the user to define the particular four bar linkage in terms of lengths of the individual links and the angle and distance to the coupler…

  13. Kinematics of Einstein-Cartan universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmatsiou, Klaountia; Tsagas, Christos G.; Barrow, John D.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the kinematics of cosmological spacetimes with nonzero torsion, in the framework of the classical Einstein-Cartan gravity. After a brief introduction to the basic features of spaces with nonvanishing torsion, we consider a family of observers moving along timelike worldlines and focus on their kinematic behavior. In so doing, we isolate the irreducible variables monitoring the observers' motion and derive their evolution formulas and associated constraint equations. Our aim is to identify the effects of spacetime torsion, and the changes they introduce into the kinematics of the standard, torsion-free, cosmological models. We employ a fully geometrical approach, imposing no restrictions on the material content, or any a priori couplings between torsion and spin. Also, we do not apply the familiar splitting of the equations, into a purely Riemannian component plus a torsion/spin part, at the start of our study, but only introduce it at the very end. With the general formulas at hand, we use the Einstein-Cartan field equations to incorporate explicitly the spin of the matter. The resulting formulas fully describe the kinematics of dynamical spacetimes within the framework of the Einstein-Cartan gravity, while in the special case of the so-called Weyssenhoff fluid, they recover results previously reported in the literature.

  14. KINEMATICS OF STELLAR POPULATIONS IN POSTSTARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela E-mail: khiner@astro-udec.cl

    2015-01-20

    Poststarburst galaxies host a population of early-type stars (A or F) but simultaneously lack indicators of ongoing star formation such as [O II] emission. Two distinct stellar populations have been identified in these systems: a young poststarburst population superimposed on an older host population. We present a study of nine poststarburst galaxies with the following objectives: (1) to investigate whether and how kinematical differences between the young and old populations of stars can be measured, and (2) to gain insight into the formation mechanism of the young population in these systems. We fit high signal-to-noise spectra with two independent populations in distinct spectral regions: the Balmer region, the Mg IB region, and the Ca triplet when available. We show that the kinematics of the two populations largely track one another if measured in the Balmer region with high signal-to-noise data. Results from examining the Faber-Jackson relation and the fundamental plane indicate that these objects are not kinematically disturbed relative to more evolved spheroids. A case study of the internal kinematics of one object in our sample shows it to be pressure supported and not rotationally dominated. Overall our results are consistent with merger-induced starburst scenarios where the young population is observed during the later stages of the merger.

  15. Color-kinematics duality for QCD amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Henrik; Ochirov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We show that color-kinematics duality is present in tree-level amplitudes of quantum chromodynamics with massive flavored quarks. Starting with the color structure of QCD, we work out a new color decomposition for n-point tree amplitudes in a reduced basis of primitive amplitudes. These primitives, with k quark-antiquark pairs and ( n - 2 k) gluons, are taken in the ( n - 2)! /k! Melia basis, and are independent under the color-algebra Kleiss-Kuijf relations. This generalizes the color decomposition of Del Duca, Dixon, and Maltoni to an arbitrary number of quarks. The color coefficients in the new decomposition are given by compact expressions valid for arbitrary gauge group and representation. Considering the kinematic structure, we show through explicit calculations that color-kinematics duality holds for amplitudes with general configurations of gluons and massive quarks. The new (massive) amplitude relations that follow from the duality can be mapped to a well-defined subset of the familiar BCJ relations for gluons. They restrict the amplitude basis further down to ( n - 3)!(2 k - 2) /k! primitives, for two or more quark lines. We give a decomposition of the full amplitude in that basis. The presented results provide strong evidence that QCD obeys the color-kinematics duality, at least at tree level. The results are also applicable to supersymmetric and D-dimensional extensions of QCD.

  16. ANALYTIC MODELING OF THE MORETON WAVE KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2009-09-10

    The issue whether Moreton waves are flare-ignited or coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven, or a combination of both, is still a matter of debate. We develop an analytical model describing the evolution of a large-amplitude coronal wave emitted by the expansion of a circular source surface in order to mimic the evolution of a Moreton wave. The model results are confronted with observations of a strong Moreton wave observed in association with the X3.8/3B flare/CME event from 2005 January 17. Using different input parameters for the expansion of the source region, either derived from the real CME observations (assuming that the upward moving CME drives the wave), or synthetically generated scenarios (expanding flare region, lateral expansion of the CME flanks), we calculate the kinematics of the associated Moreton wave signature. Those model input parameters are determined which fit the observed Moreton wave kinematics best. Using the measured kinematics of the upward moving CME as the model input, we are not able to reproduce the observed Moreton wave kinematics. The observations of the Moreton wave can be reproduced only by applying a strong and impulsive acceleration for the source region expansion acting in a piston mechanism scenario. Based on these results we propose that the expansion of the flaring region or the lateral expansion of the CME flanks is more likely the driver of the Moreton wave than the upward moving CME front.

  17. Fault model of the 2014 Cephalonia seismic sequence - Evidence of spatiotemporal fault segmentation along the NW edge of Aegean Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Moschas, Fanis; Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Finite fault models (FFM) are presented for the two main shocks of the 2014 Cephalonia (Ionian Sea, Greece) seismic sequence (M 6.0) which produced extreme peak ground accelerations ( 0.7g) in the west edge of the Aegean Arc, an area in which the poor coverage by seismological and GPS/INSAR data makes FFM a real challenge. Modeling was based on co-seismic GPS data and on the recently introduced TOPological INVersion algorithm. The latter is a novel uniform grid search-based technique in n-dimensional spaces, is based on the concept of stochastic variables and which can identify multiple unconstrained ("free") solutions in a specified search space. Derived FFMs for the 2014 earthquakes correspond to an essentially strike slip fault and of part of a shallow thrust, the surface projection of both of which run roughly along the west coast of Cephalonia. Both faults correlate with pre-existing faults. The 2014 faults, in combination with the faults of the 2003 and 2015 Leucas earthquakes farther NE, form a string of oblique slip, partly overlapping fault segments with variable geometric and kinematic characteristics along the NW edge of the Aegean Arc. This composite fault, usually regarded as the Cephalonia Transform Fault, accommodates shear along this part of the Arc. Because of the highly fragmented crust, dominated by major thrusts in this area, fault activity is associated with 20km long segments and magnitude 6.0-6.5 earthquakes recurring in intervals of a few seconds to 10 years.

  18. Advanced control schemes and kinematic analysis for a kinematically redundant 7 DOF manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei

    1990-01-01

    The kinematic analysis and control of a kinematically redundant manipulator is addressed. The manipulator is the slave arm of a telerobot system recently built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to serve as a testbed for investigating research issues in telerobotics. A forward kinematic transformation is developed in its most simplified form, suitable for real-time control applications, and the manipulator Jacobian is derived using the vector cross product method. Using the developed forward kinematic transformation and quaternion representation of orientation matrices, we perform computer simulation to evaluate the efficiency of the Jacobian in converting joint velocities into Cartesian velocities and to investigate the accuracy of Jacobian pseudo-inverse for various sampling times. The equivalence between Cartesian velocities and quaternion is also verified using computer simulation. Three control schemes are proposed and discussed for controlling the motion of the slave arm end-effector.

  19. The significance of closed kinematic chains to biological movement and dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Levin, Stephen; de Solórzano, Susan Lowell; Scarr, Graham

    2017-07-01

    Closed kinematic chains (CKCs) are widely used in mechanical engineering because they provide a simple and efficient mechanism with multiple applications, but they are much less appreciated in living tissues. Biomechanical research has been dominated by the use of lever models and their kinematic analysis, which has largely ignored the geometric organization of these ubiquitous and evolutionary-conserved systems, yet CKCs contribute substantially to our understanding of biological motion. Closed-chain kinematics couple multiple parts into continuous mechanical loops that allow the structure itself to regulate complex movements, and are described in a wide variety of different organisms, including humans. In a biological context, CKCs are modular units nested within others at multiple size scales as part of an integrated movement system that extends throughout the organism and can act in synergy with the nervous system, where present. They provide an energy-efficient mechanism that enables multiple mechanical functions to be optimized during embryological development and increases evolutionary diversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  1. Kinematic Optimization in Birds, Bats and Ornithopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Todd

    Birds and bats employ a variety of advanced wing motions in the efficient production of thrust. The purpose of this thesis is to quantify the benefit of these advanced wing motions, determine the optimal theoretical wing kinematics for a given flight condition, and to develop a methodology for applying the results in the optimal design of flapping-wing aircraft (ornithopters). To this end, a medium-fidelity, combined aero-structural model has been developed that is capable of simulating the advanced kinematics seen in bird flight, as well as the highly non-linear structural deformations typical of high-aspect ratio wings. Five unique methods of thrust production observed in natural species have been isolated, quantified and thoroughly investigated for their dependence on Reynolds number, airfoil selection, frequency, amplitude and relative phasing. A gradient-based optimization algorithm has been employed to determined the wing kinematics that result in the minimum required power for a generalized aircraft or species in any given flight condition. In addition to the theoretical work, with the help of an extended team, the methodology was applied to the design and construction of the world's first successful human-powered ornithopter. The Snowbird Human-Powered Ornithopter, is used as an example aircraft to show how additional design constraints can pose limits on the optimal kinematics. The results show significant trends that give insight into the kinematic operation of natural species. The general result is that additional complexity, whether it be larger twisting deformations or advanced wing-folding mechanisms, allows for the possibility of more efficient flight. At its theoretical optimum, the efficiency of flapping-wings exceeds that of current rotors and propellers, although these efficiencies are quite difficult to achieve in practice.

  2. Kinematic and Spatial Substructure in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; Fűrész, Gabor; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from Fűrész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular (13CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  3. Time-Dependent Kinematics of Complex Human Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2013-03-01

    The human body can be arranged in numerous geometrical configurations, including many interesting scenarios from the sport of gymnastics. One particularly challenging analytical example among these is the forward flip with maximum separation from the ground at the apex of the flight. The temporal aspects of this move involve the evaluation of multiple different positions during the trajectory, which adds significantly to the effort required. When a forward flip was executed during a football game, ready access to the recording of this allowed a detailed kinematic examination to be performed. Careful application of highly intricate protocols produces results which are consistent with similar athletic environments. The emphasis in this research is to transcend standard approaches elsewhere, which are severely limited to generic athletes and/or generic circumstances. Pedagogical benefits of the rigorous methodology adopted here are explored beyond what was introduced in a recent related study.

  4. Real time markerless motion tracking using linked kinematic chains

    DOEpatents

    Luck, Jason P.; Small, Daniel E.

    2007-08-14

    A markerless method is described for tracking the motion of subjects in a three dimensional environment using a model based on linked kinematic chains. The invention is suitable for tracking robotic, animal or human subjects in real-time using a single computer with inexpensive video equipment, and does not require the use of markers or specialized clothing. A simple model of rigid linked segments is constructed of the subject and tracked using three dimensional volumetric data collected by a multiple camera video imaging system. A physics based method is then used to compute forces to align the model with subsequent volumetric data sets in real-time. The method is able to handle occlusion of segments and accommodates joint limits, velocity constraints, and collision constraints and provides for error recovery. The method further provides for elimination of singularities in Jacobian based calculations, which has been problematic in alternative methods.

  5. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  6. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  7. Automated quantification of lumbar vertebral kinematics from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon; Zhao, Kristin; Morel, Etienne; White, Dan; Magnuson, Dixon; Gay, Ralph; An, Kai-Nan; Robb, Richard

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that the vertebra-to-vertebra patterns of spinal flexion and extension motion of persons with lower back pain will differ from those of persons who are pain-free. Thus, it is our goal to measure the motion of individual lumbar vertebrae noninvasively from dynamic fluoroscopic sequences. Two-dimensional normalized mutual information-based image registration was used to track frame-to-frame motion. Software was developed that required the operator to identify each vertebra on the first frame of the sequence using a four-point "caliper" placed at the posterior and anterior edges of the inferior and superior end plates of the target vertebrae. The program then resolved the individual motions of each vertebra independently throughout the entire sequence. To validate the technique, 6 cadaveric lumbar spine specimens were potted in polymethylmethacrylate and instrumented with optoelectric sensors. The specimens were then placed in a custom dynamic spine simulator and moved through flexion-extension cycles while kinematic data and fluoroscopic sequences were simultaneously acquired. We found strong correlation between the absolute flexionextension range of motion of each vertebra as recorded by the optoelectric system and as determined from the fluoroscopic sequence via registration. We conclude that this method is a viable way of noninvasively assessing twodimensional vertebral motion.

  8. The kinematics and kinetics of slipknots for arthroscopic Bankart repair.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P J; Hagan, R P; Fisher, A C; Holt, E M; Frostick, S P

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed to enable the in vitro measurement of the kinematics and kinetics of a slipknot, both while the knot is being tightened and with the knot in place and the tension removed. During tightening, the apparatus provides a linearly increasing resistance, which may be considered analogous to the resistance experienced when the labrum is drawn toward and apposed to the edge of the glenoid cavity during a Bankart repair. The tension to close the knot is measured with a tensiometer, in tandem with the closure of the capsule model onto the bone anchor, which is measured with a datalogger. The tightening tension was limited to 25 N and intraoperator and interoperator comparisons were made for four knots tied by six participants. Failure of a knot was taken to be reverse slippage of 2 mm. A second criterion of ease of slide was used to assess each knot. We found wide interoperator variability with regard to slipknot tying. A methodology for quality control of slipknot tying is presented.

  9. Investigation of acoustic streaming patterns around oscillating sharp edges

    PubMed Central

    Nama, Nitesh; Huang, Po-Hsun; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Oscillating sharp edges have been employed to achieve rapid and homogeneous mixing in microchannels using acoustic streaming. Here we use a perturbation approach to study the flow around oscillating sharp edges in a microchannel. This work extends prior experimental studies to numerically characterize the effect of various parameters on the acoustically induced flow. Our numerical results match well with the experimental results. We investigated multiple device parameters such as the tip angle, oscillation amplitude, and channel dimensions. Our results indicate that, due to the inherent nonlinearity of acoustic streaming, the channel dimensions could significantly impact the flow patterns and device performance. PMID:24903475

  10. Scattering theory for graphene plasmons near edges and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Aleksandr; Fogler, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Motivated by recent infrared nano-imaging experiments, we study eigenmodes of graphene plasmons near sample boundaries, corners, and interfaces. Such modes can be understood as standing-wave patters formed by multiple scattering of elementary waves. We derive the rules of the corresponding scattering theory by analyzing the integro-differential equation for the plasmon dynamics. Our analytical results include the solution for the edge reflection problem in uniform graphene and a quasiclassical formalism for graphene of slowly varying density. Numerical simulations are employed for more complicated boundary geometries (wedge, constriction, etc.) and for singular density distributions that exist near the edge of a gated graphene.

  11. Active edge control in the precessions polishing process for manufacturing large mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Wei; Walker, David; Yu, Gouyo

    2014-09-01

    The segmentation of the primary mirror is the only promising solution for building the next generation of ground telescopes. However, manufacturing segmented mirrors presents its own challenges. The edge mis-figure impacts directly on the telescope's scientific output. The `Edge effect' significantly dominates the polishing precision. Therefore, the edge control is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in the segment production that needs to be addressed urgently. This paper reports an active edge control technique for the mirror segments fabrication using the Precession's polishing technique. The strategy in this technique requires that the large spot be selected on the bulk area for fast polishing, and the small spot is used for edge figuring. This can be performed by tool lift and optimizing the dell time to compensate for non-uniform material removal at the edge zone. This requires accurate and stable edge tool influence functions. To obtain the full tool influence function at the edge, we have demonstrated in previous work a novel hybrid-measurement method which uses both simultaneous phase interferometry and profilometry. In this paper, the edge effect under `Bonnet tool' polishing is investigated. The pressure distribution is analyzed by means of finite element analysis (FEA). According to the `Preston' equation, the shape of the edge tool influence functions is predicted. With this help, the multiple process parameters at the edge zone are optimized. This is demonstrated on a 200mm crosscorners hexagonal part with a result of PV less than 200nm for entire surface.

  12. Supporting interactive graph exploration using edge plucking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Nelson; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2007-01-01

    Excessive edge density in graphs can cause serious readability issues, which in turn can make the graphs difficult to understand or even misleading. Recently, we introduced the idea of providing tools that offer interactive edge bending as a method by which edge congestion can be disambiguated. We extend this direction, presenting a new tool, Edge Plucking, which offers new interactive methods to clarify node-edge relationships. Edge Plucking expands the number of situations in which interactive graph exploration tools can be used to address edge congestion.

  13. Role of Edges in Complex Network Epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui; Xie, Fei; Chen, Chao

    2012-09-01

    In complex network epidemiology, diseases spread along contacting edges between individuals and different edges may play different roles in epidemic outbreaks. Quantifying the efficiency of edges is an important step towards arresting epidemics. In this paper, we study the efficiency of edges in general susceptible-infected-recovered models, and introduce the transmission capability to measure the efficiency of edges. Results show that deleting edges with the highest transmission capability will greatly decrease epidemics on scale-free networks. Basing on the message passing approach, we get exact mathematical solution on configuration model networks with edge deletion in the large size limit.

  14. Kinematic and morphological evolution and dynamics of coronal mass ejections in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poomvises, Watanachak

    2010-12-01

    observations, and find consistency between theory and observation. The evolution of CMEs can be explained by different forces that act on them: Lorentz force, thermal pressure force, gravity force, aero-dynamic drag force, and magnetic drag force. Based on a set of four events, I find that the drag coefficient from CME to CME is between 2.5 to 3.0, which is much smaller than the factor of twelve suggested by earlier studies. Therefore, we have been able to narrow down the range of drag coefficient, which helps improve the prediction of CME arrival time at the Earth. In the early stage of my Ph.D. study, working with a team, we have identified solar and interplanetary sources of all 88 major geomagnetic storms from 1996 to 2005. We classify the Solar-IP sources into three broad types: (1) S-type, in which the storm is associated with a single ICME and a single CME at the Sun; (2) M-type, in which the storm is associated with a complex solar wind flow produced by multiple interacting ICMEs arising from multiple halo CMEs launched from the Sun in a short period; (3) C-type, in which the storm is associated with a Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) formed at the leading edge of a high-speed stream originating from a solar coronal hole (CH). For the 88 major storms, the S-type, M-type, and C-type events number 53 (60%), 24 (27%), and 11 (13%), respectively. For the 85 events for which the surface source regions could be investigated, 54 (63%) of the storms originated in solar active regions, 11 (13%) in quiet Sun regions associated with quiescent filaments or filament channels, and 11 (13%) were associated with coronal holes. This study improves our understanding of geo-effective CMEs. In conclusion, the dissertation work has improved our understanding about the kinematic and morphologic evolution of CMEs in interplanetary space. In the future, a larger number of events need to be measured and modeled to further constrain CME evolution models, in particular, the drag coefficient

  15. Edge enhanced morphology for infrared image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Liu, Haonan

    2017-01-01

    Edge information is one of the critical information for infrared images. Morphological operators have been widely used for infrared image analysis. However, the edge information in infrared image is weak and the morphological operators could not well utilize the edge information of infrared images. To strengthen the edge information in morphological operators, the edge enhanced morphology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are given and analyzed. Secondly, the pseudo operators which are derived from the edge enhanced dilation and erosion operators are defined. Finally, the applications for infrared image analysis are shown to verify the effectiveness of the proposed edge enhanced morphological operators. The proposed edge enhanced morphological operators are useful for the applications related to edge features, which could be extended to wide area of applications.

  16. The SLUGGS Survey: Wide-field Stellar Kinematics of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Woodley, Kristin A.

    2014-08-01

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ~2-4 R e (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (σinst ~ 25 km s-1) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, σ, h 3, and h 4) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R e often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS3D survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  17. The SLUGGS survey: wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Jacob A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Woodley, Kristin A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S.; Pastorello, Nicola; Pota, Vincenzo; Usher, Christopher; Strader, Jay; Spitler, Lee R.; Foster, Caroline

    2014-08-20

    We present stellar kinematics of 22 nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on two-dimensional (2D) absorption line stellar spectroscopy out to ∼2-4 R {sub e} (effective radii), as part of the ongoing SLUGGS Survey. The galaxies span a factor of 20 in intrinsic luminosity, as well as a full range of environment and ETG morphology. Our data consist of good velocity resolution (σ{sub inst} ∼ 25 km s{sup –1}) integrated stellar-light spectra extracted from the individual slitlets of custom made Keck/DEIMOS slitmasks. We extract stellar kinematics measurements (V, σ, h {sub 3}, and h {sub 4}) for each galaxy. Combining with literature values from smaller radii, we present 2D spatially resolved maps of the large-scale kinematic structure in each galaxy. We find that the kinematic homogeneity found inside 1 R {sub e} often breaks down at larger radii, where a variety of kinematic behaviors are observed. While central slow rotators remain slowly rotating in their halos, central fast rotators show more diversity, ranging from rapidly increasing to rapidly declining specific angular momentum profiles in the outer regions. There are indications that the outer trends depend on morphological type, raising questions about the proposed unification of the elliptical and lenticular (S0) galaxy families in the ATLAS{sup 3D} survey. Several galaxies in our sample show multiple lines of evidence for distinct disk components embedded in more slowly rotating spheroids, and we suggest a joint photometric-kinematic approach for robust bulge-disk decomposition. Our observational results appear generally consistent with a picture of two-phase (in-situ plus accretion) galaxy formation.

  18. Relationship Between the Lateral Center-Edge Angle and 3-Dimensional Acetabular Coverage.

    PubMed

    Wylie, James D; Kapron, Ashley L; Peters, Christopher L; Aoki, Stephen K; Maak, Travis G

    2017-04-01

    The lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) is an important measurement in understanding acetabular morphology and has had multiple interpretations. Misunderstanding of the LCEA and its relationship with acetabular 3-dimensional (3D) morphology may result in misdiagnosis and poor outcomes. To determine the discrepancy between bone-edge and sourcil-edge LCEA measurements on anteroposterior (AP) radiographs and to determine the 3D anatomic location of the sourcil-edge and bone-edge LCEA measurements. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. The LCEA was measured on radiographs to both the sourcil-edge and bone-edge on AP images of 60 symptomatic hips. On computed tomography (CT), coronal slices producing an LCEA matching the magnitude of each AP LCEA were identified. These coronal slices were mapped to a sagittal image of the acetabulum, which was divided into a standard clockface (3 = anterior, 12 = superior). We identified clockface locations corresponding to the AP sourcil-edge and bone-edge LCEA measurements. Paired t tests identified differences in magnitude and location of the bone and sourcil LCEAs. Limits of agreement were calculated for the differences between measures. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) assessed inter- and intraobserver repeatability. On the AP radiographs, the bone-edge LCEA was a mean 4.7° (95% CI, -4.0° to 13.3°) greater than the sourcil-edge LCEA (P < .001). On CT, the sagittal clockface location of the sourcil-edge LCEA was more anterior compared with the sagittal clockface location of the maximum bone-edge LCEA (1:03 ± 0:42 vs 12:06 ± 0:30, respectively; P < .001). In hips with a difference >5° between sourcil-edge and bone-edge measurements, the coronal CT slice corresponding to the sourcil-edge LCEA was significantly more anterior (1:26 ± 0:35) than the CT slice corresponding to the bone-edge LCEA (11:46 ± 0:29; P < .001). This significant difference was similar in location but less pronounced in hips with a

  19. The influence of edge and corner evolution on plasmon properties and resonant edge effect in gold nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Bin; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yu-Ying; Yi, Zao; Li, Xi-Bo; Yi, You-Gen; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2015-01-28

    In this paper a simulation of the properties of surface plasmons on gold nanoplatelets with various cross-sections inscribed in a circle and an investigation of their field distributions to assign multiple SPRs are described. The manipulated propagation can be obtained through the evolution of edges and corners. Furthermore, the particle morphology and the associated spectral positions alone do not uniquely reflect the important details of the local field distribution or the resonance modes. The plasmon modes were investigated and found to be mainly excited along the edges and in the side and sloped side surfaces. The strong field distributions can generally be found around the corners and how the plasmons transmit through the corners to adjacent edges was also investigated. Besides the plasmons excited along the edges as were found for the triangular nanoplatelets, plasmons were excited in the interior region of the triangular surfaces and were also investigated. Despite this in the infrared region, plasmon modes were found to be along the edges for the hexagonal nanoplatelets. Also, it can be seen that the change of nanoplatelet thickness can support different plasmon modes ranging from dipolar resonance mode to quadrupole resonance mode. The thickness far below the skin depth can display complex plasmon modes along the edges and on the side and sloping side surfaces as well as the strong coupling between the top and bottom surfaces. The observed plasmon resonance modes in this simulation reflect the interference of all these contributions including the plasmons along the edges and on the side surfaces. This is an essential step towards a thorough understanding of plasmon modes and the effect of edge and corner evolution in polygonous nanoplatelets.

  20. Shape-dependent canny edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panetta, Karen A.; Agaian, Sos S.; Nercessian, Shahan C.; Almunstashri, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    Edges characterize the boundaries of objects in images and are informative structural cues for computer vision and target/object detection and recognition systems. The Canny edge detector is widely regarded as the edge detection standard. It is fairly adaptable to different environments, as its parametric nature attempts to tailor the detection of edges based on image-dependent characteristics or the particular requirements of a given implementation. Though it has been used in a myriad of image processing tasks, the Canny edge detector is still vulnerable to edge losses, localization errors, and noise sensitivity. These issues are largely due to the key tradeoff made in the scale and size of the edge detection filters used by the algorithm. Small-scaled filters are sensitive to edges but also to noise, whereas large-scaled filters are robust to noise but could filter out fine details. In this paper, novel edge detection kernel generalizations and a shape-dependent edge detector are introduced to alleviate these shortcomings. While most standard edge detection algorithms are based on convolving the input image with fixed size square kernels, this paper will illustrate the benefits of different filter sizes, and more importantly, different kernel shapes for edge detection. Moreover, new edge fusion methods are introduced to more effectively combine the individual edge responses. Existing edge detectors, including the Canny edge detector, can be obtained from the generalized edge detector by specifying corresponding parameters and kernel shapes. The proposed representations and edge detector have been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on several different types of image data. Computer simulations demonstrate that nonsquare kernel approaches can outperform square kernel approaches such as Canny, Sobel, Prewitt, Roberts, and others, providing better tradeoffs between noise rejection, accurate edge localization, and resolution. Where possible, Pratt's figure of

  1. Laplacian operator-based edge detectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Laplacian operator is a second derivative operator often used in edge detection. Compared with the first derivative-based edge detectors such as Sobel operator, the Laplacian operator may yield better results in edge localization. Unfortunately, the Laplacian operator is very sensitive to noise. In this paper, based on the Laplacian operator, a model is introduced for making some edge detectors. Also, the optimal threshold is introduced for obtaining a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimate of edges.

  2. Kinematic structure of the supergiant shell LMC 9 - I. The nebular complex DEM L208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddone, M. A.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Le Coarer, E.; Goldes, G. V.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes an extensive and eminently observational study, carried out with an Hα filter, of the kinematics of the ionized gas in the large emission region (220 pc) DEM L208 which is located in the south-east part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The intention was to establish the region's general kinematic and morphological characteristics, and to analyse its possible association with a larger structure, aiming above all to contribute to the elaboration of a detailed global kinematics image of the LMC. The nebula's edges are well defined, with fairly regular Gaussian profiles, and can be represented by a systemic radial velocity of approximately 250 km s-1 for the brightest area of DEM L208. The radial velocity fields obtained present a main component with a well-defined profile, as well as other weaker components of larger speed, which may be indicative of expansion motion or of another layer of gas. In some regions we find evidence that the disturbance of the medium is due to stellar winds from the interior of the nebula; in others the profiles observed are found to be consistent with very intense stellar winds from Wolf-Rayet stars.

  3. Edge detection and texture classification by cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Zylinski, Sarah; Osorio, Daniel; Shohet, Adam J

    2009-12-14

    Cephalopod mollusks including octopus and cuttlefish are adept at adaptive camouflage, varying their appearance to suit the surroundings. This behavior allows unique access into the vision of a non-human species because one can ask how these animals use spatial information to control their coloration pattern. There is particular interest in factors that affect the relative levels of expression of the Mottle and the Disruptive body patterns. Broadly speaking, the Mottle is displayed on continuous patterned surfaces whereas the Disruptive is used on discrete objects such as pebbles. Recent evidence from common cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, suggests that multiple cues are relevant, including spatial scale, contrast, and depth. We analyze the body pattern responses of juvenile cuttlefish to a range of checkerboard stimuli. Our results suggest that the choice of camouflage pattern is consistent with a simple model of how cuttlefish classify visual textures, according to whether they are Uniform or patterned, and whether the pattern includes visual edges. In particular, cuttlefish appear to detect edges by sensing the relative spatial phases of two spatial frequency components (e.g., fundamental and the third harmonic Fourier component in a square wave). We discuss the relevance of these findings to vision and camouflage in aquatic environments.

  4. Hand kinematics of piano playing.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F

    2011-12-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers.

  5. Hand kinematics of piano playing

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, Martha; Soechting, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Dexterous use of the hand represents a sophisticated sensorimotor function. In behaviors such as playing the piano, it can involve strong temporal and spatial constraints. The purpose of this study was to determine fundamental patterns of covariation of motion across joints and digits of the human hand. Joint motion was recorded while 5 expert pianists played 30 excerpts from musical pieces, which featured ∼50 different tone sequences and fingering. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm revealed that joint velocities could be categorized into several patterns, which help to simplify the description of the movements of the multiple degrees of freedom of the hand. For the thumb keystroke, two distinct patterns of joint movement covariation emerged and they depended on the spatiotemporal patterns of the task. For example, the thumb-under maneuver was clearly separated into two clusters based on the direction of hand translation along the keyboard. While the pattern of the thumb joint velocities differed between these clusters, the motions at the metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-phalangeal joints of the four fingers were more consistent. For a keystroke executed with one of the fingers, there were three distinct patterns of joint rotations, across which motion at the striking finger was fairly consistent, but motion of the other fingers was more variable. Furthermore, the amount of movement spillover of the striking finger to the adjacent fingers was small irrespective of the finger used for the keystroke. These findings describe an unparalleled amount of independent motion of the fingers. PMID:21880938

  6. Linking cranial morphology to prey capture kinematics in three cleaner wrasses: Labroides dimidiatus, Larabicus quadrilineatus, and Thalassoma lutescens.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Vikram B; Mehta, Rita S

    2015-11-01

    Cleaner fishes are well known for removing and consuming ectoparasites off other taxa. Observers have noted that cleaners continuously "pick" ectoparasites from the bodies of their respective client organisms, but little is known about the kinematics of cleaning. While a recent study described the jaw morphology of cleaners as having small jaw-closing muscles and weak bite forces, it is unknown how these traits translate into jaw movements during feeding to capture and remove ectoparasites embedded in their clients. Here, we describe cranial morphology and kinematic patterns of feeding for three species of cleaner wrasses. Through high-speed videography of cleaner fishes feeding in two experimental treatments, we document prey capture kinematic profiles for Labroides dimidiatus, Larabicus quadrilineatus, and Thalassoma lutescens. Our results indicate that cleaning in labrids may be associated with the ability to perform low-displacement, fast jaw movements that allow for rapid and multiple gape cycles on individually targeted items. Finally, while the feeding kinematics of cleaners show notable similarities to those of "picker" cyprinodontiforms, we find key differences in the timing of events. In fact, cleaners generally seem to be able to capture prey twice as fast as cyprinodontiforms. We thus suggest that the kinematic patterns exhibited by cleaners are indicative of picking behavior, but that "pickers" may be more kinematically diverse than previously thought.

  7. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  8. The Problem of the Edge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faatz, Judith A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a field study in a local ecosystem which allows high school students to investigate the edge effect, where a meadow and a forest meet. Students measure soil moisture content, soil temperature, air temperature, relative humidity, wind intensity, and illumination level. Teachers can help students apply their findings to understand problems…

  9. Vortex structure variation with flapping-wing stroke-reversal kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burge, Matthew

    The behavior of three-dimensional (3D) vortex structures formed during the pitching stroke-reversal of a two degree-of-freedom (2DOF) flapping wing in hover is investigated. Dye flow visualization is conducted using a scaled wing model with an internal dye manifold executing periodic flapping during dye injection, facilitating the identification of unsteady vortices. A vortex skeleton model is developed to represent the vortex loop topology, and used for description of the 3D flow structure evolutions generated with varying kinematics. Qualitative conclusions are drawn from varying the pitching reduced frequency for an advanced and symmetric pitch timing with respect to the rotational turn-around. Advanced pitch timing typically promoted the growth of pitching structures at the trailing edge, while a symmetric pitch timing promoted the growth of vortex structures at the leading edge. Large pitching reduced frequency produces stronger pitching vortices at the leading edge which remain near the wing longer and interfere with subsequent vortex formations in the following half-stroke. These dye visualization results motivate the study of the quantitative behavior via an experiment using stereo digital particle imagine velocimetry (S-DPIV). The instantaneous, phase-averaged out-of-plane vorticity, span-wise velocity, vorticity flux, and circulation at five planes along the span of the wing are measured at the end of stroke reversal for varied pitching reduced frequency with advanced pitch timing. Vortex structures formed at the leading and trailing edges from pitching have significant span-wise variation due to the rotating DOF, with the outboard structures, typically, having stronger vorticity and circulation. The circulation is normalized by the sum of a local velocity characteristic of the spanwise position and the pitching edge speed to capture the contributions of both rotating and pitching motions to the formation of the circulating structures. This scaling both

  10. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  11. Symmetry for Flavor-Kinematics Duality from an Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new representation of the nonlinear sigma model that exhibits a manifest duality between flavor and kinematics. The fields couple exclusively through cubic Feynman vertices which define the structure constants of an underlying kinematic algebra. The action is invariant under a combination of internal and spacetime symmetries whose conservation equations imply flavor-kinematics duality, ensuring that all Feynman diagrams satisfy kinematic Jacobi identities. Substituting flavor for kinematics, we derive a new cubic action for the special Galileon theory. In this picture, the vanishing soft behavior of amplitudes is a by-product of the Weinberg soft theorem.

  12. Introduction to Solid Edge(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, John C.

    1997-01-01

    Solid Edge was conceived and developed to provide breakthrough levels of productivity for engineers and designers by providing tools focused on their daily work. This user-oriented approach led to a focus on five key areas: 1) assembly-focused design, 2) ease of use, 3) plug and play software, 4) superior part modeling, and 5) production drafting. Mechanical designers work primarily with assemblies of parts that together perform a useful function. The parts themselves are principally a consequence of the function of the assembly and the interrelationships between parts. Breakthroughs in productivity will come through a focus on making the design of assemblies easier, with enhanced part design a prerequisite to that. Enhancements already in development are part to part interaction, more assembly features applying to multiple parts, exploded assemblies, assembly playback, enhanced BOM, etc.

  13. ELNES investigations of the oxygen K-edge in spinels.

    PubMed

    Docherty, F T; Craven, A J; McComb, D W; Skakle, J

    2001-02-01

    The results of a systematic study of the oxygen K-edge electron energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) from a series of aluminium- and chromium-containing spinels are presented. Extra fine structure in the region up to 10 eV above the edge onset is observed for the chromium-containing compounds and is assigned to transitions to states created by mixing of oxygen 2p and metal 3d orbitals. The experimental data has been simulated using the multiple scattering code, FEFF8. Good agreement was obtained in the case of magnesium aluminate, but relatively poor agreement was obtained in the case of the chromites. The possible fingerprints in the oxygen K-edge ELNES corresponding to a high degree of inversion the spinel structure and to a tetragonal distortion of the cubic structure are discussed.

  14. Reflection symmetry detection using locally affine invariant edge correspondence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaozhong; Tang, Zesheng; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Reflection symmetry detection receives increasing attentions in recent years. The state-of-the-art algorithms mainly use the matching of intensity-based features (such as the SIFT) within a single image to find symmetry axes. This paper proposes a novel approach by establishing the correspondence of locally affine invariant edge-based features, which are superior to the intensity based in the aspects that it is insensitive to illumination variations, and applicable to textureless objects. The locally affine invariance is achieved by simple linear algebra for efficient and robust computations, making the algorithm suitable for detections under object distortions like perspective projection. Commonly used edge detectors and a voting process are, respectively, used before and after the edge description and matching steps to form a complete reflection detection pipeline. Experiments are performed using synthetic and real-world images with both multiple and single reflection symmetry axis. The test results are compared with existing algorithms to validate the proposed method.

  15. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  16. Characterizing Fluoroscopy Based Kinematic Accuracy as a Function of Pulse Width and Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Mozingo, Joseph D.; Magnuson, Dixon J.; Pagnano, Mark W.; Zhao, Kristin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroscopic imaging has become increasingly popular to investigate total knee arthroplasty kinematics non-invasively - 3D implant models are aligned with 2D image projections, and optimized via an edge-contour alignment technique. Previous studies have quantified the accuracy of this approach, however they do not adequately address the impact of image collection parameters. A particularly sensitive parameter is the pulse width, or exposure time per frame At longer pulse widths, a more motion is captured in a single frame; this can lead to image blur and subsequent degradation to image edge quality. Therefore, the comparative accuracy of relative joint kinematics as a function of pulse width and joint velocity needs to be defined. A limits of agreement approach was taken to define the mean differences between optoelectric kinematic measures (gold standard) and fluoroscopic methods at various pulse widths (1, 8, 16ms) and knee velocities (50, 100, 225°/s). The mean absolute differences between the optoelectric and fluoroscopic methods for 1ms pulse width was less than 1.5° and 0.9mm. Comparable rotational differences (1.3°) were observed for the 8ms pulse width but had larger translational differences (1.4mm). The 16ms pulse width yielded the greatest mean differences (2.0° and 1.6mm), which increased with knee flexion velocity. The importance of pulse width and velocity should not be overlooked for future studies - this parameter has proven to be a sensitive metric in the quantification of joint motion via fluoroscopy and must be identified and reported in future studies. PMID:27769514

  17. Nature of Graphene Edges: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acik, Muge; Chabal, Yves J.

    2011-07-01

    Graphene edges determine the optical, magnetic, electrical, and electronic properties of graphene. In particular, termination, chemical functionalization and reconstruction of graphene edges leads to crucial changes in the properties of graphene, so control of the edges is critical to the development of applications in electronics, spintronics and optoelectronics. Up to date, significant advances in studying graphene edges have directed various smart ways of controlling the edge morphology. Though, it still remains as a major challenge since even minor deviations from the ideal shape of the edges significantly deteriorate the material properties. In this review, we discuss the fundamental edge configurations together with the role of various types of edge defects and their effects on graphene properties. Indeed, we highlight major demanding challenges to find the most suitable technique to characterize graphene edges for numerous device applications such as transistors, sensors, actuators, solar cells, light-emitting displays, and batteries in graphene technology.

  18. Kinematics of YSO Molecular Hydrogen Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, L.; Cruz-González, I.

    2002-06-01

    As part of an on-going kinematical survey of molecular outflows, we describe observations of the 2.12 mu m line of H[2] for objects such as OMC-1, HH 211, HH 212, DR 21, Ceph A and S187-IR . The observations were made with the CAMILA IR-camera and an imaging Fabry-Pérot etalon at the 2.12 m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in San Pedro Mártir. A 22 km s-1 (FWHM) resolution allows us to determine the global kinematics of these sources. We show that many of them are consistent with theoretical models such as the jet driven molecular outflow paradigm. A flux versus velocity relation, similar to the one observed for CO outflows, is revealed by H[2] velocity structure.

  19. On kinematic design of serial link manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Paredis, C.J.J.; Khosla, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Reconfigurable Modular Manipulator System (RMMS) consists of modular links and joints which can be assembled into many manipulator configurations. This capability allows the RMMS to be rapidly reconfigured in order to custom tailor it to specific tasks. A important issue, related to the RMMS, is the determination of the optimal manipulator configuration for a specific task. In this paper, we address the problem of mapping kinematic task specifications into a kinematic manipulator configuration. For the design of 2 degrees-of-freedom planar manipulators, an analytical solution is derived. Since, for problems with more than 2 design parameters, analytical solutions become impractical, we have also developed a numerical approach for the design of 6 degrees-of-freedom manipulators. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  1. Kinematics of horizontal and vertical caterpillar crawling.

    PubMed

    van Griethuijsen, Linnea I; Trimmer, Barry A

    2009-05-01

    Unlike horizontal crawling, vertical crawling involves two counteracting forces: torque rotating the body around its center of mass and gravity resisting forward movement. The influence of these forces on kinematics has been examined in the soft-bodied larval stage of Manduca sexta. We found that crawling and climbing are accomplished using the same movements, with both segment timing and proleg lift indistinguishable in horizontal and vertical locomotion. Minor differences were detected in stride length and in the delay between crawls, which led to a lower crawling speed in the vertical orientation. Although these differences were statistically significant, they were much smaller than the variation in kinematic parameters between animals. The ability of Manduca to crawl and climb using the same movements is best explained by Manduca's relatively small size, slow speed and strong, controlled, passive grip made possible by its proleg/crochets.

  2. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  3. Philippine fault: A key for Philippine kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrier, E.; Huchon, P.; Aurelio, M.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of new geologic data and a kinematic analysis, we establish a simple kinematic model in which the motion between the Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia is distributed on two boundaries: the Philippine Trench and the Philippine fault. This model predicts a velocity of 2 to 2.5 cm/yr along the fault. Geologic data from the Visayas provide an age of 2 to 4 Ma for the fault, an age in good agreement with the date of the beginning of subduction in the Philippine Trench. The origin of the Philippine fault would thus be the flip of subduction from west to east after the locking of convergence to the west by the collision of the Philippine mobile belt with the Eurasian margin.

  4. Kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    PubMed

    Munk, Yonatan

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the kinematics of swimming garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis) using a novel nonlinear regression-based digitization method to establish quantitative statistical support for non-constant wavelengths in the undulatory pattern exhibited by swimming snakes. We find that in swimming snakes, the growth of the amplitude of the propulsive wave head-to-tail is strongly correlated (p < 0.005) with the head-to-tail growth in the wavelength. We investigate correlations between kinematic parameters and steady swimming speed, and find a very strong positive correlation between swimming speed and undulation frequency. We furthermore find a statistically well-supported positive correlation between swimming speed and both the initial amplitude of the propulsive wave at the head and the degree of amplitude growth from head to tail.

  5. Surface growth kinematics via local curve evolution.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Derek E; Goriely, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical framework is developed to model the kinematics of surface growth for objects that can be generated by evolving a curve in space, such as seashells and horns. Growth is dictated by a growth velocity vector field defined at every point on a generating curve. A local orthonormal basis is attached to each point of the generating curve and the velocity field is given in terms of the local coordinate directions, leading to a fully local and elegant mathematical structure. Several examples of increasing complexity are provided, and we demonstrate how biologically relevant structures such as logarithmic shells and horns emerge as analytical solutions of the kinematics equations with a small number of parameters that can be linked to the underlying growth process. Direct access to cell tracks and local orientation enables for connections to be made to the underlying growth process.

  6. Plasma electron hole kinematics. I. Momentum conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Zhou, C.

    2016-08-15

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, which behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  7. Galactic warp kinematics: model vs. observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedi, H.; Figueras, F.; Aguilar, L.; Mateu, C.; Romero-Gómez, M.; López-Corredoira, M.; Garzón, F.

    2015-05-01

    We test the capability of several methods to identify and characterise the warping of the stellar disc of our Galaxy in the Gaia era. We have developed a first kinematic model for the galactic warp and derived the analytical expressions for the force field of a warped Miyamoto- Nagai potential. We have generated realistic mock catalogues of OB, A and red clump stars within the warped galactic disc, where a very complete model of Gaia observables and their expected errors are included. We use the family of Great Circle Cell Counts (GC3) methods and LonKin methods for detecting and characterising the galactic warp. As a complementary work, we look into one of the existing proper motion catalogue namely the UCAC4, and look for the kinematic signature of the warp. We demonstrate the necessity of correcting for a possible residual rotation of the Hipparcos celestial reference frame with respect to the extra galactic inertial one.

  8. SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig; Davies, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

  9. The kinematic advantage of electric cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration of a common car with with a turbocharged diesel engine is compared to the same type with an electric motor in terms of kinematics. Starting from a state of rest, the electric car reaches a distant spot earlier than the diesel car, even though the latter has a better specification for engine power and average acceleration from 0 to 100 km h-1. A three phase model of acceleration as a function of time fits the data of the electric car accurately. The first phase is a quadratic growth of acceleration in time. It is shown that the tenfold higher coefficient for the first phase accounts for most of the kinematic advantage of the electric car.

  10. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  11. The SLUGGS survey: using extended stellar kinematics to disentangle the formation histories of low-mass S0 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Forbes, Duncan A.; Foster, Caroline; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; Pastorello, Nicola; Alabi, Adebusola; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-06-01

    We utilize the DEIMOS instrument on the Keck telescope to measure the wide-field stellar kinematics of early-type galaxies as part of the SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey. In this paper, we focus on some of the lowest stellar mass lenticular galaxies within this survey, namely NGC 2549, NGC 4474, NGC 4459 and NGC 7457, performing detailed kinematic analyses out to large radial distances of ˜2-3 effective radii. For NGC 2549, we present the first analysis of data taken with the SuperSKiMS (Stellar Kinematics from Multiple Slits) technique. To better probe kinematic variations in the outskirts of the SLUGGS galaxies, we have defined a local measure of stellar spin. We use this parameter and identify a clear separation in the radial behaviour of stellar spin between lenticular and elliptical galaxies. We compare the kinematic properties of our galaxies with those from various simulated galaxies to extract plausible formation scenarios. By doing this for multiple simulations, we assess the consistency of the theoretical results. Comparisons to binary merger simulations show that low-mass lenticular galaxies generally resemble the spiral progenitors more than the merger remnants themselves, which is an indication that these galaxies are not formed through merger events. We find, however, that recent mergers cannot be ruled out for some lenticular galaxies.

  12. Rajiform locomotion: three-dimensional kinematics of the pectoral fin surface during swimming in the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon orbignyi.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Erin L; Lauder, George V

    2012-09-15

    Rajiform locomotion in fishes is dominated by distinctive undulations of expanded pectoral fins. Unlike other fishes, which typically interact with the fluid environment via multiple fins, undulating rays modulate a single control surface, the pectoral disc, to perform pelagic locomotion, maneuvering and other behaviors. Complex deformations of the broad, flexible pectoral fins occur as the undulating wave varies in three dimensions; pectoral fin kinematics and changes in waveform with swimming speed cannot be fully quantified by two-dimensional analyses of the fin margin. We present the first three-dimensional analysis of undulatory rajiform locomotion in a batoid, the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon orbignyi. Using three cameras (250 frames s(-1)), we gathered three-dimensional excursion data from 31 points on the pectoral fin during swimming at 1.5 and 2.5 disc lengths s(-1), describing the propulsive wave and contrasting waveforms between swimming speeds. Only a relatively small region of the pectoral fin (~25%) undulates with significant amplitude (>0.5 cm). Stingrays can maintain extreme lateral curvature of the distal fin margin in opposition to induced hydrodynamic loads, 'cupping' the edge of the pectoral fin into the flow, with potential implications for drag reduction. Wave amplitude increases across both anteroposterior and mediolateral fin axes. Along the anteroposterior axis, amplitude increases until the wave reaches mid-disc and then remains constant, in contrast to angulliform patterns of continuous amplitude increase. Increases in swimming speed are driven by both wave frequency and wavespeed, though multivariate analyses reveal a secondary role for amplitude.

  13. Kinematics and dynamics of the Uranian rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Richard G.

    1987-01-01

    The self-gravity model of apse alignment was tested by comparing its predictions about structure within the epsilon ring with an extensive set of observed occultation profiles covering a wide range of ring longitudes. The self-gravity model as presently constructed is inconsistent with the observations. The Lindblad resonance survey and Shepherd satellite ring perturbation are discussed. The kinematic model of the Uranian ring orbit was enhanced to accommodate Voyager observations as well as ground-based occultation observations.

  14. Efficient Kinematic Computations For 7-DOF Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark K.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for forward kinematic mappings of seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) robotic manipulator having revolute joints developed on basis of representation of redundant DOF in terms of parameter called "arm angle." Continuing effort to exploit redundancy in manipulator according to concept of basic and additional tasks. Concept also discussed in "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes With Singularities" (NPO-18556) and "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801).

  15. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  16. Kinematics and dynamics of sphenisciform wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noca, Flavio; Crisinel, Fabien; Munier, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Three-dimensional scans of three different species of taxidermied penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus, Pygoscelis papua, and Spheniscus magellanicus) have been performed. A three-dimensional reproduction of an African penguin (Sphenicus demersus) wing was manufactured and tested in a hydrodynamic channel. A six-degree-of-freedom robot was programmed to perform the three dimensional kinematics, obtained from actual footage. A six-component force balance was used to retrieve the dynamics of the wing motion. Results will be presented and discussed.

  17. The Galactic kinematics of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ak, T.; Bilir, S.; Özdönmez, A.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Ak, S.; Eker, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Kinematical properties of CVs were investigated according to population types and orbital periods, using the space velocities computed from recently updated systemic velocities, proper motions and parallaxes. Reliability of collected space velocity data was refined by removing 34 systems with largest space velocity errors. The 216 CVs in the refined sample were shown to have a dispersion of 53.70±7.41 km s-1 corresponding to a mean kinematical age of 5.29±1.35 Gyr. Population types of CVs were identified using their Galactic orbital parameters. According to the population analysis, seven old thin disc, nine thick disc and one halo CV were found in the sample, indicating that 94 % of CVs in the Solar Neighbourhood belong to the thin-disc component of the Galaxy. Mean kinematical ages 3.40±1.03 and 3.90±1.28 Gyr are for the non-magnetic thin-disc CVs below and above the period gap, respectively. There is not a meaningful difference between the velocity dispersions below and above the gap. Velocity dispersions of the non-magnetic thin-disc systems below and above the gap are 24.95±3.46 and 26.60±4.18 km s-1, respectively. This result is not in agreement with the standard formation and evolution theory of CVs. The mean kinematical ages of the CV groups in various orbital period intervals increase towards shorter orbital periods. This is in agreement with the standard theory for the evolution of CVs. Rate of orbital period change was found to be dP/ dt=-1.62(±0.15)×10-5 sec yr-1.

  18. Kinematics in irregular galaxies: NGC 4449.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, M.; Rosado, M.

    1998-11-01

    A kinematical analysis of the irregular galaxy NGC 4449 is presented based on the Fabry-Perot interferometer PUMA observations. In NGC 4449 we analyse its global velocity field, HII regions population as well as the SNR population identified on radioastronomy studies. Our first results for NGC 4449 show that the optical velocity field, presents a decreasing gradient in velocity along the optical bar and an anticorrelation with respect to the velocity field of the HI halo.

  19. The kinematic component of the cosmological redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodorowski, Michał J.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely believed that the cosmological redshift is not a Doppler shift. However, Bunn & Hogg have recently pointed out that to solve this problem properly, one has to transport parallelly the velocity four-vector of a distant galaxy to the observer's position. Performing such a transport along the null geodesic of photons arriving from the galaxy, they found that the cosmological redshift is purely kinematic. Here we argue that one should rather transport the velocity four-vector along the geodesic connecting the points of intersection of the world-lines of the galaxy and the observer with the hypersurface of constant cosmic time. We find that the resulting relation between the transported velocity and the redshift of arriving photons is not given by a relativistic Doppler formula. Instead, for small redshifts it coincides with the well-known non-relativistic decomposition of the redshift into a Doppler (kinematic) component and a gravitational one. We perform such a decomposition for arbitrary large redshifts and derive a formula for the kinematic component of the cosmological redshift, valid for any Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology. In particular, in a universe with Ωm= 0.24 and ΩΛ= 0.76, a quasar at a redshift 6, at the time of emission of photons reaching us today had the recession velocity v= 0.997c. This can be contrasted with v= 0.96c, had the redshift been entirely kinematic. Thus, for recession velocities of such high-redshift sources, the effect of deceleration of the early Universe clearly prevails over the effect of its relatively recent acceleration. Last but not the least, we show that the so-called proper recession velocities of galaxies, commonly used in cosmology, are in fact radial components of the galaxies' four-velocity vectors. As such, they can indeed attain superluminal values, but should not be regarded as real velocities.

  20. Efficient Kinematic Computations For 7-DOF Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark K.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for forward kinematic mappings of seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) robotic manipulator having revolute joints developed on basis of representation of redundant DOF in terms of parameter called "arm angle." Continuing effort to exploit redundancy in manipulator according to concept of basic and additional tasks. Concept also discussed in "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes With Singularities" (NPO-18556) and "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801).

  1. Analyzing Robotic Kinematics Via Computed Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    Computing system assists in evaluation of kinematics of conceptual robot. Displays positions and motions of robotic manipulator within work cell. Also displays interactions between robotic manipulator and other objects. Results of simulation displayed on graphical computer workstation. System includes both off-the-shelf software originally developed for automotive industry and specially developed software. Simulation system also used to design human-equivalent hand, to model optical train in infrared system, and to develop graphical interface for teleoperator simulation system.

  2. Kinematic Diversity in Rorqual Whale Feeding Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cade, David E; Friedlaender, Ari S; Calambokidis, John; Goldbogen, Jeremy A

    2016-10-10

    Rorqual whales exhibit an extreme lunge filter-feeding strategy characterized by acceleration to high speed and engulfment of a large volume of prey-laden water [1-4]. Although tagging studies have quantified the kinematics of lunge feeding, the timing of engulfment relative to body acceleration has been modeled conflictingly because it could never be directly measured [5-7]. The temporal coordination of these processes has a major impact on the hydrodynamics and energetics of this high-cost feeding strategy [5-9]. If engulfment and body acceleration are temporally distinct, the overall cost of this dynamic feeding event would be minimized. However, greater temporal overlap of these two phases would theoretically result in higher drag and greater energetic costs. To address this discrepancy, we used animal-borne synchronized video and 3D movement sensors to quantify the kinematics of both the skull and body during feeding events. Krill-feeding blue and humpback whales exhibited temporally distinct acceleration and engulfment phases, with humpback whales reaching maximum gape earlier than blue whales. In these whales, engulfment coincided largely with body deceleration; however, humpback whales pursuing more agile fish demonstrated highly variable coordination of skull and body kinematics in the context of complex prey-herding techniques. These data suggest that rorquals modulate the coordination of acceleration and engulfment to optimize foraging efficiency by minimizing locomotor costs and maximizing prey capture. Moreover, this newfound kinematic diversity observed among rorquals indicates that the energetic efficiency of foraging is driven both by the whale's engulfment capacity and the comparative locomotor capabilities of predator and prey. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  3. Stellar Kinematics from Hipparcos Proper Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    stars, classical Cepheids , and the late-type K-M giants. Comparing the derived results, the kinematical discrepancies between each subset of stars...observational techniques, many important results for Galactic astronomy have been achieved in recent years. The present work will concentrate on investigating...Hence, the sample of O-B5 stars to be analyzed is 1,523 in total. The Hipparcos Catalogue provides observations of 223 classical Cepheids . Based on the

  4. Fracture Control for NIRSpec Kinematic Mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorel, M.; Novo, F.; Jollet, D.; Sinnema, G.; Jentsch, M.

    2014-06-01

    An ESA contribution to the JWST is the Near Infra-Red Spectrograph (NIRSpec) capable of high-resolution spectroscopy. The development of the NIRSpec was commissioned to Astrium. This contribution deals with the fracture control for the optical bench kinematic (OBK) mounts which are critical structural elements of the NIRSpec platform. A summary of the main activities is given as well as difficulties encountered throughout the process and solutions adopted.

  5. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention.

  6. Investigation of the mica x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectral features at the Al K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.

    2003-10-01

    Near-edge features of Al x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra in aluminosilicate compounds with mixed coordination number are usually assigned to a fourfold coordinated site contribution followed by a sixfold coordinated site contribution that is displaced towards higher energy because of the increasing ligand nucleus potentials, neglecting possible contributions due to bond distance variations and local geometrical distortion. Here we present and discuss the Al K-edge XANES spectra of synthetic micas with either fourfold coordinated Al (phlogopite), or with sixfold coordinated Al (polylithionite), as well as with mixed coordination (preiswerkite). Multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated with the octahedral sites. This unexpected behaviour can be described as due to the effect of a significant reduction of the ligand field strength (i.e. large local distortion and Al-O bond distances).

  7. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  8. Morphologic and kinematic characteristics of elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Coh, M; Milanović, D; Kampmiller, T

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain the basic morphologic and kinematic characteristics of elite sprinters. The sample included 24 sprinters, with times over a 100 m distance between 10.21 s and 11.19 s. Morphologic characteristics of the sprinters were measured with a test battery of 17 measures, obtained according to the methodology prescribed by the International Biologic Programme (IBP). The kinematic variables were obtained from a flying start 20 m run and a 20 m run with a low start, with the technology of a contact carpet (ERGO TESTER-Bosco). Stride frequency and length, duration of contact and flight phases were registered. Time parameters were measured with a system of infrared photocells (BROWER Timing System). T-test showed that elite sprinters do not differ significantly in morphologic characteristics (p > 0.05) from the 100 m results point of view. However, statistically significant differences were obtained in starting acceleration and maximal velocity. The most important kinematic parameters for generating differences between the elite sprinters are contact time and stride frequency.

  9. Milky Way Kinematics from RAVE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Grebel, E. K.; RAVE Co.

    2012-08-01

    We present a method to derive kinematic parameters for the Galactic thick and thin disks of the Milky Way (MW) based on the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE Steinmetz et al. 2006). We introduce selection criteria in order to clean the observed radial velocities from the Galactic large scale effects and to take into account the partial sky coverage of RAVE. The data are disentangled from a mixture of thin and thick disk stars as explained in a forthcoming paper (Pasetto et al. 2012) on the basis of pure kinematics arguments and supplied with photometric distances and proper motions. We deduce the components of the Solar motion relative to the Local Standard of Rest (LSR) in the radial and vertical directions as well as the components of the velocity dispersion tensors for the two MW component on the basis of pure kinematics arguments. The selected sample is a limited subsample from the RAVE catalogue roughly extending 500 pc above and below the Galactic plane. This sample tracks the velocity dispersion trend in radial direction to 1 kpc within and 500pc outside the Solar radius in the Galactic reference system.

  10. Dynamic control of kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhengcheng

    1993-03-01

    A robot manipulator is said to be kinematically redundant when it has more degrees of freedom than are necessary to accomplish a particular task. Useful control strategies are designed for kinematically redundant manipulators in order to enhance their performance. Following the impedance control approach, the problem of minimizing redundant manipulator collision impacts is addressed. The configuration control approach is used to reduce impulsive forces, while a simplified impedance control scheme is formulated to minimize rebound effects. A new Cartesian control strategy for redundant flexible-joint manipulators is proposed. The main idea in this hybrid scheme is to control not only the manipulator's end-effector but also its links, so as to achieve specified positions and velocities for the end-effector and the links. Finally, a new application of kinematically redundant manipulators is proposed: using redundancy resolution to compensate for joint flexibility. This redundancy resolution scheme is incorporated in a control strategy for redundant flexible-joint manipulators. The problem of possible algorithmic singularities is considered, and a scheme is suggested which makes the controller robust with respect to such singularities.

  11. Kinematic fundamentals of a biomechatronic laparoscopy system.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Simón, J L; Minor Martínez, A; Ordorica Flores, R; Limón Aguilar, J L; Suaste, E

    2011-09-01

    Optical assistance in laparoscopic surgery is essential for an optimal procedure. Unlike conventional surgery, it requires new systems to reduce spatial location time, navigation and cleanliness without compromising surgical quality. This article shows the kinematic analysis of a new bio-mechatronic design to assist laparoscopic visual perspective in real time, either during training or in surgery. The bio-mechatronic system is analyzed in order to get the kinematic model of the system. The set of kinematic equations for the bio-mechatronic system are presented here. The system has been tested functionally in several surgical procedures successfully. The analysis shows the workspace under postural conditions of navigation in real time, where it is possible to get visually self assistance during training or specific surgeries. The new bio-mechatronic system has been tested in training with inanimate and biological models, in veterinary surgery and pediatrics, with the appropriate consent and respecting the Treaty of Helsinki. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly.

  13. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-01-01

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  14. Structure and kinematics of the Sumatran Fault System in North Sumatra (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Blanco, David; Philippon, Melody; von Hagke, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Lithospheric-scale faults related to oblique subduction are responsible for some of the most hazardous earthquakes reported worldwide. The mega-thrust in the Sunda sector of the Sumatran oblique subduction has been intensively studied, especially after the infamous 2004 Mw 9.1 earthquake, but its onshore kinematic complement within the Sumatran subduction, the transform Sumatran Fault System, has received considerably less attention. In this paper, we apply a combination of analysis of Digital Elevation Models (ASTER GDEM) and field evidence to resolve the kinematics of the leading edge of deformation of the northern sector of the Sumatran Fault System. To this end, we mapped the northernmost tip of Sumatra, including the islands to the northwest, between 4.5°N and 6°N. Here, major topographic highs are related to different faults. Using field evidence and our GDEM structural mapping, we can show that in the area where the fault bifurcates into two fault strands, two independent kinematic regimes evolve, both consistent with the large-scale framework of the Sumatran Fault System. Whereas the eastern branch is a classic Riedel system, the western branch features a fold-and-thrust belt. The latter contractional feature accommodated significant amounts (c. 20%) of shortening of the system in the study area. Our field observations of the tip of the NSFS match a strain pattern with a western contractional domain (Pulau Weh thrust splay) and an eastern extensional domain (Pulau Aceh Riedel system), which are together characteristic of the tip of a propagating strike-slip fault, from a mechanical viewpoint. For the first time, we describe the strain partitioning resulting from the propagation of the NSFS in Sumatra mainland. Our study helps understanding complex kinematics of an evolving strike-slip system, and stresses the importance of field studies in addition to remote sensing and geophysical studies.

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Revisiting Galaxy Classification through High-order Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Sande, Jesse; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Fogarty, Lisa M. R.; Cortese, Luca; d'Eugenio, Francesco; Croom, Scott M.; Scott, Nicholas; Allen, James T.; Brough, Sarah; Bryant, Julia J.; Cecil, Gerald; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Davies, Roger; Elahi, Pascal J.; Foster, Caroline; Goldstein, Gregory; Goodwin, Michael; Groves, Brent; Ho, I.-Ting; Jeong, Hyunjin; Jones, D. Heath; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Lawrence, Jon S.; Leslie, Sarah K.; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; McDermid, Richard M.; McElroy, Rebecca; Medling, Anne M.; Oh, Sree; Owers, Matt S.; Richards, Samuel N.; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.; Taranu, Dan; Tonini, Chiara; Walcher, C. Jakob; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent cosmological hydrodynamical simulations suggest that integral field spectroscopy can connect the high-order stellar kinematic moments h3 (˜skewness) and h4 (˜kurtosis) in galaxies to their cosmological assembly history. Here, we assess these results by measuring the stellar kinematics on a sample of 315 galaxies, without a morphological selection, using two-dimensional integral field data from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. Proxies for the spin parameter ({λ }{R{{e}}}) and ellipticity ({ɛ }{{e}}) are used to separate fast and slow rotators; there exists a good correspondence to regular and non-regular rotators, respectively, as also seen in earlier studies. We confirm that regular rotators show a strong h3 versus V/σ anti-correlation, whereas quasi-regular and non-regular rotators show a more vertical relation in h3 and V/σ . Motivated by recent cosmological simulations, we develop an alternative approach to kinematically classify galaxies from their individual h3 versus V/σ signatures. Within the SAMI Galaxy Survey, we identify five classes of high-order stellar kinematic signatures using Gaussian mixture models. Class 1 corresponds to slow rotators, whereas Classes 2-5 correspond to fast rotators. We find that galaxies with similar {λ }{R{{e}}}{--}{ɛ }{{e}} values can show distinctly different {h}3{--}V/σ signatures. Class 5 objects are previously unidentified fast rotators that show a weak h3 versus V/σ anti-correlation. From simulations, these objects are predicted to be disk-less galaxies formed by gas-poor mergers. From morphological examination, however, there is evidence for large stellar disks. Instead, Class 5 objects are more likely disturbed galaxies, have counter-rotating bulges, or bars in edge-on galaxies. Finally, we interpret the strong anti-correlation in h3 versus V/σ as evidence for disks in most fast rotators, suggesting a dearth of gas-poor mergers among fast rotators.

  16. Kinematic control of extreme jump angles in the red leg running frog (Kassina maculata).

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher Thomas; Porro, Laura Beatriz; Collings, Amber Jade

    2017-03-08

    The kinematic flexibility of frog hindlimbs enables multiple locomotor modes within a single species. Prior work has extensively explored maximum performance capacity in frogs; however, the mechanisms by which anurans modulate performance within locomotor modes remain unclear. We explored how Kassina maculata, a species known for both running and jumping abilities, modulates takeoff angle from horizontal to nearly vertical. Specifically, how do 3D motions of leg segments coordinate to move the center of mass (COM) upwards and forwards? How do joint rotations modulate jump angle? High-speed video was used to quantify 3D joint angles and their respective rotation axis vectors. Inverse kinematics was used to determine how hip, knee and ankle rotations contribute to components of COM motion. Independent of takeoff angle, leg segment retraction (rearward rotation) was twofold greater than adduction (downward rotation). Additionally, the joint rotation axis vectors reoriented through time suggesting dynamic shifts in relative roles of joints. We found two hypothetical mechanisms for increasing takeoff angle: Firstly, greater knee and ankle excursion increased shank adduction, elevating the COM. Secondly, during the steepest jumps the body rotated rapidly backwards to redirect the COM velocity. This rotation was not caused by pelvic angle extension, but rather by kinematic transmission from leg segments via reorientation of the joint rotation axes. We propose that K. maculata uses proximal leg retraction as the principal kinematic drive while dynamically tuning jump trajectory by knee and ankle joint modulation.

  17. Application of Machine Learning in Postural Control Kinematics for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yelshyna, Darya; Bicho, Estela

    2016-01-01

    The use of wearable devices to study gait and postural control is a growing field on neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this paper, we investigate if machine-learning classifiers offer the discriminative power for the diagnosis of AD based on postural control kinematics. We compared Support Vector Machines (SVMs), Multiple Layer Perceptrons (MLPs), Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBNs), and Deep Belief Networks (DBNs) on 72 participants (36 AD patients and 36 healthy subjects) exposed to seven increasingly difficult postural tasks. The decisional space was composed of 18 kinematic variables (adjusted for age, education, height, and weight), with or without neuropsychological evaluation (Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) score), top ranked in an error incremental analysis. Classification results were based on threefold cross validation of 50 independent and randomized runs sets: training (50%), test (40%), and validation (10%). Having a decisional space relying solely on postural kinematics, accuracy of AD diagnosis ranged from 71.7 to 86.1%. Adding the MoCA variable, the accuracy ranged between 91 and 96.6%. MLP classifier achieved top performance in both decisional spaces. Having comprehended the interdynamic interaction between postural stability and cognitive performance, our results endorse machine-learning models as a useful tool for computer-aided diagnosis of AD based on postural control kinematics. PMID:28074090

  18. Influence of trunk flexion on hip and knee joint kinematics during a controlled drop landing.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2008-03-01

    An erect posture and greater knee valgus during landing have been implicated as anterior cruciate ligament injury risk factors. While previous research suggests coupling of knee and hip kinematics, the influence of trunk positioning on lower extremity kinematics has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that greater trunk flexion during landing would result in greater knee and hip flexion and lesser knee valgus. Identification of a modifiable factor (e.g. trunk flexion) which positively influences kinematics of multiple lower extremity joints would be invaluable for anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention efforts. Forty healthy individuals completed two drop landing tasks while knee, hip, and trunk kinematics were sampled. The first task constituted the natural/preferred landing strategy (Preferred), while in the second task, subjects actively flexed the trunk upon landing (Flexed). Peak trunk flexion angle was 47 degrees greater for Flexed compared to Preferred (P<0.001), and was associated with increases in peak hip flexion angle of 31 degrees (P<0.001) and peak knee flexion angle of 22 degrees (P<0.001). Active trunk flexion during landing produces concomitant increases in knee and hip flexion angles. A more flexed/less erect posture during landing is associated with a reduced anterior cruciate ligament injury risk. As such, incorporating greater trunk flexion as an integral component of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs may be warranted.

  19. Three-dimensional trunk kinematics in golf: between-club differences and relationships to clubhead speed.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher; Burnett, Angus; Cochrane, Jodie; Ball, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine whether significant three-dimensional (3D) trunk kinematic differences existed between a driver and a five-iron during a golf swing; and (ii) to determine the anthropometric, physiological, and trunk kinematic variables associated with clubhead speed. Trunk range of motion and golf swing kinematic data were collected from 15 low-handicap male golfers (handicap = 2.5 +/- 1.9). Data were collected using a 10-camera motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Data on clubhead speed and ball velocity were collected using a real-time launch monitor. Paired t-tests revealed nine significant (p < or = 0.0019) between-club differences for golf swing kinematics, namely trunk and lower trunk flexion/extension and lower trunk axial rotation. Multiple regression analyses explained 33.7-66.7% of the variance in clubhead speed for the driver and five-iron, respectively, with both trunk and lower trunk variables showing associations with clubhead speed. Future studies should consider the role of the upper limbs and modifiable features of the golf club in developing clubhead speed for the driver in particular.

  20. Predicting three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematics from static imaging-based alignment measures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Benjamin R; Sheehan, Frances T

    2013-03-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome causes significant discomfort and disability among much of the general population. Despite recent breakthroughs in dynamic three-dimensional imaging technologies to assess pathological patellofemoral motion, such tools remain costly for clinical diagnostics applications. Thus, this study investigated whether three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematics could be predicted from routine two-dimensional static measures of patellofemoral joint alignment quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquired in full knee extension. Twenty-six volunteers clinically diagnosed with patellofemoral pain (19 F/7 M, 25.9 ± 11.1 years) and 26 control subjects (19 F/7 M, 25.3 ± 7.7 years) were included in this IRB-approved study. Static three-dimensional sagittal T1-weighted gradient recall echo and dynamic MRI scans were acquired. For the dynamic image acquisition, subjects cyclically flexed and extended their knee (at 30 cycles/min) while a full cine-phase contrast MRI set (24 time frames of anatomic images and x-, y-, and z-velocity images) was acquired. From these data, static measures of patellofemoral alignment and three-dimensional patellofemoral kinematics were derived. Single and multiple regressions between static and kinematic variables were evaluated. Although shown reliable, the static MRI measures could only partially predict patellofemoral kinematics, with r(2) -values ranging from 16% to 77%. This makes it imperitave that the current precise, accurate, 3D, dynamic imaging techniques be translated into clinical tools.

  1. Application of Machine Learning in Postural Control Kinematics for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luís; Gago, Miguel F; Yelshyna, Darya; Ferreira, Jaime; David Silva, Hélder; Rocha, Luís; Sousa, Nuno; Bicho, Estela

    2016-01-01

    The use of wearable devices to study gait and postural control is a growing field on neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this paper, we investigate if machine-learning classifiers offer the discriminative power for the diagnosis of AD based on postural control kinematics. We compared Support Vector Machines (SVMs), Multiple Layer Perceptrons (MLPs), Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBNs), and Deep Belief Networks (DBNs) on 72 participants (36 AD patients and 36 healthy subjects) exposed to seven increasingly difficult postural tasks. The decisional space was composed of 18 kinematic variables (adjusted for age, education, height, and weight), with or without neuropsychological evaluation (Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) score), top ranked in an error incremental analysis. Classification results were based on threefold cross validation of 50 independent and randomized runs sets: training (50%), test (40%), and validation (10%). Having a decisional space relying solely on postural kinematics, accuracy of AD diagnosis ranged from 71.7 to 86.1%. Adding the MoCA variable, the accuracy ranged between 91 and 96.6%. MLP classifier achieved top performance in both decisional spaces. Having comprehended the interdynamic interaction between postural stability and cognitive performance, our results endorse machine-learning models as a useful tool for computer-aided diagnosis of AD based on postural control kinematics.

  2. Oscillations of a Turbulent Jet Incident Upon an Edge

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2000-09-19

    For the case of a jet originating from a fully turbulent channel flow and impinging upon a sharp edge, the possible onset and nature of coherent oscillations has remained unexplored. In this investigation, high-image-density particle image velocimetry and surface pressure measurements are employed to determine the instantaneous, whole-field characteristics of the turbulent jet-edge interaction in relation to the loading of the edge. It is demonstrated that even in absence of acoustic resonant or fluid-elastic effects, highly coherent, self-sustained oscillations rapidly emerge above the turbulent background. Two clearly identifiable modes of instability are evident. These modes involve large-scale vortices that are phase-locked to the gross undulations of the jet and its interaction with the edge, and small-scale vortices, which are not phase-locked. Time-resolved imaging of instantaneous vorticity and velocity reveals the form, orientation, and strength of the large-scale concentrations of vorticity approaching the edge in relation to rapid agglomeration of small-scale vorticity concentrations. Such vorticity field-edge interactions exhibit rich complexity, relative to the simplified pattern of vortex-edge interaction traditionally employed for the quasi-laminar edgetone. Furthermore, these interactions yield highly nonlinear surface pressure signatures. The origin of this nonlinearity, involving coexistence of multiple frequency components, is interpreted in terms of large- and small-scale vortices embedded in distributed vorticity layers at the edge. Eruption of the surface boundary layer on the edge due to passage of the large-scale vortex does not occur; rather apparent secondary vorticity concentrations are simply due to distension of the oppositely-signed vorticity layer at the tip of the edge. The ensemble-averaged turbulent statistics of the jet quickly take on an identity that is distinct from the statistics of the turbulent boundary layer in the channel

  3. Quantifying edge significance on maintaining global connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yuhua; Li, Yebin; Zhang, Min; Ma, Guoshuai; Lu, Furong

    2017-01-01

    Global connectivity is a quite important issue for networks. The failures of some key edges may lead to breakdown of the whole system. How to find them will provide a better understanding on system robustness. Based on topological information, we propose an approach named LE (link entropy) to quantify the edge significance on maintaining global connectivity. Then we compare the LE with the other six acknowledged indices on the edge significance: the edge betweenness centrality, degree product, bridgeness, diffusion importance, topological overlap and k-path edge centrality. Experimental results show that the LE approach outperforms in quantifying edge significance on maintaining global connectivity. PMID:28349923

  4. Propagating edge states in strained honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Grazia; Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the helically propagating edge states associated with pseudo-Landau levels in strained honeycomb lattices. We exploit chiral symmetry to derive a general criterion for the existence of these propagating edge states in the presence of only nearest-neighbor hoppings and we verify our criterion using numerical simulations of both uniaxially and trigonally strained honeycomb lattices. We show that the propagation of the helical edge state can be controlled by engineering the shape of the edges. Sensitivity to chiral-symmetry-breaking next-nearest-neighbor hoppings is assessed. Our result opens up an avenue toward the precise control of edge modes through manipulation of the edge shape.

  5. Saddle-node dynamics for edge detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Y.F.

    1994-09-01

    The author demonstrates how the formulation of a nonlinear scale-space filter can be used for edge detection and junction analysis. By casting edge-preserving filtering in terms of maximizing information content subject to an average cost function, the computed cost at each pixel location becomes a local measure of edgeness. This computation depends on a single scale parameter and the given image data. Unlike previous approaches which require careful tuning of the filter kernels for various types of edges, this scheme is general enough to be able to handle different edges, such as lines, step edges, corners and junctions. Anisotropy in the data is handled automatically by the nonlinear dynamics.

  6. An optimization-based method for prediction of lumbar spine segmental kinematics from the measurements of thorax and pelvic kinematics.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, I; Arjmand, N; Bazrgari, B

    2015-12-01

    Given measurement difficulties, earlier modeling studies have often used some constant ratios to predict lumbar segmental kinematics from measurements of total lumbar kinematics. Recent imaging studies suggested distribution of lumbar kinematics across its vertebrae changes with trunk rotation, lumbar posture, and presence of load. An optimization-based method is presented and validated in this study to predict segmental kinematics from measured total lumbar kinematics. Specifically, a kinematics-driven biomechanical model of the spine is used in a heuristic optimization procedure to obtain a set of segmental kinematics that, when prescribed to the model, were associated with the minimum value for the sum of squared predicted muscle stresses across all the lower back muscles. Furthermore, spinal loads estimated using the predicted kinematics by the present method were compared with those estimated using constant ratios. Predicted segmental kinematics were in good agreement with those obtained by imaging with an average error of ~10%. Compared with those obtained using constant ratios, predicted spinal loads using segmental kinematics obtained here were in general smaller. In conclusion, the proposed method offers an alternative tool for improving model-based estimates of spinal loads where image-based measurement of lumbar kinematics is not feasible. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Effective Hamiltonian for protected edge states in graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Winkler, R.; Deshpande, H.

    2017-06-15

    Edge states in topological insulators (TIs) disperse symmetrically about one of the time-reversal invariant momenta Λ in the Brillouin zone (BZ) with protected degeneracies at Λ. Commonly TIs are distinguished from trivial insulators by the values of one or multiple topological invariants that require an analysis of the bulk band structure across the BZ. We propose an effective two-band Hamiltonian for the electronic states in graphene based on a Taylor expansion of the tight-binding Hamiltonian about the time-reversal invariant M point at the edge of the BZ. This Hamiltonian provides a faithful description of the protected edge states for bothmore » zigzag and armchair ribbons, though the concept of a BZ is not part of such an effective model. In conclusion, we show that the edge states are determined by a band inversion in both reciprocal and real space, which allows one to select Λ for the edge states without affecting the bulk spectrum.« less

  8. Ultrafast Dynamics near the M-edge in Chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Brian; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Prasankumar, Rohit; Rodriguez, George; Sandberg, Richard; Taylor, Antoinette; Yarotski, Dmitry

    2015-03-01

    The exploration of element specific ultrafast spin dynamics in transition metals has been extended by recent advances in table top VUV sources based on high harmonic generation. These sources provide femtosecond time resolution at photon energies that span the magnetism sensitive 3p to 3d band absorption (M-edge) in these materials. The time scale of spin dynamics determines the fundamental limits of magnetic data recording and gives insight into magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms in complex functional materials. Though there have been multiple time-resolved studies on ferromagnetic systems, antiferromagnetic (AFM) dynamics remains largely unexplored. As an AFM test system we choose chromium and measure transient reflectivity for photon energies spanning the chromium M-edge. Picosecond dynamics are measured throughout the spectrum of the VUV probe beam after excitation by an IR laser pulse. A dramatic difference is observed in the transient magnetic linear absorption dichroism of chromium for photon energies above and below the M-edge (~ 46 eV) as temperature is varied through the AFM transition. While a decrease in reflectivity is seen below the M-edge we find an increase in reflectivity above the edge. We attribute this variation to interplay between electronic and magnetic responses and discuss its relation to ultrafast magnetic ordering dynamics.

  9. Computational tool for comparison of kinematic mechanisms and commonly used kinematic models

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.M.; Van Vorhis, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate, reliable, and reproducible methods to measure the movements of human joints have been elusive. Currently, three-dimensional recording methods are used to track the motion of one segment relative to another as the joint moves. Six parameters describe the moving segment`s location and orientation relative to the reference segment: three translations (x, y, and z) and three rotations (yaw, pitch and roll) in the reference frame. The raw data can be difficult to interpret. For this reason, several methods have been developed to measure the motion of human joints and to describe the resulting data. For example, instant helical axes or screw deviation axes (Kinzell et al., 1972), the Joint Coordinate System of Grood and Suntay (1983), and the Euler angle method have been used to describe the movements of bones relative to each other. None of these methods takes into account the physical kinematic mechanism producing the joint motion. More recently, Lupichuk (1995) has developed an algorithm to find, for an arbitrary revolute, the axis` position and orientation in three- dimensional space. Each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages in analyzing joint kinematics. The authors have developed software to provide a means of comparing these methods for arbitrary, single degree of freedom, kinematic mechanisms. Our objective is to demonstrate the software and to show how it can be used to compare the results from the different kinematic models as they are applied to specific kinematic mechanisms.

  10. Pelvis and torso kinematics and their relationship to shoulder kinematics in high-school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Keeley, David W

    2010-12-01

    It was the purpose of our study to examine the kinematics of the pelvis and torso and determine their relationship to the kinematics of the shoulder in high-school baseball pitchers. A single group, repeated-measures design was used to collect pelvis, torso, and shoulder kinematics throughout the pitching motion. Subjects threw a series of maximal effort fastballs to a catcher located the regulation distance (18.44m) from the pitching mound, and those data from the fastest pitch passing through the strike zone were analyzed. After test trials, kinematic data were analyzed using a series of descriptive statistics to identify outliers and determine the nature of the distribution before testing for the presence of relationships between the various parameters. Results indicated that for several parameters, the actions at and about the shoulder are strongly related to the actions of the pelvis and torso throughout the pitching motion. However, although pelvis and torso kinematics throughout the pitching motion were inversely related to both shoulder elevation and the plane of shoulder elevation, only the rate of axial torso rotation was significantly related to these shoulder parameters. More importantly, the rate of axial torso rotation is significantly related to these shoulder parameters in a way that may help explain the high rate of shoulder injury in high-school pitchers. Therefore, strength training should focus on developing a strong stable core including the gluteal musculature in an attempt to control the rate of torso rotation during the pitch.

  11. Electronic Bandgap and Edge Reconstruction in Phosphorene: An Experimental/Theoretical joint investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liangbo; Wang, Jun; Lin, Wenzhi; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Pan, Minghu; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorene, or monolayer black phosphorus, is a new 2D layered material with high hole mobility and direct semiconducting bandgap. However, the direct bandgap of phosphorene has not been directly measured, and the properties of its edges have not been considered in detail. In a joint experimental/theoretical work, we studied the electronic properties of phosphorene and its edges [Liang et al., Nano Letters, 2014, 14, 6400]. A detailed scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) study with first-principles calculations reveals the presence of a semiconducting 2 eV gap, the direct bandgap for phosphorene. More importantly, we were able to identify a sharp mono-step in phosphorene that allowed us to perform the first-ever investigation of edges. STS measurements across the step edge indicate nontrivial multiple edge states located inside the 2 eV gap and below the Fermi level. To understand these edge states, we have modeled a series of 1D phosphorene nanoribbons including armchair- and zigzag-edged PNRs. Extensive density functional theory calculations show that edge reconstructions are responsible for energy positions of these edge states. The reconstructions self-passivate most edge dangling bonds by switching the coordination number of phosphorus from 3 to 4 or 5. NYSTAR Program C080117 and the Office of Naval Research; Oak Ridge National Laboratory by U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Bergh, Sofie Van Den; Hart, Robert; Jelle, Bjrn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild

    2013-01-31

    Insulating glass (IG) units typically consist of multiple glass panes that are sealed and held together structurally along their perimeters. This report describes a study of edge seals in IG units. First, we summarize the components, requirements, and desired properties of edge construction in IG units, based on a survey of the available literature. Second, we review commercially available window edge seals and describe their properties, to provide an easily accessible reference for research and commercial purposes. Finally, based on the literature survey and review of current commercial edge seal systems, we identify research opportunities for future edge seal improvements and solutions.

  13. Edge Simulation Laboratory Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M.; Dorr, M.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2011-02-25

    In 2010 The Edge Simulation Laboratory (ESL) embarked upon the plan laid out in the renewal proposal submitted in December 2009. This proposal called for initially parallel efforts addressing the physics of the closed-flux-surface pedestal region, using existing computational tools (GYRO, BOUT++) and analytic modeling, and physics of the scrape-off layer via development of the new edge gyrokinetic code COGENT. Progress in the former area is described in a series of monthly progress reports prepared by General Atomics; these are attached as a set of appendices (describing work done in the month prior to the indicated date). Progress in the latter area, as well as associated theoretical development, is described.

  14. Feature Extraction Without Edge Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    feature? A.I. Memo 1356, MIT Artificial Intellegence Lab, April 1992. [65] W. A. Richards, B. Dawson, and D. Whittington. Encoding contour shape by...AD-A279 842 . " Technical Report 1434 --Feature Extraction Without Edge Detection Ronald D. Chane MIT Artificial .Intelligencc Laboratory ",, 𔃾•d...Chaney 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Massachusetts Institute of Technology Artificial

  15. Edge effects and delamination failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    The fundamental relationship between the morphology of a composite laminate and the resulting free edge effects is explored and related to delamination failures. Cross-ply, angle-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates are discussed in detail. It is shown that the local mismatch in elastic properties of adjacent layers and the global stacking sequence of a laminate both have a significant influence on the interlaminar stresses and delamination failures.

  16. Retention and the competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Lemery, L D

    2000-01-01

    I believe that retaining effective, seasoned employees enhances an organization's ability to compete in the marketplace. Though these seasoned employees seem to be more explicitly expensive, a detailed analysis of the costs involved in hiring and orienting replacement personnel may prove this assumption false. In addition, seasoned employees' intimate job knowledge actually constitutes the organization's competitive edge. Therefore, retaining seasoned personnel seems to become an important, mission- and vision-imperative institutional objective.

  17. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  18. Edge Coloring, Polyhedra and Probability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    programming relaxation (called the fractional chromatic index). For any graph G one can compute x*(G) in polynomial time but deciding whether x’{G) = A or...has large maximum degree and satisfies two technical conditions, then the equality holds. The constructive proof provides a randomized polynomial ...computes an optimal edge coloring of any graph in polynomial time, on average. Acknowledgements I would like to thank Bruce Reed, Dana Scott, Alan

  19. Topological edge states in pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Cody; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Kargarian, Mehdi

    In some members of the ferro-pnictides, non-trivial topology in the bulk band-structure is related to potentially observable gapless edge states. We study these states numerically and analytically for a range of parameters, with and without superconductivity and antiferromagnetic SDW ordering, and their relation to the symmetries and topologically non-trivial aspects of our model Hamiltonian. Support was provided by the Doctoral Student Research Grant program at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

  20. On the Connection Between Flap Side-Edge Noise and Tip Vortex Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casalino, D.; Hazir, A.; Fares, E.; Duda, B.; Khorrami, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to investigate how the dynamics of the vortical flow about the flap side edge of an aircraft determine the acoustic radiation. A validated lattice- Boltzmann CFD solution of the unsteady flow about a detailed business jet configuration in approach conditions is used for the present analysis. Evidence of the connection between the noise generated by several segments of the inboard flap tip and the aerodynamic forces acting on the same segments is given, proving that the noise generation mechanism has a spatially coherent and acoustically compact character on the scale of the flap chord, and that the edge-scattering effects are of secondary importance. Subsequently, evidence of the connection between the kinematics of the tip vortex system and the aerodynamic force is provided. The kinematics of the dual vortex system are investigated via a core detection technique. Emphasis is placed on the mutual induction effects between the two main vortices rolling up from the pressure and suction sides of the flap edge. A simple heuristic formula that relates the far-field noise spectrum and the cross-spectrum of the unsteady vortical positions is developed.

  1. Characterizing multisegment foot kinematics during gait in diabetic foot patients

    PubMed Central

    Sawacha, Zimi; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guarneri, Gabriella; Corazza, Stefano; Donà, Giulia; Denti, Paolo; Facchinetti, Andrea; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus has reached epidemic proportions, this condition may result in multiple and chronic invalidating long term complications. Among these, the diabetic foot, is determined by the simultaneous presence of both peripheral neuropathy and vasculopathy that alter the biomechanics of the foot with the formation of callosity and ulcerations. To diagnose and treat the diabetic foot is crucial to understand the foot complex kinematics. Most of gait analysis protocols represent the entire foot as a rigid body connected to the shank. Nevertheless the existing multisegment models cannot completely decipher the impairments associated with the diabetic foot. Methods A four segment foot and ankle model for assessing the kinematics of the diabetic foot was developed. Ten normal subjects and 10 diabetics gait patterns were collected and major sources of variability were tested. Repeatability analysis was performed both on a normal and on a diabetic subject. Direct skin marker placement was chosen in correspondence of 13 anatomical landmarks and an optoelectronic system was used to collect the data. Results Joint rotation normative bands (mean plus/minus one standard deviation) were generated using the data of the control group. Three representative strides per subject were selected. The repeatability analysis on normal and pathological subjects results have been compared with literature and found comparable. Normal and pathological gait have been compared and showed major statistically significant differences in the forefoot and midfoot dorsi-plantarflexion. Conclusion Even though various biomechanical models have been developed so far to study the properties and behaviour of the foot, the present study focuses on developing a methodology for the functional assessment of the foot-ankle complex and for the definition of a functional model of the diabetic neuropathic foot. It is, of course, important to evaluate the major sources of

  2. Kinematic History and Tectonic Evolution of the Amerasian Basin: Investigating Palaeo-Plate Boundaries around the Chukchi Borderlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, K.; Coakley, B.; Stone, D.; Wallace, W.

    2007-12-01

    The multi-stage opening of the Arctic Ocean's Amerasian Basin is only partially understood due to the difficulty of utilizing traditional marine geologic and geophysical techniques in ice-covered waters. While the kinematic development of the Eurasian Basin is well-understood to be the northernmost extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the history of the morphologically complex Amerasian Basin may be due to multiple events, significantly complicating interpretation of its history. Any detailed model for the opening of the Amerasian Basin must both incorporate structures that accommodate spreading as well as explain the tectonic mechanisms that drove basin development. Cretaceous-age tholeiitic flood basalts and associated radiating dike swarms of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP), found along the basin margin, provide a tectonic mechanism and geometry to substantiate sound reconstruction. Detailed models need also consider pre-existing zones of weakness such as the deformation front of the Devonian Caledonides, which may underlie Barents Shelf sediments (Gee and Bogolepova, 2003). Reactivation of these ancient structural trends along this suture zone may explain the motion of Mendeleev Ridge as it rifted from Lomonosov Ridge and created the rectangular pull-apart basin between them. We propose a revised plate model for the development of the Amerasian Basin. A Cretaceous magmatic source localized under the Alpha Ridge accompanied the onset of rifting. This generated the HALIP radiating dike swarms and tholeiitic flood basalts found on the DeLong Islands, Svalbard, Franz Joseph Land, Greenland, Sverdrup Basin and, possibly, the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges. New bathymetric and sub-bottom profiling data also suggests the existence of igneous dikes on Chukchi Cap. The subsequent development of a triple junction resulted in dilational opening of the Canada Basin. Spreading was accommodated by the migration of the southern edges of the northeastern Siberian

  3. H i Kinematics and Mass Distribution of Messier 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, S. Z.; Carignan, C.; Chemin, L.; Foster, T.; Elson, E.; Jarrett, T. H.

    2017-08-01

    A new deep H i survey of the galaxy Messier 33 is presented, based on observations obtained at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory. We observe a perturbed outer gas distribution and kinematics in M33, and confirm the disk warping as a significant twist of the major axis of the velocity field, although no strong tilt is measured, in agreement with previous work. Evidence for a new low-brightness H i component with anomalous velocity is reported. It harbors a large velocity scatter, as its kinematics both exceeds and lags the rotation of the disk, and leaks in the forbidden velocity zone of apparent counterrotation. The observations also reveal wide and multiple-peak H i profiles that can be partly explained by crowded orbits in the framework of the warp model. Asymmetric motions are identified in the velocity field as possible signatures of a lopsided potential and the warp. The mass distribution modeling of the hybrid Hα-H i rotation curve favors a cuspy dark matter halo with a concentration in disagreement with the ΛCDM dark halo mass-concentration relationship. The total mass enclosed in 23 kpc is 8 {10}10 {M}⊙ , of which 11% are stars and gas. At the virial radius of the cuspy halo, the resulting total mass is 5 {10}11 {M}⊙ , but with a baryonic mass fraction of only 2%. This strongly suggests a more realistic radius encompassing the total mass of M33 that is well smaller than the virial radius of the halo, possibly comparable to the size of the H i disk.

  4. Galactic kinematics from a sample of young massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2013-08-01

    Based on published sources, we have created a kinematic database on 220 massive (> 10 M ⊙) young Galactic star systems located within ≤3 kpc of the Sun. Out of them, ≈100 objects are spectroscopic binary and multiple star systems whose components are massive OB stars; the remaining objects are massive Hipparcos B stars with parallax errors of no more than 10%. Based on the entire sample, we have constructed the Galactic rotation curve, determined the circular rotation velocity of the solar neighborhood around the Galactic center at R 0 = 8kpc, V 0 = 259±16 km s-1, and obtained the following spiral density wave parameters: the amplitudes of the radial and azimuthal velocity perturbations f R = -10.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 and f θ = 7.9 ± 1.3 km s-1, respectively; the pitch angle for a two-armed spiral pattern i = -6.0° ± 0.4°, with the wavelength of the spiral density wave near the Sun being λ = 2.6 ± 0.2 kpc; and the radial phase of the Sun in χ ⊙ = -120° ± 4°. We show that such peculiarities of the Gould Belt as the local expansion of the system, the velocity ellipsoid vertex deviation, and the significant additional rotation can be explained in terms of the density wave theory. All these effects decrease noticeably once the influence of the spiral density wave on the velocities of nearby stars has been taken into account. The influence of Gould Belt stars on the Galactic parameter estimates has also been revealed. Eliminating them from the kinematic equations has led to the following new values of the spiral density wave parameters: f θ = 2.9 ± 2.1 km s-1 and χ ⊙ = -104° ± 6°.

  5. Multibody kinematics optimization with marker projection improves the accuracy of the humerus rotational kinematics.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickaël; Bélaise, Colombe; Naaim, Alexandre; Lundberg, Arne; Chèze, Laurence

    2016-10-20

    Markers put on the arm undergo large soft tissue artefact (STA). Using markers on the forearm, multibody kinematics optimization (MKO) helps improve the accuracy of the arm kinematics especially its longitudinal rotation. However deleterious effect of STA may persist and affect other segment estimate. The objective was to present an innovative multibody kinematics optimization algorithm with projection of markers onto a requested axis of the local system of coordinates, to cancel their deleterious effect on this degree-of-freedom. Four subjects equipped with markers put on intracortical pins inserted into the humerus, on skin (scapula, arm and forearm) and subsequently on rigid cuffs (arm and forearm) performed analytic, daily-living, sports and range-of-motion tasks. Scapulohumeral kinematics was estimated using 1) pin markers (reference), 2) single-body optimization, 3) MKO, 4) MKO with projection of all arm markers and 5) MKO with projection of a selection of arm markers. Approaches 2-4 were applied to markers put on the skin and the cuff. The main findings were that multibody kinematics optimization improved the accuracy of 40-50% and the projection algorithm added an extra 20% when applied to cuff markers or a selection of skin markers (all but the medial epicondyle). Therefore, the projection algorithm performed better than multibody and single-body optimizations, especially when using markers put on a cuff. Error of humerus orientation was reduced by half to finally be less than 5°. To conclude, this innovative algorithm is a promising approach for estimating accurate upper-limb kinematics.

  6. Whole limb kinematics are preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Hui; Auyang, Arick G; Scholz, John P; Nichols, T Richard

    2009-11-01

    Biomechanics and neurophysiology studies suggest whole limb function to be an important locomotor control parameter. Inverted pendulum and mass-spring models greatly reduce the complexity of the legs and predict the dynamics of locomotion, but do not address how numerous limb elements are coordinated to achieve such simple behavior. As a first step, we hypothesized whole limb kinematics were of primary importance and would be preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after neuromuscular injury. We used a well-established peripheral nerve injury model of cat ankle extensor muscles to generate two experimental injury groups with a predictable time course of temporary paralysis followed by complete muscle self-reinnervation. Mean trajectories of individual joint kinematics were altered as a result of deficits after injury. By contrast, mean trajectories of limb orientation and limb length remained largely invariant across all animals, even with paralyzed ankle extensor muscles, suggesting changes in mean joint angles were coordinated as part of a long-term compensation strategy to minimize change in whole limb kinematics. Furthermore, at each measurement stage (pre-injury, paralytic and self-reinnervated) step-by-step variance of individual joint kinematics was always significantly greater than that of limb orientation. Our results suggest joint angle combinations are coordinated and selected to stabilize whole limb kinematics against short-term natural step-by-step deviations as well as long-term, pathological deviations created by injury. This may represent a fundamental compensation principle allowing animals to adapt to changing conditions with minimal effect on overall locomotor function.

  7. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  8. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modeling in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L D; Casper, T A; Cohen, R H; LoDestro, L L; Mattor, N; Porter, G D; Rensink, M E; Rognlien, T D; Ryutov, D D; Scott, H A; Wan, A

    1998-10-14

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. Two-dimensional simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and B-drift effects. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, and interesting effects, some traveling back up the magnetic field-lines to the SOL plasma, are predicted. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts at the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative rnodelling. Long-lived oscillatory UEDGE solutions in both ITER and DIII-D are reported. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are shown to be well modelled with UEDGE, and the roles of impurity and neutral transport in the edge and SOL are discussed.

  9. Aluminium K-Edge XANES Study of Mica Preiswerkite

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.; /SLAC, SSRl

    2006-10-27

    We present the Al K-edge XANES spectrum of synthetic mica with mixed fourfold coordinated and sixfold coordinated Al (preiswerkite). Experimental analysis and multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated to Al octahedral site. This unexpected behavior can be explained as due to a large local distortion of the Al octahedral site.

  10. Roll force, torque, lever arm coefficient, and strain distribution in edge rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, S.-E.; Gustafsson, T.

    1993-12-01

    Due to the growing importance of width control in strip and plate mills, edge rolling is currently an im-portant process in hot rolling mills. Research in edge rolling has been carried out, and in the present ar-ticle, models for roll force, torque, and lever arm coefficient are derived using the upper bound method. A simple, kinematically admissible deformation zone and velocity field, independent of friction in the roll gap, is proposed, and the energy dissipation rate is derived. The formula for energy dissipation rate has, in practice, no limitation because all edge rolling geometries are safely in the area where the formula is valid. Roll force and torque are derived by means of two independent integrals. Thus, the lever arm coef-ficient is evaluated from the expressions for roll force and torque using conventional rolling theory. Roll-ing trials report good agreement with theory. Measured roll forces are similar to calculated forces. Furthermore, the shape of the dogbone that arises during edge rolling is in fairly good agreement with the calculated dogbone shape. Deviations are due to the deviation from ideally plastic material in the ex-periments. Also, the strain distribution over the dogbone is similar to the proposed deformation zone. Thus, a new formula has been developed to a stage that it can be implemented in width control systems for edge rolling stands in hot strip and plate mills.

  11. Learning from "Talk-around-the-Edges."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Dennis; Dudley-Marling, Curt

    1995-01-01

    Argues that "talk around the edges," informal exchanges between children in the classroom, are important moments for the enhancement of language facility, at least as important as formal language lessons. Provides approaches to incorporating "talk around the edges" or talk much like "talk around the edges" into lessons. (TB)

  12. Reduction of Free-Edge Stress Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    oscillatory type of behavior near the free edge of the capped laminate before converging to zero further inside the laminate. The length of the edge effect is...Condition," J. Comp. Materials. Vol. 14 (1980), p. 2. 13. Altus, E., Rotem, A. and Shmueli, M., "Free Edge Effect in Angle- Ply Laminates - A New

  13. Understanding and preventing the edge effect.

    PubMed

    Cheneau, Edouard; Wolfram, Roswitha; Leborgne, Laurent; Waksman, Ron

    2003-02-01

    Edge stenosis, combining neointimal proliferation and negative remodeling, remains a serious limitation of vascular brachytherapy. This review comprehensively presents terminology, definitions, mechanisms, and treatment strategies to better understand the complexities of edge narrowing. The major contributors to this phenomenon are known; understanding the practical solutions will enable us to further minimize the problem of the edge effect.

  14. Densified edge seals for fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    DeCasperis, Anthony J.; Roethlein, Richard J.; Breault, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A porous fuel cell component, such as an electrode substrate, has a densified edge which forms an improved gas seal during operation when soaked with electrolyte. The edges are made from the same composition as the rest of the component and are made by compressing an increased thickness of this material along the edges during the fabrication process.

  15. Lower limb kinematic variability in dancers performing drop landings onto floor surfaces with varied mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Helen K; Hopper, Luke S; Elliott, Bruce C; Ackland, Timothy R

    2013-08-01

    Elite dancers perform highly skilled and consistent movements. These movements require effective regulation of the intrinsic and extrinsic forces acting within and on the body. Customized, compliant floors typically used in dance are assumed to enhance dance performance and reduce injury risk by dampening ground reaction forces during tasks such as landings. As floor compliance can affect the extrinsic forces applied to the body, secondary effects of floor properties may be observed in the movement consistency or kinematic variability exhibited during dance performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of floor mechanical properties on lower extremity kinematic variability in dancers performing landing tasks. A vector coding technique was used to analyze sagittal plane knee and ankle joint kinematic variability, in a cohort of 12 pre-professional dancers, through discrete phases of drop landings from a height of 0.2m. No effect on kinematic variability was observed between floors, indicating that dancers could accommodate the changing extrinsic floor conditions. Future research may consider repeat analysis under more dynamic task constraints with a less experienced cohort. However, knee/ankle joint kinematic variability was observed to increase late in the landing phase which was predominantly comprised of knee flexion coupled with the terminal range of ankle dorsiflexion. These findings may be the result of greater neural input late in the landing phase as opposed to the suggested passive mechanical interaction of the foot and ankle complex at initial contact with a floor. Analysis of joint coordination in discrete movement phases may be of benefit in identifying intrinsic sources of variability in dynamic tasks that involve multiple movement phases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterizing Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo Edge Effect Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2013-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) form in the summer mesopause region, between altitudes of 80 and 90 km. This phenomenon occurs in this region because of the extremely cold temperatures that allow for ice particles to develop, sediment, and grow to sizes as large as ~20 nm. Because these ice particles are immersed in the plasma of the D-region, electrons can attach to the ice surfaces and charge them. There are two trains of thought when it comes to the backscatter seen in sounding rocket and radar measurements of PMSEs. The first assumes that the structure of the PMSEs is driven by turbulent velocity fields and that radar detections are due to turbulent scattering. The second theory on the scatter from PMSE structures is that the echoes result from multiple sharp small-scale ledges that produce an edge scatter. In decomposing sounding rocket data, results have indicated that both scattering mechanisms play a role in PMSE backscatter. However, whereas the turbulent scatter theory is well developed, the physics behind the sharp-edge phenomena in the edge scattering theory has not been explained to date. We investigate the formation of the sharp edges in electron density detected by sounding rockets and in backscattered power detected by ground-based radars during PMSE regions by exploring the initial process by which PMSEs form using a one dimensional (1D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation, adapted from the Plasma Theory and Simulation Group at UC Berkley, starts with the ice particles immersed in a warm electron-ion plasma and allows for the charging process of the ice particles. Starting with an initial Gaussian distribution of ice particles, we show that as the ice particles charge, they increase in mass more quickly (i.e. accumulate more electrons and ions) at the edges of the PMSE structure. This increased mass decreases the diffusion rates of the edges and 'freezes' the edges of the PMSE. This result demonstrates that the reason for the

  17. Kinematic Structures Description of Bionic Hand Based on VF Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiancan; Bai, Pengying; Luo, Min; Gao, Meng; Zhan, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method for describing kinematic structure of bionic hand based on VF (virtual finger) set. At first, a 20 DOFs (degrees of freedom) human hand kinematic model is built, which is expressed by five fingers’ kinematic chains consisting of kinematic pairs and symbols that represent geometric relationships of kinematic pairs’ axes. Based on the concept of VF, the hand fingers are divided into two types: VFAA having adduction/abduction motion and VFFE having flexion/extension motion. The concept of VF set comprising VFAAs and VFFEs is defined, human hand and six basic grasp postures are described by VF set. Then, the structures corresponding VFAA and VFFE are given according to active and passive forms of finger joints, and VFFE Structure-Base comprising 20 conventional structures is built. Based on VF set and the structures of VFAA and VFFE, VF sets and kinematic structures of several classic bionic hands are given.

  18. Kinematics of transition during human accelerated sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Nagahara, Ryu; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Matsuo, Akifumi; Zushi, Koji

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated kinematics of human accelerated sprinting through 50 m and examined whether there is transition and changes in acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. Twelve male sprinters performed a 60-m sprint, during which step-to-step kinematics were captured using 60 infrared cameras. To detect the transition during the acceleration phase, the mean height of the whole-body centre of gravity (CG) during the support phase was adopted as a measure. Detection methods found two transitions during the entire acceleration phase of maximal sprinting, and the acceleration phase could thus be divided into initial, middle, and final sections. Discriminable kinematic changes were found when the sprinters crossed the detected first transition—the foot contacting the ground in front of the CG, the knee-joint starting to flex during the support phase, terminating an increase in step frequency—and second transition—the termination of changes in body postures and the start of a slight decrease in the intensity of hip-joint movements, thus validating the employed methods. In each acceleration section, different contributions of lower-extremity segments to increase in the CG forward velocity—thigh and shank for the initial section, thigh, shank, and foot for the middle section, shank and foot for the final section—were verified, establishing different acceleration strategies during the entire acceleration phase. In conclusion, there are presumably two transitions during human maximal accelerated sprinting that divide the entire acceleration phase into three sections, and different acceleration strategies represented by the contributions of the segments for running speed are employed. PMID:24996923

  19. RECENT EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF EDGE AND INTERNAL TRANSPORT BARRIERS IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    P. GOHIL; L.R. BAYLOR; K.H. BURRELL; T.A. CASPER; E.J. DOYLE; C.M. GREENFIELD; T.C. JERNIGAN; J.E. KINSEY; C.J LASNIER; R.A. MOYER; M. MURAKAMI; T.L. RHODES; D.L. RUDAKOV; G.M. STAEBLER; G. WANG; J.G. WATKINS; W.P. WEST; L.ZENG

    2002-08-01

    Results from recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have revealed many important details on transport barriers at the plasma edge and in the plasma core. These experiments include: (a) the formation of the H-mode edge barrier directly by pellet injection; (b) the formation of a quiescent H-mode edge barrier (QH-mode) which is free from edge localized modes (ELMs), but which still exhibits good density and radiative power control; (c) the formation of multiple transport barriers, such as the quiescent double barrier (QDB) which combines a internal transport barrier with the quiescent H-mode edge barrier. Results from the pellet-induced H-mode experiments indicate that: (a) the edge temperature (electron or ion) is not a critical parameter for the formation of the H-mode barrier, (b) pellet injection leads to an increased gradient in the radial electric field, E{sub r}, at the plasma edge; (c) the experimentally determined edge parameters at barrier transition are well below the predictions of several theories on the formation of the H-mode barrier, (d) pellet injection can lower the threshold power required to form the H-mode barrier. The quiescent H-mode barrier exhibits good density control as the result of continuous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity at the plasma edge called the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO). The EHO enhances the edge particle transport while maintaining a good energy transport barrier. The ability to produce multiple barriers in the QDB regime has led to long duration, high performance plasmas with {beta}{sub NH{sub 89}} values of 7 for up to 10 times the confinement time. Density profile control in the plasma core of QDB plasmas has been demonstrated using on-axis ECH.

  20. Changes in knee kinematics following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Yoo, Sam; Miller, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2016-04-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) changes the knee joint in both intentional and unintentional, known and unknown, ways. Patellofemoral and tibiofemoral kinematics play an important role in postoperative pain, function, satisfaction and revision, yet are largely unknown. Preoperative kinematics, postoperative kinematics or changes in kinematics may help identify causes of poor clinical outcome. Patellofemoral kinematics are challenging to record since the patella is obscured by the metal femoral component in X-ray and moves under the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the kinematic degrees of freedom having significant changes and to evaluate the variability in individual changes to allow future study of patients with poor clinical outcomes. We prospectively studied the 6 degrees of freedom patellofemoral and tibiofemoral weightbearing kinematics, tibiofemoral contact points and helical axes of rotation of nine subjects before and at least 1 year after total knee arthroplasty using clinically available computed tomography and radiographic imaging systems. Normal kinematics for healthy individuals were identified from the literature. Significant differences existed between pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics, with the post-TKA kinematics being closer to normal. While on average the pre-total knee arthroplasty knees in this group displayed no pivoting (only translation), individually only five knees displayed this behaviour (of these, two showed lateral pivoting, one showed medial pivoting and one showed central pivoting). There was considerable variability postoperatively as well (five central, two lateral and two medial pivoting). Both preop and postop, flexion behaviour was more hinge-like medially and more rolling laterally. Helical axes were more consistent postop for this group. An inclusive understanding of the pre-TKA and post-TKA kinematics and changes in kinematics due to total knee arthroplasty could improve implant design, patient diagnosis and

  1. Mechanics, kinematics and geometry of pebble abrasion from binary collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    As sediment is transported downstream as bedload, it collides with the bed causing sharp edges to chip and wear away, rounding the rock through the process of abrasion. Previous work has linked abrasion to downstream fining and rounding of grains, however, there has been little attempt to understand the underlying kinematics of abrasion. Furthermore, most studies neglect the fine particle produced during the abrasion process, as the initial grain gets smaller and rounder. In this research, we preform well-controlled laboratory experiments to determine the functional dependence between impact energy and mass lost from abrasion. We use a double-pendulum "Newton's Cradle" set-up to examine the abrasion between two grains and with a high-speed camera, we can quantify the impact energies during collision. Results from experiments verify that mass loss is proportional to kinetic energy. We define a material parameter that incorporates material density, Young's modulus, and tensile stress and show that this parameter is directly related to the proportionality between mass loss and energy. We identify an initial region of the mass loss curves in which abrasion is independent of energy and material properties; results suggest this region is determined by shape. We show that grain size distributions of daughter products are universal and independent of material; they follow a Weibull distribution, which is expected distribution from brittle fracture theory. Finally, scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show a thin damage zone near the surface, suggesting that collision energy is attenuated over some small skin depth. Overall, we find that pebble abrasion by collision can be characterized by two universal scaling relations - the mass loss versus energy curves and the size distribution of daughter products. Results will be useful for estimating expected abrasion rates in the field, and additionally demonstrate that low-energy collisions produce large quantities of sand

  2. Architecture and Kinematics of the Taiwan Arc-Continent Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, S.; Suppe, J.; Wu, Y. M.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    In Taiwan two subduction zones come together in quasi-orthogonal, kinematically stable configuration. Under Taiwan the upper crust of Eurasia is decoupled from the rest of the lithosphere by a detachment that forms the main subduction interface between Eurasia (EU) and Philippine Sea plate (PSP). This interface is visible in both seismicity and crustal tomography at shallow depths and can be followed into the mantle to depths of 450-500 km using global tomography. The plate interface between EU and PSP in the upper 100 km changes from about 60 degrees in the south to vertical (south-central Taiwan) to overturned (north-central Taiwan). The Eurasian Moho is similarly folded, but it does not overturn. Shortening across the plate boundary is accomplished by a combination of subduction of Eurasian lithosphere, folding and thrusting in the Eurasian upper crust, and a secondary subduction zone within the PSP. We hypothesize that: (1) once arc-continent collision occurs, subduction of Eurasian continental lower crust and upper mantle can continue by lithospheric delamination and by continuity with the much larger Eurasian slab to the south; (2) the upper crust of EU deforms by faulting and folding; (3) the present convergence rate of about 90 mm/yr is limited to the last 2 Ma, whereas the long-term rate is about 30 mm/yr and in Taiwan the difference is being taken up by secondary subduction within the PSP margin; (4) a margin-parallel STEP (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagator) fault forms the northern limit of Eurasian subduction, which allows the whole system to propagate self-similarly southwestward.

  3. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Multiple Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Multiple Pregnancy Page ... Multiple Pregnancy FAQ188, July 2015 PDF Format Multiple Pregnancy Pregnancy How does multiple pregnancy occur? What are ...

  4. Elbow Position Affects Distal Radioulnar Joint Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Eric; Li, Guoan; Souer, Sebastiaan; Lozano-Calderon, Santiago; Herndon, James H.; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Chen, Neal C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous in vivo and in vitro studies of forearm supination/pronation suggest that distal radioulnar joint kinematics may be affected by elbow flexion. The primary hypotheses tested by this study were that in vivo: 1) ulnar variance changes with elbow flexion and forearm rotation and 2) the arc of forearm rotation changes in relationship to elbow flexion. Materials and Methods Changes in radioulnar kinematics during forearm supination/pronation and elbow flexion (0–90°) were studied in five uninjured subjects using computed tomography, dual-orthogonal fluoroscopy, and three-dimensional modeling. Analysis of variance and post-hoc testing was performed. Results Proximal translation of the radius was greatest with the elbow flexed to 90° with the arm in mid-pronation. With the arm in mid-pronation, the translation of the radius was significantly greater at 0° versus 45° of elbow flexion (0.82 ± 0.59 mm v. 0.65 ± 0.80 mm, F: 4.49, Post Hoc: 0.055; p = 0.05), and significantly smaller at 45° versus 90° of elbow flexion (0.65 ± 0.80 mm v. 0.97 ± 0.35 mm, F: 4.49, Post Hoc: 0.048; p = 0.05). Proximal translation of the radius in mid-pronation was significantly greater than when the forearm was in a supinated position when the elbow was at 0° or 90° flexion (F: 14.90, post-hoc: < 0.01; p < 0.01, F: 19.11, post-hoc: < 0.01, p < 0.01). The arc of forearm rotation was significantly decreased at 0° compared to 90° of elbow flexion (129.3 ± 22.2° v 152.8 ± 14.4°, F: 3.29, post-hoc: 0.79; p = 0.09). The center of rotation shifted volarly and ulnarly with increasing elbow extension. Discussion Elbow position affects the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint. The kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint are primarily affected by forearm rotation and secondarily affected by elbow flexion. These findings have clinical relevance to our understanding of ulnar impaction, and how elbow position affects the proximal-distal translation of the radius. These

  5. Mapping Dark Matter Halos with Stellar Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremy; Gebhardt, K.; Greene, J. E.; Graves, G.

    2013-07-01

    Galaxies of all sizes form and evolve in the centers of dark matter halos. As these halos constitute the large majority of the total mass of a galaxy, dark matter certainly plays a central role in the galaxy's formation and evolution. Yet despite our understanding of the importance of dark matter, observations of the extent and shape of dark matter halos have been slow in coming. The paucity of data is particularly acute in elliptical galaxies. Happily, concerted effort over the past several years by a number of groups has been shedding light on the dark matter halos around galaxies over a wide range in mass. The development of new instrumentation and large surveys, coupled with the tantalizing evidence for a direct detection of dark matter from the AMS experiment, has brought on a golden age in the study of galactic scale dark matter halos. I report on results using extended stellar kinematics from integrated light to dynamically model massive elliptical galaxies in the local universe. I use the integral field power of the Mitchell Spectrograph to explore the kinematics of stars to large radii (R > 2.5 r_e). Once the line-of-sight stellar kinematics are measured, I employ orbit-based, axisymmetric dynamical modeling to explore a range of dark matter halo parameterizations. Globular cluster kinematics at even larger radii are used to further constrain the dynamical models. The dynamical models also return information on the anisotropy of the stars which help to further illuminate the primary formation mechanisms of the galaxy. Specifically, I will show dynamical modeling results for the first and second rank galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, M49 and M87. Although similar in total luminosity and ellipticity, these two galaxies show evidence for different dark matter halo shapes, baryon to dark matter fractions, and stellar anisotropy profiles. Moreover, the stellar velocity dispersion at large radii in M87 is significantly higher than the globular clusters at the same

  6. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  7. Stellar population and kinematics of NGC 404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, A.; Prugniel, P.; Koleva, M.; Sharina, M.

    2010-04-01

    Context. NGC 404 is a nearly face-on, nearby low-luminosity lenticular galaxy. Probing its characteristics provides a wealth of information on the details of the possible evolution processes of dS0 galaxies, which may not be possible in other, more distant objects. Aims: We study the internal kinematics and the spatial distribution of the star formation history in NGC 404. Methods: We obtained long-slit spectroscopy at the OHP 1m93 telescope along the major and minor axes of NGC 404. The spectra had a resolution R = 3600 covering a wavelength range from 4600 to 5500 Å. The data were fitted against the Pegase. HR stellar population models to derive the internal stellar kinematics, ages, and metallicities simultaneously. All this was done while taking any instrumental contamination to the line-of-sight velocity distribution into account. First, the global properties of the galaxy were analysed by fitting a single model to the data and looking at the kinematic variations and SSP equivalent age and metallicities as a function of radius. Afterwards, the stellar populations were decomposed into 4 individually analysed components. Results: NGC 404 clearly shows two radial velocity inversions along its major axis. The kinematically decoupled core rotates in the same direction as the neutral hydrogen shell that surrounds the galaxy. We resolved the star formation history in the core of the galaxy into 4 events: a very young (< 150 Myr, and [Fe/H] = 0.4) component with constant ongoing star formation, a second young (430 Myr) component with [Fe/H] = 0.1, an intermediate population (1.7 Gyr) that has [Fe/H] = -0.05, and finally an old (12 Gyr) component with [Fe/H] = -1.26. The two young components fade very quickly with radius, leaving only the intermediate and old population at a radius of 25´´ (370 pc) from the centre. Conclusions: We conclude that NGC 404 had a spiral morphology about 1 Gyr ago and that one or many merger events has triggered a morphological transition

  8. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  9. Failure tolerant operation of kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Christopher L.; Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    1994-01-01

    Redundant manipulators may compensate for failed joints with their additional degrees of freedom. In this paper such a manipulator is considered fault tolerant if it can guarantee completion of a task after any one of its joints has failed. This fault tolerance of kinematically redundant manipulators is insured here. Methods to analyze the manipulator's work space find regions inherently suitable for critical tasks because of their high level of failure tolerance. Constraints are then placed on the manipulator's range of motion to guarantee completion of a task.

  10. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  11. JFKengine: A Jacobian and Forward Kinematics Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.N.

    2003-02-13

    During robot path planning and control the equations that describe the robot motions are determined and solved. Historically these expressions were derived analytically off-line. For robots that must adapt to their environment or perform a wide range of tasks, a way is needed to rapidly re-derive these expressions to take into account the robot kinematic changes, such as when a tool is added to the end-effector. The JFKengine software was developed to automatically produce the expressions representing the manipulator arm motion, including the manipulator arm Jacobian and the forward kinematic expressions. Its programming interface can be used in conjunction with robot simulation software or with robot control software. Thus, it helps to automate the process of configuration changes for serial robot manipulators. If the manipulator undergoes a geometric change, such as tool acquisition, then JFKengine can be invoked again from the control or simulation software, passing it parameters for the new arm configuration. This report describes the automated processes that are implemented by JFKengine to derive the kinematic equations and the programming interface by which it is invoked. Then it discusses the tree data structure that was chosen to store the expressions, followed by several examples of portions of expressions as represented in the tree. The C++ classes and their methods that implement the expression differentiation and evaluation operations are described. The algorithms used to construct the Jacobian and forward kinematic equations using these basic building blocks are then illustrated. The activity described in this report is part of a larger project entitled ''Multi-Optimization Criteria-Based Robot Behavioral Adaptability and Motion Planning'' that focuses on the development of a methodology for the generalized resolution of robot motion equations with time-varying configurations, constraints, and task objective criteria. A specific goal of this project is

  12. Cosmological Applications of the Gaussian Kinematic Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantaye, Yabebal T.; Marinucci, Domenico

    2014-05-01

    The Gaussian Kinematic Formula (GKF, see Adler and Taylor (2007,2011)) is an extremely powerful tool allowing for explicit analytic predictions of expected values of Minkowski functionals under realistic experimental conditions for cosmological data collections. In this paper, we implement Minkowski functionals on multipoles and needlet components of CMB fields, thus allowing a better control of cosmic variance and extraction of information on both harmonic and real domains; we then exploit the GKF to provide their expected values on spherical maps, in the presence of arbitrary sky masks, and under nonGaussian circumstances.

  13. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  14. Quantum simulation of noncausal kinematic transformations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-08-30

    We propose the implementation of Galileo group symmetry operations or, in general, linear coordinate transformations in a quantum simulator. With an appropriate encoding, unitary gates applied to our quantum system give rise to Galilean boosts or spatial and time parity operations in the simulated dynamics. This framework provides us with a flexible toolbox that enhances the versatility of quantum simulation theory, allowing the direct access to dynamical quantities that would otherwise require full tomography. Furthermore, this method enables the study of noncausal kinematics and phenomena beyond special relativity in a quantum controllable system.

  15. Optimal kinematics and morphologies for spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tam, Daniel; Hosoi, A E

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the role of hydrodynamics in the evolution of the morphology and the selection of kinematics in simple uniflagellated microorganisms. We find that the most efficient swimming strategies are characterized by symmetrical, nonsinusoidal bending waves propagating from the base of the head to the tip of the tail. In addition, we show that the ideal tail-to-head length ratio for such a swimmer is ≈12 and that this predicted ratio is consistent with data collected from over 400 species of mammalian sperm.

  16. Confined kinematics of suspended rigid fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, A.; Perez, M.; Abisset-Chavanne, E.; Chinesta, F.; Keunings, R.

    2016-10-01

    We address the extension of Jeffery's model, governing the orientation of rods immersed in a Newtonian fluid, to confined regimes occurring when the thickness of the flow domain is narrower than the rod length. The main modelling ingredients concern: (i) the consideration of the rod interactions with one or both gap walls and their effects on the rod orientation kinematics; (ii) the consideration of non-uniform strain rates at the scale of the rod, requiring higher-order descriptions. Such scenarios are very close to those encountered in real composites forming processes and have never been appropriately addressed from a microstructural point of view.

  17. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-04-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time.1-3 However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers. This paper provides examples such as measuring the average speed of a winning horse at the Kentucky Derby, plotting speed versus time from watching the speedometer of a high-performance bike, and determining acceleration for circular motion of amusement park rides.

  18. Kinematics of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardullo, A.; Pizzella, A.; Corsini, E. M.; Bertola, F.

    2008-10-01

    We analyzed the kinematic of 12 low surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies to study the correlation between the disk circular velocity V_{c} and the central velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component σ_{0}. This relation has been claimed to be either the same power-law relation tep{buy} or a different linear one tep{piz} with respect to high surface-brightness (HSB) galaxies. We confirm here that LSB and HSB galaxies follow two different linear V_{c}-σ_{0} relations.

  19. Kinematic viscosity and density of engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Porai-Koshits, A.B.; Penkina, N.V.; Ovchinnikova, R.A.; Ashkinazi, L.A.

    1987-08-10

    In order to determine the loss of engine power due to internal friction and to estimate the performance of engine oil it is necessary to know its kinematic viscosity and density in a wide temperature range. The authors studied experimentally these physicochemical properties of a number of engine oils at temperatures from 18 to 90/sup 0/ with the aid of VPZh-2 capillary viscosimeters and single-neck pycnometers; the average errors of the measurements were about 1.5% in the case of viscosity and below 0.5% in the case of density.

  20. Modern Design of Resonant Edge-Slot Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    Resonant edge-slot (slotted-waveguide) array antennas can now be designed very accurately following a modern computational approach like that followed for some other microwave components. This modern approach makes it possible to design superior antennas at lower cost than was previously possible. Heretofore, the physical and engineering knowledge of resonant edge-slot array antennas had remained immature since they were introduced during World War II. This is because despite their mechanical simplicity, high reliability, and potential for operation with high efficiency, the electromagnetic behavior of resonant edge-slot antennas is very complex. Because engineering design formulas and curves for such antennas are not available in the open literature, designers have been forced to implement iterative processes of fabricating and testing multiple prototypes to derive design databases, each unique for a specific combination of operating frequency and set of waveguide tube dimensions. The expensive, time-consuming nature of these processes has inhibited the use of resonant edge-slot antennas. The present modern approach reduces costs by making it unnecessary to build and test multiple prototypes. As an additional benefit, this approach affords a capability to design an array of slots having different dimensions to taper the antenna illumination to reduce the amplitudes of unwanted side lobes. The heart of the modern approach is the use of the latest commercially available microwave-design software, which implements finite-element models of electromagnetic fields in and around waveguides, antenna elements, and similar components. Instead of building and testing prototypes, one builds a database and constructs design curves from the results of computational simulations for sets of design parameters. The figure shows a resonant edge-slot antenna designed following this approach. Intended for use as part of a radiometer operating at a frequency of 10.7 GHz, this antenna