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Sample records for multiple one-electron oxidations

  1. Consequence of one-electron oxidation and one-electron reduction for aniline.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Stępniewski, Tomasz M; Kolczyńska, Katarzyna

    2011-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations were performed for all possible isomers of neutral aniline and its redox forms, and intramolecular proton-transfer (prototropy) accompanied by π-electron delocalization was analyzed. One-electron oxidation (PhNH(2) - e → [PhNH(2)](+•)) has no important effect on tautomeric preferences. The enamine tautomer is preferred for oxidized aniline similarly as for the neutral molecule. Dramatical changes take place when proceeding from neutral to reduced aniline. One-electron reduction (PhNH(2) + e → [PhNH(2)](-•)) favors the imine tautomer. Independently on the state of oxidation, π- and n-electrons are more delocalized for the enamine than imine tautomers. The change of the tautomeric preferences for reduced aniline may partially explain the origin of the CH tautomers for reduced nucleobases (cytosine, adenine, and guanine).

  2. One-electron activation of water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yusuke; Vannucci, Aaron K; Dares, Christopher J; Binstead, Robert A; Meyer, Thomas J

    2014-05-14

    Rapid water oxidation catalysis is observed following electrochemical oxidation of [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpz)(OH)](+) to [Ru(V)(tpy)(bpz)(O)](3+) in basic solutions with added buffers. Under these conditions, water oxidation is dominated by base-assisted Atom Proton Transfer (APT) and direct reaction with OH(-). More importantly, we report here that the Ru(IV)═O(2+) form of the catalyst, produced by 1e(-) oxidation of [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpz)(OH2)](2+) to Ru(III) followed by disproportionation to [Ru(IV)(tpy)(bpz)(O)](2+) and [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpz)(OH2)](2+), is also a competent water oxidation catalyst. The rate of water oxidation by [Ru(IV)(tpy)(bpz)(O)](2+) is greatly accelerated with added PO4(3-) with a turnover frequency of 5.4 s(-1) reached at pH 11.6 with 1 M PO4(3-) at an overpotential of only 180 mV.

  3. One-electron oxidations of ferrocenes: A pulse radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Moshe; Weinraub, Dany; Broitman, Federico; DeFelippis, Michael R.; Klapper, Michael H.

    Using the pulse radiolysis technique we have studied the oxidation by various inorganic radicals of four water soluble ferrocene derivatives, hydroxyethyl, dimethylaminomethyl, monocarboxylic acid and dicarboxylic acid. We report the second order rate constants for these reactions, the stabilities and spectral properties of the ferrocinium products, and the electrochemically determined ferrocinium/ferrocene redox potentials. We also present preliminary estimates of tyrosine and tryptophan radical redox potentials obtained with the dicarboxylic acid ferrocene derivative as reference, and we discuss the relationship between redox potential differences and the reactivities of the ferrocenes with the inorganic radicals.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY: AQUEOUS ONE-ELECTRON OXIDATION POTENTIALS FOR SUBSTITUTED ANILINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiempirical molecular orbital theory and density functional theory are used to compute one-electron oxidation potentials for aniline and a set of 21 mono- and di-substituted anilines in aqueous solution. Linear relationships between theoretical predictions and experiment are co...

  5. Methionine one-electron oxidation: Coherent contributions from radiolysis, IRMPD spectroscopy, DFT calculations and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Debora; Bergès, Jacqueline; de Oliveira, Pedro; Houée-Levin, Chantal

    2016-11-01

    Methionine is an essential amino acid, unfortunately prone to oxidation. The mechanism of its oxidation by •OH radicals has been studied for more than 40 years and still remains misunderstood. We have reinvestigated the oxidation of this residue in model peptides, aiming at i) improving the identification of free radicals by the use of more modern quantum chemistry methods; ii) reinvestigating the one-electron reduction potentials as a function of the position in the sequence; iii) identifying the final compounds, which were still unknown; iv) reinvestigating the intramolecular electron transfer (IET) involving this residue.

  6. Oxidatively generated base damage to cellular DNA by hydroxyl radical and one-electron oxidants: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) and one-electron oxidants that may be endogenously formed through oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, inflammation and pathological conditions constitute the main sources of oxidatively generated damage to cellular DNA. It is worth mentioning that exposure of cells to exogenous physical agents (UV light, high intensity UV laser, ionizing radiation) and chemicals may also induce oxidatively generated damage to DNA. Emphasis is placed in this short review article on the mechanistic aspects of OH and one-electron oxidant-mediated formation of single and more complex damage (tandem lesions, intra- and interstrand cross-links, DNA-protein cross-links) in cellular DNA arising from one radical hit. This concerns DNA modifications that have been accurately measured using suitable analytical methods such as high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Evidence is provided that OH and one-electron oxidants after generating neutral radicals and base radical cations respectively may partly induce common degradation pathways. In addition, selective oxidative reactions giving rise to specific degradation products of OH and one-electron oxidation reactions that can be used as representative biomarkers of these oxidants have been identified.

  7. On the kinetics and energetics of one-electron oxidation of 1,3,5-triazines.

    PubMed

    Azenha, M E D G; Burrows, H D; Canle, M; Coimbra, R; Fernández, M I; García, M V; Rodrigues, A E; Santaballa, J A; Steenken, S

    2003-01-07

    One-electron oxidation of 1,3,5-triazines is observed with both excited uranyl ion (*UO2(2+)) and sulfate radical anion (SO4.-) in aqueous solution, but not with Tl2+, indicating that the standard reduction potentials E degree of 1,3,5-triazine radical cations are = 2.3 +/- 0.1 V vs. NHE, consistent with theoretical calculations; this suggests that if triazines inhibit electron transfer during photosynthesis, they would need to act on the reductive part of the electron transport chain.

  8. Pulse radiolysis of silybin: One-electron oxidation of the flavonoid at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    György, I.; Antus, S.; Földiák, G.

    One-electron oxidation of silybin, a flavonoid drug used in human therapy of liver, was investigated by pulse radiolysis at neutral pH. Phenoxyl radicals formed from the substrate by oxidising N .3 radicals were identified by comparing the transient optical absorption spectra with those obtained from model compounds. The orto-methoxy-phenolic structure (ring B) is the exclusive target for one-electron oxidation of silybin. The 5.7-dihydroxy-chromanone moiety (ring A) withstands free-radical attack at neutral pH due to the chelatic H-bond (p Ka = 10.2) existing between the 5-OH and 4-oxo groups. Hydroxyl radicals react with silybin at diffusion controlled rate ( k = 1.8 x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1). The reactivity of silybin towards free radicals at neutral pH is conform with the assumption that the physiological activity of the flavonoid is due to its chain-breaking antioxidant behaviour.

  9. Monitoring one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine in DNA crystals using ultrafast infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, James P.; Poynton, Fergus E.; Keane, Páraic M.; Gurung, Sarah P.; Brazier, John A.; Cardin, David J.; Winter, Graeme; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Towrie, Michael; Cardin, Christine J.; Kelly, John M.; Quinn, Susan J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the molecular origins of diseases caused by ultraviolet and visible light, and also to develop photodynamic therapy, it is important to resolve the mechanism of photoinduced DNA damage. Damage to DNA bound to a photosensitizer molecule frequently proceeds by one-electron photo-oxidation of guanine, but the precise dynamics of this process are sensitive to the location and the orientation of the photosensitizer, which are very difficult to define in solution. To overcome this, ultrafast time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy was performed on photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl-DNA crystals, the atomic structure of which was determined by X-ray crystallography. By combining the X-ray and TRIR data we are able to define both the geometry of the reaction site and the rates of individual steps in a reversible photoinduced electron-transfer process. This allows us to propose an individual guanine as the reaction site and, intriguingly, reveals that the dynamics in the crystal state are quite similar to those observed in the solvent medium.

  10. Enzymatic recycling of oxidized ascorbate in pig heart: one-electron vs two-electron pathway.

    PubMed

    Coassin, M; Tomasi, A; Vannini, V; Ursini, F

    1991-11-01

    Enzymatic systems able to reduce either dehydroascorbate or ascorbyl radical back to ascorbate by "recycling" vitamin C may contribute to lowering the nutritional requirement of it and to increase tissue antioxidant capacity. The activities of two enzymatic activities, GSH-dehydroascorbate reductase (two-electron reduction pathway) and NADH-semidehydroascorbate reductase (one-electron reduction pathway) in pig tissues, have been investigated. The activity of glutathione-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate, although measurable, appeared negligible taking into consideration the low physiological substrate concentration. On the other hand, the one-electron reduction of ascorbyl radical resulted fast enough to slow down the consumption of the antioxidant vitamin.

  11. One-Electron Reduction of Penicillins in Relation to the Oxidative Stress Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2015-12-11

    Certain bactericidal antibiotics target mitochondrial components and, due to the leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain, one-electron reduction might occur that can lead to intermediates passing the electron to suitable acceptors. This study aimed at investigating the one-electron reduction mechanism of selected penicillin derivatives using pulse radiolysis techniques. Penicillins can accommodate the electron on each of their carbonyl carbon. Ketyl radicals are thus produced, which are reducing agents with possibility to interact with suitable biomolecules. A detailed mechanism of the reduction is reported.

  12. One-Electron Reduction of Penicillins in Relation to the Oxidative Stress Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2015-01-01

    Certain bactericidal antibiotics target mitochondrial components and, due to the leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain, one-electron reduction might occur that can lead to intermediates passing the electron to suitable acceptors. This study aimed at investigating the one-electron reduction mechanism of selected penicillin derivatives using pulse radiolysis techniques. Penicillins can accommodate the electron on each of their carbonyl carbon. Ketyl radicals are thus produced, which are reducing agents with possibility to interact with suitable biomolecules. A detailed mechanism of the reduction is reported. PMID:26690427

  13. π to σ Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T.; Wiegand, Tyler J.; Hindi, Ragda M.; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    In this work iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron oxidized cytosine analogs including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2′-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2′-deoxycytidine 5′-monophosphate (5′-dCMP) were investigated in homogeneous aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine-iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical (cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)•). Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging ca. 8 to ca. 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)• and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that in the iminyl-σ radical, the unpaired spin is localized to the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG= −32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA-radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in dsDNA by a radiation-induced ionization–deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path. PMID:26237072

  14. One electron-controlled multiple-valued dynamic random-access-memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, H. W.; Song, B. N.; Lee, S. E.; Kim, J. S.; Shin, S. J.; Choi, J. B.; Yu, Y.-S.; Takahashi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new architecture for a dynamic random-access-memory (DRAM) capable of storing multiple values by using a single-electron transistor (SET). The gate of a SET is designed to be connected to a plurality of DRAM unit cells that are arrayed at intersections of word lines and bitlines. In this SET-DRAM hybrid scheme, the multiple switching characteristics of SET enables multiple value data stored in a DRAM unit cell, and this increases the storage functionality of the device. Moreover, since refreshing data requires only a small amount of SET driving current, this enables device operating with low standby power consumption.

  15. One-electron properties using a CI method based on multiple Hartree-Fock solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbouisson, L. A. C.; Martins, M. G. R.; Makiuchi, N.

    A multi-reference configuration interaction (CI) method based on multiple Hartree-Fock (HF) solutions is applied to study the permanent dipole moment of the LiH, BH, FH, and H2O systems with the minimal atomic basis. The LiH was also calculated with the double-zeta atomic basis. This method uses several HF solutions as references to expand the state functions. For each one of the systems studied, several HF solutions were obtained in the appropriate point and spin symmetry classes, i.e., 1?+ and 1A1. With each of these solutions is generated a distinct basis of the same full CI space. The set of these bases is a system of generators of the full CI space and the multi-reference HF (MRHF) bases are built mixing configuration state functions (CSFs) originated from distinct HF solutions.

  16. One-electron oxidation in irradiated carbon tetrachloride solutions of ZnTPP, TMPD, and phenols. [Pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grodkowski, J.; Neta, P.

    1984-03-15

    One-electron oxidation of phenol, p-methoxphenol, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, chlorpromazine, and zinc tetraphenolporphyrin (ZnTPP) was studied by pulse radiolysis in carbon tetrachloride solutions. Phenols form phenoxyl radicals and the other compounds form cation radicals with yields strongly dependent on solute concentration. The highest yield in deoxygenated solutions approached G = 4. In the presence of oxygen an additional oxidation step is observed owing to CCl/sub 3/O/sub 2/ radicals and the overall oxidation yield approached G = 8. ZnTPP was found to be oxidized to the cation radical without any side effects, unlike oxidation in 1,2-dichloroethane which was accompanied by demetallation owing to HCl production.

  17. Defining the Electronic And Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper-Bis-Phenoxide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Storr, T.; Verma, P.; Pratt, R.C.; Wasinger, E.C.; Shimazaki, Y.; Stack, T.D.P.

    2009-05-26

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal](+); Sal = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal](+) (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal](+), affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4-300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal](+) exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal(*)](+) (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal](+) (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine-bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSal(red)](+) (Sal(red) = N,N'-bis(3,5-di- tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)-ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu-bis-phenoxide complexes.

  18. Defining the Electronic and Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper–Bis-phenoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storr, Tim; Verma, Pratik; Pratt, Russell C.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal]+; Sal = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal]+ (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal]+, affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4–300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal]+ exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal•]+ (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal]+ (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine–bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSalred]+ (Salred = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)–ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu–bis-phenoxide complexes. PMID:18939830

  19. π- vs σ-radical states of one-electron-oxidized DNA/RNA bases: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D

    2013-10-03

    As a result of their inherent planarity, DNA base radicals generated by one-electron oxidation/reduction or bond cleavage form π- or σ-radicals. While most DNA base systems form π-radicals, there are a number of nucleobase analogues such as one-electron-oxidized 6-azauraci1, 6-azacytosine, and 2-thiothymine or one-electron reduced 5-bromouracil that form more reactive σ-radicals. Elucidating the availability of these states within DNA, base radical electronic structure is important to the understanding of the reactivity of DNA base radicals in different environments. In this work, we address this question by the calculation of the relative energies of π- and σ-radical states in DNA/RNA bases and their analogues. We used density functional theory B3LYP/6-31++G** method to optimize the geometries of π- and σ-radicals in Cs symmetry (i.e., planar) in the gas phase and in solution using the polarized continuum model (PCM). The calculations predict that σ- and π-radical states in one-electron-oxidized bases of thymine, T(N3-H)(•), and uracil, U(N3-H)(•), are very close in energy; i.e., the π-radical is only ca. 4 kcal/mol more stable than the σ-radical. For the one-electron-oxidized radicals of cytosine, C(•+), C(N4-H)(•), adenine, A(•+), A(N6-H)(•), and guanine, G(•+), G(N2-H)(•), G(N1-H)(•), the π-radicals are ca. 16-41 kcal/mol more stable than their corresponding σ-radicals. Inclusion of solvent (PCM) is found to stabilize the π- over σ-radical of each of the systems. U(N3-H)(•) with three discrete water molecules in the gas phase is found to form a three-electron σ bond between the N3 atom of uracil and the O atom of a water molecule, but on inclusion of full solvation and discrete hydration, the π-radical remains most stable.

  20. Theoretical study of ionization and one-electron oxidation potentials of N-heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sviatenko, Liudmyla K; Gorb, Leonid; Hill, Frances C; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    A number of density functionals was utilized to predict gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials (IPs) for nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds. Various solvation models were applied to the calculation of difference in free energies of solvation of oxidized and reduced forms of heterocyclic compounds in acetonitrile (AN) for correct reproduction of their standard oxidation potentials. We developed generally applicable protocols that could successfully predict the gas-phase adiabatic ionization potentials of nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compounds and their standard oxidation potentials in AN. This approach is supported by a MPW1K/6-31+G(d) level of theory which uses SMD(UA0) approximation for estimation of solvation energy of neutral molecules and PCM(UA0) model for ionized ones. The mean absolute derivation (MAD) and root mean square error (RMSE) of the current theoretical models for IP are equal to 0.22 V and 0.26, respectively, and for oxidation potentials MAD = 0.13 V and RMSE = 0.17.

  1. One-electron Initiated Two-electron Oxidation of Water by Aluminum Porphyrins with Earth's Most Abundant Metal Ion.

    PubMed

    Kuttassery, Fazalurahman; Mathew, Siby; Sagawa, Shogo; Remello, Sebastian Nybin; Thomas, Arun; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Onuki, Satomi; Nabetani, Yu; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Inoue, Haruo

    2017-03-20

    We report here a new molecular catalyst for efficient water splitting, aluminum porphyrins (tetra-methylpyridiniumylporphyrinatealuminum: AlTMPyP), containing the Earth's most abundant metal as the central ion. One-electron oxidation of the aluminum porphyrin initiates the two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide as the primary reaction product with the lowest known overpotential (97 mV). The aluminum-peroxo complex was clearly detected by a cold-spray ionization mass-spectrometry in HRMS mode and the structure of the intermediate was further confirmed using laser-Raman spectroscopy, indicating the hydroperoxy complex of AlTMPyP to be the key intermediate in the reaction. The two-electron oxidation of water to form hydrogen peroxide was essentially quantitative, with a Faradaic efficiency of 99%. The catalytic reaction was found to be highly efficient, with a turnover frequency up to ~ 2 × 10⁴ s¯¹. A reaction mechanism is proposed involving oxygen-oxygen bond formation by the attack of a hydroxide ion on the oxyl-radical-like axial ligand oxygen atom in the one-electron-oxidized form of AlTMPyP(O¯)₂, followed by a second electron transfer to the electrode.

  2. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J.

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup −2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}, whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol{sup −1} lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  3. Theoretical Determination of One-Electron Oxidation Potentials for Nucleic Acid Bases.

    PubMed

    Psciuk, Brian T; Lord, Richard L; Munk, Barbara H; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2012-12-11

    The oxidation potentials for N-methyl substituted nucleic acid bases guanine, adenine, cytosine, thymine, uracil, xanthine, and 8-oxoguanine were computed using B3LYP and CBS-QB3 with the SMD solvation model. Acid-base and tautomeric equilibria present in aqueous solution were accounted for by combining standard redox potentials with calculated pKa and tautomerization energies to produce an ensemble averaged pH dependent potential. Gas phase free energies were computed using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and CBS-QB3. Solvation free energies were computed at the SMD/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Compared to experimental results, calculations with the CBS-QB3 level of theory have a mean absolute error (MAE) of ca. 1 kcal/mol for the gas phase proton affinity/gas phase basicity and an MAE of ca. 0.04 eV for the adiabatic/vertical ionization potentials. The B3LYP calculations have a MAE of ∼2 kcal/mol for the proton affinity/gas phase basicity data but systematically underestimated ionization potentials by 0.14-0.21 eV. Solvent cavities for charged solute species were rescaled uniformly by fitting computed pKa data to experimentally measured pKa values. After solvent cavity scaling, the MAEs for computed pKa's compared to experimental results are 0.7 for B3LYP and 0.9 for CBS-QB3. In acetonitrile, the computed E°(XH(+•)/XH) redox potentials are systematically lower than experimentally measured potentials by 0.21 V for CBS-QB3 and 0.33 V for B3LYP. However, the redox potentials relative to adenine are in very good agreement with experimental results, with MAEs of 0.10 V for CBS-QB3 and 0.07 V for B3LYP. In aqueous solution, B3LYP and CBS-QB3 have MAEs of 0.21 and 0.19 V for E7(X(•),H(+)/XH). Replacing the methyl substituent with ribose changes the calculated E7 potentials by 0.1-0.2 V. The calculated difference between the guanine and adenine oxidation potentials is too large compared to experimental results, but the calculated difference between

  4. Two-electron reduction and one-electron oxidation of organic hydroperoxides by human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Furtmüller, P G; Burner, U; Jantschko, W; Regelsberger, G; Obinger, C

    2000-11-03

    The reaction of native myeloperoxidase (MPO) and its redox intermediate compound I with hydrogen peroxide, ethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, t-butyl hydroperoxide, 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid and cumene hydroperoxide was studied by multi-mixing stopped-flow techniques. Hydroperoxides are decomposed by MPO by two mechanisms. Firstly, the hydroperoxide undergoes a two-electron reduction to its corresponding alcohol and heme iron is oxidized to compound I. At pH 7 and 15 degrees C, the rate constant of the reaction between 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid and ferric MPO was similar to that with hydrogen peroxide (1.8x10(7) M(-1) s(-1) and 1.4x10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively). With the exception of t-butyl hydroperoxide, the rates of compound I formation varied between 5.2x10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 2.7x10(6) M(-1) s(-1). Secondly, compound I can abstract hydrogen from these peroxides, producing peroxyl radicals and compound II. Compound I reduction is shown to be more than two orders of magnitude slower than compound I formation. Again, with 3-chloroperoxybenzoic acid this reaction is most effective (6. 6x10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7 and 15 degrees C). Both reactions are controlled by the same ionizable group (average pK(a) of about 4.0) which has to be in its conjugated base form for reaction.

  5. One-electron oxidation of mitomycin C and its corresponding peroxyl radicals. A steady-state and pulse radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Solar, Sonja; Quint, Ruth M.

    1997-12-01

    The one-electron oxidation of Mitomycin C (MMC) as well as the formation of the corresponding peroxyl radicals were investigated by both steady-state and pulse radiolysis. The steady-state MMC-radiolysis by OH-attack followed at both absorption bands showed different yields: at 218 nm G i (-MMC) = 3.0 and at 364 nm G i (-MMC) = 3.9, indicating the formation of various not yet identified products, among which ammonia was determined, G(NH 3) = 0.81. By means of pulse radiolysis it was established a total κ (OH + MMC) = (5.8 ± 0.2) × 10 9 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. The transient absorption spectrum from the one-electron oxidized MMC showed absorption maxima at 295 nm ( ɛ = 9950 dm 3 mol -1 cm t-1 ), 410 nm ( ɛ = 1450 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1) and 505 nm ( ɛ = 5420 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1). At 280-320 and 505 nm and above they exhibit in the first 150 μs a first order decay, κ1 = (0.85 ± 0.1) × 10 3 s -1, and followed upto ms time range, by a second order decay, 2 κ = (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. Around 410 nm the kinetics are rather mixed and could not be resolved. The steady-state MMC-radiolysis in the presence of oxygen featured a proportionality towards the absorbed dose for both MMC-absorption bands, resulting in a G i (-MMC) = 1.5. Among several products ammonia-yield was determined G(NH 3) = 0.52. The formation of MMC-peroxyl radicals was studied by pulse radiolysis, likewise in neutral aqueous solution, but saturated with a gas mixture of 80% N 2O and 20% O 2. The maxima of the observed transient spectrum are slightly shifted compared to that of the one-electron oxidized MMC-species, namely: 290 nm ( ɛ = 10100 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1), 410 nm ( ɛ = 2900 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1) and 520 nm ( ɛ = 5500 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1). The O 2-addition to the MMC-one-electron oxidized transients was found to be at 290 to 410 nm gk(MMC·OH + O 2) = 5 × 10 7 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, around 480 nm κ = 1.6 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 and at 510 nm and above, κ = 3 × 10 8 dm 3 mol -1 s -1. The

  6. Electrochemical one-electron oxidation of low-generation polyamidoamine-type dendrimers with a 1,4-phenylenediamine core.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, Ole; Hansen, Thomas; Thorvildsen, Asbjørn; Christensen, Jørn B

    2009-08-03

    A series of polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-type dendrimers with a 1,4-phenylenediamine (PD) core is prepared from PD by procedures including Michael addition of methyl acrylate followed by aminolysis with 1,2-ethanediamine. Their one-electron oxidation potentials are determined by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in methanol, acetonitrile, dichloromethane, and dimethyl sulfoxide. The dendrimers are more difficult to oxidize than N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMePD). The oxidation potentials decrease with increasing dendrimer generation up to G0.5, after which the potential is essentially constant up to G2.0. The structures of both the neutral species and the radical cations are studied by DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory, which include a series of simple PDs for comparison. The data show that the structural arrangement close to the PD core is similar to that of N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-alkyl-p-phenylenediamines, including a planar arrangement of the atoms linked to the two PD nitrogen atoms. Thus, the effect of chain size on the oxidation potential appears to be caused primarily by a simple electronic effect. The calculations indicate considerable reorientation of the dendrimer side chains on oxidation, presumably caused by interactions between the positive charge centered at the core and the neighboring ester or amide dipoles. The relative ease of oxidation of TMePD and the lowest members of the series of the dendrimers can be reproduced theoretically only when solvation was included in the calculations. The DPV peak heights vary approximately as predicted from the Stokes-Einstein-Sutherland equation, but the variation of the relative effective radii with the size of the dendrimer is much larger than predicted from the radii obtained by the DFT calculations, that is, the dendrimers exist in solution mainly as aggregates.

  7. Hydroxyl ion addition to one-electron oxidized thymine: Unimolecular interconversion of C5 to C6 OH-adducts

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Heizer, Alicia N.; Palmer, Brian J.; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, addition of OH− to one-electron oxidized thymidine (dThd) and thymine nucleotides in basic aqueous glasses is investigated. At pHs ca. 9–10 where the thymine base is largely deprotonated at N3, one-electron oxidation of the thymine base by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K results in formation of a neutral thyminyl radical, T(−H)•. Assignment to T(−H)• is confirmed by employing 15N substituted 5'-TMP. At pH ≥ ca. 11.5, formation of the 5-hydroxythymin-6-yl radical, T(5OH)•, is identified as a metastable intermediate produced by OH− addition to T(−H)• at C5 at ca. 155 K. Upon further annealing to ca. 170 K, T(5OH)• readily converts to the 6-hydroxythymin-5-yl radical, T(6OH)•. One-electron oxidation of N3-methyl-thymidine (N3-Me-dThd) by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K produces the cation radical (N3-Me-dThd•+) for which we find a pH dependent competition between deprotonation from the methyl group at C5 and addition of OH− to C5. At pH 7 the 5-methyl deprotonated species is found; however, at pH ca. 9, N3-Me-dThd•+ produces T(5OH)• that on annealing up to 180 K forms T(6OH)•. Through use of deuterium substitution at C5' and on the thymine base, i.e., specifically employing [5',5”-D,D]-5'-dThd, [5',5”-D,D]-5'-TMP, [CD3]-dThd and [CD3,6D]-dThd, we find unequivocal evidence for T(5OH)• formation and its conversion to T(6OH)•. The addition of OH− to the C5 position in T(−H)• and N3-Me-dThd•+ is governed by spin and charge localization. DFT calculations predict that the conversion of the “reducing” T(5OH)• to the “oxidizing” T(6OH)• occurs by a unimolecular OH group transfer from C5 to C6 in the thymine base. The T(5OH)• to T(6OH)• conversion is found to occur more readily for deprotonated dThd and its nucleotides than for N3-Me-dThd. In agreement, calculations predict that the deprotonated thymine base has a lower energy barrier (ca. 6 kcal/mol) for OH transfer than its corresponding N3-protonated thymine

  8. DNA sequence context as a determinant of the quantity and chemistry of guanine oxidation produced by hydroxyl radicals and one-electron oxidants.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Yelena; Shafirovich, Vladimir; Geacintov, Nicholas E; DeMott, Michael S; Dedon, Peter C

    2008-12-19

    DNA sequence context has emerged as a critical determinant of the location and quantity of nucleobase damage caused by many oxidizing agents. However, the complexity of nucleobase and 2-deoxyribose damage caused by strong oxidants such as ionizing radiation and the Fenton chemistry of Fe2+-EDTA/H2O2 poses a challenge to defining the location of nucleobase damage and the effects of sequence context on damage chemistry in DNA. To address this problem, we developed a gel-based method that allows quantification of nucleobase damage in oxidized DNA by exploiting Escherichia coli exonuclease III to remove fragments containing direct strand breaks and abasic sites. The rigor of the method was verified in studies of guanine oxidation by photooxidized riboflavin and nitrosoperoxycarbonate, for which different effects of sequence context have been demonstrated by other approaches (Margolin, Y., Cloutier, J. F., Shafirovich, V., Geacintov, N. E., and Dedon, P. C. (2006) Nat. Chem. Biol. 2, 365-366). Using duplex oligodeoxynucleotides containing all possible three-nucleotide sequence contexts for guanine, the method was used to assess the role of DNA sequence context in hydroxyl radical-induced guanine oxidation associated with gamma-radiation and Fe2+-EDTA/H2O2. The results revealed both differences and similarities for G oxidation by hydroxyl radicals and by one-electron oxidation by riboflavin-mediated photooxidation, which is consistent with the predominance of oxidation pathways for hydroxyl radicals other than one-electron oxidation to form guanine radical cations. Although the relative quantities of G oxidation produced by hydroxyl radicals were more weakly correlated with sequence-specific ionization potential than G oxidation produced by riboflavin, damage produced by both hydroxyl radical generators and riboflavin within two- and three-base runs of G showed biases in location that are consistent with a role for electron transfer in defining the location of the damage

  9. π-Radical to σ-Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron-Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and Its Analogs.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T; Wiegand, Tyler J; Hindi, Ragda M; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D

    2015-09-03

    In this work, iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron-oxidized cytosine analogs, including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dCMP), were investigated in homogeneous, aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures by employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Upon employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones, thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical [cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)(•)]. Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging from ca. 8 to 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)(•) and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that, in the iminyl σ-radical, the unpaired spin is localized on the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form, as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG = -32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in double-stranded DNA by a radiation-induced ionization-deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path.

  10. One electron oxidation potential as a predictor of rate constants of N-containing compounds with carbonate radical and triplet excited state organic matter.

    PubMed

    Arnold, William A

    2014-04-01

    Photo-generated transient species, such as the carbonate radical and triplet excited state natural organic matter, mediate the oxidation of pollutants in various sunlit or artificially irradiated systems. In this work, one-electron oxidation potentials for 70 nitrogen-containing compounds were computed, and literature data were used to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for prediction of the second order reaction rate constants with these two oxidants. For carbonate radical, separate QSARs were necessary for compounds with and without resonance stabilization of the resulting radical, and predicted rate constants were, on average, within a factor of three of experimental values. With the limited data set available, results suggest that one-electron oxidation potential is also a viable descriptor variable for predictions of rate constants with triplet excited states.

  11. DNA damage by the sulfate radical anion: hydrogen abstraction from the sugar moiety versus one-electron oxidation of guanine.

    PubMed

    Roginskaya, Marina; Mohseni, Reza; Ampadu-Boateng, Derrick; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy

    2016-07-01

    The products of oxidative damage to double-stranded (ds) DNA initiated by photolytically generated sulfate radical anions SO4(•-) were analyzed using reverse-phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Relative efficiencies of two major pathways were compared: production of 8-oxoguanine (8oxoG) and hydrogen abstraction from the DNA 2-deoxyribose moiety (dR) at C1,' C4,' and C5' positions. The formation of 8oxoG was found to account for 87% of all quantified lesions at low illumination doses. The concentration of 8oxoG quickly reaches a steady state at about one 8oxoG per 100 base pairs due to further oxidation of its products. It was found that another guanine oxidation product identified as 2-amino-5-(2'-alkylamino)-4H-imidazol-4-one (X) was released in significant quantities from its tentative precursor 2-amino-5-[(2'-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)amino]-4H-imidazol-4-one (dIz) upon treatment with primary amines in neutral solutions. The linear dose dependence of X release points to the formation of dIz directly from guanine and not through oxidation of 8oxoG. The damage to dR was found to account for about 13% of the total damage, with majority of lesions (33%) originating from the C4' oxidation. The contribution of C1' oxidation also turned out to be significant (17% of all dR damages) despite of the steric problems associated with the abstraction of the C1'-hydrogen. However, no evidence of base-to-sugar free valence transfer as a possible alternative to direct hydrogen abstraction at C1' was found.

  12. Computational prediction of one-electron reduction potentials and acid dissociation constants for guanine oxidation intermediates and products.

    PubMed

    Psciuk, Brian T; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2013-08-15

    Reduction potentials and pK(a) values were calculated for intermediates and products along three major pathways for guanine oxidation using the B3LYP and CBS-QB3 levels of theory with the SMD implicit solvation model. N-methylated nucleobases were used as models for nucleoside species. Ensemble averaged reduction potentials at pH 7 (E7) were obtained by combining calculated standard reduction potentials with calculated pKa values in addition to accounting for tautomerization energies. Calculated pK(a) values are reasonable based on experimental estimates and chemical intuition. Pathway A leads to guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). The first step is the oxidation of 8-oxoguanine which proceeds by the loss of an electron followed by the loss of two protons and loss of another electron, yielding 8-oxopurine. The calculated E7 values for the remaining intermediates and products are at least 0.3 V higher than that of guanine, indicating that further oxidation of these species is unlikely. Pathway B leads to two formamidopyrimidine isomers (FAPyG and 2,5FAPyG). Species along this pathway have calculated reduction potentials that are much lower than the oxidation potential for guanine and would likely be very short-lived in an oxidatively stressed environment. Pathway C leads to reduced spiroiminodihydantoin and 5-carboxamido-5-formamido-2-iminohydantoin (2Ih). Similar to pathway A, the calculated reduction potentials for species along this pathway are at least 0.4 V higher than that of guanine.

  13. One-electron oxidation pathway of thiols by peroxynitrite in biological fluids: bicarbonate and ascorbate promote the formation of albumin disulphide dimers in human blood plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, G; Minetti, M

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that peroxynitrite oxidizes thiol groups through competing one- and two-electron pathways. The two-electron pathway is mediated by the peroxynitrite anion and prevails quantitatively over the one-electron pathway, which is mediated by peroxynitrous acid or a reactive species derived from it. In CO2-containing fluids the oxidation of thiols might follow a different mechanism owing to the rapid formation of a different oxidant, the nitrosoperoxycarbonate anion (ONOOCO2(-)). Here we present evidence that in blood plasma peroxynitrite induces the formation of a disulphide cross-linked protein identified by immunological (anti-albumin antibodies) and biochemical criteria (peptide mapping) as a dimer of serum albumin. The albumin dimer did not form in plasma devoid of CO2 and its formation was enhanced by ascorbate. However, analysis of thiol groups showed that reconstituting dialysed plasma with NaHCO3 protected protein thiols against the oxidation mediated by peroxynitrite and that the simultaneouspresence of ascorbate provided further protection. Ascorbate alone did not protect thiol groups from peroxynitrite-mediated oxidation. ESR spin-trapping studies with N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) revealed that peroxynitrite induced the formation of protein thiyl radicals and their intensity was markedly decreased by plasma dialysis and restored by reconstitution with NaHCO3. PBN completely inhibited the formation of albumin dimer. Moreover, the addition of iron-diethyldithiocarbamate to plasma demonstrated that peroxynitrite induced the formation of protein S-nitrosothiols and/or S-nitrothiols. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that NaHCO3 favours the one-electron oxidation of thiols by peroxynitrite with formation of thiyl radicals, ;NO2, and RSNOx. Thiyl radicals, in turn, are involved in chain reactions by which thiols are oxidized to disulphides. PMID:9425126

  14. A manganese(V)-oxo π-cation radical complex: influence of one-electron oxidation on oxygen-atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Katharine A; Neu, Heather M; de Visser, Sam P; Goldberg, David P

    2011-10-12

    One-electron oxidation of Mn(V)-oxo corrolazine 2 affords 2(+), the first example of a Mn(V)(O) π-cation radical porphyrinoid complex, which was characterized by UV-vis, EPR, LDI-MS, and DFT methods. Access to 2 and 2(+) allowed for a direct comparison of their reactivities in oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) reactions. Both complexes are capable of OAT to PPh(3) and RSR substrates, and 2(+) was found to be a more potent oxidant than 2. Analysis of rate constants and activation parameters, together with DFT calculations, points to a concerted OAT mechanism for 2(+) and 2 and indicates that the greater electrophilicity of 2(+) likely plays a dominant role in enhancing its reactivity. These results are relevant to comparisons between Compound I and Compound II in heme enzymes.

  15. The mechanism of oxidative halophenol dehalogenation by Amphitrite ornata dehaloperoxidase is initiated by H2O2 binding and involves two consecutive one-electron steps: role of ferryl intermediates.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Robert L; Coggins, Michael K; Raner, Gregory M; Walla, Mike; Dawson, John H

    2009-05-26

    The enzymatic globin, dehaloperoxidase (DHP), from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is designed to catalyze the oxidative dehalogenation of halophenol substrates. In this study, the ability of DHP to catalyze this reaction by a mechanism involving two consecutive one-electron steps via the normal order of addition of the oxidant cosubstrate (H(2)O(2)) before organic substrate [2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP)] is demonstrated. Specifically, 1 equiv of H(2)O(2) will fully convert 1 equiv of TCP to 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone, implicating the role of multiple ferryl [Fe(IV)O] species. A significant amount of heterolytic cleavage of the O-O bond of cumene hydroperoxide, consistent with transient formation of a Compound I [Fe(IV)O/porphyrin pi-cation radical] species, is observed upon its reaction with ferric DHP. In addition, a more stable high-valent Fe(IV)O-containing DHP intermediate [Compound II (Cpd II) or Compound ES] is characterized by UV-visible absorption and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. Spectral similarities are seen between this intermediate and horse heart myoglobin Cpd II. It is also shown in single-turnover experiments that the DHP Fe(IV)O intermediate is an active oxidant in halophenol oxidative dehalogenation. Furthermore, reaction of DHP with 4-chlorophenol leads to a dimeric product. The results presented herein are consistent with a normal peroxidase order of addition of the oxidant cosubstrate (H(2)O(2)) followed by organic substrate (TCP) and indicate that the enzymatic mechanism of DHP-catalyzed oxidative halophenol dehalogenation involves two consecutive one-electron steps with a dissociable radical intermediate.

  16. One-electron oxidation of ferrocenes by short-lived N-oxyl radicals. The role of structural effects on the intrinsic electron transfer reactivities.

    PubMed

    Baciocchi, Enrico; Bietti, Massimo; D'Alfonso, Claudio; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Salamone, Michela

    2011-06-07

    A kinetic study of the one electron oxidation of substituted ferrocenes (FcX: X = H, COPh, COMe, CO(2)Et, CONH(2), CH(2)OH, Et, and Me(2)) by a series of N-oxyl radicals (succinimide-N-oxyl radical (SINO), maleimide-N-oxyl radical (MINO), 3-quinazolin-4-one-N-oxyl radical (QONO) and 3-benzotriazin-4-one-N-oxyl radical (BONO)), has been carried out in CH(3)CN. N-oxyl radicals were produced by hydrogen abstraction from the corresponding N-hydroxy derivatives by the cumyloxyl radical. With all systems, the rate constants exhibited a satisfactory fit to the Marcus equation allowing us to determine self-exchange reorganization energy values (λ(NO˙/NO(-))) which have been compared with those previously determined for the PINO/PINO(-) and BTNO/BTNO(-) couples. Even small modification of the structure of the N-oxyl radicals lead to significant variation of the λ(NO˙/NO(-)) values. The λ(NO˙/NO(-)) values increase in the order BONO < BTNO < QONO < PINO < SINO < MINO which do not parallel the order of the oxidation potentials. The higher λ(NO˙/NO(-)) values found for the MINO and SINO radicals might be in accordance with a lower degree of spin delocalization in the radicals MINO and SINO and charge delocalization in the anions MINO(-) and SINO(-) due to the absence of an aromatic ring in their structure.

  17. Calmodulin Methionine Residues are Targets For One-Electron Oxidation by Hydroxyl Radicals: Formation of S therefore N three-electron bonded Radical Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nauser, Thomas; Jacoby, Michael E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Squier, Thomas C.; Schoneich, Christian

    2005-02-01

    The one-electron (1e) oxidation of organic sulfides and methionine (Met) constitutes an important reaction mechanism in vivo.1,2 Evidence for a Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of Met35 in the Alzheimer's disease -amyloid peptide was obtained,3 and, based on theoretical studies, Met radical cations were proposed as intermediates.4 In the structure of -amyloid peptide, the formation of Met radical cations appears to be facilitated by a preexisting close sulfur-oxygen (S-O) interaction between the Met35 sulfur and the carbonyl oxygen of the peptide bond C-terminal to Ile31.5 Substitution of Ile31 with Pro31 abolishes this S-O interaction,5 significantly reducing the ability of -amyloid to reduce Cu(II), and converts the neurotoxic wild-type -amyloid into a non-toxic peptide.6 The preexisting S-O bond characterized for wild-type -amyloid suggests that electron transfer from Met35 to Cu(II) is supported through stabilization of the Met radical cation by the electron-rich carbonyl oxygen, generating an SO-bonded7 sulfide radical cation (Scheme 1, reaction 1).5

  18. One-electron oxidation of diclofenac by human cytochrome P450s as a potential bioactivation mechanism for formation of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Jan Simon; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2014-01-25

    Reactive metabolites have been suggested to play a role in the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity observed with diclofenac (DF). By structural identification of the GSH conjugates formed after P450-catalyzed bioactivation of DF, it was shown that three types of reactive intermediates were formed: p-benzoquinone imines, o-imine methide and arene-oxide. Recently, detection of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac (DDF-SG), resulting from chlorine substitution, suggested the existence of a fourth type of P450-dependent reactive intermediate whose inactivation by GSH is completely dependent on presence of glutathione S-transferase. In this study, fourteen recombinant cytochrome P450s and three flavin-containing monooxygenases were tested for their ability to produce oxidative DF metabolites and their corresponding GSH conjugates. Concerning the hydroxymetabolites and their GSH conjugates, results were consistent with previous studies. Unexpectedly, all tested recombinant P450s were able to form DDF-SG to almost similar extent. DDF-SG formation was found to be partially independent of NADPH and even occurred by heat-inactivated P450. However, product formation was fully dependent on both GSH and glutathione-S-transferase P1-1. DDF-SG formation was also observed in reactions with horseradish peroxidase in absence of hydrogen peroxide. Because DDF-SG was not formed by free iron, it appears that DF can be bioactivated by iron in hemeproteins. This was confirmed by DDF-SG formation by other hemeproteins such as hemoglobin. As a mechanism, we propose that DF is subject to heme-dependent one-electron oxidation. The resulting nitrogen radical cation, which might activate the chlorines of DF, then undergoes a GST-catalyzed nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction in which the chlorine atom of the DF moiety is replaced by GSH.

  19. Nitric Oxide Reduction to Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Steps

    DOE PAGES

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; ...

    2015-03-02

    The reaction mechanism of nitric oxide (NO) reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2–) has been studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with 10–130 electrons per particle using γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. The study is based on time-resolved kinetics and reactants and products analysis. The reduction of NO by eTiO2– is interpreted in terms of competition between a reaction path leading to formation of NH3 and a path leading to N2O and N2. The proposed mechanism involves consecutive one-electron transfers of NO, and its reduction intermediates HNO, NH2O•, and NH2OH. The results show thatmore » eTiO2– does not reduce N2O and N2. Second-order rate constants of eTiO2– reactions with NO (740 ± 30 M–1 s–1) and NH2OH (270 ± 30 M–1 s–1) have been determined employing the rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique and that with HNO (>1.3 × 106 M–1 s–1) was derived from fitting the kinetic traces to the suggested reaction mechanism, which is discussed in detail.« less

  20. Copper-Catalyzed Aerobic Oxidations of Organic Molecules: Pathways for Two-Electron Oxidation with a Four-Electron Oxidant and a One-Electron Redox-Active Catalyst.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-06-16

    Selective oxidation reactions have extraordinary value in organic chemistry, ranging from the conversion of petrochemical feedstocks into industrial chemicals and polymer precursors to the introduction of heteroatom functional groups into pharmaceutical and agrochemical intermediates. Molecular oxygen (O2) would be the ideal oxidant for these transformations. Whereas many commodity-scale oxidations of simple hydrocarbon feedstocks employ O2 as an oxidant, methods for selective oxidation of more complex molecules bearing diverse functional groups are often incompatible with existing aerobic oxidation methods. The latter limitation provides the basis for our interest in the development of new catalytic transformations and the elucidation of mechanistic principles that underlie selective aerobic oxidation reactions. One challenge inherent in such methods is the incommensurate redox stoichiometry associated with the use of O2, a four-electron oxidant, in reactions that achieve two-electron oxidation of organic molecules. This issue is further complicated by the use of first-row transition-metal catalysts, which tend to undergo facile one-electron redox steps. In recent years, we have been investigating Cu-catalyzed aerobic oxidation reactions wherein the complexities just noted are clearly evident. This Account surveys our work in this area, which has emphasized three general classes of reactions: (1) single-electron-transfer reactions for oxidative functionalization of electron-rich substrates, such as arenes and heterocycles; (2) oxidative carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, including C-H oxidations, that proceed via organocopper(III) intermediates; and (3) methods for aerobic oxidation of alcohols and amines that use Cu(II) in combination with an organic redox-active cocatalyst to dehydrogenate the carbon-heteroatom bond. These reaction classes demonstrate three different pathways to achieve two-electron oxidation of organic molecules via the cooperative

  1. Nitric Oxide Reduction to Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2015-03-02

    The reaction mechanism of nitric oxide (NO) reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2) has been studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with 10–130 electrons per particle using γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. The study is based on time-resolved kinetics and reactants and products analysis. The reduction of NO by eTiO2 is interpreted in terms of competition between a reaction path leading to formation of NH3 and a path leading to N2O and N2. The proposed mechanism involves consecutive one-electron transfers of NO, and its reduction intermediates HNO, NH2O•, and NH2OH. The results show that eTiO2 does not reduce N2O and N2. Second-order rate constants of eTiO2 reactions with NO (740 ± 30 M–1 s–1) and NH2OH (270 ± 30 M–1 s–1) have been determined employing the rapid-mixing stopped-flow technique and that with HNO (>1.3 × 106 M–1 s–1) was derived from fitting the kinetic traces to the suggested reaction mechanism, which is discussed in detail.

  2. One-Electron Oxidation of Methionine-Containing Dipeptides of Reverse Sequence: Sulfur versus Sulfoxide Characterized by IRMPD Spectroscopy and Static and Dynamics DFT Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Barbara; Guidoni, Leonardo; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; de Oliveira, Pedro; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Scuderi, Debora

    2017-02-24

    Gas-phase structural modifications induced by the oxidation of methionine of the two peptides of reverse sequence, methionine-valine (Met-Val) and valine-methionine (Val-Met), have been studied by mass-selected IR multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in the 800-2000 cm(-1) fingerprint range at the Centre Laser Infrarouge d'Orsay free-electron laser facility. The oxidation has been achieved by (•)OH radicals generated by γ radiolysis. IRMPD spectra were interpreted by static and harmonic DFT calculations and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, which are employed to take into account all anharmonic and finite-temperature effects. The diagnostic signature of the sulfoxide group in the final products of Met-Val and Val-Met oxidations, which is missing in the spectra of native peptides, has been recorded. Evidence has also been gathered that a mixture of R and S isomers of close energies is formed. An interconversion between different isomers has been unveiled in the case of the oxidized Met-Val dipeptide.

  3. Seebeck coefficient of one electron

    SciTech Connect

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.

    2014-03-07

    The Seebeck coefficient of one electron, driven thermally into a semiconductor single-electron box, is investigated theoretically. With a finite temperature difference ΔT between the source and charging island, a single electron can charge the island in equilibrium, directly generating a Seebeck effect. Seebeck coefficients for small and finite ΔT are calculated and a thermally driven Coulomb staircase is predicted. Single-electron Seebeck oscillations occur with increasing ΔT, as one electron at a time charges the box. A method is proposed for experimental verification of these effects.

  4. C5′- and C3′-sugar radicals produced via photo-excitation of one-electron oxidized adenine in 2′-deoxyadenosine and its derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Becker, David; Collins, Sean; Koppen, Jessica; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    We report that photo-excitation of one-electron-oxidized adenine [A(-H)•] in dAdo and its 2′-deoxyribonucleotides leads to formation of deoxyribose sugar radicals in remarkably high yields. Illumination of A(-H)• in dAdo, 3′-dAMP and 5′-dAMP in aqueous glasses at 143 K leads to 80-100% conversion to sugar radicals at C5′ and C3′. The position of the phosphate in 5′- and 3′-dAMP is observed to deactivate radical formation at the site of substitution. In addition, the pH has a crucial influence on the site of sugar radical formation; e.g. at pH ∼5, photo-excitation of A(-H)• in dAdo at 143 K produces mainly C5′• whereas only C3′• is observed at high pH ∼12. 13C substitution at C5′ in dAdo yields 13C anisotropic couplings of (28, 28, 84) G whose isotropic component 46.7 G identifies formation of the near planar C5′•. A β-13C 16 G isotropic coupling from C3′• is also found. These results are found to be in accord with theoretically calculated 13C couplings at C5′ [DFT, B3LYP, 6-31(G) level] for C5′• and C3′•. Calculations using time-dependent density functional theory [TD-DFT B3LYP, 6-31G(d)] confirm that transitions in the near UV and visible induce hole transfer from the base radical to the sugar group leading to sugar radical formation. PMID:16537838

  5. Multiple Proteases to Localize Oxidation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins present in cellular environments with high levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and/or low levels of antioxidants are highly susceptible to oxidative post-translational modification (PTM). Irreversible oxidative PTMs can generate a complex distribution of modified protein molecules, recently termed as proteoforms. Using ubiquitin as a model system, we mapped oxidative modification sites using trypsin, Lys-C, and Glu-C peptides. Several M+16 Da proteoforms were detected as well as proteoforms that include other previously unidentified oxidative modifications. This work highlights the use of multiple protease digestions to give insights to the complexity of oxidative modifications possible in bottom-up analyses. PMID:25775238

  6. Oxidative damage in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Fischer, Marie T; Frischer, Josa M; Bauer, Jan; Höftberger, Romana; Botond, Gergö; Esterbauer, Harald; Binder, Christoph J; Witztum, Joseph L; Lassmann, Hans

    2011-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are currently poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Since mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, we analysed by immunocytochemistry the presence and cellular location of oxidized lipids and oxidized DNA in lesions and in normal-appearing white matter of 30 patients with multiple sclerosis and 24 control patients without neurological disease or brain lesions. As reported before in biochemical studies, oxidized lipids and DNA were highly enriched in active multiple sclerosis plaques, predominantly in areas that are defined as initial or 'prephagocytic' lesions. Oxidized DNA was mainly seen in oligodendrocyte nuclei, which in part showed signs of apoptosis. In addition, a small number of reactive astrocytes revealed nuclear expression of 8-hydroxy-d-guanosine. Similarly, lipid peroxidation-derived structures (malondialdehyde and oxidized phospholipid epitopes) were seen in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes and some astrocytes. In addition, oxidized phospholipids were massively accumulated in a fraction of axonal spheroids with disturbed fast axonal transport as well as in neurons within grey matter lesions. Neurons stained for oxidized phospholipids frequently revealed signs of degeneration with fragmentation of their dendritic processes. The extent of lipid and DNA oxidation correlated significantly with inflammation, determined by the number of CD3 positive T cells and human leucocyte antigen-D expressing macrophages and microglia in the lesions. Our data suggest profound oxidative injury of oligodendrocytes and neurons to be associated with active demyelination and axonal or neuronal injury in multiple sclerosis.

  7. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M [Charlotte, NC; True, Bradford G [Charlotte, NC

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  8. One-electron oxidation of 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic and 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acids in aqueous solution. the involvement of radical cations and the influence of structural effects and pH on the side-chain fragmentation reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bietti, Massimo; Capone, Alberto

    2008-01-18

    A product and time-resolved kinetic study on the one-electron oxidation of 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methylpropanoic acid (2), 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (3), and of the corresponding methyl esters (substrates 4 and 5, respectively) has been carried out in aqueous solution. With 2, no direct evidence for the formation of an intermediate radical cation 2*+ but only of the decarboxylated 4-methoxycumyl radical has been obtained, indicating either that 2*+ is not formed or that its decarboxylation is too fast to allow detection under the experimental conditions employed (k > 1 x 10(7) s(-1)). With 3, oxidation leads to the formation of the corresponding radical cation 3*+ or radical zwitterion -3*+ depending on pH. At pH 1.0 and 6.7, 3*+ and -3*+ have been observed to undergo decarboxylation as the exclusive side-chain fragmentation pathway with rate constants k = 4.6 x 10(3) and 2.3 x 10(4) s(-1), respectively. With methyl esters 4 and 5, direct evidence for the formation of the corresponding radical cations 4*+ and 5*+ has been obtained. Both radical cations have been observed to display a very low reactivity and an upper limit for their decay rate constants has been determined as k < 10(3) s(-1). Comparison between the one-electron oxidation reactions of 2 and 3 shows that the replacement of the C(CH3)2 moiety with a cyclopropyl group determines a decrease in decarboxylation rate constant of more than 3 orders of magnitude. This large difference in reactivity has been qualitatively explained in terms of three main contributions: substrate oxidation potential, stability of the carbon-centered radical formed after decarboxylation, and stereoelectronic effects. In basic solution, -3*+ and 5*+ have been observed to react with -OH in a process that is assigned to the -OH-induced ring-opening of the cyclopropane ring, and the corresponding second-order rate constants (k-OH) have been obtained. With -3*+, competition between decarboxylation and -OH

  9. Comparison of the One-electron Oxidations of CO-Bridged vs Unbridged Bimetallic Complexes: Electron-transfer Chemistry of Os2Cp2(CO)4 and Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp = η5-C5H5, Cp* = η5-C5Me5)

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, Derek R.; Bullock, R. Morris; Lee, Richmond; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Geiger, William J.

    2014-09-22

    The one-electron oxidations of two dimers of half-sandwich osmium carbonyl complexes have been examined by electrochemistry, spectro-electrochemistry, and computational methods. The all-terminal carbonyl complex Os2Cp2(CO)4 (1, Cp = η5-C5H5) undergoes a reversible one-electron anodic reaction at E1/2 = 0.41 V vs ferrocene in CH2Cl2/0.05 M [NBu4][B(C6F5)4], giving a rare example of a metal-metal bonded radical cation unsupported by bridging ligands. The IR spectrum of 1+ is consistent with an approximately 1:1 mixture of anti and gauche structures for the 33 e- radical cation in which it has retained all-terminal bonding of the CO ligands. DFT calculations, including orbital-occupancy-perturbed Mayer bond-order analyses, show that the HOMOs of anti-1 and gauche-1 are metal-ligand delocalized. Removal of an electron from 1 has very little effect on the Os-Os bond order, accounting for the resistance of 1+ to heterolytic cleavage. The Os-Os bond distance is calculated to decrease by 0.10 Å and 0.06 Å as a consequence of one-electron oxidation of anti-1 and gauche-1, respectively. The CO-bridged complex Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp* = η5-C5Me5), trans-2, undergoes a more facile oxidation, E1/2 = - 0.11 V, giving a persistent radical cation shown by solution IR analysis to preserve its bridged-carbonyl structure. However, ESR analysis of frozen solutions of 2+ is interpreted in terms of the presence of two isomers, most likely anti-2+ and trans-2+, at low temperature. Calculations show that the HOMO of trans-2 is highly delocalized over the metal-ligand framework, with the bridging carbonyls accounting for about half of the orbital makeup. The Os-Os bond order again changes very little with removal of an electron, and the Os-Os bond length actually undergoes minor shortening. Calculations suggest that the second isomer of 2+ has both the trans CO-bridged and the anti all-terminal CO structures. DRL and WEG acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation under

  10. One-electron transfer reactions of the couple NAD. /NADH. [Pulse radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grodkowski, J.; Neta, P.; Carlson, B.W.; Miller, L.

    1983-08-04

    One-electron transfer reactions involving nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized and reducd forms (NAD./NADH) were studied by pulse radiolysis in aqueous solutions. One-electron oxidation of NADH by various phenoxyl radicals and phenothiazine cation radicals was found to take place with rate constants in the range of 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, depending on the redox potential of the oxidizing species. In all cases, NAD. is formed quantitatively with no indication for the existence of the protonated form (NADH/sup +/.). The spectrum of NAD., as well as the rates of oxidation of NADH by phenoxyl and by (chlorpromazine)/sup +/. were independent of pH between pH 4.5 and 13.5. Reaction of deuterated NADH indicated only a small kinetic isotope effect. All these findings point to an electron transfer mechanism. On the other hand, attempts to observe the reverse electron transfer, i.e., one-electron reduction of NAD. to NADH by radicals such as semiquinones, showed that k was less than 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/, so that it was unobservable. Consequently, it was not possible to achieve equilibrium conditions which would have permitted the direct measurement of the redox potential for NAD./NADH. One-electron reduction of NAD. appears to be an unlikely process. 1 table.

  11. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G.; Sims, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment? Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ``humic-like`` material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  12. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G. ); Sims, R.C. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ''humic-like'' material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  13. Oxidative stress and proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lipchick, Brittany C; Fink, Emily E; Nikiforov, Mikhail A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a form of plasma cell neoplasm that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematological malignancies. Recently, several novel drugs have been discovered that almost doubled the overall survival of multiple myeloma patients. One of these drugs, the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) has demonstrated remarkable response rates in multiple myeloma patients, and yet, currently this disease remains incurable. The major factor undermining the success of multiple myeloma treatment is a rapidly emerging resistance to the available therapy. Thus, the development of stand-alone or adjuvant anti-myeloma agents becomes of paramount importance. Overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often accompanies malignant transformation due to oncogene activation and/or enhanced metabolism in tumor cells. As a result, these cells possess higher levels of ROS and lower levels of antioxidant molecules compared to their normal counterparts. Unbalanced production of ROS leads to oxidative stress which, if left unchecked, could be toxic for the cell. In multiple myeloma cells where high rates of immunoglobulin synthesis is an additional factor contributing to overproduction of ROS, further induction of oxidative stress can be an effective strategy to cope with this disease. Here we will review the available data on the role of oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibitors and the use of ROS-inducing compounds as anti-myeloma agents.

  14. One-electron images in real space: natural adaptive orbitals.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Marcos; Álvarez Boto, Roberto; Francisco, Evelio; Martín Pendás, Ángel

    2015-04-30

    We introduce a general procedure to construct a set of one-electron functions in chemical bonding theory, which remain physically sound both for correlated and noncorrelated electronic structure descriptions. These functions, which we call natural adaptive orbitals, decompose the n-center bonding indices used in real space theories of the chemical bond into one-electron contributions. For the n = 1 case, they coincide with the domain natural orbitals used in domain-averaged Fermi hole analyses. We examine their interpretation in the two-center case, and show how they behave and evolve in simple cases. Orbital pictures obtained through this technique converge onto the chemist's molecular orbital toolbox if electron correlation may be ignored, and provide new insight if it may not.

  15. Oxidative modification of serum proteins in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Galiniak, Sabina; Mucha, Sebastian; Pierzchala, Krystyna; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been demonstrated to involve oxidative stress and augmented glycoxidation. In this study, several markers of protein oxidative damage and glycoxidation have been compared in 14 relapsing remittent in MS (RRMS) patients without immunomodifying treatment, 10 patients in clinical relapse, and clinically stable patient groups treated with interferon β 1a (18) , β 1b (19) and glatiramer acetate (GA; 6) in relation to healthy subjects (12). The glycophore content was increased in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients treated with GA. The level of advanced protein oxidation products (AOPP) was increased in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients with clinical relapse. The level of protein carbonyls was elevated in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients treated with interferon β 1b. The levels of dityrosine level and N'-formylkynureine were elevated in RRSM patients without treatment while serum protein thiol groups were decreased in RRSM patients in clinical relapse as well as RRMS patients treated with interferon β 1a. Several markers of protein modification showed correlation with the C-reactive protein level and white blood cell count, suggesting that oxidative protein modifications are linked to the inflammatory processes in MS. Results of this study confirm the occurrence of protein oxidative and glycoxidative damage in MS and show that spectrophotometric and fluorimetric markers of this damage, especially the AOPP level, may be useful in monitoring oxidative stress in the course of therapy of MS.

  16. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  17. Effective one-electron approaches to calculate high harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohringer, Nina; Santra, Robin

    2006-05-01

    The single-active electron approach (SAE) is frequently applied to calculate high harmonic generation in atoms and consists in solving a one-particle Schr"odinger equation in an appropriate model potential. As an ad hoc approach it is difficult to be systematically improved. Starting with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) technique we derive a new class of effective one-electron approaches. The resulting one-electron equations are in general non-local and non-unitary. A local approximation to TDCIS can be derived by restricting the total many-body Hamiltonian to a local mean-field Hamiltonian (those usually used in SAE calculations). The resulting equations are similar to traditional SAE approaches but include an additional term which destroys the unitarity of the time-evolution. We show that this correction term is essential and improves on traditional SAE approaches. Numerical tests show that this improved SAE method gives dipole-moments in better agreement with exact results than time-dependent Hartree Fock. The test system is a one-dimensional model of helium which allows for a straightforward numerical solution and therefore provides a benchmark to assess the quality of the different approximations.

  18. Molecular structural formulas as one-electron density and hamiltonian operators: the VIF method extended.

    PubMed

    Alia, Joseph D

    2007-03-29

    The valency interaction formula (VIF) method is given a broader and more general interpretation in which these simple molecular structural formulas implicitly include all overlaps between valence atomic orbitals even for interactions not drawn in the VIF picture. This applies for VIF pictures as one-electron Hamiltonian operators as well as VIF pictures as one-electron density operators that constitute a new implementation of the VIF method simpler in its application and more accurate in its results than previous approaches. A procedure for estimating elements of the effective charge density-bond order matrix, Pmunu, from electron configurations in atoms is presented, and it is shown how these lead to loop and line constants in the VIF picture. From these structural formulas, one finds the number of singly, doubly, and unoccupied molecular orbitals, as well as the number of molecular orbitals with energy lower, equal, and higher than -1/2Eh, the negative of the hydrogen atom's ionization energy. The VIF results for water are in qualitative agreement with MP2/6311++G3df3pd, MO energy levels where the simple VIF for water presented in the earlier literature does not agree with computed energy levels. The method presented here gives the simplest accurate VIF pictures for hydrocarbons. It is shown how VIF can be used to predict thermal barriers to chemical reactions. Insertion of singlet carbene into H2 is given as an example. VIF pictures as one-electron density operators describe the ground-state multiplicities of B2, N2, and O2 molecules and as one-electron Hamiltonian operators give the correct electronegativity trend across period two. Previous implementations of VIF do not indicate singly occupied molecular orbitals directly from the pictorial VIF rules for these examples. The direct comparison between structural formulas that represent electron density and those that represent energy is supported by comparison of a simple electronegativity scale, chiD=N/n2, with

  19. Analysis of active neutron multiplicity data for Y-12 skull oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Ensslin, N.; Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Previous work on active neutron multiplicity measurements and analyses is summarized. New active multiplicity measurements are described for samples of Y-12 skull oxide using an Active Well Coincidence Counter and MSR4 multiplicity electronics. Neutron multiplication values for the samples were determined from triples/doubles ratios. Neutron multiplication values were also obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code and the results compared with the experimental values. A calibration curve of AmLi source-sample coupling vs neutron multiplication was determined and used for active multiplicity assay of the skull oxides. The results are compared with those obtained from assay with the conventional calibration-curve technique, where the doubles rate is calibrated vs the {sup 235}U mass. The coupling-multiplication relationship determined for the skull oxides is compared with that determined earlier for pure high-enrichment uranium metal and pure uranium oxide. Conclusions are drawn about the application of active multiplicity techniques to uranium assay. Additional active multiplicity measurements and calculations are recommended.

  20. Multiple nanostructures based on anodized aluminium oxide templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liaoyong; Xu, Rui; Mi, Yan; Lei, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Several physico-chemical effects and properties in the solid state involve nanoscale interactions between adjacent materials and morphologies. Arrays of binary nanostructures can generate intimate interactions between different sub-components, but fabricating binary nanostructures is challenging. Here, we propose a concept to achieve diverse binary nanostructure arrays with high degrees of controllability for each of the sub-components, including material, dimension and morphology. This binary nanostructuring concept originates with a distinctive binary-pore anodized aluminium oxide template that includes two dissimilar sets of pores in one matrix, where the openings of the two sets of pores are towards opposite sides of the template. Using the same growth mechanism, the binary-pore template can be extended to multi-pore templates with more geometrical options. We also present photoelectrodes, transistors and plasmonic devices made with our binary nanostructure arrays using different combination of materials and morphologies, and demonstrate superior performances compared to their single-component counterparts.

  1. Pulsed ELDOR spectroscopy of the Mo(V)/Fe(III) state of sulfite oxidase prepared by one-electron reduction with Ti(III) citrate.

    PubMed

    Codd, Rachel; Astashkin, Andrei V; Pacheco, Andrew; Raitsimring, Arnold M; Enemark, John H

    2002-03-01

    The titration of chicken liver sulfite oxidase (SO) with the one-electron reductant Ti(III) citrate, at pH 7.0, results in nearly quantitative selective reduction of the Mo(VI) center to Mo(V), while the b-type heme center remains in the fully oxidized Fe(III) state. The selective reduction of the Mo(VI/V) couple has been established from electronic and EPR spectra. The electronic spectrum of the Fe(III) heme center is essentially unchanged during the titration, and the continuous wave (CW)-EPR spectrum shows the appearance of the well-known Mo(V) signal due to the low pH ( lpH) form of SO. Further confirmation of the selective formation of the Mo(V)/Fe(III) form of SO is provided by the approximately 1:1 ratio of the integrated intensities of the Mo(V) and low-spin Fe(III) EPR signals after addition of one equivalent of Ti(III). The selective generation of the Mo(V)/Fe(III) form of SO is unexpected, considering that previous microcoulometry and flash photolysis investigations have indicated that the Mo(VI/V) and Fe(III/II) couples of SO have similar reduction potentials at pH 7. The nearly quantitative preparation of the one-electron reduced Mo(V)/Fe(III) form of SO by reduction with Ti(III) has enabled the interaction between these two paramagnetic metal centers, which are linked by a flexible loop with no secondary structure, to be investigated for the first time by variable-frequency pulsed electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) spectroscopy. The ELDOR kinetics were obtained from frozen solutions at 4.2 K at several microwave frequencies by pumping on the narrow Mo(V) signal and observing the effect on the Fe(III) primary echo at both higher and lower frequencies within the microwave C-band region. The ELDOR data indicate that freezing the solution of one-electron reduced SO produces localized regions where the concentration of SO approaches that in the crystal structure, which results in the interpair interactions being the dominant dipolar interaction

  2. Hydroxycitric acid ameliorates inflammation and oxidative stress in mouse models of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Afraei, Sanaz; Yaslianifard, Somaye; Ghiasy, Saleh; Sadri, Ghazal; Kalvandi, Mustafa; Alinia, Tina; Mohebbi, Ali; Yazdani, Reza; Azarian, Shahin Khadem; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Azizi, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxycitric acid (HCA) is derived primarily from the Garcinia plant and is widely used for its anti-inflammatory effects. Multiple sclerosis can cause an inflammatory demyelination and axonal damage. In this study, to validate the hypothesis that HCA exhibits therapeutic effects on multiple sclerosis, we established female C57BL/6 mouse models of multiple sclerosis, i.e., experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, using Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) emulsion containing myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (35–55). Treatment with HCA at 2 g/kg/d for 3 weeks obviously improved the symptoms of nerve injury of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, decreased serum interleulin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde levels, and increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities. These findings suggest that HCA exhibits neuroprotective effects on multiple sclerosis-caused nerve injury through ameliorating inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27904492

  3. Multiple Hits, Including Oxidative Stress, as Pathogenesis and Treatment Target in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Kawai, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-01-01

    Multiple parallel hits, including genetic differences, insulin resistance and intestinal microbiota, account for the progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Multiple hits induce adipokine secretion, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress at the cellular level that subsequently induce hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis, among which oxidative stress is considered a key contributor to progression from simple fatty liver to NASH. Although several clinical trials have shown that anti-oxidative therapy can effectively control hepatitis activities in the short term, the long-term effect remains obscure. Several trials of long-term anti-oxidant protocols aimed at treating cerebrovascular diseases or cancer development have failed to produce a benefit. This might be explained by the non-selective anti-oxidative properties of these drugs. Molecular hydrogen is an effective antioxidant that reduces only cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and several diseases associated with oxidative stress are sensitive to hydrogen. The progress of NASH to hepatocellular carcinoma can be controlled using hydrogen-rich water. Thus, targeting mitochondrial oxidative stress might be a good candidate for NASH treatment. Long term clinical intervention is needed to control this complex lifestyle-related disease. PMID:24132155

  4. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  5. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average U–Oaxial distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  6. One-electron singular spectral features of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Čadež, T.

    2017-01-01

    The momentum, electronic density, spin density, and interaction dependences of the exponents that control the (k , ω)-plane singular features of the σ = ↑ , ↓ one-electron spectral functions of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field are studied. The usual half-filling concepts of one-electron lower Hubbard band and upper Hubbard band are defined in terms of the rotated electrons associated with the model Bethe-ansatz solution for all electronic density and spin density values and the whole finite repulsion range. Such rotated electrons are the link of the non-perturbative relation between the electrons and the pseudofermions. Our results further clarify the microscopic processes through which the pseudofermion dynamical theory accounts for the one-electron matrix elements between the ground state and excited energy eigenstates.

  7. Physicochemical Property and Oxidative Stability of Whey Protein Concentrate Multiple Nanoemulsion Containing Fish Oil.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Lee, Mee-Ryung; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Won-Jae

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this research were to produce whey protein concentrate (WPC) multiple nanoemulsion (MNE) and to study how whey protein concentration level and antioxidant type affected the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of fish oil in MNE. The morphological and physicochemical characteristics of MNE were investigated by using transmission electron microscopy and particle size analyzer, respectively. The oxidative stability of fish oil in MNEs was assessed by measuring peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value, and volatile compounds. The spherical forms of emulsions with size ranging from 190 to 210 nm were observed indicating the successful production of MNE. Compared with free fish oil, fish oil in MNE exhibited lower PV, p-anisidine value, and formation of maker of oxidation of fish oil indicating the oxidative stability of fish oil in MNE was enhanced. PV, p-anisidine value, and makers of oxidation of fish oil were decreased with increased WPC concentration level. The combined use of Vitamin C and E in MNE resulted in a reduction in PV and p-anisidine value, and development of maker of oxidation. In conclusion, WPC concentration level and antioxidant type are key factors affecting the droplet size of MNE and oxidative stability of fish oil.

  8. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2_)). The Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2...

  9. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Promises for Diagnosis and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Smart superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most promising candidate for theragnosis (i.e., diagnosis and treatment) of multiple sclerosis. A deep understanding of the dynamics of the in vivo neuropathology of multiple sclerosis can be achieved by improving the efficiency of various medical techniques (e.g., positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) using multimodal SPIONs. In this Review, recent advances and challenges in the development of smart SPIONs for theragnostic applications are comprehensively described. In addition, critical outlines of emerging developments are provided from the points of view of both clinicians and nanotechnologists. PMID:22778862

  10. A one-electron approximation to domain-averaged Fermi hole analysis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David L; Ponec, Robert

    2008-03-07

    In general, full domain-averaged Fermi hole (DAFH) analysis for correlated wavefunctions requires explicit use of the correlated pair density, but such a quantity is not always readily available. We propose instead a simple one-electron approximation, which we call pseudo-DAFH or pDAFH, and which requires instead only the natural orbitals (and their occupation numbers). From comparisons of the DAFH and pDAFH modes of analysis for the bond dissociation processes in H2, N2 and LiH, as well as for the electronic structure of more complex bonding patterns, such as in CH2Li2 and Li4, we conclude that pDAFH analysis could indeed prove to be very useful when the correlated pair density is not available. Detailed comparisons are also presented of values of the shared-electron distribution index (SEDI), a proposed one-electron approximation to it (pSEDI) and a generalized Wiberg index.

  11. Role of dimethyl fumarate in oxidative stress of multiple sclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, A; Raja Rajeswari, K

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS affecting both white and grey matter. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapy with dimethyl fumarate. The clinical utility of DMF in multiple sclerosis is being explored through phase III trials with BG-12, which is an oral therapeutic agent. Currently a wide research is going on to find out the exact mechanism of DMF, till date it is not clear. Based on strong signals of nephrotoxicity in non-humans and the theoretical risk of renal cell cancer from intracellular accumulation of fumarate, post-marketing study of a large population of patients will be necessary to fully assess the long-term safety of dimethyl fumarate. The current treatment goals are to shorten the duration and severity of relapses, prolong the time between relapses, and delay progression of disability. In this regard, dimethyl fumarate offers a promising alternative to orally administered fingolimod (GILENYA) or teriflunomide (AUBAGIO), which are currently marketed in the United States under FDA-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs because of serious safety concerns. More clinical experience with all three agents will be necessary to differentiate the tolerability of long-term therapy for patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. This write-up provides the detailed information of dimethyl fumarate in treating the neuro disease, multiple sclerosis and its mechanism involved via

  12. Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage in Multiple Sclerosis and Neurodegenerative Diseases: Therapeutic Modulation via Fumaric Acid Esters

    PubMed Central

    Lee, De-Hyung; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as Huntington’s disease. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic-progressive MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Here, fumaric acid esters (FAE) are a new, orally available treatment option which had already been tested in phase II/III MS trials demonstrating beneficial effects on relapse rates and magnetic resonance imaging markers. In vitro, application of dimethylfumarate (DMF) leads to stabilization of Nrf2, activation of Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity and abundant synthesis of detoxifying proteins. Furthermore, application of FAE involves direct modification of the inhibitor of Nrf2, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1. On cellular levels, the application of FAE enhances neuronal survival and protects astrocytes against oxidative stress. Increased levels of Nrf2 are detected in the central nervous system of DMF treated mice suffering from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. In EAE, DMF ameliorates the disease course and improves preservation of myelin, axons and neurons. Finally, Nrf2 is also up-regulated in the spinal cord of autopsy specimens from untreated patients with MS, probably as part of a naturally occurring anti-oxidative response. In summary, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapies like FAE. PMID:23109883

  13. Immunology and Oxidative Stress in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Basic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro G.; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar K.; Ramírez-Anguiano, Ana C.; Flores-Alvarado, Luis J.; Ramírez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A.; Torres-Sánchez, Erandis D.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the recruitment of lymphocytes, microglia, and macrophages to lesion sites, the presence of multiple lesions, generally being more pronounced in the brain stem and spinal cord, the predominantly perivascular location of lesions, the temporal maturation of lesions from inflammation through demyelination, to gliosis and partial remyelination, and the presence of immunoglobulin in the central nervous system and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Pro-inflammatory cytokines amplify the inflammatory cascade by compromising the BBB, recruiting immune cells from the periphery, and activating resident microglia. inflammation-associated oxidative burst in activated microglia and macrophages plays an important role in the demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in the pathogenesis of MS. The inflammatory environment in demyelinating lesions leads to the generation of oxygen- and nitrogen-free radicals as well as proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Inflammation can lead to oxidative stress and vice versa. Thus, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in a self-perpetuating cycle. PMID:24174971

  14. Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein and Oxidative Stress in a Multiple Sclerosis Model.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Begoña M; Medina-Fernández, Francisco J; Aguilar-Luque, Macarena; Agüera, Eduardo; Feijoo, Montserrat; Garcia-Maceira, Fe I; Lillo, Rafael; Vieyra-Reyes, Patricia; Giraldo, Ana I; Luque, Evelio; Drucker-Colín, René; Túnez, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) suggest that altering certain bacterial populations present in the gut may lead to a proinflammatory condition, that could result in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). Also, Reactive Oxygen Species seem to be involved in the course of MS. In this study, it has been aimed to relate all these variables starting from an analysis of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and LPS-binding protein (LBP) with the determination of parameters related to oxidative stress in the blood, brain and spinal cord. For this purpose, samples obtained from EAE rats and relapsing-remitting (RRMS) MS patients were used. In addition, EAE rats were treated with Natalizumab, N-acetyl-cysteine and dimethyl fumarate. Natalizumab was also employed in RRMS. The results of this study revealed an improvement in the clinical symptoms of the EAE and MS with the treatments, as well as a reduction in the oxidative stress parameters and in LBP. Correlations between the clinical variables of the disease, i.e. oxidative damage and LBP, were established. Although the conclusions of this research are indeed relevant, further investigation would be necessary to establish the intrinsic mechanisms of the MS-oxidative stress-microbiota relationship.

  15. Redox behaviour of nifuroxazide: generation of the one-electron reduction product.

    PubMed

    Squella, J A; Letelier, M E; Lindermeyer, L; Nuñez-Vergara, L J

    1996-01-05

    The electrochemical properties of nifuroxazide have been investigated in aqueous and aqueous-DMF mixed solvents. In aqueous media, a single, irreversible four-electron reduction occurs to give the hydroxylamine derivative. In mixed media, a reversible one-electron reduction to form a nitro radical anion takes place. Cyclic voltammetric studies show that the anion radical product is stable, although the nitro radical anion intermediate shows a tendency to undergo further chemical reactions. A comparison with the voltammetric behaviour of other nitrofurans such as nifurtimox, nitrofurazone and furazolidone is made. The electrochemically-obtained parameters are correlated with the in vivo studies of oxygen consumption on Trypanosoma cruzi cell suspensions.

  16. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; ...

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  17. Multiple roles of photosynthetic and sunscreen pigments in cyanobacteria focusing on the oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wada, Naoki; Sakamoto, Toshio; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2013-05-30

    Cyanobacteria have two types of sunscreen pigments, scytonemin and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). These secondary metabolites are thought to play multiple roles against several environmental stresses such as UV radiation and desiccation. Not only the large molar absorption coefficients of these sunscreen pigments, but also their antioxidative properties may be necessary for the protection of biological molecules against the oxidative damages induced by UV radiation. The antioxidant activity and vitrification property of these pigments are thought to be requisite for the desiccation and rehydration processes in anhydrobiotes. In this review, the multiple roles of photosynthetic pigments and sunscreen pigments on stress resistance, especially from the viewpoint of their structures, biosynthetic pathway, and in vitro studies of their antioxidant activity, will be discussed.

  18. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Hubertus J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Finally, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  19. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-04-27

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  20. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-04-27

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  1. QED calculations in heavy many-electron atoms and one-electron quasi-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupitsyn, I. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.; Porsev, S. G.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Construction of simple one-electron approach to one-loop QED operator is an important task for the relativistic quantum theory of atoms and molecules. In this work we used two modifications of the model QED potential approach to calculations of the Lamb shift in many-electron atoms and one-electron quasi-molecules. The model potential is constructed as a sum of local and nonlocal (separable) potentials. The nonlocal part of the model potential was introduced to reproduce exactly the diagonal elements and also off-diagonal elements of the one-loop ab initio QED operator. The one-particle model QED operator was introduced in the Dirac-Fock and CI+MBPT relativistic calculations of the heavy and super-heavy atoms and in the calculations of the diatomic quasi-molecules. The comparison of the data obtained in different approaches to the one-loop QED operator is presented. Model QED potential is applied to calculate Lamb shift in the U91+- U92+ dimer. The results are compared with Ref..

  2. Multiple factors affect diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in iron mine soil.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi; Si, Yan-Xiao; Hong, Chen; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation by microorganisms is a critical process in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, four soil samples collected from a desert zone in an iron-exploration area and others from farmland and planted forest soil in an iron mine surrounding area. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in iron-mining area near the Miyun reservoir using ammonia monooxygenase. A subunit gene (amoA) as molecular biomarker. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to explore the relationships between the abundance of AOA and AOB and soil physicochemical parameters. The results showed that AOA were more abundant than AOB and may play a more dominant role in the ammonia-oxidizing process in the whole region. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the structural changes of AOA and AOB. The results showed that AOB were much more diverse than AOA. Nitrosospira cluster three constitute the majority of AOB, and AOA were dominated by group 1.1b in the soil. Redundancy analysis was performed to explore the physicochemical parameters potentially important to AOA and AOB. Soil characteristics (i.e. water, ammonia, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil type) were proposed to potentially contribute to the distributions of AOB, whereas Cd was also closely correlated to the distributions of AOB. The community of AOA correlated with ammonium and water contents. These results highlight the importance of multiple drivers in microbial niche formation as well as their affect on ammonia oxidizer composition, both which have significant consequences for ecosystem nitrogen functioning.

  3. A Tandem Catalyst with Multiple Metal Oxide Interfaces Produced by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huibin; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Xiaomin; Liang, Haojie; Yang, Huimin; Gao, Zhe; Wang, Jianguo; Qin, Yong

    2016-06-13

    Ideal heterogeneous tandem catalysts necessitate the rational design and integration of collaborative active sites. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a new tandem catalyst with multiple metal-oxide interfaces based on a tube-in-tube nanostructure using template-assisted atomic layer deposition, in which Ni nanoparticles are supported on the outer surface of the inner Al2 O3 nanotube (Ni/Al2 O3 interface) and Pt nanoparticles are attached to the inner surface of the outer TiO2 nanotube (Pt/TiO2 interface). The tandem catalyst shows remarkably high catalytic efficiency in nitrobenzene hydrogenation over Pt/TiO2 interface with hydrogen formed in situ by the decomposition of hydrazine hydrate over Ni/Al2 O3 interface. This can be ascribed to the synergy effect of the two interfaces and the confined nanospace favoring the instant transfer of intermediates. The tube-in-tube tandem catalyst with multiple metal-oxide interfaces represents a new concept for the design of highly efficient and multifunctional nanocatalysts.

  4. Multiple phase transition and scaling law for poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Li, Lin

    2015-02-04

    The multiple phase transition and the scaling behavior of a poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer (Pluronic F127, PEO100-PPO65-PEO100) have been studied by micro-differential scanning calorimetry and rheology. The scaling behavior of the triblock copolymer was examined using the Winter-Chambon criterion to obtain the critical gel temperature Tgel and the scaling exponent n. n was found to decrease linearly with increasing copolymer concentration. A stable hard gel was formed, but the hard gel was transformed into a soft gel upon further heating. Increasing copolymer concentration led to the increase in the temperature of hard-soft gel transition, while the sol-gel transition temperature decreased with increasing copolymer concentration. A phase diagram has been determined, which is able to classify unimers, micelles, hard gel, and soft gel regions upon heating. In addition, the scaling relation of the plateau modulus Ge with copolymer concentration was also obtained as Ge ≈ c(3.0) for both soft gel and hard gel.

  5. Oxidative modification of blood serum proteins in multiple sclerosis after interferon or mitoxantrone treatment.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-15

    This study was aimed at (i) comparison of the usefulness of serum protein oxidation parameters for assessment of oxidative stress (OS) in multiple sclerosis (MS), and (ii) comparison of OS in MS patients subject to various therapies. Elevated glycophore level was noted in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) patients without treatment and patients treated with interferons β1a and β1b (10.33±3.27, 8.02±2.22 and 8.56±2.45 vs control 5.27±0.73 fluorescence units (FU)/mg protein). Advanced oxidation protein products (295±135 vs 83±65nmol/mg protein), carbonyl groups (3.68±1.44nmol/mg protein vs 2.03±0.23nmol/mg protein), kynurenine (7.71±0.1.67 vs 5.5±0.63 FU/mg protein) and N'-formylkynurenine (7.69±0.7 vs 4.97±0.59 FU/mg protein) levels were increased, while thioredoxin level was decreased in RRMS patients without treatment (5.03±2.18 vs 10.83±2.75ng/ml) with respect to control. The level of OS was higher in untreated RRMS patients and in SPMS patients treated with mitoxantrone than in patients treated with interferon.

  6. Multiple sample characterization of coals and other substances by controlled-atmosphere programmed temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    LaCount, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    A furnace with two hot zones holds multiple analysis tubes. Each tube has a separable sample-packing section positioned in the first hot zone and a catalyst-packing section positioned in the second hot zone. A mass flow controller is connected to an inlet of each sample tube, and gas is supplied to the mass flow controller. Oxygen is supplied through a mass flow controller to each tube to either or both of an inlet of the first tube and an intermediate portion between the tube sections to intermingle with and oxidize the entrained gases evolved from the sample. Oxidation of those gases is completed in the catalyst in each second tube section. A thermocouple within a sample reduces furnace temperature when an exothermic condition is sensed within the sample. Oxidized gases flow from outlets of the tubes to individual gas cells. The cells are sequentially aligned with an infrared detector, which senses the composition and quantities of the gas components. Each elongated cell is tapered inward toward the center from cell windows at the ends. Volume is reduced from a conventional cell, while permitting maximum interaction of gas with the light beam. Reduced volume and angulation of the cell inlets provide rapid purgings of the cell, providing shorter cycles between detections. For coal and other high molecular weight samples, from 50% to 100% oxygen is introduced to the tubes.

  7. Multiple controls of oxidative metabolism in living tissues as studied by phosphorus magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Leigh, J S; Kent, J; McCully, K; Nioka, S; Clark, B J; Maris, J M; Graham, T

    1986-01-01

    Three types of metabolic control of oxidative metabolism are observed in the various tissues that have been studied by phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The principal control of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle is by ADP (or Pi/phosphocreatine). This conclusion is based upon studies of arm muscles of humans during steady-state exercise. A work-cost (Vm vs. Pi/phosphocreatine) relationship follows a Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola, where Km values from 0.5 to 0.6 and Vmax values from 50 to 200 (at nearly constant pH) are found in linearized plots of the equation V/Vmax = 1/(1 + 0.6 phosphocreatine/Pi) where V is work level (which is equal to the velocity of the enzymatic reaction) and Vmax is the maximal work capacity that is a measure of the enzyme activity (E) of oxidative metabolism. Adaptation to exercise enhances the slope of the work-cost relationship and causes large changes in Vmax or E. A second metabolic control may enhance the slope of the work-cost relationship but not Vmax. For example, the initiation of exercise can lead to an improved characteristic that can be explained by 2-fold increased substrate delivery, for example, increased oxygen delivery by microcirculatory control. Cardiac tissue of the adult dog affords an example of optimal endurance performance adaptation and exhibits the steepest work-cost relationship observed and is attributed to a coordinated control of substrate delivery that may involve Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate control of NADH; control of O2 delivery may also be involved. The calculated work-cost relationship is similar to that observed in the beagle heart. The theoretical curve illustrates that the liability of multiple controls is a sharp break point in metabolic control at the end of the multiple control range--a possible cause of instability of cardiac performance at high V/Vmax. PMID:3467315

  8. Frequency-dependent polarizabilities and shielding factors for confined one-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, H. E., Jr.; Pupyshev, Vladimir I.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dipole polarizabilities and shielding factors are calculated for the ground state of spherically symmetric screened one-electron systems embedded in an impenetrable spherical cavity. Coulomb, Yukawa, Hulthén and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials are considered. In contrast to free systems, Dirichlet boundary conditions introduce a contribution to the shielding factor that results from an integral over the surface of the confining boundary. This is a fundamental difference between free and confined systems and results in unexpected modifications to some of the classic relations for free systems. The methods derived also give a simple expression for the polarizability of the confined harmonic oscillator as an example of extending the methods of this work to potentials beyond the four studied.

  9. Zeeman energy and spin relaxation in a one-electron quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R; Witkamp, B; Vandersypen, L M K; van Beveren, L H Willems; Elzerman, J M; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2003-11-07

    We have measured the relaxation time, T1, of the spin of a single electron confined in a semiconductor quantum dot (a proposed quantum bit). In a magnetic field, applied parallel to the two-dimensional electron gas in which the quantum dot is defined, Zeeman splitting of the orbital states is directly observed by measurements of electron transport through the dot. By applying short voltage pulses, we can populate the excited spin state with one electron and monitor relaxation of the spin. We find a lower bound on T1 of 50 micros at 7.5 T, only limited by our signal-to-noise ratio. A continuous measurement of the charge on the dot has no observable effect on the spin relaxation.

  10. Excess electrons in methanol clusters: Beyond the one-electron picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Gábor; Mones, Letif; Turi, László

    2016-10-01

    We performed a series of comparative quantum chemical calculations on various size negatively charged methanol clusters, ("separators=" CH 3 OH ) n - . The clusters are examined in their optimized geometries (n = 2-4), and in geometries taken from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature (n = 2-128). These latter structures model potential electron binding sites in methanol clusters and in bulk methanol. In particular, we compute the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of an excess electron from increasing size methanol cluster anions using quantum chemical computations at various levels of theory including a one-electron pseudopotential model, several density functional theory (DFT) based methods, MP2 and coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations. The results suggest that at least four methanol molecules are needed to bind an excess electron on a hydrogen bonded methanol chain in a dipole bound state. Larger methanol clusters are able to form stronger interactions with an excess electron. The two simulated excess electron binding motifs in methanol clusters, interior and surface states, correlate well with distinct, experimentally found VDE tendencies with size. Interior states in a solvent cavity are stabilized significantly stronger than electron states on cluster surfaces. Although we find that all the examined quantum chemistry methods more or less overestimate the strength of the experimental excess electron stabilization, MP2, LC-BLYP, and BHandHLYP methods with diffuse basis sets provide a significantly better estimate of the VDE than traditional DFT methods (BLYP, B3LYP, X3LYP, PBE0). A comparison to the better performing many electron methods indicates that the examined one-electron pseudopotential can be reasonably used in simulations for systems of larger size.

  11. Excess electrons in methanol clusters: Beyond the one-electron picture.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Gábor; Mones, Letif; Turi, László

    2016-10-28

    We performed a series of comparative quantum chemical calculations on various size negatively charged methanol clusters, CH3OHn(-). The clusters are examined in their optimized geometries (n = 2-4), and in geometries taken from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperature (n = 2-128). These latter structures model potential electron binding sites in methanol clusters and in bulk methanol. In particular, we compute the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of an excess electron from increasing size methanol cluster anions using quantum chemical computations at various levels of theory including a one-electron pseudopotential model, several density functional theory (DFT) based methods, MP2 and coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations. The results suggest that at least four methanol molecules are needed to bind an excess electron on a hydrogen bonded methanol chain in a dipole bound state. Larger methanol clusters are able to form stronger interactions with an excess electron. The two simulated excess electron binding motifs in methanol clusters, interior and surface states, correlate well with distinct, experimentally found VDE tendencies with size. Interior states in a solvent cavity are stabilized significantly stronger than electron states on cluster surfaces. Although we find that all the examined quantum chemistry methods more or less overestimate the strength of the experimental excess electron stabilization, MP2, LC-BLYP, and BHandHLYP methods with diffuse basis sets provide a significantly better estimate of the VDE than traditional DFT methods (BLYP, B3LYP, X3LYP, PBE0). A comparison to the better performing many electron methods indicates that the examined one-electron pseudopotential can be reasonably used in simulations for systems of larger size.

  12. Evaluation of oxidative and nitrosative stress in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis: effect of corticosteroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Seven, Aru; Aslan, Mahmure; Incir, Said; Altıntaş, Ayşe

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the roles of oxidative and nitrosative stress in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients. Oxidative stress markers thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), 8-epi-PGF2α, conjugated diene and nitrosative stress markers nitrotyrosine, nitrit-nitrate were analysed in serum and CSF of 20 newly diagnosed RRMS patients before and after methyl prednysolone (MP) therapy (1000 mg/day i.v., for 5 days) and in healthy control group.TBARS and conjugated diene were analysed spectrophotometrically, nitrite-nitrate fluorometrically, 8-epi-PGF2α and nitrotyrosine were measured by ELISA. Serum conjugated diene (p < 0.001) and 8-epi-PGF2α (p < 0.05) levels were significantly higher in RRMS patients before MP therapy with respect to control group. MP therapy caused a significant decrease only in 8-epi-PGF2α level (p < 0.05). Serum nitrotyrosine levels were significantly lower in RRMS patients both before (p < 0.001) and after (p < 0.001) MP therapy with respect to controls. Serum nitrite-nitrate levels were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in RRMS patients before therapy compared to controls. Nitrotyrosine and nitrite-nitrate levels in CSF of RRMS patients were significantly higher (p < 0.001) before therapy compared to normal pressure hydrocephalia control group. Our findings reveal increased oxidative stress in serum of RRMS patients and the benefical role of MP therapy in relieving oxidative stress.As to nitrosative stress, nitrotyrosine and nitrite-nitrate levels were increased in CSF and decreased in serum.

  13. Multiplicative effect of inhaled plutonium oxide and benzo (a) pyrene on lung carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Métivier, H.; Wahrendorf, J.; Masse, R.

    1984-01-01

    This study describes the effect of intratracheal instillations (2 X 5 mg) of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) on lung carcinogenesis in rats which had previously inhaled different levels of 239 plutonium oxide (220, 630, 6300 Bq, initial lung burden). Survival decreased with increasing PuO2 exposure and additional B(a)P exposure. The incidence of malignant lung tumours, adjusted for differences in survival, increased in a dose-related fashion with PuO2 dose and was elevated in the presence of additional B(a)P exposure. A multiplicative relative risk model was found to describe reasonably well the observed joint effect. The practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6087866

  14. Oxidation effects on cleaved multiple quantum well surfaces in air observed by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, S.; Gallagher, M. J.; Chen, T.; Pax, P.; Sarid, D.

    1992-08-01

    The paper presents the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of cleaved InGaAs/InP multiple quantum wells and compares them with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images taken of the same heterostructure. The images were stable in air for over a day. Based on these results, it is proposed that the mechanism for contrast in the images is due to an oxide layer that grows primarily on the InGaAs wells and not on the InP barriers. Both STM and AFM clearly resolve the individual wells of the heterostructure, although STM measured a larger corrugation than an AFM. STM also exhibited superior lateral resolution of about 2 nm, while AFM had a lateral resolution of approximately 6 nm.

  15. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; Zhang, Chi; Bruhwiler, Lori; Wofsy, Steven

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  16. Investigations of the oxidation capacities of polar atmospheres with multiple oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Justin R.

    This study provides new perspectives on the atmospheric chemistry in Polar Regions using multiple oxygen isotopes of nitrate and sulfate. Despite their remote locations, these unique environments play an important role in the present state of global climate and contain invaluable clues to observing past relationships between earth's atmosphere and surface temperature. With current temperatures and greenhouse gas concentrations rising rapidly as a result of human activities, continued investigation of the effects on polar environments will elucidate their relationship to the global climate system. Three studies are presented here to constrain the oxidation pathways of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in polar atmospheres. These findings provide a new means to observe current and past oxidation conditions of tropospheric and stratospheric polar atmospheres. Currently, two uncertain aspects of climate are the projected changes in tropospheric and stratospheric oxidation chemistry and the role of aerosols in cloud formation and the global radiation budget. Because the levels of oxidants in the atmosphere directly influence greenhouse gas concentrations and aerosol distribution, the following work presents results implicit to improving knowledge of the climate system. The results presented in this dissertation include measurements of oxygen isotopes (delta17O, delta18O, and Delta 17O) in nitrate and sulfate from South Pole, Antarctica and Alert, Canada, respectively. In addition, a photochemistry experiment was conducted to measure the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on oxygen isotopes of nitrate in water and ice. Chapter 2 compares oxygen isotopes in sulfate aerosol collected at Alert, Canada over the course of one year (July 1999--June 2000) to a chemical transport model describing sulfate formation. Chapter 3 presents the results from the nitrate photochemistry experiments conducted at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California. Chapter 4

  17. Modulation of physical properties of oxide thin films by multiple fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua-Li, Yang; Bao-Min, Wang; Xiao-Jian, Zhu; Jie, Shang; Bin, Chen; Run-Wei, Li

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of the modulation of physical properties in oxide thin films by multiple fields are reviewed. Some of the key issues and prospects of this area of study are also addressed. Oxide thin films exhibit versatile physical properties such as magnetism, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, metal-insulator transition (MIT), multiferroicity, colossal magnetoresistivity, switchable resistivity. More importantly, the exhibited multifunctionality can be tuned by various external fields, which has enabled demonstration of novel electronic devices. Project supported by the State Key Project of Fundamental Research of China (Grant No. 2012CB933004), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474295, 51571208, 51525103, and 11274322), Overseas, Hong Kong & Macao Scholars Collaborated Researching Fund (Grant No. 51428201), the Instrument Developing Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YZ201327), Ningbo Major Project for Science and Technology (Grant No. 2014B11011), Ningbo International Cooperation Projects (Grant Nos. 2012D10018 and 2014D10005), the Fund for Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team (Grant No. 2015B11001), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Key Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05).

  18. Interactive effects of multiple climate change factors on ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers in a temperate steppe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuijing; Shen, Jupei; Sun, Yifei; Wang, Juntao; Zhang, Limei; Yang, Zhongling; Han, Hongyan; Wan, Shiqiang; He, Jizheng

    2017-03-15

    Global climate change could have profound effects on belowground microbial communities and subsequently affect soil biogeochemical processes. The interactive effects of multiple co-occurring climate change factors on microbially-mediated processes are not well understood. A four-factorial field experiment with elevated CO2, watering, nitrogen (N) addition and night warming was conducted in a temperate steppe of northern China. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism, combined with clone library techniques were applied to examine the effects of those climate change factors on N-related microbial abundance and community composition. Only the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria significantly increased by nitrogen addition and decreased by watering. The interactions of watering × warming on the bacterial amoA community and warming × nitrogen addition on the nosZ community were found. Redundancy analysis indicated that the ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community was affected by total N and total carbon, while the community of bacterial amoA and nosZ were significantly affected by soil pH. According to a structural equation modeling analysis, climate change influenced net primary production indirectly by altering microbial abundance and activities. These results indicated that microbial responses to the combination of chronic global change tend to be smaller than expected from single-factor global change manipulations.

  19. One-Electron Standard Reduction Potentials of Nitroaromatic and Cyclic Nitramine Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Reduction of explosives becomes less thermodynamically... oxidized energetic compounds under anoxic and suboxic conditions. Extensive studies have been conducted on the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs...by Fe(II) sorbed on iron (hydr) oxides and other minerals (Klausen et al., 1995), dissolved Fe(II) alone and in the presence of dissolved organic

  20. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation by an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.

  1. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; ...

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation bymore » an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.« less

  2. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  3. Quantum calculation of the second-order hyperpolarizability of chiral molecules in the "one-electron" model.

    PubMed

    Hache, F

    2010-09-23

    Quantum calculation of the hyperpolarizabilty tensor is carried out for chiral molecules displaying a "one-electron" chirality. Calculation is made possible by introducing a chiral perturbation term in the potential energy surface. We show that a one-electron chiral molecule is intrinsically nonlinear and diplays a nonzero electric chiral hyperpolarizability. Existence of magnetic contributions is discussed, and it is shown that higher-order perturbation terms are necessary to introduce such magnetic effects in the second-order hyperpolarizability.

  4. Biodegradation of individual and multiple chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane-oxidizing cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H L; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1996-01-01

    The microbial degradation of chlorinated and nonchlorinated methanes, ethanes, and ethanes by a mixed methane-oxidizing culture grown under chemostat and batch conditions is evaluated and compared with that by two pure methanotrophic strains: CAC1 (isolated from the mixed culture) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With the exception of 1,1-dichloroethylene, the transformation capacity (Tc) for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon was generally found to be in inverse proportion to its chlorine content within each aliphatic group (i.e., methanes, ethanes, and ethenes), whereas similar trends were not observed for degradation rate constants. Tc trends were similar for all methane-oxidizing cultures tested. None of the cultures were able to degrade the fully chlorinated aliphatics such as perchloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. Of the four cultures tested, the chemostat-grown mixed culture exhibited the highest Tc for trichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane, whereas the pure batch-grown OB3b culture exhibited the highest Tc for all other compounds tested. The product toxicity of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a mixture containing multiple compounds was cumulative and predictable when using parameters measured from the degradation of individual compounds. The Tc for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in a mixture (Tcmix) and the total Tc for the mixture (sigma Tcmix) are functions of the individual Tc, the initial substrate concentration (S0), and the first-order rate constant (k/Ks) of each compound in the mixture, indicating the importance of identifying the properties and compositions of all potentially degradable compounds in a contaminant mixture. PMID:8795228

  5. Depression's multiple comorbidities explained by (neuro)inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Kubera, Marta; Obuchowiczwa, Ewa; Goehler, Lisa; Brzeszcz, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    There is now evidence that depression, as characterized by melancholic symptoms, anxiety, and fatigue and somatic (F&S) symptoms, is the clinical expression of peripheral cell-mediated activation, inflammation and induction of oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways and of central microglial activation, decreased neurogenesis and increased apoptosis. This review gives an explanation for the multiple "co-morbidities" between depression and a large variety of a) brain disorders related to neurodegeneration, e.g. Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and stroke; b) medical disorders, such as cardiovascular disorder, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, leaky gut, diabetes type 1 and 2, obesity and the metabolic syndrome, and HIV infection; and c) conditions, such as hemodialysis, interferon-α-based immunotherapy, the postnatal period and psychosocial stressors. The common denominator of all those disorders/conditions is the presence of microglial activation and/or activation of peripheral IO&NS pathways. There is evidence that shared peripheral and / or central IO&NS pathways underpin the pathophysiology of depression and the previously mentioned disorders and that activation of these IO&NS pathways contributes to shared risk. The IO&NS pathways function as a smoke sensor that detect threats in the peripheral and central parts of the body and signal these threats as melancholic, anxiety, and fatigue and somatic (F&S) symptoms. The presence of concomitant depression is strongly associated with a lower quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality in medical disorders. This may be explained since depression contributes to increased (neuro)inflammatory burden and may therefore drive the inflammatory and degenerative progression. It is concluded that the activation of peripheral

  6. Oxidative stress in severe pulmonary trauma in critical ill patients. Antioxidant therapy in patients with multiple trauma--a review.

    PubMed

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Papurica, Marius; Dumbuleu, Maria Corina; Chira, Alexandru Mihai; Rosu, Oana Maria; Sandesc, Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Multiple trauma patients require extremely good management and thus, the trauma team needs to be prepared and to be up to date with the new standards of intensive therapy. Oxidative stress and free radicals represent an extremely aggressive factor to cells, having a direct consequence upon the severity of lung inflammation. Pulmonary tissue is damaged by oxidative stress, leading to biosynthesis of mediators that exacerbate inflammation modulators. The subsequent inflammation spreads throughout the body, leading most of the time to multiple organ dysfunction and death. In this paper, we briefly present an update of biochemical effects of oxidative stress and free radical damage to the pulmonary tissue in patients in critical condition in the intensive care unit. Also, we would like to present a series of active substances that substantially reduce the aggressiveness of free radicals, increasing the chances of survival.

  7. Relative antioxidant efficiency of a large series of carotenoids in terms of one electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia

    2007-11-08

    The relative antioxidant efficiency, expressed as electron donating capability, of a large series of carotenoids has been studied using density functional theory. Their reactivity toward nine different radicals has been modeled as well as the electron transfer between pairs of carotenoids, one of which is present as a radical cation. The influence of the solvent polarity has also been studied. Torulene was found to be the most easily oxidized carotenoid, followed by lycopene. This higher reactivity is proposed in the present work for the first time, and the potential implications of such a finding are discussed. Since torulene has not been previously studied, compared to other carotenoids in terms of oxidation potentials, further experimental studies are suggested in order to confirm or reject this prediction. Ionization potential seems to be a magnitude calculable at low computational cost that correctly predicts the relative ease of oxidation in a series of carotenoids. The nuclear reorganization energy associated with electron-transfer reactions has been calculated in a very simple but apparently efficient way that allows computation of free energy barriers and relative rate constants in good agreement with the experimental values. In addition, an additive correction is proposed to include the effect of increasing the size of basis sets on the energies of Car(n) --> Car(n-1)(*+) processes. The general agreement between different calculated magnitudes and the corresponding available experimental data supports the predictions from this work.

  8. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    PubMed

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-05

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature.

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY, LOW EMISSIONS, SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS FOR MULTIPLE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Ward; Michael A. Petrik

    2004-07-28

    Technology Management Inc. (TMI), teamed with the Ohio Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has engineered, constructed, and demonstrated a stationary, low power, multi-module solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) prototype system operating on propane and natural gas. Under Phase I, TMI successfully operated two systems in parallel, in conjunction with a single DC-AC inverter and battery bus, and produced net AC electricity. Phase II testing expanded to include alternative and renewable fuels typically available in rural regions of Ohio. The commercial system is expected to have ultra-low pollution, high efficiency, and low noise. The TMI SOFC uses a solid ceramic electrolyte operating at high temperature (800-1000 C) which electrochemically converts gaseous fuels (hydrogen or mixed gases) and oxygen into electricity. The TMI system design oxidizes fuel primarily via electrochemical reactions and uses no burners (which pollute and consume fuel)--resulting in extremely clean exhaust. The use of proprietary sulfur tolerant materials developed by TMI allows system operation without additional fuel pre-processing or sulfur removal. Further, the combination of high operating temperatures and solid state operation increases the potential for higher reliability and efficiencies compared to other types of fuel cells. Applications for the TMI SOFC system cover a wide range of transportation, building, industrial, and military market sectors. A generic technology, fuel cells have the potential to be embodied into multiple products specific to Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program areas including: Fuel Cells and Microturbines, School Buildings, Transportation, and Bioenergy. This program focused on low power stationary applications using a multi-module system operating on a range of common fuels. By producing clean electricity more efficiently (thus using less fuel), fuel cells have the triple effect of cleaning up the

  10. Simultaneous Bioreduction of Multiple Oxidized Contaminants Using a Membrane Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixiang; Lin, Hua; Xu, Xiaoyin; Jiang, Minmin; Chang, Chein-Chi; Xia, Siqing

    2017-02-01

      This study tests a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) to investigate simultaneous bioreduction of selected oxidized contaminants, including nitrate (-N), sulfate (), bromate (), chromate (Cr(VI)) and para-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB). The experiments demonstrate that MBfR can achieve high performance for contaminants bioreduction to harmless or immobile forms in 240 days, with a maximum reduction fluxes of 0.901 g -N/m2·d, 1.573 g /m2·d, 0.009 g /m2·d, 0.022 g Cr(VI)/m2·d, and 0.043 g p-CNB/m2·d. Increasing H2 pressure and decreasing influent surface loading enhanced removal efficiency of the reactor. Flux analysis indicates that nitrate and sulfate reductions competed more strongly than , Cr(VI) and p-CNB reduction. The average H2 utilization rate, H2 flux, and H2 utilization efficiency of the reactor were 0.026 to 0.052 mg H2/cm3·d, 0.024 to 0.046 mg H2/cm2·d, and 97.5% to 99.3% (nearly 100%). Results show the hydrogen-based MBfR may be suitable for removing multiple oxidized contaminants in drinking water or groundwater.

  11. NADPH oxidase expression in active multiple sclerosis lesions in relation to oxidative tissue damage and mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marie T; Sharma, Rakhi; Lim, Jamie L; Haider, Lukas; Frischer, Josa M; Drexhage, Joost; Mahad, Don; Bradl, Monika; van Horssen, Jack; Lassmann, Hans

    2012-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, and we recently provided evidence for oxidative damage of oligodendrocytes and dystrophic axons in early stages of active multiple sclerosis lesions. In this study, we identified potential sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species through gene expression in carefully staged and dissected lesion areas and by immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression. Genome-wide microarrays confirmed mitochondrial injury in active multiple sclerosis lesions, which may serve as an important source of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found differences in the gene expression levels of various nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits between initial multiple sclerosis lesions and control white matter. These results were confirmed at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry, showing upregulation of the subunits gp91phox, p22phox, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 in activated microglia in classical active as well as slowly expanding lesions. The subunits gp91phox and p22phox were constitutively expressed in microglia and were upregulated in the initial lesion. In contrast, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 expression were more restricted to the zone of initial damage or to lesions from patients with acute or early relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis. Double labelling showed co-expression of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits in activated microglia and

  12. NADPH oxidase expression in active multiple sclerosis lesions in relation to oxidative tissue damage and mitochondrial injury

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marie T.; Sharma, Rakhi; Lim, Jamie L.; Haider, Lukas; Frischer, Josa M.; Drexhage, Joost; Mahad, Don; Bradl, Monika; van Horssen, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, associated with demyelination and neurodegeneration. The mechanisms of tissue injury are poorly understood, but recent data suggest that mitochondrial injury may play an important role in this process. Mitochondrial injury can be triggered by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide species, and we recently provided evidence for oxidative damage of oligodendrocytes and dystrophic axons in early stages of active multiple sclerosis lesions. In this study, we identified potential sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species through gene expression in carefully staged and dissected lesion areas and by immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression. Genome-wide microarrays confirmed mitochondrial injury in active multiple sclerosis lesions, which may serve as an important source of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found differences in the gene expression levels of various nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits between initial multiple sclerosis lesions and control white matter. These results were confirmed at the protein level by means of immunohistochemistry, showing upregulation of the subunits gp91phox, p22phox, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 in activated microglia in classical active as well as slowly expanding lesions. The subunits gp91phox and p22phox were constitutively expressed in microglia and were upregulated in the initial lesion. In contrast, p47phox, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase organizer 1 expression were more restricted to the zone of initial damage or to lesions from patients with acute or early relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis. Double labelling showed co-expression of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits in activated microglia and

  13. Simultaneous analysis of multiple lipid oxidation products in vivo by liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

    PubMed

    Yin, Huiyong; Davis, Todd; Porter, Ned A

    2010-01-01

    Free radical-induced oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) has been linked to a number of human diseases including atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders. Oxidation of PUFAs generates hydroperoxides and cyclic peroxides that are reduced to lipid alcohol, such as hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETEs), and isoprostanes (IsoPs) respectively. The IsoPs are isomers of prostaglandins that are generated from autoxidation of arachidonic acid (C20:4). Quantification of F(2)-IsoPs has been regarded as the "gold standard" to assess oxidative stress status in various human diseases. We herein report the protocol of analyzing HETEs and F(2)-IsoPs using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled to reverse phase liquid chromatography. The selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode selects the parent ion of interest in the first Quad (m/z 319 for HETE and m/z 353 for F(2)-IsoPs) and fragments it in the second while an ion characteristic of the analyte of interest is monitored in the third Quad. This highly selective technique permits the simultaneous analysis of multiple oxidation products such as the HETEs and F(2)-IsoPs. This LC-MS technique can be applied to study the free radical oxidation mechanism in vitro and assess the oxidative stress status in biological tissues and fluids.

  14. Aptamer-Conjugated Graphene Oxide Membranes for Highly Efficient Capture and Accurate Identification of Multiple Types of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Though it has been well-documented over past two decades that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood can be used as a biomarker for metastatic cancer, there are enormous challenges in capturing and identifying CTCs with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Because of the heterogeneous expression of CTC markers, it is now well understood that a single CTC marker is insufficient to capture all CTCs from the blood. Driven by the clear need, this study reports for the first time highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of CTCs from infected blood using aptamer-modified porous graphene oxide membranes. The results demonstrate that dye-modified S6, A9, and YJ-1 aptamers attached to 20–40 μm porous garphene oxide membranes are capable of capturing multiple types of tumor cells (SKBR3 breast cancer cells, LNCaP prostate cancer cells, and SW-948 colon cancer cells) selectively and simultaneously from infected blood. Our result shows that the capture efficiency of graphene oxide membranes is ∼95% for multiple types of tumor cells; for each tumor concentration, 10 cells are present per milliliter of blood sample. The selectivity of our assay for capturing targeted tumor cells has been demonstrated using membranes without an antibody. Blood infected with different cells also has been used to demonstrate the targeted tumor cell capturing ability of aptamer-conjugated membranes. Our data also demonstrate that accurate analysis of multiple types of captured CTCs can be performed using multicolor fluorescence imaging. Aptamer-conjugated membranes reported here have good potential for the early diagnosis of diseases that are currently being detected by means of cell capture technologies. PMID:25565372

  15. R-matrix-incorporating-time theory of one-electron atomic and molecular systems in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broin, Cathal Ó.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this thesis tutorial we discuss the R-matrix-incorporating-time ab initio theoretical framework for the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of one-electron atomic and molecular systems under strong electromagnetic fields. Within this approach, a division-of-space method is developed with the configuration space of the electron’s coordinates separated over two regions, the inner and outer regions. In the inner region the quantum system’s time-dependent wavefunction is expanded on the eigenstate basis set of its field-free Hamiltonian representation while in the outer region its grid representation is considered. The present tutorial describes in detail the theoretical formulation for one-electron quantum systems. Example calculations are discussed for atomic hydrogen, H, and the molecular hydrogen ion, {{{H}}}2+, in intense laser fields.

  16. Age-induced hair greying - the multiple effects of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Seiberg, M

    2013-12-01

    An obvious sign of ageing is hair greying, or the loss of pigment production and deposition within the hair shafts. Numerous mechanisms, acting at different levels and follicular locations, contribute to hair greying, ranging from melanocyte stem cells defects to follicular melanocyte death. One key issue that is in common to these processes is oxidative damage. At the hair follicle stem cells niche, oxidative stress, accelerated by B-cell lymphoma 2 gene (BCL-2) depletion, leads to selective apoptosis and diminution of melanocyte stem cells, reducing the repopulation of newly formed anagen follicles. Melanotic bulbar melanocytes express high levels of BCL-2 to enable survival from melanogenesis- and ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) attacks. With ageing, the bulbar melanocyte expression of anti-oxidant proteins such as BCL-2, and possibly TRP-2, is reduced, and the dedicated enzymatic anti-oxidant defence system throughout the follicle weakens, resulting in enhanced oxidative stress. A marked reduction in catalase expression and activity results in millimolar accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, contributing to bulbar melanocyte malfunction and death. Interestingly, amelanotic melanocytes at the outer root sheath (ORS) are somewhat less affected by these processes and survive for longer time even within the white, ageing hair follicles. Better understanding of the overtime susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress at the different follicular locations might yield clues to possible therapies for the prevention and reversal of hair greying.

  17. Modulation of Cell Metabolic Pathways and Oxidative Stress Signaling Contribute to Acquired Melphalan Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zub, Kamila Anna; de Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70–80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance. PMID:25769101

  18. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70-80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance.

  19. Effect of temperature in multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress in coastal shrimp.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Catarina; Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joma; Diniz, Mário S

    2014-04-01

    Various studies in captivity and in the wild have pointed to the effect of season, and temperature in particular, in the levels of the oxidative stress biomarkers currently used for environmental quality assessment. However, knowledge on how temperature affects the oxidative stress response is unavailable for most species. This study investigated the effect of increasing temperature on lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase in the shrimps, Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus. It was concluded that increasing temperatures significantly affect all the biomarkers tested in both species, with the exception of superoxide dismutase in P. serratus which was not affected by temperature. The oxidative stress response was more intense in P. elegans, than in P. serratus, producing higher peaks of all biomarkers at temperatures between 22°C and 26°C, followed by low levels at higher temperatures. It was concluded that monitoring of ecosystems using oxidative stress biomarkers should take into account the species and thermal history of the organisms. Sampling should be avoided during heat waves and immediately after heat waves.

  20. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  1. Chop deletion reduces oxidative stress, improves beta cell function, and promotes cell survival in multiple mouse models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Benbo; Scheuner, Donalyn; Ron, David; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaufman, Randal J

    2008-10-01

    The progression from insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes is caused by the failure of pancreatic beta cells to produce sufficient levels of insulin to meet the metabolic demand. Recent studies indicate that nutrient fluctuations and insulin resistance increase proinsulin synthesis in beta cells beyond the capacity for folding of nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen, thereby disrupting ER homeostasis and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). Chronic ER stress promotes apoptosis, at least in part through the UPR-induced transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). We assessed the effect of Chop deletion in multiple mouse models of type 2 diabetes and found that Chop-/- mice had improved glycemic control and expanded beta cell mass in all conditions analyzed. In both genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance, CHOP deficiency improved beta cell ultrastructure and promoted cell survival. In addition, we found that isolated islets from Chop-/- mice displayed increased expression of UPR and oxidative stress response genes and reduced levels of oxidative damage. These findings suggest that CHOP is a fundamental factor that links protein misfolding in the ER to oxidative stress and apoptosis in beta cells under conditions of increased insulin demand.

  2. Origin of Multiple Peaks in the Potentiodynamic Oxidation of CO Adlayers on Pt and Ru-Modified Pt Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongsen; Abruña, Héctor D

    2015-05-21

    The study of the electrooxidation mechanism of CO(ad) on Pt based catalysts is very important for designing more effective CO-tolerant electrocatalysts for fuel cells. We have studied the origin of multiple peaks in the cyclic voltammograms of CO stripping from polycrystalline Pt and Ru modified polycrystalline Pt (Pt/Ru) surfaces in both acidic and alkaline media by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS), DFT calculations, and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. A new CO(ad) electrooxidation kinetic model on heterogeneous Pt and Pt/Ru catalysts is proposed to account for the multiple peaks experimentally observed. In this model, OH species prefer to adsorb at low-coordination sites or Ru sites and, thus, suppress CO repopulation from high-coordination sites onto these sites. Therefore, CO(ad) oxidation occurs on different facets or regions, leading to multiplicity of CO stripping peaks. This work provides a new insight into the CO electrooxidation mechanism and kinetics on heterogeneous catalysts.

  3. Visible light-induced formation of corrole-manganese(V)-oxo complexes: Observation of multiple oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ka, Wai Kwong; Ngo, Fung Lee; Ranburger, Davis; Malone, Jonathan; Zhang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    Two manganese(V)-oxo corroles [Mn(V)(Cor)O] that differ in their electronic environments were produced by visible light irradiation of highly photo-labile corrole-manganese(IV) bromates. The corrole ligands under study include 5,10,15-tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole (TPFC), and 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole (TPC). The kinetics of oxygen transfer atom (OAT) reactions with various organic reductants by these photo-generated Mn(V)(Cor)O were also studied in CH3CN and CH2Cl2 solutions. Mn(V)(Cor)O exhibits remarkable solvent and ligand effect on its reactivity and spectral behavior. In the more electron-deficient TPFC system and in the polar solvent CH3CN, Mn(V)(Cor)O returned Mn(III) corrole in the end of oxidation reactions. However, in the less polar solvent CH2Cl2 or in the less electron-deficient TPC system, Mn(IV) product was formed instead of Mn(III). Furthermore, with the same substrates and in the same solvent, the order of reactivity of Mn(V)(Cor)O was TPC>TPFC, which is inverted from that expected based on the electron-demand of corrole ligands. Our spectral and kinetic results in this study provide compelling evidence in favor of multiple oxidation pathways, where Mn(V)(Cor)O may serve as direct two-electron oxidant or undergo a disproportionation reaction to form a manganese(VI)-oxo corrole as the true oxidant. The choice of pathways is strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent and the corrole ligand.

  4. Arsenite oxidizing multiple metal resistant bacteria isolated from industrial effluent: their potential use in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Naureen, Ayesha; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-08-01

    Arsenite oxidizing bacteria, isolated from industrial wastewater, showed high resistance against arsenite (40 mM) and other heavy metals (10 mM Pb; 8 mM Cd; 6 mM Cr; 10 mM Cu and 26.6 mM As(5+)). Bacterial isolates were characterized, on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA ribotyping, as Bacillus cereus (1.1S) and Acinetobacter junii (1.3S). The optimum temperature and pH for the growth of both strains were found to be 37 °C and 7. Both the strains showed maximum growth after 24 h of incubation. The predominant form of arsenite oxidase was extracellular in B. cereus while in A. junii both types of activities, intracellular and extracellular, were found. The extracellular aresenite oxidase activity was found to be 730 and 750 µM/m for B. cereus and A. junii, respectively. The arsenite oxidase from both bacterial strains showed maximum activity at 37 °C, pH 7 and enhanced in the presence of Zn(2+). The presence of two protein bands with molecular weight of approximately 70 and 14 kDa in the presence of arsenic points out a possible role in arsenite oxidation. Arsenite oxidation potential of B. cereus and A. junii was determined up to 92 and 88 % in industrial wastewater after 6 days of incubation. The bacterial treated wastewater improved the growth of Vigna radiata as compared to the untreated wastewater. It indicates that these bacterial strains may find some potential applications in wastewater treatment systems to transform toxic arsenite into less toxic form, arsenate.

  5. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R.; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ. PMID:24913629

  6. Theoretical study of the protonation of the one-electron-reduced guanine-cytosine base pair by water.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sodio C N; Wang, Tzu-Pin; Kao, Chai-Lin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Hsing-Yin

    2013-02-21

    Prototropic equilibria in ionized DNA play an important role in charge transport and radiation damage of DNA and, therefore, continue to attract considerable attention. Although it is well-established that electron attachment will induce an interbase proton transfer from N1 of guanine (G) to N3 of cytosine (C), the question of whether the surrounding water in the major and minor grooves can protonate the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair still remains open. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the energetics and mechanism for the protonation of the one-electron-reduced G:C base pair by water. Through the calculations of thermochemical cycles, the protonation free energies were estimated to be in the range of 11.6-14.2 kcal/mol. The calculations for the models of C(•-)(H(2)O)(8) and G(-H1)(-)(H(2)O)(16), which were used to simulate the detailed processes of protonation by water before and after the interbase proton transfer, respectively, revealed that the protonation proceeds through a concerted double proton transfer involving the water molecules in the first and second hydration shells. Comparing the present results with the rates of interbase proton transfer and charge transfer along DNA suggests that protonation on the C(•-) moiety is not competitive with interbase proton transfer, but the possibility of protonation on the G(-H1)(-) moiety after interbase proton transfer cannot be excluded. Electronic-excited-state calculations were also carried out by the time-dependent DFT approach. This information is valuable for experimental identification in the future.

  7. Multiple Supersonic Phase Fronts Launched at a Complex-Oxide Heterointerface.

    PubMed

    Först, M; Beyerlein, K R; Mankowsky, R; Hu, W; Mattoni, G; Catalano, S; Gibert, M; Yefanov, O; Clark, J N; Frano, A; Glownia, J M; Chollet, M; Lemke, H; Moser, B; Collins, S P; Dhesi, S S; Caviglia, A D; Triscone, J-M; Cavalleri, A

    2017-01-13

    Selective optical excitation of a substrate lattice can drive phase changes across heterointerfaces. This phenomenon is a nonequilibrium analogue of static strain control in heterostructures and may lead to new applications in optically controlled phase change devices. Here, we make use of time-resolved nonresonant and resonant x-ray diffraction to clarify the underlying physics and to separate different microscopic degrees of freedom in space and time. We measure the dynamics of the lattice and that of the charge disproportionation in NdNiO_{3}, when an insulator-metal transition is driven by coherent lattice distortions in the LaAlO_{3} substrate. We find that charge redistribution propagates at supersonic speeds from the interface into the NdNiO_{3} film, followed by a sonic lattice wave. When combined with measurements of magnetic disordering and of the metal-insulator transition, these results establish a hierarchy of events for ultrafast control at complex-oxide heterointerfaces.

  8. Multiple Supersonic Phase Fronts Launched at a Complex-Oxide Heterointerface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Först, M.; Beyerlein, K. R.; Mankowsky, R.; Hu, W.; Mattoni, G.; Catalano, S.; Gibert, M.; Yefanov, O.; Clark, J. N.; Frano, A.; Glownia, J. M.; Chollet, M.; Lemke, H.; Moser, B.; Collins, S. P.; Dhesi, S. S.; Caviglia, A. D.; Triscone, J.-M.; Cavalleri, A.

    2017-01-01

    Selective optical excitation of a substrate lattice can drive phase changes across heterointerfaces. This phenomenon is a nonequilibrium analogue of static strain control in heterostructures and may lead to new applications in optically controlled phase change devices. Here, we make use of time-resolved nonresonant and resonant x-ray diffraction to clarify the underlying physics and to separate different microscopic degrees of freedom in space and time. We measure the dynamics of the lattice and that of the charge disproportionation in NdNiO3 , when an insulator-metal transition is driven by coherent lattice distortions in the LaAlO3 substrate. We find that charge redistribution propagates at supersonic speeds from the interface into the NdNiO3 film, followed by a sonic lattice wave. When combined with measurements of magnetic disordering and of the metal-insulator transition, these results establish a hierarchy of events for ultrafast control at complex-oxide heterointerfaces.

  9. Self-interaction correction in multiple scattering theory: application to transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Daene, Markus W; Lueders, Martin; Ernst, Arthur; Diemo, Koedderitzsch; Temmerman, Walter M; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    We apply to transition metal monoxides the self-interaction corrected (SIC) local spin density (LSD) approximation, implemented locally in the multiple scattering theory within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) band structure method. The calculated electronic structure and in particular magnetic moments and energy gaps are discussed in reference to the earlier SIC results obtained within the LMTO-ASA band structure method, involving transformations between Bloch and Wannier representations to solve the eigenvalue problem and calculate the SIC charge and potential. Since the KKR can be easily extended to treat disordered alloys, by invoking the coherent potential approximation (CPA), in this paper we compare the CPA approach and supercell calculations to study the electronic structure of NiO with cation vacancies.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of dye waste water by biomass charcoal loaded multiple rare earth composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriga; CHEN, Liping

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the individual effect as well as the interactions of different influencing factors like catalyst dosage, aeration rate, temperature and pH on the removal of methylene blue (MB) using biomass charcoal loaded multiple rare earth composite material. Design-Expert 7.0 was used to design testing program and establish response surface model. The result showed that among the factors, catalyst dosage played the most important role, then pH value, aeration rate and temperature in turn. By the optimization of process parameters, the optimum experimental conditions were catalyst dosage of 2.50 g, aeration rate of 2.5 L·min-1, temperature of 21 °C and pH value of 12, under these optimum conditions, maximum predicted and observed decolorization rate were 100.00% and 99.61%, the observed value was well match with the predicted value.

  11. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry.

  12. New Insights into the Role of Oxidative Stress Mechanisms in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by an inflammatory process and demyelination. The etiology of the disease is still not fully understood. Therefore, finding new etiological factors is of such crucial importance. It is suspected that the development of MS may be affected by oxidative stress (OS). In the acute phase OS initiates inflammatory processes and in the chronic phase it sustains neurodegeneration. Redox processes in MS are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, dysregulation of axonal bioenergetics, iron accumulation in the brain, impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, and OS memory. The present paper is a review of the current literature about the role of OS in MS and it focuses on all major aspects. The article explains the mechanisms of OS, reports unique biomarkers with regard to their clinical significance, and presents a poorly understood relationship between OS and neurodegeneration. It also provides novel methods of treatment, including the use of antioxidants and the role of antioxidants in neuroprotection. Furthermore, adding new drugs in the treatment of relapse may be useful. The article considers the significance of OS in the current treatment of MS patients. PMID:27829982

  13. New Insights into the Role of Oxidative Stress Mechanisms in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Bożena; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by an inflammatory process and demyelination. The etiology of the disease is still not fully understood. Therefore, finding new etiological factors is of such crucial importance. It is suspected that the development of MS may be affected by oxidative stress (OS). In the acute phase OS initiates inflammatory processes and in the chronic phase it sustains neurodegeneration. Redox processes in MS are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, dysregulation of axonal bioenergetics, iron accumulation in the brain, impaired oxidant/antioxidant balance, and OS memory. The present paper is a review of the current literature about the role of OS in MS and it focuses on all major aspects. The article explains the mechanisms of OS, reports unique biomarkers with regard to their clinical significance, and presents a poorly understood relationship between OS and neurodegeneration. It also provides novel methods of treatment, including the use of antioxidants and the role of antioxidants in neuroprotection. Furthermore, adding new drugs in the treatment of relapse may be useful. The article considers the significance of OS in the current treatment of MS patients.

  14. Is warmer better? Decreased oxidative damage in notothenioid fish after long-term acclimation to multiple stressors.

    PubMed

    Enzor, Laura A; Place, Sean P

    2014-09-15

    Antarctic fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have evolved several unique adaptations to deal with subzero temperatures. However, these adaptations may come with physiological trade-offs, such as an increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. As such, the expected environmental perturbations brought on by global climate change have the potential to significantly increase the level of oxidative stress and cellular damage in these endemic fish. Previous single stressor studies of the notothenioids have shown they possess the capacity to acclimate to increased temperatures, but the cellular-level effects remain largely unknown. Additionally, there is little information on the ability of Antarctic fish to respond to ecologically relevant environmental changes where multiple variables change concomitantly. We have examined the potential synergistic effects that increased temperature and Ṗ(CO2) have on the level of protein damage in Trematomus bernacchii, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus newnesi, and combined these measurements with changes in total enzymatic activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in order to gauge tissue-specific changes in antioxidant capacity. Our findings indicate that total SOD and CAT activity levels displayed only small changes across treatments and tissues. Short-term acclimation to decreased seawater pH and increased temperature resulted in significant increases in oxidative damage. Surprisingly, despite no significant change in antioxidant capacity, cellular damage returned to near-basal levels, and significantly decreased in T. bernacchii, after long-term acclimation. Overall, these data suggest that notothenioid fish currently maintain the antioxidant capacity necessary to offset predicted future ocean conditions, but it remains unclear whether this capacity comes with physiological trade-offs.

  15. Striking multiple synergies created by combining reduced graphene oxides and carbon nanotubes for polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping'an; Liu, Lina; Fu, Shenyuan; Yu, Youming; Jin, Chunde; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2013-03-01

    The extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene stimulate the development of advanced composites. Recently, several studies have reported significant synergies in the mechanical, electrical and thermal conductivity properties of polymer nanocomposites by incorporating their nanohybrids. In this work, we created polypropylene nanocomposites with homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and reduced graphene oxides via a facile polymer-latex-coating plus melt-mixing strategy, and investigated their synergistic effects in their viscoelastic, gas barrier, and flammability properties. Interestingly, the results show remarkable synergies, enhancing their melt modulus and viscosity, O2 barrier, and flame retardancy properties and respectively exhibiting a synergy percentage of 15.9%, 45.3%, and 20.3%. As previously reported, we also observed remarkable synergistic effects in their tensile strength (14.3%) and Young’s modulus (27.1%), electrical conductivity (32.3%) and thermal conductivity (34.6%). These impressive results clearly point towards a new strategy to create advanced materials by adding binary combinations of different types of nanofillers.

  16. Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Orphan, Victoria J; House, Christopher H; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; McKeegan, Kevin D; DeLong, Edward F

    2002-05-28

    No microorganism capable of anaerobic growth on methane as the sole carbon source has yet been cultivated. Consequently, information about these microbes has been inferred from geochemical and microbiological observations of field samples. Stable isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers and rRNA gene surveys have implicated specific microbes in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here we use combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses, to identify anaerobic methanotrophs in marine methane-seep sediments. The results provide direct evidence for the involvement of at least two distinct archaeal groups (ANME-1 and ANME-2) in AOM at methane seeps. Although both archaeal groups often occurred in direct physical association with bacteria, they also were observed as monospecific aggregations and as single cells. The ANME-1 archaeal group more frequently existed in monospecific aggregations or as single filaments, apparently without a bacterial partner. Bacteria associated with both archaeal groups included, but were not limited to, close relatives of Desulfosarcina species. Isotopic analyses suggest that monospecific archaeal cells and cell aggregates were active in anaerobic methanotrophy, as were multispecies consortia. In total, the data indicate that the microbial species and biotic interactions mediating anaerobic methanotrophy are diverse and complex. The data also clearly show that highly structured ANME-2/Desulfosarcina consortia are not the sole entities responsible for AOM at marine methane seeps. Other microbial groups, including ANME-1 archaea, are capable of anaerobic methane consumption either as single cells, in monospecific aggregates, or in multispecies consortia.

  17. A multiple shock tube and chemical kinetic modeling study of diethyl ether pyrolysis and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, K; Gillespie, F; Simmie, J M; Curran, H J; Kuraguchi, Y; Hoshikawa, H; Yamane, M; Hidaka, Y

    2010-09-02

    The pyrolysis and oxidation of diethyl ether (DEE) has been studied at pressures from 1 to 4 atm and temperatures of 900-1900 K behind reflected shock waves. A variety of spectroscopic diagnostics have been used, including time-resolved infrared absorption at 3.39 mum and time-resolved ultraviolet emission at 431 nm and absorption at 306.7 nm. In addition, a single-pulse shock tube was used to measure reactant, intermediate, and product species profiles by GC samplings at different reaction times varying from 1.2 to 1.8 ms. A detailed chemical kinetic model comprising 751 reactions involving 148 species was assembled and tested against the experiments with generally good agreement. In the early stages of reaction the unimolecular decomposition and hydrogen atom abstraction of DEE and the decomposition of the ethoxy radical have the largest influence. In separate experiments at 1.9 atm and 1340 K, it is shown that DEE inhibits the reactivity of an equimolar mixture of hydrogen and oxygen (1% of each).

  18. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, M.P.; Cedraz-Mercez, P.L.; Varanda, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1) the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2) synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON. PMID:24519124

  19. Electrical properties of single and multiple poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanowires for sensing nitric oxide gas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui-Hsin; Lin, Chia-Yu; Hsiao, Tzu-Chien; Fang, Yueh-Yuan; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Yang, Dongfang; Lee, Chih-Kung; Hsu, Su-Ming; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2009-04-27

    The electrical properties of conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), nanowires were studied to develop nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors with low working temperatures. A nanowire with a diameter of 300 nm was fabricated using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) across a 55 microm gap between a pair of electrodes. The electrical properties of single or multiple PEDOT nanowires were examined by plotting the current-voltage (I-V) curves in the range -3 V to +3 V at temperatures between 298 K and 393 K. The conductance of parallel wires was normalized with respect to the dimensions of the fabricated nanowires. The single nanowire exhibited nonlinear conductance associated with hysteresis but multiple wires did not. The currents increased with the temperature and the I-V characteristics were consistent with the power law G(T)alphaT(alpha) with alpha approximately 5.14 and 5.43. The responses to NO were highly linear and reproducible, indicating that sensing using PEDOT nanowires was reliable with a minimal concentration of NO of 10 ppm.

  20. The effect of albedo neutrons on the neutron multiplication of small plutonium oxide samples in a PNCC chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourva, L. C.-A.; Croft, S.; Weaver, D. R.

    2002-03-01

    This paper describes how to evaluate the effect of neutrons reflected from parts of a passive neutron coincidence chamber on the neutron leakage self-multiplication, ML, of a fissile sample. It is shown that albedo neutrons contribute, in the case of small plutonium bearing samples, to a significant part of ML, and that their effect has to be taken into account in the relationship between the measured coincidence count rates and the 240Pu effective mass of the sample. A simple one-interaction model has been used to write the balance of neutron gains and losses in the material when exposed to the re-entrant neutron flux. The energy and intensity profiles of the re-entrant flux have been parameterised using Monte Carlo MCNP TM calculations. This technique has been implemented for the On Site Laboratory neutron/gamma counter within the existing MEPL 1.0 code for the determination of the neutron leakage self-multiplication. Benchmark tests of the resulting MEPL 2.0 code with MCNP TM calculations showed that for typical safeguard samples the newly developed code estimates ( ML-1) to within 1% of the MCNP TM results. The precision of these results along with the rapidity of the proposed calculation method therefore make the use of a "known ML" approach for solving the Böhnel equations very attractive when measuring density controlled gram size PuO 2 or Mixed Oxide (MOX) samples.

  1. Using multiple hydrogen bonding cross-linkers to access reversibly responsive three dimensional graphene oxide architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junkai; Shen, Yongtao; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene materials have attracted a lot of attention for efficiently utilizing inherent properties of graphene sheets. However, 3D graphene materials reported in the previous literature are constructed through covalent or weak non-covalent interactions, causing permanent structure/property changes. In this paper, a novel 3D graphene material of dynamic interactions between lamellas with 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone as a supra-molecular motif has been synthesized. This 3D graphene material shows enhanced sheet interactions while the cross-linking takes place. With proper solvent stimulation, the integrated 3D graphene material can disassemble as isolated sheets. The driving force for the 3D structure assembly or disassembly is considered to be the forming or breaking of the multiple hydrogen bonding pairs. Furthermore, the 3D material is used as an intelligent dye adsorber to adsorb methylene blue and release it. The controllable and reversible characteristic of this 3D graphene material may open an avenue to the synthesis and application of novel intelligent materials.Three-dimensional (3D) graphene materials have attracted a lot of attention for efficiently utilizing inherent properties of graphene sheets. However, 3D graphene materials reported in the previous literature are constructed through covalent or weak non-covalent interactions, causing permanent structure/property changes. In this paper, a novel 3D graphene material of dynamic interactions between lamellas with 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone as a supra-molecular motif has been synthesized. This 3D graphene material shows enhanced sheet interactions while the cross-linking takes place. With proper solvent stimulation, the integrated 3D graphene material can disassemble as isolated sheets. The driving force for the 3D structure assembly or disassembly is considered to be the forming or breaking of the multiple hydrogen bonding pairs. Furthermore, the 3D material is used as an

  2. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  3. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  4. Genetic, Immune-Inflammatory, and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers as Predictors for Disability and Disease Progression in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kallaur, Ana Paula; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Oliveira, Sayonara Rangel; Simão, Andrea Name Colado; Pereira, Wildea Lice de Carvalho Jennings; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Flauzino, Tamires; Proença, Caio de Meleck; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Kaimen-Maciel, Damacio Ramón; Maes, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the TNFβ NcoI polymorphism (rs909253) and immune-inflammatory, oxidative, and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) biomarkers as predictors of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). We included 212 MS patients (150 female, 62 male, mean (±standard deviation (SD)) age = 42.7 ± 13.8 years) and 249 healthy controls (177 female, 72 male, 36.8 ± 11 years). The disability was measured the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in 2006 and 2011. We determined the TNFβ NcoI polymorphism and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17, albumin, ferritin, and plasma levels of lipid hydroperoxides (CL-LOOH), carbonyl protein, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP). The mean EDSS (±SD) in 2006 was 1.62 ± 2.01 and in 2011 3.16 ± 2.29, and disease duration was 7.34 ± 7.0 years. IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, AOPP, and NOx levels were significantly higher and IL-4 lower in MS patients with a higher 2011 EDSS scores (≥3) as compared with those with EDSS < 3. The actual increases in EDSS from 2006 to 2011 were positively associated with TNF-α and IFN-γ. Increased IFN-γ values were associated with higher pyramidal symptoms and increased IL-6 with sensitive symptoms. Increased carbonyl protein and IL-10 but lowered albumin levels predicted cerebellar symptoms. The TNFB1/B2 genotype decreased risk towards progression of pyramidal symptoms. Treatments with IFN-β and glatiramer acetate significantly reduced TNF-α but did not affect the other IO&NS biomarkers or disease progression. Taken together, IO&NS biomarkers and NcoI TNFβ genotypes predict high disability in MS and are associated with different aspects of disease progression. New drugs to treat MS should also target oxidative stress pathways.

  5. A simple quasi-diabatization scheme suitable for spectroscopic problems based on one-electron properties of interacting states

    SciTech Connect

    Cave, Robert J.; Stanton, John F.

    2016-02-07

    We present a simple quasi-diabatization scheme applicable to spectroscopic studies that can be applied using any wavefunction for which one-electron properties and transition properties can be calculated. The method is based on rotation of a pair (or set) of adiabatic states to minimize the difference between the given transition property at a reference geometry of high symmetry (where the quasi-diabatic states and adiabatic states coincide) and points of lower symmetry where quasi-diabatic quantities are desired. Compared to other quasi-diabatization techniques, the method requires no special coding, facilitates direct comparison between quasi-diabatic quantities calculated using different types of wavefunctions, and is free of any selection of configurations in the definition of the quasi-diabatic states. On the other hand, the method appears to be sensitive to multi-state issues, unlike recent methods we have developed that use a configurational definition of quasi-diabatic states. Results are presented and compared with two other recently developed quasi-diabatization techniques.

  6. Accurate calculation of absolute one-electron redox potentials of some para-quinone derivatives in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2007-08-02

    Standard ab initio molecular orbital theory and density functional theory calculations have been used to calculate absolute one-electron reduction potentials of several para-quinones in acetonitrile. The high-level composite method of G3(MP2)-RAD is used for the gas-phase calculations and a continuum model of solvation, CPCM, has been employed to calculate solvation energies. To compare the theoretical reduction potentials with experiment, the reduction potentials relative to a standard calomel electrode (SCE) have also been calculated and compared to experimental values. The average error of the calculated reduction potentials using the proposed method is 0.07 V without any additional approximation. An ONIOM method in which the core is studied at G3(MP2)-RAD and the substituent effect of the rest of the molecule is studied at R(O)MP2/6-311+G(3df,2p) provides an accurate low-cost alternative to G3(MP2)-RAD for larger molecules.

  7. Electron-nuclear dynamics of the one-electron nonlinear polyatomic molecule H32+ in ultrashort intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, C.; Lu, H. Z.; Chelkowski, S.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2014-02-01

    A quantum description of the one-electron triangular H32+ molecular ion, beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, is used to study the full influence of the nuclear motion on the high-intensity photoionization and harmonic generation processes. A detailed analysis of electron and proton motions and their time-dependent acceleration allows for identification of the main electron recollision events as a function of time-dependent configuration of the protons. High-order-harmonic generation photons are shown to be produced by single-electron recollision in the second half of the pulse envelope, which also induces a redshift in the harmonics, due to the rapid few-femtosecond motions of protons. Perpendicular harmonics are produced, in general, with a linearly polarized laser pulse parallel to a bond of the triangular molecule, and, in particular, the harmonics in the cutoff region are elliptically polarized. When the laser-pulse polarization is parallel to a symmetry axis of the triangular molecular ion, creation and destruction of the chemical bond perpendicular to the polarization is predicted on a near-femtosecond time scale.

  8. Pulse-radiolysis studies on the interaction of one-electron-reduced species with ascorbate oxidase in aqueous solution.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, P; Fielden, E M; Finazzi-Agrò, A; Avigliano, L

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of e-aq., CO2-. and one-electron reduced nitroaromatics (RNO2-.) with ascorbate oxidase (AAO) was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.5 by using the technique of pulse radiolysis. From observations at 330, 410 and 610 nm, interaction of e-aq. and CO2-. with AAO results in non-specific reduction of the protein followed by reduction of Type 1 Cu in a rate-determining intramolecular step. Only a few per cent of the reducing equivalents ultimately results in reduction of Type 1 Cu. With large excesses of reducing equivalents (e-aq. and CO2-.) with respect to the copper concentration, the amount of Type 1 copper reduced never exceeds 50% of the total amount of Type 1 copper after a single radiation pulse. With less-powerful reducing agents, e.g. RNO2-. reduction of Type 1 Cu occurs via a bimolecular step, and there is no evidence for formation of radicals on protein residues. From observations at 330 nm it is evident that Type 2 and/or Type 3 Cu may also be reduced along with Type 1 Cu. Almost stoichiometric reduction of AAO by RNO2-. was observed, e.g. the protein accepts 6-7 reducing equivalents. It is inferred that the various types of redox couples Cu2+/Cu+ are in equilibrium and that intramolecular electron transfer between the different types of Cu is not rate-determining when using RNO2-. as reducing agent. PMID:6405732

  9. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  10. Oxidative responsiveness to multiple stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki: Interactions between temperature, acidification and cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Maura; Lanzoni, Ilaria; Nardi, Alessandro; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Marta; Fattorini, Daniele; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    High-latitude marine ecosystems are ranked to be among the most sensitive regions to climate change since highly stenothermal and specially adapted organisms might be seriously affected by global warming and ocean acidification. The present investigation was aimed to provide new insights on the sensitivity to such environmental stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki, focussing also on their synergistic effects with cadmium exposure, naturally abundant in this area for upwelling phenomena. Scallops were exposed for 2 weeks to various combinations of Cd (0 and 40 μgL-1), pH (8.05 and 7.60) and temperature (-1 and +1 °C). Beside Cd bioaccumulation, a wide panel of early warning biomarkers were analysed in digestive glands and gills including levels of metallothioneins, individual antioxidants and total oxyradical scavenging capacity, onset of oxidative cell damage like lipid peroxidation, lysosomal stability, DNA integrity and peroxisomal proliferation. Results indicated reciprocal interactions between multiple stressors and their elaboration by a quantitative hazard model based on the relevance and magnitude of effects, highlighted a different sensitivity of analysed tissues. Due to cellular adaptations to high basal Cd content, digestive gland appeared more tolerant toward other prooxidant stressors, but sensitive to variations of the metal. On the other hand, gills were more affected by various combinations of stressors occurring at higher temperature.

  11. Impact of graphene oxide on the structure and function of important multiple blood components by a dose-dependent pattern.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ru; Yu, Yueping; Shen, Chaoxuan; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2015-06-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become great concern in biomedical fields. Though many investigations about their toxicity have been reported, systematic investigation on the interaction with multiple blood components is lacking. In this work, we studied the effects of the graphene oxide (GO) on the structure and function of the blood components, especially, on morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen conformation, complement activation, and blood coagulation function. Scanning electron microscopy observation and hemolysis test results showed that the GO can affect RBC morphology and membrane integrity in a concentration-dependent way. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra showed that GO could alter the secondary structures and conformation of BSA and fibrinogen. In addition, the presence of GO could also trigger complement activation by detecting their key biomarker molecules in plasma. In the blood clotting process, the GO showed significant adverse effect on the activated partial thromboplastin time but not on prothrombin time of the platelet-poor plasma. Meanwhile, the GO also caused abnormal thromboelastography parameters of the whole blood coagulation. The results obtained in this study provides good insight into understanding the biomedical application of GO in vivo.

  12. Multiple sulfur isotope composition of oxidized Samoan melts and the implications of a sulfur isotope 'mantle array' in chemical geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    To better address how subducted protoliths drive the Earth's mantle sulfur isotope heterogeneity, we report new data for sulfur (S) and copper (Cu) abundances, S speciation and multiple S isotopic compositions (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) in 15 fresh submarine basaltic glasses from the Samoan archipelago, which defines the enriched-mantle-2 (EM2) endmember. Bulk S abundances vary between 835 and 2279 ppm. About 17 ± 11% of sulfur is oxidized (S6+) but displays no consistent trend with bulk S abundance or any other geochemical tracer. The S isotope composition of both dissolved sulfide and sulfate yield homogeneous Δ33S and Δ36S values, within error of Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT). In contrast, δ34S values are variable, ranging between +0.11 and +2.79‰ (±0.12‰ 1σ) for reduced sulfur, whereas oxidized sulfur values vary between +4.19 and +9.71‰ (±0.80‰, 1σ). Importantly, δ34S of the reduced S pool correlates with the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the glasses, in a manner similar to that previously reported for South-Atlantic MORB, extending the trend to δ34S values up to + 2.79 ± 0.04 ‰, the highest value reported for undegassed oceanic basalts. As for EM-1 basalts from the South Atlantic ridge, the linear δ34S-87Sr/86Sr trend requires the EM-2 endmember to be relatively S-rich, and only sediments can account for these isotopic characteristics. While many authors argue that both the EM-1 and EM-2 mantle components record subduction of various protoliths (e.g. upper or lower continental crust, lithospheric mantle versus intra-metasomatized mantle, or others), it is proposed here that they primarily reflect sediment recycling. Their distinct Pb isotope variation can be accounted for by varying the proportion of S-poor recycled oceanic crust in the source of mantle plumes.

  13. Efficacy of Fish Oil on Serum of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 Oxidative Stress Markers in Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Interferon Beta-1b

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Ramirez, V.; Macias-Islas, M. A.; Ortiz, G. G.; Pacheco-Moises, F.; Torres-Sanchez, E. D.; Sorto-Gomez, T. E.; Cruz-Ramos, J. A.; Orozco-Aviña, G.; Celis de la Rosa, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to focal plaques of demyelination and tissue injury in the central nervous system. Oxidative stress is also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Current research findings suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as eicosapenta-enoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) contained in fish oil may have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of fish oil supplementation on serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative stress markers, and disease progression in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. The primary outcome was serum TNFα levels; secondary outcomes were IL-1β 1b, IL-6, nitric oxide catabolites, lipoperoxides, progression on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), and annualized relapses rate (ARR). Fish oil treatment decreased the serum levels of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide metabolites compared with placebo group (P ≤ 0.001). There was no significant difference in serum lipoperoxide levels during the study. No differences in EDSS and ARR were found. Conclusion. Fish oil supplementation is highly effective in reducing the levels of cytokines and nitric oxide catabolites in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. PMID:23861993

  14. Tissue- and development-specific expression of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M A; Cai, L; Hübner, N; Lee, Y A; Lindpaintner, K

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as an intercellular messenger and mediates numerous biological functions. Among the three isoforms of NO synthase that produce NO, the ubiquitously expressed neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) is responsible for a large part of NO production, yet its regulation is poorly understood. Recent reports of two alternative spliceforms of nNOS in the mouse and in man have raised the possibility of spatial and temporal modulation of expression. This study demonstrates the existence of at least three transcripts of the rat nNOS gene designated nNOSa, nNOSb, and nNOSc, respectively, with distinct 5' untranslated first exons that arise from alternative splicing to a common second exon. Expression of the alternative transcripts occurs with a high degree of tissue and developmental specificity, as demonstrated by RNase protection assays on multiple tissues from both fetal and adult rats. Furthermore, terminal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma-derived PC12 cells into neurons is associated with induction of nNOSa, suggesting, likewise, development- and tissue-specific transcriptional control of nNOS isoform expression. Physical mapping using a rat yeast artificial chromosome clone shows that the alternatively spliced first exons 1a, 1b, and 1c are separated by at least 15-60 kb from the downstream coding sequence, with exons 1b and 1c being positioned within 200 bp of each other. These findings provide evidence that the biological activity of nNOS is tightly and specifically regulated by a complex pattern of alternative splicing, indicating that the notion of constitutive expression of this isoform needs to be revised. PMID:9294118

  15. Nitric oxide-induced murine hematopoietic stem cell fate involves multiple signaling proteins, gene expression, and redox modulation.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Dias, Carolina C; Regina, Helena; Segreto, C; Addios, Priscilla C; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Barros, Carlos C; Higa, Elisa M S; Buri, Marcus V; Ferreira, Alice T; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

    2014-11-01

    There are a growing number of reports showing the influence of redox modulation in cellular signaling. Although the regulation of hematopoiesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has been described, their direct participation in the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains unclear. In this work, the direct role of nitric oxide (NO(•)), a RNS, in the modulation of hematopoiesis was investigated using two sources of NO(•) , one produced by endothelial cells stimulated with carbachol in vitro and another using the NO(•)-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) in vivo. Two main NO(•) effects were observed: proliferation of HSCs-especially of the short-term HSCs-and its commitment and terminal differentiation to the myeloid lineage. NO(•)-induced proliferation was characterized by the increase in the number of cycling HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells positive to BrdU and Ki-67, upregulation of Notch-1, Cx43, PECAM-1, CaR, ERK1/2, Akt, p38, PKC, and c-Myc. NO(•)-induced HSCs differentiation was characterized by the increase in granulocytic-macrophage progenitors, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units, mature myeloid cells, upregulation of PU.1, and C/EBPα genes concomitantly to the downregulation of GATA-3 and Ikz-3 genes, activation of Stat5 and downregulation of the other analyzed proteins mentioned above. Also, redox status modulation differed between proliferation and differentiation responses, which is likely associated with the transition of the proliferative to differentiation status. Our findings provide evidence of the role of NO(•) in inducing HSCs proliferation and myeloid differentiation involving multiple signaling.

  16. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase is Involved in Vascular Hyporeactivity and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Associated with Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Regina; Chiazza, Fausto; Collino, Massimo; Assreuy, Jamil; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Severe hemorrhage can lead to global ischemia and hemorrhagic shock (HS), resulting in multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. Restoration of blood flow and re-oxygenation is associated with an exacerbation of tissue injury and inflammatory response. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has been implicated in vascular collapse and systemic inflammation of septic shock; however, the role of nNOS in HS is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of nNOS in the MOF associated with HS.Rats were subjected to HS under anesthesia. Mean arterial pressure was reduced to 30  mmHg for 90  min, followed by resuscitation with shed blood. Rats were randomly treated with two chemically distinct nNOS inhibitors [ARL 17477 (1 mg/kg) and 7-nitroindazol (5 mg/kg)] or vehicle upon resuscitation. Four hours later, parameters of organ injury and dysfunction were assessed.HS was associated with MOF development. Inhibition of nNOS activity at resuscitation protected rats against the MOF and vascular dysfunction. In addition, treatment of HS rats with nNOS inhibitors attenuated neutrophil infiltration into target organs and decreased the activation of NF-κB, iNOS expression, NO production, and nitrosylation of proteins. Furthermore, nNOS inhibition also reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in HS rats.In conclusion, two distinct inhibitors of nNOS activity reduced the MOF, vascular dysfunction, and the systemic inflammation associated with HS. Thus, nNOS inhibitors may be useful as an adjunct therapy before fluids and blood administration in HS patients to avoid the MOF associated with reperfusion injury during resuscitation.

  17. Determination of anesthetic molecule environments by infrared spectroscopy. II. Multiple sites for nitrous oxide in proteins, lipids, and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, J H; Gorga, J C; Caughey, W S

    1985-08-01

    The presence of molecules of the general anesthetic nitrous oxide (N2O) in oils, esters, proteins, red cells, cream, lipid vesicles, and brain tissue upon exposure to the gas was observed by infrared spectroscopy. Analysis of the N-N-O antisymmetric stretch band reveals a distribution of N2O molecules among several sites of differing polarity in these solutions and tissues. The sensitivity of the band intensity and frequency to the number and strength of the dipoles in the solvating molecules is demonstrated by the resolution of N2O-ester and N2O-alkane interactions in acetic acid ethyl ester and oleic acid methyl ester. In all aqueous solutions and in all tissues a population of N2O molecules in water is observed. At least two sites of N2O-protein interaction are observed in purified hemoglobin A and packed red cells; multiple N2O sites may also be present in bovine serum albumin. Two sites of N2O-lipid interaction are observed in whipping cream and in an aqueous suspension of phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The sites providing the least polar immediate environment to N2O in hemoglobin, cream, and vesicles give similar band frequencies to those found in pure alkane solvents. Infrared spectra of bovine brain tissue, upon exposure to N2O, show N2O molecules present in water and in two less-polar environments. Analysis of spectra of N2O in cerebellum tissue removed from a dog under halothane-N2O anesthesia reveals, in addition to N2O in water, a single population of N2O molecules in an alkane-like environment. Infrared spectroscopy provides a unique means of probing the structure of the environment of N2O and should prove useful in correlating anesthetic potency with anesthetic environment under physiological conditions.

  18. One-electron properties and electrostatic interaction energies from the expectation value expression and wave function of singles and doubles coupled cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Korona, Tatiana; Jeziorski, Bogumil

    2006-11-14

    One-electron density matrices resulting from the explicitly connected commutator expansion of the expectation value were implemented at the singles and doubles coupled cluster (CCSD) level. In the proposed approach the one-electron density matrix is obtained at a little extra cost in comparison to the calculation of the CCSD correlation energy. Therefore, in terms of the computational time the new method is significantly less demanding than the conventional linear-response CCSD theory which requires additionally an expensive calculation of the left-hand solution of the CCSD equations. The quality of the new density matrices was investigated by computing a set of one-electron properties for a series of molecules of varying sizes and comparing the results with data obtained using the full configuration interaction method or higher level coupled cluster theory. It has been found that the results obtained using the new approach are of the same quality as those predicted by the linear-response CCSD method. The novel one-electron density matrices have also been applied to study the energy of the electrostatic interaction for a number of van der Waals complexes, including the benzene and azulene dimers.

  19. One-electron oxidation of DNA by ionizing radiation: competition between base-to-base hole-transfer and hole-trapping.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kiran K K; Tyagi, Rahul; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Bernhard, William A

    2010-06-10

    The distance of hole migration through DNA determines the degree to which radiation-induced lesions are clustered. It is the degree of clustering that confers to ionizing radiation its high toxicity. The migration distance is governed by a competition between hole transfer and irreversible trapping reactions. An important type of trapping is reactions that lead to the formation of deoxyribose radicals, which are precursors to free base release (fbr). Using HPLC, fbr was measured in X-irradiated films of d(CGCGCGCGCG)(2) and d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2) as well as three genomic DNAs: M. luteus, calf thymus, and C. perfringens. The level of DNA hydration was varied from Gamma = 2.5 to 22 mol waters/mol nucleotide. The chemical yields of each base, G(base), were measured and used to calculate the modification factor, M(base). This factor compensates for differences in the GC/AT ratio, providing a measure of the degree to which a given base influences its own release. In the DNA oligomers, M(Gua) > M(Cyt), a result ascribed to the previously observed end effect in short oligomers. In the highly polymerized genomic DNA, we found that M(Cyt) > M(Gua) and that M(Thy) is consistently the smallest of the M factors. For these same DNA films, the yields of total DNA trapped radicals, G(tot)(fr), were measured using EPR spectroscopy. The yield of deoxyribose radicals was calculated using G(dRib)(fr) = approximately 0.11 x G(tot)(fr). Comparing G(dRib)(fr) with total fbr, we found that only about half of the fbr is accounted for by deoxyribose radical intermediates. We conclude that for a hole on cytosine, Cyt(*+), base-to-base hole transfer competes with irreversible trapping by the deoxyribose. In the case of a hole on thymine, Thy(*+), base-to-base hole transfer competes with irreversible trapping by methyl deprotonation. Close proximity of Gua protects the deoxyribose of Cyt but sensitizes the deoxyribose of Thy.

  20. EPR spin-trapping evidence for the direct, one-electron reduction of tert-butylhydroperoxide to the tert-butoxyl radical by copper(II): paradigm for a previously overlooked reaction in the initiation of lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clare M; Burkitt, Mark J

    2003-06-11

    Lipid peroxidation is often initiated using Cu(II) ions. It is widely assumed that Cu(II) oxidizes preformed lipid hydroperoxides to peroxyl radicals, which propagate oxidation of the parent fatty acid via hydrogen atom abstraction. However, the oxidation of alkyl hydroperoxides by Cu(II) is thermodynamically unfavorable. An alternative means by which Cu(II) ions could initiate lipid peroxidation is by their one-electron reduction of lipid hydroperoxides to alkoxyl radicals, which would be accompanied by the generation of Cu(III). We have investigated by EPR spectroscopy, in conjunction with the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, the reactions of various Cu(II) chelates with tert-butylhydroperoxide. Spectra contained signals from the tert-butoxyl, methyl, and methoxyl radical adducts. In many previous studies, the signal from the methoxyl adduct has been assigned incorrectly to the tert-butylperoxyl adduct, which is now known to be unstable, releasing the tert-butoxyl radical upon decomposition. This either is trapped by 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide or undergoes beta-scission to the methyl radical, which either is trapped or reacts with molecular oxygen to give, ultimately, the methoxyl radical adduct. By using metal chelates that are known to be specific in either their oxidation or reduction of tert-butylhydroperoxide (the Cu(II) complex of bathocuproine disulfonic acid and the Fe(II) complex of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, respectively) for comparison, we have been able to deduce, from the relative concentrations of the three radical adducts, that the Cu(II) complexes tested each reduce tert-butylhydroperoxide directly to the tert-butoxyl radical. These findings suggest that a previously overlooked reaction, namely the direct reduction of preformed lipid hydroperoxides to alkoxyl radicals by Cu(II), may be responsible for the initiation of lipid peroxidation by Cu(II) ions.

  1. PM2.5 collected in China causes inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in macrophages through the multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Ito, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; He, Cuiying; Arashidani, Keiichi; He, Miao; Sun, Guifan; Zeng, Yang; Sone, Hideko; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution continues to increase in East Asia, particularly in China, and is considered to cause serious health problems. In this study, we investigated the toxicological properties of particulate matter ≤2.5mm (PM2.5) collected in an urban area in China (Shenyang), focusing on inflammation and oxidative stress tightly linked to respiratory diseases. Exposure to PM2.5 significantly increased the expression levels of inflammatory (interleukin-1β and cyclooxygenase-2) and oxidative stress (heme oxygenase1) genes in the mouse macrophages. PM2.5-caused inflammatory response was strongly suppressed by endotoxin neutralizer (polymyxin B) and knock-out of toll-like receptor 4, while oxidative stress was not. On the other hand, an antioxidant (N-acetylcystein) suppressed oxidative stress, but not inflammatory response. These results suggest that PM2.5 in the atmospheric environment of China causes inflammation and oxidative stress in macrophages via separate pathways.

  2. Graphene oxide selectively targets cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: implications for non-toxic cancer treatment, via "differentiation-based nano-therapy".

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Marco; Verre, Andrea F; Iliut, Maria; Peiris-Pagés, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Gandara, Ricardo; Cappello, Anna Rita; Sotgia, Federica; Vijayaraghavan, Aravind; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-02-28

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a.k.a. cancer stem cells (CSCs), are difficult to eradicate with conventional approaches to cancer treatment, such as chemo-therapy and radiation. As a consequence, the survival of residual CSCs is thought to drive the onset of tumor recurrence, distant metastasis, and drug-resistance, which is a significant clinical problem for the effective treatment of cancer. Thus, novel approaches to cancer therapy are needed urgently, to address this clinical need. Towards this end, here we have investigated the therapeutic potential of graphene oxide to target cancer stem cells. Graphene and its derivatives are well-known, relatively inert and potentially non-toxic nano-materials that form stable dispersions in a variety of solvents. Here, we show that graphene oxide (of both big and small flake sizes) can be used to selectively inhibit the proliferative expansion of cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types. For this purpose, we employed the tumor-sphere assay, which functionally measures the clonal expansion of single cancer stem cells under anchorage-independent conditions. More specifically, we show that graphene oxide effectively inhibits tumor-sphere formation in multiple cell lines, across 6 different cancer types, including breast, ovarian, prostate, lung and pancreatic cancers, as well as glioblastoma (brain). In striking contrast, graphene oxide is non-toxic for "bulk" cancer cells (non-stem) and normal fibroblasts. Mechanistically, we present evidence that GO exerts its striking effects on CSCs by inhibiting several key signal transduction pathways (WNT, Notch and STAT-signaling) and thereby inducing CSC differentiation. Thus, graphene oxide may be an effective non-toxic therapeutic strategy for the eradication of cancer stem cells, via differentiation-based nano-therapy.

  3. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  4. Coulomb Blockade of the Conductivity of SiO{sub x} Films Due to One-Electron Charging of a Silicon Quantum Dot in a Chain of Electronic States

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, M.D.; Kamaev, G.N.; Volodin, V.A.; Arzhannikova, S.A.; Kachurin, G.A.; Cherkova, S.G.; Kretinin, A.V.; Malyutina-Bronskaya, V.V.; Marin, D.V.

    2005-08-15

    The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures with silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon oxide have been studied. The nanocrystals are formed by decomposition of an oversaturated solid solution of implanted silicon during thermal annealing at a temperature of {approx}1000 deg. C. At liquid-nitrogen temperature, a stepped current-voltage characteristic is observed in a MOS structure consisting of Si nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} film. The stepped current-voltage characteristic is, for the first time, quantitatively described using a model in which charge transport occurs via a chain of local states containing a silicon nanocrystal. The presence of steps is found to be associated with one-electron charging of the silicon nanocrystal and Coulomb blockade of the probability of a hop from the nearest local state to the conducting chain. The local states in silicon dioxide are assumed to be related to an excess of silicon atoms. The presence of such states is confirmed by measurements of the differential conductance and capacitance. For MOS structures implanted with silicon, the differential capacitance and conductance are found to be higher, compared to the reference structures, in the range of biases exceeding 0.2 V. In the same bias range, the conductance is observed to decrease under ultraviolet irradiation due to a change in the population of the states in the conductivity chains.

  5. Mitochondrial-Targeted Decyl-Triphenylphosphonium Enhances 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Mediated Oxidative Stress and Clonogenic Killing of Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schibler, Jeanine; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann M.; Reedy, Jessica L.; Zhan, Fenghuang; Spitz, Douglas R.; Schultz, Michael K.; Goel, Apollina

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic advances have markedly prolonged overall survival in multiple myeloma (MM) but the disease currently remains incurable. In a panel of MM cell lines (MM.1S, OPM-2, H929, and U266), using CD138 immunophenotyping, side population staining, and stem cell-related gene expression, we demonstrate the presence of stem-like tumor cells. Hypoxic culture conditions further increased CD138low stem-like cells with upregulated expression of OCT4 and NANOG. Compared to MM cells, these stem-like cells maintained lower steady-state pro-oxidant levels with increased uptake of the fluorescent deoxyglucose analog. In primary human MM samples, increased glycolytic gene expression correlated with poorer overall and event-free survival outcomes. Notably, stem-like cells showed increased mitochondrial mass, rhodamine 123 accumulation, and orthodox mitochondrial configuration while more condensed mitochondria were noted in the CD138high cells. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) induced ER stress as detected by qPCR (BiP, ATF4) and immunoblotting (BiP, CHOP) and increased dihydroethidium probe oxidation both CD138low and CD138high cells. Treatment with a mitochondrial-targeting agent decyl-triphenylphosphonium (10-TPP) increased intracellular steady-state pro-oxidant levels in stem-like and mature MM cells. Furthermore, 10-TPP mediated increases in mitochondrial oxidant production were suppressed by ectopic expression of manganese superoxide dismutase. Relative to 2-DG or 10-TPP alone, 2-DG plus 10-TPP combination showed increased caspase 3 activation in MM cells with minimal toxicity to the normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Notably, treatment with polyethylene glycol conjugated catalase significantly reduced 2-DG and/or 10-TPP-induced apoptosis of MM cells. Also, the combination of 2-DG with 10-TPP decreased clonogenic survival of MM cells. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy of metabolic oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity of MM cells via 2-DG

  6. Vegetables’ juice influences polyol pathway by multiple mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress and resultant diabetic complications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashok K.; Kumar, D. Anand; Sweeya, Pisupati S.; Chauhan, H. Anusha; Lavanya, V.; Sireesha, K.; Pavithra, K.; Zehra, Amtul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced generation of free radicals and consequent development of oxidative stress by polyol pathway is one of the crucial mechanisms stirring up development of diabetic complications. We evaluated influence of ten vegetables’ juice on polyol pathway along with their antioxidant and antioxidative stress potentials. Materials and Methods: Aldose reductase activity was determined utilising goat lens and human erythrocytes. In goat lens, utilization of nicotinamine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and aldose reductase inhibition was assayed. In human erythrocytes, sorbitol formation was measured as an index of aldose reductase activity under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions. Ability of juices in inhibiting oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar and calf thymus DNA and inhibitory activity against hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis of erythrocytes was also analysed. Phytochemical contents like total polyphenol, total flavonoid and total protein were measured to find their influence on biological activities. Results: Vegetables’ juice displayed varying degrees of inhibitory potentials in mitigating NADPH dependent catalytic activity of aldose reductase in goat lens, accumulation of sorbitol in human erythrocytes under different glucose concentrations; Fenton-reaction induced oxidative damage to deoxyribose sugar, and calf thymus DNA. Substantial variations in vegetables phytochemicals content were also noticed in this study. Conclusions: Vegetables’ juice possesses potent activities in influencing polyol pathway by various mechanisms in favour of reducing development of oxidative stress independent of their inherent antioxidative properties. Juice of ivy gourd followed by green cucumber and ridge gourd were among the most potent for they displayed strong activities on various parameters analysed in this study. These vegetables’ juice may become part of mechanism-based complementary antioxidant therapy to prevent

  7. An Overview of Methods in Plant Nitric Oxide (NO) Research: Why Do We Always Need to Use Multiple Methods?

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hideo; Watanabe, Naoko S; Sakihama, Yasuko; Cohen, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule among living organisms. To investigate versatile functions of NO in plants it is essential to analyze biologically produced NO with an appropriate method. Owing to the uniqueness of NO, plant researchers may encounter difficulties in applying methods that have been developed for mammalian study. Based on our experience, we present here a practical guide to NO measurement fitted to plant biology.

  8. Au-ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide immunosensing platform for simultaneous electrochemical detection of multiple analytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-01-15

    In this work, an Au-ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (IL-rGO-Au) was fabricated via the self-assembly of ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by electrostatic interaction. The IL-rGO can be synthesized and stabilized by introducing the cations of the amine-terminated ionic liquids (IL-NH2) into the graphene oxide (GO). With the assistance of IL-NH2, AuNPs were uniformly and densely absorbed on the surfaces of the IL-rGO. The proposed IL-rGO-Au nanocomposite can be used as an immunosensing platform because it can not only facilitate the electrons transfer of the electrode surface but also provide a large accessible surface area for the immobilization of abundant antibody. To assess the performance of the IL-rGO-Au nanocomposite, a sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor was designed for simultaneous multianalyte detection (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as model analytes). The chitosan (CS) coated prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) or cadmium hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles (CdNPs) and loaded with AuNPs were used as distinguishable signal tags. The resulting immunosensor exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity in simultaneous determination of CEA and AFP in a single run. The linear ranges were from 0.01 to 100 ng mL(-1) for both CEA and AFP. The detection limits reached 0.01 ng mL(-1) for CEA and 0.006 ng mL(-1) for AFP, respectively. No obvious nonspecific adsorption and cross-talk was observed during a series of analyses to detect target analytes. In addition, for the detection of clinical serum samples, it is well consistent with the data determined by the ELISA, indicating that the immunosensor provides a possible application for the simultaneous multianalyte determination of CEA and AFP in clinical diagnostics.

  9. Analytic energy gradients for the spin-free exact two-component theory using an exact block diagonalization for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-08-28

    We report the implementation of analytic energy gradients for the evaluation of first-order electrical properties and nuclear forces within the framework of the spin-free (SF) exact two-component (X2c) theory. In the scheme presented here, referred to in the following as SFX2c-1e, the decoupling of electronic and positronic solutions is performed for the one-electron Dirac Hamiltonian in its matrix representation using a single unitary transformation. The resulting two-component one-electron matrix Hamiltonian is combined with untransformed two-electron interactions for subsequent self-consistent-field and electron-correlated calculations. The "picture-change" effect in the calculation of properties is taken into account by considering the full derivative of the two-component Hamiltonian matrix with respect to the external perturbation. The applicability of the analytic-gradient scheme presented here is demonstrated in benchmark calculations. SFX2c-1e results for the dipole moments and electric-field gradients of the hydrogen halides are compared with those obtained from nonrelativistic, SF high-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess, and SF Dirac-Coulomb calculations. It is shown that the use of untransformed two-electron interactions introduces rather small errors for these properties. As a first application of the analytic geometrical gradient, we report the equilibrium geometry of methylcopper (CuCH(3)) determined at various levels of theory.

  10. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  11. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) inhibits survival and proliferation of VEGF-exposed multiple myeloma cells through its anti-oxidative properties.

    PubMed

    Seki, Ritsuko; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Yoshida, Takafumi; Torimura, Takuji; Ueno, Takato; Sata, Michio; Okamura, Takashi

    2013-02-22

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been reported not only to induce angiogenesis within the bone marrow, but also directly stimulate the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, thus being involved in the development and progression of this second most common hematological malignancy. We, along with others, have found that pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) has anti-angiogenic and anti-vasopermeability properties both in cell culture and animal models by counteracting the biological actions of VEGF. However, effects of PEDF on VEGF-exposed myeloma cells remain unknown. In this study, we examined whether and how PEDF could inhibit the VEGF-induced proliferation and survival of myeloma cells. PEDF, a glutathione peroxidase mimetic, ebselen, or an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, diphenylene iodonium significantly inhibited the VEGF-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, increase in anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor, myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1) expression, and proliferation in U266 myeloma cells. VEGF blocked apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells isolated from patients, which was prevented by PEDF. PEDF also reduced p22phox levels in VEGF-exposed U266 cells. Furthermore, overexpression of dominant-negative human Rac-1 mutant mimicked the effects of PEDF on ROS generation and Mcl-1 expression in U266 cells. Our present study suggests that PEDF could block the VEGF-induced proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma U266 cells through its anti-oxidative properties via suppression of p22phox, one of the membrane components of NADPH oxidase. Suppression of VEGF signaling by PEDF may be a novel therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  12. A traditional Korean multiple herbal formulae (Yuk-Mi-Jihwang-Tang) attenuates acute restraint stress-induced brain tissue oxidation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung-Il; Lee, Hye-Won; Eom, Tae-Min; Lim, Sung-Ah; Ha, Hun-Yong; Seol, In-Chan; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Oh, Dal-Seok; Yoo, Ho-Ryong

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the protective effects of Yuk-Mi-Jihwang-Tang (YJT) against acute restraint stress-induced brain oxidative damage. A water extract of YJT was prepared and subjected to high performance liquid chromatography - diode array detector-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS). Thirty-six heads of C57BL/6J male mice (7 weeks) were divided into six groups (n = 6/group). The mice were orally administrated YJT (0, 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) or vitamin C (100 mg/kg) for 5 consecutive days before 6 h of acute restraint stress. In the brain tissue, lipidperoxidation, antioxidant components, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured, and the serum corticosterone level was determined. Acute restraint stress-induced notably increased lipid peroxidation in brain tissues, and pretreatment with YJT showed a significant decreased the lipid peroxidation levels (p< 0.05). The levels of antioxidant components including total glutathione contents, activities of SOD and catalase were remarkably depleted by acute restraint stress, whereas these alterations were significantly restored by treatment with YJT (p< 0.05 or p< 0.01). The restraint stress markedly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6 in the gene expression and protein levels (p< 0.05 or p< 0.01). Pretreatment with YJT significantly attenuated serum corticosterone (200 mg/kg, p < 0.05). YJT drastically attenuated the levels of 4- HNE, HO-1, Nox 2 and iNOSwhich were elevated during acute restraint stress, whereas the Nrf2 level was increased in brain tissue protein levels. Our data suggest that YJT protects the brain tissue against oxidative damage and regulates stress hormones.

  13. Analysis, Design, and Optimization of Matched-Impedance Wide-Band Amplifiers With Multiple Feedback Loops Using 0.18 μm Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yo-Sheng; Lee, Tai-Hsing

    2004-10-01

    The realization of matched-impedance wide-band amplifier fabricated by 0.18 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process is reported. The technique of multiple feedback loops was used in the amplifier for terminal impedance matching and wide bandwidth simultaneously. The experimental results show that 3-dB bandwidth of 3 GHz and a gain of 10.7 dB with in-band input/output return loss more than 10 dB are obtained. These values agree well with those predicted from the analytic expressions derived for voltage gain, trans-impedance gain, bandwidth, and input/output return loss and impedance. In addition, the use of source capacitive peaking technique can improve the intrinsic over-damped characteristic of this amplifier.

  14. Synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles containing Fe, Si, and V using multiple diffusion flames and catalytic oxidation capability of carbon-coated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamed A.; Memon, Nasir K.; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles containing iron, silicon, and vanadium are synthesized using multiple diffusion flames. The growth of carbon-coated (C-TiO2), carbon-coated with iron oxide (Fe/C-TiO2), silica-coated (Si-TiO2), and vanadium-doped (V-TiO2) TiO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated using a single-step process. Hydrogen, oxygen, and argon are utilized to establish the flame, with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as the precursor for TiO2. For the growth of Fe/C-TiO2 nanoparticles, TTIP is mixed with xylene and ferrocene. While for the growth of Si-TiO2 and V-TiO2, TTIP is mixed with hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and vanadium (V) oxytriisopropoxide, respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with energy-filtered TEM for elemental mapping (of Si, C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen adsorption BET surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Anatase is the dominant phase for the C-TiO2, Fe/C-TiO2, and Si-TiO2 nanoparticles, whereas rutile is the dominant phase for the V-TiO2 nanoparticles. For C-TiO2 and Fe/C-TiO2, the nanoparticles are coated with about 3-5-nm thickness of carbon. The iron-based TiO2 nanoparticles significantly improve the catalytic oxidation of carbon, where complete oxidation of carbon occurs at a temperature of 470 °C (with iron) compared to 610 °C (without iron). Enhanced catalytic oxidation properties are also observed for model soot particles, Printex-U, when mixed with Fe/C-TiO2. With regards to Si-TiO2 nanoparticles, a uniform coating of 3 to 8 nm of silicon dioxide is observed around the TiO2 particles. This coating mainly occurs due to variance in the chemical reaction rates of the precursors. Finally, with regards to V-TiO2, vanadium is doped within the TiO2 nanoparticles as visualized by HRTEM and XPS further confirms the formation of V4+ and V5+ oxidation states.

  15. Multiple-stimuli responsive bioelectrocatalysis based on reduced graphene oxide/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) composite films and its application in the fabrication of logic gates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lian, Wenjing; Yao, Huiqin; Liu, Hongyun

    2015-03-11

    In the present work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAA) composite films were electrodeposited onto the surface of Au electrodes in a fast and one-step manner from an aqueous mixture of a graphene oxide (GO) dispersion and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAA) monomer solutions. Reflection-absorption infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies were employed to characterize the successful construction of the rGO/PNIPAA composite films. The rGO/PNIPAA composite films exhibited reversible potential-, pH-, temperature-, and sulfate-sensitive cyclic voltammetric (CV) on-off behavior to the electroactive probe ferrocenedicarboxylic acid (Fc(COOH)2). For instance, after the composite films were treated at -0.7 V for 7 min, the CV responses of Fc(COOH)2 at the rGO/PNIPAA electrodes were quite large at pH 8.0, exhibiting the on state. However, after the films were treated at 0 V for 30 min, the CV peak currents became much smaller, demonstrating the off state. The mechanism of the multiple-stimuli switchable behaviors for the system was investigated not only by electrochemical methods but also by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The potential-responsive behavior for this system was mainly attributed to the transformation between rGO and GO in the films at different potentials. The film system was further used to realize multiple-stimuli responsive bioelectrocatalysis of glucose catalyzed by the enzyme of glucose oxidase and mediated by the electroactive probe of Fc(COOH)2 in solution. On the basis of this, a four-input enabled OR (EnOR) logic gate network was established.

  16. Orthogonal natural atomic orbitals form an appropriate one-electron basis for expanding CASSCF wave functions into localized bonding schemes and their weights.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Vinzenz

    2007-09-01

    Localized bonding schemes and their weights have been obtained for the pi-electron system of nitrone by expanding complete active space self-consistent field wave functions into a set of Slater determinants composed of orthogonal natural atomic orbitals (NAOs) of Weinhold and Landis (Valency and Bonding: A Natural Bond Orbital Donor-Acceptor Perspective, 2005). Thus, the derived bonding schemes are close to orthogonal valence bond structures. The calculated sequence of bonding scheme weights accords with the sequence of genuine resonance structure weights derived previously by Ohanessian and Hiberty (Chem Phys Lett 1987, 137, 437), who employed nonorthogonal atomic orbitals. This accord supports the notion that NAOs form an appropriate orthogonal one-electron basis for expanding complete active space self-consistent field wave functions into meaningful bonding schemes and their weights.

  17. Relationship between the Increased Haemostatic Properties of Blood Platelets and Oxidative Stress Level in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with the Secondary Progressive Stage.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Bijak, Michał; Miller, Elżbieta; Rywaniak, Joanna; Miller, Sergiusz; Saluk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with complex pathogenesis, different clinical courses and recurrent neurological relapses and/or progression. Despite various scientific papers that focused on early stage of MS, our study targets selective group of late stage secondary progressive MS patients. The presented work is concerned with the reactivity of blood platelets in primary hemostasis in SP MS patients. 50 SP MS patients and 50 healthy volunteers (never diagnosed with MS or other chronic diseases) were examined to evaluate the biological activity of blood platelets (adhesion, aggregation), especially their response to the most important physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, and collagen) and the effect of oxidative stress on platelet activity. We found that the blood platelets from SP MS patients were significantly more sensitive to all used agonists in comparison with control group. Moreover, the platelet hemostatic function was advanced in patients suffering from SP MS and positively correlated with increased production of O2 (-∙) in these cells, as well as with Expanded Disability Status Scale. We postulate that the increased oxidative stress in blood platelets in SP MS may be primarily responsible for the altered haemostatic properties of blood platelets.

  18. Assembly and benign step-by-step post-treatment of oppositely charged reduced graphene oxides for transparent conductive thin films with multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayi; He, Junhui

    2012-06-07

    We report a new approach for the fabrication of flexible and transparent conducting thin films via the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of oppositely charged reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and the benign step-by-step post-treatment on substrates with a low glass-transition temperature, such as glass and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). The RGO dispersions and films were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy, UV-visible absorption spectrophotometery, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, contact angle/interface systems and a four-point probe. It was found that the graphene thin films exhibited a significant increase in electrical conductivity after the step-by-step post-treatments. The graphene thin film on the PET substrate had a good conductivity retainability after multiple cycles (30 cycles) of excessively bending (bending angle: 180°), while tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) thin films on PET showed a significant decrease in electrical conductivity. In addition, the graphene thin film had a smooth surface with tunable wettability.

  19. Thiocyanate complexes of uranium in multiple oxidation states: a combined structural, magnetic, spectroscopic, spectroelectrochemical, and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Emtithal; Platts, James A; Hartl, František; Lorusso, Giulia; Evangelisti, Marco; Schulzke, Carola; Baker, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    A comprehensive study of the complexes A4[U(NCS)8] (A = Cs, Et4N, (n)Bu4N) and A3[UO2(NCS)5] (A = Cs, Et4N) is described, with the crystal structures of [(n)Bu4N]4[U(NCS)8]·2MeCN and Cs3[UO2(NCS)5]·O0.5 reported. The magnetic properties of square antiprismatic Cs4[U(NCS)8] and cubic [Et4N]4[U(NCS)8] have been probed by SQUID magnetometry. The geometry has an important impact on the low-temperature magnetic moments: at 2 K, μeff = 1.21 μB and 0.53 μB, respectively. Electronic absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the uranium(IV) compounds have been measured. The redox chemistry of [Et4N]4[U(NCS)8] has been explored using IR and UV-vis spectroelectrochemical methods. Reversible 1-electron oxidation of one of the coordinated thiocyanate ligands occurs at +0.22 V vs Fc/Fc(+), followed by an irreversible oxidation to form dithiocyanogen (NCS)2 which upon back reduction regenerates thiocyanate anions coordinating to UO2(2+). NBO calculations agree with the experimental spectra, suggesting that the initial electron loss of [U(NCS)8](4-) is delocalized over all NCS(-) ligands. Reduction of the uranyl(VI) complex [Et4N]3[UO2(NCS)5] to uranyl(V) is accompanied by immediate disproportionation and has only been studied by DFT methods. The bonding in [An(NCS)8](4-) (An = Th, U) and [UO2(NCS)5](3-) has been explored by a combination of DFT and QTAIM analysis, and the U-N bonds are predominantly ionic, with the uranyl(V) species more ionic that the uranyl(VI) ion. Additionally, the U(IV)-NCS ion is more ionic than what was found for U(IV)-Cl complexes.

  20. The detectability of nitrous oxide mitigation efficacy in intensively grazed pastures using a multiple plot micrometeorological technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, A. M. S.; Harvey, M. J.; Martin, R. J.; Bromley, A. M.; Evans, M. J.; Mukherjee, S.; Laubach, J.

    2013-10-01

    Methodologies are required to verify agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation at scales relevant to farm management. Micrometeorological techniques provide a viable approach for comparing fluxes between fields receiving mitigation treatments and control fields. However, they have rarely been applied to spatially verifying treatments aimed at mitigating nitrous oxide emission from intensively grazed pastoral systems. We deployed a micrometeorological system to compare N2O flux among several ~ 1.5 ha plots in intensively grazed dairy pasture. The sample collection and measurement system is referred to as the Field-Scale Nitrous Oxide Mitigation Assessment System (FS-NOMAS) and used a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer to measure N2O gradients to high precision at four locations along a 300 m transect. The utility of the FS-NOMAS to assess mitigation efficacy depends largely on its ability to resolve very small vertical N2O gradients. The performance of the FS-NOMAS was assessed in this respect in laboratory and field-based studies. The FS-NOMAS could reliably resolve gradients of 0.039 ppb between a height of 0.5 m and 1.0 m. The gradient resolution achieved corresponded to the ability to detect an inter-plot N2O flux difference of 26.4 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 under the most commonly encountered conditions of atmospheric mixing (quantified here by a turbulent transfer coefficient), but this ranged from 11 to 59 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 as the transfer coefficient ranged between its 5th and 95th percentile. Assuming a likely value of 100 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 for post-grazing N2O fluxes from intensively grazed New Zealand dairy pasture, the system described here would be capable of detecting a mitigation efficacy of 26% for a single (40 min) comparison. We demonstrate that the system has considerably greater sensitivity to treatment effects by measuring cumulative fluxes over extended periods.

  1. The detectability of nitrous oxide mitigation efficacy in intensively grazed pastures using a multiple-plot micrometeorological technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, A. M. S.; Harvey, M. J.; Martin, R. J.; Bromley, A. M.; Evans, M. J.; Mukherjee, S.; Laubach, J.

    2014-05-01

    Methodologies are required to verify agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation at scales relevant to farm management. Micrometeorological techniques provide a viable approach for comparing fluxes between fields receiving mitigation treatments and control fields. However, they have rarely been applied to spatially verifying treatments aimed at mitigating nitrous oxide emission from intensively grazed pastoral systems. We deployed a micrometeorological system to compare N2O flux among several ~1.5 ha plots in intensively grazed dairy pasture. The sample collection and measurement system is referred to as the Field-Scale Nitrous Oxide Mitigation Assessment System (FS-NOMAS) and used a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer to measure N2O gradients to high precision at four locations along a 300 m transect. The utility of the FS-NOMAS to assess mitigation efficacy depends largely on its ability to resolve very small vertical N2O gradients. The performance of the FS-NOMAS was assessed in this respect in laboratory and field-based studies. The FS-NOMAS could reliably resolve gradients of 0.039 ppb between a height of 0.5 and 1.0 m. The gradient resolution achieved corresponded to the ability to detect an inter-plot N2O flux difference of 26 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 under the most commonly encountered conditions of atmospheric mixing (quantified here by a turbulent transfer coefficient), but this ranged from 11 to 59 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 as the transfer coefficient ranged between its 5th and 95th percentile. Assuming a likely value of 100 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1 for post-grazing N2O fluxes from intensively grazed New Zealand dairy pasture, the system described here would be capable of detecting a mitigation efficacy of 26% for a single (40 min) comparison. We demonstrate that the system has considerably greater sensitivity to treatment effects by measuring cumulative fluxes over extended periods.

  2. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  3. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNA/RNA Aptamers and Graphene Oxide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Weber, Thomas J.; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Chiann Tso; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-07-23

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine-5’-triphosphate (GTP) are primary energy resources and function coordinately for numerous reactions such as microtubule assembly, insulin secretion and ion channel regulation. We have developed a novel DNA/RNA aptamer- graphene oxide nanosheet (GO-nS) sensing platform that can selectively and simultaneously detect ATP and GTP in live cells. A fluorescent tag is covalently attached to aptamers and fluorescence is quenched upon binding of aptamer to the GO-nS. Fluorescently tagged aptamers that selectively bind ATP or GTP were isolated from an aptamer library and were adsorbed onto GO-nS. Upon incubation with targets (ATP and/or GTP), the aptamers readily dissociated from GO-nS and the fluorescent signal was recovered. By covalently attaching fluorophores, both ATP and GTP sensing aptamers could be exploited to simultaneously visualize aptamer dissociation in live cells. In addition, the GO-nS appear to be biocompatible and protect the adsorbed DNA/RNA aptamers from enzymatic cleavage. Our results support the application of aptamer/GO-nS as a sensing platform for nucleotides in living cells and have implications for the development of additional sensor platforms for other bio-molecules that show selective interactions with aptamers and other biomarkers.

  4. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO

  5. Nitric Oxide-cGMP Signaling Stimulates Erythropoiesis through Multiple Lineage-Specific Transcription Factors: Clinical Implications and a Novel Target for Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Tohru; Sellak, Hassan; Odo, Nadine; Adekile, Adekunle D.; Gaensler, Karin M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been directed to the physiological effects of nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling, but virtually nothing is known about its hematologic effects. We reported for the first time that cGMP signaling induces human γ-globin gene expression. Aiming at developing novel therapeutics for anemia, we examined here the hematologic effects of NO-cGMP signaling in vivo and in vitro. We treated wild-type mice with NO to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of cGMP signaling. Compared to untreated mice, NO-treated mice had higher red blood cell counts and total hemoglobin but reduced leukocyte counts, demonstrating that when activated, NO-cGMP signaling exerts hematopoietic effects on multiple types of blood cells in vivo. We next generated mice which overexpressed rat sGC in erythroid and myeloid cells. The forced expression of sGCs activated cGMP signaling in both lineage cells. Compared with non-transgenic littermates, sGC mice exhibited hematologic changes similar to those of NO-treated mice. Consistently, a membrane-permeable cGMP enhanced the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors toward erythroid-lineage cells but inhibited them toward myeloid-lineage cells by controlling multiple lineage-specific transcription factors. Human γ-globin gene expression was induced at low but appreciable levels in sGC mice carrying the human β-globin locus. Together, these results demonstrate that NO-cGMP signaling is capable of stimulating erythropoiesis in both in vitro and vivo settings by controlling the expression of multiple lineage-specific transcription factors, suggesting that cGMP signaling upregulates erythropoiesis at the level of gene transcription. The NO-cGMP signaling axis may constitute a novel target to stimulate erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:26727002

  6. Communication: Satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-02-07

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system’s density matrix. While Lindblad’s modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and BeH{sub 2} subject to environmental noise.

  7. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  8. Quantum Switching of Magnetic Fields by Circularly Polarized Re-Optimized π Laser Pulses: From One-Electron Atomic Ions to Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ingo; Manz, Jörn

    Circularly polarized re-optimized π laser pulses may induce electronic and/or nuclear ring currents in model systems, from one-electron atomic ions till molecules which should have three-, four-, or higher-fold axes of rotations or reflection-rotations, in order to support doubly or more degenerate, complex-valued eigenstates which support these ring currents. The ring currents in turn induce magnetic fields. The effects are about two orders of magnitude larger than for traditional ring currents which are induced by external magnetic fields. Moreover, the laser pulses allow to control the strengths and shapes of the ring currents and, therefore, also the induced magnetic fields. We present a survey of the development of the field, together with new quantum simulations which document ultrafast switchings of magnetic fields. We discuss various criteria such as strong ring currents with small radii, in order to generate huge magnetic fields, approaching 1,000T, in accord with the Biot-Savart law. Moreover, we consider various methods for monitoring the fields, and for applications, in particular ultrafast deflections of neutrons by means of quantum switching of the ring currents and induced magnetic fields.

  9. One-electron versus electron-electron interaction contributions to the spin-spin coupling mechanism in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: analysis of basic electronic effects.

    PubMed

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-12-22

    For the first time, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism is decomposed into one-electron and electron-electron interaction contributions to demonstrate that spin-information transport between different orbitals is not exclusively an electron-exchange phenomenon. This is done using coupled perturbed density-functional theory in conjunction with the recently developed J-OC-PSP [=J-OC-OC-PSP: Decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization)] method. One-orbital contributions comprise Ramsey response and self-exchange effects and the two-orbital contributions describe first-order delocalization and steric exchange. The two-orbital effects can be characterized as external orbital, echo, and spin transport contributions. A relationship of these electronic effects to zeroth-order orbital theory is demonstrated and their sign and magnitude predicted using simple models and graphical representations of first order orbitals. In the case of methane the two NMR spin-spin coupling constants result from totally different Fermi contact coupling mechanisms. (1)J(C,H) is the result of the Ramsey response and the self-exchange of the bond orbital diminished by external first-order delocalization external one-orbital effects whereas (2)J(H,H) spin-spin coupling is almost exclusively mitigated by a two-orbital steric exchange effect. From this analysis, a series of prediction can be made how geometrical deformations, electron lone pairs, and substituent effects lead to a change in the values of (1)J(C,H) and (2)J(H,H), respectively, for hydrocarbons.

  10. One-electron reduction of tris(2,2 prime -bipyrimidine)ruthenium(2+) ion in aqueous solution. A photochemical, radiation chemical, and electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Neshvad, G.; Hoffman, M.Z. ); Mulazzani, Q.G.; Ciano, M.; D'Angelantonio, M. ); Venturi, M. Univ. di Bologna )

    1989-08-10

    The reduction of Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous solution has been investigated by use of photochemical, radiation chemical, and electrochemical techniques. The luminescent excited state of the substrate, *Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+}, has a lifetime ({tau}{sub 0}) of 0.081 {mu}s and a standard reduction potential of {approximately} 1.2 V; it is quenched by electron donors (D) such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), triethanolamine (TEOA), ascorbate ion, deprotonated cysteine, and reduced glutathione with values of k{sub q} that depend on the pH of the solution and the reducing ability of the quencher. The one-electron-reduced species, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +}, is formed in the quenching reaction; it is also produced electrochemically and from the reaction of radiolytically generated CO{sub 2}{sup {center dot}{minus}} with Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} (k = 6.7 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} is a good reducing agent (E{sub ox}{sup 0} = 0.73 V) and reduces MV{sup 2+} (methylviologen) to MV{sup {center dot}+} (k = 1.0 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} also undergoes protonation; its acidic form (pK{sub a} 6.3) is a milder reducing agent (E{sub ox}{sup 0} = 0.50 V) but is still capable of reducing MV{sup 2+} (k = 1.0 {times} 10{sup 6} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). Both forms of Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup +} are unstable with respect to long-term storage; it is likely they engage in disproportionation and/or reaction with the solvent. The continuous photolysis of a solution containing Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+}, MV{sup 2+}, and a sacrificial reductive quencher (EDTA, TEOA) generates MV{sup {center dot}+}. Values of {eta}{sub ce} of 0.64 and {approximately}0.7 for TEOA and EDTA, respectively, in alkaline solution have been obtained.

  11. Timing of multiple hydrothermal events in the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Creaser, Robert A.; DuFrane, S. Andrew; Melo, Gustavo H. C.; Delinardo da Silva, Marco A.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Sato, Kei

    2015-06-01

    The Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil, hosts several iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, including Sossego, Cristalino, Alvo 118, Bacuri, Bacaba, Castanha, and Visconde. Mapping and U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) IIe zircon geochronology allowed the characterization of the host rocks, situated within regional WNW-ESE shear zones. They encompass Mesoarchean (3.08-2.85 Ga) TTG orthogneiss, granites, and remains of greenstone belts, Neoarchean (ca. 2.74 Ga) granite, shallow-emplaced porphyries, and granophyric granite coeval with gabbro, and Paleoproterozoic (1.88 Ga) porphyry dykes. Extensive hydrothermal zones include albite-scapolite, biotite-scapolite-tourmaline-magnetite alteration, and proximal potassium feldspar, chlorite-epidote and chalcopyrite formation. U-Pb laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) analysis of ore-related monazite and Re-Os NTIMS analysis of molybdenite suggest multiple Neoarchean (2.76 and 2.72-2.68 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.06 Ga) hydrothermal events at the Bacaba and Bacuri deposits. These results, combined with available geochronological data from the literature, indicate recurrence of hydrothermal systems in the Southern Copper Belt, including 1.90-1.88-Ga ore formation in the Sossego-Curral ore bodies and the Alvo 118 deposit. Although early hydrothermal evolution at 2.76 Ga points to fluid migration coeval with the Carajás Basin formation, the main episode of IOCG genesis (2.72-2.68 Ga) is related to basin inversion coupled with Neoarchean (ca. 2.7 Ga) felsic magmatism. The data suggest that the IOCG deposits in the Southern Copper Belt and those in the Northern Copper Belt (2.57-Ga Salobo and Igarapé Bahia-Alemão deposits) do not share a common metallogenic evolution. Therefore, the association of all IOCG deposits of the Carajás Province with a single extensive hydrothermal system is precluded.

  12. Chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin against chemically induced nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenesis via amelioration of oxidative stress and modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Aisha; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Nafees, Sana; Rashid, Summya; Saidullah, Bano; Sultana, Sarwat

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin was evaluated against ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced renal oxidative stress and carcinogenesis in wistar rats. Nephrotoxicity was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt). Renal cancer was initiated by the administration of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN 200mg/kg b.wt ip) and promoted by Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt ip) twice weekly for 16 weeks. Efficacy of hesperidin against Fe-NTA-induced nephrotoxicity was assessed in terms of biochemical estimation of antioxidant enzyme activities viz. reduced renal GSH, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and renal toxicity markers (BUN, Creatinine, KIM-1). Administration of Fe-NTA significantly depleted antioxidant renal armory, enhanced renal lipid peroxidation as well as the levels of BUN, creatinine and KIM-1. However, simultaneous pretreatment of hesperidin restored their levels in a dose dependent manner. Expression of apoptotic markers caspase-3, caspase-9, bax, bcl-2 and proliferative marker PCNA along with inflammatory markers (NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α) were also analysed to assess the chemopreventive potential of hesperidin in two-stage renal carcinogenesis model. Hesperidin was found to induce caspase-3, caspase-9, bax expression and downregulate bcl-2, NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α, PCNA expression. Histopathological findings further revealed hesperidin's chemopreventive efficacy by restoring the renal morphology. Our results provide a powerful evidence suggesting hesperidin to be a potent chemopreventive agent against renal carcinogenesis possibly by virtue of its antioxidant properties and by modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

  13. Guanine oxidation by electron transfer: one- versus two-electron oxidation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kupan, Adam; Saulière, Aude; Broussy, Sylvain; Seguy, Christel; Pratviel, Geneviève; Meunier, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    The degeneracy of the guanine radical cation, which is formed in DNA by oxidation of guanine by electron transfer, was studied by a detailed analysis of the oxidation products of guanine on oligonucleotide duplexes and by labeling experiments. It was shown that imidazolone, the major product of guanine oxidation, is formed through a one-electron oxidation process and incorporates one oxygen atom from O2. The formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine by a two-electron oxidation process was a minor pathway. The two-electron oxidation mechanism was also evidenced by the formation of a tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane adduct.

  14. Multiple protective mechanisms of alpha-lipoic acid in oxidation, apoptosis and inflammation against hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Baeeri, Maryam; Maqbool, Faheem; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    The naturally antioxidant and coenzyme, alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA), has gained considerable attention regarding different functions and therapeutically effective in treating oxidative stress-associated diseases in the human body. This study was designed to examine the protective effect of α-LA against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lymphoid cells. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were preincubated with α-LA and then exposed to H2O2. After that, the viability of the cells, rate of apoptosis, oxidative stress biomarkers such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), and also tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were studied. Pretreatment of lymphocytes with α-LA, dramatically enhanced viability of the cells and decreased apoptosis. Investigation of caspases gives a clear picture of the mechanism by which α-LA decreases ROS and causes a reduction in apoptosis through caspase-9-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Furthermore, α-LA dose dependently decreased oxidative stress by a reduction in level of LPO, and the dose of 1000 µM indicates a significant decrease (p < 0.01) in TNF-α level. Collectively, the present data show that α-LA is an ideal compound which has profound protective effects on oxidation, inflammation, and apoptosis. As a result, α-LA may indicate a new way toward the development of antioxidant therapy.

  15. Multiple Low-Dose Radiation Prevents Type 2 Diabetes-Induced Renal Damage through Attenuation of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance and Subsequent Renal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Minglong; Lu, Xuemian; Cong, Weitao; Xing, Xiao; Tan, Yi; Li, Yunqian; Li, Xiaokun; Jin, Litai; Wang, Xiaojie; Dong, Juancong; Jin, Shunzi; Zhang, Chi; Cai, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia and lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress are the key pathogeneses of renal damage in type 2 diabetes. Increasing evidence shows that whole-body low dose radiation (LDR) plays a critical role in attenuating insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Objective The aims of the present study were to investigate whether LDR can prevent type 2 diabetes-induced renal damage and the underlying mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD, 40% of calories from fat) for 12 weeks to induce obesity followed by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg) to develop a type 2 diabetic mouse model. The mice were exposed to LDR at different doses (25, 50 and 75 mGy) for 4 or 8 weeks along with HFD treatment. At each time-point, the kidney weight, renal function, blood glucose level and insulin resistance were examined. The pathological changes, renal lipid profiles, inflammation, oxidative stress and fibrosis were also measured. Results HFD/STZ-induced type 2 diabetic mice exhibited severe pathological changes in the kidney and renal dysfunction. Exposure of the mice to LDR for 4 weeks, especially at 50 and 75 mGy, significantly improved lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity and protein kinase B activation, meanwhile, attenuated inflammation and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. The LDR-induced anti-oxidative effect was associated with up-regulation of renal nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2) expression and function. However, the above beneficial effects were weakened once LDR treatment was extended to 8 weeks. Conclusion These results suggest that LDR exposure significantly prevented type 2 diabetes-induced kidney injury characterized by renal dysfunction and pathological changes. The protective mechanisms of LDR are complicated but may be mainly attributed to the attenuation of dyslipidemia and the subsequent lipotoxicity-induced insulin resistance

  16. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway, concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  17. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway involving concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  18. The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome caused by endotoxin in the rat: attenuation of liver dysfunction by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Thiemermann, C.; Ruetten, H.; Wu, C. C.; Vane, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. We have investigated whether (i) endotoxaemia caused by E. coli lipopolysaccharide in the anaesthetized rat causes a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS; e.g. circulatory failure, renal failure, liver failure), and (ii) an enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO) due to induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) contributes to the MODS. In addition, this study elucidates the beneficial and adverse effects of aminoethyl-isothiourea (AE-ITU), a relatively selective inhibitor of iNOS activity, and NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a non-selective inhibitor of NOS activity on the MODS caused by endotoxaemia. 2. In the anaesthetized rat, LPS caused a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from 117 +/- 3 mmHg (time 0) to 97 +/- 4 mmHg at 2 h (P < 0.05, n = 15) and 84 +/- 4 mmHg at 6 h (P < 0.05, n = 15). The pressor effect of noradrenaline (NA, 1 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) was also significantly reduced at 1 to 6 h after LPS (vascular hyporeactivity). Treatment of LPS-rats with AE-ITU (1 mg kg-1, i.v. plus 1 mg kg-1 h-1 starting at 2 h after LPS) caused only a transient rise in MAP, but significantly attenuated the delayed vascular hyporeactivity seen in LPS-rats. Infusion of L-NMMA (3 mg kg-1, i.v. plus 3 mg kg-1 h-1) caused a rapid and sustained rise in MAP and attenuated the delayed vascular hyporeactivity to NA. Neither AE-ITU nor L-NMMA had any effect on either MAP or the pressor effect elicited by NA in rats infused with saline rather than LPS. 3. Endotoxaemia for 6 h was associated with a significant rise in the serum levels of aspartate or alanine aminotransferase (i.e. GOT or GPT), gamma-glutamyl-transferase (gamma GT), and bilirubin, and hence, liver dysfunction. Treatment of LPS-rats with AE-ITU significantly attenuated this liver dysfunction (rise in GOT, GPT, gamma GT and bilirubin) (P < 0.05, n = 10). In contrast, L-NMMA reduced the increase in the serum levels of gamma GT and bilirubin, but not in GOT and GPT (n = 5). Injection of LPS also caused a

  19. Attenuation of endotoxin-induced multiple organ dysfunction by 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine, a potent inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Ruetten, H.; Southan, G. J.; Abate, A.; Thiemermann, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of (i) several guanidines on the activity of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) in murine cultured macrophages and rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASM); and (ii) 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine, the most potent inhibitor of iNOS activity discovered, on haemodynamics, multiple organ (liver, renal, and pancreas) dysfunction and iNOS activity in rats with endotoxic shock. 2. The synthesized guanidine analogues caused concentration-dependent inhibitions of the increase in nitrite formation caused by lipopolysaccaride (LPS, 1 microgram ml-1) in J774.2 macrophages and RASM cells with the following rank order of potency: 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine > 1-amino-2-methyl-guanidine > 1-amino-1-methyl-guanidine > 1-amino-1,2-dimethyl-guanidine. Interestingly, 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine (IC50: J774.2, 68 microM; RASM, 114 microM) was more potent in inhibiting nitrite formation caused by LPS than NG-methyl-L-arginine, but less potent than aminoethyl-isothiourea. 3. In the anaesthetized rat, LPS caused a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from 115 +/- 4 mmHg (time 0) to 98 +/- 5 mmHg at 2 h (P < 0.05, n = 10) and 69 +/- 5 mmHg at 6 h (P < 0.05, n = 10). The pressor effect of noradrenaline (NA, 1 mg kg-1, i.v.) was also significantly reduced at 1 to 6 h after LPS (vascular hyporeactivity). Treatment of LPS-rats with 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine (10 mg kg-1, i.v. plus 10 mg kg-1 h-1 starting at 2 h after LPS) prevented the delayed hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity seen in LPS-rats. However, 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine had no effect on either MAP or the pressor effect elicited by NA in rats infused with saline rather than LPS. 4. Endotoxaemia for 6 h caused a significant rise in the serum levels of aspartate or alanine aminotransferase (i.e. GOT or GPT) and bilirubin, and hence, liver dysfunction. Treatment of LPS-rats with 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine significantly attenuated the liver dysfunction caused

  20. Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the ultraviolet-B (280-315 nm) induced oxidative stress of plant leaves through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Wu, Min; Dér, András; Eriksson, Leif A; Strid, Åke; Hideg, Éva

    2014-06-27

    Solar UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation is a developmental signal in plants but may also cause oxidative stress when combined with other environmental factors. Using computer modeling and in solution experiments we show that UV-B is capable of photosensitizing hydroxyl radical production from hydrogen peroxide. We present evidence that the oxidative effect of UV-B in leaves is at least twofold: (i) it increases cellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations, to a larger extent in pyridoxine antioxidant mutant pdx1.3-1 Arabidopsis and; (ii) is capable of a partial photo-conversion of both 'natural' and 'extra' hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radicals. As stress conditions other than UV can increase cellular hydrogen peroxide levels, synergistic deleterious effects of various stresses may be expected already under ambient solar UV-B.

  1. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parke, A L; Liu, P T; Parke, D V

    2003-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and renal failure, is described, its clinical features outlined, its origins in tissue oxidative stress following severe infections, surgical trauma, ionizing radiation, high-dosage drugs and chemicals, severe hemorrhage, etc., are defined, and its prevention and treatment prescribed.

  2. An experimental comparison of the Marcus-Hush and Butler-Volmer descriptions of electrode kinetics applied to cyclic voltammetry. The one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane studied at a mercury microhemisphere electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstridge, Martin C.; Wang, Yijun; Limon-Petersen, Juan G.; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-11-01

    We present a comparative experimental evaluation of the Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush models using cyclic voltammetry at a microelectrode. Numerical simulations are used to fit experimental voltammetry of the one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane, in water and acetonitrile, respectively, at a mercury microhemisphere electrode. For Eu (III) very accurate fits to experiment were obtained over a wide range of scan rates using Butler-Volmer kinetics, whereas the Marcus-Hush model was less accurate. The reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane was well simulated by both models, however Marcus-Hush required a reorganisation energy lower than expected.

  3. Isotopically exchangeable concentrations of elements having multiple oxidation states: the case of Fe(II)/Fe(III) isotope self-exchange in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard N; Waite, T David

    2009-07-15

    Isotope exchange techniques have been used to probe isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe (E value) that are in dynamic equilibrium between the aqueous- and solid-phase of coastal lowland acid sulfate soils. Isotope self-exchange between Fe(II) and Fe(III) was rapid and complete in <1 min (p < 0.05) indicating that this reaction was initially occurring solely in the aqueous-phase and the surface of the soil solid-phase. It is further demonstrated that accurate and valid measurements of isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe do not require corrections for Fe speciation. This also holds for any element existing in two or more oxidation states which are completely isotopically self-exchangeable in soils. As isotope self-exchange between Fe(II) and Fe(III) is rapid, the distribution coefficient (Kd) and E value determined via this methodology are, therefore, truly representative of Fe regardless of the relative importance of Fe(II) or Fe(III) to the isotopically exchangeable pool of Fe. In the 21 soil samples examined, isotopically exchangeable concentrations of Fe varied from 90 mg/kg to values as high as 3610 mg/kg in acidic, saturated samples collected below the groundwater table from the transition soil horizon. The combination of low Evalues and extremely high Kd values in the upper oxidized layers of these soils indicate that these soil horizons are a relatively insignificant source of transportable (labile) Fe. As such, given our knowledge on the general rates of microbial Fe(III) reduction in, and the hydraulic properties of, the coastal lowland acid sulfate soils of this region, only those soils adjacent to agricultural drains are likely to contribute to the load of Fe entering surrounding aquatic systems.

  4. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective ...

  5. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  6. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  7. The multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation disorders, glutaric aciduria type II and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and electron transfer flavoprotein activities in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, B A; Rhead, W J

    1986-01-01

    The multiple acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenation disorders (MAD) include severe (S) and mild (M) variants, glutaric aciduria type II (MAD:S) and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria (MAD:M). Intact MAD:M mitochondria oxidized [1-14C]octanoate, [1-14C]palmityl-CoA, and [1,5-14C]glutarate at 20-46% of control levels; MAD:S mitochondria oxidized these three substrates at 0.4-18% of control levels. In MAD:M mitochondria, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were similar to control, whereas MAD:S ADH activities ranged from 38% to 73% of control. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) activities in five MAD:M cell lines ranged from 29 to 51% of control (P less than 0.01); ETF deficiency was the primary enzymatic defect in two MAD:M lines. In four MAD:S patients, ETF activities ranged from 3% to 6% of control (P less than 0.001); flavin adenine dinucleotide addition increased residual ETF activity from 4% to 21% of control in a single MAD:S line (P less than 0.01). Three MAD:S patients had ETF activities ranging from 33 to 53% of control; other investigators found deficient ETF-dehydrogenase activity in these MAD:S and three of our MAD:M cell lines. PMID:3722376

  8. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediated cold- and dehydration-induced myo-inositol phosphate synthase that confers multiple resistances to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jiali; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Han, Ruihong; Guo, Zhenfei

    2013-02-01

    myo-Inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS) is the key enzyme of myo-inositol synthesis, which is a central molecule required for cell metabolism and plant growth as a precursor to a large variety of compounds. A full-length fragment of MfMIPS1 cDNA was cloned from Medicago falcata that is more cold-tolerant than Medicago sativa. While MfMIPS1 transcript was induced in response to cold, dehydration and salt stress, MIPS transcript and myo-inositol were maintained longer and at a higher level in M. falcata than in M. sativa during cold acclimation at 5 °C. MfMIPS1 transcript was induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2)) and nitric oxide (NO), but was not responsive to abscisic acid (ABA). Pharmacological experiments revealed that H(2) O(2) and NO are involved in the regulation of MfMIPS1 expression by cold and dehydration, but not by salt. Overexpression of MfMIPS1 in tobacco increased the MIPS activity and levels of myo-inositol, galactinol and raffinose, resulting in enhanced resistance to chilling, drought and salt stresses in transgenic tobacco plants. It is suggested that MfMIPS1 is induced by diverse environmental factors and confers resistance to various abiotic stresses.

  9. The effect of polyol on multiple ligand capped silver alloyed nanobimetallic particles in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and oleic acid matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeyemi Adekoya, Joseph; Olugbenga Dare, Enock; Olurotimi Ogunniran, Kehinde; Oluwasegun Siyanbola, Tolutope; Oyewale Ajani, Olayinka; Osereme Ehi-Eromosele, Cyril; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-12-01

    The syntheses of Ag/M (M is Co, Ni, Pd, Pt and Ru) alloyed nanobimetallic particles in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide and oleic acid matrices were successfully carried out by the successive reduction of ligand capped metal ions with polyols, which resulted in rapid precipitation of some fractal high index faceted hybrid Ag/M bimetal nanoparticles. The optical measurements revealed the existence of modified surface plasmon band and peak broadening resulting from reaction-limited growth processes of the metal sols, making it possible to monitor the changes spectrometrically. The bimetallic nanoparticles were further characterized by powder x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques which confirmed the formation of novel core-shell and alloyed clusters. The Ag/M nanoparticles thus synthesized within TOPO/OA matrices indicated significant reduction potential as a result of their energy band gap 2.65-2.77 eV which points to the fact that they could serve as reducing agents for electrocatalytic reaction.

  10. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  11. Enhancing optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by nanopatterning on indium tin oxide with tunable fill factor using multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo Xiong, Zhuo; Chen, Yu; Zhen, Aigong; Shan, Liang; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Junxi

    2014-11-21

    In this study, the multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography method utilizing the polystyrene nanospheres with focusing behavior is investigated and introduced to fabricate diverse photonic crystals (PCs) on indium tin oxide to enhance the optical output power of GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED). Simulated results indicate that the focused light intensity decreases with increasing tilted angle due to the shadow effect introduced by adjacent nanospheres. The fill factor of nanopattern is tunable by controlling tilted angles and exposure times. To attain quadruple PC without overlapping patterns, mathematical calculation model is used to define the optimum range of tilted angles. Angular emission patterns and three-dimensional finite-difference time domain simulated results indicate that the enhanced light extraction of PC LEDs results mainly from diffused scattering effects, and the diffraction effects of PC on light extracted efficiency increase with the increase of fill factor. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the multiple PC can extract more light from GaN into air than common PC with same period and fill factor.

  12. Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser based on single and multiple walled carbon nanotubes embedded in polyethylene oxide film as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Ali, N. M.; Salleh, Z. S.; Rahman, A. A.; Harun, S. W.; Manaf, M.; Arof, H.

    2015-01-01

    A passive, stable and low cost Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is demonstrated using both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which are embedded in polyethylene oxide (PEO) film as a saturable absorber (SA). The film is sandwiched between two FC/PC fiber connectors and integrated into the laser cavity for Q-switching pulse generation operating at wavelength of 1533.6 nm. With SWCNTs, the laser produces a stable pulse train with repetition rate and pulse width ranging from 9.52 to 33.33 kHz and 16.8 to 8.0 μs while varying the 980 nm pump power from 48.5 mW to 100.4 mW. On the other hand, with MWCNTs, the repetition rate and pulse width can be tuned in a wider range of 6.12-33.62 kHz and 9.5- 4.2 μs, respectively as the pump power increases from 37.9 to 120.6 mW. The MWCNTs produce the pulse train at a lower threshold and attain a higher repetition rate compared to the SWCNTs. This is due to thicker carbon nanotubes layer of the MWCNTs which provides more absorption and consequently higher damage threshold. The Q-switched EDFL produces the highest pulse energy of 531 nJ at pump power of 37.9 mW with the use of MWCNTs-PEO SA.

  13. Evolution of Diterpene Metabolism: Sitka Spruce CYP720B4 Catalyzes Multiple Oxidations in Resin Acid Biosynthesis of Conifer Defense against Insects1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  14. PDE5 inhibitors enhance the lethality of pemetrexed through inhibition of multiple chaperone proteins and via the actions of cyclic GMP and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L.; Poklepovic, Andrew; Gordon, Sarah; Dent, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors prevent the breakdown of cGMP that results in prolonged protein kinase G activation and the generation of nitric oxide. PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the anti-NSCLC cell effects of the NSCLC therapeutic pemetrexed. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] activated an eIF2α – ATF4 – CHOP – Beclin1 pathway causing formation of toxic autophagosomes; activated a protective IRE1 – XBP-1 – chaperone induction pathway; and activated a toxic eIF2α – CHOP – DR4 / DR5 / CD95 induction pathway. [Pemetrexed + sildenafil] reduced the expression of c-FLIP-s, MCL-1 and BCL-XL that was blocked in a cell-type -dependent fashion by either over-expression of HSP90 / GRP78 / HSP70 / HSP27 or by blockade of eIF2α-CHOP signaling. Knock down of PKGI/II abolished the ability of sildenafil to enhance pemetrexed toxicity whereas pan-inhibition of NOS using L-NAME or knock down of [iNOS + eNOS] only partially reduced the lethal drug interaction. Pemetrexed reduced the ATPase activities of HSP90 and HSP70 in an ATM-AMPK-dependent fashion that was enhanced by sildenafil signaling via PKGI/II. The drug combination activated an ATM-AMPK-TSC2 pathway that was associated with reduced mTOR S2448 and ULK-1 S757 phosphorylation and increased ULK-1 S317 and ATG13 S318 phosphorylation. These effects were prevented by chaperone over-expression or by expression of an activated form of mTOR that prevented autophagosome formation and reduced cell killing. In two models of NSCLC, sildenafil enhanced the ability of pemetrexed to suppress tumor growth. Collectively we argue that the combination of [pemetrexed + PDE5 inhibitor] should be explored in a new NSCLC phase I trial. PMID:27903966

  15. Multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Peller, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    This article presents a review of multiple myeloma, precursor states, and related plasma cell disorders. The clinical roles of fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) and the potential to improve the management of patients with multiple myeloma are discussed. The clinical and research data supporting the utility of PET/CT use in evaluating myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias continues to grow.

  16. Detailed electrochemical studies of the tetraruthenium polyoxometalate water oxidation catalyst in acidic media: identification of an extended oxidation series using Fourier transformed alternating current voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Guo, Si-Xuan; Murphy, Aidan F; McCormac, Timothy; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M; Zhu, Guibo; Hill, Craig L; Geletii, Yurii V

    2012-11-05

    The electrochemistry of the water oxidation catalyst, Rb(8)K(2)[{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(γ-SiW(10)O(36))(2)] (Rb(8)K(2)-1(0)) has been studied in the presence and absence of potassium cations in both hydrochloric and sulfuric acid solutions by transient direct current (dc) cyclic voltammetry, a steady state dc method in the rotating disk configuration and the kinetically sensitive technique of Fourier transformed large-amplitude alternating current (ac) voltammetry. In acidic media, the presence of potassium ions affects the kinetics (apparent rate of electron transfer) and thermodynamics (reversible potentials) of the eight processes (A'/A to H/H') that are readily detected under dc voltammetric conditions. The six most positive processes (A'/A to F/F'), each involve a one electron ruthenium based charge transfer step (A'/A, B'/B are Ru(IV/V) oxidation and C/C' to F/F' are Ru(IV/III) reduction). The apparent rate of electron transfer of the ruthenium centers in sulfuric acid is higher than in hydrochloric acid. The addition of potassium cations increases the apparent rates and gives rise to a small shift of reversible potential. Simulations of the Fourier transformed ac voltammetry method show that the B'/B, E/E', and F/F' processes are quasi-reversible, while the others are close to reversible. A third Ru(IV/V) oxidation process is observed just prior to the positive potential limit via dc methods. Importantly, the ability of the higher harmonic components of the ac method to discriminate against the irreversible background solvent process allows this (process I) as well as an additional fourth reversible ruthenium based process (J) to be readily identified. The steady-state rotating disk electrode (RDE) method confirmed that all four Ru-centers in Rb(8)K(2)-1(0) are in oxidation state IV. The dc and ac data indicate that reversible potentials of the four ruthenium centers are evenly spaced, which may be relevant to understanding of the water oxidation

  17. The nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    King, S Bruce

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used to treat a variety of cancers and sickle cell disease. Despite this widespread use, a complete mechanistic understanding of the beneficial actions of this compound remains to be understood. Hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and increases the levels of fetal hemoglobin, which explains a portion of the effects of this drug. Administration of hydroxyurea to patients results in a significant increase in levels of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin, nitrite and nitrate suggesting the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide. Formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea may explain a portion of the observed effects of hydroxyurea treatment. At the present, the mechanism or mechanisms of nitric oxide release, the identity of the in vivo oxidant and the site of metabolism remain to be identified. Chemical oxidation of hydroxyurea produces nitric oxide and nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These oxidative pathways generally proceed through the nitroxide radical (2) or C-nitrosoformamide (3). Biological oxidants, including both iron and copper containing enzymes and proteins, also convert hydroxyurea to nitric oxide or its decomposition products in vitro and these reactions also occur through these intermediates. A number of other reactions of hydroxyurea including the reaction with ribonucleotide reductase and irradiation demonstrate the potential to release nitric oxide and should be further investigated. Gaining an understanding of the metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide will provide valuable information towards the treatment of these disorders and may lead to the development of better therapeutic agents.

  18. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively.

  19. Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... parents. It's important for caretakers to spend time speaking directly to each child, as well as reading to them and encouraging language. Social skills can come earlier for multiples, simply because they' ...

  20. [Multiple meningiomas].

    PubMed

    Terrier, L-M; François, P

    2016-06-01

    Multiple meningiomas (MMs) or meningiomatosis are defined by the presence of at least 2 lesions that appear simultaneously or not, at different intracranial locations, without the association of neurofibromatosis. They present 1-9 % of meningiomas with a female predominance. The occurrence of multiple meningiomas is not clear. There are 2 main hypotheses for their development, one that supports the independent evolution of these tumors and the other, completely opposite, that suggests the propagation of tumor cells of a unique clone transformation, through cerebrospinal fluid. NF2 gene mutation is an important intrinsic risk factor in the etiology of multiple meningiomas and some exogenous risk factors have been suspected but only ionizing radiation exposure has been proven. These tumors can grow anywhere in the skull but they are more frequently observed in supratentorial locations. Their histologic types are similar to unique meningiomas of psammomatous, fibroblastic, meningothelial or transitional type and in most cases are benign tumors. The prognosis of these tumors is eventually good and does not differ from the unique tumors except for the cases of radiation-induced multiple meningiomas, in the context of NF2 or when diagnosed in children where the outcome is less favorable. Each meningioma lesion should be dealt with individually and their multiple character should not justify their resection at all costs.

  1. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  2. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  3. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  4. Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Details the characteristics of Howard Gardner's seven multiple intelligences (MI): linguistic, logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, musical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal. Discusses the implications of MI for instruction. Explores how students can study using their preferred learning style - visual, auditory, and physical study…

  5. JS-K, a GST-activated nitric oxide generator, induces DNA double-strand breaks, activates DNA damage response pathways, and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Hideshima, Teru; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Ocio, Enrique M; Raje, Noopur; Catley, Laurence; Li, Chun-Qi; Trudel, Laura J; Yasui, Hiroshi; Vallet, Sonia; Kutok, Jeffery L; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Saavedra, Joseph E; Wogan, Gerald N; Keefer, Larry K; Shami, Paul J; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-07-15

    Here we investigated the cytotoxicity of JS-K, a prodrug designed to release nitric oxide (NO(*)) following reaction with glutathione S-transferases, in multiple myeloma (MM). JS-K showed significant cytotoxicity in both conventional therapy-sensitive and -resistant MM cell lines, as well as patient-derived MM cells. JS-K induced apoptosis in MM cells, which was associated with PARP, caspase-8, and caspase-9 cleavage; increased Fas/CD95 expression; Mcl-1 cleavage; and Bcl-2 phosphorylation, as well as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and endonuclease G (EndoG) release. Moreover, JS-K overcame the survival advantages conferred by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), or by adherence of MM cells to bone marrow stromal cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that JS-K-induced cytotoxicity was mediated via NO(*) in MM cells. Furthermore, JS-K induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and activated DNA damage responses, as evidenced by neutral comet assay, as well as H2AX, Chk2 and p53 phosphorylation. JS-K also activated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) in MM cells; conversely, inhibition of JNK markedly decreased JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Importantly, bortezomib significantly enhanced JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, JS-K is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs survival in a human MM xenograft mouse model. Taken together, these data provide the preclinical rationale for the clinical evaluation of JS-K to improve patient outcome in MM.

  6. Oxidative DNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Henrik E

    2005-07-01

    the separation procedure proper prior to detection. A large effort from 20+ laboratories supported by a grant from the EU has reduced artifacts considerably and work towards interlaboratory standardization of the methodology is in progress. The presently agreed "normal" levels of the most frequent known lesion 8-oxodG is about 5 per million dG's in DNA. A comprehensive evaluation of the evidence, from chemistry to clinical and epidemiological trials, linking oxidative modifications to cancer will be given. Finally, an estimate of the quantitative role oxidative DNA modifications play among the multiplicity of other insults is given. While there is no question that all of these oxidative mechanisms do exist, quantitative data on their importance for the human situation do not exist. Prospective human studies that can provide such quantitative data on different mechanisms are underway.

  7. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In addition to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS.

  8. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for slightly more than 10% of all hematologic cancers. In this paper, we present a historically focused review of the disease, from the description of the first case in 1844 to the present. The evolution of drug therapy and stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of myeloma, as well as the development of new agents, is discussed. We also provide an update on current concepts of diagnosis and therapy, with an emphasis on how treatments have emerged from a historical perspective after certain important discoveries and the results of experimental studies. PMID:18332230

  9. Myelin basic protein-primed T cells of female but not male mice induce nitric-oxide synthase and proinflammatory cytokines in microglia: implications for gender bias in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Jana, Malabendu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Pahan, Kalipada

    2005-09-23

    Females are more susceptible than males to multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanism behind this gender difference is poorly understood. Because the presence of neuroantigen-primed T cells within the CNS is necessary for the development of MS, the present study was undertaken to investigate the activation of microglia by myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells of male, female, and castrated male mice. Interestingly, MBP-primed T cells isolated from female and castrated male but not from male mice induced the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-1alpha, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in microglia by cell-cell contact. Again there was no apparent defect in male microglia, because MBP-primed T cells isolated from female and castrated male but not male mice were capable of inducing the production of NO in male primary microglia. Inhibition of female T cell contact-mediated microglial expression of proinflammatory molecules by dominant-negative mutants of p65 and C/EBPbeta suggest that female MBP-primed T cells induce microglial expression of proinflammatory molecules through the activation of NF-kappaB and C/EBPbeta. Interestingly, MBP-primed T cells of male, female, and castrated male mice were able to induce microglial activation of NF-kappaB. However, MBP-primed T cells of female and castrated male but not male mice induced microglial activation of C/EBPbeta. These studies suggest that microglial activation of C/EBPbeta but not NF-kappaB by T cell:microglial contact is a gender-specific event and that male MBP-primed T cells are not capable of inducing microglial expression of proinflammatory molecules due to their inability to induce the activation of C/EBPbeta in microglia. This novel gender-sensitive activation of microglia by neuroantigen-primed T cell contact could be one of the mechanisms behind the female-loving nature of MS.

  10. Multiple Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Philip Joseph

    1987-09-01

    The Theory of Inflation, namely, that at some point the entropy content of the universe was greatly increased, has much promise. It may solve the puzzles of homogeneity and the creation of structure. However, no particle physics model has yet been found that can successfully drive inflation. The difficulty in satisfying the constraint that the isotropy of the microwave background places on the effective potential of prospective models is immense. In this work we have codified the requirements of such models in a most general form. We have carefully calculated the amounts of inflation the various problems of the Standard Model need for their solution. We have derived a completely model independent upper bound on the inflationary Hubble parameter. We have developed a general notation with which to probe the possibilities of Multiple Inflation. We have shown that only in very unlikely circumstances will any evidence of an earlier inflation, survive the de Sitter period of its successor. In particular, it is demonstrated that it is most unlikely that two bouts of inflation will yield high amplitudes of density perturbations on small scales and low amplitudes on large. We conclude that, while multiple inflation will be of great theoretical interest, it is unlikely to have any observational impact.

  11. [Multiple apheresis].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C

    2007-05-01

    Multiple apheresis makes it possible to obtain at least two labile blood components from a single donor using a cell separator. It can be either multicomponent apheresis leading to the preparation of at least two different blood component types or red blood cell apheresis providing two identical red blood cell concentrates. These techniques available in addition to whole blood donation, are modifying collection strategies in many Etablissements Français du Sang and will contribute to improve stock logistics in the future. In areas with insufficient stock, these procedures will help achieve blood component self-sufficiency. The author first describes the principle underlying different--current or future--techniques as well as their advantages and drawbacks. He finally addresses the potential impact of these processes on the evolution of blood collection and the advantages to be gained.

  12. Photocatalytic Anion Oxidation and Applications in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hering, Thea; Meyer, Andreas Uwe; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-19

    Ions and radicals of the same kind differ by one electron only. The oxidation of many stable inorganic anions yields their corresponding highly reactive radicals, and visible light excitable photocatalysts can provide the required oxidation potential for this transformation. Air oxygen serves as the terminal oxidant, or cheap sacrificial oxidants are used, providing a very practical approach for generating reactive inorganic radicals for organic synthesis. We discuss in this perspective several recently reported examples: Nitrate radicals are obtained by one-electron photooxidation of nitrate anions and are very reactive toward organic molecules. The photooxidation of sulfinate salts yields the much more stable sulfone radicals, which smoothly add to double bonds. A two-electron oxidation of chloride anions to electrophilic chlorine species reacting with arenes in aromatic substitutions extends the method beyond radical reactions. The chloride anion oxidation proceeds via photocatalytically generated peracidic acid as the oxidation reagent. Although the number of reported examples of photocatalytically generated inorganic radical intermediates for organic synthesis is still small, future extension of the concept to other inorganic ions as radical precursors is a clear perspective.

  13. The Oxidation of Cysteine, Cysteinesulfinic Acid and Cysteic Acid on a Polycrystalline Gold Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    The mechanism of cysteine, cysteinesulfinic acid and cysteic acid electrooxidation in perchloric acid solutions has been studied using cyclic ... voltammetry . All compounds investigated have been found to be chemisorbed on a polycrystalline gold electrode and oxidized with four, two or one electron

  14. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  15. Modulation of Phenol Oxidation in Cofacial Dyads.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon Jun; Huynh, Michael; Halbach, Robert L; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-09-23

    The presentation of two phenols on a xanthene backbone is akin to the tyrosine dyad (Y730 and Y731) of ribonucleotide reductase. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two phenol moieties are cofacially disposed at 4.35 Å. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that phenol oxidation is modulated within the dyad, which exhibits a splitting of one-electron waves with the second oxidation of the phenol dyad occurring at larger positive potential than that of a typical phenol. In contrast, a single phenol appended to a xanthene exhibits a two-electron process, consistent with reported oxidation pathways of phenols in acetonitrile. The perturbation of the phenol potential by stacking is reminiscent of a similar effect for guanines stacked within DNA base pairs.

  16. Multiple osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Bovée, Judith VMG

    2008-01-01

    Multiple osteochondromas (MO) is characterised by development of two or more cartilage capped bony outgrowths (osteochondromas) of the long bones. The prevalence is estimated at 1:50,000, and it seems to be higher in males (male-to-female ratio 1.5:1). Osteochondromas develop and increase in size in the first decade of life, ceasing to grow when the growth plates close at puberty. They are pedunculated or sessile (broad base) and can vary widely in size. The number of osteochondromas may vary significantly within and between families, the mean number of locations is 15–18. The majority are asymptomatic and located in bones that develop from cartilage, especially the long bones of the extremities, predominantly around the knee. The facial bones are not affected. Osteochondromas may cause pain, functional problems and deformities, especially of the forearm, that may be reason for surgical removal. The most important complication is malignant transformation of osteochondroma towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma, which is estimated to occur in 0.5–5%. MO is an autosomal dominant disorder and is genetically heterogeneous. In almost 90% of MO patients germline mutations in the tumour suppressor genes EXT1 or EXT2 are found. The EXT genes encode glycosyltransferases, catalyzing heparan sulphate polymerization. The diagnosis is based on radiological and clinical documentation, supplemented with, if available, histological evaluation of osteochondromas. If the exact mutation is known antenatal diagnosis is technically possible. MO should be distinguished from metachondromatosis, dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica and Ollier disease. Osteochondromas are benign lesions and do not affect life expectancy. Management includes removal of osteochondromas when they give complaints. Removed osteochondromas should be examined for malignant transformation towards secondary peripheral chondrosarcoma. Patients should be well instructed and regular follow-up for early detection

  17. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  18. Multiple sclerosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - multiple sclerosis ... The following organizations provide information on multiple sclerosis : Multiple Sclerosis Foundation -- www.msfocus.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis National ...

  19. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  20. Size Dependence of [n]Cycloparaphenylenes (n=5-12) in Electrochemical Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kayahara, Eiichi; Fukayama, Kei; Nishinaga, Tohru; Yamago, Shigeru

    2016-06-21

    The oxidation processes of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) (n=5-12) were systematically investigated by cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. All CPPs underwent pseudo-reversible two-electron oxidation irrespective of ring size, forming the corresponding radical cations and then dications. The results were in sharp contrast to those observed for linear oligoparaphenylenes, which only undergo one-electron oxidation. The difference in the first and second oxidation potentials in the CPP oxidation was affected by the ring size and became more significant as the decrease of CPP size. In other words, while the first oxidation from neutral CPP to the radical cation occurred faster as the size of CPP becomes smaller, the second oxidation from the radical cation to dication exhibited opposite size dependence.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of homo- and heterobimetallic niobium{sup v} and tantalum{sup v} peroxo-polyaminocarboxylato complexes and their use as single or multiple molecular precursors for Nb-Ta mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bayot, Daisy . E-mail: devillers@chim.ucl.ac.be

    2005-09-15

    New water-soluble bimetallic peroxo complexes of niobium{sup V} and/or tantalum{sup V} with high-denticity polyaminocarboxylate ligands have been prepared, characterized from the spectroscopic point of view, and used as molecular precursors for Nb-Ta mixed oxides. Four new homobimetallic complexes (gu){sub 3}[Nb{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].3H{sub 2}O 1 (gu){sub 3}[Ta{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].5H{sub 2}O 2 (gu){sub 3}[Nb{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4})].2H{sub 2}O 4 and (gu){sub 3}[Ta{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4})].3H{sub 2}O 5 and the corresponding heterometallic complexes (gu){sub 3}[NbTa(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].2.5H{sub 2}O 3 and (gu){sub 3}[NbTa(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4)}].2H{sub 2}O 6 have been obtained. In these compounds, the in situ oxidation of the nitrogen atoms of the PAC ligands into N-oxide groups has been evidenced by IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The thermal treatment of the homonuclear complexes in air at 700 or 800 deg. C, depending on the Ta content, provided Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} or Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} while the heteronuclear compounds led to the solid solution TaNbO{sub 5}. BET and SEM measurements have been carried out and comparison of the morphology of the samples prepared from homo- and heterometallic precursors is discussed.

  2. [Nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  4. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  5. Combination of visible-light responsive heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysts for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kato, Satoshi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2011-10-28

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO(4)), which is a visible-light responsive heterogeneous photocatalyst, was combined with homogeneous ruthenium complexes to increase the overall photocatalytic reactivity for water oxidation with a one-electron oxidant, [Co(III)(NH(3))(5)Cl](2+). Photoinduced electron transfer from the excited state of ruthenium(II) complexes to [Co(III)(NH(3))(5)Cl](2+) affords ruthenium(III) complexes which can oxidize water to oxygen with BiVO(4) under visible light irradiation.

  6. Chasing the limits of the one electron approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kędziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz M.

    2014-10-06

    Rapid progress in the development of computational methods for quantum chemistry is not properly balanced by the development of basis sets. Even in the case of few-electron systems it is hard to find basis set which are able to reproduce the ECG benchmarks with the mhartree accuracy. In this paper we show early work on improvements of the basis sets for small atomic and molecular systems. As a starting point the ground state of lithium atom and the lowest states of lithium dimer will be investigated. The exploratory optimization of the exponents of primitive gaussians will be based on even tempered scheme combined with CISD method.

  7. Multiple aberrations in shared inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways explain the co-association of depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD), and the increased risk for CVD and due mortality in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Ruckoanich, Piyanuj; Chang, Young Seun; Mahanonda, Nithi; Berk, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is evidence that there is a bidirectional relationship between major depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD): depressed patients are a population at risk for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, and depression is more frequent in patients who suffer from CVD. There is also evidence that inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways underpin the common pathophysiology of both CVD and major depression. Activation of these pathways may increase risk for both disorders and contribute to shared risk. The shared IO&NS pathways that may contribute to CVD and depression comprise the following: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ; T cell activation; increased acute phase proteins, like C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin; complement factors; increased LPS load through bacterial translocation and subsequent gut-derived inflammation; induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase with increased levels of tryptophan catabolites; decreased levels of antioxidants, like coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase; increased O&NS characterized by oxidative damage to low density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid inositol, increased malondialdehyde, and damage to DNA and mitochondria; increased nitrosative stress; and decreased ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The complex interplay between the abovementioned IO&NS pathways in depression results in pro-atherogenic effects and should be regarded as a risk factor to future clinical CVD and due mortality. We suggest that major depression should be added as a risk factor to the Charlson "comorbidity" index. It is advised that patients with (sub)chronic or recurrent major depression should routinely be assessed by serology tests to predict if they have an increased risk to cardiovascular disorders.

  8. Multiple exciton collection in a sensitized photovoltaic system.

    PubMed

    Sambur, Justin B; Novet, Thomas; Parkinson, B A

    2010-10-01

    Multiple exciton generation, the creation of two electron-hole pairs from one high-energy photon, is well established in bulk semiconductors, but assessments of the efficiency of this effect remain controversial in quantum-confined systems like semiconductor nanocrystals. We used a photoelectrochemical system composed of PbS nanocrystals chemically bound to TiO(2) single crystals to demonstrate the collection of photocurrents with quantum yields greater than one electron per photon. The strong electronic coupling and favorable energy level alignment between PbS nanocrystals and bulk TiO(2) facilitate extraction of multiple excitons more quickly than they recombine, as well as collection of hot electrons from higher quantum dot excited states. Our results have implications for increasing the efficiency of photovoltaic devices by avoiding losses resulting from the thermalization of photogenerated carriers.

  9. Excitonic Interfacial Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanism in the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Methanol to Formaldehyde on TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Migani, Annapaola; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-12-14

    CH3OH on a single-crystal rutile TiO2(110) surface is a widely studied model system for heterogeneous photocatalysis. Using spin-polarized density functional theory with a hybrid functional (HSE06), we study the photocatalytic oxidation of CH3OH adsorbed at a coordinately unsaturated Ti site as an excited-state process with triplet spin multiplicity. The oxidation to CH2O is stepwise and involves a CH3O intermediate. The first O-H dissociation step follows an excitonic interfacial proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism where the hole-electron (h-e) pair generated during the excitation is bound, and the h is transferred to the adsorbate. The O-H dissociation paths associated with other h-e pairs are unreactive, and the moderate experimental efficiency is due to the different reactivity of the h-e pairs. The excited-state CH3O intermediate further deactivates through a seam of intersection between the ground and excited states. It can follow three different paths, regeneration of adsorbed CH3OH or formation of the ground-state CH3O anion or an adsorbed CH2O radical anion. The third channel corresponds to photochemical CH2O formation from CH3OH, where a single photon induces one electron oxidation and transfer of two protons. These results expand the current view on the photocatalysis of CH3OH on TiO2(110) by highlighting the role of excitons and showing that adsorbed CH3OH may also be an active species in the photocatalytic oxidation to CH2O.

  10. A many-body states picture of electronic friction: The case of multiple orbitals and multiple electronic states.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-08-07

    We present a very general form of electronic friction as present when a molecule with multiple orbitals hybridizes with a metal electrode. To develop this picture of friction, we embed the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) within a classical master equation (CME). Thus, this article extends our previous work analyzing the case of one electronic level, as we may now treat the case of multiple levels and many electronic molecular states. We show that, in the adiabatic limit, where electron transitions are much faster than nuclear motion, the QCLE-CME reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation, such that nuclei feel an average force as well as friction and a random force-as caused by their interaction with the metallic electrons. Finally, we show numerically and analytically that our frictional results agree with other published results calculated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. Numerical recipes for solving this QCLE-CME will be provided in a subsequent paper.

  11. A many-body states picture of electronic friction: The case of multiple orbitals and multiple electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2016-08-01

    We present a very general form of electronic friction as present when a molecule with multiple orbitals hybridizes with a metal electrode. To develop this picture of friction, we embed the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) within a classical master equation (CME). Thus, this article extends our previous work analyzing the case of one electronic level, as we may now treat the case of multiple levels and many electronic molecular states. We show that, in the adiabatic limit, where electron transitions are much faster than nuclear motion, the QCLE-CME reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation, such that nuclei feel an average force as well as friction and a random force—as caused by their interaction with the metallic electrons. Finally, we show numerically and analytically that our frictional results agree with other published results calculated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. Numerical recipes for solving this QCLE-CME will be provided in a subsequent paper.

  12. Haemophilus influenzae and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Alistair; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Munson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. H. influenzae can, however, move out of its commensal niche and cause multiple respiratory tract diseases. Such diseases include otitis media in young children, as well as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and bronchitis. During the course of colonization and infection, H. influenzae must withstand oxidative stress generated by multiple reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by other co-pathogens and by host cells. H. influenzae has, therefore, evolved multiple mechanisms that protect the cell against oxygen-generated stresses. In this review, we will describe these systems relative to the well-described systems in Escherichia coli. Moreover, we will compare how H. influenzae combats the effect of oxidative stress as a necessary phenotype for its roles as both a successful commensal and pathogen. PMID:22919631

  13. Nicotine increases oxidative stress, activates NF-kappaB and GRP78, induces apoptosis and sensitizes cells to genotoxic/xenobiotic stresses by a multiple stress inducer, deoxycholate: relevance to colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crowley-Weber, Cara L; Dvorakova, Katerina; Crowley, Cheray; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol; Garewal, Harinder; Payne, Claire M

    2003-03-06

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that environmental (smoking) and dietary factors (high fat) contribute to carcinogenesis in many organ systems. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that nicotine, a component of cigarette smoke, and sodium deoxycholate (NaDOC), a cytotoxic bile salt that increases in concentration in the gastrointestinal tract after a high fat meal, induce similar cellular stresses and that nicotine may enhance some of the NaDOC-induced stresses. We found that nicotine, at 0.8 microM, the very low sub-micromolar level occurring in the tissues of smokers: (1). increases oxidative stress; (2). activates NF-kappaB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor; (3). activates the 78 kD glucose regulated protein promoter, an indication of endoplasmic reticulum stress; (4). induces apoptosis; (5). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the 153 kD growth arrest and DNA damage promoter, an indication of increased genotoxic stress; and (6). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the xenobiotic response element. Our findings have applicability to G.I. cancer, in general, since smoking is a risk factor in the development of esophageal, pancreatic, gastric and colon cancer, and these cancers are also promoted by bile acids.

  14. Multiple-Ring Digital Communication Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1992-01-01

    Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control functions of electric-power-distribution networks. Optical-fiber links of communication network follow power-distribution routes. Since fiber crosses open power switches, communication network includes multiple interconnected loops with occasional spurs. At each intersection node is needed. Nodes of communication network include power-distribution substations and power-controlling units. In addition to serving data acquisition and control functions, each node acts as repeater, passing on messages to next node(s). Multiple-ring communication network operates on new AbNET protocol and features fiber-optic communication.

  15. Iron Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  16. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neutral Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Oxidate Stress and Damage in Multiple Hit Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpes virus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex three-dimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6]. By combining the RFs of microgravity, radiation, and viral infection we will demonstrate that living in the space environment leads to significant physiological consequences for the peripheral and subsequently the central nervous system (PNS, CNS) associated with OSaD generation and consequentially endangers long-duration and exploration-class missions.

  17. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  18. Multiple sclerosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000129.htm Multiple sclerosis - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... Your doctor has told you that you have multiple sclerosis (MS). This disease affects the brain and spinal ...

  19. Challenges of Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Challenges of Parenting Multiples There are many psychological, social, and economic ... the unique challenges and rewards that come from parenting multiples. For more information on the medical aspects ...

  20. Twins, Triplets, Multiple Births

    MedlinePlus

    ... deliver by C-section, especially if there are three babies or more. Parenting multiples can be a challenge. Volunteer help and support groups for parents of multiples can help. Dept. of Health and ...

  1. MultipleColposcopyJCO

    Cancer.gov

    Performing multiple biopsies during a procedure known as colposcopy—visual inspection of the cervix—is more effective than performing only a single biopsy of the worst-appearing area for detecting cervical cancer precursors. This multiple biopsy approach

  2. Operation of the Oxide Washer for Water-Washing Solubles out of Impure Pu Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, K E; Close, W L; Krikorian, O H; Summers III, H V

    2006-01-30

    An evaluation has been made for using the Oxide Washer to wash water-soluble materials out of impure Pu oxide. It is found that multiple washes are needed to reduce the water-soluble materials to very low levels in the impure Pu oxides. The removal of the wash water from the Oxide Washer is accompanied by particulates of the impure Pu oxide, which subsequently need to be filtered out. In spite of the additional filtration needed, the overall level of manpower required for processing is still only about one third of that for an all-manual operation.

  3. Oxidised guanidinohydantoin (Ghox) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) are major products of iron- and copper-mediated 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation.

    PubMed

    White, Blánaid; Tarun, Maricar C; Gathergood, Nicholas; Rusling, James F; Smyth, Malcolm R

    2005-12-01

    8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), an important biomarker of DNA damage in oxidatively generated stress, is highly reactive towards further oxidation. Much work has been carried out to investigate the oxidation products of 8-oxoGua by one-electron oxidants, singlet oxygen, and peroxynitrite. This report details for the first time, the iron- and copper-mediated Fenton oxidation of 8-oxoGua and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo). Oxidised guanidinohydantoin (Gh(ox)) was detected as the major product of oxidation of 8-oxoGua with iron or copper and hydrogen peroxide, both at pH 7 and pH 11. Oxaluric acid was identified as a final product of 8-oxoGua oxidation. 8-oxodGuo was subjected to oxidation under the same conditions as 8-oxoGua. However, dGh(ox) was not generated. Instead, spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) was detected as the major product for both iron and copper mediated oxidation at pH 7. It was proposed that the oxidation of 8-oxoGua was initiated by its one-electron oxidation by the metal species, which leads to the reactive intermediate 8-oxoGua (+), which readily undergoes further oxidation. The product of 8-oxoGua and 8-oxodGuo oxidation was determined by the 2'-deoxyribose moiety of the 8-oxodGuo, not whether copper or iron was the metal involved in the oxidation.

  4. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  5. Multiple ionization of atoms by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu; Shevelko, V. P.

    2015-06-01

    A method is suggested for quickly and easily estimating multiple ionization (MI) cross sections of heavy atoms colliding with highly charged ions, using the independent-particle model (IPM). One-electron ionization probabilities p(b) are calculated using the geometrical model for p(0) values at zero impact parameter b and the relativistic Born approximation for one-electron ionization cross sections. Numerical results of MI cross sections are presented for Ne and Ar atoms colliding with Ar8+, Fe20+, Au24+, Bi67+ and U90+ ions at energies 1 MeV u{}-1-10 GeV u{}-1and compared with available experimental data and CTMC (classical trajectory Monte Carlo) calculations. The present method of calculation describes experimental dependencies of MI cross sections on the number of ejected electrons m within a factor of two to three. Numerical calculations show that at intermediate ion energies E = 1 - 10 MeV u{}-1, the contribution of MI cross sections to the total, i.e. summed over all m values, is quite large ˜35% and decreases with increasing energy.

  6. Oxide Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    Thermoelectricity in oxides, especially NaxCoO2 and related materials, is discussed from the point of view of first principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory. The electronic structure of this material is exceptional in that it has a combination of very narrow bands and strong hybridization between metal d states and ligand p states. As shown within the framework of conventional Boltzmann transport theory, this leads to high Seebeck coefficients even at metallic carrier densities. This suggests a strategy of searching for other narrow band oxides that can be doped metallic with mobile carriers. Some possible avenues for finding such materials are suggested.

  7. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  8. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  9. Merphos oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Merphos oxide ; CASRN 78 - 48 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  10. Thallium oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thallium oxide ; CASRN 1314 - 32 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  11. Propylene oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propylene oxide ; CASRN 75 - 56 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  13. Creating Multiple Processes from Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolffe, Robert; Robinson, Helja; Grant, Jean Marie

    1998-01-01

    Howard Gardner's multiple-intelligences theory stresses that all humans possess the various intelligences (linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, bodily-kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalist) to differing degrees, and most people can attain adequate competency levels. This article provides a sample checklist for…

  14. On Multiple Questions and Multiple WH Fronting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudin, Catherine

    An analysis of languages with multiple fronting of WH words (who, what, whom, etc.) looks in detail at Polish, Serbo-Croatian, Czech, Bulgarian (Slavic languages), and Romanian (a Romance language). In spite of their superficial similarity, the Slavic and East European languages that normally put all WH words at the beginning of clauses fall into…

  15. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  16. Multiple Instance Fuzzy Inference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-02

    INFERENCE A novel fuzzy learning framework that employs fuzzy inference to solve the problem of multiple instance learning (MIL) is presented. The...fuzzy learning framework that employs fuzzy inference to solve the problem of multiple instance learning (MIL) is presented. The framework introduces a...or learned from data. In multiple instance problems, the training data is ambiguously labeled. Instances are grouped into bags, labels of bags are

  17. Active neutron multiplicity analysis and Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, M. S.; Ensslin, N.; Langner, D. G.; Miller, M. C.; Siebelist, R.; Stewart, J. E.; Ceo, R. N.; May, P. K.; Collins, L. L., Jr.

    Active neutron multiplicity measurements of high-enrichment uranium metal and oxide samples have been made at Los Alamos and Y-12. The data from the measurements of standards at Los Alamos were analyzed to obtain values for neutron multiplication and source-sample coupling. These results are compared to equivalent results obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. An approximate relationship between coupling and multiplication is derived and used to correct doubles rates for multiplication and coupling. The utility of singles counting for uranium samples is also examined.

  18. Oxidation of guanine in double-stranded DNA by [Ru(bpy)2dppz]Cl2 in cationic reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sarah E; Grigoryan, Armine; Szalai, Veronika A

    2007-10-01

    DNA oxidation has been investigated in the medium of cationic reverse micelles (RMs). The oxidative chemistry is photochemically initiated using the DNA intercalator bis(bipyridine)dipyridophenazine ruthenium(II) chloride ([Ru(bpy)2dppz]Cl2) bound to duplex DNA in the RMs. High-resolution polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) is used to reveal and quantify guanine (G) oxidation products, including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8OG). In buffer solution, the addition of the oxidative quenchers potassium ferricyanide or pentaamminechlorocobalt(III) dichloride leads to an increase in the amount of piperidine-labile G oxidation products generated via one-electron oxidation. In RMs, however, the yield of oxidatively generated damage is attenuated. With or without ferricyanide quencher in the RMs, the yield of oxidatively generated products is approximately the same. Inclusion of the cationic quencher [CoCl(NH3)5]2+ in the RMs increases the amount of oxidation products generated but not to the extent that it does in buffer solution. Under anaerobic conditions, all of the samples in RMs, with or without added oxidative quenchers, show decreased levels of piperidine-labile oxidation products, suggesting that the primary oxidant in RMs is singlet oxygen. G oxidation is enhanced in D2O and deuterated heptane and is diminished in the presence of sodium azide in RMs, also supporting 1O2 as the main G oxidant in RMs. Isotopic labeling experiments show that the oxygen atom in 8OG produced in RMs is not from water. The observed change in the G oxidation mechanism from a one-electron process in buffer to mostly 1O2 in RMs illustrates the importance of both DNA structure and DNA environment on the chemistry of G oxidation.

  19. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  20. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  1. Multiple Frequency Parametric Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    300003 1 MULTIPLE FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...beams. However, the multiple nonlinear interactions are not taken advantage of in order to generate additional efficiencies, bandwidth, and SNR...array. [0050] It will be understood that many additional changes in details, materials , steps, and arrangements of parts which have been described

  2. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  3. Assessing Children's Multiplicative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins much of the mathematics learned beyond the early primary school years. This paper reports on a current study that utilises an interview tool and a written quiz to gather data about children's multiplicative thinking. The development of the tools and some of the…

  4. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  5. Applying Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulou, Joanna A.

    2009-01-01

    The ideas of multiple intelligences introduced by Howard Gardner of Harvard University more than 25 years ago have taken form in many ways, both in schools and in other sometimes-surprising settings. The silver anniversary of Gardner's learning theory provides an opportunity to reflect on the ways multiple intelligences theory has taken form and…

  6. Orchestrating Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Seana; Kornhaber, Mindy; Gardner, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Education policymakers often go astray when they attempt to integrate multiple intelligences theory into schools, according to the originator of the theory, Howard Gardner, and his colleagues. The greatest potential of a multiple intelligences approach to education grows from the concept of a profile of intelligences. Each learner's intelligence…

  7. Constraining Multiple Grammars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This article offers the author's commentary on the Multiple Grammars (MG) language acquisition theory proposed by Luiz Amaral and Tom Roeper in the present issue. Multiple Grammars advances the claim that optionality is a constitutive characteristic of any one grammar, with interlanguage grammars being perhaps the clearest examples of a…

  8. Multiple scattering technique lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissonnette, Luc R.

    1992-01-01

    The Bernouilli-Ricatti equation is based on the single scattering description of the lidar backscatter return. In practice, especially in low visibility conditions, the effects of multiple scattering can be significant. Instead of considering these multiple scattering effects as a nuisance, we propose here to use them to help resolve the problems of having to assume a backscatter-to-extinction relation and specifying a boundary value for a position far remote from the lidar station. To this end, we have built a four-field-of-view lidar receiver to measure the multiple scattering contributions. The system has been described in a number of publications that also discuss preliminary results illustrating the multiple scattering effects for various environmental conditions. Reported here are recent advances made in the development of a method of inverting the multiple scattering data for the determination of the aerosol scattering coefficient.

  9. Electrochemical oxidation of cyanide in the hydrocyclone cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dhamo, N.

    1996-12-31

    A diluted electroplating cyanide rinse water has been used to test the use of the hydrocyclone cell (HCC) in batch recycle mode of operation for the simultaneous oxidation of cyanide during the electrodeposition of silver. The results obtained in this work with regard to the final products, current efficiency and the number of transferred electrons per CN{sup {minus}} helped to establish a probable reaction scheme. According to this, the process occurs mainly with one-electron transfer, through cyanate and cyanogen as intermediate species. Meanwhile, under conditions where the electrolyte circulates in an open bath and flows successively through the cathodic and the anodic compartments, as in the case of the HCC system, the cyanate could be produced by the direct oxidation through air and/or generated peroxide and CN could be lost as HCN (g).

  10. Multiple frame cluster tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadaleta, Sabino; Klusman, Mike; Poore, Aubrey; Slocumb, Benjamin J.

    2002-08-01

    Tracking large number of closely spaced objects is a challenging problem for any tracking system. In missile defense systems, countermeasures in the form of debris, chaff, spent fuel, and balloons can overwhelm tracking systems that track only individual objects. Thus, tracking these groups or clusters of objects followed by transitions to individual object tracking (if and when individual objects separate from the groups) is a necessary capability for a robust and real-time tracking system. The objectives of this paper are to describe the group tracking problem in the context of multiple frame target tracking and to formulate a general assignment problem for the multiple frame cluster/group tracking problem. The proposed approach forms multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and base individual frame clustering decisions on the information from multiple frames of data in much the same way that MFA or MHT work for individual object tracking. The formulation of the assignment problem for resolved object tracking and candidate clustering methods for use in multiple frame cluster tracking are briefly reviewed. Then, three different formulations are presented for the combination of multiple clustering hypotheses on each frame of data and the multiple frame assignments of clusters between frames.

  11. Multiple intracranial enterogenous cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Walls, T J; Purohit, D P; Aji, W S; Schofield, I S; Barwick, D D

    1986-01-01

    The case of a 40-year-old woman with increasing ataxia is described. Although the clinical presentation and evoked response studies raised the possibility of multiple sclerosis, further investigation revealed multiple cystic intracranial lesions. Surgical excision of one of the lesions relieved the patient's symptoms. Histological examination revealed that this was an enterogenous cyst. Although single cysts of this type have rarely been reported occurring in the posterior cranial fossa, the occurrence of multiple lesions, some in the supratentorial compartment, appears to be unique. Images PMID:3701354

  12. Multiple Myeloma and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Zeinab A.; Zantout, Mira S.; Azar, Sami T.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant plasma cell disorder that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematologic cancers. It is characterized by accumulation of clonal plasma cells, predominantly in the bone marrow. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing; therefore, it is expected that there will be an increase in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma with concomitant diabetes mellitus. The treatment of multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus is multifaceted. The coexistence of the two conditions in a patient forms a major challenge for physicians. PMID:22363889

  13. Vision and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Simon J; Raoof, Naz; McLean, Rebecca J; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect vision in many ways, including optic neuritis, chronic optic neuropathy, retrochiasmal visual field defects, higher order cortical processing, double vision, nystagmus and also by related ocular conditions such as uveitis. There are also side effects from recently introduced multiple sclerosis treatments that can affect vision. This review will discuss all these aspects and how they come together to cause visual symptoms. It will then focus on practical aspects of how to recognise when there is a vision problem in a multiple sclerosis patient and on what treatments are available to improve vision.

  14. On the consistent definition of spin-orbit effects calculated by relativistic effective core potentials with one-electron spin-orbit operators: Comparison of spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Kyu; Bae, Cheolbeom; Lee, Yoon Sup

    1999-05-01

    The spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4 are evaluated by two-component calculations using several relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) with one-electron spin-orbit operators. The used RECPs are shape-consistent RECPs derived by Wildman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9975 (1997)] and three sets of energy-consistent (or adjusted) RECPs published by Schwerdtfeger et al. [Phys. Scr. 36, 453 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 90, 762 (1989)], Küchle et al. [Mol. Phys. 74, 1245 (1991)], and Leininger et al. [Chem. Phys. 217, 19 (1997)]. The shape-consistent RECP results are in very good agreement with the Küchle et al. energy-consistent RECP results for all the molecules studied here and all-electron results for TlH. The RECPs of Schwerdtfeger et al. and Leininger et al. seem to provide qualitatively different spin-orbit effects. If one defines spin-free RECP as the potential average of the corresponding two-component RECP, all RECPs give very similar spin-orbit effects for all the cases. Most of the discrepancies of molecular spin-orbit effects among various RECPs reported in the literature may originate from different definitions of RECPs with or without a spin-orbit term and not from the inherent difference in spin-orbit operators.

  15. Multiple vitamin overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... ingredient in a multiple vitamin supplement can be toxic in large amounts, but the most serious risk ... chap 9. Velez LI, O'Connell EJ. Heavy metals. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. ...

  16. The Multiplicative Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between three critical elements, and the associated mathematical language, to assist students to make the critical transition from additive to multiplicative thinking are examined in this article by Chris Hurst.

  17. Taking multiple medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why you may Need More Than one Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  18. Pomalidomide for Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of pomalidomide (Pomalyst®) and low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone alone in patients with multiple myeloma that has progressed despite other treatments.

  19. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  20. What Is Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple myeloma is a cancer formed by malignant plasma cells. Normal plasma cells are found in the bone marrow and ... to an infection, they mature and change into plasma cells. Plasma cells make the antibodies (also called ...

  1. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Investors Our Model Testimonials Investor Resources Investor Spotlight Financials Estate Planning Investor Services MMRF EVENTS MMRF Events Team for Cures Signature Events Independent Events Featured Supporters Spirit of Hope Honorees Education ... Partners Careers ABOUT MULTIPLE MYELOMA What ...

  2. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  4. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  5. Multiple pterygium syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Salszberg, B

    1981-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, pterygia of the neck, fingers, and antecubital, popliteal, and intercrural areas, growth retardation, and facial, vertebral, and genital anomalies. We present two unrelated patients of 17 and 6 years of age, respectively, affected with this condition. We describe the natural history of their disorder since birth and review the spectrum of phenotypic variation of the multiple pterygium syndrome in 25 published cases. Images PMID:7334504

  6. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  7. Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes Measurement Error Models

    PubMed Central

    Tekwe, Carmen D.; Carter, Randy L.; Cullings, Harry M.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes Models (MIMIC) are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times however when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model, (2) to develop likelihood based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model, (3) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. As a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure. PMID:24962535

  8. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  9. Multiple indicators, multiple causes measurement error models

    DOE PAGES

    Tekwe, Carmen D.; Carter, Randy L.; Cullings, Harry M.; ...

    2014-06-25

    Multiple indicators, multiple causes (MIMIC) models are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times, however, when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this study are as follows: (i) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model; (ii) to develop likelihood-based estimation methodsmore » for the MIMIC ME model; and (iii) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. Finally, as a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure.« less

  10. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  11. Multiple indicators, multiple causes measurement error models

    SciTech Connect

    Tekwe, Carmen D.; Carter, Randy L.; Cullings, Harry M.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2014-06-25

    Multiple indicators, multiple causes (MIMIC) models are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times, however, when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this study are as follows: (i) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model; (ii) to develop likelihood-based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model; and (iii) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. Finally, as a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure.

  12. Trousseau's syndrome: multiple definitions and multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In 1865, Armand Trousseau noted that unexpected or migratory thrombophlebitis could be a forewarning of an occult visceral malignancy. An analysis by Sack and colleagues in 1977 extended the term Trousseau's syndrome to include chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy associated with microangiopathy, verrucous endocarditis, and arterial emboli in patients with cancer, often occurring with mucin-positive carcinomas. In recent times the term has been ascribed to various clinical situations, ranging all the way from these classic descriptions to any kind of coagulopathy occurring in the setting of any kind of malignancy. These multiple definitions of Trousseau's syndrome are partly the consequence of multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms that apparently contribute to the hypercoagulability associated with cancer. Even the classic syndrome probably represents a spectrum of disorders, ranging from exaggerated fluid-phased thrombosis dependent on prothrombotic agents such as tissue factor to a platelet- and endotheliumum-based selectin-dependent microangiopathy associated with mucin-producing carcinomas, along with thrombin and fibrin production. Also considered here are recent hypotheses about genetic pathways within tumor cells that might trigger these thrombotic phenomena, and the reasons why therapy with heparins of various kinds remain the preferred treatment, probably because of their salutary actions on several of the proposed pathologic mechanisms. PMID:17496204

  13. Mechanism of oxidative conversion of Amplex® Red to resorufin: Pulse radiolysis and enzymatic studies.

    PubMed

    Dębski, Dawid; Smulik, Renata; Zielonka, Jacek; Michałowski, Bartosz; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Dębowska, Karolina; Adamus, Jan; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Sikora, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Amplex® Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine) is a fluorogenic probe widely used to detect and quantify hydrogen peroxide in biological systems. Detection of hydrogen peroxide is based on peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Amplex® Red to resorufin. In this study we investigated the mechanism of one-electron oxidation of Amplex® Red and we present the spectroscopic characterization of transient species formed upon the oxidation. Oxidation process has been studied by a pulse radiolysis technique with one-electron oxidants (N3(•), CO3(•-),(•)NO2 and GS(•)). The rate constants for the Amplex® Red oxidation by N3(•) ((2)k=2.1·10(9)M(-1)s(-1), at pH=7.2) and CO3(•-) ((2)k=7.6·10(8)M(-1)s(-1), at pH=10.3) were determined. Two intermediates formed during the conversion of Amplex® Red into resorufin have been characterized. Based on the results obtained, the mechanism of transformation of Amplex® Red into resorufin, involving disproportionation of the Amplex® Red-derived radical species, has been proposed. The results indicate that peroxynitrite-derived radicals, but not peroxynitrite itself, are capable to oxidize Amplex® Red to resorufin. We also demonstrate that horseradish peroxidase can catalyze oxidation of Amplex® Red not only by hydrogen peroxide, but also by peroxynitrite, which needs to be considered when employing the probe for hydrogen peroxide detection.

  14. Pathways of peroxynitrite oxidation of thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Quijano, C; Alvarez, B; Gatti, R M; Augusto, O; Radi, R

    1997-02-15

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the thiol group of both cysteine and glutathione. This process is associated with oxygen consumption. At acidic pH and a cysteine/peroxynitrite molar ratio of < or = 1.2, there was a single fast phase of oxygen consumption, which increased with increasing concentrations of both cysteine and oxygen. At higher molar ratios the profile of oxygen consumption became biphasic, with a fast phase (phase I) that decreased with increasing cysteine concentration, followed by a slow phase (phase II) whose rate of oxygen consumption increased with increasing cysteine concentration. Oxygen consumption in phase I was inhibited by desferrioxamine and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, but not by mannitol; superoxide dismutase also inhibited oxygen consumption in phase I, while catalase added during phase II decreased the rate of oxygen consumption. For both cysteine and glutathione, oxygen consumption in phase I was maximal at neutral to acidic pH: in contrast, total thiol oxidation was maximal at alkaline pH. EPR spin-trapping studies using N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone indicated that the yield of thiyl radical adducts had a pH profile comparable with that found for oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the reactions of peroxynitrite with cysteine and glutathione were 1290 +/- 30 M-1.S-1 and 281 +/- 6 M-1.S-1 respectively at pH 5.75 and 37 degrees C. These results are consistent with two different pathways participating in the reaction of peroxynitrite with low-molecular-mass thiols: (a) the reaction of the peroxynitrite anion with the protonated thiol group, in a second-order process likely to involve a two-electron oxidation, and (b) the reaction of peroxynitrous acid, or a secondary species derived from it, with the thiolate in a one-electron transfer process that yields thiyl radicals capable of initiating an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction.

  15. Pathways of peroxynitrite oxidation of thiol groups.

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, C; Alvarez, B; Gatti, R M; Augusto, O; Radi, R

    1997-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the thiol group of both cysteine and glutathione. This process is associated with oxygen consumption. At acidic pH and a cysteine/peroxynitrite molar ratio of < or = 1.2, there was a single fast phase of oxygen consumption, which increased with increasing concentrations of both cysteine and oxygen. At higher molar ratios the profile of oxygen consumption became biphasic, with a fast phase (phase I) that decreased with increasing cysteine concentration, followed by a slow phase (phase II) whose rate of oxygen consumption increased with increasing cysteine concentration. Oxygen consumption in phase I was inhibited by desferrioxamine and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, but not by mannitol; superoxide dismutase also inhibited oxygen consumption in phase I, while catalase added during phase II decreased the rate of oxygen consumption. For both cysteine and glutathione, oxygen consumption in phase I was maximal at neutral to acidic pH: in contrast, total thiol oxidation was maximal at alkaline pH. EPR spin-trapping studies using N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone indicated that the yield of thiyl radical adducts had a pH profile comparable with that found for oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the reactions of peroxynitrite with cysteine and glutathione were 1290 +/- 30 M-1.S-1 and 281 +/- 6 M-1.S-1 respectively at pH 5.75 and 37 degrees C. These results are consistent with two different pathways participating in the reaction of peroxynitrite with low-molecular-mass thiols: (a) the reaction of the peroxynitrite anion with the protonated thiol group, in a second-order process likely to involve a two-electron oxidation, and (b) the reaction of peroxynitrous acid, or a secondary species derived from it, with the thiolate in a one-electron transfer process that yields thiyl radicals capable of initiating an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction. PMID:9078258

  16. UO2 oxidative corrosion by non-classical diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Joanne; Chaka, Anne M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Biwer, Craig A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bargar, John R.; Eng, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Using x-ray scattering, spectroscopy, and computational methods, we show that oxidation of the UO2 (111) surface results in a self-organized arrangement of oxygen interstitials with three-layer periodicity, producing a nanoscale oscillatory oxidation front with uranium in three oxidation states: IV, V, and VI. This complex diffusion profile is driven by the transfer of the lowest energy U5f electrons from multiple U atoms into the O2p band. Our results contrast with all previous bulk structural oxidation models and the simple exponential oxidation front expected from classical diffusion.

  17. Ferricytochrome (c) directly oxidizes aminoacetone to methylglyoxal, a catabolite accumulated in carbonyl stress.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Adriano; Mano, Camila M; Mantovani, Mariana C; Dyszy, Fábio H; Massari, Júlio; Tokikawa, Rita; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Nantes, Iseli L; Bechara, Etelvino J H

    2013-01-01

    Age-related diseases are associated with increased production of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species such as methylglyoxal. Aminoacetone, a putative threonine catabolite, is reportedly known to undergo metal-catalyzed oxidation to methylglyoxal, NH4(+) ion, and H2O2 coupled with (i) permeabilization of rat liver mitochondria, and (ii) apoptosis of insulin-producing cells. Oxidation of aminoacetone to methylglyoxal is now shown to be accelerated by ferricytochrome c, a reaction initiated by one-electron reduction of ferricytochrome c by aminoacetone without amino acid modifications. The participation of O2(•-) and HO (•) radical intermediates is demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of added superoxide dismutase and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spin-trapping experiments with 5,5'-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. We hypothesize that two consecutive one-electron transfers from aminoacetone (E0 values = -0.51 and -1.0 V) to ferricytochrome c (E0 = 0.26 V) may lead to aminoacetone enoyl radical and, subsequently, imine aminoacetone, whose hydrolysis yields methylglyoxal and NH4(+) ion. In the presence of oxygen, aminoacetone enoyl and O2(•-) radicals propagate aminoacetone oxidation to methylglyoxal and H2O2. These data endorse the hypothesis that aminoacetone, putatively accumulated in diabetes, may directly reduce ferricyt c yielding methylglyoxal and free radicals, thereby triggering redox imbalance and adverse mitochondrial responses.

  18. Ferricytochrome c Directly Oxidizes Aminoacetone to Methylglyoxal, a Catabolite Accumulated in Carbonyl Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Adriano; Mano, Camila M.; Mantovani, Mariana C.; Dyszy, Fábio H.; Massari, Júlio; Tokikawa, Rita; Nascimento, Otaciro R.; Nantes, Iseli L.; Bechara, Etelvino J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related diseases are associated with increased production of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species such as methylglyoxal. Aminoacetone, a putative threonine catabolite, is reportedly known to undergo metal-catalyzed oxidation to methylglyoxal, NH4+ ion, and H2O2 coupled with (i) permeabilization of rat liver mitochondria, and (ii) apoptosis of insulin-producing cells. Oxidation of aminoacetone to methylglyoxal is now shown to be accelerated by ferricytochrome c, a reaction initiated by one-electron reduction of ferricytochrome c by aminoacetone without amino acid modifications. The participation of O2•− and HO• radical intermediates is demonstrated by the inhibitory effect of added superoxide dismutase and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spin-trapping experiments with 5,5′-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide. We hypothesize that two consecutive one-electron transfers from aminoacetone (E0 values = −0.51 and −1.0 V) to ferricytochrome c (E0 = 0.26 V) may lead to aminoacetone enoyl radical and, subsequently, imine aminoacetone, whose hydrolysis yields methylglyoxal and NH4+ ion. In the presence of oxygen, aminoacetone enoyl and O2•− radicals propagate aminoacetone oxidation to methylglyoxal and H2O2. These data endorse the hypothesis that aminoacetone, putatively accumulated in diabetes, may directly reduce ferricyt c yielding methylglyoxal and free radicals, thereby triggering redox imbalance and adverse mitochondrial responses. PMID:23483930

  19. Electrochemical Detection of Multiple Bioprocess Analytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus that includes highly miniaturized thin-film electrochemical sensor array has been demonstrated as a prototype of instruments for simultaneous detection of multiple substances of interest (analytes) and measurement of acidity or alkalinity in bioprocess streams. Measurements of pH and of concentrations of nutrients and wastes in cell-culture media, made by use of these instruments, are to be used as feedback for optimizing the growth of cells or the production of desired substances by the cultured cells. The apparatus is designed to utilize samples of minimal volume so as to minimize any perturbation of monitored processes. The apparatus can function in a potentiometric mode (for measuring pH), an amperometric mode (detecting analytes via oxidation/reduction reactions), or both. The sensor array is planar and includes multiple thin-film microelectrodes covered with hydrous iridium oxide. The oxide layer on each electrode serves as both a protective and electrochemical transducing layer. In its transducing role, the oxide provides electrical conductivity for amperometric measurement or pH response for potentiometric measurement. The oxide on an electrode can also serve as a matrix for one or more enzymes that render the electrode sensitive to a specific analyte. In addition to transducing electrodes, the array includes electrodes for potential control. The array can be fabricated by techniques familiar to the microelectronics industry. The sensor array is housed in a thin-film liquid-flow cell that has a total volume of about 100 mL. The flow cell is connected to a computer-controlled subsystem that periodically draws samples from the bioprocess stream to be monitored. Before entering the cell, each 100-mL sample is subjected to tangential-flow filtration to remove particles. In the present version of the apparatus, the electrodes are operated under control by a potentiostat and are used to simultaneously measure the pH and the concentration of glucose

  20. Use of Multiple Correlation Analysis and Multiple Regression Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; Petoskey, Martha D.

    1999-01-01

    Distinguishes between multiple correlation and multiple regression analysis. Illustrates suggested information reporting methods and reviews the use of regression methods when dealing with problems of missing data. (SK)

  1. Enhancing multiple disciplinary teamwork.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E

    2008-01-01

    Multiple disciplinary research provides an opportunity to bring together investigators across disciplines to provide new views and develop innovative approaches to important questions. Through this shared experience, novel paradigms are formed, original frameworks are developed, and new language is generated. Integral to the successful construction of effective cross-disciplinary teams is the recognition of antecedent factors that affect the development of the team such as intrapersonal, social, physical environmental, organizational, and institutional influences. Team functioning is enhanced with well-developed behavioral, affective, interpersonal, and intellectual processes. Outcomes of effective multiple disciplinary research teams include novel ideas, integrative models, new training programs, institutional change, and innovative policies that can also influence the degree to which antecedents and processes contribute to team performance. Ongoing evaluation of team functioning and achievement of designated outcomes ensures the continued development of the multiple disciplinary team and confirmation of this approach as important to the advancement of science.

  2. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  3. Neutron multiplicity analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and Multiplicity) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron multiplicity data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the multiplicity distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background subtraction and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and multiplicity analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron multiplicity counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron multiplicity counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron multiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This

  4. [Multiple intracranial arteriovenous malformation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, Miguel; Santin-Amo, José María; Román-Pena, Paula; Vázquez Herrero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are thought to be exceedingly rare lesions and have usually been reported as single cases. The incidence of multiple cerebral AVMs in major series ranges from 0.3% to 9% and, in the majority of cases, these malformations are associated with other vascular anomalies of the brain or soft tissues. We report a 62-year-old woman that presented with a left temporal haemorrhage. Angiography showed 3 AVMs located in the left temporal lobe, left cerebellar hemisphere and right temporal lobe. The lesions were treated with radiosurgery.

  5. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pont, Allan

    1980-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes consist of three distinct disease entities. They have in common adenomatous, carcinomatous or hyperplastic involvement of a variety of endocrine glands, and an autosomal dominant inheritance. MEN I includes hyperparathyroidism, islet cell and pituitary tumors. The components of MEN IIa are hyperparathyroidism, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. MEN IIb includes multiple neuromas, medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma. Effective tests are available for the early detection of components of the syndromes in potentially affected patients. Screening can lead to therapeutic intervention before clinical sequelae ensue. PMID:6247851

  6. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger; Esposito, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  7. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  8. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress.

  9. Concerted proton-electron transfer in the oxidation of hydrogen-bonded phenols.

    PubMed

    Rhile, Ian J; Markle, Todd F; Nagao, Hirotaka; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Lam, Oanh P; Lockwood, Mark A; Rotter, Katrina; Mayer, James M

    2006-05-10

    Three phenols with pendant, hydrogen-bonded bases (HOAr-B) have been oxidized in MeCN with various one-electron oxidants. The bases are a primary amine (-CPh(2)NH(2)), an imidazole, and a pyridine. The product of chemical and quasi-reversible electrochemical oxidations in each case is the phenoxyl radical in which the phenolic proton has transferred to the base, (*)OAr-BH(+), a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) process. The redox potentials for these oxidations are lower than for other phenols, predominately from the driving force for proton movement. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs by a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism, based on thermochemical arguments, isotope effects, and DeltaDeltaG(++)/DeltaDeltaG degrees . The data rule out stepwise paths involving initial electron transfer to form the phenol radical cations [(*)(+)HOAr-B] or initial proton transfer to give the zwitterions [(-)OAr-BH(+)]. The rate constant for heterogeneous electron transfer from HOAr-NH(2) to a platinum electrode has been derived from electrochemical measurements. For oxidations of HOAr-NH(2), the dependence of the solution rate constants on driving force, on temperature, and on the nature of the oxidant, and the correspondence between the homogeneous and heterogeneous rate constants, are all consistent with the application of adiabatic Marcus theory. The CPET reorganization energies, lambda = 23-56 kcal mol(-)(1), are large in comparison with those for electron transfer reactions of aromatic compounds. The reactions are not highly non-adiabatic, based on minimum values of H(rp) derived from the temperature dependence of the rate constants. These are among the first detailed analyses of CPET reactions where the proton and electron move to different sites.

  10. Metalloradical Complexes of Manganese and Chromium Featuring an Oxidatively Rearranged Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Çelenligil-Çetin, Remle; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Lalioti, Nikolia; Sanakis, Yiannis; Staples, Richard J.; Rath, Nigam P.; Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2009-01-01

    Redox events involving both metal and ligand sites are receiving increased attention since a number of biological processes direct redox equivalents toward functional residues. Metalloradical synthetic analogs remain scarce and require better definition of their mode of formation and subsequent operation. The trisamido-amine ligand [(RNC6H4)3N]3−, where R is the electron-rich 4-t-BuPh, is employed in this study to generate redox active residues in manganese and chromium complexes. Solutions of [(L1)Mn(II)–THF]− in THF are oxidized by dioxygen to afford [(L1re–1)Mn(III)–(O)2–Mn(III)(L1re–1)]2− as the major product. The rare dinuclear manganese (III,III) core is stabilized by a rearranged ligand that has undergone an one-electron oxidative transformation, followed by retention of the oxidation equivalent as a π radical in an o-diiminobenzosemiquinonate moiety. Magnetic studies indicate that the ligand-centered radical is stabilized by means of extended antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = ½ radical and the adjacent S = 2 Mn(III) site, as well as between the two Mn(III) centers via the dioxo bridge. Electrochemical and EPR data suggest that this system can store higher levels of oxidation potency. Entry to the corresponding Cr(III) chemistry is achieved by employing CrCl3 to access both [(L1)Cr(III)–THF] and [(L1re–1)Cr(III)–THF(Cl)], featuring the intact and the oxidatively rearranged ligands, respectively. The latter is generated by ligand-centered oxidation of the former compound. The rearranged ligand is perceived to be the product of an one-electron oxidation of the intact ligand to afford a metal-bound aminyl radical that subsequently mediates a radical 1,4-(N-to-N) aryl migration. PMID:18937446

  11. Metal oxide-based transparent conducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillispie, Meagen Anne

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) are important materials widely used for transparent contacts in flat panel displays, light emitting diodes, and solar cells. While Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) continues to be the TCO of choice, the increasing cost of raw In has resulted in an increasing interest in developing In-free alternatives to ITO. In this work, two metal oxide systems were investigated for their viability as In-free TCO materials. First, Nb- or Ta-doped anatase TiO2 was selected due to the recent reports of high conductivity in pulse laser deposited (PLD) films. Thin films doped with either 15 mol% Nb or 20 mol% Ta were deposited on glass and SrTiO3 (STO) substrates using RF magnetron sputtering techniques. In all cases, maximum conductivity was achieved when the films crystallized in the anatase structure of TiO2. Films sputtered on STO possessed similar electrical and optical properties as PLD films on STO, yet at a much lower deposition temperature while films deposited on glass had much lower conductivity, due to dramatically reduced mobility. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction analysis showed that doped TiO2 films sputter deposited on STO were biaxially textured along the (004) direction. This texturing was not observed in films deposited on glass, which were composed of randomly-oriented crystalline anatase. Biaxial texturing in the film helps to reduce grain boundary resistance, thereby increasing carrier mobility and further enhancing conductivity. The Cu-based delafossite system (CuBO2, B is a 3+ metal cation) was selected as the second TCO material system due to its natural p-type conductivity, a rarity among existing TCOs. Study of this system was two-pronged: (1) application of codoping techniques to achieve bipolar conductivity; and (2) investigate stability of mixed B cation delafossites. CuAlO2 and CuGaO2 were both codoped with varying ratios of donors and acceptors in an attempt to achieve bipolar conductivity. Very little change in the electrical

  12. Multiple Docking Adapter Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This cutaway drawing details the major characteristics of the Skylab Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA). The MDA, built under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center, housed the control units for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP), and Zero-Gravity Materials Processing Facility, and provided a docking port for the Apollo Command Module (CM).

  13. A Multiple Intelligence Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuzzi, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Describes multiple intelligence instruction (MII), based on the theory that humans possess seven intelligences: visual, musical, logical-mathematical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, linguistic, and bodily-kinesthetic. Argues that current methods of assessment are deficit-based and, therefore, not helpful in assessing MII students. Describes an…

  14. Universality of particle multiplicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e(+)e(-) interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  15. Multiple personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Salama, A A

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents a description of Multiple Personality Disorder--its development, etiology, and presentation. The paper stresses the criteria for diagnosis that can help professionals to identify individuals at an early stage. An overview of treatment approaches and indications for hospitalization, length of treatment, and goals are also explained.

  16. Hyperamylasaemia in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bloemendal, H J; Lobatto, S

    1996-07-01

    A 71-year-old woman, known to have multiple myeloma, was admitted because of fever, abdominal pain and hyperamylasaemia and hyperamylasuria. She was diagnosed as having acute pancreatitis. Because the diagnosis could not be confirmed, and serum lipase was normal, it appeared that this patient had developed an amylase-producing myeloma lesion in the pelvis.

  17. Caring for Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... in online discussions, meet other NICU families. Mothering Multiples: Breastfeeding and Caring for Twins or More, by Karen Kerkhoff Gromada (La Leche League International, 1999). Mothers of Super Twins (MOST) A support network of families who have or are expecting triplets, ...

  18. Preparing for Multiple Births

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. Preparing for Childbirth Getting ready for a multiple birth may seem overwhelming, and concerns about pre-term labor can be additional burdens for you to bear. The best reassurance is knowing that you have a network of support around you: capable doctors, a caring ...

  19. Multiple Grammars and MOGUL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John

    2014-01-01

    Optionality is a central phenomenon in second language acquisition (SLA), for which any adequate theory must account. Amaral and Roeper (this issue; henceforth A&R) offer an appealing approach to it, using Roeper's Multiple Grammars Theory, which was created with first language in mind but which extends very naturally to SLA. They include…

  20. Assessing Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William C.

    This paper explains Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI) and discusses questions raised about MI theory in regard to validity, assessment, and implications for instructional activities. MI theory asserts that human cognitive competence is best described in terms of a set of abilities, talents, and mental skills that each child…

  1. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  2. Automatic multiple applicator electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Easy-to-use, economical device permits electrophoresis on all known supporting media. System includes automatic multiple-sample applicator, sample holder, and electrophoresis apparatus. System has potential applicability to fields of taxonomy, immunology, and genetics. Apparatus is also used for electrofocusing.

  3. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  4. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C D

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is one of the main reasons for invalidation of young adults of both sexes. The disease is more common in women than in men. The illness begins most frequently in patients between the ages of 20 and 40 years, which is also the most fertile period for women. MS is an immune-mediated disease with chronic evolution marked by exacerbations and remissions that amplify the degree of disability. The most common clinical picture is the one with relapse and remission whose evolution is greatly improved after immunomodulatory treatment. We have revised the literature together with the data from the national multiple sclerosis society and the cases that are in the National Programme of Multiple Sclerosis, mainly the ones that are assigned to the regional center of Iaşi, at the Neurology Clinic inside the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital Iaşi. Pregnancy is quite frequent in female patients with MS. Certain risks are present during pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding and certain protocols must be applied, such as interrupting the immunomodulatory treatment before the conception. Child delivery must be closely monitored and it must take into consideration the dysfunction that the patient has and be adapted to the existing deficits. There are some methods that may be used during delivery for female patients with multiple sclerosis in order to make this process smooth and reduce the risk of postpartum complications. Multiple sclerosis is an invalidating disease, with a high prevalence in women. Pregnancy in patients with MS is not such a natural phenomenon as in a healthy female and it requires a multidisciplinary team in order to ensure the safety of both the mother and the newborn.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  6. Potential biological chemistry of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with the nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Bruce King, S

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, an important gaseous signaling agent generated in numerous biological tissues, influences many physiological processes. This biological profile seems reminiscent of nitric oxide, another important endogenously synthesized gaseous signaling molecule. Hydrogen sulfide reacts with nitric oxide or oxidized forms of nitric oxide and nitric oxide donors in vitro to form species that display distinct biology compared to both hydrogen sulfide and NO. The products of these interesting reactions may include small-molecule S-nitrosothiols or nitroxyl, the one-electron-reduced form of nitric oxide. In addition, thionitrous acid or thionitrite, compounds structurally analogous to nitrous acid and nitrite, may constitute a portion of the reaction products. Both the chemistry and the biology of thionitrous acid and thionitrite, compared to nitric oxide or hydrogen sulfide, remain poorly defined. General mechanisms for the formation of S-nitrosothiols, nitroxyl, and thionitrous acid based upon the ability of hydrogen sulfide to act as a nucleophile and a reducing agent with reactive nitric oxide-based intermediates are proposed. Hydrogen sulfide reactivity seems extensive and could have an impact on numerous areas of redox-controlled biology and chemistry, warranting more work in this exciting and developing area.

  7. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  8. FTIR Spectroscopy Applied in Remazol Blue Dye Oxidation by Laccases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Hernández, J.; Zavala-Soto, M. E.; Bibbins-Martínez, M.; Delgado-Macuil, R.; Díaz-Godinez, G.; Rojas-López, M.

    2008-04-01

    We have used FTIR with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) technique to analyze the decolourization process of Remazol Blue dye (RB19) caused by the oxidative activity of laccase enzyme. It is known that laccases catalyze the oxidation of a large range of phenolic compounds and aromatic amines carrying out one-electron oxidations, although also radicals could be formed which undergo subsequent nonenzymatic reactions. The enzyme laccase is a copper-containing polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.10.3.2) which has been tested as a potential alternative in detoxification of environmental pollutants such as dyes present in wastewaters generated for the textile industry. In order to ensure degradation or avoid formation of toxic compounds it is important to establish the mechanism by which laccase oxidizes dyes. In this research individual ATR-FTIR spectra have been recorded for several reaction times between 0 to 236 hours, and the temporal dependence of the reaction was analyzed through the relative diminution of the intensity of the infrared band at 1127 cm-1 (associated to C-N vibration), with respect to the intensity of the band at 1104 cm-1 (associated to S = O) from sulphoxide group. Decolourization process of this dye by laccase could be attributed to its accessibility on the secondary amino group, which is a potential point of attack of laccases, abstracting the hydrogen atom. This decolourization process of remazol blue dye by laccase enzyme might in a future replace the traditionally high chemical, energy and water consuming textile operations.

  9. Mechanism of Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Mononuclear Manganese Complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ying; Ye, Ke; Siegbahn, Per E M; Liao, Rong-Zhen

    2016-12-07

    The design and synthesis of biomimetic Mn complexes to catalyze oxygen evolution is a very appealing goal because water oxidation in nature employs a Mn complex. Recently, the mononuclear Mn complex [LMn(II) (H2 O)2 ](2+) [1, L=Py2 N(tBu)2 , Py=pyridyl] was reported to catalyze water oxidation electrochemically at an applied potential of 1.23 V at pH 12.2 in aqueous solution. Density functional calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of water oxidation promoted by this catalyst. The calculations showed that 1 can lose two protons and one electron readily to produce [LMn(III) (OH)2 ](+) (2), which then undergoes two sequential proton-coupled electron-transfer processes to afford [LMn(V) OO](+) (4). The O-O bond formation can occur through direct coupling of the two oxido ligands or through nucleophilic attack of water. These two mechanisms have similar barriers of approximately 17 kcal mol(-1) . The further oxidation of 4 to generate [LMn(VI) OO](2+) (5), which enables O-O bond formation, has a much higher barrier. In addition, ligand degradation by C-H activation has a similar barrier to that for the O-O bond formation, and this explains the relatively low turnover number of this catalyst.

  10. Oxidation at Surfaces of Uranium Oxide Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueneman, Richard; Burgraff, Larry

    2001-04-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2 (S)) is unstable in an oxidizing environment and oxidizes until covered with a layer of uranium trioxide (UO3 (C)). During the oxidation process, uranium cations change from U+4 to U+6 and the oxide crystal structure changes from face centered cubic to orthorhombic. Seven UO2(S) samples were prepared by pressing UO2 (S) powder into a tungsten screen and then subjected to five different temperatures and three partial pressures of oxygen. UO2 (S) oxidation was monitored with in situ photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Quantitative oxidation data was obtained with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The in situ PL spectra did not identify UO3 (C) forming on the sample surfaces however, a new PL signature not associated with uranyl was observed. SIMS and XPS data from oxidized UO2 (S) samples indicated that at low temperatures, surface oxidation is kinetically limited and at high temperatures, surface oxidation is limited by diffusion. A model for the oxidation rate to UO3 (C) was not developed due to the temperature dependant oxidation process and high vacuum reduction of amorphous UO3 (A) present on the UO2 (S) sample surfaces prior to oxidation. A PL emission spectra intensity reduction was noticed on a UO3 (C) sample at room temperature under high vacuum. A reduction and re-oxidation of three additional UO3 (C) samples identified a kinetically irreversible reduction process for UO3(C) under high vacuum. A SIMS surface scan was performed on a fourth UO3(C) sample before and after exposure to ultra-high vacuum (10-8 torr) and the results suggest the reduction of UO3(C) to lower oxides (U3O8, U3O7 and UO2) at room temperature.

  11. Search for multiple-electron emission in Auger transition processes in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaskar, S.; Hulbert, S. L.; Dong, Q.; Bartynski, B. A.; Weiss, A. H.

    2010-03-01

    We present electron-electron coincidence measurements from Ag(100) taken using a synchrotron radiation photon beam of 465eV energy (which is just above the Ag 3d threshold), with one electron energy analyzer fixed at 175 eV kinetic energy and the other scanned from 150 to 200 eV. The data show a pronounced step at 175 eV consistent with processes in which the energy associated with the filling of the M core hole is shared with two or more correlated electrons that are emitted in an Auger transition accompanied by multiple-electron emission. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of these multiple-electron Auger processes, first posited to explain the origin of the large low energy tail characteristic of Auger spectra from solids.footnotetextE. Jensen, R. A. Bartynski, R. F. Garrett, S. L. Hulbert, E. D. Johnson, and C.-C., Phys. Rev. B 45, 13636 (1992)

  12. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  13. Multiple zeros of polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    For polynomials of higher degree, iterative numerical methods must be used. Four iterative methods are presented for approximating the zeros of a polynomial using a digital computer. Newton's method and Muller's method are two well known iterative methods which are presented. They extract the zeros of a polynomial by generating a sequence of approximations converging to each zero. However, both of these methods are very unstable when used on a polynomial which has multiple zeros. That is, either they fail to converge to some or all of the zeros, or they converge to very bad approximations of the polynomial's zeros. This material introduces two new methods, the greatest common divisor (G.C.D.) method and the repeated greatest common divisor (repeated G.C.D.) method, which are superior methods for numerically approximating the zeros of a polynomial having multiple zeros. These methods were programmed in FORTRAN 4 and comparisons in time and accuracy are given.

  14. Portable multiplicity counter

    DOEpatents

    Newell, Matthew R.; Jones, David Carl

    2009-09-01

    A portable multiplicity counter has signal input circuitry, processing circuitry and a user/computer interface disposed in a housing. The processing circuitry, which can comprise a microcontroller integrated circuit operably coupled to shift register circuitry implemented in a field programmable gate array, is configured to be operable via the user/computer interface to count input signal pluses receivable at said signal input circuitry and record time correlations thereof in a total counting mode, coincidence counting mode and/or a multiplicity counting mode. The user/computer interface can be for example an LCD display/keypad and/or a USB interface. The counter can include a battery pack for powering the counter and low/high voltage power supplies for biasing external detectors so that the counter can be configured as a hand-held device for counting neutron events.

  15. Universality of particle multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K. |

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  16. Multiple muons in MACRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  17. [Multiple primary pulmonary carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Guitart, A C; Gómez, G; Estrada, G; Rodríguez, C; León, C; Cornudella, R

    1991-02-01

    Three cases of multiple simultaneous primary lung carcinomas are presented, in which diagnosis was established by post-surgery pathological exam. In all three cases, chest X-ray showed pulmonary masses suggestive or clinical malignancy, and pre-surgery pathological diagnosis or squamous lung carcinoma. During thoracotomy or in the resected segment, a second lesion we confirmed which made resection necessary being this second lesion classified as lung adenocarcinoma.

  18. Multiple myeloma: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Marilyn L

    2011-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by complex genetic aberrations and heterogeneous outcomes. Over the past 25 years, cytogenetic analysis has played a key role in the diagnosis and management of MM. This article reviews the conventional cytogenetics, molecular cytogenetics, and genomic diagnostics of MM and highlights a few recent clinical trials that demonstrate the impact of genetic risk stratification on the treatment of this plasma cell malignancy.

  19. Multiple log potash assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. G.

    1993-10-01

    A five-mineral multiple-log potash assay technique has been successfully applied to evaluate potash-rich intervals in evaporite sequences. The technique is able to distinguish economic potash minerals from non-economic potash minerals and from other non-potash radioactive minerals. It can be applied on location, using a programmable calculator or microcomputer, providing near real-time logs of potash mineral concentrations. Log assay values show good agreement with core wet chemistry analyses.

  20. In situ formation of cobalt oxide nanocubanes as efficient oxygen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Gregory S; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jian; Yonemoto, Bryan T; Zhou, Xinggui; Zhu, Kake; Jiao, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen evolution from water poses a significant challenge in solar fuel production because it requires an efficient catalyst to bridge the one-electron photon capture process with the four-electron oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, a new strategy was developed to synthesize nonsupported ultrasmall cobalt oxide nanocubanes through an in situ phase transformation mechanism using a layered Co(OH)(OCH3) precursor. Under sonication, the precursor was exfoliated and transformed into cobalt oxide nanocubanes in the presence of NaHCO3-Na2SiF6 buffer solution. The resulting cobalt catalyst with an average particle size less than 2 nm exhibited a turnover frequency of 0.023 per second per cobalt in photocatalytic water oxidation. X-ray absorption results suggested a unique nanocubane structure, where 13 cobalt atoms fully coordinated with oxygen in an octahedral arrangement to form 8 Co4O4 cubanes, which may be responsible for the exceptionally high OER activity.

  1. Direct Oxidative Damage of Naked DNA Generated upon Absorption of UV Radiation by Nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mendoza, Miguel; Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-06

    It has been shown that in addition to formation of pyrimidine dimers, UV irradiation of DNA in the absence of photosensitizer also induces formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, but the mechanism of formation of that oxidized base has not been clearly established. In the present study, we provide an unambiguous demonstration that absorption of UVC and UVB radiation by the nucleobases induces DNA oxidation via a direct process (one-electron oxidation) and not singlet oxygen. Evidence arose from the fact that polyamine-guanine adducts that are specifically produced through the transient formation of guanine radical cation are generated following UV irradiation of DNA in the presence of a polyamine even in the absence of any photosensitizer.

  2. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development.

  5. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  6. Multiple protein structure alignment.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Flores, T. P.; Orengo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed to compare protein structures and to combine them into a multiple structure consensus. Previous methods of multiple structure comparison have only concatenated pairwise alignments or produced a consensus structure by averaging coordinate sets. The current method is a fusion of the fast structure comparison program SSAP and the multiple sequence alignment program MULTAL. As in MULTAL, structures are progressively combined, producing intermediate consensus structures that are compared directly to each other and all remaining single structures. This leads to a hierarchic "condensation," continually evaluated in the light of the emerging conserved core regions. Following the SSAP approach, all interatomic vectors were retained with well-conserved regions distinguished by coherent vector bundles (the structural equivalent of a conserved sequence position). Each bundle of vectors is summarized by a resultant, whereas vector coherence is captured in an error term, which is the only distinction between conserved and variable positions. Resultant vectors are used directly in the comparison, which is weighted by their error values, giving greater importance to the matching of conserved positions. The resultant vectors and their errors can also be used directly in molecular modeling. Applications of the method were assessed by the quality of the resulting sequence alignments, phylogenetic tree construction, and databank scanning with the consensus. Visual assessment of the structural superpositions and consensus structure for various well-characterized families confirmed that the consensus had identified a reasonable core. PMID:7849601

  7. Synthesis, Radical Reactivity, and Thermochemistry of Monomeric Cu(II) Alkoxide Complexes Relevant to Cu/Radical Alcohol Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Thomas R; Capitao, Dany; Kaminsky, Werner; Qian, Zhaoshen; Mayer, James M

    2016-06-06

    Two new monomeric Cu(II) alkoxide complexes were prepared and fully characterized as models for intermediates in copper/radical mediated alcohol oxidation catalysis: Tp(tBuR)Cu(II)OCH2CF3 with Tp(tBu) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 1 or Tp(tBuMe) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 2. These complexes were made as models for potential intermediates in enzymatic and synthetic catalytic cycles for alcohol oxidation. However, the alkoxide ligands are not readily oxidized by loss of H; instead, these complexes were found to be hydrogen atom acceptors. They oxidize the hydroxylamine TEMPOH, 2,4,6-tri-t-butylphenol, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to the nitroxyl radical, phenoxyl radical, and benzene, with formation of HOCH2CF3 (TFE) and the Cu(I) complexes Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)-MeCN in dichloromethane/1% MeCN or 1/2 [Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 in toluene. On the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics arguments, these reactions likely proceed through concerted proton-electron transfer mechanisms. Thermochemical analyses give lower limits for the "effective bond dissociation free energies (BDFE)" of the O-H bonds in 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 + TFE and upper limits for the free energies associated with alkoxide oxidations via hydrogen atom transfer (effective alkoxide α-C-H BDFEs). These values are summations of the free energies of multiple chemical steps, which include the energetically favorable formation of 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2. The effective alkoxide α-C-H bonds are very weak, BDFE ≤ 38 ± 4 kcal mol(-1) for 1 and ≤44 ± 5 kcal mol(-1) for 2 (gas-phase estimates), because C-H homolysis is thermodynamically coupled to one electron transfer to Cu(II) as well as the favorable formation of the 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 dimer. Treating 1 with the H atom acceptor (t)Bu3ArO(•) did not result in the expected alkoxide oxidation to an aldehyde, but rather net 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxyl radical transfer occurred to generate an unusual 2-substituted dienone-ether product. Treating 2

  8. Cost and Performance Assessment of In-situ Chemical Oxidation for Intermittent and Continuous Oxidant Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Parker, J.; Borden, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a popular remediation technology that involves injection of chemical oxidant into groundwater to destroy dissolved and non-aqueous liquid phase contaminants. Depending on site conditions, oxidant can be injected into the contaminated subsurface periodically (intermittently) or continuously. A common approach is to intermittently inject oxidant into a network of wells over a period long enough to emplace oxidant over a target treatment volume (referred to ISCO-int). The injection phase is followed by a passive phase when the oxidant is allowed to react with contaminants and natural oxygen demand (NOD) and to migrate under natural hydraulic gradients. This process may be repeated multiple times until termination criteria are met. Recently, some practitioners have adopted an alternative approach in which oxidant is injected continuously with extraction wells recovering unreacted oxidant to recycle with additional makeup oxidant to maintain its constant concentration (referred to ISCO-cont). Each method has certain advantages and disadvantages. This study numerically evaluates those two ISCO practices in terms of remediation costs and performance based on multiple equi-probable parameter sets. Stochastic cost optimization toolbox (SCOToolkit) is used for this purpose. SCOToolkit is an integrated semi-analytical model for contaminant transport and remediation (e.g., thermal source treatment, ISCO, electron donor injections, permeable reactive barriers) enabling inverse solution and Monte Carlo simulations. Four different aquifer settings, slow and fast Darcy velocities combined with low and high NOD conditions, are used for the evaluation. Preliminary results showed that ISCO-cont is effective for a full scale application without large investment while ISCO-int is more efficient to utilize oxidant in well-characterized sites. Pros and cons of each approach are discussed for the practical use of ISCO for various site conditions.

  9. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  10. Nitroxyl (HNO): A Reduced Form of Nitric Oxide with Distinct Chemical, Pharmacological, and Therapeutic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shoman, Mai E.; Aly, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide (NO), shows a distinct chemical and biological profile from that of NO. HNO is currently being viewed as a vasodilator and positive inotropic agent that can be used as a potential treatment for heart failure. The ability of HNO to react with thiols and thiol containing proteins is largely used to explain the possible biological actions of HNO. Herein, we summarize different aspects related to HNO including HNO donors, chemistry, biology, and methods used for its detection. PMID:26770654

  11. Radical Chemistry and Cytotoxicity of Bioreductive 3-Substituted Quinoxaline Di-N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert F; Yadav, Pooja; Shinde, Sujata S; Hong, Cho R; Pullen, Susan M; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Wilson, William R; Hay, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    The radical chemistry and cytotoxicity of a series of quinoxaline di-N-oxide (QDO) compounds has been investigated to explore the mechanism of action of this class of bioreductive drugs. A series of water-soluble 3-trifluoromethyl (4-10), 3-phenyl (11-19), and 3-methyl (20-21) substituted QDO compounds were designed to span a range of electron affinities consistent with bioreduction. The stoichiometry of loss of QDOs by steady-state radiolysis of anaerobic aqueous formate buffer indicated that one-electron reduction of QDOs generates radicals able to initiate chain reactions by oxidation of formate. The 3-trifluoromethyl analogues exhibited long chain reactions consistent with the release of the HO(•), as identified in EPR spin trapping experiments. Several carbon-centered radical intermediates, produced by anaerobic incubation of the QDO compounds with N-terminal truncated cytochrome P450 reductase (POR), were characterized using N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps and were observed by EPR. Experimental data were well simulated for the production of strongly oxidizing radicals, capable of H atom abstraction from methyl groups. The kinetics of formation and decay of the radicals produced following one-electron reduction of the parent compounds, both in oxic and anoxic solutions, were determined using pulse radiolysis. Back oxidation of the initially formed radical anions by molecular oxygen did not compete effectively with the breakdown of the radical anions to form oxidizing radicals. The QDO compounds displayed low hypoxic selectivity when tested against oxic and hypoxic cancer cell lines in vitro. The results from this study form a kinetic description and explanation of the low hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity of QDOs against cancer cells compared to the related benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (BTO) class of compounds.

  12. Comparative studies on the cumene hydroperoxide- and NADPH-supported N-oxidation of 4-chloroaniline by cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Hlavica, P; Golly, I; Mietaschk, J

    1983-06-15

    The present study confirms that cytochrome P-450 can act as a catalyst in the cumene hydroperoxide-supported N-oxidation of 4-chloroaniline. Analogous to the NADPH/O2-driven N-oxidation process, product dissociation is likely to limit the overall rate of cytochrome P-450 cycling also in the peroxidatic pathway. The oxy complexes involved in either metabolic route differ with respect to stability, spectral properties and need for thiolate-mediated resonance stabilization. With the organic hydroperoxide, the metabolic profile is shifted from the preponderant production of N-(4-chlorophenyl)hydroxylamine to the formation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. This finding suggests that the peroxide-sustained N-oxidation mechanism differs in several ways from that functional in the NADPH/O2-dependent oxenoid reaction. Thus one-electron oxidation, triggered by homolytic cleavage of the oxygen donor, is proposed as the mechanism of peroxidatic transformation of 4-chloroaniline.

  13. Nitric oxide and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has complex and diverse functions in physiological and pathophysiological phenomena. The mechanisms of many events induced by NO are now well defined, so that a fundamental understanding of NO biology is almost established. Accumulated evidence suggests that NO and oxygen radicals such as superoxide are key molecules in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. NO biosynthesis, particularly through expression of an inducible NO synthase (iNOS), occurs in a variety of microbial infections. Although antimicrobial activity of NO is appreciated for bacteria and protozoa, NO has opposing effects in virus infections such as influenza virus pneumonia and certain other neurotropic virus infections. iNOS produces an excessive amount of NO for long periods, which allows generation of a highly reactive nitrogen oxide species, peroxynitrite, via a radical coupling reaction of NO with superoxide. Thus, peroxynitrite causes oxidative tissue injury through potent oxidation and nitration reactions of various biomolecules. NO also appears to affect a host's immune response, with immunopathological consequences. For example, overproduction of NO in virus infections in mice is reported to suppress type 1 helper T-cell-dependent immune responses, leading to type 2 helper T-cell-biased immunological host responses. Thus, NO may be a host response modulator rather than a simple antiviral agent. The unique biological properties of NO are further illustrated by our recent data suggesting that viral mutation and evolution may be accelerated by NO-induced oxidative stress. Here, we discuss these multiple roles of NO in pathogenesis of virus infections as related to both non-specific inflammatory responses and immunological host reactions modulated by NO during infections in vivo. PMID:11106932

  14. Neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Emerit, J; Edeas, M; Bricaire, F

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now recognized as accountable for redox regulation involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Its role is pivotal for the modulation of critical cellular functions, notably for neurons astrocytes and microglia, such as apoptosis program activation, and ion transport, calcium mobilization, involved in excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity and apoptosis are the two main causes of neuronal death. The role of mitochondria in apoptosis is crucial. Multiple apoptotic pathways emanate from the mitochondria. The respiratory chain of mitochondria that by oxidative phosphorylation, is the fount of cellular energy, i.e. ATP synthesis, is responsible for most of ROS and notably the first produced, superoxide anion (O(2)(;-)). Mitochondrial dysfunction, i.e. cell energy impairment, apoptosis and overproduction of ROS, is a final common pathogenic mechanism in aging and in neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nitric oxide (NO(;)), an RNS, which can be produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase in brain, plays a prominent role. The research on the genetics of inherited forms notably ALS, AD, PD, has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of the sporadic forms of neurodegenerative diseases or of aging of the brain. ROS and RNS, i.e. oxidative stress, are not the origin of neuronal death. The cascade of events that leads to neurons, death is complex. In addition to mitochondrial dysfunction (apoptosis), excitotoxicity, oxidative stress (inflammation), the mechanisms from gene to disease involve also protein misfolding leading to aggregates and proteasome dysfunction on ubiquinited material.

  15. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  16. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  17. The enzymatic oxidation of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kotchey, Gregg P; Allen, Brett L; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E; Star, Alexander

    2011-03-22

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon--the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (∼40 μM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Owing to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors.

  18. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification

    PubMed Central

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan S.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surrounding it. Using these patches, a dictionary is trained for each class in a supervised fashion. Commonly, redundant/overcomplete dictionaries are trained and image patches are sparsely represented by a linear combination of only a few of the dictionary elements. Given a set of trained dictionaries, a new patch is sparse coded using each of them, and subsequently assigned to the class whose dictionary yields the minimum residual energy. We propose a generalization of this scheme. The method, which we call multiple sparse representations classification (mSRC), is based on the observation that an overcomplete, class specific dictionary is capable of generating multiple accurate and independent estimates of a patch belonging to the class. So instead of finding a single sparse representation of a patch for each dictionary, we find multiple, and the corresponding residual energies provides an enhanced statistic which is used to improve classification. We demonstrate the efficacy of mSRC for three example applications: pixelwise classification of texture images, lumen segmentation in carotid artery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and bifurcation point detection in carotid artery MRI. We compare our method with conventional SRC, K-nearest neighbor, and support vector machine classifiers. The results show that mSRC outperforms SRC and the other reference methods. In addition, we present an extensive evaluation of the effect of the main mSRC parameters: patch size, dictionary size, and

  19. Multiple pulmonary rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Gokhan; Senturk, Taskin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 45-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, who was admitted to our rheumatology department with exacerbation of the disease. The patient's disease activity score (DAS 28) was 6.9. Physical examination revealed changes in the lung auscultation as a rough breathing sound at the middle and lower lobe of the right lung. Chest X-ray revealed multiple nodular densities in both lungs. Lung biopsy was performed for the diagnosis and revealed necrotizing granulomas with central fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells. Such a histopathological picture is typical for rheumatoid nodules. Finally the patient was treated with rituximab, with significant improvement.

  20. Multiple personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Piper, A

    1994-05-01

    Five aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of multiple personality disorder (MPD) were examined. The following five conclusions were made: the contemporary diagnostic criteria are vague and overinclusive; the recent alleged increase in prevalence of the disorder is almost certainly artefactual; legal proceedings involving MPD patients raise disturbing questions about personal responsibility; there is little literature support for the theory that MPD results from childhood trauma; and many of the techniques used to diagnose and treat the condition reinforce its symptoms. A careful revision of diagnostic criteria for the disorder is recommended.

  1. Ambulation and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    Walking impairment is a common consequence of multiple sclerosis (MS) that can result in substantial limitations of daily activities and compromised quality of life. Walking impairment is often monitored as an indicator of disease and neurologic disability progression. The worsening of walking performance while undertaking a cognitive task underscores the role of nonmotor impairments in ambulation limitations. Walking impairment has ubiquitous and life-altering consequences, underscoring the importance of continued efforts to identify approaches to prevent and forestall this event, and to restore walking ability in persons with MS.

  2. Multiple Sclerosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Faguy, Kathryn

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurologic condition in young adults and imposes high financial and quality of life costs on patients, their families, and society. Yet, developments in the battle against MS include new treatments to slow its progression and updated diagnostic criteria that can accelerate diagnosis and effective treatment. This article offers a review and update on the disease, focusing on risk factors and possible causes, symptoms, forms of MS, diagnostic criteria and tools, and the expanding array of approved treatments. It also reports on the skyrocketing cost of MS drugs, misdiagnosis, and special patient populations with MS.

  3. Multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Soong, B W; Casamassima, A C; Fink, J K; Constantopoulos, G; Horwitz, A L

    1988-08-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency is an inherited disorder characterized by a deficiency of several sulfatases and the accumulation of sulfatides, glycosaminoglycans, sphingolipids, and steroid sulfates in tissues and body fluids. The clinical manifestations represent the summation of two diseases: late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis. We present a 9-year-old girl with a phenotype similar to a mucopolysaccharidosis: short stature, microcephaly, and mild facial dysmorphism, along with dysphagia, retinal degeneration, developmental arrest, and ataxia. We discuss the importance of measuring the sulfatase activities in the leukocytes, and the instability of sulfatases in the cultured skin fibroblasts.

  4. In situ analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine oxidation reveals sequence- and agent-specific damage spectra.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kok Seong; Cui, Liang; Taghizadeh, Koli; Wishnok, John S; Chan, Wan; DeMott, Michael S; Babu, I Ramesh; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Dedon, Peter C

    2012-10-31

    Guanine is a major target for oxidation in DNA, with 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) as a major product. 8-oxodG is itself significantly more susceptible to oxidation than guanine, with the resulting damage consisting of more than 10 different products. This complexity has hampered efforts to understand the determinants of biologically relevant DNA oxidation chemistry. To address this problem, we have developed a high mass accuracy mass spectrometric method to quantify oxidation products arising site specifically in DNA. We applied this method to quantify the role of sequence context in defining the spectrum of damage products arising from oxidation of 8-oxodG by two oxidants: nitrosoperoxycarbonate (ONOOCO(2)(-)), a macrophage-derived chemical mediator of inflammation, and the classical one-electron oxidant, riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. The results reveal the predominance of dehydroguanidinohydantoin (DGh) in 8-oxodG oxidation by both oxidants. While the relative quantities of 8-oxodG oxidation products arising from ONOOCO(2)(-) did not vary as a function of sequence context, products of riboflavin-mediated photooxidation of 8-oxodG were highly sequence dependent. Several of the 8-oxodG oxidation products underwent hydrolytic conversion to new products with half-lives of 2-7 h. The results have implications for understanding the chemistry of DNA oxidation and the biological response to the damage, with DNA damage recognition and repair systems faced with a complex and dynamic set of damage targets.

  5. Factorial Invariance in Multiple Populations: A Multiple Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple testing method for examining factorial invariance for latent constructs evaluated by multiple indicators in distinct populations is outlined. The procedure is based on the false discovery rate concept and multiple individual restriction tests and resolves general limitations of a popular factorial invariance testing approach. The…

  6. Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic precursor stage of multiple myeloma (MM) characterized by clonal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) ≥ 10% and/or M protein level ≥ 30 g/L in the absence of end organ damage. It represents an intermediate stage between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and symptomatic MM. The risk of progression to symptomatic MM is not uniform, and several parameters have been reported to predict the risk of progression. These include the level of M protein and the percentage of BMPC, the proportion of immunophenotypically aberrant plasma cells, and the presence of immunoparesis, free light-chain (FLC) ratio, peripheral blood plasma cells (PBPC), pattern of serum M protein evolution, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytogenetic abnormalities, IgA isotype, and Bence Jones proteinuria. So far treatment is still not recommended for SMM, because several trials suggested that patients with SMM do not benefit from early treatment. However, the Mateos et al. trial showed a survival benefit after early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with high-risk SMM. This trial has prompted a reevaluation of early treatment in an asymptomatic patient population. PMID:26000300

  7. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  8. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M. J.; Coursin, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    The multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), though newly described, has manifested itself in intensive care unit (ICU) patients for several decades. As the name implies, it is a syndrome in which more than one organ system fails. Failure of these multiple organ systems may or may not be related to the initial injury or disease process for which the patient was admitted to the ICU. MODS is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in current ICU practice. While the pathophysiology of MODS is not completely known, much evidence indicates that, during the initial injury which precipitates ICU admission, a chain of events is initiated which results in activation of several endogenous metabolic pathways. These pathways release compounds which, in and of themselves, are usually cytoprotective. However, an over exuberant activation of these endogenous systems results in an inflammatory response which can lead to development of failure in distant organs. As these organs fail, they activate and propagate the systemic inflammatory response. No therapy has proven entirely efficacious at modulating this inflammatory response and the incidence and severity of MODS. In current ICU practice, treatment is focused on prevention and treating individual organ dysfunction as it develops. With increased understanding of the pathophysiology of MODS therapy will come newer modalities which inhibit or interfere with the propagation of the endogenous systemic inflammatory response. These newer therapies hold great promise and already some are undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:7825351

  9. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  10. [Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuenca Solanas, M

    1999-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is a clinical situation that has been described as a result of the rapid progress and advances that have been made in recent decades in the physiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic support of critically ill patients. In 1991, in view of the confusing terminology used to characterize processes coursing with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a consensus conference was held. A series of basic definitions were established and the term "multiple organ failure" was replace by MODS. In response to outside aggression, the organism tries to defend itself with two mechanisms: a non-specific humoral and cellular response called inflammation, and a specific antigenic response that modifies the genetic codes of cells of the defense system and constitutes an immunological response. At present it is thought that the inflammatory response is activated (SIRS) in response to an uncontrolled aggression, but an antiinflammatory response syndrome (ARS) exists as well. An exaggerated SIRS can lead to MODS. MODS usually debuts with pulmonary dysfunction. If the aggression persists, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, coagulation, central nervous system, gastrointestinal metabolism, neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal failure follow. A series of causes often trigger this syndrome and certain factors favor it. Prevention of these causes and factors in fundamental for controlling the occurrence of MODS. At present, there is no clear treatment for MODS, although numerous studies designed to block the release of certain proinflammatory mediators or to neutralize antiinflammatory responses are being carried out.

  11. Multiple Representations of Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliviera, Jessica; Weglarz, Meredith; Vesenka, James

    2009-10-01

    For many students the concept of buoyancy falls under a category that can be loosely described as ``knowing it when they see it.'' Unfortunately some of the misconceptions this generates are that ``objects float because they are light'' and ``objects float because they are full of air'' [1]. Those these can some times be true, these descriptions are vague at best, and frequently can be wrong. Part of these misconceptions may stem from incomplete immersion of the object in the fluid and the vector nature of forces. We describe a demonstration/lab activity to help students make sense about relationship between the tension on and weight of an object immersed in water. The activity is in rich in multiple representations, graphical, diagrammatical as well as mathematical. A simple four question multiple choice pre/post test survey has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the lab activity.[4pt] [1] Bruce Harlan ``Diving Science'', www.stmatthewsschool.com/deep/pdfs/Diving%20Science.pdf

  12. Smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-05-14

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM.

  13. Multiple symbol differential detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A differential detection technique for multiple phase shift keying (MPSK) signals is provided which uses a multiple symbol observation interval on the basis of which a joint decision is made regarding the phase of the received symbols. In accordance with the invention, a first difference phase is created between first and second received symbols. Next, the first difference phase is correlated with the possible values thereof to provide a first plurality of intermediate output signals. A second difference phase is next created between second and third received symbols. The second difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a second plurality of intermediate output signals. Next, a third difference phase is created between the first and third symbols. The third difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a third plurality of intermediate output signals. Each of the first plurality of intermediate outputs are combined with each of the second plurality of intermediate outputs and each of the third plurality of intermediate outputs to provide a plurality of possible output values. Finally, a joint decision is made by choosing from the plurality of possible output values the value which represents the best combined correlation of the first, second and third difference values with the possible values thereof.

  14. Smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM. PMID:25838344

  15. Management of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perrin Ross, Amy

    2013-11-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease of the central nervous system that disrupts signals within the brain and also the signals between the brain and body, will likely experience symptoms that may negatively impact their quality of life (QOL). Due to the complexity of MS and its disease burden, multidisciplinary management that combines pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies with patient education is necessary. Diagnosing relapses of MS in clinical practice can be difficult due to the multiple subtypes of MS, variations of symptomatology, and pseudo-relapses. Managing relapses also presents its own set of challenges, for example, evaluating if treatment is appropriate and determining which agent would be most effective for a patient if treatment is recommended. Patient education is essential for achieving optimal outcomes for patients with MS and improving patient QOL, and should increase awareness of: (1) the disease itself and its progression; (2) the signs and symptoms of MS; (3) current treatment strategies and plan of care; (4) the recognition and management of relapses; (5) the value of treatment adherence and impact of nonadherence; and (6) hope for the future. The management of active MS may be further complicated by the complex variety of pharmacotherapeutic options, and in some instances, by having to switch between agents and drug classes. Newer agents in development (eg, alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab, laquinimod) offer the opportunity to expand the therapeutic armamentarium, although further long-term data are required to evaluate any safety concerns associated with newer agents.

  16. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  17. Multiple personality disorder following childbirth.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, J M; Friedman, T

    1993-06-01

    A case of multiple personality disorder is described as a coping mechanism protecting the patient from the abuse to which she was subjected throughout her life. The multiple personalities became more prominent following the birth of a severely handicapped child.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable ...

  19. Lattice Multiplication: Old and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givan, Betty; Karr, Rosemary

    1988-01-01

    The author presents two examples of lattice multiplication followed by a computer algorithm to perform this multiplication. The algorithm is given in psuedocode but could easily be given in Pascal. (PK)

  20. Solar conversion efficiency of photovoltaic and photoelectrolysis cells with carrier multiplication absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, M. C.; Nozik, A. J.

    2006-10-01

    We calculate the maximum power conversion efficiency for conversion of solar radiation to electrical power or to a flux of chemical free energy for the case of hydrogen production from water photoelectrolysis. We consider several types of ideal absorbers where absorption of one photon can produce more than one electron-hole pair that are based on semiconductor quantum dots with efficient multiple exciton generation (MEG) or molecules that undergo efficient singlet fission (SF). Using a detailed balance model with 1 sun AM1.5G illumination, we find that for single gap photovoltaic (PV) devices the maximum efficiency increases from 33.7% for cells with no carrier multiplication to 44.4% for cells with carrier multiplication. We also find that the maximum efficiency of an ideal two gap tandem PV device increases from 45.7% to 47.7% when carrier multiplication absorbers are used in the top and bottom cells. For an ideal water electrolysis two gap tandem device, the maximum conversion efficiency is 46.0% using a SF top cell and a MEG bottom cell versus 40.0% for top and bottom cell absorbers with no carrier multiplication. We also consider absorbers with less than ideal MEG quantum yields as are observed experimentally.

  1. Veratryl alcohol-mediated oxidation of isoeugenyl acetate by lignin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    ten Have, R; De Thouars, R G; Swarts, H J; Field, J A

    1999-11-01

    The mechanism of the veratryl alcohol (VA)-mediated oxidation of isoeugenyl acetate (IEA) by lignin peroxidase, and the subsequent spontaneous Calpha-Cbeta cleavage of IEA to vanillyl acetate were studied. IEA oxidation only occurred in the presence of VA. It probably did not bind to lignin peroxidase as evidenced by an unaffected Km for VA in the presence of IEA, and by the fact that a 10-fold molar excess of the unreactive IEA counterpart, eugenyl acetate, did not affect the IEA oxidation rate. IEA was very efficient in recycling VA. Up to 34 mol of IEA were oxidized per mol VA. Formation of the predominant VA oxidation product, veratraldehyde, was postponed until IEA was almost completely oxidized. Together these findings suggest that IEA was oxidized by VA.+ rather than directly by lignin peroxidase. Thus, VA functioned as a redox mediator during IEA oxidation which is remarkable considering the high calculated ionization potential of 8.81 eV. Regardless of the presence of O2, approximately 2 mol of IEA were consumed per mol H2O2, which indicated that IEA was enzymatically oxidized by one electron to the putative radical cation (IEA.+). After formation of IEA.+, a series of O2-dependent chemical reactions were responsible for Calpha-Cbeta cleavage to the major oxidation product vanillyl acetate, as evidenced by the observation that an N2 atmosphere did not inhibit IEA oxidation, but almost completely inhibited vanillyl acetate formation. GC-MS analyses revealed that under an air atmosphere 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-2-propanone, 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-1-hydroxy-2-propanone, and 1-(4'-acetoxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-2-hydroxy-1-propanone were also formed. Formation of the latter two was diminished under an N2 atmosphere.

  2. Biological water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2013-07-16

    Photosystem II (PSII), a multisubunit pigment-protein supercomplex found in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, catalyzes a unique reaction in nature: the light-driven oxidation of water. Remarkable recent advances in the structural analysis of PSII now give a detailed picture of the static supercomplex on the molecular level. These data provide a solid foundation for future functional studies, in particular the mechanism of water oxidation and oxygen release. The catalytic core of the PSII is a tetramanganese-calcium cluster (Mn₄O₅Ca), commonly referred to as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The function of the OEC rests on its ability to cycle through five metastable states (Si, i = 0-4), transiently storing four oxidizing equivalents, and in so doing, facilitates the four electron water splitting reaction. While the latest crystallographic model of PSII gives an atomic picture of the OEC, the exact connectivity within the inorganic core and the S-state(s) that the X-ray model represents remain uncertain. In this Account, we describe our joint experimental and theoretical efforts to eliminate these ambiguities by combining the X-ray data with spectroscopic constraints and introducing computational modeling. We are developing quantum chemical methods to predict electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters for transition metal clusters, especially focusing on spin-projection approaches combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We aim to resolve the geometric and electronic structures of all S-states, correlating their structural features with spectroscopic observations to elucidate reactivity. The sequence of manganese oxidations and concomitant charge compensation events via proton transfer allow us to rationalize the multielectron S-state cycle. EPR spectroscopy combined with theoretical calculations provides a unique window into the tetramangenese complex, in particular its protonation states and metal ligand sphere evolution, far

  3. Oxidative stress and myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuko; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are produced highly in myocarditis. ROS, which not only act as effectors for pathogen killing but also mediate signal transduction in the stress responsive pathways, are closely related with both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, oxidative stress overwhelming the capacity of anti-oxidative system generated in severe inflammation has been suggested to damage tissues and exacerbate inflammation. Oxidative stress worsens the autoimmunological process of myocarditis, and suppression of the anti-oxidative system and long-lasting oxidative stress could be one of the pathological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling leading to inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is considered to be one of the promising treatment targets of myocarditis. Evidences of anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis have not been fully established. Basic strategies of anti-oxidative treatments include inhibition of ROS production, activation of anti-oxidative enzymes and elimination of generated free radicals. ROS are produced by mitochondrial respiratory chain reactions and enzymes including NADPH oxidases, cyclooxygenase, and xanthine oxidase. Other systems involved in inflammation and stress response, such as NF-κB, Nrf2/Keap1, and neurohumoral factors also influence oxidative stress in myocarditis. The efficacy of anti-oxidative treatments could also depend on the etiology and the phases of myocarditis. We review in this article the pathological significance of ROS and oxidative stress, and the potential anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis.

  4. Mechanisms of oxidation of guanine in DNA by carbonate radical anion, a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Seog K; Margolin, Yelena; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is produced during inflammation and combines rapidly with carbon dioxide to yield the unstable nitrosoperoxycarbonate, which decomposes (in part) to CO(3) (.-) and (.)NO(2) radicals. The CO(3) (.-) radicals oxidize guanine bases in DNA through a one-electron transfer reaction process that ultimately results in the formation of stable guanine oxidation products. Here we have explored these mechanisms, starting with a spectroscopic study of the kinetics of electron transfer from 20-22mer double-stranded oligonucleotides to CO(3) (.-) radicals, together with the effects of base sequence on the formation of the end-products in runs of one, two, or three contiguous guanines. The distributions of these alkali-labile lesions were determined by gel electrophoresis methods. The cascade of events was initiated through the use of 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate CO(3) (.-) radicals by an established method based on the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radicals and the oxidation of bicarbonate. Although the Saito model (Saito et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6406-6407) predicts relative ease of one-electron oxidations in DNA, following the trend 5'-GGG > 5'-GG > 5'-G, we found that the rate constants for CO(3) (.-)-mediated oxidation of guanines in these sequence contexts (k(5)) showed only small variation within a narrow range [(1.5-3.0)x10(7) M(-1) s(-1)]. In contrast, the distributions of the end-products are dependent on the base sequence context and are higher at the 5'-G in 5'-GG sequences and at the first two 5'-guanines in the 5'-GGG sequences. These effects are attributed to a combination of initial hole distributions among the contiguous guanines and the subsequent differences in chemical reaction yields at each guanine. The lack of dependence of k(5) on sequence context indicates that the one-electron oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3) (.-) radicals occurs by an inner-sphere mechanism.

  5. What Happens After Treatment for Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Multiple Myeloma? For most people, multiple myeloma never goes away ... for Multiple Myeloma Stops Working More In Multiple Myeloma About Multiple Myeloma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. Can Multiple Myeloma Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Multiple Myeloma Be Found Early? It’s difficult to diagnose multiple ... Your Doctor About Multiple Myeloma? More In Multiple Myeloma About Multiple Myeloma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Profiling cytosine oxidation in DNA by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Samson-Thibault, Francois; Madugundu, Guru S; Gao, Shanshan; Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2012-09-17

    Spontaneous and oxidant-induced damage to cytosine is probably the main cause of CG to TA transition mutations in mammalian genomes. The reaction of hydroxyl radical (·OH) and one-electron oxidants with cytosine derivatives produces numerous oxidation products, which have been identified in large part by model studies with monomers and short oligonucleotides. Here, we developed an analytical method based on LC-MS/MS to detect 10 oxidized bases in DNA, including 5 oxidation products of cytosine. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the measurement of base damage in isolated calf thymus DNA exposed to ionizing radiation in aerated aqueous solutions (0-200 Gy) and to well-known Fenton-like reactions (Fe(2+) or Cu(+) with H(2)O(2) and ascorbate). The following cytosine modifications were quantified as modified 2'-deoxyribonucleosides upon exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation in aqueous aerated solution: 5-hydroxyhydantoin (Hyd-Ura) > 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHUra) > 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OHCyt) > 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrouracil (Ura-Gly) > 1-carbamoyl-4,5-dihydroxy-2-oxoimidazolidine (Imid-Cyt). The total yield of cytosine oxidation products was comparable to that of thymine oxidation products (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine (Thy-Gly), 5-hydroxy-5-methylhydantotin (Hyd-Thy), 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil (5-HmUra), and 5-formyluracil (5-ForUra)) as well as the yield of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua). The major oxidation product of cytosine in DNA was Hyd-Ura. In contrast, the formation of Imid-Cyt was a minor pathway of DNA damage, although it is the major product arising from irradiation of the monomers, cytosine, and 2'-deoxycytidine. The reaction of Fenton-like reagents with DNA gave a different distribution of cytosine derived products compared to ionizing radiation, which likely reflects the reaction of metal ions with intermediate peroxyl radicals or hydroperoxides. The analysis of the main cytosine oxidation products will help elucidate the complex

  8. Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A.; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway”, through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:20703435

  9. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the "final common pathway", through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients.

  10. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  11. [Pediatric multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Auner, B; Marzi, I

    2014-05-01

    Multiple trauma in children is rare so that even large trauma centers will only treat a small number of cases. Nevertheless, accidents are the most common cause of death in childhood whereby the causes are mostly traffic accidents and falls. Head trauma is the most common form of injury and the degree of severity is mostly decisive for the prognosis. Knowledge on possible causes of injury and injury patterns as well as consideration of anatomical and physiological characteristics are of great importance for treatment. The differences compared to adults are greater the younger the child is. Decompression and stopping bleeding are the main priorities before surgical fracture stabilization. The treatment of a severely injured child should be carried out by an interdisciplinary team in an approved trauma center with expertise in pediatrics. An inadequate primary assessment involves a high risk of early mortality. On the other hand children have a better prognosis than adults with comparable injuries.

  12. Multiple suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, J; Youngman, W F; Kreizman, G

    1968-04-01

    A sample of 157 persons who attempted suicide from 2 to 6 times was compared with a sample of 1,045 single attempted suicides on a number of personal and social characteristics and other factors related to the act itself. Suicide death rates, obtained through a follow-up of both groups for a year following the last attempt, were also compared. It is concluded (1) that the two groups are essentially similar in their general characteristics and in their risk of suicide and (2) that, among multiples, little change occurs from first to second attempt. However, it is pointed out that both groups are at considerably higher risk of suicide than those who have not made attempts.

  13. [Pomalidomide for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Fouquet, G; Macro, M; Decaux, O; Fohrer, C; Guidez, S; Demarquette, H; Le Grand, C; Prodhomme, C; Renaud, L; Bories, C; Herbaux, C; Karlin, L; Roussel, M; Benboubker, L; Hulin, C; Arnulf, B; Leleu, X

    2015-09-01

    Once characterized by a very poor outcome, multiple myeloma (MM) now has a significantly prolonged survival, with major improvements allowed by the use of "novel agents": proteasome inhibitors (first-in-class bortezomib) and immunomodulatory compounds (IMiDs; first-in-class thalidomide and lenalidomide). However, the vast majority - if not all - of patients with MM ultimately end up being refractory to all existing drugs, including these efficient novel agents. There is a clear unmet medical need in this situation, which warrants the development of the next generation of proteasome inhibitors and IMiDs, as well as new drug classes. This review focuses on pomalidomide, the next generation IMiD, recently approved by the US FDA and the EMA for patients with relapsed or refractory MM who have received at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib, and have demonstrated disease progression on their last therapy.

  14. Tremor in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mostert, Jop; Heersema, Dorothea; De Keyser, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Tremor is estimated to occur in about 25 to 60 percent of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This symptom, which can be severely disabling and embarrassing for patients, is difficult to manage. Isoniazid in high doses, carbamazepine, propranolol and gluthetimide have been reported to provide some relief, but published evidence of effectiveness is very limited. Most trials were of small size and of short duration. Cannabinoids appear ineffective. Tremor reduction can be obtained with stereotactic thalamotomy or thalamic stimulation. However, the studies were small and information on long-term functional outcome is scarce. Physiotherapy, tremor reducing orthoses, and limb cooling can achieve some functional improvement. Tremor in MS remains a significant challenge and unmet need, requiring further basic and clinical research. PMID:17318714

  15. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  16. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  17. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.; Schuler, Jason M.; Chandler, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that utilized multiple fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, for the design and assembly of a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, for the design and assembly of a portable four monitor hyper wall strip that could extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill that could be utilized on a next generation robot or rover, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and creation of a new outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory.

  18. MULTIPLE GALAXY COLLISIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Here is a sampling of 15 ultraluminous infrared galaxies viewed by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble's sharp vision reveals more complexity within these galaxies, which astronomers are interpreting as evidence of a multiple-galaxy pileup. These images, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are part of a three-year study of 123 galaxies within 3 billion light-years of Earth. The study was conducted in 1996, 1997, and 1999. False colors were assigned to these photos to enhance fine details within these coalescing galaxies. Credits: NASA, Kirk Borne (Raytheon and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.), Luis Colina (Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain), and Howard Bushouse and Ray Lucas (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.)

  19. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  20. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  1. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  2. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress. PMID:20357926

  3. Electrolytic oxidation of anthracite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Patton, K.M.; Heard, I.

    1981-01-01

    An anthracite slurry can be oxidized only with difficulty by electrolytic methods in which aqueous electrolytes are used if the slurry is confined to the region of the anode by a porous pot or diaphragm. However, it can be easily oxidized if the anthracite itself is used as the anode. No porous pot or diaphragm is needed. Oxidative consumption of the coal to alkali-soluble compounds is found to proceed preferentially at the edges of the aromatic planes. An oxidation model is proposed in which the chief oxidants are molecular and radical species formed by the electrolytic decomposition of water at the coal surface-electrolyte interface. The oxidation reactions proposed account for the opening of the aromatic rings and the subsequent formation of carboxylic acids. The model also explains the observed anisotropic oxidation and the need for the porous pot or diaphragm used in previous studies of the oxidation of coal slurries. ?? 1981.

  4. Solution voltammetry of 4 nm magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph J P; Westgard, John A; Cooper, Laura M; Murray, Royce W

    2014-07-30

    The voltammetry of solution-dispersed magnetite iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles is described. Their currents are controlled by nanoparticle transport rates, as shown with potential step chronoamperometry and rotated disk voltammetry. In pH 2 citrate buffer with added NaClO4 electrolyte, solution cyclic voltammetry of these nanoparticles (average diameter 4.4 ± 0.9 nm, each containing ca. 30 Fe sites) displays an electrochemically irreversible oxidation with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.52 V and an irreversible reduction with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode. These processes are presumed to correspond to the formal potentials for one-electron oxidation of Fe(II) and reduction of Fe(III) at their different sites in the magnetite nanoparticle structure. The heterogeneous electrode reaction rates of the nanoparticles are very slow, in the 10(-5) cm/s range. The nanoparticles are additionally characterized by a variety of tools, e.g., TEM, UV/vis, and XPS spectroscopies.

  5. Oxidation of Structural Fe(II) in Biotite by Lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelobolina, E.; Blöthe, M.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.

    2008-12-01

    The potential for microbial involvement in the oxidation of Fe(II)-bearing phyllosilicates is an understudied aspect of soil/sediment Fe biogeochemistry. An important property of structural Fe in Fe-bearing smectites is their ability to undergo multiple redox cycles without being mobilized. An obvious choice of mineral substrate for enumeration/isolation of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms would be reduced smectite. But reduced smectite is readily oxidized by air. That is why biotite was chosen as a substrate for this study. In contrast to smectite, biotite is more stable in the presence of air, but incapable of redox cycling. Once Fe(II) is oxidized, biotite is weathered to expendable 2:1 phyllosilicates or kaolinite. First, we evaluated the ability of a neutral-pH lithoautotrophic nitrate-reducing enrichment culture (MPI culture), recovered by Straub et al (Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 1996, 62:1458-1460) from a freshwater ditch, to oxidize two different specimens of biotite. The culture was capable of multiple transfers in anaerobic nitrate-containing biotite suspensions. The growth of MPI culture resulted in decrease of 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) content and simultaneous nitrate reduction. Cell yields were comparable to those observed for other neutral-pH lithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. High resolution TEM examination revealed structural and chemical changes at the edges of oxidized biotite and formation of reddish amorphous precipitates dominated by Si and Fe. To further evaluate efficiency of biotite for recovery of oxygen- and nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing cultures microbial enumeration study was performed using subsoil from a site near Madison, WI. The soil is rich in Fe-bearing smectite and shows evidence of redoximorphic features. The enumeration of Fe(II) oxidizing organisms from this sediment showed 10-fold higher efficiency of biotite over soluble Fe(II) for recovery of Fe(II)-oxidizers. Isolation and identification of both aerobic and

  6. Method of making controlled morphology metal-oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan

    2016-05-17

    A method of making metal oxides having a preselected morphology includes preparing a suspension that includes a solvent, polymeric nanostructures having multiplicities of hydroxyl surface groups and/or carboxyl surface groups, and a metal oxide precursor. The suspension has a preselected ratio of the polymeric nanostructures to the metal oxide precursor of at least 1:3, the preselected ratio corresponding to a preselected morphology. Subsequent steps include depositing the suspension onto a substrate, removing the solvent to form a film, removing the film from the substrate, and annealing the film to volatilize the polymeric nanostructures and convert the metal oxide precursor to metal oxide nanoparticles having the preselected morphology or to a metal oxide nanosheet including conjoined nanoparticles having the preselected morphology.

  7. Studies in zirconium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Drunen, C. J.; Levitan, J.

    1968-01-01

    Study provides insight into the oxidation mechanism of zirconium by combining electrical measurements with oxidation data. The measurement of electrical potential across growing scale on zirconium and the determination of conventional weight-change oxidation data were carried out at 550, 700, and 800 degrees C.

  8. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than

  9. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility

  10. Oxidation state in chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.; Fegley, Bruce; Brett, Robin

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of extant data on chondrite oxidation states and intrinsic O fugacities. A variety of oxidation states are exhibited by the chondritic meteorites; petrologic and chemical data may be used to arrange the major chondrite groups in order of oxidation state. The intrinsic O fugacity measurements on chondrite whole-rock samples are noted to display a corresponding ordering of oxidation states. Metamorphosed chondrites and igneous meteorites that were substantially altered by metamorphic reactions, outgassing, and igneous processes may preserve information on the oxidation state and size of their parent bodies.

  11. A Microscale Oxidation Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelter, Michael W.; Macudzinski, Rebecca M.; Passarelli, Mary Ellen

    2000-11-01

    We have adapted oxidation of an alcohol with sodium hypochlorite solution to a "puzzle" approach by using a diol as the substrate for oxidation. The diols under investigation have both a primary and a secondary hydroxyl group. There are three possible outcomes to the reaction: (i) only the primary alcohol is oxidized to the aldehyde (or carboxylic acid); (ii) only the secondary alcohol is oxidized to the ketone; or (iii) both alcohols are oxidized. The assignment is to perform the reaction and determine the structure of the product through interpretation of the IR spectrum. Examples using two commercially available diols are shown.

  12. Oxidation of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water by Potassium Ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjin; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Huang, Rongfu; Elnakar, Haitham; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-04-19

    This paper investigates the oxidation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) by potassium ferrate(VI). Due to the selectivity of ferrate(VI) oxidation, two-ring and three-ring fluorescing aromatics were preferentially removed at doses <100 mg/L Fe(VI), and one-ring aromatics were removed only at doses ≥100 mg/L Fe(VI). Ferrate(VI) oxidation achieved 64.0% and 78.4% removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) at the dose of 200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Fe(VI) respectively, and NAs with high carbon number and ring number were removed preferentially. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra indicated that the oxidation of fluorescing aromatics resulted in the opening of some aromatic rings. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis detected signals of organic radical intermediates, indicating that one-electron transfer is one of the probable mechanisms in the oxidation of NAs. The inhibition effect of OSPW on Vibrio fischeri and the toxicity effect on goldfish primary kidney macrophages (PKMs) were both reduced after ferrate(VI) oxidation. The fluorescing aromatics in OSPW were proposed to be an important contributor to this acute toxicity. Degradation of model compounds with ferrate(VI) was also investigated and the results confirmed our findings in OSPW study.

  13. Multiple stage railgun

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Scudder, Jonathan K.; Aaland, Kristian

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

  14. [Smoking and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Arruti, Maialen; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Egüés, Nerea; Olascoaga, Javier

    2015-02-16

    Introduccion. La esclerosis multiple (EM) es una enfermedad autoinmune de etiologia compleja, hoy por hoy desconocida, en la que factores geneticos y ambientales determinan la susceptibilidad. En los ultimos años, el efecto del tabaco ha sido uno de los factores ambientales que ha emergido en la EM, y se ha asociado tanto a un aumento de la susceptibilidad como a un aumento de la progresion. Objetivo. Revisar la evidencia actual sobre el papel del tabaco en la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados que han analizado distintos aspectos del tabaco en la EM: vias patogenicas implicadas, asociacion del tabaco y riesgo de EM, interaccion con otros factores de riesgo y efecto del tabaco en el curso de la enfermedad. Conclusiones. Los estudios observacionales demuestran que el tabaquismo incrementa de forma significativa el riesgo de EM (odds ratio ~ 1,5) y es un factor de riesgo independiente. Sin embargo, la EM es una enfermedad compleja y el aumento de riesgo por el tabaco puede diferir en funcion de la interaccion con otros factores geneticos y ambientales. El papel del tabaco como factor de progresion es mas controvertido, con resultados contradictorios y estudios de gran variabilidad, lo que dificulta establecer una conclusion firme. Los mecanismos por los que el tabaquismo modifica el riesgo y posiblemente la progresion de la enfermedad no son aun conocidos.

  15. Fatigue and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Béthoux, F

    2006-07-01

    Even if the definition and pathophysiology of fatigue in multiple sclerosis (MS) are still debated, and despite the scarcity of objective markers correlated with the subjective sensation of fatigue, a review of the literature shows the importance of its detection and management, and allows one to propose therapeutic strategies. Fatigue is not only the most frequently reported symptom in MS, but also a frequent source of activity and participation limitations, psychological distress, and impairment of quality of life. Its management, which must be initiated early, is based on a comprehensive evaluation of its characteristics and consequences (sometimes with the use of scales such as the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale), and on the identification of many potential contributing factors (psychological disorders, sleep disturbances, pain, infections and other comorbidities, medications, and deconditioning). Rehabilitative interventions are essential to the treatment of fatigue. Beyond the traditional energy conservation strategies and cooling techniques, several randomized controlled studies have demonstrated the positive impact of aerobic exercise. Medications are partially beneficial, and with the exception of amantadine, their efficacy has not been confirmed by randomized double-blind trials.

  16. Isothermal Multiple Displacement Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal multiple strand displacement amplification (IMDA) of the whole human genome is a promising method for procuring abundant DNA from valuable and often limited clinical specimens. However, whether DNA generated by this method is of high quality and a faithful replication of the DNA in the original specimen, allowing for subsequent molecular diagnostic testing, requires verification. In this study, we evaluated the suitability of IMDA-generated DNA (IMDA-DNA) for detecting antigen receptor gene rearrangements, chromosomal translocations, and gene mutations using Southern blot analysis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, or sequencing methods in 28 lymphoma and leukemia clinical specimens. Molecular testing before and after whole genome amplification of these specimens using the IMDA technique showed concordance in 27 of 28 (96%) specimens. Analysis of IMDA-DNA by Southern blot analysis detected restriction fragments >12 kilobases long. No amplification bias was observed at all loci tested demonstrating that this method can be useful in generating large amounts of unbiased, high molecular weight DNA from limited clinical specimens. PMID:15269301

  17. Multiple Myeloma: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Farsi, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a rare, largely incurable malignant disease of plasma cells. Patients usually present with hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia and/or lytic bony lesions along with a monoclonal protein in the serum and/or urine in addition to an increase in the number of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Patients with myeloma live on an average for five to seven years, with their survival dependent on the presence or absence of different prognostic markers. Treatment of younger fit patients is with induction therapy consisting of steroids with one or more novel anti-myeloma agents followed by high dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation, while older and less fit patients are treated with melphalan-based combination chemotherapy. Supportive care is of paramount importance and includes the use of bisphosphonates, prophylactic antibiotics, thrombosis prophylaxis and the use of hematopoietic growth factors along with the treatment of complications of disease and its therapy. As more progress is being made and deeper responses are being attained, the disease might turn into a potentially curable one in the near future. PMID:23386937

  18. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  19. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  20. Multiple valence superatoms.

    PubMed

    Reveles, J U; Khanna, S N; Roach, P J; Castleman, A W

    2006-12-05

    We recently demonstrated that, in gas phase clusters containing aluminum and iodine atoms, an Al(13) cluster behaves like a halogen atom, whereas an Al(14) cluster exhibits properties analogous to an alkaline earth atom. These observations, together with our findings that Al(13)(-) is inert like a rare gas atom, have reinforced the idea that chosen clusters can exhibit chemical behaviors reminiscent of atoms in the periodic table, offering the exciting prospect of a new dimension of the periodic table formed by cluster elements, called superatoms. As the behavior of clusters can be controlled by size and composition, the superatoms offer the potential to create unique compounds with tailored properties. In this article, we provide evidence of an additional class of superatoms, namely Al(7)(-), that exhibit multiple valences, like some of the elements in the periodic table, and hence have the potential to form stable compounds when combined with other atoms. These findings support the contention that there should be no limitation in finding clusters, which mimic virtually all members of the periodic table.

  1. [Diet and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pozuelo-Moyano, Beatriz; Benito-León, Julián

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. El tipo de dieta se ha relacionado con el proceso inflamatorio que forma parte de la esclerosis multiple (EM). En los ultimos años, distintas lineas de investigacion han generado una gran cantidad de conocimiento sobre la participacion de la dieta en la patogenesis de la EM. Objetivo. Elucidar de modo critico las evidencias que relacionan distintos tipos de dietas y alimentos con la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados mas significativos que han analizado el papel de la dieta en la patogenesis y en el tratamiento de la EM. Para explorar la asociacion entre la dieta y el riesgo de EM se ha revisado la evidencia disponible hasta el momento, pasando por estudios observacionales hasta terminar con estudios de intervencion. Conclusiones. Se necesita mas investigacion sobre la nutricion como factor de riesgo, ya que podria tener relacion con la enfermedad, y el control de esta podria llevar a una disminucion significativa de la incidencia o progresion de la patologia.

  2. Multiple sclerosis and behavior.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, James B; Kablinger, Anita; Alekseeva, Nadejda

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most frequently seen neurological causes of progressive disability in early to middle adulthood. The disease is variable in its presentation and course, affects roughly 100-300 per 100,000 persons within the United States alone, and is slightly more common among females than males. MS places substantial burdens on patients, families, and caregivers. It negatively affects cognitive abilities and psychiatric functioning, and can add a notably deleterious effect on a patient's quality of life. This chapter reviews the recent literature on the behavioral manifestations of MS. Cognitive domains discussed include executive functioning, processing speed, attention, learning and memory, language functioning, and visual spatial processing. Some attention will also be paid to differential diagnosis and the cognitive effects of treatment. Psychiatric manifestations are also discussed, including symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, euphoria, pathological laughter and crying, and psychosis, as well as maladaptive personality traits. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of the effects of MS on quality of life including such areas as fatigue, sexual dysfunction, pain, employment, and cognitive functioning.

  3. Multiple trellis coded modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A technique for designing trellis codes to minimize bit error performance for a fading channel. The invention provides a criteria which may be used in the design of such codes which is significantly different from that used for average white Gaussian noise channels. The method of multiple trellis coded modulation of the present invention comprises the steps of: (a) coding b bits of input data into s intermediate outputs; (b) grouping said s intermediate outputs into k groups of s.sub.i intermediate outputs each where the summation of all s.sub.i,s is equal to s and k is equal to at least 2; (c) mapping each of said k groups of intermediate outputs into one of a plurality of symbols in accordance with a plurality of modulation schemes, one for each group such that the first group is mapped in accordance with a first modulation scheme and the second group is mapped in accordance with a second modulation scheme; and (d) outputting each of said symbols to provide k output symbols for each b bits of input data.

  4. Low dose naltrexone therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Y P

    2005-01-01

    The use of low doses of naltrexone for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) enjoys a worldwide following amongst MS patients. There is overwhelming anecdotal evidence, that in low doses naltrexone not only prevents relapses in MS but also reduces the progression of the disease. It is proposed that naltrexone acts by reducing apoptosis of oligodendrocytes. It does this by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. This results in a decrease in the formation of peroxynitrites, which in turn prevent the inhibition of the glutamate transporters. Thus, the excitatory neurotoxicity of glutamate on neuronal cells and oligodendrocytes via activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid class of glutamate receptor is prevented. It is crucial that the medical community respond to patient needs and investigate this drug in a clinical trial.

  5. Enriched Storable Oxidizers for Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, R. L.; Herdy, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The name "enriched storable oxidizers" (ESOs) has been coined for a family of optimized mixtures of between two and four oxidizer fluids. For most applications, the constituents of these mixtures would be nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2); in some applications, the mixtures might include inhibited red fuming nitric acid [IRFN (which consists of red fuming nitric acid to which some hydrogen fluoride is added to reduce its corrosive effect]. The optimum proportions of these constituents would be different for different applications. ESOs were originally proposed for use in spacecraft and launch-rocket propulsion systems: ESOs could be especially useful in advanced spacecraft propulsion systems that could operate in multiple modes. ESOs might also be useful in special terrestrial applications that could include ramjet and scramjet aircraft engines.

  6. New concepts in vascular nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Oeckler, R A; Wolin, M S

    2000-09-01

    Low levels of nitric oxide (NO) control the activities of guanylate cyclase and mitochondrial respiration. Increasing NO levels interact with multiple signaling systems through the formation of peroxynitrite and other oxidation products. Signaling mechanisms linked to NO participate in the prevention of acute responses such as vasoconstriction, thrombosis and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. In contrast, processes related to vascular remodeling, and responses to injury that are associated with the progression and adaptation to disease processes, are not as well understood. Many of the opposing processes involved in these adaptations may originate from the diverse signaling mechanisms that NO and its oxidized products can regulate in a cell-specific manner in the vessel wall.

  7. Iron-cobalt bimetal oxide nanorods as efficient and robust water oxidation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xichen; Huang, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuming; Zhao, Yukun; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Yong

    2017-03-15

    Cobalt-based oxides are considered as potential water oxidation catalysts for future artificial photosynthetic systems because of their high abundance, strong stability and efficient performance. Herein, a series of cobalt-based oxides, MnCo3-nO4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co) samples, were synthesized through changing the metal sources by a low-temperature coprecipitation method. These catalysts were investigated under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation conditions. And they all exhibited efficient activity for water oxidation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions under visible light irradiation. An excellent O2 yield of 90.4% for Fe-Co bimetal oxide (Fe1.1Co1.9O4) nanorods was obtained under optimal conditions (photoirradiation at λ ≥ 420 nm, [Ru(bpy)3](ClO4)2 as the photosensitizer, Na2S2O8 as the oxidant in borate buffer at pH = 9.0, bpy = 2,2-bipyridine). Among MnCo3-nO4 samples, Fe1.1Co1.9O4 nanorods were proved to be the optimal electrocatalytic water oxidation catalyst as well. Multiple experiments (SEM, FT-IR, XRD, XPS, Bulk electrolysis) were used to test the stability of Fe1.1CO1.9O4 and these results indicate that Fe1.1CO1.9O4 nanorods are highly stable. Furthermore, based on Mott-Schottky and cyclic voltammetry analysis, the best balanced flat-band potential of Fe1.1CO1.9O4 nanorods is just located at the middle position between the oxidation potential of O2/H2O and the half-wave potential of [Ru(bpy)3](3+/2+), which was probably responsible for their superior photocatalytic water oxidation performance.

  8. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  9. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  10. CuO impregnated activated carbon for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an original approach to the removal of phenol in synthetic wastewater by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with copper binding activated carbon (CuAC) catalysts. The characteristics and oxidation performance of CuAC in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol were studied in a batch reactor at 80 degrees C. Complete conversion of the oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, was observed with CuAC catalyst in 20 min oxidation, and a highly efficient phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement were achieved in the first 30 min. The good oxidation performance of CuAC catalyst was contributed to the activity enhancement of copper oxide, which was binding in the carbon matrix. It can be concluded that the efficiency of oxidation dominated by the residual H2O2 in this study. An over 90% COD removal was achieved by using the multiple-step addition in this catalytic oxidation.

  11. Zirconium Oxide Nanostructures Prepared by Anodic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Ying Yi; Bhuiyan, Md S; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic films can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide film to flake off. Further studies are needed to define the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  12. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  13. Iron increases the susceptibility of multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Paolo; Fontana, Francesca; Frenquelli, Michela; Cenci, Simone; Marcatti, Magda; Sitia, Roberto; Tonon, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant still incurable plasma cell disorder. Pharmacological treatment based on proteasome inhibition has improved patient outcome; however, bortezomib-resistance remains a major clinical problem. Inhibition of proteasome functionality affects cellular iron homeostasis and iron is a potent inducer of reactive oxygen species and cell death, unless safely stored in ferritin. We explored the potential role of iron in bortezomib-resistance. We analyzed iron proteins, oxidative status and cell viability in 7 multiple myeloma cell lines and in plasma cells from 5 patients. Cells were treated with increasing bortezomib concentrations with or without iron supplementation. We reduced ferritin levels by both shRNA technology and by drug-induced iron starvation. Multiple myeloma cell lines are characterized by distinct ferritin levels, which directly correlate with bortezomib resistance. We observed that iron supplementation upon bortezomib promotes protein oxidation and cell death, and that iron toxicity inversely correlates with basal ferritin levels. Bortezomib prevents ferritin upregulation in response to iron, thus limiting the ability to buffer reactive oxygen species. Consequently, reduction of basal ferritin levels increases both bortezomib sensitivity and iron toxicity. In patients’ cells, we confirmed that bortezomib prevents ferritin increase, that iron supplementation upon bortezomib increases cell death and that ferritin reduction overcomes bortezomib resistance. Bortezomib affects iron homeostasis, sensitizing cells to oxidative damage. Modulation of iron status is a strategy worth exploring to improve the efficacy of proteasome inhibition therapies. PMID:23242599

  14. Surface analyses and modelling of rate multiplicity and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.; Conner, W.C.

    1990-11-01

    Catalytic partial and complete oxidations of chemical species are a quite important class of reactions in the production of many commercial chemicals and in the elimination of environmental pollutants. This research focuses on a sub-class of oxidation reactions in which CO is a key player -- be it a reactant, intermediate, or product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The first three years of our research has followed two parallel paths which have a common destination and which together provide a framework for the proposed new research. The first path has involved the development of a combined experimental/modelling and analysis methodology for constructing feasible mechanistic sequences and their corresponding kinetic models of catalytic reactions that exhibit multiple rate behavior. The rather well-studied Pt catalyzed CO oxidation served as the test reaction. Our approach involves the measurement of basic kinetic features (apparent reaction orders, activation energy) and multiplicity features (location of ignition and extinction points) over a wide range of conditions (catalyst temperature, total pressure, feed composition), and a kinetic modelling part, in which potential reaction sequences are constructed and screened based on their ability to predict the experimentally observed kinetic and multiplicity features over a wide range of conditions. The second path has involved the development of an under-utilized (in catalysis) spectroscopic technique, Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIRES), to monitor the surface of a catalyst during reaction. Main accomplishments from both studies are summarized.

  15. Rituximab in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsson, Rasmus; Alping, Peter; Novakova, Lenka; Björck, Anna; Fink, Katharina; Islam-Jakobsson, Protik; Malmeström, Clas; Axelsson, Markus; Vågberg, Mattias; Sundström, Peter; Lycke, Jan; Piehl, Fredrik; Svenningsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of rituximab in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In this retrospective uncontrolled observational multicenter study, off-label rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified through the Swedish MS register. Outcome data were collected from the MS register and medical charts. Adverse events (AEs) grades 2–5 according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events were recorded. Results: A total of 822 rituximab-treated patients with MS were identified: 557 relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 198 secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and 67 primary progressive MS (PPMS). At baseline, 26.2% had contrast-enhancing lesions (CELs). Patients were treated with 500 or 1,000 mg rituximab IV every 6–12 months, during a mean 21.8 (SD 14.3) months. During treatment, the annualized relapse rates were 0.044 (RRMS), 0.038 (SPMS), and 0.015 (PPMS), and 4.6% of patients displayed CELs. Median Expanded Disability Status Scale remained unchanged in RRMS (p = 0.42) and increased by 0.5 and 1.0 in SPMS and PPMS, respectively (p = 0.10 and 0.25). Infusion-related AEs occurred during 7.8% of infusions and most were mild. A total of 89 AEs grades ≥2 (of which 76 infections) were recorded in 72 patients. No case of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy was detected. Conclusions: This is the largest cohort of patients with MS treated with rituximab reported so far. The safety, clinical, and MRI findings in this heterogeneous real-world cohort treated with different doses of rituximab were similar to those reported in previous randomized controlled trials on B-cell depletion therapy in MS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for patients with MS, rituximab is safe and effective. PMID:27760868

  16. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that ranged multiple aspects and fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, a design and build for a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, a design for a portable four monitor hyper wall that can extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill for a next generation robot, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and implementation of a new weekly outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory. The objectives for the command center were to create a central computer controlled area for the still in production lunar regolith bin. It needed to be easy to use and the operating systems had to be Linux. The objectives for the hyper wall were to build a mobile transport of monitors that could potentially attach to one another. It needed to be light but sturdy, and have the ability to last. The objectives for the blast shield included a robust design that could withstand a small equipment malfunction, while also being convenient for use. The objectives for the nano-drill included the research and implementation of programming for vertical and horizontal movement. The hyper wall and blasts shield project were designed by me in the Pro/Engineer/Creo2 software. Each project required a meeting with the Swamp Works engineers and was declared successful.

  17. Multiple sclerosis update.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Clyde E

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic but incurable disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is often diagnosed in the second or third decade of life. It is more common among women than men, significantly impairs patient quality of life, and is associated with substantial costs to patients, healthcare systems, and society. Of the approximately 2.3 million individuals worldwide that have MS, more than 400,000 reside in the United States. Although the etiology of MS is not completely understood, a great deal of evidence suggests a complex relationship between environmental and genetic factors. The pathophysiology of MS involves an aberrant attack by the host immune system on oligodendrocytes, which synthesize and maintain myelin sheaths in the CNS. There are 4 identified disease courses in MS, and approximately 85% of people with MS present with relapsing-remitting MS, which is characterized by discrete acute attacks followed by periods of remission. Signs and symptoms of MS are dependent on the demyelinated area(s) of the CNS and often involve sensory disturbances, limb weakness, fatigue, and increased body temperature. The criteria for a diagnosis of MS include evidence of damage in at least 2 separate areas of the CNS, evidence that the damage occurred at different time points, and the ruling out of other possible diagnoses. Diseasemodifying drugs (DMDs) that reduce the frequency of relapses, development of brain lesions, and progression of disability are the standard of care for relapsing forms of MS, and the use of DMDs should be initiated as early as possible.

  18. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a common genetically and clinically heterogeneous skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset osteoarthritis, mainly in the hip and knee, and mild-to-moderate short stature. Here we report on a 6-generation MED family with 17 affected members. Method The clinical and radiographic data on the 12 affected members still living were scrutinized. A structured inquiry comprising state of health and MED-related symptoms since birth up to the present time and the osteoarthritis outcome (KOOS) questionnaire were sent to all living family members with MED. The 5 known gene loci for autosomal dominant MED were analyzed for linkage, using fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers. Linkage was ascertained with markers close to the COL9A2 gene, which was analyzed for mutations by sequencing. Results We identified an exon 3 donor splice mutation in the COL9A2 gene in all affected family members. Clinical, radiographic, and questionnaire data from affected family members suggested that MED caused by COL9A2 mutations starts in early childhood with knee pain accompanied by delayed ossification of femoral epiphyses. The disease then either stabilizes during puberty or progresses with additional joints becoming affected; joint surgery might be necessary. The progression of the disease also affects muscles, with increasing atrophy, resulting in muscle fatigue and pain. Muscular atrophy has not been reported earlier in cases with COL9A2 mutations. Interpretation In a patient with clinically suspected or verified MED, it is important to perform DNA-based analysis to identify a possible disease-causing mutation. This information can be used to carry out genetic risk assessment of other family members and to achieve an early and correct diagnosis in the children. PMID:19995321

  19. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease.

  20. Multiplicative Thinking: Much More than Knowing Multiplication Facts and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is accepted as a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins important mathematical concepts such as fraction understanding, proportional reasoning, and algebraic thinking. It is characterised by understandings such as the multiplicative relationship between places in the number system, basic and extended number…

  1. Oxidations of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic aliphatic amines by horseradish peroxidase: the indole ring binds to the enzyme and mediates electron-transfer amine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Shan; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2008-01-23

    Although oxidations of aromatic amines by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are well-known, typical aliphatic amines are not substrates of HRP. In this study, the reactions of N-benzyl and N-methyl cyclic amines with HRP were found to be slow, but reactions of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines were 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. Analyses of pH-rate profiles revealed a dominant contribution to reaction by the amine-free base forms, the only species found to bind to the enzyme. A metabolic study on a family of congeneric N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines indicated competition between amine and indole oxidation pathways. Amine oxidation dominated for the seven- and eight-membered azacycles, where ring size supports the change in hybridization from sp3 to sp2 that occurs upon one-electron amine nitrogen oxidation, whereas only indole oxidation was observed for the six-membered ring congener. Optical difference spectroscopic binding data and computational docking simulations suggest that all the arylalkylamine substrates bind to the enzyme through their aromatic termini with similar binding modes and binding affinities. Kinetic saturation was observed for a particularly soluble substrate, consistent with an obligatory role of an enzyme-substrate complexation preceding electron transfer. The significant rate enhancements seen for the indoleethylamine substrates suggest the ability of the bound indole ring to mediate what amounts to medium long-range electron-transfer oxidation of the tertiary amine center by the HRP oxidants. This is the first systematic investigation to document aliphatic amine oxidation by HRP at rates consistent with normal metabolic turnover, and the demonstration that this is facilitated by an auxiliary electron-rich aromatic ring.

  2. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  3. Characteristics of Biological Nitrogen Removal in a Multiple Anoxic and Aerobic Biological Nutrient Removal Process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huoqing; Guan, Yuntao; Li, Li; Wu, Guangxue

    2015-01-01

    Two sequencing batch reactors, one with the conventional anoxic and aerobic (AO) process and the other with the multiple AO process, were operated to examine characteristics of biological nitrogen removal, especially of the multiple AO process. The long-term operation showed that the total nitrogen removal percentage of the multiple AO reactor was 38.7% higher than that of the AO reactor. In the multiple AO reactor, at the initial SBR cycle stage, due to the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, no nitrite and/or nitrate were accumulated. In the multiple AO reactor, activities of nitrite oxidizing bacteria were inhibited due to the multiple AO operating mode applied, resulting in the partial nitrification. Denitrifiers in the multiple AO reactor mainly utilized internal organic carbon for denitrification, and their activities were lower than those of denitrifiers in the AO reactor utilizing external organic carbon. PMID:26491676

  4. The role of the fano resonance in multiple exciton generation in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksengendler, B. L.; Marasulov, M. B.; Nikiforov, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The phenomenon of interference between two pathways of electron transfer from the valence to the conduction band at a quantum dot is considered. The first way is the conventional "valence band-conduction band" transition, while the second is the transition via a virtual two-electron state on the Tamm level in a quantum dot (QD) followed by the Auger effect, which ejects one electron from the Tamm level to the conduction band. In the case of a coherent addition of these ionization pathways, the Fano resonance can take place, this leading to an increase in the coefficient of photon absorption. This results in increasing internal efficiency of light conversion and can provide a basis for increasing the efficiency of solar cells due to the phenomenon of multiple exciton generation.

  5. Activation of peroxynitrite by inducible nitric-oxide synthase: a direct source of nitrative stress.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Amandine; Mattioli, Tony A; Stuehr, Dennis J; Santolini, Jérôme

    2007-05-11

    In mammals, nitric oxide (NO) is an essential biological mediator that is exclusively synthesized by nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs). However, NOSs are also directly or indirectly responsible for the production of peroxynitrite, a well known cytotoxic agent involved in numerous pathophysiological processes. Peroxynitrite reactivity is extremely intricate and highly depends on activators such as hemoproteins. NOSs present, therefore, the unique ability to both produce and activate peroxynitrite, which confers upon them a major role in the control of peroxynitrite bioactivity. We report here the first kinetic analysis of the interaction between peroxynitrite and the oxygenase domain of inducible NOS (iNOSoxy). iNOSoxy binds peroxynitrite and accelerates its decomposition with a second order rate constant of 22 x 10(4) m(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.4. This reaction is pH-dependent and is abolished by the binding of substrate or product. Peroxynitrite activation is correlated with the observation of a new iNOS heme intermediate with specific absorption at 445 nm. iNOSoxy modifies peroxynitrite reactivity and directs it toward one-electron processes such as nitration or one-electron oxidation. Taken together our results suggest that, upon binding to iNOSoxy, peroxynitrite undergoes homolytic cleavage with build-up of an oxo-ferryl intermediate and concomitant release of a NO(2)(.) radical. Successive cycles of peroxynitrite activation were shown to lead to iNOSoxy autocatalytic nitration and inhibition. The balance between peroxynitrite activation and self-inhibition of iNOSoxy may determine the contribution of NOSs to cellular oxidative stress.

  6. Elucidation of the factors affecting the oxidative activity of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase by an electrochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenichi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-07

    Steady-state kinetics of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase toward p-hydroquinone derivatives have been examined by using an electrochemical analysis based on the theory of steady-state bioelectrocatalysis. The electrochemical technique has enabled one to examine the influence of electronic and chemical properties of substrates on the activity. It was proven that the oxidative activity of ascorbate oxidase was dominated by the highly selective substrate-binding affinity based on electrostatic interaction beyond the one-electron redox potential difference between ascorbate oxidase's type 1 copper site and substrate.

  7. Elucidation of the factors affecting the oxidative activity of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase by an electrochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Kenichi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-07

    Steady-state kinetics of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase toward p-hydroquinone derivatives have been examined by using an electrochemical analysis based on the theory of steady-state bioelectrocatalysis. The electrochemical technique has enabled one to examine the influence of electronic and chemical properties of substrates on the activity. It was proven that the oxidative activity of ascorbate oxidase was dominated by the highly selective substrate-binding affinity based on electrostatic interaction beyond the one-electron redox potential difference between ascorbate oxidase's type 1 copper site and substrate.

  8. Copper-catalyzed hydroquinone oxidation and associated redox cycling of copper under conditions typical of natural saline waters.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Pham, A Ninh; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2013-08-06

    A detailed kinetic model has been developed to describe the oxidation of Cu(I) by O2 and the reduction of Cu(II) by 1,4-hydroquinone (H2Q) in the presence of O2 in 0.7 M NaCl solution over a pH range of 6.5-8.0. The reaction between Cu(I) and O2 is shown to be the most important pathway in the overall oxidation of Cu(I), with the rate constant for this oxidation process increasing with an increasing pH. In 0.7 M NaCl solutions, Cu(II) is capable of catalyzing the oxidation of H2Q in the presence of O2 with the monoanion, HQ(-), the kinetically active hydroquinone form, reducing Cu(II) with an intrinsic rate constant of (5.0 ± 0.4) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). Acting as a chain-propagating species, the deprotonated semiquinone radical (SQ(•) (-)) generated from both the one-electron oxidation of H2Q and the one-electron reduction of 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) also reacts rapidly with Cu(II) and Cu(I), with the same rate constant of (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). In addition to its role in reformation of Cu(II) via continuous oxidation of Cu(I), O2 rapidly removes SQ(•) (-), resulting in the generation of O2(•) (-). Agreement between half-cell reduction potentials of different redox couples provides confirmation of the veracity of the proposed model describing the interactions of copper and quinone species in circumneutral pH saline solutions.

  9. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-10-12

    An article of manufacture is described including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductor. 5 figures.

  10. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  11. Design for Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Schaeffer, Jon C.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Alloys intended for use in high-temperature environment rely on the formation of a continuous, compact, slow-growing oxide layer for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. To be protective, this oxide layer must be chemically, thermodynamically stable. Successful alloy design for oxidative environment is best achieved by developing alloys that are capable of forming adherent scales of either alumina (Al2O3), chromia (Cr2O3), or silica (SiO2). In this article, emphasis has been placed on the issue related to high-temperature oxidation of superalloys used in gas turbine engine application. Despite the complexity of these alloys, optimal performance has been associated with protective alumina scale formation. As will be described below, both compositional makeup and protective coatings play key role in providing oxidation protection. Other high-temperature materials described include nickel and titanium aluminide intermetallics, refractory metal, and ceramics.

  12. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chancellor, Christopher John

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: multiple endocrine neoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 4 Genomics Education Programme (UK): Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 Genomics Education Programme (UK): Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2A MalaCards: multiple endocrine ...

  14. Chaotic communication scheme with multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobreshov, A. M.; Karavaev, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    A new scheme of data transmission with nonlinear admixing is described, in which the two mutually inverse operations (multiplication and division) ensure multiplicative mixing of the informative and chaotic signals that provides a potentially higher degree of security. A special feature of the proposed scheme is the absence of limitations (related to the division by zero) imposed on the types of informative signals.

  15. The problem with multiple robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Marcus J.; Kenny, Patrick G.

    1994-01-01

    The issues that can arise in research associated with multiple, robotic agents are discussed. Two particular multi-robot projects are presented as examples. This paper was written in the hope that it might ease the transition from single to multiple robot research.

  16. Multiple Intelligences Centers and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Carolyn; Freeman, Lynn

    Based upon Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, this book guides elementary school teachers through the process of using classroom learning centers and projects by providing choices for students. The guide is divided into two sections, providing the theoretical background and information on how to develop multiple intelligences learning…

  17. Folklore and the Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehnecke, Dianne Swenson

    1995-01-01

    Explores using Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences for folklore analysis. States that when listening to folktales, linguistic intelligence was used, as opposed to drawing pictures of the stories, which used spatial intelligence. Provides some ideas on how to bring folklore studies and the use of multiple intelligences into the classroom. (PA)

  18. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Teresa C.; Castro, Wanda; Shah, Anjali; Courtney, Ardith; Ortstadt, Jeffrey; Davis, Scott L.; Logan, Diana; Abraham, Thomas; Abraham, Jaspreet; Remington, Gina; Treadaway, Katherine; Graves, Donna; Hart, John; Stuve, Olaf; Lemack, Gary; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults. The ability to impact the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis should not only incorporate therapies that are disease modifying, but should also include a course of action for the global multidisciplinary management focused on quality of life and functional capabilities. PMID:21694806

  19. Adult Multiple Intelligences and Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Meg Ryback

    In the Adult Multiple Intelligences (AMI) study, 10 teachers of adults from the northeastern region of the United States explored for 18 months the ways that multiple intelligences (MI) theory could support instruction and assessment in various adult learning contexts. The results of this research were published in a book by Julie Viens called MI…

  20. Multiple Intelligences for Differentiated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, R. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    There is an intricate literacy to Gardner's multiple intelligences theory that unlocks key entry points for differentiated learning. Using a well-articulated framework, rich with graphic representations, Williams provides a comprehensive discussion of multiple intelligences. He moves the teacher and students from curiosity, to confidence, to…

  1. Multiplication Fact Fluency Using Doubles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Judith M.; Rubenstein, Rheta N.

    2010-01-01

    Not knowing multiplication facts creates a gap in a student's mathematics development and undermines confidence and disposition toward further mathematical learning. Learning multiplication facts is a first step in proportional reasoning, "the capstone of elementary arithmetic and the gateway to higher mathematics" (NRC 2001, p. 242). Proportional…

  2. Rickettsial Antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Field, E. J.; Chambers, Mavis

    1970-01-01

    The serum of subjects with multiple sclerosis or other degenerative neurological diseases and that of normal controls does not differ significantly in its content of antibodies to several rickettsial antigens. There is no evidence for a rickettsial aetiology of multiple sclerosis, and no grounds for an extended clinical trial of Le Gac's full method of treatment with antibiotics. PMID:4983591

  3. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  4. Multilevel Charge Storage in a Multiple Alloy Nanodot Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gae-Hun; Lee, Jung-Min; Heub Song, Yun; Bea, Ji Chel; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa

    2011-09-01

    A multilevel charge storage in a multiple FePt alloy nanodot memory is investigated for the first time. It is demonstrated that the memory structure with multiple FePt nanodot layers effectively realizes a multilevel state by the adjustment of gate voltage. Metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with four FePt nanodot layers as a floating gate are fabricated to evaluate the multilevel cell characteristic and reliability. Here, the effect of memory window for a nanodot diameter is also investigated, and it is found that a smaller dot size gives a larger window. From the results showing good endurance and retention characteristics for the multilevel states, it is expected that a multiple FePt nanodot memory using Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling can be a candidate structure for the future multilevel NAND flash memory.

  5. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  6. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  7. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  8. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  9. Enzymatic DNA oxidation: mechanisms and biological significance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guo-Liang; Walsh, Colum P

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation at cytosines (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes in mammals. How methylation is reversed was until recently poorly understood. The family of dioxygenases commonly known as Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins are responsible for the oxidation of 5mC into three new forms, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Current models link Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation with active DNA demethylation. The higher oxidation products (5fC and 5caC) are recognized and excised by the DNA glycosylase TDG via the base excision repair pathway. Like DNA methyltransferases, Tet enzymes are important for embryonic development. We will examine the mechanism and biological significance of Tet-mediated 5mC oxidation in the context of pronuclear DNA demethylation in mouse early embryos. In contrast to its role in active demethylation in the germ cells and early embryo, a number of lines of evidence suggest that the intragenic 5hmC present in brain may act as a stable mark instead. This short review explores mechanistic aspects of TET oxidation activity, the impact Tet enzymes have on epigenome organization and their contribution to the regulation of early embryonic and neuronal development.

  10. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, David

    2000-01-01

    A method of preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A .beta.-metal .beta.-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  11. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Ingersoll, D.

    2000-07-11

    A method is described for preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A {beta}-metal {beta}-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  12. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious.

  13. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  14. Structural consequences of the one-electron reduction of d4 [Mo(CO)2(eta-PhC[triple bond]CPh)Tp']+ and the electronic structure of the d5 radicals [M(CO)L(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp'] {L = CO and P(OCH2)3CEt}.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher J; Bartlett, Ian M; Boonyuen, Supakorn; Connelly, Neil G; Harding, David J; Hayward, Owen D; McInnes, Eric J L; Orpen, A Guy; Quayle, Michael J; Rieger, Philip H

    2006-07-28

    Reduction of [M(CO)2(eta-RC[triple bond]CR')Tp']X {Tp' = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate, M = Mo, X = [PF6]-, R = R' = Ph, C6H4OMe-4 or Me; R = Ph, R' = H; M = W, X = [BF4]-, R = R' = Ph or Me; R = Ph, R' = H} with [Co(eta-C5H5)2] gave paramagnetic [M(CO)2(eta-RC[triple bond]CR')Tp'], characterised by IR and ESR spectroscopy. X-Ray structural studies on the redox pair [Mo(CO)2(eta-PhC[triple bond]CPh)Tp'] and [Mo(CO)2(eta-PhC[triple bond]CPh)Tp'][PF6] showed that oxidation is accompanied by a lengthening of the C[triple bond]C bond and shortening of the Mo-C(alkyne) bonds, consistent with removal of an electron from an orbital antibonding with respect to the Mo-alkyne bond, and with conversion of the alkyne from a three- to a four-electron donor. Reduction of [Mo(CO)(NCMe)(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp'][PF6] with [Co(eta-C5H5)2] in CH2Cl2 gives [MoCl(CO)(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp'], via nitrile substitution in [Mo(CO)(NCMe)(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp'], whereas a similar reaction with [M(CO){P(OCH2)3CEt}(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp']+ (M = Mo or W) gives the phosphite-containing radicals [M(CO){P(OCH2)3CEt}(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp']. ESR spectroscopic studies and DFT calculations on [M(CO)L(eta-MeC[triple bond]CMe)Tp'] {M = Mo or W, L = CO or P(OCH2)3CEt} show the SOMO of the neutral d5 species (the LUMO of the d4 cations) to be largely d(yz) in character although much more delocalised in the W complexes. Non-coincidence effects between the g and metal hyperfine matrices in the Mo spectra indicate hybridisation of the metal d-orbitals in the SOMO, consistent with a rotation of the coordinated alkyne about the M-C2 axis.

  15. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  16. The Interface Between Chemical and Oxide Materials in the DSPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Thomas; Alibabaei, Leila; Sherman, Benjamin; Sheridan, Matthew; Ashford, Dennis; Lapides, Alex; Brennaman, Kyle; Nayak, Animesh; Roy, Subhangi

    Significant challenges exist for both chemical and oxide materials in the Dye Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell (DSPEC) for water oxidation or CO2 reduction. They arise from light absorption, the energetics of electron or hole injection, the accumulation of multiple redox equivalents at catalysts for water oxidation or water/CO2 reduction in competition with back electron transfer, and sustained, long term performance. These challenges are being met by the use of a variety of chromophores (metal complexes, organic dyes, porphyrins), broad application of nanoparticle mesoscopic oxide films, atomic layer deposition (ALD) to prepare core/shell and stabilizing overlayer structures, and recent advances in the molecular catalysis of water oxidation and CO2 reduction. UNC EFRC Center for Solar Fuels, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001011.

  17. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  18. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  19. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  20. UV Induced Oxidation of Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde, F. (Inventor); Luecke, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated at least in part using in situ UV radiation sources. The sources of the oxidizing species include oxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen may be a component of the gaseous stream or added to the gaseous stream, preferably near a UV radiation source, and is converted to ozone by the UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is decomposed through a combination of vaporization and UV irradiation. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50% by volume and increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding vaporization within the flow channel of the gaseous stream and in the presence of the UV radiation sources.