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Sample records for multiple one-electron oxidations

  1. Consequence of one-electron oxidation and one-electron reduction for aniline.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Ewa D; Stępniewski, Tomasz M; Kolczyńska, Katarzyna

    2011-12-01

    Quantum-chemical calculations were performed for all possible isomers of neutral aniline and its redox forms, and intramolecular proton-transfer (prototropy) accompanied by π-electron delocalization was analyzed. One-electron oxidation (PhNH(2) - e → [PhNH(2)](+•)) has no important effect on tautomeric preferences. The enamine tautomer is preferred for oxidized aniline similarly as for the neutral molecule. Dramatical changes take place when proceeding from neutral to reduced aniline. One-electron reduction (PhNH(2) + e → [PhNH(2)](-•)) favors the imine tautomer. Independently on the state of oxidation, π- and n-electrons are more delocalized for the enamine than imine tautomers. The change of the tautomeric preferences for reduced aniline may partially explain the origin of the CH tautomers for reduced nucleobases (cytosine, adenine, and guanine).

  2. One-electron oxidation of DNA: mechanism and consequences.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Gary B

    2009-01-01

    All living organisms store the information necessary to maintain life in their DNA. Any process that damages DNA and causes loss or corruption of that information threatens the viability of the organism. One-electron oxidation is such a process. Loss of an electron from DNA generates a radical cation that is located primarily on its nucleobases. The radical cation migrates reversibly through duplex DNA by hopping until it is eventually trapped in an irreversible chemical reaction. The particular sequence of nucleobases in a DNA oligomer determines both the efficiency of hopping and the specific location and nature of the damaging chemical reaction. In its normal aqueous solutions, DNA is a polyanion because of the negative charge carried by its phosphate groups. Counter ions (typically Na(+)) to the phosphate groups play an important role in facilitating both the migration of the radical cation and in its eventual reaction with H(2)O. Irreversible reaction of a radical cation with H(2)O in duplex DNA occurs preferentially at the most reactive site. In normal DNA that is comprised of the four common DNA nucleobases, reaction occurs most commonly at a guanine and results in its conversion primarily to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-OxoG). Both electronic and steric effects control the outcome of this process. If the DNA oligomer does not contain a suitable guanine, then reaction of the radical cation occurs at the thymine of a TT step primarily by a tandem process. The general outcomes revealed in the one-electron oxidation of DNA oligomers in solution appear to be generally valid also for more complex DNA structures and for the cellular DNA of living organisms.

  3. COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROCHEMISTRY: AQUEOUS ONE-ELECTRON OXIDATION POTENTIALS FOR SUBSTITUTED ANILINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semiempirical molecular orbital theory and density functional theory are used to compute one-electron oxidation potentials for aniline and a set of 21 mono- and di-substituted anilines in aqueous solution. Linear relationships between theoretical predictions and experiment are co...

  4. One-Electron Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide by a Stable Oxidant: Hexachloroiridate(IV).

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Stanbury, David M

    2016-08-01

    Detailed reports on the oxidation of aqueous H2S by mild one-electron oxidants are lacking, presumably because of the susceptibility of these reactions to trace metal-ion catalysis and the formation of turbid sulfur sols. Here we report on the reaction of [IrCl6](2-) with H2S in acetate buffers. Dipicolinic acid (dipic) is shown to be effective in suppressing metal-ion catalysis. In the presence of dipic the reaction produces [IrCl6](3-) and polysulfides; turbidity develops primarily after the Ir(IV) oxidant is consumed. Water-soluble phosphines are shown to prevent the development of turbidity; in the case of tris-hydroxymethylphosphine (THMP) the product is the corresponding sulfide, THMP═S. THMP diminishes the rates of reduction of Ir(IV), and the rate law with sufficient THMP is first order in [Ir(IV)] and first order in [HS(-)]. The rate-limiting step is inferred to be electron transfer from HS(-) to Ir(IV) with ket = 2.9 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 25.0 °C and μ = 0.1 M. The kinetic inhibition by THMP is attributed to its interception of a polysulfide chain elongation process. PMID:27410173

  5. Pulse radiolysis of silybin: One-electron oxidation of the flavonoid at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    György, I.; Antus, S.; Földiák, G.

    One-electron oxidation of silybin, a flavonoid drug used in human therapy of liver, was investigated by pulse radiolysis at neutral pH. Phenoxyl radicals formed from the substrate by oxidising N .3 radicals were identified by comparing the transient optical absorption spectra with those obtained from model compounds. The orto-methoxy-phenolic structure (ring B) is the exclusive target for one-electron oxidation of silybin. The 5.7-dihydroxy-chromanone moiety (ring A) withstands free-radical attack at neutral pH due to the chelatic H-bond (p Ka = 10.2) existing between the 5-OH and 4-oxo groups. Hydroxyl radicals react with silybin at diffusion controlled rate ( k = 1.8 x 10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1). The reactivity of silybin towards free radicals at neutral pH is conform with the assumption that the physiological activity of the flavonoid is due to its chain-breaking antioxidant behaviour.

  6. XeF(2) /fluoride acceptors as versatile one-electron oxidants.

    PubMed

    Poleschner, Helmut; Seppelt, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    No phlogiston but xenon is released when XeF2 /F(-) acceptors act as new one-electron oxidants. F(-) acceptors are Lewis acids BF3 , B(C6 F5 )3 , and Al{OC(CF3 )3 }3 , and silyl derivatives TfOSiMe3 , Tf2 NSiMe3 , Me3 Si(+)  B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , and Me3 Si(+)  CHB11 Cl11 (-) . The anions BF4 (-) , TfO(-) , Tf2 N(-) , FB(C6 F5 )3 (-) , FAl{OC(CF3 )3 }3 (-) , B(C6 F5 )4 (-) , or CHB11 Cl11 (-) can be introduced into oxidation products of R2 E2 (E=S, Se, Te), [FeCp2 ], [(FeCpS)4 ], tetrathiafulvalene, thianthrene, and (2,4-Br2 C6 H3 )3 N. PMID:24127390

  7. One-electron oxidation of ruthenocene: reactions of the ruthenocenium ion in gentle electrolyte media.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Jannie C; Nafady, Ayman; Roudebush, John H; Trupia, Sabrina; Geiger, William E

    2009-03-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of ruthenocene, RuCp(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5)), 1, has been studied in dichloromethane using a supporting electrolyte containing either the [B(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) (TFAB) or the [B(C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2))(4)](-) (BArF(24)) counteranion. A quasi-Nernstian process was observed in both cases, with E(1/2) values of 0.41 and 0.57 V vs FeCp(2) in the respective electrolyte media. The ruthenocenium ion 1(+) equilibrates with a metal-metal bonded dimer [Ru(2)Cp(4)](2+), 2(2+), that is increasingly preferred at low temperatures. Dimerization equilibrium constants determined by digital simulation of cyclic voltammetry (CV) curves were in the range of 10(2)-10(4) M(-1) at temperatures of 256 to 298 K. Near room temperature, and particularly when BArF(24) is the counteranion, the dinuclear species [Ru(2)Cp(2)(sigma:eta(5)-C(5)H(4))(2)] (2+), 3(2+), in which each metal is sigma-bonded to a cyclopentadienyl ring, was the preferred electrolytic oxidation product. Cathodic reduction of 3(2+) regenerated ruthenocene. The two dinuclear products, 2(2+) and 3(2+), were characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy on anodically electrolyzed solutions of 1 at low temperatures in CD(2)Cl(2)/[NBu(4)][BArF(24)]. The variable temperature NMR behavior of these solutions showed that 3(2+) and 2(2+) take part in a thermal equilibrium, the latter being dominant at the lowest temperatures. Ruthenocene hydride, [1-H](+), was also identified as being present in the electrolysis solutions. The oxidation of ruthenocene is shown to be an inherent one-electron process, giving a ruthenocenium ion which is highly susceptible to reactions that allow it to regain an 18-electron configuration. In a dry non-donor solvent, and in the absence of nucleophiles, this electronic configuration is attained by self-reactions involving formation of Ru-Ru or Ru-C bonds. The present data offer a mechanistic explanation for the previously described results on the chemical oxidation of osmocene (Droege, M

  8. One-Electron Reduction of Penicillins in Relation to the Oxidative Stress Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2015-12-11

    Certain bactericidal antibiotics target mitochondrial components and, due to the leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain, one-electron reduction might occur that can lead to intermediates passing the electron to suitable acceptors. This study aimed at investigating the one-electron reduction mechanism of selected penicillin derivatives using pulse radiolysis techniques. Penicillins can accommodate the electron on each of their carbonyl carbon. Ketyl radicals are thus produced, which are reducing agents with possibility to interact with suitable biomolecules. A detailed mechanism of the reduction is reported.

  9. One-Electron Reduction of Penicillins in Relation to the Oxidative Stress Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2015-01-01

    Certain bactericidal antibiotics target mitochondrial components and, due to the leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain, one-electron reduction might occur that can lead to intermediates passing the electron to suitable acceptors. This study aimed at investigating the one-electron reduction mechanism of selected penicillin derivatives using pulse radiolysis techniques. Penicillins can accommodate the electron on each of their carbonyl carbon. Ketyl radicals are thus produced, which are reducing agents with possibility to interact with suitable biomolecules. A detailed mechanism of the reduction is reported. PMID:26690427

  10. π to σ Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T.; Wiegand, Tyler J.; Hindi, Ragda M.; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    In this work iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron oxidized cytosine analogs including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2′-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2′-deoxycytidine 5′-monophosphate (5′-dCMP) were investigated in homogeneous aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine-iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical (cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)•). Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging ca. 8 to ca. 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)• and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that in the iminyl-σ radical, the unpaired spin is localized to the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG= −32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA-radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in dsDNA by a radiation-induced ionization–deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path. PMID:26237072

  11. One electron-controlled multiple-valued dynamic random-access-memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kye, H. W.; Song, B. N.; Lee, S. E.; Kim, J. S.; Shin, S. J.; Choi, J. B.; Yu, Y.-S.; Takahashi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new architecture for a dynamic random-access-memory (DRAM) capable of storing multiple values by using a single-electron transistor (SET). The gate of a SET is designed to be connected to a plurality of DRAM unit cells that are arrayed at intersections of word lines and bitlines. In this SET-DRAM hybrid scheme, the multiple switching characteristics of SET enables multiple value data stored in a DRAM unit cell, and this increases the storage functionality of the device. Moreover, since refreshing data requires only a small amount of SET driving current, this enables device operating with low standby power consumption.

  12. Oxidation reactions of cytosine DNA components by hydroxyl radical and one-electron oxidants in aerated aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Richard; Cadet, Jean

    2010-04-20

    Indirect evidence strongly suggests that oxidation reactions of cytosine and its minor derivative 5-methylcytosine play a major role in mutagenesis and cancer. Therefore, there is an emerging necessity to identify the final oxidation products of these reactions, to search for their formation in cellular DNA, and to assess their mutagenic features. In this Account, we report and discuss the main *OH and one-electron-mediated oxidation reactions, two of the most potent sources of DNA damage, of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine nucleosides that have been recently characterized. The addition of *OH to the 5,6-unsaturated double bond of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine generates final degradation products that resemble those observed for uracil and thymine. The main product from the oxidation of cytosine, cytosine glycol, has been shown to undergo dehydration at a much faster rate as a free nucleoside than when inserted into double-stranded DNA. On the other hand, the predominant *OH addition at C5 of cytosine or 5-methylcytosine leads to the formation of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro radicals that give rise to novel products with an imidazolidine structure. The mechanism of the formation of imidazolidine products is accounted for by rearrangement reactions that in the presence of molecular oxygen likely involve an intermediate pyrimidine endoperoxide. The reactions of the radical cations of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine are governed by competitive hydration, mainly at C6 of the pyrimidine ring, and deprotonation from the exocyclic amino and methyl group, leading in most cases to products similar to those generated by *OH. 5-Hydroxypyrimidines, the dehydration products of cytosine and uracil glycols, have a low oxidation potential, and their one-electron oxidation results in a cascade of decomposition reactions involving the formation of isodialuric acid, dialuric acid, 5-hydroxyhydantoin, and its hydroxyketone isomer. In biology, GC --> AT transitions are the most common mutations

  13. DFT Studies of the Extent of Hole Delocalization in One-electron Oxidized Adenine and Guanine base Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of hole delocalization in one-electron oxidized adenine (A)- and guanine (G)-stacks and shows that new IR vibrational bands are predicted that are characteristic of hole delocalization within A-stacks. The geometries of A-stack (Ai; i = 2 – 8) and G-stack (GG and GGG) in their neutral and one-electron oxidized states were optimized with the bases in a B-DNA conformation using the M06-2X/6-31G* method. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) is localized on a single adenine in A-stacks and on a single guanine in GG and GGG stacks; located at the 5′-site of the stack. On one-electron oxidation (removal of an electron from the HOMO of the neutral A- and G-stacks) a “hole” is created. Mulliken charge analysis shows that these “holes” are delocalized over 2 – 3 adenine bases in the A-stack. The calculated spin density distribution of (Ai)•+ (i = 2 – 8), also, showed delocalization of the hole predominantly on two adenine bases with some delocalization on a neighboring base. For GG and GGG radical cations, the hole was found to be localized on a single G in the stack. The calculated HFCCs of GG and GGG are in good agreement with the experiment. Further, from the vibrational frequency analysis, it was found that IR spectra of neutral and the corresponding one-electron oxidized adenine stacks are quite different. The IR spectra of (A2)•+ has intense IR peaks between 900 – 1500 cm−1 which are not present in the neutral A2 stack. The presence of (A2)•+ in the adenine stack has a characteristic intense peak at ~1100 cm−1. Thus IR and Raman spectroscopy has potential for monitoring the extent of hole delocalization in A stacks. PMID:21417208

  14. One-electron oxidation of gemcitabine and analogs: mechanism of formation of C3' and C2' sugar radicals.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Rayala, Ramanjaneyulu; Hindi, Ragda M; Adhikary, Ananya; Wnuk, Stanislaw F; Sevilla, Michael D

    2014-11-01

    Gemcitabine is a modified cytidine analog having two fluorine atoms at the 2'-position of the ribose ring. It has been proposed that gemcitabine inhibits RNR activity by producing a C3'• intermediate via direct H3'-atom abstraction followed by loss of HF to yield a C2'• with 3'-keto moiety. Direct detection of C3'• and C2'• during RNR inactivation by gemcitabine still remains elusive. To test the influence of 2'- substitution on radical site formation, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies are carried out on one-electron oxidized gemcitabine and other 2'-modified analogs, i.e., 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-2'-C-methylcytidine (MeFdC) and 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (2'-FdC). ESR line components from two anisotropic β-2'-F-atom hyperfine couplings identify the C3'• formation in one-electron oxidized gemcitabine, but no further reaction to C2'• is found. One-electron oxidized 2'-FdC is unreactive toward C3'• or C2'• formation. In one-electron oxidized MeFdC, ESR studies show C2'• production presumably from a very unstable C3'• precursor. The experimentally observed hyperfine couplings for C2'• and C3'• match well with the theoretically predicted ones. C3'• to C2'• conversion in one-electron oxidized gemcitabine and MeFdC has theoretically been modeled by first considering the C3'• and H3O(+) formation via H3'-proton deprotonation and the subsequent C2'• formation via HF loss induced by this proximate H3O(+). Theoretical calculations show that in gemcitabine, C3'• to C2'• conversion in the presence of a proximate H3O(+) has a barrier in agreement with the experimentally observed lack of C3'• to C2'• conversion. In contrast, in MeFdC, the loss of HF from C3'• in the presence of a proximate H3O(+) is barrierless resulting in C2'• formation which agrees with the experimentally observed rapid C2'• formation.

  15. Prototropic Equilibria in DNA Containing One-electron Oxidized GC: Intra-duplex vs. Duplex to Solvent Deprotonation

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Munafo, Shawn A.; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    By use of ESR and UV-vis spectral studies, this work identifies the protonation states of one-electron oxidized G:C (viz. G•+:C, G(N1-H)•:C(+H+), G(N1-H)•:C, and G(N2-H)•:C) in a DNA oligomer d[TGCGCGCA]2. Benchmark ESR and UV-vis spectra from one electron oxidized 1-Me-dGuo are employed to analyze the spectral data obtained in one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 at various pHs. At pH ≥7, the initial site of deprotonation of one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 to the surrounding solvent is found to be at N1 forming G(N1-H)•:C at 155 K. However, upon annealing to 175 K, the site of deprotonation to the solvent shifts to an equilibrium mixture of G(N1-H)•:C and G(N2-H)•:C. For the first time, the presence of G(N2-H)•:C in a ds DNA-oligomer is shown to be easily distinguished from the other prototropic forms, owing to its readily observable nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz(N2)= 16 G). In addition, for the oligomer in H2O, an additional 8 G N2-H proton HFCC is found. This ESR identification is supported by a UV-vis absorption at 630 nm which is characteristic for G(N2-H)• in model compounds and oligomers. We find that the extent of photo-conversion to the C1′ sugar radical (C1′•) in the one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 allows for a clear distinction among the various G:C protonation states which can not be easily distinguished by ESR or UV-vis spectroscopies with this order for the extent of photo-conversion: G•+:C > G(N1-H)•:C(+H+) >> G(N1-H)•:C. We propose that it is the G•+:C form that undergoes deprotonation at the sugar and this requires reprotonation of G within the lifetime of exited state. PMID:21491657

  16. Prototropic equilibria in DNA containing one-electron oxidized GC: intra-duplex vs. duplex to solvent deprotonation.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Munafo, Shawn A; Khanduri, Deepti; Sevilla, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    By use of ESR and UV-vis spectral studies, this work identifies the protonation states of one-electron oxidized G:C (viz. G˙+:C, G(N1–H)˙:C(+H+), G(N1–H)˙:C, and G(N2-H)˙:C) in a DNA oligomer d[TGCGCGCA]2. Benchmark ESR and UV-vis spectra from one electron oxidized 1-Me-dGuo are employed to analyze the spectral data obtained in one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 at various pHs. At pH ≥7, the initial site of deprotonation of one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 to the surrounding solvent is found to be at N1 forming G(N1–H)˙:C at 155 K. However, upon annealing to 175 K, the site of deprotonation to the solvent shifts to an equilibrium mixture of G(N1–H)˙:C and G(N2–H)˙:C. For the first time, the presence of G(N2–H)˙:C in a ds DNA-oligomer is shown to be easily distinguished from the other prototropic forms, owing to its readily observable nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz(N2) = 16 G). In addition, for the oligomer in H2O, an additional 8 G N2–H proton HFCC is found. This ESR identification is supported by a UV-vis absorption at 630 nm which is characteristic for G(N2–H)˙ in model compounds and oligomers. We find that the extent of photo-conversion to the C1′ sugar radical (C1′˙) in the one-electron oxidized d[TGCGCGCA]2 allows for a clear distinction among the various G:C protonation states which can not be easily distinguished by ESR or UV-vis spectroscopies with this order for the extent of photo-conversion: G˙+:C > G(N1–H)˙:C(+H+) ≫ G(N1–H)˙:C. We propose that it is the G˙+:C form that undergoes deprotonation at the sugar and this requires reprotonation of G within the lifetime of exited state

  17. Rapid polyether cleavage via extracellular one-electron oxidation by a brown-rot basidiomycete

    PubMed Central

    Kerem, Zohar; Bao, Wuli; Hammel, Kenneth E.

    1998-01-01

    Fungi that cause brown rot of wood are essential biomass recyclers and also the principal agents of decay in wooden structures, but the extracellular mechanisms by which they degrade lignocellulose remain unknown. To test the hypothesis that brown-rot fungi use extracellular free radical oxidants as biodegradative tools, Gloeophyllum trabeum was examined for its ability to depolymerize an environmentally recalcitrant polyether, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), that cannot penetrate cell membranes. Analyses of degraded PEOs by gel permeation chromatography showed that the fungus cleaved PEO rapidly by an endo route. 13C NMR analyses of unlabeled and perdeuterated PEOs recovered from G. trabeum cultures showed that a major route for depolymerization was oxidative C—C bond cleavage, a reaction diagnostic for hydrogen abstraction from a PEO methylene group by a radical oxidant. Fenton reagent (Fe(II)/H2O2) oxidized PEO by the same route in vitro and therefore might account for PEO biodegradation if it is produced by the fungus, but the data do not rule out involvement of less reactive radicals. The reactivity and extrahyphal location of this PEO-degrading system suggest that its natural function is to participate in the brown rot of wood and that it may enable brown-rot fungi to degrade recalcitrant organopollutants. PMID:9724710

  18. Defining the Electronic and Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper–Bis-phenoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Storr, Tim; Verma, Pratik; Pratt, Russell C.; Wasinger, Erik C.; Shimazaki, Yuichi; Stack, T. Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal]+; Sal = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal]+ (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal]+, affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4–300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal]+ exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal•]+ (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal]+ (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine–bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSalred]+ (Salred = N, N′-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)–ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu–bis-phenoxide complexes. PMID:18939830

  19. Defining the Electronic And Geometric Structure of One-Electron Oxidized Copper-Bis-Phenoxide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Storr, T.; Verma, P.; Pratt, R.C.; Wasinger, E.C.; Shimazaki, Y.; Stack, T.D.P.

    2009-05-26

    The geometric and electronic structure of an oxidized Cu complex ([CuSal](+); Sal = N,N'-bis(3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) with a non-innocent salen ligand has been investigated both in the solid state and in solution. Integration of information from UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, electrochemistry, resonance Raman spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations provides critical insights into the nature of the localization/delocalization of the oxidation locus. In contrast to the analogous Ni derivative [NiSal](+) (Storr, T.; et al. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 5198), which exists solely in the Ni(II) ligand-radical form, the locus of oxidation is metal-based for [CuSal](+), affording exclusively a Cu(III) species in the solid state (4-300 K). Variable-temperature solution studies suggest that [CuSal](+) exists in a reversible spin-equilibrium between a ligand-radical species [Cu(II)Sal(*)](+) (S = 1) and the high-valent metal form [Cu(III)Sal](+) (S = 0), indicative of nearly isoenergetic species. It is surprising that a bis-imine-bis-phenolate ligation stabilizes the Cu(III) oxidation state, and even more surprising that in solution a spin equilibrium occurs without a change in coordination number. The oxidized tetrahydrosalen analogue [CuSal(red)](+) (Sal(red) = N,N'-bis(3,5-di- tert-butylhydroxybenzyl)-1,2-cyclohexane-(1R,2R)-diamine) exists as a temperature-invariant Cu(II)-ligand-radical complex in solution, demonstrating that ostensibly simple variations of the ligand structure affect the locus of oxidation in Cu-bis-phenoxide complexes.

  20. The one-electron oxidation of a dithiolate molecule: The importance of chemical intuition

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, Eric A. C.; Burns, Thomas D.; Boyd, Russell J.

    2014-05-14

    A series of nine commonly used density functional methods were assessed to accurately predict the oxidation potential of the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup −2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}) redox couple. It was found that due to their greater tendency for charge delocalization the GGA functionals predict a structure where the radical electron is delocalized within the alkene backbone of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}S{sub 2}{sup •−}, whereas the hybrid functionals and the reference QCISD/cc-pVTZ predict that the radical electron remains localized on the sulfurs. However, chemical intuition suggests that the results obtained with the GGA functionals should be correct. Indeed, with the use of the geometries obtained at the HCTH/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory both the QCISD and hybrid DFT methods yield a molecule with a delocalized electron. Notably, this new molecule lies at least 53 kJ mol{sup −1} lower in energy than the previously optimized one that had a localized radical. Using these new structures the calculated oxidation potential was found to be 2.71–2.97 V for the nine DFT functionals tested. The M06-L functional provided the best agreement with the QCISD/cc-pVTZ reference oxidation potential of 3.28 V.

  1. One-electron oxidation and reduction of glycosaminoglycan chloramides: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, S; Parsons, B J; Houee-Levin, C; Marignier, J-L; Paterson, A W J; Heyes, D J

    2013-10-01

    Hypochlorous acid and its acid-base counterpart, hypochlorite ions, produced under inflammatory conditions, may produce chloramides of glycosaminoglycans, these being significant components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This may occur through the binding of myeloperoxidase directly to the glycosaminoglycans. The N-Cl group in the chloramides is a potential selective target for both reducing and oxidizing radicals, leading possibly to more efficient and damaging fragmentation of these biopolymers relative to the parent glycosaminoglycans. In this study, the fast reaction techniques of pulse radiolysis and nanosecond laser flash photolysis have been used to generate both oxidizing and reducing radicals to react with the chloramides of hyaluronan (HACl) and heparin (HepCl). The strong reducing formate radicals and hydrated electrons were found to react rapidly with both HACl and HepCl with rate constants of 1-1.7 × 10(8) and 0.7-1.2 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) for formate radicals and 2.2 × 10(9) and 7.2 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1) for hydrated electrons, respectively. The spectral characteristics of the products of these reactions were identical and were consistent with initial attack at the N-Cl groups, followed by elimination of chloride ions to produce nitrogen-centered radicals, which rearrange subsequently and rapidly to produce C-2 radicals on the glucosamine moiety, supporting an earlier EPR study by M.D. Rees et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.125: 13719-13733; 2003). The oxidizing hydroxyl radicals also reacted rapidly with HACl and HepCl with rate constants of 2.2 × 10(8) and 1.6 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1), with no evidence from these data for any degree of selective attack on the N-Cl group relative to the N-H groups and other sites of attack. The carbonate anion radicals were much slower with HACl and HepCl than hydroxyl radicals (1.0 × 10(5) and 8.0 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1), respectively) but significantly faster than with the parent molecules (3.5 × 10(4) and 5.0 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1

  2. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of One-Electron Oxidized Cyclic Dipeptides with Thioether Groups.

    PubMed

    Köchling, Talea; Morozova, Olga B; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2016-09-01

    Photo-oxidation of seven cyclic dipeptides containing methionine, Met, and/or S-methylcysteine, Cys(Me) by electron transfer from the sulfur atom was studied in aqueous solution by time-resolved and field dependent CIDNP (chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization). Hyperpolarized high resolution NMR spectral patterns of the starting peptides detected immediately after pulsed laser excitation show signals of all protons that are bound to carbons neighboring the sulfur atom, thus proving the involvement of sulfur-centered cation radicals. The magnetic field dependence of CIDNP shows a pronounced maximum that is determined by the g-factors and hyperfine coupling constants of the transient radical species. From simulation of the experimental data obtained for the magnetic field dependences of CIDNP, three types of radical structures were characterized: (1) a linear sulfur-centered cation radical of the methionine (Met) residue (g = 2.0107 ± 0.0010) for cyclo-(d-Met-l-Met) (trans-configuration), cyclo-(d-Met-l-Cys(Me)) (trans-configuration), and cyclo-(Gly-Met); (2) a cyclic radical (S∴O)(+) (g = 2.0088 ± 0.0010) with a two-center three-electron bond (2c-3e) structure between the sulfur atom of the Cys(Me) residue and the oxygen atom of cyclo-(d-Met-l-Cys(Me)) and cyclo-(Gly-Cys(Me)); (3) a cyclic radical (S∴S)(+) (g = 2.013 ± 0.0020) with a two-center three-electron bond structure between the two sulfur atoms of the peptides cyclo-(l-Met-l-Met), cyclo-(l-Met-l-Cys(Me)), and cyclo-(l-Cys(Me)-l-Cys(Me)). In contrast, no indication of any type of cyclic radicals with a two-center three-electron bond between sulfur and nitrogen atoms was found. In addition, the hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) were determined. PMID:27518876

  3. Proton Transfer Induced SOMO-to-HOMO Level Switching in One-Electron Oxidized A-T and G-C Base Pairs: A Density Functional Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we show that for one-electron oxidized A-T or G-C base pairs the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) is located on A or G and is lower in energy than the doubly occupied highest-occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) localized to the pyrimidines, T or C. This directs second ionizations to the pyrimidine bases resulting in triplet state diradical dications, (A•+-T•+) and (G•+-C•+). On interbase proton transfer, the SOMO and HOMO levels switch and the second oxidation is redirected to G and A. For G-C, the doubly oxidized singlet G(-H)+-C(H+) is more stable than its triplet (G•+-C•+); however, for A-T, the triplet (A•+-T•+) lies lowest in energy. The study demonstrates that double ionization of the A-T base pair results in a triplet dication diradical, which is more stable than the proton-transferred triplet or singlet species; whereas, double ionization of the G-C base pair, the proton transferred doubly oxidized singlet, G(-H)+-C(H+), is more stable and has both oxidations on guanine. In DNA, with both A-T and G-C, multiple oxidations would transfer to the guanine base alone. PMID:24798145

  4. Hydroxyl ion addition to one-electron oxidized thymine: Unimolecular interconversion of C5 to C6 OH-adducts

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Heizer, Alicia N.; Palmer, Brian J.; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, addition of OH− to one-electron oxidized thymidine (dThd) and thymine nucleotides in basic aqueous glasses is investigated. At pHs ca. 9–10 where the thymine base is largely deprotonated at N3, one-electron oxidation of the thymine base by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K results in formation of a neutral thyminyl radical, T(−H)•. Assignment to T(−H)• is confirmed by employing 15N substituted 5'-TMP. At pH ≥ ca. 11.5, formation of the 5-hydroxythymin-6-yl radical, T(5OH)•, is identified as a metastable intermediate produced by OH− addition to T(−H)• at C5 at ca. 155 K. Upon further annealing to ca. 170 K, T(5OH)• readily converts to the 6-hydroxythymin-5-yl radical, T(6OH)•. One-electron oxidation of N3-methyl-thymidine (N3-Me-dThd) by Cl2•− at ca. 155 K produces the cation radical (N3-Me-dThd•+) for which we find a pH dependent competition between deprotonation from the methyl group at C5 and addition of OH− to C5. At pH 7 the 5-methyl deprotonated species is found; however, at pH ca. 9, N3-Me-dThd•+ produces T(5OH)• that on annealing up to 180 K forms T(6OH)•. Through use of deuterium substitution at C5' and on the thymine base, i.e., specifically employing [5',5”-D,D]-5'-dThd, [5',5”-D,D]-5'-TMP, [CD3]-dThd and [CD3,6D]-dThd, we find unequivocal evidence for T(5OH)• formation and its conversion to T(6OH)•. The addition of OH− to the C5 position in T(−H)• and N3-Me-dThd•+ is governed by spin and charge localization. DFT calculations predict that the conversion of the “reducing” T(5OH)• to the “oxidizing” T(6OH)• occurs by a unimolecular OH group transfer from C5 to C6 in the thymine base. The T(5OH)• to T(6OH)• conversion is found to occur more readily for deprotonated dThd and its nucleotides than for N3-Me-dThd. In agreement, calculations predict that the deprotonated thymine base has a lower energy barrier (ca. 6 kcal/mol) for OH transfer than its corresponding N3-protonated thymine

  5. π-Radical to σ-Radical Tautomerization in One-Electron-Oxidized 1-Methylcytosine and Its Analogs.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Bishop, Casandra T; Wiegand, Tyler J; Hindi, Ragda M; Adhikary, Ananya; Sevilla, Michael D

    2015-09-01

    In this work, iminyl σ-radical formation in several one-electron-oxidized cytosine analogs, including 1-MeC, cidofovir, 2'-deoxycytidine (dCyd), and 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate (5'-dCMP), were investigated in homogeneous, aqueous (D2O or H2O) glassy solutions at low temperatures by employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Upon employing density functional theory (DFT) (DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* method), the calculated hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) values of iminyl σ-radical agree quite well with the experimentally observed ones, thus confirming its assignment. ESR and DFT studies show that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical is a tautomer of the deprotonated cytosine π-cation radical [cytosine π-aminyl radical, C(N4-H)(•)]. Employing 1-MeC samples at various pHs ranging from ca. 8 to 11, ESR studies show that the tautomeric equilibrium between C(N4-H)(•) and the iminyl σ-radical at low temperature is too slow to be established without added base. ESR and DFT studies agree that, in the iminyl σ-radical, the unpaired spin is localized on the exocyclic nitrogen (N4) in an in-plane pure p-orbital. This gives rise to an anisotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling (Azz = 40 G) from N4 and a near isotropic β-nitrogen coupling of 9.7 G from the cytosine ring nitrogen at N3. Iminyl σ-radical should exist in its N3-protonated form, as the N3-protonated iminyl σ-radical is stabilized in solution by over 30 kcal/mol (ΔG = -32 kcal/mol) over its conjugate base, the N3-deprotonated form. This is the first observation of an isotropic β-hyperfine ring nitrogen coupling in an N-centered DNA radical. Our theoretical calculations predict that the cytosine iminyl σ-radical can be formed in double-stranded DNA by a radiation-induced ionization-deprotonation process that is only 10 kcal/mol above the lowest energy path.

  6. Formation of isodialuric acid lesion within DNA oligomers via one-electron oxidation of 5-hydroxyuracil: characterization, stability and excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Philippe; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxyuracil is a major oxidized nucleobase that can be generated by the action of •OH radical and one-electron oxidants. The latter modified base that exhibits a low ionization potential is highly susceptible to further degradation upon exposure to various oxidants. Emphasis was placed in thiswork on the formation and characterization of one-electron oxidation products of 5-hydroxyuracil within DNA fragments of defined sequence. For this purpose, 5-hydroxyuracil containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides of various lengths were synthesized and then exposed to the oxidizing action of iridium salts. Isodialuric acid was found to be formed almost quantitatively by a one-electron oxidation mechanism for which relevant information was inferred from a freeze-quenched ESR study. Information on the stability of isodialuric acid thus formed and its conversion products in aqueous solutions was also gained from experiments performed at acidic, neutral and alkali pH’s. Moreover, biochemical features dealing with the substrate specificity of several bacterial and yeast base excision repair enzymes to remove isodialuric acid from site-specifically modified DNA fragments were determined. PMID:16885239

  7. The intriguing enhancement of chloroperoxidase mediated one-electron oxidations by azide, a known active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Daniel; Hager, Lowell; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide is a well known heme-enzyme active site ligand and inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Herein, azide is reported to enhance a set of heme-enzyme mediated reactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is disconnected from native enzyme-azide binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide could enhance heme-enzyme reactions via a newly proposed mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Azide contained in reagents could impact reaction outcomes in redox biochemistry. -- Abstract: Azide is a well-known inhibitor of heme-enzymes. Herein, we report the counter-intuitive observation that at some concentration regimes, incorporation of azide in the reaction medium enhances chloroperoxidase (CPO, a heme-enzyme) mediated one-electron abstractions from several substrates. A diffusible azidyl radical based mechanism is proposed for explaining the phenomenon. Further, it is projected that the finding could have significant impact on routine in situ or in vitro biochemistry studies involving heme-enzyme systems and azide.

  8. One-Electron Oxidation of Gemcitabine and Analogs: Mechanism of Formation of C3′ and C2′ Sugar Radicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine is a modified cytidine analog having two fluorine atoms at the 2′-position of the ribose ring. It has been proposed that gemcitabine inhibits RNR activity by producing a C3′• intermediate via direct H3′-atom abstraction followed by loss of HF to yield a C2′• with 3′-keto moiety. Direct detection of C3′• and C2′• during RNR inactivation by gemcitabine still remains elusive. To test the influence of 2′- substitution on radical site formation, electron spin resonance (ESR) studies are carried out on one-electron oxidized gemcitabine and other 2′-modified analogs, i.e., 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-2′-C-methylcytidine (MeFdC) and 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxycytidine (2′-FdC). ESR line components from two anisotropic β-2′-F-atom hyperfine couplings identify the C3′• formation in one-electron oxidized gemcitabine, but no further reaction to C2′• is found. One-electron oxidized 2′-FdC is unreactive toward C3′• or C2′• formation. In one-electron oxidized MeFdC, ESR studies show C2′• production presumably from a very unstable C3′• precursor. The experimentally observed hyperfine couplings for C2′• and C3′• match well with the theoretically predicted ones. C3′• to C2′• conversion in one-electron oxidized gemcitabine and MeFdC has theoretically been modeled by first considering the C3′• and H3O+ formation via H3′-proton deprotonation and the subsequent C2′• formation via HF loss induced by this proximate H3O+. Theoretical calculations show that in gemcitabine, C3′• to C2′• conversion in the presence of a proximate H3O+ has a barrier in agreement with the experimentally observed lack of C3′• to C2′• conversion. In contrast, in MeFdC, the loss of HF from C3′• in the presence of a proximate H3O+ is barrierless resulting in C2′• formation which agrees with the experimentally observed rapid C2′• formation. PMID:25296262

  9. Binding of benzo(a)pyrene to DNA by cytochrome P-450 catalyzed one-electron oxidation in rat liver microsomes and nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalieri, E.L.; Rogan, E.G.; Devanesan, P.D.; Cremonesi, P. ); Cerny, R.L.; Gross, M.L. ); Bodell, W.J. )

    1990-05-22

    To investigate whether cytochrome P-450 catalyzes the covalent binding of substrates to DNA by one-electron oxidation, the ability of both uninduced and 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) induced rat liver microsomes and nuclei to catalyze covalent binding of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) to DNA and formation of the labile adduct 7-(benzo(a)pyren-6-yl)guanine (BP-N7Gua) was investigated. In the various systems studied, 1-9 times more BP-N7Gua adduct was isolated than the total amount of stable BP adducts in the DNA. The specific cytochrome P-450 inhibitor 2-((4,6-dichloro-o-biphenyl)oxy)ethylamine hydrobromide (DPEA) reduced or eliminated BP metabolism, binding of BP to DNA, and formation of BP-N7Gua by cytochrome P-450 in both microsomes and nuclei. The effects of the antioxidants cysteine, glutathione, and p-methoxythiophenol were also investigated. This study represents the first demonstration of cytochrome P-450 mediating covalent binding of substrates to DNA via one-electron oxidation and suggests that this enzyme can catalyze peroxidase-type electron-transfer reactions.

  10. Photoinduced One-Electron Oxidation of Benzyl Methyl Sulfides in Acetonitrile: Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Evidence for a Thionium Ion Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bettoni, Marta; Del Giacco, Tiziana; Stradiotto, Marina; Elisei, Fausto

    2015-08-21

    The photo-oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl methyl sulfide (1a), benzyl methyl sulfide (1b), and 4-cyanobenzyl methyl sulfide (1c) has been investigated in the presence of N-methoxy phenanthridinium hexafluorophosphate (MeOP(+)PF6(-)) under nitrogen in CH3CN. The steady-state photolysis experiments showed for the investigated sulfides exclusively the formation of the corresponding benzaldehyde as the oxidation product, reasonably due to a deprotonation of the sulfide radical cations. Photo-oxidation of 1a-1c occurs through an electron transfer process. Indeed, laser flash photolysis measurements showed an efficient formation of sulfide radical cations, detected in their dimeric form [(4-X-C6H4CH2SCH3)2(+•)] at ≈520 nm. At longer delay times, the absorption of the dimer radical cation was replaced by an absorption band assigned to the (α-thio)benzyl cation (thionium ion, λmax = 420-400 nm), formed by oxidation of the benzyl radical and not by that of the (α-thiomethyl)benzyl radical, as expected if a Cα-H bond cleavage is operative. This finding highlights a particular stability of this kind of cation never reported before, even though its involvement in one-electron oxidation mechanisms of various sulfides has already been invoked. Density functional theory calculations allowed identification of a significant charge and spin delocalization involving both the phenyl ring and the sulfur atom of the radical cations.

  11. Detection of Structural Changes upon One-Electron Oxidation and Reduction of Stilbene Derivatives by Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy during Pulse Radiolysis and Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Cho, Dae Won; Choi, Jungkweon; Tojo, Sachiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-07-01

    Stilbene (St) derivatives have been investigated for many years because of their interesting photochemical reactions such as cis-trans isomerization in the excited states and charged states and their relation to poly(p-phenylenevinylene)s. To clarify their charged state properties, structural information is indispensable. In the present study, radical cations and radical anions of St derivatives were investigated by radiation chemical methods. Absorption spectra of radical ion states were obtained by transient absorption measurements during pulse radiolysis; theoretical calculations that included the solvent effect afforded reasonable assignments. The variation in the peak position was explained by using HOMO and LUMO energy levels. Structural changes upon one-electron oxidation and reduction were detected by time-resolved resonance Raman measurements during pulse radiolysis. Significant downshifts were observed with the CC stretching mode of the ethylenic groups, indicative of the decrease in the bonding order. It was confirmed that the downshifts observed with reduction were larger than those with oxidation. On the other hand, the downshift caused by oxidation depends significantly on the electron-donating or electron-withdrawing nature of the substituents.

  12. Detection of Structural Changes upon One-Electron Oxidation and Reduction of Stilbene Derivatives by Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Spectroscopy during Pulse Radiolysis and Theoretical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Cho, Dae Won; Choi, Jungkweon; Tojo, Sachiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-07-01

    Stilbene (St) derivatives have been investigated for many years because of their interesting photochemical reactions such as cis-trans isomerization in the excited states and charged states and their relation to poly(p-phenylenevinylene)s. To clarify their charged state properties, structural information is indispensable. In the present study, radical cations and radical anions of St derivatives were investigated by radiation chemical methods. Absorption spectra of radical ion states were obtained by transient absorption measurements during pulse radiolysis; theoretical calculations that included the solvent effect afforded reasonable assignments. The variation in the peak position was explained by using HOMO and LUMO energy levels. Structural changes upon one-electron oxidation and reduction were detected by time-resolved resonance Raman measurements during pulse radiolysis. Significant downshifts were observed with the CC stretching mode of the ethylenic groups, indicative of the decrease in the bonding order. It was confirmed that the downshifts observed with reduction were larger than those with oxidation. On the other hand, the downshift caused by oxidation depends significantly on the electron-donating or electron-withdrawing nature of the substituents. PMID:26052901

  13. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions.

  14. Nitrite Reduction to Nitrous Oxide and Ammonia by TiO2 Electrons in a Colloid Solution via Consecutive One-Electron Transfer Reactions.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sara; Behar, David; Rajh, Tijana; Rabani, Joseph

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism of nitrite reduction by excess electrons on TiO2 nanoparticles (eTiO2(-)) was studied under anaerobic conditions. TiO2 was loaded with up to 75 electrons per particle, induced by γ-irradiation of acidic TiO2 colloid solutions containing 2-propanol. Time-resolved kinetics and material analysis were performed, mostly at 1.66 g L(-1) TiO2. At relatively low nitrite concentrations (R = [eTiO2(-)]o/[nitrite]o > 1.5), eTiO2(-) decays via two consecutive processes; at higher concentrations, only one decay step is observed. The stoichiometric ratio Δ[eTiO2(-)]/[nitrite]o of the faster process is about 2. This process involves the one-electron reduction of nitrite, forming the nitrite radical (k1 = (2.0 ± 0.2) × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)), which further reacts with eTiO2(-) (k2) in competition with its dehydration to nitric oxide (NO) (k3). The ratios k2/k3 = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1) and k2 > 1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) were derived from kinetic simulations and product analysis. The major product of this process is NO. The slower stage of the kinetics involves the reduction of NO by eTiO2(-), and the detailed mechanism of this process has been discussed in our earlier publication. The results reported in this study suggest that several intermediates, including NO and NH2OH, are adsorbed on the titanium nanoparticles and give rise to inverse dependency of the respective reaction rates on the TiO2 concentration. It is demonstrated that the reduction of nitrite by eTiO2(-) yields mainly N2O and NH3 via consecutive one-electron transfer reactions. PMID:27050805

  15. Calmodulin Methionine Residues are Targets For One-Electron Oxidation by Hydroxyl Radicals: Formation of S therefore N three-electron bonded Radical Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Nauser, Thomas; Jacoby, Michael E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Squier, Thomas C.; Schoneich, Christian

    2005-02-01

    The one-electron (1e) oxidation of organic sulfides and methionine (Met) constitutes an important reaction mechanism in vivo.1,2 Evidence for a Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of Met35 in the Alzheimer's disease -amyloid peptide was obtained,3 and, based on theoretical studies, Met radical cations were proposed as intermediates.4 In the structure of -amyloid peptide, the formation of Met radical cations appears to be facilitated by a preexisting close sulfur-oxygen (S-O) interaction between the Met35 sulfur and the carbonyl oxygen of the peptide bond C-terminal to Ile31.5 Substitution of Ile31 with Pro31 abolishes this S-O interaction,5 significantly reducing the ability of -amyloid to reduce Cu(II), and converts the neurotoxic wild-type -amyloid into a non-toxic peptide.6 The preexisting S-O bond characterized for wild-type -amyloid suggests that electron transfer from Met35 to Cu(II) is supported through stabilization of the Met radical cation by the electron-rich carbonyl oxygen, generating an SO-bonded7 sulfide radical cation (Scheme 1, reaction 1).5

  16. One-Electron Oxidation of a Disilicon(0) Compound: An Experimental and Theoretical Study of [Si2](+) Trapped by N-Heterocyclic Carbenes.

    PubMed

    Arz, Marius I; Straßmann, Martin; Meyer, Andreas; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Schiemann, Olav; Filippou, Alexander C

    2015-08-24

    One-electron oxidation of the disilicon(0) compound Si2(Idipp)2 (1, Idipp = 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-ylidene) with [Fe(C5Me5)2][B(Ar(F))4] (Ar(F) = C6H3-3,5-(CF3)2) affords selectively the green radical salt [Si2(Idipp)2][B(Ar(F))4] (1-[B(Ar(F))4). Oxidation of the centrosymmetric 1 occurs reversibly at a low redox potential (E1/2 = -1.250 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc), and is accompanied by considerable structural changes as shown by single-crystal X-ray structural analysis of 1-B(Ar(F))4. These include a shortening of the Si-Si bond, a widening of the Si-Si-CNHC angles, and a lowering of the symmetry, leading to a quite different conformation of the NHC substituents at the two inequivalent Si sites in 1(+). Comparative quantum chemical calculations of 1 and 1(+) indicate that electron ejection occurs from the symmetric (n+) combination of the Si lone pairs (HOMO). EPR studies of 1-B(Ar(F))4 in frozen solution verified the inequivalency of the two Si sites observed in the solid-state, and point in agreement with the theoretical results to an almost equal distribution of the spin density over the two Si atoms, leading to quite similar (29)Si hyperfine coupling tensors in 1(+). EPR studies of 1-B(Ar(F))4 in liquid solution unraveled a topomerization with a low activation barrier that interconverts the two Si sites in 1(+). PMID:26246231

  17. Characterization of lysine-guanine cross-links upon one-electron oxidation of a guanine-containing oligonucleotide in the presence of a trilysine peptide.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Sandrine; Hau, Jörg; Gasparutto, Didier; Cadet, Jean; Favier, Alain; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2006-05-01

    Formation of DNA-protein cross-links involving the initial formation of a guanine radical cation was investigated. For this purpose, riboflavin-mediated photosensitization of a TGT oligonucleotide in aerated aqueous solution in the presence of the KKK tripeptide was performed. We have shown that the nucleophilic addition of the epsilon-amino group of the central lysine residue of KKK to the C8 atom of either the guanine radical cation or its deprotonated form gives rise to the efficient formation of a Nepsilon-(guanin-8-yl)-lysine cross-link. Interestingly, the time course of formation of the above-mentioned cross-link was found to be not linear with the time of irradiation, and its formation rapidly reached a plateau. This is explained by secondary decomposition of the initially generated cross-link which could be further oxidized more efficiently than starting TGT oligonucleotide. One-electron oxidation of the initially generated cross-link was found to produce mainly two diastereomeric cross-links exhibiting a spiroimino-trilysine-dihydantoin structure as inferred from enzymatic digestion, CD, UV, NMR and mass spectrometry measurements. In addition, other minor cross-links, for which formation was favored at acidic pH, were assigned as lysine-guanine adducts in which the modified guanine base exhibits a guanidino-trilysine-iminohydantoin structure. A proposed mechanism for the formation of the different detected oligonucleotide-peptide cross-links is given. The high yield of formation of the detected cross-links strongly suggests that a DNA-protein cross-link involving a lysine residue linked to the C8 position of guanine could be generated in cellular systems if a lysine is located in the close vicinity of a guanine radical cation.

  18. Formation of aminyl radicals on electron attachment to AZT: Abstraction from the sugar phosphate backbone vs. one-electron oxidation of Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Khanduri, Deepti; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Rice, Cory T.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Employing electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, we have characterized the radicals formed in 3′-Azido-3′-deoxythymidine (3′-AZT) and in its 5′-analog 5′-azido-5′-deoxythymidine (5′-AZT) after electron attachment in γ-irradiated aqueous (H2O or D2O) glassy (7.5 M LiCl) systems. ESR spectral studies and theoretical calculations show that the predominant site of electron capture in 3′-AZT and in 5′-AZT is at the azide group and not at the thymine moiety. The azide group in AZT is therefore more electron affinic than the most electron affinic DNA base, thymine. Electron attachment to 3′-AZT and 5′-AZT results in an unstable azide anion radical intermediate (RN3•−) that is too short lived to be observed in our work even at 77 K. At 77 K we observe the neutral aminyl radical (RNH•) after loss of N2 from RN3•− followed by protonation of nitrene anion radical (RN•−) to give RNH•. The expected RN•− intermediate is not observed as protonation from water is complete at 77 K even in under highly basic conditions. Formation of RND• in D2O solutions confirms water as the source of the NH proton in the RNH•. Our assignments to these radicals are aided by DFT calculations for hyperfine coupling constants which closely match the experimental values. On annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 160–170 K), RNH• undergoes bimolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions from the thymine methyl group and the sugar moiety resulting in the formation of the thymine allyl radical (UCH2•) and two sugar radicals - C3′•, C5′•. RNH• also results in one-electron oxidation of the guanine base in 3′-AZG. This work provides a potential mechanism for the reported radiosensitization effects of AZT. PMID:20575557

  19. Computational studies of the geometry and electronic structure of an all-inorganic and homogeneous tetra-Ru-polyoxotungstate catalyst for water oxidation and its four subsequent one-electron oxidized forms.

    PubMed

    Quiñonero, David; Kaledin, Alexey L; Kuznetsov, Aleksey E; Geletii, Yurii V; Besson, Claire; Hill, Craig L; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2010-01-14

    Geometry and electronic structure of five species [{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(2)](10-) (1), [{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(2)](9-) (2), [{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(2)](8-) (3), [{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(2)](7-) (4), and [{Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)}(gamma-SiW(10)O(36))(2)](6-) (5) with different oxidation states of Ru centers were studied at the density functional and COSMO levels of theory. These species are expected to be among the possible intermediates of the recently reported 1-catalyzed water oxidation (Geletii, Y. V.; Botar, B.; Kogerler, P.; Hillesheim, D. A.; Musaev, D. G.; Hill, C. L. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 3896-3899 and Sartorel, A.; Carraro, M.; Scorrano, G.; Zorzi, R. D.; Geremia, S.; McDaniel, N. D.; Bernhard, S.; Bonchio, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 5006-5007). It was shown that RI-BP86 correctly describes the geometry and energy of the low-lying electronic states of compound 1, whereas the widely used B3LYP approach overestimates the energy of its high-spin states. Including the solvent and/or countercation effects into calculations improves the agreement between the calculated and experimental data. It was found that the several HOMOs and LUMOs of the studied complexes are bonding and antibonding orbitals of the [Ru(4)O(4)(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](6+) core, and four subsequent one-electron oxidations of 1, leading to formation of 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively, involve only {Ru(4)} core orbitals. In other words, catalyst instability due to ligand oxidation in the widely studied Ru-blue dimer, [(bpy)(2)(O)Ru(V)-(mu-O)-Ru(V)(O)(bpy)(2)](4+), is not operable for 1: the latter all-inorganic catalyst is predicted to be stable under water oxidation turnover conditions. The calculated HOMOs and LUMOs of all the studied species are very close in energy and exhibit a "quasi-continuum" or "nanoparticle-type" electronic structure similar to that of nanosized transition

  20. One-Electron Oxidation of [M(P(t) Bu3 )2 ] (M=Pd, Pt): Isolation of Monomeric [Pd(P(t) Bu3 )2 ](+) and Redox-Promoted C-H Bond Cyclometalation.

    PubMed

    Troadec, Thibault; Tan, Sze-Yin; Wedge, Christopher J; Rourke, Jonathan P; Unwin, Patrick R; Chaplin, Adrian B

    2016-03-01

    Oxidation of zero-valent phosphine complexes [M(P(t) Bu3 )2 ] (M=Pd, Pt) has been investigated in 1,2-difluorobenzene solution using cyclic voltammetry and subsequently using the ferrocenium cation as a chemical redox agent. In the case of palladium, a mononuclear paramagnetic Pd(I) derivative was readily isolated from solution and fully characterized (EPR, X-ray crystallography). While in situ electrochemical measurements are consistent with initial one-electron oxidation, the heavier congener undergoes C-H bond cyclometalation and ultimately affords the 14 valence-electron Pt(II) complex [Pt(κ(2) PC -P(t) Bu2 CMe2 CH2 )(P(t) Bu3 )](+) with concomitant formation of [Pt(P(t) Bu3 )2 H](+) .

  1. Radical cations as precursors in the metabolic formation of quinones from benzo[a]pyrene and 6-fluorobenzo[a]pyrene. Fluoro substitution as a probe for one-electron oxidation in aromatic substrates.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, E L; Rogan, E G; Cremonesi, P; Devanesan, P D

    1988-06-01

    Three classes of products are formed when benzo[a]pyrene (BP) is metabolized by cytochrome P-450: dihydrodiols, phenols and the quinones, BP 1,6-, 3,6- and 6,12-dione. These products have been thought to arise from attack of a catalytically-activated electrophilic oxygen atom. In this paper we report chemical and biochemical experiments which demonstrate that BP quinones arise from an initial one-electron oxidation of BP to form its radical cation. BP, 6-fluorobenzo[a]pyrene (6-FBP), 6-chlorobenzo[a]pyrene (6-ClBP), and 6-bromobenzo[a]pyrene (6-BrBP) were metabolized by uninduced and 3-methylcholanthrene-induced rat liver microsomes in the presence of NADPH or cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) as cofactor. BP and 6-FBP produced similar metabolic profiles with induced microsomes in the presence of NADPH or 2 mM CHP. With NADPH both compounds produced dihydrodiols, phenols and quinones, whereas with CHP, they yielded only quinones. Metabolism of BP and 6-FBP was also similar with uninduced microsomes and 2 mM CHP, yielding the same BP quinones. With uninduced microsomes in the presence of NADPH, BP produced all three classes of metabolites, whereas 6-FBP afforded only quinones. At a low concentration of CHP (0.10 mM), BP was metabolized to phenols and quinones, whereas 6-FBP gave only quinones. 6-ClBP and 6-BrBP were poor substrates, forming metabolites only with induced microsomes and NADPH. One-electron oxidation of BP by Mn(OAc)3 occurred exclusively at C-6 with predominant formation of 6-acetoxyBP and small amounts of BP quinones. In the one-electron oxidation of 6-FBP by Mn(OAc)3, the major products obtained were 6-acetoxyBP, a mixture of 1,6- and 3,6-diacetoxyBP, and BP quinones. Reaction of BP and 6-FBP radical cation perchlorates with water produced the same BP quinones. Conversely, electrophilic substitution of 6-FBP with bromine or deuterium ion afforded C-1 and/or C-3 derivatives with retention of the fluoro substituent at C-6. These results indicate that

  2. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M.; True, Bradford G.

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  3. Comparison of the One-electron Oxidations of CO-Bridged vs Unbridged Bimetallic Complexes: Electron-transfer Chemistry of Os2Cp2(CO)4 and Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp = η5-C5H5, Cp* = η5-C5Me5)

    SciTech Connect

    Laws, Derek R.; Bullock, R. Morris; Lee, Richmond; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Geiger, William J.

    2014-09-22

    The one-electron oxidations of two dimers of half-sandwich osmium carbonyl complexes have been examined by electrochemistry, spectro-electrochemistry, and computational methods. The all-terminal carbonyl complex Os2Cp2(CO)4 (1, Cp = η5-C5H5) undergoes a reversible one-electron anodic reaction at E1/2 = 0.41 V vs ferrocene in CH2Cl2/0.05 M [NBu4][B(C6F5)4], giving a rare example of a metal-metal bonded radical cation unsupported by bridging ligands. The IR spectrum of 1+ is consistent with an approximately 1:1 mixture of anti and gauche structures for the 33 e- radical cation in which it has retained all-terminal bonding of the CO ligands. DFT calculations, including orbital-occupancy-perturbed Mayer bond-order analyses, show that the HOMOs of anti-1 and gauche-1 are metal-ligand delocalized. Removal of an electron from 1 has very little effect on the Os-Os bond order, accounting for the resistance of 1+ to heterolytic cleavage. The Os-Os bond distance is calculated to decrease by 0.10 Å and 0.06 Å as a consequence of one-electron oxidation of anti-1 and gauche-1, respectively. The CO-bridged complex Os2Cp*2(μ-CO)2(CO)2 (Cp* = η5-C5Me5), trans-2, undergoes a more facile oxidation, E1/2 = - 0.11 V, giving a persistent radical cation shown by solution IR analysis to preserve its bridged-carbonyl structure. However, ESR analysis of frozen solutions of 2+ is interpreted in terms of the presence of two isomers, most likely anti-2+ and trans-2+, at low temperature. Calculations show that the HOMO of trans-2 is highly delocalized over the metal-ligand framework, with the bridging carbonyls accounting for about half of the orbital makeup. The Os-Os bond order again changes very little with removal of an electron, and the Os-Os bond length actually undergoes minor shortening. Calculations suggest that the second isomer of 2+ has both the trans CO-bridged and the anti all-terminal CO structures. DRL and WEG acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation under

  4. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G.; Sims, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment? Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ``humic-like`` material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  5. Interactions between manganese oxides and multiple-ringed aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, G. ); Sims, R.C. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    Objective is to determine whether Mn reductive dissolution can oxidize multiple-ringed aromatics, such as PAHs, in an oxic environment Research indicated that certain PAHs (eg, dihydrodiols and diones that form free-radical intermediates) are susceptible to oxidation and polymerization. Over 14 days, 83, 76, 54, 70, and 20% of the Mn was reduced by 2,3-, 1,3-, and 1,4-naphthalenediol, quinizarin, and 1,4-naphthoquinone, respectively. 100, 100, and 65% of the first three PAHs were oxidized, respectively. Aromatics with diol functional groups were more easily oxidized than those with only dione groups. Relatively insoluble compounds like quinizarin can be oxidized; insoluble ''humic-like'' material precipitated, indicating a polymerization-humification process. Results suggest that electron transfer/organic release from the oxide surface is the rate-limiting step.

  6. Oxidative stress and proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lipchick, Brittany C; Fink, Emily E; Nikiforov, Mikhail A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a form of plasma cell neoplasm that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematological malignancies. Recently, several novel drugs have been discovered that almost doubled the overall survival of multiple myeloma patients. One of these drugs, the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) has demonstrated remarkable response rates in multiple myeloma patients, and yet, currently this disease remains incurable. The major factor undermining the success of multiple myeloma treatment is a rapidly emerging resistance to the available therapy. Thus, the development of stand-alone or adjuvant anti-myeloma agents becomes of paramount importance. Overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often accompanies malignant transformation due to oncogene activation and/or enhanced metabolism in tumor cells. As a result, these cells possess higher levels of ROS and lower levels of antioxidant molecules compared to their normal counterparts. Unbalanced production of ROS leads to oxidative stress which, if left unchecked, could be toxic for the cell. In multiple myeloma cells where high rates of immunoglobulin synthesis is an additional factor contributing to overproduction of ROS, further induction of oxidative stress can be an effective strategy to cope with this disease. Here we will review the available data on the role of oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibitors and the use of ROS-inducing compounds as anti-myeloma agents. PMID:26827824

  7. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  8. A polar copper-boron one-electron σ-bond.

    PubMed

    Moret, Marc-Etienne; Zhang, Limei; Peters, Jonas C

    2013-03-13

    Virtually all chemical bonds consist of one or several pairs of electrons shared by two atoms. Examples of σ-bonds made of a single electron delocalized over two neighboring atoms were until recently found only in gas-phase cations such as H2(+) and Li2(+) and in highly unstable species generated in solid matrices. Only in the past decade was bona fide one-electron bonding observed for molecules in fluid solution. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of a thermally stable compound featuring a Cu-B one-electron bond, as well as its oxidized (nonbonded) and reduced (two-electrons-bonded) congeners. This triad provides an excellent opportunity to study the degree of σ-bonding in a metalloboratrane as a function of electron count. PMID:23418750

  9. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems and radical reactions in cells by nitroxyl biradical as probe.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoko; Koshiishi, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a novel probe for the simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems (electron transport chain) and one-electron oxidizing systems (free radical reactions) in cells by electron chemical detection was developed. Six-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl; TEMPO series) are sensitive to one-electron redox systems, generating the hydroxylamine form [TEMPO(H)] via one-electron reduction, and the secondary amine form [TEMPO(N)] via one-electron oxidation in the presence of thiols. In contrast, the sensitivities of five-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl; PROXYL series) to the one-electron redox systems are comparatively low. The electron chemical detector can detect 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), TEMPO(H) and PROXYL but not TEMPO(N). Therefore, nitroxyl biradical, TEMPO-PROXYL, as a probe for the evaluation of one-electron redox systems was employed. TEMPO-PROXYL was synthesized by the conjunction of 4-amino-TEMPO with 3-carboxyl-PROXYL via the conventional dicyclohexyl carbodiimide reaction. TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were simultaneously quantified by HPLC with Coularray detection. Calibration curves for the quantification of TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were linear in the range from 80 nm to 80 μm, and the lowest quantification limit of each molecule was estimated to be <80 nm. The relative standard deviations at 0.8 and 80 μm were within 10% (n = 5). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26613564

  11. The isolable cation radical of disilene: synthesis, characterization, and a reversible one-electron redox system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeyoshi; Ichinohe, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira

    2008-05-14

    The highly twisted tetrakis(di-tert-butylmethylsilyl)disilene 1 was treated with Ph3C+.BAr4- (BAr4-: TPFPB = tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate) in toluene, producing disilene cation radical 3 upon one-electron oxidation. Cation radical 3 was isolated in the form of its borate salt as extremely air- and moisture-sensitive red-brown crystals. The molecular structure of 3 was established by X-ray crystallography, which showed a highly twisted structure (twisting angle of 64.9 degrees) along the central Si-Si bond with a bond length of 2.307(2) A, which is 2.1% elongated relative to that of 1. The cation radical is stabilized by sigma-pi hyperconjugation by the four tBu2MeSi groups attached to the two central sp2-Si atoms. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) of the 29Si nuclei indicates delocalization of the spin over the central two Si atoms. A reversible one-electron redox system between disilene, cation radical, and anion radical is also reported.

  12. Analysis of active neutron multiplicity data for Y-12 skull oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Ensslin, N.; Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Previous work on active neutron multiplicity measurements and analyses is summarized. New active multiplicity measurements are described for samples of Y-12 skull oxide using an Active Well Coincidence Counter and MSR4 multiplicity electronics. Neutron multiplication values for the samples were determined from triples/doubles ratios. Neutron multiplication values were also obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code and the results compared with the experimental values. A calibration curve of AmLi source-sample coupling vs neutron multiplication was determined and used for active multiplicity assay of the skull oxides. The results are compared with those obtained from assay with the conventional calibration-curve technique, where the doubles rate is calibrated vs the {sup 235}U mass. The coupling-multiplication relationship determined for the skull oxides is compared with that determined earlier for pure high-enrichment uranium metal and pure uranium oxide. Conclusions are drawn about the application of active multiplicity techniques to uranium assay. Additional active multiplicity measurements and calculations are recommended.

  13. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; Sustersik, Silvia; Barba, Elías Alejandro; Aguayo, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old) and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old) fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals), and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress. PMID:19242067

  14. Estimation of interfacial shear strength between superconducting oxides and silver sheath from multiple-fracture phenomenon of the oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ochiai, Shojiro; Hayasi, Kenji; Osamura, Kozo )

    1994-02-01

    The influence of interfacial shear strength superconducting Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver on the multiple fracture of the oxides embedded in silver-sheathed composite wires, prepared by a powder-in-tube method, on the multiple fracture of the oxides was analyzed. The stress distribution in the oxide was calculated based on the proposed method, and the multiple-fracture phenomenon was simulated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation method. From the comparison of the experimental results with those obtained by the simulation, the interfacial shear strength between Y-Ba-Cu-O and silver and that between Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and silver were estimated to be nearly 30 and 40 MPa, respectively.

  15. Optimal Biofilm Featues: metabolic and geometric response to multiple oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempes, C.; Okegbe, C.; Mears-Clarke, Z.; Follows, M. J.; Dietrich, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important challenge in understanding complex microbial mat communities is determining how groups of a single species balance metabolic requirements with the dynamics of resource supply. We have investigated this problem in the context of redox resources within a single-species bacterial biofilm. We developed a mathematical model of oxidant availability and metabolic response within biofilm features and we show that observed biofilm geometries maximize cellular reproduction and growth efficiency. Our model accurately predicts the measured distribution of two types of electron acceptors: oxygen, which is available from the environment, and phenazines, redox-active small molecules produced by the bacterium. Because our model is based on resource dynamics, we are also able to predict observed shifts in feature geometry based on changes in the availability of redox resources such as variations in the external availability of oxygen or the removal of phenazines. This analysis suggests various avenues for understanding microstructure and the evolution of spatial metabolism in microbial mats.

  16. Phenol coupling initiated by one-electron oxidation of tyrosine units in peptides and histone.

    PubMed

    Prütz, W A; Butler, J; Land, E J

    1983-08-01

    Phenoxyl radicals generated pulse radiolytically by the reaction of N.3 with Gly-Tyr decay biomolecularly (2k = 4.7 X 10(8)M-1 s-1) with efficient formation of 2,2'-dimers, which enolize rapidly (k = 2.7 X 10(4) s-1) to produce the 2,2'-biphenolic product. The build-up of the characteristic 2,2'-biphenol fluorescence (400 nm) and absorption also indicated a delayed (k = 80 s-1) process, probably involving the phenoxyl <-> phenoxy-quinol equilibrium. About 60 per cent of the Gly-Tyr phenoxyls were found to dimerize to the 2,2'-biphenol, and a similarly efficient 2,2'-coupling seems to occur with other tyrosyls, such as Lys-Tyr-Lys and histone. gamma-Radiolysis was applied to estimate relative yields of formation of 2,2'-biphenols under various conditions. Dimerization is almost completely inhibited by cysteine or oxygen, consistent with phenoxyl 'repair' by cysteine or O-.2; disproportionation of O-.2 with SOD prevents repair. The phenol 2,2'-coupling is less efficient for .OH- and inefficient for e-aq-initiation. PMID:6603438

  17. Diluted II-VI oxide semiconductors with multiple band gaps.

    PubMed

    Yu, K M; Walukiewicz, W; Wu, J; Shan, W; Beeman, J W; Scarpulla, M A; Dubon, O D; Becla, P

    2003-12-12

    We report the realization of a new mult-band-gap semiconductor. Zn(1-y)Mn(y)OxTe1-x alloys have been synthesized using the combination of oxygen ion implantation and pulsed laser melting. Incorporation of small quantities of isovalent oxygen leads to the formation of a narrow, oxygen-derived band of extended states located within the band gap of the Zn(1-y)Mn(y)Te host. When only 1.3% of Te atoms are replaced with oxygen in a Zn0.88Mn0.12Te crystal the resulting band structure consists of two direct band gaps with interband transitions at approximately 1.77 and 2.7 eV. This remarkable modification of the band structure is well described by the band anticrossing model. With multiple band gaps that fall within the solar energy spectrum, Zn(1-y)Mn(y)OxTe1-x is a material perfectly satisfying the conditions for single-junction photovoltaics with the potential for power conversion efficiencies surpassing 50%.

  18. The effect of multiple allergen immunotherapy on exhaled nitric oxide in adults with allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of objective measures of the clinical efficacy of allergen immunotherapy which relies on patients’ perception about the effect of this treatment. We studied whether the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide is affected by multiple allergen immunotherapy in polysensitized adult subjects with allergic rhinitis. We also looked for associations between exhaled nitric oxide and subjects’ demographics, symptom scores, and pulmonary function tests. Methods Twenty adult, polysensitized subjects with seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis who chose to undergo allergen immunotherapy were enrolled. They were evaluated at baseline, and 4, 8, 12, 24, and 52 weeks later. Exhaled nitric oxide was reported as the mean of triplicate determinations. Findings Our results indicate that multiple allergen immunotherapy did not affect exhaled nitric oxide levels and such levels did not correlate with subjects’ demographics and pulmonary function tests. However, exhaled nitric oxide was associated with rhinoconjuctivitis and asthma symptom scores at the end of the study. Conclusions In polysensitized adult subjects with allergic rhinitis, exhaled nitric oxide levels are unaffected by multiple allergen immunotherapy. PMID:23958488

  19. Multiple Hits, Including Oxidative Stress, as Pathogenesis and Treatment Target in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Kawai, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-01-01

    Multiple parallel hits, including genetic differences, insulin resistance and intestinal microbiota, account for the progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Multiple hits induce adipokine secretion, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress at the cellular level that subsequently induce hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis, among which oxidative stress is considered a key contributor to progression from simple fatty liver to NASH. Although several clinical trials have shown that anti-oxidative therapy can effectively control hepatitis activities in the short term, the long-term effect remains obscure. Several trials of long-term anti-oxidant protocols aimed at treating cerebrovascular diseases or cancer development have failed to produce a benefit. This might be explained by the non-selective anti-oxidative properties of these drugs. Molecular hydrogen is an effective antioxidant that reduces only cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and several diseases associated with oxidative stress are sensitive to hydrogen. The progress of NASH to hepatocellular carcinoma can be controlled using hydrogen-rich water. Thus, targeting mitochondrial oxidative stress might be a good candidate for NASH treatment. Long term clinical intervention is needed to control this complex lifestyle-related disease. PMID:24132155

  20. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  1. Integration of graphene oxide and DNA as a universal platform for multiple arithmetic logic units.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Ren, Jiangtao; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2014-11-28

    By a combination of graphene oxide and DNA, a universal platform was developed for integration of multiple logic gates to implement both half adder and half subtractor functions. A constant undefined threshold range between high and low fluorescence output signals was set for all the developed logic gates.

  2. From 0 to II in One-Electron Steps: A Series of Ruthenium Complexes Supported by TropPPh2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuxiu; Gianetti, Thomas L; Harbort, Joshua; Wörle, Michael D; Tan, Lilin; Su, Cheng-Yong; Jurt, Pascal; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2016-09-19

    We report the synthesis of a series of ruthenium complexes supported by the phosphine olefin ligand tropPPh2 (trop=5-H-dibenzo-[a,d]cyclohepten-5-yl) in the oxidation states 0, +I, and +II, formed via successive one-electron oxidization steps from Ru(0) (tropPPh2 )2 . The bidentate character of the tropPPh2 ligand and its steric hindrance force the complexes to adopt uncommon geometries, which were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. EPR data of the mononuclear Ru(I) complex reveal couplings of the unpaired spin with the ruthenium and two phosphorus nuclei, as well as the olefinic protons which show that the spin is mainly localized on the Ru(I) center. PMID:27557780

  3. Boron-Boron One-Electron Sigma Bonds versus B-X-B Bridged Structures.

    PubMed

    Kusevska, Elena; Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2016-09-12

    The existence of one-electron B-B σ bonds, for two different sets of compounds, was investigated by analyzing their electron density with different tools, namely QTAIM, ELF, NCIPLOT, and NBO approaches. Our results indicate that although the generic label "one-electron sigma bond" is often used in the literature, the nature of these bonds varies considerably, or they even do not exist. The [B2 X6 ](-) radical anions give place to true covalent one-electron σ bonds, the stronger the more electronegative is the X substituent. When both boron atoms are substituents in a rigid aromatic moiety, such as naphthalene, to yield 1,8-disubstituted derivatives, two kinds of equilibrium structures are found, those also stabilized through a one-electron σ bond (X=OH, F, Cl, CN) and those stabilized by the formation of B-X-B bridges (X=H, OMe). These 1,8-BX2 naphthalene derivatives can be considered as analogues of 1,8-NX2 naphthalene proton sponges. While the latter are able to stabilize a proton between the two basic sites, the former are able to stabilize an electron between the two electron-deficient B atoms. Interestingly, when all the H atoms attached to B are substituted by phenyl groups no one-electron σ bonds B-B bonds are formed, due to the dispersion of the unpaired electron in the aromatic substituents. PMID:27530734

  4. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average U–Oaxial distance of 2.05 ± 0.01 Å was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  5. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Promises for Diagnosis and Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Smart superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most promising candidate for theragnosis (i.e., diagnosis and treatment) of multiple sclerosis. A deep understanding of the dynamics of the in vivo neuropathology of multiple sclerosis can be achieved by improving the efficiency of various medical techniques (e.g., positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) using multimodal SPIONs. In this Review, recent advances and challenges in the development of smart SPIONs for theragnostic applications are comprehensively described. In addition, critical outlines of emerging developments are provided from the points of view of both clinicians and nanotechnologists. PMID:22778862

  6. Ischemia modified albumin is an indicator of oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ozgur; Ellidag, Hamit Yasar; Eren, Esin; Kurtulus, Fatma; Yaman, Aylin; Yılmaz, Necat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Oligodendrocytes need iron in processes of energy generation and myelination. However, excessive levels of iron may exert iron induced oxidative stress and thus lead to tissue degeneration. Monitoring oxidative stress will be of paramount importance in follow-up of patients with many diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to measure total anti-oxidative status (TAS), total oxidative status (TOS) and ischemia modified albumin (IMA) in stable relapse remitting MS (RRMS) patients. Materials and methods: Thirty-five RRMS patients (15 males and 20 females; median age 42 (20–55) years) and thirty-five age-sex matched healthy controls (13 males and 22 females; median age 37 (21–60) years) were included in this study. All patients were diagnosed with MS according to the criteria of McDonald. Results: IMA levels were significantly higher in RRMS patients (P < 0.001), while TAS and TOS did not show any significant difference between groups (P = 0.870 and P = 0.460, respectively). Conclusions: Our results suggest IMA as a more efficient serum marker than TAS and TOS in detecting the oxidative stress in MS patients. Serum oxidative stress markers should be included in future study protocols besides clinical and radiological parameters. PMID:25351357

  7. One-electron standard reduction potentials of nitroaromatic and cyclic nitramine explosives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive studies have been conducted in the past decades to predict the environmental abiotic and biotic redox fate of nitroaromatic and nitramine explosives. However, surprisingly little information is available on one-electron standard reduction potentials (Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2_)). The Eo(R-NO2/R-NO2...

  8. Oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis: Central and peripheral mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Kim; Tenbrock, Klaus; Kipp, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which if produced in excess lead to oxidative stress, have been implicated as mediators of demyelination and axonal damage in both MS and its animal models. One of the most studied cell populations in the context of ROS-mediated tissue damage in MS are macrophages and their CNS companion, microglia cells. However, and this aspect is less well appreciated, the extracellular and intracellular redox milieu is integral to many processes underlying T cell activation, proliferation and apoptosis. In this review article we discuss how oxidative stress affects central as well as peripheral aspects of MS and how manipulation of ROS pathways can potentially affect the course of the disease. It is our strong belief that the well-directed shaping of ROS pathways has the potential to ameliorate disease progression in MS. PMID:26626971

  9. Oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis patients in clinical remission: association with the expanded disability status scale.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sayonara Rangel; Kallaur, Ana Paula; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Lopes, Josiane; Panis, Carolina; Petenucci, Diego Lima; da Silva, Eloisa; Cecchini, Rubens; Kaimen-Maciel, Damácio Ramon; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci

    2012-10-15

    Increased levels of oxidative stress markers and/or decreased levels of antioxidant molecules have been described in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This imbalance has been implicated in demyelination and axonal damage. The aims of this study were to evaluate oxidative stress in MS patients and to verify its correlation with disability as assessed by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). This case-controlled study included 91 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) and 196 healthy individuals matched by age, gender, ethnicity, smoking status, and body mass index. Oxidative stress was evaluated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide-initiated chemiluminescence (CL-LOOH), carbonyl protein, nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), sulfhydryl groups of proteins and serum uric acid levels. MS patients exhibited higher plasma levels of CL-LOOH (p<0.0001) and carbonyl protein (p=0.0081), and lower plasma levels of NOx (p<0.0001), TRAP (p=0.0088), and sulfhydryl groups (p=0.0003) compared to the control subjects. A multivariate analysis showed an association between oxidative markers and the presence of MS. Patients with an EDSS >3.5 showed higher CL-LOOH than control subjects (p=0.0093). A positive correlation was observed between CL-LOOH and EDSS (r=0.3244, p=0.0026) and between carbonyl protein and EDSS (r=0.3012, p=0.0041). These results demonstrate that oxidative stress plays an important role in the physiopathology of MS progression. PMID:22883481

  10. Inflammation, Iron, Energy Failure, and Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Different trigger pathologies have been suggested by the primary cytodegenerative “inside-out” and primary inflammation-driven “outside-in” hypotheses. Recent data indicate that mitochondrial injury and subsequent energy failure are key factors in the induction of demyelination and neurodegeneration. The brain weighs only a few percent of the body mass but accounts for approximately 20% of the total basal oxygen consumption of mitochondria. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial injury in patients with multiple sclerosis and energy failure in the central nervous system of susceptible individuals. The interconnected mechanisms responsible for free radical production in patients with multiple sclerosis are as follows: (i) inflammation-induced production of free radicals by activated immune cells, (ii) liberation of iron from the myelin sheets during demyelination, and (iii) mitochondrial injury and thus energy failure-related free radical production. In the present review, the different sources of oxidative stress and their relationships to patients with multiple sclerosis considering tissue injury mechanisms and clinical aspects have been discussed. PMID:26106458

  11. Role of dimethyl fumarate in oxidative stress of multiple sclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, A; Raja Rajeswari, K

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS affecting both white and grey matter. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapy with dimethyl fumarate. The clinical utility of DMF in multiple sclerosis is being explored through phase III trials with BG-12, which is an oral therapeutic agent. Currently a wide research is going on to find out the exact mechanism of DMF, till date it is not clear. Based on strong signals of nephrotoxicity in non-humans and the theoretical risk of renal cell cancer from intracellular accumulation of fumarate, post-marketing study of a large population of patients will be necessary to fully assess the long-term safety of dimethyl fumarate. The current treatment goals are to shorten the duration and severity of relapses, prolong the time between relapses, and delay progression of disability. In this regard, dimethyl fumarate offers a promising alternative to orally administered fingolimod (GILENYA) or teriflunomide (AUBAGIO), which are currently marketed in the United States under FDA-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs because of serious safety concerns. More clinical experience with all three agents will be necessary to differentiate the tolerability of long-term therapy for patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. This write-up provides the detailed information of dimethyl fumarate in treating the neuro disease, multiple sclerosis and its mechanism involved via

  12. Role of dimethyl fumarate in oxidative stress of multiple sclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, A; Raja Rajeswari, K

    2016-04-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS affecting both white and grey matter. Inflammation and oxidative stress are also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Recent data point at an important role of anti-oxidative pathways for tissue protection in chronic MS, particularly involving the transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Thus, novel therapeutics enhancing cellular resistance to free radicals could prove useful for MS treatment. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative pathways are important players in MS pathophysiology and constitute a promising target for future MS therapy with dimethyl fumarate. The clinical utility of DMF in multiple sclerosis is being explored through phase III trials with BG-12, which is an oral therapeutic agent. Currently a wide research is going on to find out the exact mechanism of DMF, till date it is not clear. Based on strong signals of nephrotoxicity in non-humans and the theoretical risk of renal cell cancer from intracellular accumulation of fumarate, post-marketing study of a large population of patients will be necessary to fully assess the long-term safety of dimethyl fumarate. The current treatment goals are to shorten the duration and severity of relapses, prolong the time between relapses, and delay progression of disability. In this regard, dimethyl fumarate offers a promising alternative to orally administered fingolimod (GILENYA) or teriflunomide (AUBAGIO), which are currently marketed in the United States under FDA-mandated Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) programs because of serious safety concerns. More clinical experience with all three agents will be necessary to differentiate the tolerability of long-term therapy for patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. This write-up provides the detailed information of dimethyl fumarate in treating the neuro disease, multiple sclerosis and its mechanism involved via

  13. Serum chemical elements and oxidative status in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Alessandro; Ristori, Giovanni; Giubilei, Franco; Stazi, Maria Antonia; Pino, Anna; Visconti, Andrea; Brescianini, Sonia; Sepe Monti, Micaela; Forte, Giovanni; Stanzione, Paolo; Bocca, Beatrice; Bomboi, Giuseppe; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Annibali, Viviana; Salvetti, Marco; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2007-05-01

    The role of some chemical elements in neurodegeneration was suggested by various authors. To obtain a profile of chemical elements and oxidative status in complex neurological diseases, an unbiased "omics" approach, i.e., quantification of 26 elements and oxidative stress parameters (serum oxidative status (SOS) and serum anti-oxidant capacity (SAC)), combined with multivariate statistical procedures (forward discriminant analysis, FDA) to analyse the vast amount of data, was applied to four groups of subjects (53 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 71 with Parkinson disease (PD), 60 with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 124 healthy individuals). Descriptive statistics revealed numerous differences between each disease and healthy status. A concordant imbalance (reduction in Fe, Zn and SAC, and increase in SOS) was shared by AD, PD and MS. The FDA yielded three significant discriminant functions based on age, SOS, Ca, Fe, Si, Sn, V, Zn and Zr, and identified disease-specific profiles of element imbalances, thus showing the appropriateness of the "omics" approach. It may help assess the contribution of chemical elements and oxidative stress to disease causation and may provide complex predictors of disease evolution or treatment response.

  14. Oxidative Stress Kills Human Primary Oligodendrocytes Via Neutral Sphingomyelinase: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Arundhati

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common human demyelinating disease of the central nervous system where oxidative stress has been proposed to play an important role in oligodendroglial death. However, molecular mechanisms that couple oxidative stress to the loss of oligodendrocytes are poorly understood. This study underlines the importance of neutral sphingomyelinase–ceramide pathway in mediating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and cell death of human primary oligodendrocytes. Various oxidative stress-inducing agents, such as, superoxide radical produced by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase, hydrogen peroxide, aminotriazole capable of inhibiting catalase and increasing intracellular level of H2O2, or reduced glutathione-depleting diamide induced the activation of neutral sphingomyelinase and the production of ceramide. It is interesting to note that antisense knockdown of neutral but not acidic sphingomyelinase ablated oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and cell death in human primary oligodendrocytes. This study identifies neutral but not acidic sphingomyelinase as a target for possible therapeutic intervention in MS. PMID:18040843

  15. Immunology and Oxidative Stress in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Basic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro G.; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar K.; Ramírez-Anguiano, Ana C.; Flores-Alvarado, Luis J.; Ramírez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A.; Torres-Sánchez, Erandis D.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the recruitment of lymphocytes, microglia, and macrophages to lesion sites, the presence of multiple lesions, generally being more pronounced in the brain stem and spinal cord, the predominantly perivascular location of lesions, the temporal maturation of lesions from inflammation through demyelination, to gliosis and partial remyelination, and the presence of immunoglobulin in the central nervous system and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Pro-inflammatory cytokines amplify the inflammatory cascade by compromising the BBB, recruiting immune cells from the periphery, and activating resident microglia. inflammation-associated oxidative burst in activated microglia and macrophages plays an important role in the demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in the pathogenesis of MS. The inflammatory environment in demyelinating lesions leads to the generation of oxygen- and nitrogen-free radicals as well as proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Inflammation can lead to oxidative stress and vice versa. Thus, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in a self-perpetuating cycle. PMID:24174971

  16. Immunology and oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis: clinical and basic approach.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar K; Ramírez-Anguiano, Ana C; Flores-Alvarado, Luis J; Ramírez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; Torres-Sánchez, Erandis D

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the recruitment of lymphocytes, microglia, and macrophages to lesion sites, the presence of multiple lesions, generally being more pronounced in the brain stem and spinal cord, the predominantly perivascular location of lesions, the temporal maturation of lesions from inflammation through demyelination, to gliosis and partial remyelination, and the presence of immunoglobulin in the central nervous system and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Pro-inflammatory cytokines amplify the inflammatory cascade by compromising the BBB, recruiting immune cells from the periphery, and activating resident microglia. inflammation-associated oxidative burst in activated microglia and macrophages plays an important role in the demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in the pathogenesis of MS. The inflammatory environment in demyelinating lesions leads to the generation of oxygen- and nitrogen-free radicals as well as proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Inflammation can lead to oxidative stress and vice versa. Thus, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in a self-perpetuating cycle.

  17. Immunology and oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis: clinical and basic approach.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar K; Ramírez-Anguiano, Ana C; Flores-Alvarado, Luis J; Ramírez-Ramírez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; Torres-Sánchez, Erandis D

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the recruitment of lymphocytes, microglia, and macrophages to lesion sites, the presence of multiple lesions, generally being more pronounced in the brain stem and spinal cord, the predominantly perivascular location of lesions, the temporal maturation of lesions from inflammation through demyelination, to gliosis and partial remyelination, and the presence of immunoglobulin in the central nervous system and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Pro-inflammatory cytokines amplify the inflammatory cascade by compromising the BBB, recruiting immune cells from the periphery, and activating resident microglia. inflammation-associated oxidative burst in activated microglia and macrophages plays an important role in the demyelination and free radical-mediated tissue injury in the pathogenesis of MS. The inflammatory environment in demyelinating lesions leads to the generation of oxygen- and nitrogen-free radicals as well as proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Inflammation can lead to oxidative stress and vice versa. Thus, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in a self-perpetuating cycle. PMID:24174971

  18. Inelastic electron scattering in amorphous silicon nitride and aluminum oxide with multiple-scattering corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livins, Peteris; Aton, T.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1988-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss measurements for an amorphous chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride film and evaporated sapphire in the broad energy range 1-200 eV are investigated. A method, not requiring the zero-loss peak, to remove the multiple scattering is discussed, applied, and the optical constants obtained. An Elliot-type model used with aluminum oxide gives a valence-exciton binding energy of 1.36+/-0.2 eV with a band gap of 9.8+/-0.2 eV. The unexpected strength of the nitrogen 2s transition is noted in silicon nitride.

  19. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    DOE PAGES

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; et al

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  20. Multiple Roles of Photosynthetic and Sunscreen Pigments in Cyanobacteria Focusing on the Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Naoki; Sakamoto, Toshio; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have two types of sunscreen pigments, scytonemin and mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). These secondary metabolites are thought to play multiple roles against several environmental stresses such as UV radiation and desiccation. Not only the large molar absorption coefficients of these sunscreen pigments, but also their antioxidative properties may be necessary for the protection of biological molecules against the oxidative damages induced by UV radiation. The antioxidant activity and vitrification property of these pigments are thought to be requisite for the desiccation and rehydration processes in anhydrobiotes. In this review, the multiple roles of photosynthetic pigments and sunscreen pigments on stress resistance, especially from the viewpoint of their structures, biosynthetic pathway, and in vitro studies of their antioxidant activity, will be discussed. PMID:24958001

  1. Multiple factors affect diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in iron mine soil.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi; Si, Yan-Xiao; Hong, Chen; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation by microorganisms is a critical process in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, four soil samples collected from a desert zone in an iron-exploration area and others from farmland and planted forest soil in an iron mine surrounding area. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in iron-mining area near the Miyun reservoir using ammonia monooxygenase. A subunit gene (amoA) as molecular biomarker. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to explore the relationships between the abundance of AOA and AOB and soil physicochemical parameters. The results showed that AOA were more abundant than AOB and may play a more dominant role in the ammonia-oxidizing process in the whole region. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the structural changes of AOA and AOB. The results showed that AOB were much more diverse than AOA. Nitrosospira cluster three constitute the majority of AOB, and AOA were dominated by group 1.1b in the soil. Redundancy analysis was performed to explore the physicochemical parameters potentially important to AOA and AOB. Soil characteristics (i.e. water, ammonia, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil type) were proposed to potentially contribute to the distributions of AOB, whereas Cd was also closely correlated to the distributions of AOB. The community of AOA correlated with ammonium and water contents. These results highlight the importance of multiple drivers in microbial niche formation as well as their affect on ammonia oxidizer composition, both which have significant consequences for ecosystem nitrogen functioning.

  2. Multiple factors affect diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in iron mine soil.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yi; Si, Yan-Xiao; Hong, Chen; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation by microorganisms is a critical process in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, four soil samples collected from a desert zone in an iron-exploration area and others from farmland and planted forest soil in an iron mine surrounding area. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in iron-mining area near the Miyun reservoir using ammonia monooxygenase. A subunit gene (amoA) as molecular biomarker. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to explore the relationships between the abundance of AOA and AOB and soil physicochemical parameters. The results showed that AOA were more abundant than AOB and may play a more dominant role in the ammonia-oxidizing process in the whole region. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the structural changes of AOA and AOB. The results showed that AOB were much more diverse than AOA. Nitrosospira cluster three constitute the majority of AOB, and AOA were dominated by group 1.1b in the soil. Redundancy analysis was performed to explore the physicochemical parameters potentially important to AOA and AOB. Soil characteristics (i.e. water, ammonia, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil type) were proposed to potentially contribute to the distributions of AOB, whereas Cd was also closely correlated to the distributions of AOB. The community of AOA correlated with ammonium and water contents. These results highlight the importance of multiple drivers in microbial niche formation as well as their affect on ammonia oxidizer composition, both which have significant consequences for ecosystem nitrogen functioning. PMID:25860433

  3. One-electron excitations, correlation effects, and the plasmon in cesium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Fleszar, A. ||; Stumpf, R.; Eguiluz, A.G. ||

    1997-01-01

    We study the dynamical electronic response of Cs at a first-principles level. The spatially localized 5p semicore shell induces a physical interplay between crystal local fields and electron correlations, leading to a novel, and relatively large, many-body shift of the plasmon energy. This effect, combined with that of one-electron transitions into empty states near the plasmon energy, yields a plasmon dispersion curve which is in excellent agreement with experiment for small wave vectors. In addition, our results feature a flat dispersion for large wave vectors, in qualitative agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Redox behaviour of nifuroxazide: generation of the one-electron reduction product.

    PubMed

    Squella, J A; Letelier, M E; Lindermeyer, L; Nuñez-Vergara, L J

    1996-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of nifuroxazide have been investigated in aqueous and aqueous-DMF mixed solvents. In aqueous media, a single, irreversible four-electron reduction occurs to give the hydroxylamine derivative. In mixed media, a reversible one-electron reduction to form a nitro radical anion takes place. Cyclic voltammetric studies show that the anion radical product is stable, although the nitro radical anion intermediate shows a tendency to undergo further chemical reactions. A comparison with the voltammetric behaviour of other nitrofurans such as nifurtimox, nitrofurazone and furazolidone is made. The electrochemically-obtained parameters are correlated with the in vivo studies of oxygen consumption on Trypanosoma cruzi cell suspensions. PMID:8620571

  5. Investigation of oxidative balance in patients with dysmenorrhea by multiple serum markers

    PubMed Central

    Turhan, Nilgün; Çelik, Havva; Duvan, Candan İltemir; Onaran, Yüksel; Aydın, Murat; Armutcu, Ferah

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the level of oxidative stress in patients with dysmenorrhea by multiple serum markers including malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrotyrosine (3-NT), deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Material and Methods: Fifty-eight women, aged between 20 and 34, who had had regular menses for at least six previous cycles, were involved. The women were divided into two groups. The study group consisted of 33 patients with primary dysmenorrhea, and the control group consisted of 25 healthy women. Results: Demographic characteristics of patients were similar between the two groups. The serum MDA levels were 1.32±0.46 and 0.91±0.26 nmol/mL for the dysmenorrhea and control groups, respectively (p<0.001). The differences in plasma levels of 3-NT, SOD and serum 8-OhdG were similar in both groups (p>0.05). Also, no correlation was found between the severity of dysmenorrhea and the levels of oxidative markers. Conclusion: Oxidative stress is slightly aggravated in patients with dysmenorrhea. PMID:24592048

  6. Multiple sample characterization of coals and other substances by controlled-atmosphere programmed temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    LaCount, Robert B.

    1993-01-01

    A furnace with two hot zones holds multiple analysis tubes. Each tube has a separable sample-packing section positioned in the first hot zone and a catalyst-packing section positioned in the second hot zone. A mass flow controller is connected to an inlet of each sample tube, and gas is supplied to the mass flow controller. Oxygen is supplied through a mass flow controller to each tube to either or both of an inlet of the first tube and an intermediate portion between the tube sections to intermingle with and oxidize the entrained gases evolved from the sample. Oxidation of those gases is completed in the catalyst in each second tube section. A thermocouple within a sample reduces furnace temperature when an exothermic condition is sensed within the sample. Oxidized gases flow from outlets of the tubes to individual gas cells. The cells are sequentially aligned with an infrared detector, which senses the composition and quantities of the gas components. Each elongated cell is tapered inward toward the center from cell windows at the ends. Volume is reduced from a conventional cell, while permitting maximum interaction of gas with the light beam. Reduced volume and angulation of the cell inlets provide rapid purgings of the cell, providing shorter cycles between detections. For coal and other high molecular weight samples, from 50% to 100% oxygen is introduced to the tubes.

  7. Multiple controls of oxidative metabolism in living tissues as studied by phosphorus magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Leigh, J S; Kent, J; McCully, K; Nioka, S; Clark, B J; Maris, J M; Graham, T

    1986-01-01

    Three types of metabolic control of oxidative metabolism are observed in the various tissues that have been studied by phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The principal control of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle is by ADP (or Pi/phosphocreatine). This conclusion is based upon studies of arm muscles of humans during steady-state exercise. A work-cost (Vm vs. Pi/phosphocreatine) relationship follows a Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola, where Km values from 0.5 to 0.6 and Vmax values from 50 to 200 (at nearly constant pH) are found in linearized plots of the equation V/Vmax = 1/(1 + 0.6 phosphocreatine/Pi) where V is work level (which is equal to the velocity of the enzymatic reaction) and Vmax is the maximal work capacity that is a measure of the enzyme activity (E) of oxidative metabolism. Adaptation to exercise enhances the slope of the work-cost relationship and causes large changes in Vmax or E. A second metabolic control may enhance the slope of the work-cost relationship but not Vmax. For example, the initiation of exercise can lead to an improved characteristic that can be explained by 2-fold increased substrate delivery, for example, increased oxygen delivery by microcirculatory control. Cardiac tissue of the adult dog affords an example of optimal endurance performance adaptation and exhibits the steepest work-cost relationship observed and is attributed to a coordinated control of substrate delivery that may involve Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate control of NADH; control of O2 delivery may also be involved. The calculated work-cost relationship is similar to that observed in the beagle heart. The theoretical curve illustrates that the liability of multiple controls is a sharp break point in metabolic control at the end of the multiple control range--a possible cause of instability of cardiac performance at high V/Vmax. PMID:3467315

  8. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Hubertus J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractional occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Finally, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.

  9. QED calculations in heavy many-electron atoms and one-electron quasi-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupitsyn, I. I.; Safronova, M. S.; Kozlov, M. G.; Porsev, S. G.; Shabaev, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Construction of simple one-electron approach to one-loop QED operator is an important task for the relativistic quantum theory of atoms and molecules. In this work we used two modifications of the model QED potential approach to calculations of the Lamb shift in many-electron atoms and one-electron quasi-molecules. The model potential is constructed as a sum of local and nonlocal (separable) potentials. The nonlocal part of the model potential was introduced to reproduce exactly the diagonal elements and also off-diagonal elements of the one-loop ab initio QED operator. The one-particle model QED operator was introduced in the Dirac-Fock and CI+MBPT relativistic calculations of the heavy and super-heavy atoms and in the calculations of the diatomic quasi-molecules. The comparison of the data obtained in different approaches to the one-loop QED operator is presented. Model QED potential is applied to calculate Lamb shift in the U91+- U92+ dimer. The results are compared with Ref..

  10. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE PAGES

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-05-23

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  11. Oxidative stress impairs multiple regulatory events to drive persistent cytokine-stimulated STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ivan H W; Yeap, Yvonne Y C; Ong, Lynette S R; Jans, David A; Bogoyevitch, Marie A

    2014-03-01

    Although cytokine-driven STAT3 phosphorylation and activation are often transient, persistent activation of STAT3 is a hallmark of a range of pathologies and underpins altered transcriptional responses. As triggers in disease frequently include combined increases in inflammatory cytokine and reactive oxygen species levels, we report here how oxidative stress impacts on cytokine-driven STAT3 signal transduction events. In the model system of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), combined treatment with the interleukin-6 family cytokine Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) drove persistent STAT3 phosphorylation whereas STAT3 phosphorylation increased only transiently in response to LIF alone and was not increased by H2O2 alone. Surprisingly, increases in transcript levels of the direct STAT3 gene target SOCS3 were delayed during the combined LIF + H2O2 treatment, leading us to probe the impact of oxidative stress on STAT3 regulatory events. Indeed, LIF + H2O2 prolonged JAK activation, delayed STAT3 nuclear localisation, and caused relocalisation of nuclear STAT3 phosphatase TC-PTP (TC45) to the cytoplasm. In exploring the nuclear import/ export pathways, we observed disruption of nuclear/cytoplasmic distributions of Ran and importin-alpha3 in cells exposed to H2O2 and the resultant reduced nuclear trafficking of Classical importin-alpha/3-dependent protein cargoes. CRM1-mediated nuclear export persisted despite the oxidative stress insult, with sustained STAT3 Y705 phosphorylation enhancing STAT3 nuclear residency. Our studies thus reveal for the first time the striking impact of oxidative stress to sustain STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear retention following disruption of multiple regulatory events, with significant implications for STAT3 function.

  12. One-electron reduction of 8-bromo-2-aminoadenosine in the aqueous phase: radiation chemical and DFT studies of the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaloudis, Panagiotis; D'Angelantonio, Mila; Guerra, Maurizio; Gimisis, Thanasis; Mulazzani, Quinto G; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2008-04-24

    Two tautomeric forms of one-electron oxidized 2-aminoadenosine (2AA) have been produced by reactions of hydrated electrons (e aq-) with 8-bromo-2-aminoadenosine (8-Br-2AA) at natural pH, whereas only one tautomer is formed by oxidation of 2AA. Tailored experiments by pulse radiolysis and time-dependent DFT (TD-B3LYP/6-311G**//B1B95/6-31+G**) calculations allowed the definition of the reaction mechanism in some detail. The electron adducts of 8-Br-2AA protonated at C8 eject Br- and produce the two short-lived tautomers (8 and 9). The first observable species decays by first-order kinetics to produce the second intermediate, which is also obtained by oxidation of 2AA by SO4*-. The rate of tautomerization (k taut = 4.5 x 104 s-1) is strongly accelerated by phosphate and is retarded in D2O (kinetic isotope effect 7). B1B95/6-31+G** calculations showed that the tautomerization is a water-assisted process. In acidic or basic solutions, the "instantaneous" formation of one-electron oxidized 2AA or its deprotonated forms has been produced by reactions of e aq- with 8-Br-2AA. gamma-Radiolysis of 8-Br-2AA in aqueous solutions followed by product studies led to the formation of 2AA as a single product.

  13. Zeeman energy and spin relaxation in a one-electron quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R; Witkamp, B; Vandersypen, L M K; van Beveren, L H Willems; Elzerman, J M; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2003-11-01

    We have measured the relaxation time, T1, of the spin of a single electron confined in a semiconductor quantum dot (a proposed quantum bit). In a magnetic field, applied parallel to the two-dimensional electron gas in which the quantum dot is defined, Zeeman splitting of the orbital states is directly observed by measurements of electron transport through the dot. By applying short voltage pulses, we can populate the excited spin state with one electron and monitor relaxation of the spin. We find a lower bound on T1 of 50 micros at 7.5 T, only limited by our signal-to-noise ratio. A continuous measurement of the charge on the dot has no observable effect on the spin relaxation.

  14. Apple juice attenuates genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by cadmium exposure in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes de Moura, Carolina Foot; Pidone Ribeiro, Flávia Andressa; Lucke, Gabriela; Boiago Gollucke, Andrea Pitelli; Fujiyama Oshima, Celina Tizuko; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the health benefits associated with apple consumption following cadmium exposure. A total of 15 Wistar rats were distributed into three groups (n=5), as follows: control group (non-treated group, CTRL); cadmium group (Cd) and apple juice group (Cd+AJ). The results showed a decrease in the frequency micronucleated cells in bone marrow and hepatocytes in the group exposed to cadmium and treated with apple juice. Apple juice was also able to reduce the 8OHdG levels and to decrease genetic damage in liver and peripheral blood cells. Catalase (CAT) was decreased following apple juice intake. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apple juice seems to be able to prevent genotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by cadmium exposure in multiple organs of Wistar rats.

  15. Global methane and nitrous oxide emissions from terrestrial ecosystems due to multiple environmental changes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanqin; Chen, Guangsheng; Lu, Chaoqun; Xu, Xiaofeng; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Bowen; Banger, Kamaljit; Tao, Bo; Pan, Shufen; Chu, Mingliang; Zhang, Chi; Bruhwiler, Lori; Wofsy, Steven

    2015-03-16

    Greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate change is among the most pressing sustainability challenges facing humanity today, posing serious risks for ecosystem health. Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are the two most important GHGs after carbon dioxide (CO2), but their regional and global budgets are not well known. In this paper, we applied a process-based coupled biogeochemical model to concurrently estimate the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of CH4 and N2O fluxes as driven by multiple environmental changes, including climate variability, rising atmospheric CO2, increasing nitrogen deposition, tropospheric ozone pollution, land use change, and nitrogen fertilizer use.

  16. Modulation of physical properties of oxide thin films by multiple fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua-Li, Yang; Bao-Min, Wang; Xiao-Jian, Zhu; Jie, Shang; Bin, Chen; Run-Wei, Li

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of the modulation of physical properties in oxide thin films by multiple fields are reviewed. Some of the key issues and prospects of this area of study are also addressed. Oxide thin films exhibit versatile physical properties such as magnetism, ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity, metal–insulator transition (MIT), multiferroicity, colossal magnetoresistivity, switchable resistivity. More importantly, the exhibited multifunctionality can be tuned by various external fields, which has enabled demonstration of novel electronic devices. Project supported by the State Key Project of Fundamental Research of China (Grant No. 2012CB933004), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474295, 51571208, 51525103, and 11274322), Overseas, Hong Kong & Macao Scholars Collaborated Researching Fund (Grant No. 51428201), the Instrument Developing Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YZ201327), Ningbo Major Project for Science and Technology (Grant No. 2014B11011), Ningbo International Cooperation Projects (Grant Nos. 2012D10018 and 2014D10005), the Fund for Ningbo Science and Technology Innovation Team (Grant No. 2015B11001), the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Key Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05).

  17. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L

    2014-11-28

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  18. One-electron reduced density matrices of strongly correlated harmonium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Explicit asymptotic expressions are derived for the reduced one-electron density matrices (the 1-matrices) of strongly correlated two- and three-electron harmonium atoms in the ground and first excited states. These expressions, which are valid at the limit of small confinement strength ω, yield electron densities and kinetic energies in agreement with the published values. In addition, they reveal the ω{sup 5/6} asymptotic scaling of the exchange components of the electron-electron repulsion energies that differs from the ω{sup 2/3} scaling of their Coulomb and correlation counterparts. The natural orbitals of the totally symmetric ground state of the two-electron harmonium atom are found to possess collective occupancies that follow a mixed power/Gaussian dependence on the angular momentum in variance with the simple power-law prediction of Hill’s asymptotics. Providing rigorous constraints on energies as functionals of 1-matrices, these results are expected to facilitate development of approximate implementations of the density matrix functional theory and ensure their proper description of strongly correlated systems.

  19. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation by an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.

  20. Predicting Reduction Rates of Energetic Nitroaromatic Compounds Using Calculated One-Electron Reduction Potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Bylaska, Eric J.; Johnston, Hayley; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2015-02-11

    The evaluation of new energetic nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) for use in green munitions formulations requires models that can predict their environmental fate. The susceptibility of energetic NACs to nitro reduction might be predicted from correlations between rate constants (k) for this reaction and one-electron reduction potentials (E1NAC) / 0.059 V, but the mechanistic implications of such correlations are inconsistent with evidence from other methods. To address this inconsistency, we have reevaluated existing kinetic data using a (non-linear) free-energy relationship (FER) based on the Marcus theory of outer-sphere electron transfer. For most reductants, the results are inconsistent with rate limitation bymore » an initial, outer-sphere electron transfer, suggesting that the strong correlation between k and E1NAC is justified only as an empirical model. This empirical correlation was used to calibrate a new quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) using previously reported values of k for non-energetic NAC reduction by Fe(II) porphyrin and newly reported values of E1NAC determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) level with the COSMO solvation model. The QSAR was then validated for energetic NACs using newly measured kinetic data for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The data show close agreement with the QSAR, supporting its applicability to energetic NACs.« less

  1. One-electron reduced density matrices of strongly correlated harmonium atoms.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Explicit asymptotic expressions are derived for the reduced one-electron density matrices (the 1-matrices) of strongly correlated two- and three-electron harmonium atoms in the ground and first excited states. These expressions, which are valid at the limit of small confinement strength ω, yield electron densities and kinetic energies in agreement with the published values. In addition, they reveal the ω(5/6) asymptotic scaling of the exchange components of the electron-electron repulsion energies that differs from the ω(2/3) scaling of their Coulomb and correlation counterparts. The natural orbitals of the totally symmetric ground state of the two-electron harmonium atom are found to possess collective occupancies that follow a mixed power/Gaussian dependence on the angular momentum in variance with the simple power-law prediction of Hill's asymptotics. Providing rigorous constraints on energies as functionals of 1-matrices, these results are expected to facilitate development of approximate implementations of the density matrix functional theory and ensure their proper description of strongly correlated systems.

  2. Biodegradation of individual and multiple chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane-oxidizing cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H L; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1996-01-01

    The microbial degradation of chlorinated and nonchlorinated methanes, ethanes, and ethanes by a mixed methane-oxidizing culture grown under chemostat and batch conditions is evaluated and compared with that by two pure methanotrophic strains: CAC1 (isolated from the mixed culture) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. With the exception of 1,1-dichloroethylene, the transformation capacity (Tc) for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon was generally found to be in inverse proportion to its chlorine content within each aliphatic group (i.e., methanes, ethanes, and ethenes), whereas similar trends were not observed for degradation rate constants. Tc trends were similar for all methane-oxidizing cultures tested. None of the cultures were able to degrade the fully chlorinated aliphatics such as perchloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride. Of the four cultures tested, the chemostat-grown mixed culture exhibited the highest Tc for trichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane, whereas the pure batch-grown OB3b culture exhibited the highest Tc for all other compounds tested. The product toxicity of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in a mixture containing multiple compounds was cumulative and predictable when using parameters measured from the degradation of individual compounds. The Tc for each chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon in a mixture (Tcmix) and the total Tc for the mixture (sigma Tcmix) are functions of the individual Tc, the initial substrate concentration (S0), and the first-order rate constant (k/Ks) of each compound in the mixture, indicating the importance of identifying the properties and compositions of all potentially degradable compounds in a contaminant mixture. PMID:8795228

  3. Pluriformity of inflammation in multiple sclerosis shown by ultra-small iron oxide particle enhancement.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, Machteld M; Oude Engberink, Raoul D; Seewann, Alexandra; Pouwels, Petra J W; Wattjes, Mike P; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Pering, Christiane; Polman, Chris H; de Vries, Helga E; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Barkhof, Frederik

    2008-03-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) is routinely used as a marker for inflammation in MRI to visualize breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in multiple sclerosis. Recent data suggest that ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO) can be used to visualize cellular infiltration, another aspect of inflammation. This project aimed to compare the novel USPIO particle SHU555C to the longitudinal pattern of Gd-DTPA enhancement in multiple sclerosis. Nineteen relapsing-remitting patients were screened monthly using Gd-enhanced MRI. In case of new enhancing lesions, USPIO were injected and 24 h later, MRI was performed and blood was collected to confirm USPIO loading of circulating monocytes. Lesion development was monitored by 3 monthly Gd-DTPA-enhanced scans and a final scan 7-11 months after injection. USPIO-enhancement was observed as hyperintensity on T1-weighted images, whereas no signal changes were observed on T2-weighted-gradient-echo images. In 14 patients with disease activity, 188 USPIO-positive lesions were seen, 144 of which were Gd-negative. By contrast, there were a total of 59 Gd-positive lesions, 15 of which were USPIO negative. Three patterns of USPIO-enhancement were seen: (i) focal enhancement; (ii) ring-like enhancement and (iii) return to isointensity of a previously hypointense lesion. The latter pattern was most frequently observed for lesions that turned out to be transiently hypointense on follow-up scans, and ring-enhancing lesions were less likely to evolve into black holes at follow-up than lesions without ring-like USPIO-enhancement; we speculate this to be associated with repair. In 4% of the USPIO-positive/Gd negative lesions, USPIO-enhancement preceded Gd-enhancement by 1 month. USPIO-enhancement remained visible for up to 3 months in 1.5% of all USPIO-positive lesions. In 29% of the lesions enhancing with both contrast agents, USPIO-enhancement persisted whereas Gd-enhancement had already resolved. In conclusion, the new

  4. Repeated exposure to isoprene oxidation products causes enhanced respiratory tract effects in multiple murine strains.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Annette C; Shore, Stephanie A; Spengler, John D

    2003-10-01

    Ozone reacts with terpenes, common hydrocarbons in cleaning and consumer products as well as the ambient environment, to form particle- and gas-phase products; these have been shown to cause sensory irritation and airflow limitation in mice during single exposures. Isoprene, a hemiterpene emitted from both plants and animals as a bioeffluent, induces the largest effects. This study evaluated the effects of repeated exposures to isoprene oxidation products (OPs) on airway irritation, airflow limitation, and airway responsiveness. A secondary objective was to evaluate a genetic influence by examining multiple murine strains. Six strains (A/J, AKR/J, BALB/c, Swiss Webster, C57Bl/6, and C3H/HeN; total n = 35) were exposed to isoprene oxidation products (1080 +/- 155 ppb isoprene + 3227 +/- 157 ppb ozone at admixing) for 3 h/day for 4 consecutive days. Respiratory parameters were monitored on days 1 and 4 via head-out plethysmography, and airway responsiveness to aerosolized methacholine was evaluated 24 h before the first exposure and immediately after the fourth exposure. Sensory irritation was observed during exposure, as evidenced by a reduction in respiratory frequency (f). A reduction in peak expiratory flow normalized for tidal volume (PEF/VT) also occurred, indicating an airflow limitation effect. Marked enhancement of the effects on f and PEF/VT was observed with repeated exposures, suggesting a cumulative effect. Frequency was reduced from 46.0 +/- 2.3% of baseline during exposure 1 to 34.2 +/- 2.1% during exposure 4 (p =.00002; pooled values for all strains). Similarly, PEF/VT decreased from 75.6 +/- 3.9% of baseline during exposure 1 to 53.1 +/- 3.7% during exposure 4 (p <.00001). A significant reduction in airway responsiveness was observed following repeated exposures in most strains. Interstrain differences in responses were noted, indicating a genetic component. These findings have important implications for indoor environments, where isoprene

  5. Biocompatible nanocarriers that respond to oxidative environments via interactions between chitosan and multiple metal ions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shichang; Xia, Liye; Ding, Chenchen; Wen, Lu; Wan, Weihua; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as an early damage signal contributing to the oxidative stress response and can act as a trigger in smart oxidation-responsive drug delivery systems that are currently in development. Current H2O2-triggered oxidation-responsive polymeric systems are usually derived from chemical synthesis and rarely include natural polymers. Herein, we report two series of nanoparticle (NP) complexes prepared with the biopolymer chitosan (CS) and four different metal ions (Cu2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, and Fe3+), defined as CSNPs-metal complexes (Series 1) and CS-metal complexes NPs (Series 2), which responded to oxidation by dissolving upon H2O2 exposure. Experiments examining Nile red release and H2O2-triggered degradation confirmed that both series of complexes showed better sensitivity to oxidation than the CSNPs alone. Furthermore, preliminary cytotoxicity and histological observations indicated that the two series exhibited little or no cytotoxicity and generated a mild inflammatory response. Our work provides a novel and promising strategy for developing NPs for use as intelligent oxidation-responsive systems. PMID:27358564

  6. Age-induced hair greying - the multiple effects of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Seiberg, M

    2013-12-01

    An obvious sign of ageing is hair greying, or the loss of pigment production and deposition within the hair shafts. Numerous mechanisms, acting at different levels and follicular locations, contribute to hair greying, ranging from melanocyte stem cells defects to follicular melanocyte death. One key issue that is in common to these processes is oxidative damage. At the hair follicle stem cells niche, oxidative stress, accelerated by B-cell lymphoma 2 gene (BCL-2) depletion, leads to selective apoptosis and diminution of melanocyte stem cells, reducing the repopulation of newly formed anagen follicles. Melanotic bulbar melanocytes express high levels of BCL-2 to enable survival from melanogenesis- and ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) attacks. With ageing, the bulbar melanocyte expression of anti-oxidant proteins such as BCL-2, and possibly TRP-2, is reduced, and the dedicated enzymatic anti-oxidant defence system throughout the follicle weakens, resulting in enhanced oxidative stress. A marked reduction in catalase expression and activity results in millimolar accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, contributing to bulbar melanocyte malfunction and death. Interestingly, amelanotic melanocytes at the outer root sheath (ORS) are somewhat less affected by these processes and survive for longer time even within the white, ageing hair follicles. Better understanding of the overtime susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress at the different follicular locations might yield clues to possible therapies for the prevention and reversal of hair greying.

  7. How the multiple antioxidant properties of ascorbic acid affect lipid oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Uluata, Sibel; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2015-02-18

    Lipid oxidation is a serious problem for oil-containing food products because it negatively affects shelf life and nutritional composition. An antioxidant strategy commonly employed to prevent or delay oxidation in foods is to remove oxygen from the closed food-packaging system. An alternative technique is use of an edible oxygen scavenger to remove oxygen within the food. Ascorbic acid (AA) is a particularly promising antioxidant because of its natural label and multiple antioxidative functions. In this study, AA was tested as an oxygen scavenger in buffer and an oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion. The effects of transition metals on the ability of AA to scavenge oxygen were determined. Headspace oxygen decrease less than 1% in the medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT) O/W emulsion system (pH 3 and 7). AA was able to almost completely remove dissolved oxygen (DO) in a buffered solution. Transition metals (Fe(2+) and Cu(+)) significantly accelerated the degradation of AA; however, iron and copper only increased DO depletion rates, by 10.6-16.4% from day 1 to 7, compared to the control. AA (2.5-20 mM) decreased DO in a 1% O/W emulsion system 32.0-64.0% and delayed the formation of headspace hexanal in the emulsion from 7 to over 20 days. This research shows that, when AA is used in an O/W emulsion system, oxidation of the emulsion system can be delay by multiple mechanisms. PMID:25650525

  8. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio; Sharma, Animesh; Demirovic, Aida; Rao, Shalini; Young, Clifford; Aas, Per Arne; Ericsson, Ida; Sundan, Anders; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Slupphaug, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are widely used chemotherapeutics in the treatment of many cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, sarcoma, lung, breast and ovarian cancer. Melphalan is the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agent against multiple myeloma. However, despite a 70-80% initial response rate, virtually all patients eventually relapse due to the emergence of drug-resistant tumour cells. By using global proteomic and transcriptomic profiling on melphalan sensitive and resistant RPMI8226 cell lines followed by functional assays, we discovered changes in cellular processes and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further explored to elucidate their potential to overcome melphalan resistance.

  9. Comparison of the effects of chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose and polyacrylic acid on the multiplication of phytopathogenic viruses.

    PubMed

    Kluge, S

    1985-10-01

    Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose (COAM) inhibit the multiplication of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaf disks by up to 50%. The reduction in TMV content is time-dependent and decreases with longer time intervals between the virus infection and the application of substances. The multiplication of potato virus X (PVX) in leaf disks is not affected by either PAA or COAM. In intact plants PAA produces a strong antiviral effect on both PVX and red clover mottle virus (RCMV). The effect produced by COAM is much less pronounced, although this substance is less toxic and could be used in a higher concentration than PAA. Neither of these compounds has a significant influence on the development of virus-induced necroses in Nicotiana glutinosa, Gomphrena globosa or Phaseolus vulgaris plants when administered one day before or after virus infection.

  10. Effect of temperature in multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress in coastal shrimp.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Catarina; Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joma; Diniz, Mário S

    2014-04-01

    Various studies in captivity and in the wild have pointed to the effect of season, and temperature in particular, in the levels of the oxidative stress biomarkers currently used for environmental quality assessment. However, knowledge on how temperature affects the oxidative stress response is unavailable for most species. This study investigated the effect of increasing temperature on lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase in the shrimps, Palaemon elegans and Palaemon serratus. It was concluded that increasing temperatures significantly affect all the biomarkers tested in both species, with the exception of superoxide dismutase in P. serratus which was not affected by temperature. The oxidative stress response was more intense in P. elegans, than in P. serratus, producing higher peaks of all biomarkers at temperatures between 22°C and 26°C, followed by low levels at higher temperatures. It was concluded that monitoring of ecosystems using oxidative stress biomarkers should take into account the species and thermal history of the organisms. Sampling should be avoided during heat waves and immediately after heat waves. PMID:24679970

  11. Isolated iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase exists in multiple forms in its oxidized and semi-reduced states.

    PubMed

    Newton, W E; Gheller, S F; Feldman, B J; Dunham, W R; Schultz, F A

    1989-02-01

    Electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic experiments demonstrate that the isolated iron-molybdenum cofactor from the molybdenum-iron protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii exists in multiple forms in both its oxidized and semi-reduced states. The particular forms found in either oxidation state appear to be a function of the acid/base status of the solvent, N-methylformamide. In "alkaline" N-methylformamide, a single, detectable form of iron-molybdenum cofactor is observed for both oxidized and semi-reduced states. The semi-reduced form, termed R(s-r), is the one previously recognized with an S = 3/2 EPR spectrum with apparent g values of 4.6, 3.4, 2.0. Its oxidized counterpart, termed B(ox), is characterized electrochemically by a differential pulse voltammetric reduction peak at -0.37 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode. In "acidic" solvent, two distinct, previously unrecognized redox pairs of iron-molybdenum cofactor forms exist. The two semi-reduced forms, N(s-r) and W(s-r), are characterized by EPR spectra with g = 4.5, 3.6, 2.0 and g = 4.9, 3.1, 1.9, respectively. Their oxidized counterparts, A(ox) and C(ox), have differential pulse voltammetric reduction peaks at -0.32 and -0.43 V versus the normal hydrogen electrode, respectively. Manipulations of either the isolation protocol or the sample conditions affects both the type and distribution of forms present. Each form likely corresponds to a biologically significant state of the cofactor cluster within the protein.

  12. Purple carrot extract protects against cadmium intoxication in multiple organs of rats: Genotoxicity, oxidative stress and tissue morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Claudio, Samuel Rangel; Gollucke, Andrea Pittelli Boiago; Yamamura, Hirochi; Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Bataglion, Giovana Anceski; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Peres, Rogerio Correa; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if purple carrot extract is able to protect against the noxious activities induced by cadmium exposure in multiple organs of rats. For this purpose, histopathological analysis, genotoxicity and oxidative status were investigated in this setting. A total of twenty Wistar rats weighing 250g on the average, and 8 weeks age were distributed into four groups (n=5), as follows: Control group (non-treated group, CTRL); Cadmium group (Cd) and Purple carrot extract groups at 400mg/L or 800mg/L. Histopathological analysis revealed that liver from animals treated with purple carrot extract improved tissue degeneration induced by cadmium intoxication. Genetic damage was reduced in blood and hepatocytes as depicted by comet and micronucleus assays in animals treated with purple carrot extract. SOD-CuZn and cytocrome C gene expression increased in groups treated with purple carrot extract. Purple carrot extract also reduced the 8OHdG levels in liver cells when compared to cadmium group. Taken together, our results demonstrate that purple carrot extract is able to protect against cadmium intoxication by means of reducing tissue regeneration, genotoxicity and oxidative stress in multiple organs of Wistar rats. PMID:26653742

  13. Multiple ink-jet printed zinc tin oxide layers with improved TFT performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykora, Benedikt; Wang, Di; von Seggern, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    In the last two decades, metal-oxides, like zinc tin oxide (ZTO), are widely studied semiconductors for transistor applications. This study presents a simple, non-toxic, stable, and cost efficient precursor route for ZTO deposition by ink-jet printing. Such fabricated thin films are composed of an amorphous phase with embedded ZnO nanocrystals. The saturation mobility of ink-jet printed transistors increases from 0.05 cm2 V-1 s-1 for a single semiconducting layer to 7.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 for a transistor composed of 8 layers. This constitutes the highest saturation mobility of an ink-jet printed ZTO transistor reported so far. The devices exhibit large output currents (up to 38.7 mA) and high on/off ratios (exceeding 108). The large improvement in transistor performance with the number of layers is ascribed to an improved degree of substrate coverage confirmed by AFM investigations.

  14. Novel mixed-oxide ceramic for neutron multiplication and tritium generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Dakshinamoorthy; Ghanwat, S. J.; Tripathi, B. M.; Danani, Chandan

    2011-10-01

    Beryllium and lithium titanate (Li 2TiO 3), have limited use in blankets due to the swelling of beryllium and low thermal conductivity of Li 2TiO 3. A novel mixed oxide composite of beryllium oxide and lithium titanate (BeO-Li 2TiO 3) is proposed, which utilizes the high thermal conductivity of BeO and its favourable neutronics. Li 2TiO 3 was prepared using two different routes, one employing a solid-state reaction and the other through sol-gel route. The sintered BeO-Li 2TiO 3 is found to have no intermediate products and its thermal conductivity decreased from 36 to 14 W/m/K with the increase in temperature from 127 °C to 927 °C. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of BeO-Li 2TiO 3 is less than that of Li 2TiO 3. Thermodynamic calculations show that tritium cannot be trapped in BeO unless beryllium monotrioxide (BeOT) is formed. The merits of BeO are compared with beryllium metal and neutronic calculations on tritium production in this novel mixed oxide are also presented.

  15. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ.

  16. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  17. HCV core protein uses multiple mechanisms to induce oxidative stress in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander V; Smirnova, Olga A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Ivanova, Olga N; Karpenko, Inna L; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2015-05-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGF\\(\\upbeta\\)1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37-191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1\\(\\upalpha\\). The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein.

  18. Chop deletion reduces oxidative stress, improves β cell function, and promotes cell survival in multiple mouse models of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Benbo; Scheuner, Donalyn; Ron, David; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2008-01-01

    The progression from insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes is caused by the failure of pancreatic β cells to produce sufficient levels of insulin to meet the metabolic demand. Recent studies indicate that nutrient fluctuations and insulin resistance increase proinsulin synthesis in β cells beyond the capacity for folding of nascent polypeptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen, thereby disrupting ER homeostasis and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). Chronic ER stress promotes apoptosis, at least in part through the UPR-induced transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). We assessed the effect of Chop deletion in multiple mouse models of type 2 diabetes and found that Chop–/– mice had improved glycemic control and expanded β cell mass in all conditions analyzed. In both genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance, CHOP deficiency improved β cell ultrastructure and promoted cell survival. In addition, we found that isolated islets from Chop–/– mice displayed increased expression of UPR and oxidative stress response genes and reduced levels of oxidative damage. These findings suggest that CHOP is a fundamental factor that links protein misfolding in the ER to oxidative stress and apoptosis in β cells under conditions of increased insulin demand. PMID:18776938

  19. Barley has two peroxisomal ABC transporters with multiple functions in β-oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Medhurst, Anne; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Zhang, Xuebin; Devonshire, Jean; Scholefield, Duncan; Fernández, José; Axcell, Barry; Ramsay, Luke; Waterham, Hans R.; Waugh, Robbie; Theodoulou, Frederica L.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In oilseed plants, peroxisomal β-oxidation functions not only in lipid catabolism but also in jasmonate biosynthesis and metabolism of pro-auxins. Subfamily D ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters mediate import of β-oxidation substrates into the peroxisome, and the Arabidopsis ABCD protein, COMATOSE (CTS), is essential for this function. Here, the roles of peroxisomal ABCD transporters were investigated in barley, where the main storage compound is starch. Barley has two CTS homologues, designated HvABCD1 and HvABCD2, which are widely expressed and present in embryo and aleurone tissues during germination. Suppression of both genes in barley RNA interference (RNAi) lines indicated roles in metabolism of 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyrate (2,4-DB) and indole butyric acid (IBA), jasmonate biosynthesis, and determination of grain size. Transformation of the Arabidopsis cts-1 null mutant with HvABCD1 and HvABCD2 confirmed these findings. HvABCD2 partially or completely complemented all tested phenotypes of cts-1. In contrast, HvABCD1 failed to complement the germination and establishment phenotypes of cts-1 but increased the sensitivity of hypocotyls to 100 μM IBA and partially complemented the seed size phenotype. HvABCD1 also partially complemented the yeast pxa1/pxa2Δ mutant for fatty acid β-oxidation. It is concluded that the core biochemical functions of peroxisomal ABC transporters are largely conserved between oilseeds and cereals but that their physiological roles and importance may differ. PMID:24913629

  20. One electron reduced square planar bis(benzene-1,2-dithiolato) copper dianionic complex and redox switch by O2/HO(-).

    PubMed

    Maiti, Biplab K; Maia, Luisa B; Pal, Kuntal; Pakhira, Bholanath; Avilés, Teresa; Moura, Isabel; Pauleta, Sofia R; Nuñez, José L; Rizzi, Alberto C; Brondino, Carlos D; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Moura, José J G

    2014-12-15

    The complex [Ph4P]2[Cu(bdt)2] (1(red)) was synthesized by the reaction of [Ph4P]2[S2MoS2CuCl] with H2bdt (bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) in basic medium. 1(red) is highly susceptible toward dioxygen, affording the one electron oxidized diamagnetic compound [Ph4P][Cu(bdt)2] (1(ox)). The interconversion between these two oxidation states can be switched by addition of O2 or base (Et4NOH = tetraethylammonium hydroxide), as demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. Thiomolybdates, in free or complex forms with copper ions, play an important role in the stability of 1(red) during its synthesis, since in its absence, 1(ox) is isolated. Both 1(red) and 1(ox) were structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. EPR experiments showed that 1(red) is a Cu(II)-sulfur complex and revealed strong covalency on the copper-sulfur bonds. DFT calculations confirmed the spin density delocalization over the four sulfur atoms (76%) and copper (24%) atom, suggesting that 1(red) has a "thiyl radical character". Time dependent DFT calculations identified such ligand to ligand charge transfer transitions. Accordingly, 1(red) is better described by the two isoelectronic structures [Cu(I)(bdt2, 4S(3-,)*)](2-) ↔ [Cu(II)(bdt2, 4S(4-))](2-). On thermodynamic grounds, oxidation of 1(red) (doublet state) leads to 1(ox) singlet state, [Cu(III)(bdt2, 4S(4-))](1-). PMID:25470763

  1. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  2. Achieving Low Overpotential Li-O₂ Battery Operations by Li₂O₂ Decomposition through One-Electron Processes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Dong, Qi; Madden, Ian; Yao, Xiahui; Cheng, Qingmei; Dornath, Paul; Fan, Wei; Wang, Dunwei

    2015-12-01

    As a promising high-capacity energy storage technology, Li-O2 batteries face two critical challenges, poor cycle lifetime and low round-trip efficiencies, both of which are connected to the high overpotentials. The problem is particularly acute during recharge, where the reactions typically follow two-electron mechanisms that are inherently slow. Here we present a strategy that can significantly reduce recharge overpotentials. Our approach seeks to promote Li2O2 decomposition by one-electron processes, and the key is to stabilize the important intermediate of superoxide species. With the introduction of a highly polarizing electrolyte, we observe that recharge processes are successfully switched from a two-electron pathway to a single-electron one. While a similar one-electron route has been reported for the discharge processes, it has rarely been described for recharge except for the initial stage due to the poor mobilities of surface bound superoxide ions (O2(-)), a necessary intermediate for the mechanism. Key to our observation is the solvation of O2(-) by an ionic liquid electrolyte (PYR14TFSI). Recharge overpotentials as low as 0.19 V at 100 mA/g(carbon) are measured.

  3. Robust and efficient amide-based nonheme manganese(III) hydrocarbon oxidation catalysts: substrate and solvent effects on involvement and partition of multiple active oxidants.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Joo; Lee, Sun Hwa; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Soo Hyun; Goo, Hyo Geun; Eom, Geun Hee; Lee, Ju Hoon; Lah, Myoung Soo; Kim, Youngmee; Kim, Sung-Jin; Lee, Ju Eun; Lee, Hong-In; Kim, Cheal

    2011-06-20

    Two new mononuclear nonheme manganese(III) complexes of tetradentate ligands containing two deprotonated amide moieties, [Mn(bpc)Cl(H(2)O)] (1) and [Mn(Me(2)bpb)Cl(H(2)O)]⋅CH(3)OH (2), were prepared and characterized. Complex 2 has also been characterized by X-ray crystallography. Magnetic measurements revealed that the complexes are high spin (S = 5/2) Mn(III) species with typical magnetic moments of 4.76 and 4.95 μ(B), respectively. These nonheme Mn(III) complexes efficiently catalyzed olefin epoxidation and alcohol oxidation upon treatment with MCPBA under mild experimental conditions. Olefin epoxidation by these catalysts is proposed to involve the multiple active oxidants Mn(V)=O, Mn(IV)=O, and Mn(III)-OO(O)CR. Evidence for this approach was derived from reactivity and Hammett studies, KIE (k(H)/k(D)) values, H(2)(18)O-exchange experiments, and the use of peroxyphenylacetic acid as a mechanistic probe. In addition, it has been proposed that the participation of Mn(V)=O, Mn(IV)=O, and Mn(III)-OOR could be controlled by changing the substrate concentration, and that partitioning between heterolysis and homolysis of the O-O bond of a Mn-acylperoxo intermediate (Mn-OOC(O)R) might be significantly affected by the nature of solvent, and that the O-O bond of the Mn-OOC(O)R might proceed predominantly by heterolytic cleavage in protic solvent. Therefore, a discrete Mn(V)=O intermediate appeared to be the dominant reactive species in protic solvents. Furthermore, we have observed close similarities between these nonheme Mn(III) complex systems and Mn(saloph) catalysts previously reported, suggesting that this simultaneous operation of the three active oxidants might prevail in all the manganese-catalyzed olefin epoxidations, including Mn(salen), Mn(nonheme), and even Mn(porphyrin) complexes. This mechanism provides the greatest congruity with related oxidation reactions by using certain Mn complexes as catalysts.

  4. INTERCONNECTION BETWEEN NITRIC OXIDE FORMATION AND HYPERSENSITIVITY PARAMETERS UNDER GUINEA PIG MODEL OF ACUTE ASTHMA WITH MULTIPLE CHALLENGES.

    PubMed

    Parilova, O O; Shandrenko, S G

    2015-01-01

    An immunoregulatory role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of adaptive immune responses associated with allergic diseases is very important. The present study extended these observations by the examination of the reciprocal changes in characteristic immunologic parameters of the disease and NO level of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells under guinea pig model of acute asthma with multiple challenges. Development of guinea pig Th2 mediated asthma was accompanied by increasing the level of allergic markers: ovalbumin (OVA) specific IgG and IL-4. We demonstrated that the infiltrate of airway cells contributes to NO synthesis in the respiratory tract during allergic inflammation. The level of intracellular NO formation significantly correlated with plasma allergen specific IgG value in OVA-induced asthma. The presented data evidence that the elevated intracellular NO level in BAL fluid may reflect a nitrosative stress in respiratory tract in general, when allergic asthma exacerbation is present.

  5. Self-interaction correction in multiple scattering theory: application to transition metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Daene, Markus W; Lueders, Martin; Ernst, Arthur; Diemo, Koedderitzsch; Temmerman, Walter M; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    We apply to transition metal monoxides the self-interaction corrected (SIC) local spin density (LSD) approximation, implemented locally in the multiple scattering theory within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) band structure method. The calculated electronic structure and in particular magnetic moments and energy gaps are discussed in reference to the earlier SIC results obtained within the LMTO-ASA band structure method, involving transformations between Bloch and Wannier representations to solve the eigenvalue problem and calculate the SIC charge and potential. Since the KKR can be easily extended to treat disordered alloys, by invoking the coherent potential approximation (CPA), in this paper we compare the CPA approach and supercell calculations to study the electronic structure of NiO with cation vacancies.

  6. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry. PMID:27319056

  7. Investigation of hair dye deposition, hair color loss, and hair damage during multiple oxidative dyeing and shampooing cycles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guojin; McMullen, Roger L; Kulcsar, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Color fastness is a major concern for consumers and manufacturers of oxidative hair dye products. Hair dye loss results from multiple wash cycles in which the hair dye is dissolved by water and leaches from the hair shaft. In this study, we carried out a series of measurements to help us better understand the kinetics of the leaching process and pathways associated with its escape from the fiber. Hair dye leaching kinetics was measured by suspending hair in a dissolution apparatus and monitoring the dye concentration in solution (leached dye) with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The physical state of dye deposited in hair fibers was evaluated by a reflectance light microscopy technique, based on image stacking, allowing enhanced depth of field imaging. The dye distribution within the fiber was monitored by infrared spectroscopic imaging of hair fiber cross sections. Damage to the ultrafine structure of the hair cuticle (surface, endocuticle, and cell membrane complex) and cortex (cell membrane complex) was determined in hair cross sections and on the hair fiber surface with atomic force microscopy. Using differential scanning calorimetry, we investigated how consecutive coloring and leaching processes affect the internal proteins of hair. Further, to probe the surface properties of hair we utilized contact angle measurements. This study was conducted on both pigmented and nonpigmented hair to gain insight into the influence of melanin on the hair dye deposition and leaching processes. Both types of hair were colored utilizing a commercial oxidative hair dye product based on pyrazole chemistry.

  8. Optimal control of the electronic current density: Application to one- and two-dimensional one-electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerlander, David; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Castro, Alberto

    2011-04-15

    Quantum optimal control theory is a powerful tool for engineering quantum systems subject to external fields such as the ones created by intense lasers. The formulation relies on a suitable definition for a target functional, that translates the intended physical objective to a mathematical form. We propose the use of target functionals defined in terms of the one-particle density and its current. A strong motivation for this is the possibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory for the description of the system dynamics. We exemplify this idea by defining an objective functional that on one hand attempts a large overlap with a target density and on the other hand minimizes the current. The latter requirement leads to optimized states with increased stability, which we prove with a few examples of one- and two-dimensional one-electron systems.

  9. NPGPx (GPx7): a novel oxidative stress sensor/transmitter with multiple roles in redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ing; Wei, Pei-Chi; Hsu, Jye-Lin; Su, Fang-Yi; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    NPGPx (GPx7) is a member of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) family without any GPx activity. GPx7 displays a unique function which serves as a stress sensor/transmitter to transfer the signal to its interacting proteins by shuttling disulfide bonds in response to various stresses. In this review, we focus on the exceptional structural and biochemical features of GPx7 compared to other 7 family members and described how GPx7 regulates the diverse signaling targets including GRP78, PDI, CPEB2, and XRN2, and their different roles in unfolded protein response, oxidative stress, and non-targeting siRNA stress response, respectively. The phenotypes associated with GPx7 deficiency in mouse or human including ROS accumulations, highly elevated cancer incidences, auto-immune disorders, and obesity are also revealed in this paper. Finally, we compare GPx8 with GPx7, which shares the highest structural similarity but different biological roles in stress response. These insights have thus provided a more comprehensive understanding of the role of GPx7 in the maintenance of redox homeostasis. PMID:27186289

  10. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Silva, M P da; Cedraz-Mercez, P L; Varanda, W A

    2014-02-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1) the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2) synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON.

  11. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, M.P.; Cedraz-Mercez, P.L.; Varanda, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1) the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2) synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON. PMID:24519124

  12. Striking multiple synergies created by combining reduced graphene oxides and carbon nanotubes for polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ping'an; Liu, Lina; Fu, Shenyuan; Yu, Youming; Jin, Chunde; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2013-03-01

    The extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene stimulate the development of advanced composites. Recently, several studies have reported significant synergies in the mechanical, electrical and thermal conductivity properties of polymer nanocomposites by incorporating their nanohybrids. In this work, we created polypropylene nanocomposites with homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and reduced graphene oxides via a facile polymer-latex-coating plus melt-mixing strategy, and investigated their synergistic effects in their viscoelastic, gas barrier, and flammability properties. Interestingly, the results show remarkable synergies, enhancing their melt modulus and viscosity, O2 barrier, and flame retardancy properties and respectively exhibiting a synergy percentage of 15.9%, 45.3%, and 20.3%. As previously reported, we also observed remarkable synergistic effects in their tensile strength (14.3%) and Young’s modulus (27.1%), electrical conductivity (32.3%) and thermal conductivity (34.6%). These impressive results clearly point towards a new strategy to create advanced materials by adding binary combinations of different types of nanofillers.

  13. Striking multiple synergies created by combining reduced graphene oxides and carbon nanotubes for polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping'an; Liu, Lina; Fu, Shenyuan; Yu, Youming; Jin, Chunde; Wu, Qiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2013-03-29

    The extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene stimulate the development of advanced composites. Recently, several studies have reported significant synergies in the mechanical, electrical and thermal conductivity properties of polymer nanocomposites by incorporating their nanohybrids. In this work, we created polypropylene nanocomposites with homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and reduced graphene oxides via a facile polymer-latex-coating plus melt-mixing strategy, and investigated their synergistic effects in their viscoelastic, gas barrier, and flammability properties. Interestingly, the results show remarkable synergies, enhancing their melt modulus and viscosity, O2 barrier, and flame retardancy properties and respectively exhibiting a synergy percentage of 15.9%, 45.3%, and 20.3%. As previously reported, we also observed remarkable synergistic effects in their tensile strength (14.3%) and Young's modulus (27.1%), electrical conductivity (32.3%) and thermal conductivity (34.6%). These impressive results clearly point towards a new strategy to create advanced materials by adding binary combinations of different types of nanofillers.

  14. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation.

  15. Nitrogen loading and nitrous oxide emissions from a river with multiple hydroelectric reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinsong; Cao, Wenzhi; Cao, Di; Huang, Zheng; Liang, Ying

    2015-05-01

    River networks receive a large fraction of the anthropogenic nitrogen applied to river catchments. The different impacts of the stream nitrogen (N) loading on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from various of aquatic ecosystems are still unknown. In this study, direct measurements of water-air interface N2O exchange in different water bodies were conducted. Results showed that the water-air interface N2O exchange from tributaries, hydropower station reservoirs, a main stream, and its estuary were 10.14 ± 13.51, 15.64 ± 10.72, 27.59 ± 20.99, and 15.98 ± 12.26 µg N2O-N m(-2) h(-1), respectively, indicating the strong impacts of human activities on N2O emission rates. The water NO2 (-)-N values predicted the dissolved N2O concentrations better than did the NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N values, indicating strong denitrification and nitrification processes. The dissolved inorganic N explained 36 % of the variations in the N2O emissions for the whole river network.

  16. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation. PMID:26924114

  17. [Multiplication of Brucella abortus and production of nitric oxide in two macrophage cell lines of different origin].

    PubMed

    Serafino, J; Conde, S; Zabal, O; Samartino, L

    2007-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a bacterium which causes abortions and infertility in cattle and undulant fever in humans. It multiplies intracellularly, evading the mechanisms of cellular death. Nitric oxide (NO) is important in the regulation of the immune response. In the present work, we studied the ability of three B. abortus strains to survive intracellularly in two macrophage cell lines. The bacterial multiplication in both cell lines was determined at two different times in UFC/ ml units. Moreover the inoculated cells were also observed under light-field and fluorescence microscopy stained with Giemsa and acridine orange, respectively. The stain of both cellular lines showed similar results with respect to the UFC/ml determination. The presence of B. abortus was confirmed by electronic microscopy. In both macrophage cell lines inoculated with the rough strain RB51, the multiplication diminished and the level of NO was higher, compared with cells inoculated with smooth strains (S19 and 2308). These results suggest that the absence of O-chain of LPS probably affects the intracellular growth of B. abortus.

  18. Using multiple hydrogen bonding cross-linkers to access reversibly responsive three dimensional graphene oxide architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Junkai; Shen, Yongtao; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene materials have attracted a lot of attention for efficiently utilizing inherent properties of graphene sheets. However, 3D graphene materials reported in the previous literature are constructed through covalent or weak non-covalent interactions, causing permanent structure/property changes. In this paper, a novel 3D graphene material of dynamic interactions between lamellas with 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone as a supra-molecular motif has been synthesized. This 3D graphene material shows enhanced sheet interactions while the cross-linking takes place. With proper solvent stimulation, the integrated 3D graphene material can disassemble as isolated sheets. The driving force for the 3D structure assembly or disassembly is considered to be the forming or breaking of the multiple hydrogen bonding pairs. Furthermore, the 3D material is used as an intelligent dye adsorber to adsorb methylene blue and release it. The controllable and reversible characteristic of this 3D graphene material may open an avenue to the synthesis and application of novel intelligent materials.Three-dimensional (3D) graphene materials have attracted a lot of attention for efficiently utilizing inherent properties of graphene sheets. However, 3D graphene materials reported in the previous literature are constructed through covalent or weak non-covalent interactions, causing permanent structure/property changes. In this paper, a novel 3D graphene material of dynamic interactions between lamellas with 2-ureido-4[1H]-pyrimidinone as a supra-molecular motif has been synthesized. This 3D graphene material shows enhanced sheet interactions while the cross-linking takes place. With proper solvent stimulation, the integrated 3D graphene material can disassemble as isolated sheets. The driving force for the 3D structure assembly or disassembly is considered to be the forming or breaking of the multiple hydrogen bonding pairs. Furthermore, the 3D material is used as an

  19. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants.

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  1. Oxidative Stress Triggers Body-Wide Skipping of Multiple Exons of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joonbae; Singh, Natalia N.; Ottesen, Eric W.; Sivanesan, Senthilkumar; Shishimorova, Maria; Singh, Ravindra N.

    2016-01-01

    Humans carry two nearly identical copies of Survival Motor Neuron gene: SMN1 and SMN2. Loss of SMN1 leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most frequent genetic cause of infant mortality. While SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7, correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing holds the promise of a cure for SMA. Previously, we used cell-based models coupled with a multi-exon-skipping detection assay (MESDA) to demonstrate the vulnerability of SMN2 exons to aberrant splicing under the conditions of oxidative stress (OS). Here we employ a transgenic mouse model and MESDA to examine the OS-induced splicing regulation of SMN2 exons. We induced OS using paraquat that is known to trigger production of reactive oxygen species and cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We show an overwhelming co-skipping of SMN2 exon 5 and exon 7 under OS in all tissues except testis. We also show that OS increases skipping of SMN2 exon 3 in all tissues except testis. We uncover several new SMN2 splice isoforms expressed at elevated levels under the conditions of OS. We analyze cis-elements and transacting factors to demonstrate the diversity of mechanisms for splicing misregulation under OS. Our results of proteome analysis reveal downregulation of hnRNP H as one of the potential consequences of OS in brain. Our findings suggest SMN2 as a sensor of OS with implications to SMA and other diseases impacted by low levels of SMN protein. PMID:27111068

  2. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  3. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in multiple organs of mice acutely exposed to amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Yasin, Javed; Kazzam, Elsadig E; Ali, Badreldin H

    2016-01-01

    The use of amorphous silica (SiO2) in biopharmaceutical and industrial fields can lead to human exposure by injection, skin penetration, ingestion, or inhalation. However, the in vivo acute toxicity of amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles (SiNPs) on multiple organs and the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well understood. Presently, we investigated the acute (24 hours) effects of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm SiNPs (0.25 mg/kg) on systemic toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in the lung, heart, liver, kidney, and brain of mice. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased by SiNPs in the lung, liver, kidney, and brain, but was not changed in the heart. Similarly, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were significantly affected by SiNPs in all organs studied. While the concentration of tumor necrosis factor α was insignificantly increased in the liver and brain, its increase was statistically significant in the lung, heart, and kidney. SiNPs induced a significant elevation in pulmonary and renal interleukin 6 and interleukin-1 beta in the lung, liver, and brain. Moreover, SiNPs caused a significant increase in DNA damage, assessed by comet assay, in all the organs studied. SiNPs caused leukocytosis and increased the plasma activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alanine aminotranferase, and aspartate aminotransferase. These results indicate that acute systemic exposure to SiNPs causes oxidative stress, inflammation, and DNA damage in several major organs, and highlight the need for thorough evaluation of SiNPs before they can be safely used in human beings. PMID:27022259

  4. A simple quasi-diabatization scheme suitable for spectroscopic problems based on one-electron properties of interacting states.

    PubMed

    Cave, Robert J; Stanton, John F

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple quasi-diabatization scheme applicable to spectroscopic studies that can be applied using any wavefunction for which one-electron properties and transition properties can be calculated. The method is based on rotation of a pair (or set) of adiabatic states to minimize the difference between the given transition property at a reference geometry of high symmetry (where the quasi-diabatic states and adiabatic states coincide) and points of lower symmetry where quasi-diabatic quantities are desired. Compared to other quasi-diabatization techniques, the method requires no special coding, facilitates direct comparison between quasi-diabatic quantities calculated using different types of wavefunctions, and is free of any selection of configurations in the definition of the quasi-diabatic states. On the other hand, the method appears to be sensitive to multi-state issues, unlike recent methods we have developed that use a configurational definition of quasi-diabatic states. Results are presented and compared with two other recently developed quasi-diabatization techniques. PMID:26851911

  5. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of CsAr van der Waals system including the spin-orbit interaction.

    PubMed

    Dhiflaoui, J; Berriche, H

    2010-07-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of the CsAr van der Waals system have been determined using [Cs(+)] and [Ar] core pseudopotentials and by considering core polarization operators on both atoms. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the CsAr system to only one electron, i.e., the valence electron, which led to use of large basis sets for Cs and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states are performed at the self consistent field (SCF) level. Spin-orbit interaction is also considered within a semiempirical scheme for the states dissociating into Cs(6p) and Cs(5d). The core-core interactions for Cs(+)Ar is included using the coupled cluster simple and double excitation (CCSD) accurate potential of Hickling et al. (Hickling, H.; Viehland, L.; Shepherd, D.; Soldan, P.; Lee, E.; Wright, T. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2004, 6, 4233). In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical and experimental works. Such comparison has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the spectroscopic data for the higher excited states are presented for the first time.

  6. Impact of graphene oxide on the structure and function of important multiple blood components by a dose-dependent pattern.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ru; Yu, Yueping; Shen, Chaoxuan; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2015-06-01

    Graphene and its derivatives have become great concern in biomedical fields. Though many investigations about their toxicity have been reported, systematic investigation on the interaction with multiple blood components is lacking. In this work, we studied the effects of the graphene oxide (GO) on the structure and function of the blood components, especially, on morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen conformation, complement activation, and blood coagulation function. Scanning electron microscopy observation and hemolysis test results showed that the GO can affect RBC morphology and membrane integrity in a concentration-dependent way. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra showed that GO could alter the secondary structures and conformation of BSA and fibrinogen. In addition, the presence of GO could also trigger complement activation by detecting their key biomarker molecules in plasma. In the blood clotting process, the GO showed significant adverse effect on the activated partial thromboplastin time but not on prothrombin time of the platelet-poor plasma. Meanwhile, the GO also caused abnormal thromboelastography parameters of the whole blood coagulation. The results obtained in this study provides good insight into understanding the biomedical application of GO in vivo. PMID:25257186

  7. Oxidative responsiveness to multiple stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki: Interactions between temperature, acidification and cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Maura; Lanzoni, Ilaria; Nardi, Alessandro; d'Errico, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Marta; Fattorini, Daniele; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    High-latitude marine ecosystems are ranked to be among the most sensitive regions to climate change since highly stenothermal and specially adapted organisms might be seriously affected by global warming and ocean acidification. The present investigation was aimed to provide new insights on the sensitivity to such environmental stressors in the key Antarctic species, Adamussium colbecki, focussing also on their synergistic effects with cadmium exposure, naturally abundant in this area for upwelling phenomena. Scallops were exposed for 2 weeks to various combinations of Cd (0 and 40 μgL-1), pH (8.05 and 7.60) and temperature (-1 and +1 °C). Beside Cd bioaccumulation, a wide panel of early warning biomarkers were analysed in digestive glands and gills including levels of metallothioneins, individual antioxidants and total oxyradical scavenging capacity, onset of oxidative cell damage like lipid peroxidation, lysosomal stability, DNA integrity and peroxisomal proliferation. Results indicated reciprocal interactions between multiple stressors and their elaboration by a quantitative hazard model based on the relevance and magnitude of effects, highlighted a different sensitivity of analysed tissues. Due to cellular adaptations to high basal Cd content, digestive gland appeared more tolerant toward other prooxidant stressors, but sensitive to variations of the metal. On the other hand, gills were more affected by various combinations of stressors occurring at higher temperature.

  8. Protein oxidation and peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established.

  9. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function. Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides inhibit these pathways and this may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in cells. Available evidence supports an association between protein oxidation and multiple human pathologies, but whether this link is causal remains to be established. PMID:27026395

  10. Multiple sulfur isotope composition of oxidized Samoan melts and the implications of a sulfur isotope 'mantle array' in chemical geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    To better address how subducted protoliths drive the Earth's mantle sulfur isotope heterogeneity, we report new data for sulfur (S) and copper (Cu) abundances, S speciation and multiple S isotopic compositions (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) in 15 fresh submarine basaltic glasses from the Samoan archipelago, which defines the enriched-mantle-2 (EM2) endmember. Bulk S abundances vary between 835 and 2279 ppm. About 17 ± 11% of sulfur is oxidized (S6+) but displays no consistent trend with bulk S abundance or any other geochemical tracer. The S isotope composition of both dissolved sulfide and sulfate yield homogeneous Δ33S and Δ36S values, within error of Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT). In contrast, δ34S values are variable, ranging between +0.11 and +2.79‰ (±0.12‰ 1σ) for reduced sulfur, whereas oxidized sulfur values vary between +4.19 and +9.71‰ (±0.80‰, 1σ). Importantly, δ34S of the reduced S pool correlates with the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the glasses, in a manner similar to that previously reported for South-Atlantic MORB, extending the trend to δ34S values up to + 2.79 ± 0.04 ‰, the highest value reported for undegassed oceanic basalts. As for EM-1 basalts from the South Atlantic ridge, the linear δ34S-87Sr/86Sr trend requires the EM-2 endmember to be relatively S-rich, and only sediments can account for these isotopic characteristics. While many authors argue that both the EM-1 and EM-2 mantle components record subduction of various protoliths (e.g. upper or lower continental crust, lithospheric mantle versus intra-metasomatized mantle, or others), it is proposed here that they primarily reflect sediment recycling. Their distinct Pb isotope variation can be accounted for by varying the proportion of S-poor recycled oceanic crust in the source of mantle plumes.

  11. Efficacy of Fish Oil on Serum of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 Oxidative Stress Markers in Multiple Sclerosis Treated with Interferon Beta-1b

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Ramirez, V.; Macias-Islas, M. A.; Ortiz, G. G.; Pacheco-Moises, F.; Torres-Sanchez, E. D.; Sorto-Gomez, T. E.; Cruz-Ramos, J. A.; Orozco-Aviña, G.; Celis de la Rosa, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to focal plaques of demyelination and tissue injury in the central nervous system. Oxidative stress is also thought to promote tissue damage in multiple sclerosis. Current research findings suggest that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) such as eicosapenta-enoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) contained in fish oil may have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the efficacy of fish oil supplementation on serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative stress markers, and disease progression in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. The primary outcome was serum TNFα levels; secondary outcomes were IL-1β 1b, IL-6, nitric oxide catabolites, lipoperoxides, progression on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS), and annualized relapses rate (ARR). Fish oil treatment decreased the serum levels of TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and nitric oxide metabolites compared with placebo group (P ≤ 0.001). There was no significant difference in serum lipoperoxide levels during the study. No differences in EDSS and ARR were found. Conclusion. Fish oil supplementation is highly effective in reducing the levels of cytokines and nitric oxide catabolites in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. PMID:23861993

  12. Performance enhancement of multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated using self-aligned and laser interference photolithography techniques

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The simple self-aligned photolithography technique and laser interference photolithography technique were proposed and utilized to fabricate multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Since the multiple-gate structure could improve the electrical field distribution along the ZnO channel, the performance of the ZnO MOSFETs could be enhanced. The performance of the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs was better than that of the conventional single-gate ZnO MOSFETs. The higher the drain-source saturation current (12.41 mA/mm), the higher the transconductance (5.35 mS/mm) and the lower the anomalous off-current (5.7 μA/mm) for the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs were obtained. PMID:24948884

  13. Performance enhancement of multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated using self-aligned and laser interference photolithography techniques.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Ying; Huang, Hung-Lin; Tseng, Chun-Yen

    2014-01-01

    The simple self-aligned photolithography technique and laser interference photolithography technique were proposed and utilized to fabricate multiple-gate ZnO metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Since the multiple-gate structure could improve the electrical field distribution along the ZnO channel, the performance of the ZnO MOSFETs could be enhanced. The performance of the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs was better than that of the conventional single-gate ZnO MOSFETs. The higher the drain-source saturation current (12.41 mA/mm), the higher the transconductance (5.35 mS/mm) and the lower the anomalous off-current (5.7 μA/mm) for the multiple-gate ZnO MOSFETs were obtained.

  14. Tissue- and development-specific expression of multiple alternatively spliced transcripts of rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M A; Cai, L; Hübner, N; Lee, Y A; Lindpaintner, K

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as an intercellular messenger and mediates numerous biological functions. Among the three isoforms of NO synthase that produce NO, the ubiquitously expressed neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) is responsible for a large part of NO production, yet its regulation is poorly understood. Recent reports of two alternative spliceforms of nNOS in the mouse and in man have raised the possibility of spatial and temporal modulation of expression. This study demonstrates the existence of at least three transcripts of the rat nNOS gene designated nNOSa, nNOSb, and nNOSc, respectively, with distinct 5' untranslated first exons that arise from alternative splicing to a common second exon. Expression of the alternative transcripts occurs with a high degree of tissue and developmental specificity, as demonstrated by RNase protection assays on multiple tissues from both fetal and adult rats. Furthermore, terminal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma-derived PC12 cells into neurons is associated with induction of nNOSa, suggesting, likewise, development- and tissue-specific transcriptional control of nNOS isoform expression. Physical mapping using a rat yeast artificial chromosome clone shows that the alternatively spliced first exons 1a, 1b, and 1c are separated by at least 15-60 kb from the downstream coding sequence, with exons 1b and 1c being positioned within 200 bp of each other. These findings provide evidence that the biological activity of nNOS is tightly and specifically regulated by a complex pattern of alternative splicing, indicating that the notion of constitutive expression of this isoform needs to be revised. PMID:9294118

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease Influences Multiple Systems: Describing the Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Kidney Damage, and Concomitant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation promote renal injury via damage to molecular components of the kidney. Unfortunately, relationships between inflammation and oxidative stress are cyclical in that the inflammatory processes that exist to repair radical-mediated damage may be a source of additional free radicals, resulting in further damage to renal tissue. Oxidative stress and inflammation also have the ability to become systemic, serving to injure tissues distal to the site of original insult. This review describes select mediators in the exacerbatory relationship between oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD. This review also discusses oxidative stress, inflammation, and CKD as they pertain to the development and progression of common CKD-associated comorbidities. Lastly, the utility of several widely accessible and cost-effective lifestyle interventions and their ability to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation are discussed and recommendations for future research are provided. PMID:25861414

  16. Identification of one-electron reductases that activate both the hypoxia prodrug SN30000 and diagnostic probe EF5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingli; Guise, Chris P; Dachs, Gabi U; Phung, Yen; Hsu, Annie Huai-Ling; Lambie, Neil K; Patterson, Adam V; Wilson, William R

    2014-10-15

    SN30000 is a second-generation benzotriazine-N-oxide hypoxia-activated prodrug scheduled for clinical trial. Previously we showed that covalent binding of the hypoxia probe EF5 predicts metabolic activation of SN30000 in a panel of cancer cell lines under anoxia, suggesting that they are activated by the same reductases. However the identity of these reductases is unknown. Here, we test whether forced expression of nine oxidoreductases with known or suspected roles in bioreductive prodrug metabolism (AKR1C3, CYB5R3, FDXR, MTRR, NDOR1, NOS2A, NQO1, NQO2 and POR) enhances oxic or anoxic reduction of SN30000 and EF5 by HCT116 cells. Covalent binding of (14)C-EF5 and reduction of SN30000 to its 1-oxide and nor-oxide metabolites was highly selective for anoxia in all lines, with significantly elevated anoxic metabolism of both compounds in lines over-expressing POR, MTRR, NOS2A or NDOR1. There was a strong correlation between EF5 binding and SN30000 metabolism under anoxia across the cell lines (R(2)=0.84, p=0.0001). Antiproliferative potency of SN30000 under anoxia was increased most strongly by overexpression of MTRR and POR. Transcript abundance in human tumours, evaluated using public domain mRNA expression data, was highest for MTRR, followed by POR, NOS2A and NDOR1, with little variation between tumour types. Immunostaining of tissue microarrays demonstrated variable MTRR protein expression across 517 human cancers with most displaying low expression. In conclusion, we have identified four diflavin reductases (POR, MTRR, NOS2A and NDOR1) capable of reducing both SN30000 and EF5, further supporting use of 2-nitroimidazole probes to predict the ability of hypoxic cells to activate SN30000. PMID:25130546

  17. PM2.5 collected in China causes inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in macrophages through the multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Ito, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; He, Cuiying; Arashidani, Keiichi; He, Miao; Sun, Guifan; Zeng, Yang; Sone, Hideko; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution continues to increase in East Asia, particularly in China, and is considered to cause serious health problems. In this study, we investigated the toxicological properties of particulate matter ≤2.5mm (PM2.5) collected in an urban area in China (Shenyang), focusing on inflammation and oxidative stress tightly linked to respiratory diseases. Exposure to PM2.5 significantly increased the expression levels of inflammatory (interleukin-1β and cyclooxygenase-2) and oxidative stress (heme oxygenase1) genes in the mouse macrophages. PM2.5-caused inflammatory response was strongly suppressed by endotoxin neutralizer (polymyxin B) and knock-out of toll-like receptor 4, while oxidative stress was not. On the other hand, an antioxidant (N-acetylcystein) suppressed oxidative stress, but not inflammatory response. These results suggest that PM2.5 in the atmospheric environment of China causes inflammation and oxidative stress in macrophages via separate pathways. PMID:27393915

  18. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  19. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and dietary interventions to reduce oxidative stress in a secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patient leads to marked gains in function: a case report.

    PubMed

    Reese, David; Shivapour, Ezzatolah T; Wahls, Terry L; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna D; Shields, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation has been used to aid musculoskeletal recovery. Excessive oxidative stress and excitoxicity are implicated in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A 52-year-old white female with SPMS had been scooter- and cane-dependent for 4 years. She requested and received a trial of neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Two months after initiating NMES the patient adopted several nutritional interventions to lower oxidative stress and excito-toxicity. During the first 2 months of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, the therapist observed modest gait improvements. Following the addition of nutritional interventions, more rapids gains in strength and endurance, including muscle groups not receiving neuromuscular electrical stimulation were observed by both the therapist and the patient. After 8 months of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (6 months of nutritional intervention) the patient's function had improved sufficiently that she no longer used a scooter or cane and rode her bicycle routinely 8 miles, including hills. PMID:19918474

  20. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation and dietary interventions to reduce oxidative stress in a secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patient leads to marked gains in function: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Reese, David; Shivapour, Ezzatolah T; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna D; Shields, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation has been used to aid musculoskeletal recovery. Excessive oxidative stress and excitoxicity are implicated in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. A 52-year-old white female with SPMS had been scooter- and cane-dependent for 4 years. She requested and received a trial of neuromuscular electrical stimulation. Two months after initiating NMES the patient adopted several nutritional interventions to lower oxidative stress and excito-toxicity. During the first 2 months of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, the therapist observed modest gait improvements. Following the addition of nutritional interventions, more rapids gains in strength and endurance, including muscle groups not receiving neuromuscular electrical stimulation were observed by both the therapist and the patient. After 8 months of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (6 months of nutritional intervention) the patient’s function had improved sufficiently that she no longer used a scooter or cane and rode her bicycle routinely 8 miles, including hills. PMID:19918474

  1. Multiple Sulfate Isotopic Evidence on the Formation of Oxide Copper Ore at Spence, Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Bao, H.; Reich, M.; Palacios, C.

    2007-12-01

    In the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, one of the world's richest metallogenic provinces, porphyry copper deposits are characterized by the unique occurrence of atacamite in their oxidized zones. The origin and formation of the oxide zone of these copper deposits is, however, controversial. It was proposed that Cl-rich deep formation water pumping-up events along faults by earthquakes, after onset of the hyperaridity, were required (Cameron et al., 2007). Their model would imply that supplies of saline deep formation water from fractures to the surface should have left behind a homogeneous or fracture-controlled salt profile from surface down to the oxide zone. While no excluding the deep formation water model in other deposit, here we propose that, in our sampling region, the alternative saline source, which is critical for atacamite formation, could be locally evaporated groundwater, Cl-rich salts leached from arid surface by meteoric water, or brines from eastern salar basins at a time when the climate in northern Chile was changing from arid to hyperarid. At this climate transition, arid- requiring minerals such as atacamite in the oxide zone were formed and, more importantly, preserved upon evaporation beneath the surface alluvial deposits. Since salt accumulation at the surface remain active during hyperarid condition, our model would predict that water-soluble salt profile from surface to the oxide zone should have a characteristic pattern: salts with an atmospheric component on the surface gradually transitioning to salts of the oxide ore zone on the bottom and a mixing zone in between. To test these two alternative models, we focus on sulfate salts, one of the common water-soluble salts in arid environments. An added advantage is that sulfate accumulated on desert surface has a secondary atmospheric component that bears a unique triple oxygen isotope signature, easily distinguishable from sulfate formed by the oxidation of sulfide minerals at the oxide

  2. Multiple forms of the catalytic centre, CuZ, in the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Tim; Berks, Ben C; Butt, Julea N; Thomson, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    Nitrous oxide reductase catalyses the reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen at a unique tetranuclear copper site, called Cu(Z), which has a central inorganic sulphide ligand. Limited incubation with oxygen during the preparation of nitrous oxide reductase from Paracoccus pantotrophus results in changed redox properties of the catalytic centre by comparison with anaerobic preparations. While the anaerobically purified enzyme has a catalytic centre which performs a single electron step at a midpoint potential of E(m)=+60 mV versus the standard hydrogen electrode (n=1), the altered centre shows no redox change under similar experimental conditions. Spectroscopic properties of this 'redox fixed' centre are similar to spectra of the reduced 'redox active' form of CuZ, although the positions and intensities of a number of transitions are changed in the optical spectrum. These observations are interpreted in terms of two forms of the catalytic centre, called CuZ and CuZ*. The structural relationship between these forms is unclear. EPR and magnetic circular dichroism spectra suggest that the basic Cu4S structure is common to both. Curiously, steady-state activity of the aerobic enzyme preparation is slightly increased despite the fact the catalytic centre does not undergo detectable redox changes. PMID:12049645

  3. Assay of scrap plutonium oxide by thermal neutron multiplicity counting for IAEA verification of excess materials from nuclear weapons production

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Krick, M.S.; Xiao, J.; LeMaire, R.J.; Fotin, V.; McRae, L.; Scott, D.; Westsik, G.

    1996-09-01

    The US Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy commits the US to placing under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards excess nuclear materials no longer needed for the US nuclear deterrent. As of January 1,1996, the IAEA has completed Initial Physical Inventory Verification (IPIV) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant, the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant, and a plutonium storage vault at Rock Flats. Two IPIVs were performed at Hanford . This paper reports the results of thermal neutron multiplicity assay of plutonium residues during the second IPIV at Hanford. Using the Three Ring Multiplicity Counter (3RMC), measurements were performed on 69 individual cans of plutonium residues, each containing approximately 1 kg of material. Of the 69 items, 67 passed the IAEA acceptance criteria and two were selected for destructive analysis.

  4. Recent advances of transition-metal catalyzed radical oxidative cross-couplings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Liu, Dong; Lei, Aiwen

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Oxidative cross-coupling reactions between two nucleophiles are a powerful synthetic strategy to synthesize various kinds of functional molecules. Along with the development of transition-metal-catalyzed oxidative cross-coupling reactions, chemists are applying more and more first-row transition metal salts (Fe, Co, etc.) as catalysts. Since first-row transition metals often can go through multiple chemical valence changes, those oxidative cross-couplings can involve single electron transfer processes. In the meantime, chemists have developed diverse mechanistic hypotheses of these types of reactions. However, none of these hypotheses have led to conclusive reaction pathways until now. From studying both our own work and that of others in this field, we believe that radical oxidative cross-coupling reactions can be classified into four models based on the final bond formations. In this Account, we categorize and summarize these models. In model I, one of the starting nucleophiles initially loses one electron to generate its corresponding radical under oxidative conditions. Then, bond formations between this radical and another nucleophile create a new radical, [Nu(1)-Nu(2)](•), followed by a further radical oxidation step to generate the cross-coupling product. The radical oxidative alkenylation with olefin, radical oxidative arylative-annulation, and radical oxidative amidation are examples of this model. In model II, one of the starting nucleophiles loses its two electrons via two steps of single-electron-transfer to generate an electrophilic intermediate, followed by a direct bond formation with the other nucleophile. For example, the oxidative C-O coupling of benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds with carboxylic acids and oxidative C-N coupling of aldehydes with amides are members of this model group. For model III, both nucleophiles are oxidized to their corresponding radicals. Then, the radicals combine to form the final coupling product. The dioxygen

  5. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems. PMID:26459428

  6. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  7. Biodistribution of a High Dose of Diamond, Graphite, and Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles After Multiple Intraperitoneal Injections in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Lipińska, Ludwika; Mitura, Katarzyna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanoparticles have recently drawn intense attention in biomedical applications. Hence, there is a need for further in vivo investigations of their biocompatibility and biodistribution via various exposure routes. We hypothesized that intraperitoneally injected diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles may have different biodistribution and exert different effects on the intact organism. Forty Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the control and treated with nanoparticles by intraperitoneal injection (4 mg of nanoparticles/kg body weight) eight times during the 4-week period. Blood was collected for evaluation of blood morphology and biochemistry parameters. Photographs of the general appearance of each rat's interior were taken immediately after sacrifice. The organs were excised and their macroscopic structure was visualized using a stereomicroscope. The nanoparticles were retained in the body, mostly as agglomerates. The largest agglomerates (up to 10 mm in diameter) were seen in the proximity of the injection place in the stomach serous membrane, between the connective tissues of the abdominal skin, muscles, and peritoneum. Numerous smaller, spherical-shaped aggregates (diameter around 2 mm) were lodged among the mesentery. Moreover, in the connective and lipid tissue in the proximity of the liver and spleen serosa, small aggregates of graphite and graphene oxide nanoparticles were observed. However, all tested nanoparticles did not affect health and growth of rats. The nanoparticles had no toxic effects on blood parameters and growth of rats, suggesting their potential applicability as remedies or in drug delivery systems.

  8. Data of multiple regressions analysis between selected biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in Saudi autistic patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates data of multiple regression analysis between nine biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and impaired detoxification as two mechanisms recently recorded as autism phenotypes. The presented data was obtained by measuring a panel of markers in 20 autistic patients aged 3–15 years and 20 age and gender matching healthy controls. Levels of GSH, glutathione status (GSH/GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxidoxins (Prxs I and III), glutamate, glutamine, glutamate/glutamine ratio glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in plasma and mercury (Hg) in red blood cells were determined in both groups. In Multiple regression analysis, R2 values which describe the proportion or percentage of variance in the dependent variable attributed to the variance in the independent variables together were calculated. Moreover, β coefficients values which show the direction either positive or negative and the contribution of the independent variable relative to the other independent variables in explaining the variation of the dependent variable were determined. A panel of inter-related markers was recorded. This paper contains data related to and supporting research articles currently published entitled “Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism” [1], “Novel metabolic biomarkers related to sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia [2], and “A key role for an impaired detoxification mechanism in the etiology and severity of autism spectrum disorders” [3]. PMID:26933667

  9. Data of multiple regressions analysis between selected biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in Saudi autistic patients.

    PubMed

    El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-06-01

    This work demonstrates data of multiple regression analysis between nine biomarkers related to glutamate excitotoxicity and impaired detoxification as two mechanisms recently recorded as autism phenotypes. The presented data was obtained by measuring a panel of markers in 20 autistic patients aged 3-15 years and 20 age and gender matching healthy controls. Levels of GSH, glutathione status (GSH/GSSG), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), thioredoxin (Trx), thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxidoxins (Prxs I and III), glutamate, glutamine, glutamate/glutamine ratio glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in plasma and mercury (Hg) in red blood cells were determined in both groups. In Multiple regression analysis, R (2) values which describe the proportion or percentage of variance in the dependent variable attributed to the variance in the independent variables together were calculated. Moreover, β coefficients values which show the direction either positive or negative and the contribution of the independent variable relative to the other independent variables in explaining the variation of the dependent variable were determined. A panel of inter-related markers was recorded. This paper contains data related to and supporting research articles currently published entitled "Mechanism of nitrogen metabolism-related parameters and enzyme activities in the pathophysiology of autism" [1], "Novel metabolic biomarkers related to sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways in autistic patients of Saudi Arabia [2], and "A key role for an impaired detoxification mechanism in the etiology and severity of autism spectrum disorders" [3]. PMID:26933667

  10. Accumulation of multiple oxidative equivalents at a single site by cross-surface electron transfer on TiO2.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjing; Ito, Akitaka; Binstead, Robert A; Hanson, Kenneth; Luo, Hanlin; Brennaman, M Kyle; Concepcion, Javier J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-08-01

    The photodriven accumulation of two oxidative equivalents at a single site was investigated on TiO2 coloaded with a ruthenium polypyridyl chromophore [Ru(bpy)2((4,4'-(OH)2PO)2bpy)](2+) (Ru(II)P(2+), bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, ((OH)2PO)2-bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-diyldiphosphonic acid) and a water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy) ((4,4'-(OH)2PO-CH2)2bpy)(OH2)](2+) (Ru(II)OH2(2+), Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine, (4,4'-(OH)2PO-CH2)2bpy) = 4,4'-bis-methlylenephosphonato-2,2'-bipyridine). Electron injection from the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state of -Ru(II)P(2+) (-Ru(II)P(2+)*) to give -Ru(III)P(3+) and TiO2(e(-)) was followed by rapid (<20 ns) nearest-neighbor -Ru(II)OH2(2+) to -Ru(III)P(3+) electron transfer. On surfaces containing both -Ru(II)P(2+) and -Ru(III)OH2(3+) (or -Ru(III)OH(2+)), -Ru(II)OH2(2+) was formed by random migration of the injected electron inside the TiO2 nanoparticle and recombination with the preoxidized catalyst, followed by relatively slow (μs-ms) non-nearest neighbor cross-surface electron transfer from -Ru(II)OH2(2+) to -Ru(III)P(3+). Steady state illumination of coloaded TiO2 photoanodes in a dye sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) configuration resulted in the buildup of -Ru(III)P(3+), -Ru(III)OH(2+), and -Ru(IV)═O(2+), with -Ru(IV)═O(2+) formation favored at high chromophore to catalyst ratios. PMID:23848562

  11. Polymerized nano-curcumin attenuates neurological symptoms in EAE model of multiple sclerosis through down regulation of inflammatory and oxidative processes and enhancing neuroprotection and myelin repair.

    PubMed

    Mohajeri, Maryam; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood; Javan, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of central nervous system (CNS). Polyphenol curcumin has been used in traditional medicine as an effective drug for a variety of diseases. Different formulations of curcumin are introduced to increase its stability and effectiveness. Here we have examined the effect of polymerized form of nano-curcumin (PNC) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as an animal model of MS. EAE was induced in female Lewis rats and PNC or curcumin was daily administrated intraperitonealy from day 12-29 post immunization. When the prophylactic effect of PNC was under investigation, rats received PNC from the first day of immunization. Treatment with PNC resulted in decreased scores of disease in therapeutic and prophylactic administration when compared with control group. Staining by luxol fast blue and H&E and immuno-staining of lumbar spinal cord cross sections, confirmed a significant decrease in the amounts of demyelination, inflammation and BBB breaking down. Gene expression studies in lumbar spinal cord showed a corrected balance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes expression, decreased oxidative stress, improved remyelination and increased progenitor cell markers after treatment with PNC. Our results demonstrated an efficient therapeutic effect of PNC as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress agent, with significant effects on the EAE scores and myelin repair mechanisms.

  12. Z-Scan Analysis: a New Method to Determine the Oxidative State of Low-Density Lipoprotein and Its Association with Multiple Cardiometabolic Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Maria Camila Pruper; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Giampaoli, Viviane; da Conceição Quintaneiro Aubin, Elisete; de Araújo Lima Barbosa, Milena Maria; Damasceno, Nágila Raquel Teixeira

    2016-04-01

    The great atherogenic potential of oxidized low-density lipoprotein has been widely described in the literature. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the state of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in human plasma measured by the Z-scan technique has an association with different cardiometabolic biomarkers. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein B, paraoxonase-1, and glucose were analyzed using standard commercial kits, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was estimated using the Friedewald equation. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect electronegative low-density lipoprotein. Low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein sizes were determined by Lipoprint® system. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the non-linear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solution. Principal component analysis and correlations were used respectively to resize the data from the sample and test association between the θ parameter, measured with the Z-scan technique, and the principal component. A total of 63 individuals, from both sexes, with mean age 52 years (±11), being overweight and having high levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, were enrolled in this study. A positive correlation between the θ parameter and more anti-atherogenic pattern for cardiometabolic biomarkers together with a negative correlation for an atherogenic pattern was found. Regarding the parameters related with an atherogenic low-density lipoprotein profile, the θ parameter was negatively correlated with a more atherogenic pattern. By using Z-scan measurements, we were able to find an association between oxidized low-density lipoprotein state and multiple cardiometabolic biomarkers in samples from individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  13. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T; Fernie, Alisdair R; Talla, Sai K; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-02-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C(3) plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck-Halliwell-Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants.

  14. In Situ Live Cell Sensing of Multiple Nucleotides Exploiting DNA/RNA Aptamers and Graphene Oxide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying; Li, Zhaohui; Weber, Thomas J.; Hu, Dehong; Lin, Chiann Tso; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-07-23

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine-5’-triphosphate (GTP) are primary energy resources and function coordinately for numerous reactions such as microtubule assembly, insulin secretion and ion channel regulation. We have developed a novel DNA/RNA aptamer- graphene oxide nanosheet (GO-nS) sensing platform that can selectively and simultaneously detect ATP and GTP in live cells. A fluorescent tag is covalently attached to aptamers and fluorescence is quenched upon binding of aptamer to the GO-nS. Fluorescently tagged aptamers that selectively bind ATP or GTP were isolated from an aptamer library and were adsorbed onto GO-nS. Upon incubation with targets (ATP and/or GTP), the aptamers readily dissociated from GO-nS and the fluorescent signal was recovered. By covalently attaching fluorophores, both ATP and GTP sensing aptamers could be exploited to simultaneously visualize aptamer dissociation in live cells. In addition, the GO-nS appear to be biocompatible and protect the adsorbed DNA/RNA aptamers from enzymatic cleavage. Our results support the application of aptamer/GO-nS as a sensing platform for nucleotides in living cells and have implications for the development of additional sensor platforms for other bio-molecules that show selective interactions with aptamers and other biomarkers.

  15. Genetic variants associated with arsenic metabolism within human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase show wide variation across multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Junko; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Kato, Hideaki; Yuasa, Isao; Panduro, Arturo; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo

    2011-02-01

    Human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of the AS3MT gene in Mexican and German populations. The distribution of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in AS3MT was assessed on healthy individuals: 38 Mestizo, 69 Nahuas, 50 Huicholes, and 32 Germans. All 18 SNPs were polymorphic in the German and Mexican populations. Of the three Mexican populations, a minor allele frequency was the highest in the Mestizo, followed by the Nahuas and Huicholes. In the German and three Mexican groups, haplotype #1(TATAGAAGTCTTCATGAC) was the most predominant. Seven haplotypes were newly found in the German and three Mexican populations. The D' values between SNP pairs were high in the German and Nahua populations; they had a similar pattern. The pattern of the Mestizo was more similar to the African than to the other Mexican populations. Huicholes had a moderate pattern of the African and German/Nahua populations. The network had three clusters. One originated in the African population and another may have originated in an Asian (Chinese and/or Japanese) population. The third one may have originated among Caucasians. This study is the first to demonstrate the existence of genetic heterogeneity in the distribution of 18 SNPs in AS3MT of German and Mexican populations.

  16. Orthogonal natural atomic orbitals form an appropriate one-electron basis for expanding CASSCF wave functions into localized bonding schemes and their weights.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Vinzenz

    2007-09-01

    Localized bonding schemes and their weights have been obtained for the pi-electron system of nitrone by expanding complete active space self-consistent field wave functions into a set of Slater determinants composed of orthogonal natural atomic orbitals (NAOs) of Weinhold and Landis (Valency and Bonding: A Natural Bond Orbital Donor-Acceptor Perspective, 2005). Thus, the derived bonding schemes are close to orthogonal valence bond structures. The calculated sequence of bonding scheme weights accords with the sequence of genuine resonance structure weights derived previously by Ohanessian and Hiberty (Chem Phys Lett 1987, 137, 437), who employed nonorthogonal atomic orbitals. This accord supports the notion that NAOs form an appropriate orthogonal one-electron basis for expanding complete active space self-consistent field wave functions into meaningful bonding schemes and their weights.

  17. Communication: satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices.

    PubMed

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A

    2015-02-01

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system's density matrix. While Lindblad's modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F2, N2, CO, and BeH2 subject to environmental noise.

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid radiosensitizes tumor hypoxic cells in vitro through the oxidation of nitroxyl to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Samuni, Yuval; Wink, David A; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B; Goldstein, Sara

    2014-08-01

    The pharmacological effects of hydroxamic acids are partially attributed to their ability to serve as HNO and/or NO donors under oxidative stress. Previously, it was concluded that oxidation of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by the metmyoglobin/H2O2 reaction system releases NO, which was based on spin trapping of NO and accumulation of nitrite. Reinvestigation of this system demonstrates the accumulation of N2O, which is a marker of HNO formation, at similar rates under normoxia and anoxia. In addition, the yields of nitrite that accumulated in the absence and the presence of O2 did not differ, implying that the source of nitrite is other than autoxidation of NO. In this system metmyoglobin is instantaneously and continuously converted into compound II, leading to one-electron oxidation of SAHA to its respective transient nitroxide radical. Studies using pulse radiolysis show that one-electron oxidation of SAHA (pKa=9.56 ± 0.04) yields the respective nitroxide radical (pKa=9.1 ± 0.2), which under all experimental conditions decomposes bimolecularly to yield HNO. The proposed mechanism suggests that compound I oxidizes SAHA to the respective nitroxide radical, which decomposes bimolecularly in competition with its oxidation by compound II to form HNO. Compound II also oxidizes HNO to NO and NO to nitrite. Given that NO, but not HNO, is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, we hypothesized that under an oxidizing environment SAHA might act as a NO donor and radiosensitize hypoxic cells. Preincubation of A549 and HT29 cells with 2.5 μM SAHA for 24h resulted in a sensitizer enhancement ratio at 0.01 survival levels (SER0.01) of 1.33 and 1.59, respectively. Preincubation of A549 cells with oxidized SAHA had hardly any effect and, with 2mM valproic acid, which lacks the hydroxamate group, resulted in SER0.01=1.17. Preincubation of HT29 cells with SAHA and Tempol, which readily oxidizes HNO to NO, enhanced the

  19. Solution of the Dirac equation using the Rayleigh-Ritz method: Flexible basis coupling large and small components. Results for one-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Bağcı, A; Hoggan, P E

    2016-07-01

    An algebraic solution of the Dirac equation is reinvestigated. Slater-type spinor orbitals and their corresponding system of differential equations are defined in two- and four-component formalism. They describe the radial function in components of the wave function of the Dirac equation solution to high accuracy. They constitute the matrix elements arising in a generalized eigenvalue equation. These terms are evaluated through prolate spheroidal coordinates. The corresponding integrals are calculated by the numerical global-adaptive method taking into account the Gauss-Kronrod numerical integration extension. Sample calculations are performed using flexible basis sets generated with both signs of the relativistic angular momentum quantum number κ. Applications to one-electron atoms and diatomics are detailed. Variationally optimum values for orbital parameters are obtained at given nuclear separation. Methods discussed in this work are capable of yielding highly accurate relativistic two-center integrals for all ranges of orbital parameters. This work provides an efficient way to overcome the problems that arise in relativistic calculations. PMID:27575231

  20. Communication: Satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-02-07

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system’s density matrix. While Lindblad’s modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and BeH{sub 2} subject to environmental noise.

  1. Quantum Switching of Magnetic Fields by Circularly Polarized Re-Optimized π Laser Pulses: From One-Electron Atomic Ions to Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ingo; Manz, Jörn

    Circularly polarized re-optimized π laser pulses may induce electronic and/or nuclear ring currents in model systems, from one-electron atomic ions till molecules which should have three-, four-, or higher-fold axes of rotations or reflection-rotations, in order to support doubly or more degenerate, complex-valued eigenstates which support these ring currents. The ring currents in turn induce magnetic fields. The effects are about two orders of magnitude larger than for traditional ring currents which are induced by external magnetic fields. Moreover, the laser pulses allow to control the strengths and shapes of the ring currents and, therefore, also the induced magnetic fields. We present a survey of the development of the field, together with new quantum simulations which document ultrafast switchings of magnetic fields. We discuss various criteria such as strong ring currents with small radii, in order to generate huge magnetic fields, approaching 1,000T, in accord with the Biot-Savart law. Moreover, we consider various methods for monitoring the fields, and for applications, in particular ultrafast deflections of neutrons by means of quantum switching of the ring currents and induced magnetic fields.

  2. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  3. Solution of the Dirac equation using the Rayleigh-Ritz method: Flexible basis coupling large and small components. Results for one-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baǧcı, A.; Hoggan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    An algebraic solution of the Dirac equation is reinvestigated. Slater-type spinor orbitals and their corresponding system of differential equations are defined in two- and four-component formalism. They describe the radial function in components of the wave function of the Dirac equation solution to high accuracy. They constitute the matrix elements arising in a generalized eigenvalue equation. These terms are evaluated through prolate spheroidal coordinates. The corresponding integrals are calculated by the numerical global-adaptive method taking into account the Gauss-Kronrod numerical integration extension. Sample calculations are performed using flexible basis sets generated with both signs of the relativistic angular momentum quantum number κ . Applications to one-electron atoms and diatomics are detailed. Variationally optimum values for orbital parameters are obtained at given nuclear separation. Methods discussed in this work are capable of yielding highly accurate relativistic two-center integrals for all ranges of orbital parameters. This work provides an efficient way to overcome the problems that arise in relativistic calculations.

  4. Deviations from one-electron behavior in the Ag and Pd M4,5-VV Auger spectra of AgcPd1-c alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariot, J.-M.; Hague, C. F.; Dufour, G.

    1981-04-01

    A systematic investigation of the Ag and Pd M4,5-VV Auger spectra in the pure metals and in the AgcPd1-c(0.1<=c<=0.9) alloys is presented. The shape of the Auger spectra is discussed in relation to the values of the effective Coulomb interaction Ueff between the two holes present in the final state of the Auger transition and of the width W of the one-electron local densities of states as obtained from Lβ2,15 soft-x-ray emission bands. The Auger spectra of Ag in the metal and the alloys have a pronounced quasiatomic character, as can be expected from the Ueff2W ratio which is found to be close to unity. The Auger spectrum of pure Pd (Ueff2W~0.4) can be explained in terms of an atomic model in which strong band effects are present. For alloys with low-Pd content where Pd forms an impurity state, it is shown that final states other than the localized [4d2] two-hole state have to be invoked to explain the line shape.

  5. Charge transfer in collisions of the effectively-one-electron isocharged ions Si3+, C3+, and O3+ with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, N. L.; Teixeira, E.; Hall, B.; Öhrn, Y.; Deumens, E.; Sabin, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.77.064702 77, 064702 (2008)], Bruhns reported on an experimental investigation of charge transfer in collisions of Si3+ ions with atomic hydrogen and compared the energy dependence of the transfer cross sections with published theoretical results and with earlier experimental results for other effectively-one-electron isocharged ions, including C3+ and O3+. These authors observe that these three ions all have the structure of a single electron outside a closed subshell and thus might be expected to behave similarly. However, their results show quite different behavior, and they conclude that the influence of quantum-mechanical effects from the ionic core is clearly seen. We have investigated theoretically three collision systems, Si3+, C3+, and O3+ with atomic hydrogen, at projectile energies up to 10 keV/amu using the method of electron nuclear dynamics (END). In this paper we want to clarify and describe in some detail these quantum-mechanical effects by showing the time-dependent dynamics of the electrons during the collision of these three ions with atomic hydrogen. Total charge transfer cross sections were calculated for all three ions and compared with other theoretical and experimental results, showing good overall agreement. With this validation of the END description of the processes, we analyze the details of the computed dynamics of the electrons in each of the processes and illustrate the different mechanisms underlying observed differences in reaction outcomes.

  6. A study on the immobilization of selenium oxyanions by H2/Pd(s) in aqueous solution: confirmation of the one-electron reduction barrier of selenate.

    PubMed

    Puranen, Anders; Jansson, Mats; Jonsson, Mats

    2010-07-30

    Selenium is a trace element of concern in several geochemical contexts, due to the potentially high mobility of the selenium oxyanions and the narrow range between deficiency and toxicity of the element. For high level nuclear waste repositories the long-lived fission product 79Se has been identified as a potential key dose contributor for the long-term safety. This paper deals with the catalytic effect of Pd(s) on the H2 reduction of selenium oxyanions which was studied experimentally in aqueous solutions containing bicarbonate and chloride. Pd-catalysts and hydrogen have been proposed for the remediation of various groundwater contaminants and can also serve as a model substance for catalytic noble metal inclusions present in spent nuclear fuel. In this study selenite (SeO3(2)--) was found to adsorb on Pd. In the presence of hydrogen the rate of selenite removal increased yielding elemental Se. However, no adsorption or reduction of selenate (SeO4(2)--) was observed. A simple radiation chemical experiment revealed a notable barrier towards stepwise one-electron reduction of selenate to selenite. This provides an explanation for the lower reactivity of selenate in systems where reductive immobilization of selenite as well as selenate is thermodynamically favorable.

  7. Acute paraquat exposure determines dose-dependent oxidative injury of multiple organs and metabolic dysfunction in rats: impact on exercise tolerance.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo D; Gonçalves, Reggiani V; Cupertino, Marli C; Santos, Eliziária C; Bigonha, Solange M; Fernandes, Geraldo J M; Maldonado, Izabel R S C; Natali, Antônio J

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the pathological morphofunctional adaptations related to the imbalance of exercise tolerance triggered by paraquat (PQ) exposure in rats. The rats were randomized into four groups with eight animals each: (a) SAL (control): 0.5 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution; (b) PQ10: PQ 10 mg/kg; (c) PQ20: PQ 20 mg/kg; and (d) PQ30: PQ 30 mg/kg. Each group received a single injection of PQ. After 72 hours, the animals were subjected to an incremental aerobic running test until fatigue in order to determine exercise tolerance, blood glucose and lactate levels. After the next 24 h, lung, liver and skeletal muscle were collected for biometric, biochemical and morphological analyses. The animals exposed to PQ exhibited a significant anticipation of anaerobic metabolism during the incremental aerobic running test, a reduction in exercise tolerance and blood glucose levels as well as increased blood lactate levels during exercise compared to control animals. PQ exposure increased serum transaminase levels and reduced the glycogen contents in liver tissue and skeletal muscles. In the lung, the liver and the skeletal muscle, PQ exposure also increased the contents of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, superoxide dismutase and catalase, as well as a structural remodelling compared to the control group. All these changes were dose-dependent. Reduced exercise tolerance after PQ exposure was potentially influenced by pathological remodelling of multiple organs, in which glycogen depletion in the liver and skeletal muscle and the imbalance of glucose metabolism coexist with the induction of lipid, protein and DNA oxidation, a destructive process not counteracted by the upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:27277193

  8. Timing of multiple hydrothermal events in the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Creaser, Robert A.; DuFrane, S. Andrew; Melo, Gustavo H. C.; Delinardo da Silva, Marco A.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Sato, Kei

    2015-06-01

    The Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil, hosts several iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, including Sossego, Cristalino, Alvo 118, Bacuri, Bacaba, Castanha, and Visconde. Mapping and U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) IIe zircon geochronology allowed the characterization of the host rocks, situated within regional WNW-ESE shear zones. They encompass Mesoarchean (3.08-2.85 Ga) TTG orthogneiss, granites, and remains of greenstone belts, Neoarchean (ca. 2.74 Ga) granite, shallow-emplaced porphyries, and granophyric granite coeval with gabbro, and Paleoproterozoic (1.88 Ga) porphyry dykes. Extensive hydrothermal zones include albite-scapolite, biotite-scapolite-tourmaline-magnetite alteration, and proximal potassium feldspar, chlorite-epidote and chalcopyrite formation. U-Pb laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) analysis of ore-related monazite and Re-Os NTIMS analysis of molybdenite suggest multiple Neoarchean (2.76 and 2.72-2.68 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.06 Ga) hydrothermal events at the Bacaba and Bacuri deposits. These results, combined with available geochronological data from the literature, indicate recurrence of hydrothermal systems in the Southern Copper Belt, including 1.90-1.88-Ga ore formation in the Sossego-Curral ore bodies and the Alvo 118 deposit. Although early hydrothermal evolution at 2.76 Ga points to fluid migration coeval with the Carajás Basin formation, the main episode of IOCG genesis (2.72-2.68 Ga) is related to basin inversion coupled with Neoarchean (ca. 2.7 Ga) felsic magmatism. The data suggest that the IOCG deposits in the Southern Copper Belt and those in the Northern Copper Belt (2.57-Ga Salobo and Igarapé Bahia-Alemão deposits) do not share a common metallogenic evolution. Therefore, the association of all IOCG deposits of the Carajás Province with a single extensive hydrothermal system is precluded.

  9. Nitrous oxide has multiple deleterious effects on cobalamin metabolism and causes decreases in activities of both mammalian cobalamin-dependent enzymes in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, H; Osborne, M L; Kolhouse, J F; Binder, M J; Podell, E R; Utley, C S; Abrams, R S; Allen, R H

    1981-01-01

    In man, use of the general anesthetic nitrous oxide, N2O, is associated with hematologic and neurologic abnormalities that mimic those seen in cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B12) deficiency. We have measured a number of aspects of Cbl metabolism in rts exposed to various concentrations of N2O for various periods of time. As little as 2% N2O given for 15 h resulted in 30% inhibition of methionine synthetase (MS) in rat liver. With 50% N2O, inhibition of 70% occurred with 1 h and did not change during the next 48 h. Under these conditions, no inhibition of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MMCoAM) was observed. The recovery of MS activity was slow and was only 80% of control values 72 h after N2O was stopped. Studies employing rats previously injected with [57Co]Cbl showed that N2O displaced [57Co]Cbl from MS in a manner that temporally and quantitatively paralleled the loss of MS activity. Recovery of MS activity paralleled the reappearance of [57Co]Cbl on MS. N2O also caused the hepatic content of CH3-[57Co]Cbl to decrease by 20-60%. When [57Co]-Cbl was extracted from liver and analyzed by paper chromatography, [57Co]Cbl analogues were present (10-40% of total [57Co]Cbl) in rats exposed to N2O, but not in control animals. When rats were exposed to 50% N2O for 33 d, the total of endogenous Cbl and Cbl analogues in liver decreased to 35% of control values and endogenous Cbl decreased to 10% of control values. At this time, MS activity was 15% of control values and MMCoAM was only 26% of control values. We conclude that N2O causes multiple defects in Cbl metabolism that include the following: (a) rapid inhibition of MS activity with a slow recovery when N2O is stopped; (b) displacement of Cbl from MS; (c) decreased CH3-Cbl; (d) conversion of Cbl to Cbl analogues; (e) the gradual development of Cbl deficiency and (f) an eventual decrease in MMCoAM activity with a further decrease in MS activity. PMID:6112240

  10. Kinetic Isotope Effects in Hydroxylation Reactions Effected by Cytochrome P450 Compounds I Implicate Multiple Electrophilic Oxidants for P450-Catalyzed Oxidations†

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xin; Zhang, Haoming; Hollenberg, Paul F.; Newcomb, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects were measured for oxidations of (S,S)-2-(p-trifluoromethylphenyl)cyclopropylmethane containing zero, two, and three deuterium atoms on the methyl group by Compounds I from the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP119 and CYP2B4 at 22 °C. The oxidations displayed saturation kinetics, which permitted solution of both binding constants (Kbind) and first-order oxidation rate constants (kox) for both enzymes with the three substrates. The binding constant for CYP2B4 Compound I was about one order of magnitude greater than that for CYP119 Compound I, but the oxidation rate constants were similar for the two. In oxidations of 1-d0, kox = 10.4 s−1 for CYP119 Compound I, and kox = 12.4 s−1 for CYP2B4 Compound I. Primary kinetic isotope effects (P) and secondary kinetic isotope effects (S) were obtained from the results with the three isotopomers. The primary KIEs were large, P = 9.8 and P = 8.9 for CYP119 and CYP2B4 Compounds I, respectively, and the secondary KIEs were small and normal, S = 1.07 and S = 1.05, respectively. Large intermolecular KIEs for 1-d0 and 1-d3 of kH/kD = 11.2 and 9.8 found for the two Compounds I contrast with small intermolecular KIEs obtained previously for the same substrate in P450-catalyzed oxidations; these differences suggest that a second electrophilic oxidant, presumably iron-complexed hydrogen peroxide, is important in cytochromes P450 oxidations under turnover conditions. PMID:19182902

  11. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway involving concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  12. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by RuV=O3+ and RuIV=O2+

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the RuV=O3+ form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]2+ [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to RuIV=O2+ and for the RuIV=O2+ form with added bases due to a new pathway, concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  13. Attenuation of endotoxin-induced multiple organ dysfunction by 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine, a potent inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Ruetten, H.; Southan, G. J.; Abate, A.; Thiemermann, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of (i) several guanidines on the activity of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) in murine cultured macrophages and rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASM); and (ii) 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine, the most potent inhibitor of iNOS activity discovered, on haemodynamics, multiple organ (liver, renal, and pancreas) dysfunction and iNOS activity in rats with endotoxic shock. 2. The synthesized guanidine analogues caused concentration-dependent inhibitions of the increase in nitrite formation caused by lipopolysaccaride (LPS, 1 microgram ml-1) in J774.2 macrophages and RASM cells with the following rank order of potency: 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine > 1-amino-2-methyl-guanidine > 1-amino-1-methyl-guanidine > 1-amino-1,2-dimethyl-guanidine. Interestingly, 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine (IC50: J774.2, 68 microM; RASM, 114 microM) was more potent in inhibiting nitrite formation caused by LPS than NG-methyl-L-arginine, but less potent than aminoethyl-isothiourea. 3. In the anaesthetized rat, LPS caused a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from 115 +/- 4 mmHg (time 0) to 98 +/- 5 mmHg at 2 h (P < 0.05, n = 10) and 69 +/- 5 mmHg at 6 h (P < 0.05, n = 10). The pressor effect of noradrenaline (NA, 1 mg kg-1, i.v.) was also significantly reduced at 1 to 6 h after LPS (vascular hyporeactivity). Treatment of LPS-rats with 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine (10 mg kg-1, i.v. plus 10 mg kg-1 h-1 starting at 2 h after LPS) prevented the delayed hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity seen in LPS-rats. However, 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine had no effect on either MAP or the pressor effect elicited by NA in rats infused with saline rather than LPS. 4. Endotoxaemia for 6 h caused a significant rise in the serum levels of aspartate or alanine aminotransferase (i.e. GOT or GPT) and bilirubin, and hence, liver dysfunction. Treatment of LPS-rats with 1-amino-2-hydroxy-guanidine significantly attenuated the liver dysfunction caused

  14. Hydrogen peroxide contributes to the ultraviolet-B (280-315 nm) induced oxidative stress of plant leaves through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Czégény, Gyula; Wu, Min; Dér, András; Eriksson, Leif A; Strid, Åke; Hideg, Éva

    2014-06-27

    Solar UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation is a developmental signal in plants but may also cause oxidative stress when combined with other environmental factors. Using computer modeling and in solution experiments we show that UV-B is capable of photosensitizing hydroxyl radical production from hydrogen peroxide. We present evidence that the oxidative effect of UV-B in leaves is at least twofold: (i) it increases cellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations, to a larger extent in pyridoxine antioxidant mutant pdx1.3-1 Arabidopsis and; (ii) is capable of a partial photo-conversion of both 'natural' and 'extra' hydrogen peroxide to hydroxyl radicals. As stress conditions other than UV can increase cellular hydrogen peroxide levels, synergistic deleterious effects of various stresses may be expected already under ambient solar UV-B.

  15. Multiple-mask chemical etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, D. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multiple masking techniques use lateral etching to reduce the total area of the high etch-rate oxide exposed to the chemical etchant. One method uses a short-term etch to remove the top layer from the silicon oxide surface, another acts before the top layer is grown.

  16. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called multiple pregnancy . If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each ... fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This ...

  17. Multiple myeloma

    MedlinePlus

    Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - multiple ... Multiple myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...

  18. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  19. Aqueous extract of some indigenous medicinal plants inhibits glycation at multiple stages and protects erythrocytes from oxidative damage-an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Rashmi S; Sankhe, Neena M; Shaikh, Shamim A; Phatak, Devyani V; Parikh, Juhi U; Khaire, Amrita A; Kemse, Nisha G

    2015-04-01

    Azadirachta indica, Emblica officinalis, Syzygium cumini and Terminalia bellirica are common in Indian system of traditional medicine for the prevention of diabetes and its complications. The aim of the present study was to comprehensively and comparatively investigate the antiglycation potential of these plant extracts at multiple stages and their possible protective effect against glycated albumin mediated toxicity to erythrocytes. Antiglycation activities of these plant extracts was measured by co-incubation of plant extract with bovine serum albumin-fructose glycation model. The multistage glycation markers- fructosamines (early stage), protein carbonyls (intermediate stage) and AGEs (late stage) are investigated along with measurement of thiols and β aggregation of albumin using amyloid-specific dyes-Congo red and Th T. Protection of erythrocytes from glycated albumin induced toxicity by these plant extracts was assessed by measuring erythrocytes hemolysis, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and intracellular antioxidant capacity. Total phenolics, reducing power and antioxidant activities of the plant extracts were also measured. In vitro glycation assays showed that plant extracts exerted site specific inhibitory effects at multiple stages, with T. bellirica showing maximum attenuation. In erythrocytes, along with the retardation of glycated albumin induced hemolysis and lipid-peroxidation, T. bellirica considerably maintained cellular antioxidant potential. Significant positive correlations were observed between erythrocyte protection parameters with total phenolics. These plant extracts especially T. bellirica prevents glycation induced albumin modifications and subsequent toxicity to erythrocytes which might offer additional protection against diabetic vascular complications. PMID:25829572

  20. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simanihuruk, Mudin

    2011-01-01

    Multiplication facts are difficult to teach. Therefore many researchers have put a great deal of effort into finding multiplication strategies. Sherin and Fuson (2005) provided a good survey paper on the multiplication strategies research area. Kolpas (2002), Rendtorff (1908), Dabell (2001), Musser (1966) and Markarian (2009) proposed the finger…

  1. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  2. An experimental comparison of the Marcus-Hush and Butler-Volmer descriptions of electrode kinetics applied to cyclic voltammetry. The one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane studied at a mercury microhemisphere electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henstridge, Martin C.; Wang, Yijun; Limon-Petersen, Juan G.; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-11-01

    We present a comparative experimental evaluation of the Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush models using cyclic voltammetry at a microelectrode. Numerical simulations are used to fit experimental voltammetry of the one electron reductions of europium (III) and 2-methyl-2-nitropropane, in water and acetonitrile, respectively, at a mercury microhemisphere electrode. For Eu (III) very accurate fits to experiment were obtained over a wide range of scan rates using Butler-Volmer kinetics, whereas the Marcus-Hush model was less accurate. The reduction of 2-methyl-2-nitropropane was well simulated by both models, however Marcus-Hush required a reorganisation energy lower than expected.

  3. Near-field-assisted localization: effect of size and filling factor of randomly distributed zinc oxide nanoneedles on multiple scattering and localization of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silies, Martin; Mascheck, Manfred; Leipold, David; Kollmann, Heiko; Schmidt, Slawa; Sartor, Janos; Yatsui, Takashi; Kitamura, Kokoro; Ohtsu, Motoicho; Kalt, Heinz; Runge, Erich; Lienau, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of the diameter and the filling factor of randomly arranged ZnO nanoneedles on the multiple scattering and localization of light in disordered dielectrics. Coherent, ultra-broadband second-harmonic (SH) microscopy is used to probe the spatial localization of light in representative nm-sized ZnO arrays of needles. We observe strong fluctuations of the SH intensity inside different ZnO needle geometries. Comparison of the SH intensity distributions with predictions based on a one-parameter scaling model indicate that SH fluctuations can be taken as a quantitative measure for the degree of localization. Interestingly, the strongest localization signatures are found for densely packed arrays of thin needles with diameters in the range of only 30 nm range, despite the small scattering cross section of these needles. FDTD simulations indicate that in this case coupling of electric near-fields between neighbouring needles governs the localization.

  4. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  5. Preparation of liquid-core nanocapsules from poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-glycidol] with multiple hydrophobic linoleates at an oil-water interface and its encapsulation of pyrene.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Wang, Guowei; Huang, Junlian

    2007-06-01

    A convenient approach is provided to prepare liquid-core nanocapsules by cross-linking an amphiphilic copolymer at an oil-water interface. The hydrophilic copolymer poly[(ethylene oxide)-co-glycidol] was prepared by anionic polymerization of ethylene oxide and ethoxyethyl glycidyl ether first, then the hydroxyl groups on the backbone were recovered after hydrolysis and partly modified by hydrophobic conjugated linoleic acid. The copolymer with multiple linoleate pendants was absorbed at an oil-water interface and then cross-linked to form stable nanocapsules. The mean diameter of the nanocapsule was below 350 nm, and the size distribution was relatively narrow (<0.2) at low concentrations of oil in acetone (<10 mg/mL). The particle size could be tuned easily by variation of the emulsification conditions. The nanocapsule was stable in water for at least 5 months, and the shell maintained its integrity after removal of the oily core by solvent. Pyrene was encapsulated in these nanocapsules, and a loading efficiency as high as 94% was measured by UV spectroscopy.

  6. Enhancing optical power of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by nanopatterning on indium tin oxide with tunable fill factor using multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yonghui; Wei, Tongbo Xiong, Zhuo; Chen, Yu; Zhen, Aigong; Shan, Liang; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Qiang; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Junxi

    2014-11-21

    In this study, the multiple-exposure nanosphere-lens lithography method utilizing the polystyrene nanospheres with focusing behavior is investigated and introduced to fabricate diverse photonic crystals (PCs) on indium tin oxide to enhance the optical output power of GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED). Simulated results indicate that the focused light intensity decreases with increasing tilted angle due to the shadow effect introduced by adjacent nanospheres. The fill factor of nanopattern is tunable by controlling tilted angles and exposure times. To attain quadruple PC without overlapping patterns, mathematical calculation model is used to define the optimum range of tilted angles. Angular emission patterns and three-dimensional finite-difference time domain simulated results indicate that the enhanced light extraction of PC LEDs results mainly from diffused scattering effects, and the diffraction effects of PC on light extracted efficiency increase with the increase of fill factor. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the multiple PC can extract more light from GaN into air than common PC with same period and fill factor.

  7. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Amaranth Extract/AuNPs Composite Hydrogel on Tumor Cells as Integrated Platform for Localized and Multiple Synergistic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guanru; Wang, Yunlong; Gong, Baoyou; Xiao, Yazhong; Chen, Yan; Wang, Shaohua; Li, Shikuo; Huang, Fangzhi; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian

    2015-06-01

    Integration of multimodal treatment strategies combined with localized therapy to enhance antitumor efficacy and reduce side effects is still a challenge. Herein, a novel composite hydrogel containing rGO, amaranth extract (AE) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was prepared by using AE as both reductant and cross-linking agent. The chlorophyll derivatives in AE were also employed as a photodynamic therapy drug. Meanwhile, AuNPs and rGO both have obvious photothermal effects and can accelerate the generation of cytotoxic singlet oxygen (1O2). The temperature increase of rGO/AE/AuNPs precursor is up to 6.3 °C under 808 nm laser irradiation at a power density of 200 mW·cm(-2). The hydrogel shell on in situ tumor cells was easily formed and regulated by near-infrared irradiation within 10 min, which could both retain a high concentration of drugs on the lesion site and prevent them from migrating to normal tissue, thus reducing the side effects. Compared with rGO/AE and AE, rGO/AE/AuNPs showed a remarkably improved and synergistic antitumor effect. The hydrogel possesses good biocompatibility and high hydrophilicity and could be used for loading chemotherapeutics, which provides a new approach for located and multiple antitumor therapies. PMID:25978657

  8. Evolution of Diterpene Metabolism: Sitka Spruce CYP720B4 Catalyzes Multiple Oxidations in Resin Acid Biosynthesis of Conifer Defense against Insects1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  9. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism. PMID:21994349

  10. Evolution of diterpene metabolism: Sitka spruce CYP720B4 catalyzes multiple oxidations in resin acid biosynthesis of conifer defense against insects.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Björn; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Hamberger, Britta; Séguin, Armand; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Diterpene resin acids (DRAs) are specialized (secondary) metabolites of the oleoresin defense of conifers produced by diterpene synthases and cytochrome P450s of the CYP720B family. The evolution of DRA metabolism shares common origins with the biosynthesis of ent-kaurenoic acid, which is highly conserved in general (primary) metabolism of gibberellin biosynthesis. Transcriptome mining in species of spruce (Picea) and pine (Pinus) revealed CYP720Bs of four distinct clades. We cloned a comprehensive set of 12 different Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) CYP720Bs as full-length cDNAs. Spatial expression profiles, methyl jasmonate induction, and transcript enrichment in terpenoid-producing resin ducts suggested a role of CYP720B4 in DRA biosynthesis. CYP720B4 was characterized as a multisubstrate, multifunctional enzyme by the formation of oxygenated diterpenoids in metabolically engineered yeast, yeast in vivo transformation of diterpene substrates, in vitro assays with CYP720B4 protein produced in Escherichia coli, and alteration of DRA profiles in RNA interference-suppressed spruce seedlings. CYP720B4 was active with 24 different diterpenoid substrates, catalyzing consecutive C-18 oxidations in the biosynthesis of an array of diterpene alcohols, aldehydes, and acids. CYP720B4 was most active in the formation of dehydroabietic acid, a compound associated with insect resistance of Sitka spruce. We identified patterns of convergent evolution of CYP720B4 in DRA metabolism and ent-kaurene oxidase CYP701 in gibberellin metabolism and revealed differences in the evolution of specialized and general diterpene metabolism in a gymnosperm. The genomic and functional characterization of the gymnosperm CYP720B family highlights that the evolution of specialized metabolism involves substantial diversification relative to conserved, general metabolism.

  11. Representing Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harries, Tony; Barmby, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors wish to explore the use of visual representations in facilitating the understanding of multiplication. In doing so, they examine the different aspects of multiplication that they can access through different representations. In addition, they draw on a study that they have been carrying out looking at pupils' actual use…

  12. Multiple homicides.

    PubMed

    Copeland, A R

    1989-09-01

    A study of multiple homicides or multiple deaths involving a solitary incident of violence by another individual was performed on the case files of the Office of the Medical Examiner of Metropolitan Dade County in Miami, Florida, during 1983-1987. A total of 107 multiple homicides were studied: 88 double, 17 triple, one quadruple, and one quintuple. The 236 victims were analyzed regarding age, race, sex, cause of death, toxicologic data, perpetrator, locale of the incident, and reason for the incident. This article compares this type of slaying with other types of homicide including those perpetrated by serial killers. Suggestions for future research in this field are offered.

  13. Electrochemistry and electrogenerated chemiluminescence of π-stacked poly(fluorenemethylene) oligomers. Multiple, interacting electron transfers.

    PubMed

    Qi, Honglan; Chang, Jinho; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Thakur, Khushabu; Rathore, Rajendra; Bard, Allen J

    2012-10-01

    The electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of a series of π-stacked poly(fluorenemethylene) oligomers (Fn, n = 1-6) were investigated. The pendant cofacially oriented fluorene moieties are essentially in contact with each other by Van der Waals interaction promoting electronic delocalization in these species. All six compounds give successive cyclic voltammetric one-electron (1e) oxidations in 1:1 acetonitrile/benzene (MeCN/Bz), and the multiple 1e transfer properties of all these compounds were confirmed by chronoamperometric experiments with an ultramicroelectrode and digital simulations. The potentials for oxidation of the successive 1e transfers can be explained in terms of electrostatic interactions among the fluorenes. The monomer (F1) shows one irreversible wave, while F2 shows two reversible 1e waves. F3 shows only two reversible 1e oxidation waves, which is consistent with the large energy to remove a third electron because of the greater electrostatic repulsion, so the third wave is shifted toward more positive potentials. Both F4 and F5 show three reversible 1e oxidation waves, while F6 shows four reversible 1e waves. The removal of the first electron from an oligomer becomes easier as n increases. The stability of the radical cations also increases with n. The removal of consecutive electrons from Fn can be correlated with the distance between fluorene moieties. No reduction peaks were observed except for some broad ones at ~-3.2 V vs SCE in THF, which is consitent with the wide highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital gap in these compounds (absorbance at about 300 nm). No characteristic annihilation ECL signal was observed for these compounds in 1:1 MeCN/Bz mixed solvent. However, the ECL of F6 in the presence of the coreactant C(2)O(4)(2-) showed a long-wavelength ECL emission that was proposed to be electrolyzed byproduct from the radical cation. PMID:22946643

  14. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively. PMID:26414425

  15. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  16. Developing Multiple-Site Kinetic Models in Catalysis Simulation: A Case Study of 02+2N0 ↔ 2 NO2 Oxidation-Reduction Chemistry on Pt(100) Catalyst Crystal Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Chin, Ya-Huei; Peden, Charles HF

    2006-02-15

    It is generally recognized that developing a kinetic model for a supported catalyst is difficult since multiple site types exist. These sites can arise from a distribution of crystal facets (e.g., (100), (110), etc.) each with their unique intrinsic site types (e.g., atop, bridge, hollow, etc.). Additional complexities arise from non-basel plane site types (defect, edge, corner, etc.), all whose differing lateral interaction energies may be coverage dependent for each site pairwise interaction. To demonstrate the complexities that develop even for a greatly simplified system, we examine a multiple site kinetic model of the reaction 2NO + O2 - 2NO2 on an ideal Pt(100) catalyst. A model of the Pt(100) surface is adopted where atop, bridge, and 4-fold hollow sites are responsible for O2, NO, and NO2 chemisorption to form Pt-O, Pt-NO, and Pt-NO2 species. In our kinetic scheme, equilibrium is assumed for O2, NO, and NO2 chemisorption due to their high sticking coefficients (all > 0.1). A single rate determining step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type was chosen to describe the oxidation of NO on platinum via the reaction PtH,A,B-O + PtH,A,B-NO - PtH,A,B + PtH,A,B-NO2, where H, A, and B represent 4-fold hollow, atop, and bridge sites. Equal kinetic parameters for all site combinations were assumed to exist and, in part, taken from the literature to be AH+=83 kJ/mol and AS+=20 J/K mol. The exercise here is largely hypothetical but offers insight into how more detailed kinetic models may be developed, such as through the use of reaction velocity matrices, a concept introduced here. Specifically for this system, the model yielded insight into NOx chemistry on Pt(100) in that it predicted that the greatest reaction velocities (forward and reverse) occurred via the reaction Pt-O(atop) + Pt-NO(bridge) A Pt(atop) + Pt-NO2(bridge). We believe the framework of a site-specific modeling scheme presented here is an important starting point for future site-specific microkinetic

  17. Myeloma (multiple)

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Multiple myeloma is the most common primary cancer of the bones in adults, representing about 1% of all cancers diagnosed in the US in 2004, and 14% of all haematological malignancies. In the UK, multiple myeloma accounts for 1% of all new cases of cancer diagnosed each year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment in people with asymptomatic early stage multiple myeloma (stage I)? What are the effects of first-line treatments in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? What are the effect of salvage treatments, or supportive therapy, in people with advanced stage multiple myeloma (stages II and III)? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to November 2004 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 71 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: allogenic transplant (non-myeloablative), autologous stem cell transplant (early or late transplantation, double or single, purging of), bisphosphonates, bone marrow stem cells, bortezomib, chemotherapy (combination, conventional dose, intermediate dose plus stem cell rescue, high-dose plus stem cell rescue), combination chemotherapy plus corticosteroids, deferred treatment (in stage I disease), early chemotherapy plus corticosteroids (in stage I disease), epoetin alpha, first-line treatments, infection prophylaxis, interferon, maintenance therapy (in advanced multiple myeloma), melphalan (normal dose

  18. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  19. Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Common manifestations include paresthesias, diplopia, loss of vision, numbness or weakness of the limbs, bowel or bladder dysfunction, spasticity, ataxia, fatigue, and mental changes. Four main patterns of MS are recognized: relapsing remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive, and progressive relapsing. The cause of MS is unknown, although it appears to be an autoimmune disease. Much of what is known about MS has been learned from an animal model of the disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. PMID:24381825

  20. Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Nicoline; Calabresi, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that there are 300,000 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States and 2.3 million worldwide. Each MS attack can affect function in cognitive, emotional, motoric, sensory, or visual domains. Patients are often struck in the prime of their lives as they attempt to move forward with career, and family. Since the previous 2010 Seminars in Neurology Pearls and Pitfalls issue, the world of MS has drastically changed and advanced. Here the authors address the ever-changing MS world in both treatment options and diagnostics, covering easily missed differential diagnoses, newly available immunomodulatory therapy, and the challenges of safely treating patients. PMID:27643903

  1. Multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal plasma cell malignancy that accounts for slightly more than 10% of all hematologic cancers. In this paper, we present a historically focused review of the disease, from the description of the first case in 1844 to the present. The evolution of drug therapy and stem-cell transplantation for the treatment of myeloma, as well as the development of new agents, is discussed. We also provide an update on current concepts of diagnosis and therapy, with an emphasis on how treatments have emerged from a historical perspective after certain important discoveries and the results of experimental studies. PMID:18332230

  2. [Multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Abe, Masahiro; Miki, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Shingen

    2016-03-01

    Owing to the positive clinical benefits obtained with new agents, complete remission (CR) can be used as a surrogate for overall survival, and should be achieved. Although multiple myeloma is a heterogeneous disease in terms of myeloma cell- and patient-related risk factors, patients should receive the most effective combination therapy based on proteasome inhibitors and/or immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) as backbone medication irrespective of the risks encountered in the setting of induction therapy ("one-size-fits-all" therapy), followed by consolidation/maintenance therapy to achieve CR with the ultimate goal of extended survival. Myeloma-defining biomarkers have been established to identify high-risk smoldering myeloma requiring treatment. The development of salvage treatments yielding better outcomes for relapsed/refractory myeloma is urgently needed. Upcoming novel molecular targeting agents with different modes of action and immunotherapeutic agents will be integrated into myeloma treatment regimens with a great therapeutic impact, and further evolution of the treatment paradigm for multiple myeloma is eagerly anticipated. PMID:27076236

  3. [Multiple apheresis].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C

    2007-05-01

    Multiple apheresis makes it possible to obtain at least two labile blood components from a single donor using a cell separator. It can be either multicomponent apheresis leading to the preparation of at least two different blood component types or red blood cell apheresis providing two identical red blood cell concentrates. These techniques available in addition to whole blood donation, are modifying collection strategies in many Etablissements Français du Sang and will contribute to improve stock logistics in the future. In areas with insufficient stock, these procedures will help achieve blood component self-sufficiency. The author first describes the principle underlying different--current or future--techniques as well as their advantages and drawbacks. He finally addresses the potential impact of these processes on the evolution of blood collection and the advantages to be gained. PMID:17521944

  4. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boster, Aaron L.; Racke, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preliminary studies have suggested that a high salt diet may play a role in the development of autoimmune disease and possibly multiple sclerosis (MS). Promising clinical trial results for 2 new therapies for MS have been reported. Dimethyl fumarate, also known by its investigational name BG-12, became the third oral disease-modifying therapy for MS to be Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved in March 2013. Interestingly, dimethyl fumarate served as the active compound used for the treatment of psoriasis for decades. Alemtuzumab remains under investigation and is not currently FDA-approved for treatment of MS. Other drugs currently approved for alternative indications are being investigated for use in MS. Additionally, an investigation of alternative dosing strategies for glatiramer acetate suggests that patients may benefit from a higher dose formulation and less frequent medication administration. Advances in basic science research have identified another potential autoantigenic target in MS, KIR4.1, which may provide further insight into MS pathophysiology. PMID:24175156

  5. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Massimo; Preziosa, Paolo; Rocca, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Due to its sensitivity to the different multiple sclerosis (MS)-related abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established tool to diagnose MS and to monitor its evolution. MRI has been included in the diagnostic workup of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS, and ad hoc criteria have been proposed and are regularly updated. In patients with definite MS, the ability of conventional MRI techniques to explain patients' clinical status and progression of disability is still suboptimal. Several advanced MRI-based technologies have been applied to estimate overall MS burden in the different phases of the disease. Their use has allowed the heterogeneity of MS pathology in focal lesions, normal-appearing white matter and gray matter to be graded in vivo. Recently, additional features of MS pathology, including macrophage infiltration and abnormal iron deposition, have become quantifiable. All of this, combined with functional imaging techniques, is improving our understanding of the mechanisms associated with MS evolution. In the near future, the use of ultrahigh-field systems is likely to provide additional insight into disease pathophysiology. However, the utility of advanced MRI techniques in clinical trial monitoring and in assessing individual patients' response to treatment still needs to be assessed. PMID:27432676

  6. Photocatalytic Anion Oxidation and Applications in Organic Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hering, Thea; Meyer, Andreas Uwe; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-19

    Ions and radicals of the same kind differ by one electron only. The oxidation of many stable inorganic anions yields their corresponding highly reactive radicals, and visible light excitable photocatalysts can provide the required oxidation potential for this transformation. Air oxygen serves as the terminal oxidant, or cheap sacrificial oxidants are used, providing a very practical approach for generating reactive inorganic radicals for organic synthesis. We discuss in this perspective several recently reported examples: Nitrate radicals are obtained by one-electron photooxidation of nitrate anions and are very reactive toward organic molecules. The photooxidation of sulfinate salts yields the much more stable sulfone radicals, which smoothly add to double bonds. A two-electron oxidation of chloride anions to electrophilic chlorine species reacting with arenes in aromatic substitutions extends the method beyond radical reactions. The chloride anion oxidation proceeds via photocatalytically generated peracidic acid as the oxidation reagent. Although the number of reported examples of photocatalytically generated inorganic radical intermediates for organic synthesis is still small, future extension of the concept to other inorganic ions as radical precursors is a clear perspective.

  7. Selective Oxidizer For Removal Of Carbon Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trocciola, John C.; Schroll, Craig R.; Lesieur, Roger R.

    1996-01-01

    Catalytic apparatus selectively oxidizes most of carbon monoxide (without oxidizing hydrogen) in stream of reformed fuel gas fed to low-temperature fuel cell. Multiple catalytic stages at progressively lower temperatures operate without becoming poisoned. Catalysts used to oxidize CO selectively include platinum on alumina and commercial catalyst known as "Selectoxo."

  8. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  9. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  10. Modulation of Phenol Oxidation in Cofacial Dyads.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon Jun; Huynh, Michael; Halbach, Robert L; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-09-23

    The presentation of two phenols on a xanthene backbone is akin to the tyrosine dyad (Y730 and Y731) of ribonucleotide reductase. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two phenol moieties are cofacially disposed at 4.35 Å. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that phenol oxidation is modulated within the dyad, which exhibits a splitting of one-electron waves with the second oxidation of the phenol dyad occurring at larger positive potential than that of a typical phenol. In contrast, a single phenol appended to a xanthene exhibits a two-electron process, consistent with reported oxidation pathways of phenols in acetonitrile. The perturbation of the phenol potential by stacking is reminiscent of a similar effect for guanines stacked within DNA base pairs.

  11. Modulation of Phenol Oxidation in Cofacial Dyads

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon Jun; Huynh, Michael; Halbach, Robert L.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of two phenols on a xanthene backbone is akin to the tyrosine dyad (Y730 and Y731) of ribonucleotide reductase. X-ray crystallography reveals that the two phenol moieties are cofacially disposed at 4.35 Å. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) reveals that phenol oxidation is modulated within the dyad, which exhibits a splitting of one-electron waves with the second oxidation of the phenol dyad occurring at larger positive potential than that of a typical phenol. In contrast, a single phenol appended to a xanthene exhibits a two-electron (ECE) process, consistent with reported oxidation pathways of phenols in acetonitrile. The perturbation of the phenol potential by stacking is reminiscent of a similar effect for guanines stacked within DNA base pairs. PMID:26305909

  12. Multiple System Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple System Atrophy Information Page Condensed from Multiple System Atrophy ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Multiple System Atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  13. Multiple sclerosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - multiple sclerosis ... The following organizations provide information on multiple sclerosis : Multiple Sclerosis Foundation -- www.msfocus.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis National ...

  14. Visible-Light-Promoted Oxidative [4 + 2] Cycloadditions of Aryl Silyl Enol Ethers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Lu, Zhan

    2016-08-19

    Visible-light-promoted oxidative [4 + 2] cycloadditions of ε,3-unsaturated silyl enol ethers have been developed to efficiently and diastereoselectively construct polycyclic skeletons under mild conditions. The diastereoselectivities were dependent on the stereoconfiguration of silyl enol ether, substitutions on the link, as well as electric properties of substitutions on aryl rings. The intermediates could be trapped by TEMPO, oxygen or methanol. Mechanistic studies indicated the reaction was initiated by one-electron oxidation of the silyl enol ether. PMID:27391768

  15. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of homo- and heterobimetallic niobium{sup v} and tantalum{sup v} peroxo-polyaminocarboxylato complexes and their use as single or multiple molecular precursors for Nb-Ta mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bayot, Daisy . E-mail: devillers@chim.ucl.ac.be

    2005-09-15

    New water-soluble bimetallic peroxo complexes of niobium{sup V} and/or tantalum{sup V} with high-denticity polyaminocarboxylate ligands have been prepared, characterized from the spectroscopic point of view, and used as molecular precursors for Nb-Ta mixed oxides. Four new homobimetallic complexes (gu){sub 3}[Nb{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].3H{sub 2}O 1 (gu){sub 3}[Ta{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].5H{sub 2}O 2 (gu){sub 3}[Nb{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4})].2H{sub 2}O 4 and (gu){sub 3}[Ta{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4})].3H{sub 2}O 5 and the corresponding heterometallic complexes (gu){sub 3}[NbTa(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(dtpaO{sub 3})].2.5H{sub 2}O 3 and (gu){sub 3}[NbTa(O{sub 2}){sub 4}(HtthaO{sub 4)}].2H{sub 2}O 6 have been obtained. In these compounds, the in situ oxidation of the nitrogen atoms of the PAC ligands into N-oxide groups has been evidenced by IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The thermal treatment of the homonuclear complexes in air at 700 or 800 deg. C, depending on the Ta content, provided Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} or Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} while the heteronuclear compounds led to the solid solution TaNbO{sub 5}. BET and SEM measurements have been carried out and comparison of the morphology of the samples prepared from homo- and heterometallic precursors is discussed.

  17. Size Dependence of [n]Cycloparaphenylenes (n=5-12) in Electrochemical Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kayahara, Eiichi; Fukayama, Kei; Nishinaga, Tohru; Yamago, Shigeru

    2016-06-21

    The oxidation processes of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) (n=5-12) were systematically investigated by cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. All CPPs underwent pseudo-reversible two-electron oxidation irrespective of ring size, forming the corresponding radical cations and then dications. The results were in sharp contrast to those observed for linear oligoparaphenylenes, which only undergo one-electron oxidation. The difference in the first and second oxidation potentials in the CPP oxidation was affected by the ring size and became more significant as the decrease of CPP size. In other words, while the first oxidation from neutral CPP to the radical cation occurred faster as the size of CPP becomes smaller, the second oxidation from the radical cation to dication exhibited opposite size dependence. PMID:27137132

  18. Size Dependence of [n]Cycloparaphenylenes (n=5-12) in Electrochemical Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kayahara, Eiichi; Fukayama, Kei; Nishinaga, Tohru; Yamago, Shigeru

    2016-06-21

    The oxidation processes of [n]cycloparaphenylenes ([n]CPPs) (n=5-12) were systematically investigated by cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. All CPPs underwent pseudo-reversible two-electron oxidation irrespective of ring size, forming the corresponding radical cations and then dications. The results were in sharp contrast to those observed for linear oligoparaphenylenes, which only undergo one-electron oxidation. The difference in the first and second oxidation potentials in the CPP oxidation was affected by the ring size and became more significant as the decrease of CPP size. In other words, while the first oxidation from neutral CPP to the radical cation occurred faster as the size of CPP becomes smaller, the second oxidation from the radical cation to dication exhibited opposite size dependence.

  19. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  20. Multiple and additive functions of ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1: cataract phenotype and ocular oxidative damage in Aldh3a1(-/-)/Aldh1a1(-/-) knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Natalie; Bateman, J Bronwyn; Estey, Tia; Kuszak, Jer R; Nees, David W; Piatigorsky, Joram; Duester, Gregg; Day, Brian J; Huang, Jie; Hines, Lisa M; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2007-08-31

    ALDH3A1 (aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1) is abundant in the mouse cornea but undetectable in the lens, and ALDH1A1 is present at lower (catalytic) levels in the cornea and lens. To test the hypothesis that ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1 protect the anterior segment of the eye against environmentally induced oxidative damage, Aldh1a1(-/-)/Aldh3a1(-/-) double knock-out and Aldh1a1(-/-) and Aldh3a1(-/-) single knock-out mice were evaluated for biochemical changes and cataract formation (lens opacification). The Aldh1a1/Aldh3a1- and Aldh3a1-null mice develop cataracts in the anterior and posterior subcapsular regions as well as punctate opacities in the cortex by 1 month of age. The Aldh1a1-null mice also develop cataracts later in life (6-9 months of age). One- to three-month-old Aldh-null mice exposed to UVB exhibited accelerated anterior lens subcapsular opacification, which was more pronounced in Aldh3a1(-/-) and Aldh3a1(-/-)/Aldh1a1(-/-) mice compared with Aldh1a1(-/-) and wild type animals. Cataract formation was associated with decreased proteasomal activity, increased protein oxidation, increased GSH levels, and increased levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and malondialdehyde-protein adducts. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that corneal ALDH3A1 and lens ALDH1A1 protect the eye against cataract formation via nonenzymatic (light filtering) and enzymatic (detoxification) functions. PMID:17567582

  1. Multiple aberrations in shared inflammatory and oxidative & nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways explain the co-association of depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD), and the increased risk for CVD and due mortality in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michael; Ruckoanich, Piyanuj; Chang, Young Seun; Mahanonda, Nithi; Berk, Michael

    2011-04-29

    There is evidence that there is a bidirectional relationship between major depression and cardiovascular disorder (CVD): depressed patients are a population at risk for increased cardiac morbidity and mortality, and depression is more frequent in patients who suffer from CVD. There is also evidence that inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways underpin the common pathophysiology of both CVD and major depression. Activation of these pathways may increase risk for both disorders and contribute to shared risk. The shared IO&NS pathways that may contribute to CVD and depression comprise the following: increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ; T cell activation; increased acute phase proteins, like C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, fibrinogen and α1-antitrypsin; complement factors; increased LPS load through bacterial translocation and subsequent gut-derived inflammation; induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase with increased levels of tryptophan catabolites; decreased levels of antioxidants, like coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin E, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase; increased O&NS characterized by oxidative damage to low density lipoprotein (LDL) and phospholipid inositol, increased malondialdehyde, and damage to DNA and mitochondria; increased nitrosative stress; and decreased ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The complex interplay between the abovementioned IO&NS pathways in depression results in pro-atherogenic effects and should be regarded as a risk factor to future clinical CVD and due mortality. We suggest that major depression should be added as a risk factor to the Charlson "comorbidity" index. It is advised that patients with (sub)chronic or recurrent major depression should routinely be assessed by serology tests to predict if they have an increased risk to cardiovascular disorders.

  2. Characterization of divalent and trivalent species generated in the chemical and electrochemical oxidation of a dimeric pincer complex of nickel.

    PubMed

    Spasyuk, Denis M; Gorelsky, Serge I; van der Est, Art; Zargarian, Davit

    2011-03-21

    The electrolytic and chemical oxidation of the dimeric pincer complex [κ(P),κ(C),κ(N),μ(N)-(2,6-(i-Pr(2)POC(6)H(3)CH(2)NBn)Ni](2) (1; Bn = CH(2)Ph) has been investigated by various analytic techniques. Cyclic voltammetry measurements have shown that 1 undergoes a quasi-reversible, one electron, Ni-based redox process (ΔE(0)(1/2) = -0.07 V vs Cp(2)Fe/[Cp(2)Fe](+)), and spectroelectrochemical measurements conducted on the product of the electrolytic oxidation, [1](+•), have shown multiple low-energy electronic transitions in the range of 10,000-15,000 cm(-1). Computational studies using Density Functional Theory (B3LYP) have corroborated the experimentally obtained structure of 1, provided the electronic structure description, and helped interpret the experimentally obtained absorption spectra for 1 and [1](+·). These calculations indicate that the radical cation [1](+·) is a dimeric, mixed-valent species (class III) wherein most of the spin density is delocalized over the two nickel centers (Ni(+2.5)(2)N(2)), but some spin density is also present over the two nitrogen atoms (Ni(2+)(2)N(2)·). Examination of alternative structures for open shell species generated from 1 has shown that the spin density distribution is highly sensitive toward changes in the ligand environment of the Ni ions. NMR, UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses have shown that chemical oxidation of 1 with N-Bromosuccinimide (NBS) follows a complex process that gives multiple products, including the monomeric trivalent species κ(P),κ(C),κ(N)-{2,6-(i-Pr(2)PO)(C(6)H(3))(CH═NBn)}NiBr(2) (2). These studies also indicate that oxidation of 1 with 1 equiv of NBS gives an unstable, paramagnetic intermediate that decomposes to a number of divalent species, including succinimide and the monomeric divalent complexes κ(P),κ(C),κ(N)-{2,6-(i-Pr(2)PO)(C(6)H(3))(CH═NBn)}NiBr (3) and κ(P),κ(C),κ(N)-{2,6-(i-Pr(2)PO)(C(6)H(3))(CH(2)N

  3. Progress towards Generating Rydberg State, One Electron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiling, Joan; Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Naing, Aung; Tan, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    We report on progress towards producing hydrogen-like ions in Rydberg states from bare nuclei. Fully stripped neon atoms (Ne10+) are produced by the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at NIST. These ions are extracted via a beamline from the EBIT into a second apparatus where they are captured at low energy in a unitary Penning trap. The second apparatus has a cross-beam configuration, with a perpendicular beam of laser excited Rb atoms intersecting the ion beam at the Penning trap. While stored in the trap, the ions can interact with the Rb and, through charge exchange interactions, the bare nuclei can capture one or more electrons from the Rb. The ions are then analyzed by dumping the trap to a time-of-flight detector, which allows determination of the ion charge state evolution. This work builds towards laser spectroscopy on hydrogen-like ions in circular Rydberg states to obtain a value for the Rydberg constant independent of nuclear size effects. Such a measurement could shed some light on the proton radius puzzle.

  4. Chasing the limits of the one electron approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kędziera, Dariusz; Mentel, Łukasz M.

    2014-10-06

    Rapid progress in the development of computational methods for quantum chemistry is not properly balanced by the development of basis sets. Even in the case of few-electron systems it is hard to find basis set which are able to reproduce the ECG benchmarks with the mhartree accuracy. In this paper we show early work on improvements of the basis sets for small atomic and molecular systems. As a starting point the ground state of lithium atom and the lowest states of lithium dimer will be investigated. The exploratory optimization of the exponents of primitive gaussians will be based on even tempered scheme combined with CISD method.

  5. Optimization schemes for efficient multiple exciton generation and extraction in colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damtie, Fikeraddis A.; Karki, Khadga J.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Wacker, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) is a process in which more than one electron hole pair is generated per absorbed photon. It allows us to increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Experimental studies have shown the multiple exciton generation yield of 1.2 in isolated colloidal quantum dots. However real photoelectric devices require the extraction of electron hole pairs to electric contacts. We provide a systematic study of the corresponding quantum coherent processes including extraction and injection and show that a proper design of extraction and injection rates enhances the yield significantly up to values around 1.6.

  6. A many-body states picture of electronic friction: The case of multiple orbitals and multiple electronic states.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-08-01

    We present a very general form of electronic friction as present when a molecule with multiple orbitals hybridizes with a metal electrode. To develop this picture of friction, we embed the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) within a classical master equation (CME). Thus, this article extends our previous work analyzing the case of one electronic level, as we may now treat the case of multiple levels and many electronic molecular states. We show that, in the adiabatic limit, where electron transitions are much faster than nuclear motion, the QCLE-CME reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation, such that nuclei feel an average force as well as friction and a random force-as caused by their interaction with the metallic electrons. Finally, we show numerically and analytically that our frictional results agree with other published results calculated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. Numerical recipes for solving this QCLE-CME will be provided in a subsequent paper. PMID:27497534

  7. A many-body states picture of electronic friction: The case of multiple orbitals and multiple electronic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2016-08-01

    We present a very general form of electronic friction as present when a molecule with multiple orbitals hybridizes with a metal electrode. To develop this picture of friction, we embed the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) within a classical master equation (CME). Thus, this article extends our previous work analyzing the case of one electronic level, as we may now treat the case of multiple levels and many electronic molecular states. We show that, in the adiabatic limit, where electron transitions are much faster than nuclear motion, the QCLE-CME reduces to a Fokker-Planck equation, such that nuclei feel an average force as well as friction and a random force—as caused by their interaction with the metallic electrons. Finally, we show numerically and analytically that our frictional results agree with other published results calculated using non-equilibrium Green's functions. Numerical recipes for solving this QCLE-CME will be provided in a subsequent paper.

  8. Multiple-Ring Digital Communication Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1992-01-01

    Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control functions of electric-power-distribution networks. Optical-fiber links of communication network follow power-distribution routes. Since fiber crosses open power switches, communication network includes multiple interconnected loops with occasional spurs. At each intersection node is needed. Nodes of communication network include power-distribution substations and power-controlling units. In addition to serving data acquisition and control functions, each node acts as repeater, passing on messages to next node(s). Multiple-ring communication network operates on new AbNET protocol and features fiber-optic communication.

  9. Nicotine increases oxidative stress, activates NF-kappaB and GRP78, induces apoptosis and sensitizes cells to genotoxic/xenobiotic stresses by a multiple stress inducer, deoxycholate: relevance to colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crowley-Weber, Cara L; Dvorakova, Katerina; Crowley, Cheray; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol; Garewal, Harinder; Payne, Claire M

    2003-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that environmental (smoking) and dietary factors (high fat) contribute to carcinogenesis in many organ systems. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that nicotine, a component of cigarette smoke, and sodium deoxycholate (NaDOC), a cytotoxic bile salt that increases in concentration in the gastrointestinal tract after a high fat meal, induce similar cellular stresses and that nicotine may enhance some of the NaDOC-induced stresses. We found that nicotine, at 0.8 microM, the very low sub-micromolar level occurring in the tissues of smokers: (1). increases oxidative stress; (2). activates NF-kappaB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor; (3). activates the 78 kD glucose regulated protein promoter, an indication of endoplasmic reticulum stress; (4). induces apoptosis; (5). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the 153 kD growth arrest and DNA damage promoter, an indication of increased genotoxic stress; and (6). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the xenobiotic response element. Our findings have applicability to G.I. cancer, in general, since smoking is a risk factor in the development of esophageal, pancreatic, gastric and colon cancer, and these cancers are also promoted by bile acids. PMID:12606154

  10. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  11. What Is Multiple Myeloma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... other tissues. If someone has only a single plasma cell tumor, the disease is called an isolated (or solitary ) plasmacytoma . If someone has more than one plasmacytoma, they have multiple myeloma . Multiple myeloma is ...

  12. Challenges of Parenting Multiples

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parenting Multiples There are many psychological, social, and economic issues associated with multiple pregnancies. These issues should ... births can also be helpful during difficult times. ECONOMIC ISSUES • The health care cost for delivery and ...

  13. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the Community Stay Informed Corporate Support National Multiple Sclerosis Society Our Mission: People affected by MS can ... 10.5 Million in New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever October 11, ...

  14. MultipleColposcopyJCO

    Cancer.gov

    Performing multiple biopsies during a procedure known as colposcopy—visual inspection of the cervix—is more effective than performing only a single biopsy of the worst-appearing area for detecting cervical cancer precursors. This multiple biopsy approach

  15. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancerous (malignant) tumors or grow excessively without forming tumors. Multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes are caused by ... This Article Generic Name Select Brand Names corticotropin H.P. ACTHAR GEL epinephrine ADRENALIN Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia ...

  16. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neutral Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Oxidate Stress and Damage in Multiple Hit Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and maintaining homeostasis. Spaceflight-adaptation syndrome is the combination of space environmental conditions and the synergistic reaction of the human physiology. Our work addresses the role of oxidative stress and damage (OSaD) as a negative and contributing Risk Factor (RF) in the following areas of combined spaceflight related dysregulation: i) radiation induced cellular damage [1], [2] ii) immune impacts and the inflammatory response [3], [4] and iii) varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation [5]. Varicella-zoster (VZV)/Chicken Pox virus is a neurotropic human alphaherpes virus resulting in varicella upon primary infection, suppressed by the immune system becomes latent in ganglionic neurons, and reactivates under stress events to re-express in zoster and possibly shingles. Our laboratory has developed a complex three-dimensional (3D) normal human neural tissue model that emulates several characteristics of the human trigeminal ganglia (TG) and allows the study of combinatorial experimentation which addresses, simultaneously, OSaD associated with Spaceflight adaptation and habitation [6]. By combining the RFs of microgravity, radiation, and viral infection we will demonstrate that living in the space environment leads to significant physiological consequences for the peripheral and subsequently the central nervous system (PNS, CNS) associated with OSaD generation and consequentially endangers long-duration and exploration-class missions.

  17. Magnesium Oxide

    MedlinePlus

    ... different reasons. Some people use it as an antacid to relieve heartburn, sour stomach, or acid indigestion. ... stomach.Do not take magnesium oxide as an antacid for longer than 2 weeks unless your doctor ...

  18. Evidence for the role of holes in blinking: negative and oxidized CdSe/CdS dots.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2012-10-23

    Thin shell CdSe/CdS colloidal quantum dots with a small 3 nm core diameter exhibit typical blinking and a binary PL intensity distribution. Electrochemical charging with one electron suppresses the blinking. With a larger core of 5 nm, the blinking statistics of on and off states is identical to that of a smaller core but the dots also display a grey state with a finite duration time (~6 ms) on glass. However, the grey state disappears on the electron-accepting ZnO nanocrystals film. In addition, the grey state PL lifetime on glass is similar to the trion lifetime measured from electrochemically charged dots. Therefore, the grey state is assigned to the photocharged negative dots. It is concluded that a grey state is always present as the dots get negatively photocharged even though it might not be observed due to the brightness of the trion and/or the duration time of the negative charge. With thick shell CdSe/CdS dots under electrochemical control, multiple charging, up to four electrons per dot, is observed as sequential changes in the photoluminescence lifetime which can be described by the Nernst equation. The small potential increment confirms the weak electron confinement with the thick CdS shell. Finally, the mechanism of hole-trapping and surface oxidation by the hole is proposed to account for the grey state and off state in the blinking.

  19. The oxidation of phenol by ferrate(VI) and ferrate(V). A pulse radiolysis and stopped-flow study.

    PubMed

    Rush, J D; Cyr, J E; Zhao, Z; Bielski, B H

    1995-04-01

    Potassium ferrate, K2FeO4, is found to oxidize phenol in aqueous solution (5.5 < or = pH < or = 10) by a process which is second order in both reactants; -d[FeVI]/dt=k1[FeVI][phenol], k1 = 10(7)M-1s-1. Product analysis by HPLC showed a mixture of hydroxylated products, principally paraquinone, and biphenols that indicate that oxidation of phenol occurs by both one-electron and two-electron pathways. The two-electron oxidant, producing both para- and ortho-hydroxylated phenols is considered to be ferrate(V) which is itself produced by the initial one-electron reduction of ferrate(VI). The rate of ferrate(V) reaction with phenol was determined by pre-mix stopped flow pulse-radiolysis and found to be k7 = (3.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(5)M-1s-1. PMID:7633565

  20. Operation of the Oxide Washer for Water-Washing Solubles out of Impure Pu Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, K E; Close, W L; Krikorian, O H; Summers III, H V

    2006-01-30

    An evaluation has been made for using the Oxide Washer to wash water-soluble materials out of impure Pu oxide. It is found that multiple washes are needed to reduce the water-soluble materials to very low levels in the impure Pu oxides. The removal of the wash water from the Oxide Washer is accompanied by particulates of the impure Pu oxide, which subsequently need to be filtered out. In spite of the additional filtration needed, the overall level of manpower required for processing is still only about one third of that for an all-manual operation.

  1. Using nitrogen isotope fractionation to assess the oxidation of substituted anilines by manganese oxide.

    PubMed

    Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Jiskra, Martin; Turgeon, Aurora; Garr, Ashley N; Arnold, William A; Cramer, Christopher J; Schwarzenbach, René P; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2011-07-01

    We explored the N isotope fractionation associated with the oxidation of substituted primary aromatic amines, which are often the position of initial attack in transformation processes of environmental contaminants. Apparent (15)N-kinetic isotope effects, AKIE(N), were determined for the oxidation of various substituted anilines in suspensions of manganese oxide (MnO(2)) and compared to reference experiments in homogeneous solutions and at electrode surfaces, as well as to density functional theory calculations of intrinsic KIE(N)for electron and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. Owing to the partial aromatic imine formation after one-electron oxidation and corresponding increase in C-N bond strength, AKIE(N)-values were inverse, substituent-dependent, and confined to the range between 0.992 and 0.999 in agreement with theory. However, AKIE(N)-values became normal once the fraction of cationic species prevailed owing to (15)N-equilibrium isotope effects, EIE(N), of 1.02 associated with N atom deprotonation. The observable AKIE(N)-values are substantially modulated by the acid/base pre-equilibria of the substituted anilines and isotope fractionation may even vanish under conditions where normal EIE(N) and inverse AKIE(N) cancel each other out. The pH-dependent trends of the AKIE(N)-values provide a new line of evidence for the identification of contaminant degradation processes via oxidation of primary aromatic amino groups.

  2. Kinetic evidence for rapid oxidation of (-)-epicatechin by human myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Spalteholz, Holger; Furtmueller, Paul Georg; Jakopitsch, Christa; Obinger, Christian; Schewe, Tankred; Sies, Helmut; Arnhold, Juergen

    2008-07-11

    Apocynin has been reported to require dimerization by myeloperoxidase (MPO) to inhibit leukocyte NADPH oxidase. (-)-Epicatechin, a dietary flavan-3-ol, has been identified as a 'prodrug' of apocynin-like metabolites that inhibit endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and elevate the cellular level of nitric oxide. Since (-)-epicatechin has tentatively been identified as substrate of MPO, we studied the one-electron oxidation of (-)-epicatechin by MPO. By using multi-mixing stopped-flow technique, we demonstrate that (-)-epicatechin is one of the most efficient electron donors for heme peroxidases investigated so far. Second order rate constants for the (-)-epicatechin-mediated conversion of MPO-compound I to compound II and compound II to resting enzyme were estimated to be 1.9 x 10{sup 7} and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively (pH 7, 25 deg. C). The data indicate that (-)-epicatechin is capable of undergoing fast MPO-mediated one-electron oxidation.

  3. Fine Design of Photoredox Systems for Catalytic Fluoromethylation of Carbon-Carbon Multiple Bonds.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takashi; Akita, Munetaka

    2016-09-20

    Trifluoromethyl (CF3) and difluoromethyl (CF2H) groups are versatile structural motifs, especially in the fields of pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Thus, the development of new protocols for tri- and difluoromethylation of various skeletons has become a vital subject to be studied in the field of synthetic organic chemistry. For the past decades, a variety of fluoromethylating reagents have been developed. In particular, bench-stable and easy-to-use electrophilic fluoromethylating reagents such as the Umemoto, Yagupolskii-Umemoto, Togni, and Hu reagents serve as excellent fluoromethyl sources for ionic and carbenoid reactions. Importantly, the action of catalysis has become a promising strategy for developing new fluoromethylations. For the past several years, photoredox catalysis has emerged as a useful tool for radical reactions through visible-light-induced single-electron-transfer (SET) processes. Commonly used photocatalysts such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and fac-[Ir(ppy)3] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; ppy = 2-pyridylphenyl) have potential as one-electron reductants strong enough to reduce those fluoromethylating reagents, resulting in facile generation of the corresponding fluoromethyl radicals. Therefore, if we can design proper reaction systems, efficient and selective radical fluoromethylation would proceed without any sacrificial redox agents, i.e., via a redox-neutral process under mild reaction conditions: irradiation with visible light, including sunlight, below room temperature. It should be noted that examples of catalytic fluoromethylation of compounds with carbon-carbon multiple bonds have been limited until recent years. In this Account, we will focus on our recent research on photoredox-catalyzed fluoromethylation of carbon-carbon multiple bonds. First, choices of the photocatalyst and the fluoromethylating reagent and the basic concept involving a redox-neutral oxidative quenching cycle are explained. Then photocatalytic trifluoromethylation of olefins is

  4. [Nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase related to male reproduction].

    PubMed

    Ji, Jiajia; Zhao, Yanfang; Chen, Guoyuan

    2007-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may be a kind of signal molecule which may have multiplicate physiological function such as secondary messenger, neurotransmitter and effect molecule. NO may play a crucial role in organism. The production of NO can not get away from nitric oxide synthase (NOS) which may distribute in almost all kind of organs of male reproductive system. NO and NOS may have the function of bifunctional regulation for reproduction. In this paper, the regulatory function of NO and NOS on male reproductive system were reviewed.

  5. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV). PMID:26039669

  6. Nutrition for Multiples.

    PubMed

    Luke, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    In 2012 there were 135,943 infants of multiple pregnancies born in the United States, nearly a 2-fold increase since 1980, with twins accounting for 96% of all multiple births. To date, most perinatal morbidities associated with multiple births have proven resistant to technological or pharmaceutical interventions. Maternal nutrition can have a profound effect on the course and outcome of multiple pregnancy, with the goal of achieving optimal intrauterine growth and birthweights, and minimizing prenatal and perinatal complications for the mother and her children.

  7. Oxide Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    Thermoelectricity in oxides, especially NaxCoO2 and related materials, is discussed from the point of view of first principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory. The electronic structure of this material is exceptional in that it has a combination of very narrow bands and strong hybridization between metal d states and ligand p states. As shown within the framework of conventional Boltzmann transport theory, this leads to high Seebeck coefficients even at metallic carrier densities. This suggests a strategy of searching for other narrow band oxides that can be doped metallic with mobile carriers. Some possible avenues for finding such materials are suggested.

  8. Oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  9. Thallium oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Thallium oxide ; CASRN 1314 - 32 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  10. Propylene oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propylene oxide ; CASRN 75 - 56 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  11. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Merphos oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Merphos oxide ; CASRN 78 - 48 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  13. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  14. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  15. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... it is multiple myeloma . Stay on top of discoveries, trials, research and more. Click here to sign up for the MMRF Newsletter First name Last name E-mail address CLOSE News & Press Multiple Myeloma Knowledge Center Privacy Policy Donor Privacy Policy Terms of ...

  16. Orchestrating Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Seana; Kornhaber, Mindy; Gardner, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Education policymakers often go astray when they attempt to integrate multiple intelligences theory into schools, according to the originator of the theory, Howard Gardner, and his colleagues. The greatest potential of a multiple intelligences approach to education grows from the concept of a profile of intelligences. Each learner's intelligence…

  17. Twins, Triplets, Multiple Births

    MedlinePlus

    ... from alone. Multiple births are up in the United States. More women are having babies after age 30 and more are taking fertility drugs. Both boost the chance of carrying more than one baby. A family history of twins also makes multiples more likely. Years ...

  18. Prediction in Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the concept of prediction via multiple regression (MR) and discusses the assumptions underlying multiple regression analyses. Also discusses shrinkage, cross-validation, and double cross-validation of prediction equations and describes how to calculate confidence intervals around individual predictions. (SLD)

  19. [Multiple pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma].

    PubMed

    Haro, M; Ruiz, J; Vila, X; Avellanet, M; Izquierdo, J

    1994-01-01

    The causes of multiple pulmonary nodules are many, with metastasis being the most feared. A rare but possible etiology, however, is hyalinizing multiple granuloma. We present a case that allows us to review this condition and its course, as well as a variety of associated immunological changes and possible complications. PMID:8087395

  20. Applying Multiple Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christodoulou, Joanna A.

    2009-01-01

    The ideas of multiple intelligences introduced by Howard Gardner of Harvard University more than 25 years ago have taken form in many ways, both in schools and in other sometimes-surprising settings. The silver anniversary of Gardner's learning theory provides an opportunity to reflect on the ways multiple intelligences theory has taken form and…

  1. Constraining Multiple Grammars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This article offers the author's commentary on the Multiple Grammars (MG) language acquisition theory proposed by Luiz Amaral and Tom Roeper in the present issue. Multiple Grammars advances the claim that optionality is a constitutive characteristic of any one grammar, with interlanguage grammars being perhaps the clearest examples of a…

  2. Current multiplication by using multiple thyristors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Pemen, A J M; Van Heesch, E J M; Winands, G J J

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a circuit topology to obtain current multiplication by using multiple thyristors. To gain insight into this technique, an equivalent circuit model is introduced. Proper operation of the topology was demonstrated by experiments on a small-scale setup including three thyristors. One thyristor is triggered by a trigger circuit; the other two are autotriggered and require no external trigger circuit. The three thyristors could be synchronized automatically in sequence. During the closing process, the discharging of the energy storage capacitors via the thyristors is prevented. The discharging starts when all thyristors are closed, and the currents through each thyristor are simultaneous and identical. The output current is exactly three times the switching current.

  3. Spectroscopy of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Benjamin; Limpens, Rens; Chung, Nguyen Xuan; Schall, Peter; Gregorkiewicz, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Carrier multiplication in nanostructures promises great improvements in a number of widely used technologies, among others photodetectors and solar cells. The decade since its discovery was ridden with fierce discussions about its true existence, magnitude, and mechanism. Here, we introduce a novel, purely spectroscopic approach for investigation of carrier multiplication in nanocrystals. Applying this method to silicon nanocrystals in an oxide matrix, we obtain an unambiguous spectral signature of the carrier multiplication process and reveal details of its size-dependent characteristics-energy threshold and efficiency. The proposed method is generally applicable and suitable for both solid state and colloidal samples, as well as for a great variety of different materials. PMID:26852922

  4. Catalyst for carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor); Brown, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Vannorman, John D. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A catalyst is disclosed for the combination of CO and O2 to form CO2, which includes a platinum group metal (e.g., platinum); a reducable metal oxide having multiple valence states (e.g., SnO2); and a compound which can bind water to its structure (e.g., silica gel). This catalyst is ideally suited for application to high-powered pulsed, CO2 lasers operating in a sealed or closed-cycle condition.

  5. ZnO-based multiple channel and multiple gate FinMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching-Ting; Huang, Hung-Lin; Tseng, Chun-Yen; Lee, Hsin-Ying

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, zinc oxide (ZnO)-based metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) have attracted much attention, because ZnO-based semiconductors possess several advantages, including large exciton binding energy, nontoxicity, biocompatibility, low material cost, and wide direct bandgap. Moreover, the ZnO-based MOSFET is one of most potential devices, due to the applications in microwave power amplifiers, logic circuits, large scale integrated circuits, and logic swing. In this study, to enhance the performances of the ZnO-based MOSFETs, the ZnObased multiple channel and multiple gate structured FinMOSFETs were fabricated using the simple laser interference photolithography method and the self-aligned photolithography method. The multiple channel structure possessed the additional sidewall depletion width control ability to improve the channel controllability, because the multiple channel sidewall portions were surrounded by the gate electrode. Furthermore, the multiple gate structure had a shorter distance between source and gate and a shorter gate length between two gates to enhance the gate operating performances. Besides, the shorter distance between source and gate could enhance the electron velocity in the channel fin structure of the multiple gate structure. In this work, ninety one channels and four gates were used in the FinMOSFETs. Consequently, the drain-source saturation current (IDSS) and maximum transconductance (gm) of the ZnO-based multiple channel and multiple gate structured FinFETs operated at a drain-source voltage (VDS) of 10 V and a gate-source voltage (VGS) of 0 V were respectively improved from 11.5 mA/mm to 13.7 mA/mm and from 4.1 mS/mm to 6.9 mS/mm in comparison with that of the conventional ZnO-based single channel and single gate MOSFETs.

  6. Oxidation of DNA: damage to nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Kanvah, Sriram; Joseph, Joshy; Schuster, Gary B; Barnett, Robert N; Cleveland, Charles L; Landman, Uzi

    2010-02-16

    All organisms store the information necessary to maintain life in their DNA. Any process that damages DNA, causing a loss or corruption of that information, jeopardizes the viability of the organism. One-electron oxidation is such a process. In this Account, we address three of the central features of one-electron oxidation of DNA: (i) the migration of the radical cation away from the site of its formation; (ii) the electronic and structural factors that determine the nucleobases at which irreversible reactions most readily occur; (iii) the mechanism of reaction for nucleobase radical cations. The loss of an electron (ionization) from DNA generates an electron "hole" (a radical cation), located most often on its nucleobases, that migrates reversibly through duplex DNA by hopping until it is trapped in an irreversible chemical reaction. The particular sequence of nucleobases in a DNA oligomer determines both the efficiency of hopping and the specific location and nature of the damaging chemical reaction. In aqueous solution, DNA is a polyanion because of the negative charge carried by its phosphate groups. Counterions to the phosphate groups (typically Na(+)) play an important role in facilitating both hopping and the eventual reaction of the radical cation with H(2)O. Irreversible reaction of a radical cation with H(2)O in duplex DNA occurs preferentially at the most reactive site. In normal DNA, comprising the four common DNA nucleobases G, C, A, and T, reaction occurs most commonly at a guanine, resulting in its conversion primarily to 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-OxoG). Both electronic and steric effects control the outcome of this process. If the DNA oligomer does not contain a suitable guanine, then reaction of the radical cation occurs at the thymine of a TT step, primarily by a tandem process. The oxidative damage of DNA is a complex process, influenced by charge transport and reactions that are controlled by a combination of enthalpic, entropic, steric, and

  7. [Psychoneuroimmunology and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M V; Pashchenkov, M V; Boĭko, A N

    2015-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss interactions between mental, nervous and immune systems in multiple sclerosis, an impact of psycho-emotional stress on disease development and progression as well as possible mechanisms of these interactions.

  8. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  9. The Multiplicative Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between three critical elements, and the associated mathematical language, to assist students to make the critical transition from additive to multiplicative thinking are examined in this article by Chris Hurst.

  10. Pomalidomide for Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of pomalidomide (Pomalyst®) and low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone alone in patients with multiple myeloma that has progressed despite other treatments.

  11. Sequential multiple analyses of atmospheric nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Hato, Yuki; Mori, Kotaro; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Namihira, Takao

    2007-03-15

    Sequential injection analysis (SIA) was applied to multi-gas monitoring for atmospheric analysis. HONO, NO(2) or NO was collected in an individual diffusion scrubber in which the channel array was filled with either HCl or triethanolamine solution. All analytes were collected in the form of nitrite ions in the scrubber, and were transferred via a 12-port selection valve into a 2.5-ml syringe. The reagent, 3-amino-1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (C-acid) solution was subsequently introduced into the syringe, and inter-mixed with the nitrite sample, whereafter the mixed solution was transferred to a heated reactor and held for 3min at 100 degrees C. After that, the sample/reagent solution was returned to the syringe and alkalinized. Then, the final solution was analyzed using a homemade fluorescence detector. Atmospheric HONO, NO(2) and NO were successfully monitored 3 or 4times/h. The limits of detection were 0.22, 0.28 and 0.35ppbv for HONO, NO(2) and NO, respectively. It was demonstrated for the first time that SIA is a good tool for multi-gas atmospheric analysis. These nitrogen-oxygen compounds are interconvertible, and the simultaneous measurement of these gases is important. Especially, HONO is a source of OH radicals which contribute greatly to atmospheric pollution, and indeed atmospheric chemistry. This method allows the three gases to be measured using one system. The NO(2) and NO data obtained by SIA was compared with those obtained using chemiluminescence instrument. SIA has been successfully applied to atmospheric measurements. Interestingly, it was observed that HONO levels rose toward the end of periods of rain.

  12. Multiple beam ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Robert; Bevis, Charles; Lopez-Rios, Raymond; Reichanadter, Jonathan; Gardner, Dennis F.; Porter, Christina; Shanblatt, Elisabeth; Tanksalvala, Michael; Mancini, Giulia F.; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Adams, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We present an extension to ptychography that allows simultaneous deconvolution of multiple, spatially separate, illuminating probes. This enables an increased field of view and hence, an increase in imaging throughput, without increased exposure times. This technique can be used for any non-interfering probes: demonstrated with multiple wavelengths and orthogonal polarizations. The latter of which gives us spatially resolved polarization spectroscopy from a single scan.

  13. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  14. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  15. Trousseau's syndrome: multiple definitions and multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    In 1865, Armand Trousseau noted that unexpected or migratory thrombophlebitis could be a forewarning of an occult visceral malignancy. An analysis by Sack and colleagues in 1977 extended the term Trousseau's syndrome to include chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy associated with microangiopathy, verrucous endocarditis, and arterial emboli in patients with cancer, often occurring with mucin-positive carcinomas. In recent times the term has been ascribed to various clinical situations, ranging all the way from these classic descriptions to any kind of coagulopathy occurring in the setting of any kind of malignancy. These multiple definitions of Trousseau's syndrome are partly the consequence of multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms that apparently contribute to the hypercoagulability associated with cancer. Even the classic syndrome probably represents a spectrum of disorders, ranging from exaggerated fluid-phased thrombosis dependent on prothrombotic agents such as tissue factor to a platelet- and endotheliumum-based selectin-dependent microangiopathy associated with mucin-producing carcinomas, along with thrombin and fibrin production. Also considered here are recent hypotheses about genetic pathways within tumor cells that might trigger these thrombotic phenomena, and the reasons why therapy with heparins of various kinds remain the preferred treatment, probably because of their salutary actions on several of the proposed pathologic mechanisms. PMID:17496204

  16. Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes Measurement Error Models

    PubMed Central

    Tekwe, Carmen D.; Carter, Randy L.; Cullings, Harry M.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes Models (MIMIC) are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times however when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model, (2) to develop likelihood based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model, (3) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. As a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure. PMID:24962535

  17. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  18. Multiple indicators, multiple causes measurement error models.

    PubMed

    Tekwe, Carmen D; Carter, Randy L; Cullings, Harry M; Carroll, Raymond J

    2014-11-10

    Multiple indicators, multiple causes (MIMIC) models are often employed by researchers studying the effects of an unobservable latent variable on a set of outcomes, when causes of the latent variable are observed. There are times, however, when the causes of the latent variable are not observed because measurements of the causal variable are contaminated by measurement error. The objectives of this paper are as follows: (i) to develop a novel model by extending the classical linear MIMIC model to allow both Berkson and classical measurement errors, defining the MIMIC measurement error (MIMIC ME) model; (ii) to develop likelihood-based estimation methods for the MIMIC ME model; and (iii) to apply the newly defined MIMIC ME model to atomic bomb survivor data to study the impact of dyslipidemia and radiation dose on the physical manifestations of dyslipidemia. As a by-product of our work, we also obtain a data-driven estimate of the variance of the classical measurement error associated with an estimate of the amount of radiation dose received by atomic bomb survivors at the time of their exposure. PMID:24962535

  19. Breast-feeding multiples.

    PubMed

    Flidel-Rimon, O; Shinwell, E S

    2002-06-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutrition for human infants. Its advantages over the milk of other species, such as cows, include both a reduced risk for infections, allergies and chronic diseases, together with the full nutritional requirements for growth and development. Breast-feeding is as important for multiples as for singletons. Despite the advantages, multiples receive less breast-feeding than singletons. Common reasons for not breast-feeding multiples include the fear of not fulfilling the infants' needs and the difficulty of coping with the demands on the mother's time. In addition, many multiples are delivered prematurely and by Caesarean section. Maternal pain and discomfort together with anxiety over the infants' condition are not conducive to successful breast-feeding. During lactation, the mother needs to add calories to her daily diet. It has been recommended to add approximately 500-600 kcal/day for each infant. Thus, between eating, nursing and sleeping, life is very busy for the mother of multiples. However, there is evidence that, with appropriate nutrition, one mother can nourish more than one infant. Also, simultaneous breast-feeding can save much time. Combined efforts of parents, close family, friends and the medical team can help to make either full or partial breast-feeding of multiples possible. However, when breast-feeding is not possible, health care workers need to carefully avoid judgmental approaches that may induce feelings of guilt.

  20. Biologically relevant oxidants and terminology, classification and nomenclature of oxidatively generated damage to nucleobases and 2-deoxyribose in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    CADET, JEAN; LOFT, STEFFEN; OLINSKI, RYSZARD; EVANS, MARK D.; BIALKOWSKI, KAROL; WAGNER, J. RICHARD; DEDON, PETER C.; MØLLER, PETER; GREENBERG, MARC M.; COOKE, MARCUS S.

    2013-01-01

    A broad scientific community is involved in investigations aimed at delineating the mechanisms of formation and cellular processing of oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids. Perhaps as a consequence of this breadth of research expertise, there are nomenclature problems for several of the oxidized bases including 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoGua), a ubiquitous marker of almost every type of oxidative stress in cells. Efforts to standardize the nomenclature and abbreviations of the main DNA degradation products that arise from oxidative pathways are reported. Information is also provided on the main oxidative radicals, non-radical oxygen species, one-electron agents and enzymes involved in DNA degradation pathways as well in their targets and reactivity. A brief classification of oxidatively generated damage to DNA that may involve single modifications, tandem base modifications, intrastrand and interstrand cross-links together with DNA-protein cross-links and base adducts arising from the addition of lipid peroxides breakdown products is also included. PMID:22263561

  1. Electrochemical oxidation of cyanide in the hydrocyclone cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dhamo, N.

    1996-12-31

    A diluted electroplating cyanide rinse water has been used to test the use of the hydrocyclone cell (HCC) in batch recycle mode of operation for the simultaneous oxidation of cyanide during the electrodeposition of silver. The results obtained in this work with regard to the final products, current efficiency and the number of transferred electrons per CN{sup {minus}} helped to establish a probable reaction scheme. According to this, the process occurs mainly with one-electron transfer, through cyanate and cyanogen as intermediate species. Meanwhile, under conditions where the electrolyte circulates in an open bath and flows successively through the cathodic and the anodic compartments, as in the case of the HCC system, the cyanate could be produced by the direct oxidation through air and/or generated peroxide and CN could be lost as HCN (g).

  2. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative mobilization in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Arti; Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Milner, Stephen; Bhat, Satyanarayan

    2008-02-01

    A severe burn is associated with release of inflammatory mediators which ultimately cause local and distant pathophysiological effects. Mediators including Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) are increased in affected tissue, which are implicated in pathophysiological events observed in burn patients. The purpose of this article is to understand the role of oxidative stress in burns, in order to develop therapeutic strategies. All peer-reviewed, original and review articles published in the English language literature relevant to the topic of oxidative stress in burns in animals and human subjects were selected for this review and the possible roles of ROS and RNS in the pathophysiology of burns are discussed. Both increased xanthine oxidase and neutrophil activation appear to be the oxidant sources in burns. Free radicals have been found to have beneficial effects on antimicrobial action and wound healing. However following a burn, there is an enormous production of ROS which is harmful and implicated in inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, immunosuppression, infection and sepsis, tissue damage and multiple organ failure. Thus clinical response to burn is dependent on the balance between production of free radicals and its detoxification. Supplementation of antioxidants in human and animal models has proven benefit in decreasing distant organ failure suggesting a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for the local and distant pathophysiological events observed after burn, and therefore anti-oxidant therapy might be beneficial in minimizing injury in burned patients.

  3. Neuromaturation of multiples.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marilee C; Donohue, Pamela K

    2002-06-01

    Etiology of preterm birth and degree of maturation are the primary determinants of a preterm infant's survival and complications. Multiple gestation increases the likelihood of preterm birth but its influence on rate of maturation or complications of prematurity has been controversial, primarily because of confounding variables (e.g. race, aetiology of preterm delivery, degree of prematurity and pregnancy complications). Very low birthweight preterm multiples have virtually the same rates of neonatal mortality, complications and neuromaturation as preterm singletons of the same gestational age. There is no advantage of delivering twins or higher order multiples before 30 weeks gestation, unless a fetus decompensates in utero. Survival improves for near term intermediate-size preterm multiples while intrauterine growth decelerates and placental and fetal neuromaturation accelerate. These data and the high fetal death rate at term support delivery of multiples as soon as there is fetal lung maturity, and consideration of elective delivery of twins at 35-38 weeks gestation and triplets at 33-35 weeks gestation.

  4. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  5. On the consistent definition of spin-orbit effects calculated by relativistic effective core potentials with one-electron spin-orbit operators: Comparison of spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Young-Kyu; Bae, Cheolbeom; Lee, Yoon Sup

    1999-05-01

    The spin-orbit effects for Tl, TlH, TlH3, PbH2, and PbH4 are evaluated by two-component calculations using several relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) with one-electron spin-orbit operators. The used RECPs are shape-consistent RECPs derived by Wildman et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 107, 9975 (1997)] and three sets of energy-consistent (or adjusted) RECPs published by Schwerdtfeger et al. [Phys. Scr. 36, 453 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 90, 762 (1989)], Küchle et al. [Mol. Phys. 74, 1245 (1991)], and Leininger et al. [Chem. Phys. 217, 19 (1997)]. The shape-consistent RECP results are in very good agreement with the Küchle et al. energy-consistent RECP results for all the molecules studied here and all-electron results for TlH. The RECPs of Schwerdtfeger et al. and Leininger et al. seem to provide qualitatively different spin-orbit effects. If one defines spin-free RECP as the potential average of the corresponding two-component RECP, all RECPs give very similar spin-orbit effects for all the cases. Most of the discrepancies of molecular spin-orbit effects among various RECPs reported in the literature may originate from different definitions of RECPs with or without a spin-orbit term and not from the inherent difference in spin-orbit operators.

  6. Electrochemical Detection of Multiple Bioprocess Analytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus that includes highly miniaturized thin-film electrochemical sensor array has been demonstrated as a prototype of instruments for simultaneous detection of multiple substances of interest (analytes) and measurement of acidity or alkalinity in bioprocess streams. Measurements of pH and of concentrations of nutrients and wastes in cell-culture media, made by use of these instruments, are to be used as feedback for optimizing the growth of cells or the production of desired substances by the cultured cells. The apparatus is designed to utilize samples of minimal volume so as to minimize any perturbation of monitored processes. The apparatus can function in a potentiometric mode (for measuring pH), an amperometric mode (detecting analytes via oxidation/reduction reactions), or both. The sensor array is planar and includes multiple thin-film microelectrodes covered with hydrous iridium oxide. The oxide layer on each electrode serves as both a protective and electrochemical transducing layer. In its transducing role, the oxide provides electrical conductivity for amperometric measurement or pH response for potentiometric measurement. The oxide on an electrode can also serve as a matrix for one or more enzymes that render the electrode sensitive to a specific analyte. In addition to transducing electrodes, the array includes electrodes for potential control. The array can be fabricated by techniques familiar to the microelectronics industry. The sensor array is housed in a thin-film liquid-flow cell that has a total volume of about 100 mL. The flow cell is connected to a computer-controlled subsystem that periodically draws samples from the bioprocess stream to be monitored. Before entering the cell, each 100-mL sample is subjected to tangential-flow filtration to remove particles. In the present version of the apparatus, the electrodes are operated under control by a potentiostat and are used to simultaneously measure the pH and the concentration of glucose

  7. Nitric oxide and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muntané, Jordi; la Mata, Manuel De

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a lipophilic, highly diffusible and short-lived physiological messenger which regulates a variety of important physiological responses including vasodilation, respiration, cell migration, immune response and apoptosis. NO is synthesized by three differentially gene-encoded NO synthase (NOS) in mammals: neuronal NOS (nNOS or NOS-1), inducible NOS (iNOS or NOS-2) and endothelial NOS (eNOS or NOS-3). All isoforms of NOS catalyze the reaction of L-arginine, NADPH and oxygen to NO, L-citrulline and NADP. NO may exert its cellular action by cGMP-dependent as well as by cGMP-independent pathways including postranslational modifications in cysteine (S-nitrosylation or S-nitrosation) and tyrosine (nitration) residues, mixed disulfide formation (S-nitrosoglutathione or GSNO) or promoting further oxidation protein stages which have been related to altered protein function and gene transcription, genotoxic lesions, alteration of cell-cycle check points, apoptosis and DNA repair. NO sensitizes tumor cells to chemotherapeutic compounds. The expression of NOS-2 and NOS-3 has been found to be increased in a variety of human cancers. The multiple actions of NO in the tumor environment is related to heterogeneous cell responses with particular attention in the regulation of the stress response mediated by the hypoxia inducible factor-1 and p53 generally leading to growth arrest, apoptosis or adaptation. PMID:21161018

  8. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Multiple sclerosis is a condition characterized by areas of damage ( ...

  10. Multiple noncontiguous spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R L; Reid, D C; Saboe, L A

    1991-02-01

    The data from a prospective study of 508 spine injuries were reviewed to determine the incidence of multiple noncontiguous spine fractures. All patients were examined at admission and at 1 and 2 years postinjury. This series identified 77 (15.2%) multilevel fractures. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary cause of these fractures. The incidence of neurologic injury was not significantly different between multiple noncontiguous and single fractures. Failure to use seat belts and ejection from the vehicle were the main factors associated with multiple noncontiguous spine injuries. Seven major fracture patterns were identified, which accounted for 60% of these injuries. The prognosis for multilevel spine fractures was not significantly worse that that for single-level injuries. PMID:2011766

  11. Enhancing multiple disciplinary teamwork.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E

    2008-01-01

    Multiple disciplinary research provides an opportunity to bring together investigators across disciplines to provide new views and develop innovative approaches to important questions. Through this shared experience, novel paradigms are formed, original frameworks are developed, and new language is generated. Integral to the successful construction of effective cross-disciplinary teams is the recognition of antecedent factors that affect the development of the team such as intrapersonal, social, physical environmental, organizational, and institutional influences. Team functioning is enhanced with well-developed behavioral, affective, interpersonal, and intellectual processes. Outcomes of effective multiple disciplinary research teams include novel ideas, integrative models, new training programs, institutional change, and innovative policies that can also influence the degree to which antecedents and processes contribute to team performance. Ongoing evaluation of team functioning and achievement of designated outcomes ensures the continued development of the multiple disciplinary team and confirmation of this approach as important to the advancement of science.

  12. MAVID multiple alignment server.

    PubMed

    Bray, Nicolas; Pachter, Lior

    2003-07-01

    MAVID is a multiple alignment program suitable for many large genomic regions. The MAVID web server allows biomedical researchers to quickly obtain multiple alignments for genomic sequences and to subsequently analyse the alignments for conserved regions. MAVID has been successfully used for the alignment of closely related species such as primates and also for the alignment of more distant organisms such as human and fugu. The server is fast, capable of aligning hundreds of kilobases in less than a minute. The multiple alignment is used to build a phylogenetic tree for the sequences, which is subsequently used as a basis for identifying conserved regions in the alignment. The server can be accessed at http://baboon.math.berkeley.edu/mavid/.

  13. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  14. Multiple origins of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.; Valentine, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    There is some indication that life may have originated readily under primitive earth conditions. If there were multiple origins of life, the result could have been a polyphyletic biota today. Using simple stochastic models for diversification and extinction, we conclude: (1) the probability of survival of life is low unless there are multiple origins, and (2) given survival of life and given as many as 10 independent origins of life, the odds are that all but one would have gone extinct, yielding the monophyletic biota we have now. The fact of the survival of our particular form of life does not imply that it was unique or superior.

  15. Neutron multiplicity analysis tool

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and Multiplicity) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron multiplicity data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the multiplicity distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background subtraction and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and multiplicity analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron multiplicity counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron multiplicity counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron multiplicity measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This

  16. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger; Esposito, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  17. UO2 oxidative corrosion by non-classical diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Joanne; Chaka, Anne M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Biwer, Craig A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bargar, John R.; Eng, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Using x-ray scattering, spectroscopy, and computational methods, we show that oxidation of the UO2 (111) surface results in a self-organized arrangement of oxygen interstitials with three-layer periodicity, producing a nanoscale oscillatory oxidation front with uranium in three oxidation states: IV, V, and VI. This complex diffusion profile is driven by the transfer of the lowest energy U5f electrons from multiple U atoms into the O2p band. Our results contrast with all previous bulk structural oxidation models and the simple exponential oxidation front expected from classical diffusion.

  18. Multiple Peroxisomal Enzymatic Deficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vamecq, Joseph; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Van Hoof, François; Misson, Jean-Paul; Evrard, Philippe; Verellen, Gaston; Eyssen, Hendrik J.; Van Eldere, Johan; Schutgens, Ruud B. H.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Roels, Frank; Goldfischer, Sidney L.

    1986-01-01

    Biologic, morphologic, and biochemical investigations performed in 2 patients demonstrate multiple peroxisomal deficiencies in the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger (CHRS) and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD). Very long chain fatty acids, abnormal bile acids, including bile acid precursors (di- and trihydroxycoprostanoic acids), and C29-dicarboxylic acid accumulated in plasma in both patients. Generalized hyperaminoaciduria was also present. Peroxisomes could not be detected in CHRS liver and kidney; however, in the NALD patient, small and sparse cytoplasmic bodies resembling altered peroxisomes were found in hepatocytes. Hepatocellular and Kupffer cell lysosomes were engorged with ferritin and contained clefts and trilaminar structures believed to represent very long chain fatty acids. Enzymatic deficiencies reflected the peroxisomal defects. Hepatic glycolate oxidase and palmitoyl-CoA oxidase activities were deficient. No particle-bound catalase was found in cultured fibroblasts, and ether glycerolipid (plasmalogen) biosynthesis was markedly reduced. Administration of phenobarbital and clofibrate, an agent that induces peroxisomal proliferation and enzymatic activities, to the NALD patient did not bring about any changes in plasma metabolites, liver peroxisome population, or oxidizing activities. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:2879480

  19. Multiple access mass storage network

    SciTech Connect

    Wentz, D.L. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Multi-Access Storage Subnetwork (MASS) is the latest addition to the Octopus computer network at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The subnetwork provides shared mass storage for the Laboratory's multiple-host computer configuration. A Control Data Corp. 38500 Mass Storage facility is interfaces by MASS to the large, scientific worker computers to provide an on-line capacity of 1 trillion bits of user-accessible data. The MASS architecture offers a very high performance approach to the management of large data storage, as well as a high degree of reliability needed for operation in the Laboratory's timesharing environment. MASS combines state-of-the-art digital hardware with an innovative system philosophy. The key LLL design features of the subnetwork that contribute to the high performance include the following: a data transmission scheme that provides a 40-Mbit/s channel over distances of up to 1000 ft, a large metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory buffer controlled by a 24-port memory multiplexer with an aggregate data rate of 280 Mbit/s, and a set of high-speed microprocessor-based controllers driving the commercial mass storage units. Reliability of the system is provided by a completely redundant network, including two control minicomputer systems. Also enhancing reliability is error detection and correction in the MOS memory. A hardware-generated checksum is carried with each file throughout the entire network to ensure integrity of user files. 6 figures, 1 table.

  20. Mechanism of oxidative conversion of Amplex® Red to resorufin: Pulse radiolysis and enzymatic studies.

    PubMed

    Dębski, Dawid; Smulik, Renata; Zielonka, Jacek; Michałowski, Bartosz; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Dębowska, Karolina; Adamus, Jan; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Sikora, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Amplex® Red (10-acetyl-3,7-dihydroxyphenoxazine) is a fluorogenic probe widely used to detect and quantify hydrogen peroxide in biological systems. Detection of hydrogen peroxide is based on peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Amplex® Red to resorufin. In this study we investigated the mechanism of one-electron oxidation of Amplex® Red and we present the spectroscopic characterization of transient species formed upon the oxidation. Oxidation process has been studied by a pulse radiolysis technique with one-electron oxidants (N3(•), CO3(•-),(•)NO2 and GS(•)). The rate constants for the Amplex® Red oxidation by N3(•) ((2)k=2.1·10(9)M(-1)s(-1), at pH=7.2) and CO3(•-) ((2)k=7.6·10(8)M(-1)s(-1), at pH=10.3) were determined. Two intermediates formed during the conversion of Amplex® Red into resorufin have been characterized. Based on the results obtained, the mechanism of transformation of Amplex® Red into resorufin, involving disproportionation of the Amplex® Red-derived radical species, has been proposed. The results indicate that peroxynitrite-derived radicals, but not peroxynitrite itself, are capable to oxidize Amplex® Red to resorufin. We also demonstrate that horseradish peroxidase can catalyze oxidation of Amplex® Red not only by hydrogen peroxide, but also by peroxynitrite, which needs to be considered when employing the probe for hydrogen peroxide detection.

  1. Oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  2. Observation of oxide/Si(001)-interface during layer-by-layer oxidation by scanning reflection electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, S.; Watanabe, H.; Maruno, S.; Ichikawa, M.; Kawamura, T.

    1997-08-01

    We have found that terrace contrast of oxidized Si(001) substrate observed with a scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) is reversed by progress in thermal oxidation by one atomic layer of Si. The cause for such terrace contrast reversion is that reflection electron intensity depends on Si-bond direction at oxide/Si interface. This fact was confirmed by calculations based on a multiple scattering theory. The motion of oxide/Si-bulk interface can be, thus, observed by SREM. The reversion and continuous change of the terrace contrast indicate that oxidation occurs monolayer by monolayer on Si(001) substrate.

  3. [Susceptibility gene in multiple system atrophy (MSA)].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate molecular bases of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we first focused on recently identified MSA multiplex families. Though linkage analyses followed by whole genome resequencing, we have identified a causative gene, COQ2, for MSA. We then conducted comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of COQ2 of sporadic MSA cases and controls, and found that functionally deleterious COQ2 variants confer a strong risk for developing MSA. COQ2 encodes an enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of coenzyme Q10. Decreased synthesis of coenzyme Q10 is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of MSA through decreased electron transport in mitochondria and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. PMID:25672683

  4. [Multiple bowenoid arsenic keratoses].

    PubMed

    Leyh, F; Rothlaender, J P

    1985-01-01

    Case report of multiple keratoses and chronic lymphatic leukemia after arsenic poisoning 30 years ago during a one-year exposure to copper acetoarsenate in a pesticide factory. Absorption through the skin with local arsenic skin damage is discussed. Etretinate therapy (1 mg/kg b. w.) was ineffective.

  5. Multiple Cutaneous Reticulohistiocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hemmady, Karishma D; Someshwar, Shylaja S; Jerajani, Hemangi R

    2016-01-01

    Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis characterized in its full form by severe destructive arthritis, cutaneous nodules, and systemic manifestations. Cutaneous lesions may precede, accompany, or more commonly develop later than other features in this disease. We describe a case of multiple cutaneous reticulohistiocytoma without any systemic associations after thorough investigations. PMID:26955136

  6. Managing Multiple Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePascale, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of how one might feel about the recent developments in teacher evaluation systems, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and adequate yearly progress (AYP), or student assessments for high-stakes promotion decisions, educators overwhelmingly agree that use of multiple measures is better than reliance on a single measure such as a large-scale,…

  7. Automatic multiple applicator electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunbaum, B. W.

    1977-01-01

    Easy-to-use, economical device permits electrophoresis on all known supporting media. System includes automatic multiple-sample applicator, sample holder, and electrophoresis apparatus. System has potential applicability to fields of taxonomy, immunology, and genetics. Apparatus is also used for electrofocusing.

  8. [Smoldering multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Fouquet, G; Guidez, S; Herbaux, C; Demarquette, H; Leleu, X

    2014-04-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic plasma cell neoplasia, characterized by monoclonal plasma cell proliferation in the absence of end-organ damage, but with a high risk of progression to multiple myeloma. It has therefore to be distinguished from monoclonal gammapathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), which has a much lower risk of progression, but also from multiple myeloma, which remains an incurable disease and requires a specific treatment. The critical question in the management of SMM is whether an early therapeutic strategy could help delaying the progression to multiple myeloma, in order to lower the risk of serious complications related to this progression, or even to cure the disease. This early treatment could not be proposed to all SMM patients, who are indeed asymptomatic, and in whom the risk of toxicity could make it difficult to justify the potential benefit obtained. The challenge is to target early at diagnosis SMM patients with a high risk of progression, using available routine tests sufficiently reliable to warrant the therapeutic sanction which relies on it. Today however, apart from randomized studies, recommendations are to maintain therapeutic abstention in SMM patients. PMID:24050785

  9. Patterns in Multiples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robold, Alice I.

    1982-01-01

    Activities that allow students to represent patterns concretely before showing the patterns in color on paper are presented. Three basic activities are described, with suggestions made for extensions that allow further pupil exploration of multiples. Student discovery of relationships not found by the teacher is expected. (MP)

  10. Higher-order Multiples.

    PubMed

    Stone, Joanne; Kohari, Katherine S

    2015-09-01

    Higher-order multiple gestations have increased since the advent of advanced reproductive technologies. These pregnancies present unique risks to both mothers and fetuses. It is imperative that early diagnosis of chronicity be determined and that proper counseling is performed, so patients understand the risks, evaluation, and management needed.

  11. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  12. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  13. Multiple Grammars and MOGUL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truscott, John

    2014-01-01

    Optionality is a central phenomenon in second language acquisition (SLA), for which any adequate theory must account. Amaral and Roeper (this issue; henceforth A&R) offer an appealing approach to it, using Roeper's Multiple Grammars Theory, which was created with first language in mind but which extends very naturally to SLA. They include…

  14. Mastering the Multiplication Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Ettorre, Jenna

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the results of a six-week research project (after baseline data was collected) that focused on three different strategies (flashcards, interactive games, and music) and their effectiveness in helping fifth grade students memorize the basic multiplication facts. Many teachers face a serious problem when their…

  15. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  16. Improvement of pro-oxidant capacity of protocatechuic acid by esterification.

    PubMed

    Zeraik, Maria Luiza; Petrônio, Maicon S; Coelho, Dyovani; Regasini, Luis Octavio; Silva, Dulce H S; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Machado, Sergio A S; Bolzani, Vanderlan S; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2014-01-01

    Pro-oxidant effects of phenolic compounds are usually correlated to the one-electron redox potential of the phenoxyl radicals. Here we demonstrated that, besides their oxidizability, hydrophobicity can also be a decisive factor. We found that esterification of protocatechuic acid (P0) provoked a profound influence in its pro-oxidant capacity. The esters bearing alkyl chains containing two (P2), four (P4) and seven (P7) carbons, but not the acid precursor (P0), were able to exacerbate the oxidation of trolox, α-tocopherol and rifampicin. This effect was also dependent on the catechol moiety, since neither gallic acid nor butyl gallate showed any pro-oxidant effects. A comparison was also made with apocynin, which is well-characterized regarding its pro-oxidant properties. P7 was more efficient than apocynin regarding co-oxidation of trolox. However, P7 was not able to co-oxidize glutathione and NADH, which are targets of the apocynin radical. A correlation was found between pro-oxidant capacity and the stability of the radicals, as suggested by the intensity of the peak current in the differential pulse voltammetry experiments. In conclusion, taking into account that hydroquinone and related moieties are frequently found in biomolecules and quinone-based chemotherapeutics, our demonstration that esters of protocatechuic acid are specific and potent co-catalysts in their oxidations may be very relevant as a pathway to exacerbate redox cycling reactions, which are usually involved in their biological and pharmacological mechanisms of action.

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of ²⁴³Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode.

    PubMed

    Dares, Christopher J; Lapides, Alexander M; Mincher, Bruce J; Meyer, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Selective oxidation of trivalent americium (Am) could facilitate its separation from lanthanides in nuclear waste streams. Here, we report the application of a high-surface-area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand to the oxidation of Am(III) to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 volts (V) versus the saturated calomel electrode were applied, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 molar acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides a method to access the higher oxidation states of Am in noncomplexing media for the study of the associated coordination chemistry and, more important, for more efficient separation protocols. PMID:26542564

  18. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  19. Multiplicative Calculus and Student Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Duff

    1999-01-01

    Multiplicative calculus is based on a multiplicative rate of change whereas the usual calculus is based on an additive rate of change. Describes some student investigations into multiplicative calculus, including an original student idea about multiplicative Euler's Method. (Author/ASK)

  20. Core multiplication in childhood.

    PubMed

    McCrink, Koleen; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2010-08-01

    A dedicated, non-symbolic, system yielding imprecise representations of large quantities (approximate number system, or ANS) has been shown to support arithmetic calculations of addition and subtraction. In the present study, 5-7-year-old children without formal schooling in multiplication and division were given a task requiring a scalar transformation of large approximate numerosities, presented as arrays of objects. In different conditions, the required calculation was doubling, quadrupling, or increasing by a fractional factor (2.5). In all conditions, participants were able to represent the outcome of the transformation at above-chance levels, even on the earliest training trials. Their performance could not be explained by processes of repeated addition, and it showed the critical ratio signature of the ANS. These findings provide evidence for an untrained, intuitive process of calculating multiplicative numerical relationships, providing a further foundation for formal arithmetic instruction. PMID:20537618

  1. Multiple zeros of polynomials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    For polynomials of higher degree, iterative numerical methods must be used. Four iterative methods are presented for approximating the zeros of a polynomial using a digital computer. Newton's method and Muller's method are two well known iterative methods which are presented. They extract the zeros of a polynomial by generating a sequence of approximations converging to each zero. However, both of these methods are very unstable when used on a polynomial which has multiple zeros. That is, either they fail to converge to some or all of the zeros, or they converge to very bad approximations of the polynomial's zeros. This material introduces two new methods, the greatest common divisor (G.C.D.) method and the repeated greatest common divisor (repeated G.C.D.) method, which are superior methods for numerically approximating the zeros of a polynomial having multiple zeros. These methods were programmed in FORTRAN 4 and comparisons in time and accuracy are given.

  2. Multiple pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.S.; Jernigan, J.L.

    1981-02-10

    A multiple pulse laser from a single resonant cavity is disclosed. An acousto-optic cell is used to modulate coherent light from a lasing element. Either multiple chirp signals or a masked mirror are used to provide distinct pulses of light. Through proper choice of materials for the acousto-optic cell and use of divergent optics, a higher power level is obtained. Use of a multi-tapped delay line permits a shorter period between pulses due to the linear superposition principle. When the mask embodiment is used, the acousto-optic cell focuses light which scans across the mask. Whenever the focused light passes through the mask, lasing occurs which generates an output pulse.

  3. Portable multiplicity counter

    DOEpatents

    Newell, Matthew R.; Jones, David Carl

    2009-09-01

    A portable multiplicity counter has signal input circuitry, processing circuitry and a user/computer interface disposed in a housing. The processing circuitry, which can comprise a microcontroller integrated circuit operably coupled to shift register circuitry implemented in a field programmable gate array, is configured to be operable via the user/computer interface to count input signal pluses receivable at said signal input circuitry and record time correlations thereof in a total counting mode, coincidence counting mode and/or a multiplicity counting mode. The user/computer interface can be for example an LCD display/keypad and/or a USB interface. The counter can include a battery pack for powering the counter and low/high voltage power supplies for biasing external detectors so that the counter can be configured as a hand-held device for counting neutron events.

  4. Multiple wavelength diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Teichmann, Sven; Abbey, Brian; Peele, Andrew G.; Williams, Garth J.; Hannaford, Peter; van Dao, Lap; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate coherent diffraction imaging using multiple harmonics from a high-harmonic generation source. An algorithm is presented that builds the known incident spectrum into the reconstruction procedure with the result that the useable flux is increased by more than an order of magnitude. Excellent images are obtained with a resolution of (165±5)nm and compare very well with images from a scanning electron microscope.

  5. Multiple muons in MACRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  6. Universality of particle multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K. |

    1994-09-01

    We discuss the scaling properties and universality aspects of the rapidity and multiplicity distributions of particles produced in high energy hadronic and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions. This paper is based on material presented in three lectures on pomeron phenomenology, which included a review of traditional soft pomeron physics and selected topics on hard diffraction processes probing the structure function of the pomeron.

  7. Multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Nathan A; Yurs, Lena A; Block, Stephen B; Pakoulev, Andrei V; Kornau, Kathryn M; Wright, John C

    2009-08-20

    Multiple quantum coherences provide a powerful approach for studies of complex systems because increasing the number of quantum states in a quantum mechanical superposition state increases the selectivity of a spectroscopic measurement. We show that frequency domain multiple quantum coherence multidimensional spectroscopy can create these superposition states using different frequency excitation pulses. The superposition state is created using two excitation frequencies to excite the symmetric and asymmetric stretch modes in a rhodium dicarbonyl chelate and the dynamic Stark effect to climb the vibrational ladders involving different overtone and combination band states. A monochromator resolves the free induction decay of different coherences comprising the superposition state. The three spectral dimensions provide the selectivity required to observe 19 different spectral features associated with fully coherent nonlinear processes involving up to 11 interactions with the excitation fields. The different features act as spectroscopic probes of the diagonal and off-diagonal parts of the molecular potential energy hypersurface. This approach can be considered as a coherent pump-probe spectroscopy where the pump is a series of excitation pulses that prepares a multiple quantum coherence and the probe is another series of pulses that creates the output coherence. PMID:19507812

  8. MULTIPLE OSCILLATION STABILIZING CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    YUE,M.; SCHLUETER,R.; AZARM,M.; BARI,R.

    2004-07-23

    This paper presents a strategy that may be used to guide stabilizing control design for multiple oscillations, which are difficult to control using conventional control design procedures. A multiple oscillation phenomena is observed in an example power system. A local bifurcation and an interarea bifurcation develop in an example power system due to multiple bifurcation parameter variations. The dynamic behaviors of the bifurcating system are complex due to the overlapping of the two different bifurcation subsystems and are shown to be difficult to control. The double bifurcations are studied in this paper and in order to stabilize them, three kind of {mu}-synthesis robust controls are designed, (a) {mu}-synthesis power system stabilizer (MPSS); (b) {mu}-synthesis SVC control (MSVC); and (c) a mixed MPSS/MSVC control. Based on the bifurcation subsystem analysis, the measurement signals and locations of the controls are selected. The control performances of three kind of controls are evaluated and compared. The conclusions are given according to the analysis and time simulation results.

  9. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  10. Nitric Oxide Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative illnesses such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has become prominent over the years. Increased activity of the enzymes that produce reactive oxygen species, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and imbalances in glutathione pools mediate and mark the neurodegenerative process. Much of the oxidative damage of proteins is brought about by the overproduction of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its subsequent reactivity with reactive oxygen species. Proteomic methods have advanced the field tremendously, by facilitating the quantitative assessment of differential expression patterns and oxidative modifications of proteins and alongside, mapping their non-canonical functions. As a signaling molecule involved in multiple biochemical pathways, the level of nitric oxide is subject to tight regulation. All three NOS isoforms display aberrant patterns of expression in Alzheimer's disease, altering intracellular signaling and routing oxidative stress in directions that are uncompounded. This review discusses the prime factors that control nitric oxide biosynthesis, reactivity footprints and ensuing effects in the development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Metalloradical Complexes of Manganese and Chromium Featuring an Oxidatively Rearranged Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Çelenligil-Çetin, Remle; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Lalioti, Nikolia; Sanakis, Yiannis; Staples, Richard J.; Rath, Nigam P.; Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2009-01-01

    Redox events involving both metal and ligand sites are receiving increased attention since a number of biological processes direct redox equivalents toward functional residues. Metalloradical synthetic analogs remain scarce and require better definition of their mode of formation and subsequent operation. The trisamido-amine ligand [(RNC6H4)3N]3−, where R is the electron-rich 4-t-BuPh, is employed in this study to generate redox active residues in manganese and chromium complexes. Solutions of [(L1)Mn(II)–THF]− in THF are oxidized by dioxygen to afford [(L1re–1)Mn(III)–(O)2–Mn(III)(L1re–1)]2− as the major product. The rare dinuclear manganese (III,III) core is stabilized by a rearranged ligand that has undergone an one-electron oxidative transformation, followed by retention of the oxidation equivalent as a π radical in an o-diiminobenzosemiquinonate moiety. Magnetic studies indicate that the ligand-centered radical is stabilized by means of extended antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = ½ radical and the adjacent S = 2 Mn(III) site, as well as between the two Mn(III) centers via the dioxo bridge. Electrochemical and EPR data suggest that this system can store higher levels of oxidation potency. Entry to the corresponding Cr(III) chemistry is achieved by employing CrCl3 to access both [(L1)Cr(III)–THF] and [(L1re–1)Cr(III)–THF(Cl)], featuring the intact and the oxidatively rearranged ligands, respectively. The latter is generated by ligand-centered oxidation of the former compound. The rearranged ligand is perceived to be the product of an one-electron oxidation of the intact ligand to afford a metal-bound aminyl radical that subsequently mediates a radical 1,4-(N-to-N) aryl migration. PMID:18937446

  12. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  13. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  14. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  15. Oxidation resistance of silicon ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasutoshi, H.; Hirota, K.

    1984-01-01

    Oxidation resistance, and examples of oxidation of SiC, Si3N4 and sialon are reviewed. A description is given of the oxidation mechanism, including the oxidation product, oxidation reaction and the bubble size. The oxidation reactions are represented graphically. An assessment is made of the oxidation process, and an oxidation example of silicon ceramics is given.

  16. FTIR Spectroscopy Applied in Remazol Blue Dye Oxidation by Laccases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Hernández, J.; Zavala-Soto, M. E.; Bibbins-Martínez, M.; Delgado-Macuil, R.; Díaz-Godinez, G.; Rojas-López, M.

    2008-04-01

    We have used FTIR with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) technique to analyze the decolourization process of Remazol Blue dye (RB19) caused by the oxidative activity of laccase enzyme. It is known that laccases catalyze the oxidation of a large range of phenolic compounds and aromatic amines carrying out one-electron oxidations, although also radicals could be formed which undergo subsequent nonenzymatic reactions. The enzyme laccase is a copper-containing polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.10.3.2) which has been tested as a potential alternative in detoxification of environmental pollutants such as dyes present in wastewaters generated for the textile industry. In order to ensure degradation or avoid formation of toxic compounds it is important to establish the mechanism by which laccase oxidizes dyes. In this research individual ATR-FTIR spectra have been recorded for several reaction times between 0 to 236 hours, and the temporal dependence of the reaction was analyzed through the relative diminution of the intensity of the infrared band at 1127 cm-1 (associated to C-N vibration), with respect to the intensity of the band at 1104 cm-1 (associated to S = O) from sulphoxide group. Decolourization process of this dye by laccase could be attributed to its accessibility on the secondary amino group, which is a potential point of attack of laccases, abstracting the hydrogen atom. This decolourization process of remazol blue dye by laccase enzyme might in a future replace the traditionally high chemical, energy and water consuming textile operations.

  17. Multiple sclerosis and infections.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The intersection between infections and multiple sclerosis (MS) is complex and bidirectional. Numerous infectious agents have been posited to play a role in the initiation of MS, while emerging evidence suggests a potential relationship between established MS and the gut microbiome. As both systemic and CNS infections are major complications of MS, the clinical manifestations and evolving epidemiology of these infections over the lifespan of the MS patient are examined in this review. Data from animal models and human studies are discussed. PMID:26611265

  18. Multiple-chemical sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Glinton, Gloria J

    2005-12-01

    Multiple-chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a condition in which individuals have an acute hypersensitivity to low levels of chemicals found in everyday substances, such as household cleaning agents, pesticides, fresh paint, new carpeting, synthetic building materials, newsprint, perfume, and numerous other petrochemical products. This condition continues to remain somewhat of a mystery to the medical community, and its true prevalence rate is unknown because many cases are not identified and reported as MCS. This article will inform the reader about the condition of MCS.

  19. Multiple personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Piper, A

    1994-05-01

    Five aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of multiple personality disorder (MPD) were examined. The following five conclusions were made: the contemporary diagnostic criteria are vague and overinclusive; the recent alleged increase in prevalence of the disorder is almost certainly artefactual; legal proceedings involving MPD patients raise disturbing questions about personal responsibility; there is little literature support for the theory that MPD results from childhood trauma; and many of the techniques used to diagnose and treat the condition reinforce its symptoms. A careful revision of diagnostic criteria for the disorder is recommended.

  20. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  1. Nitric oxide inhibition strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Vivian (Wai Chong); Lerner, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide is involved in many physiologic processes. There are efforts, described elsewhere in this volume, to deliver nitric oxide to tissues as a therapy. Nitric oxide also contributes to pathophysiologic processes. Inhibiting nitric oxide or its production can thus also be of therapeutic benefit. This article addresses such inhibitory strategies. PMID:26634146

  2. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  3. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  4. Factorial Invariance in Multiple Populations: A Multiple Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2013-01-01

    A multiple testing method for examining factorial invariance for latent constructs evaluated by multiple indicators in distinct populations is outlined. The procedure is based on the false discovery rate concept and multiple individual restriction tests and resolves general limitations of a popular factorial invariance testing approach. The…

  5. Cost and Performance Assessment of In-situ Chemical Oxidation for Intermittent and Continuous Oxidant Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Parker, J.; Borden, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a popular remediation technology that involves injection of chemical oxidant into groundwater to destroy dissolved and non-aqueous liquid phase contaminants. Depending on site conditions, oxidant can be injected into the contaminated subsurface periodically (intermittently) or continuously. A common approach is to intermittently inject oxidant into a network of wells over a period long enough to emplace oxidant over a target treatment volume (referred to ISCO-int). The injection phase is followed by a passive phase when the oxidant is allowed to react with contaminants and natural oxygen demand (NOD) and to migrate under natural hydraulic gradients. This process may be repeated multiple times until termination criteria are met. Recently, some practitioners have adopted an alternative approach in which oxidant is injected continuously with extraction wells recovering unreacted oxidant to recycle with additional makeup oxidant to maintain its constant concentration (referred to ISCO-cont). Each method has certain advantages and disadvantages. This study numerically evaluates those two ISCO practices in terms of remediation costs and performance based on multiple equi-probable parameter sets. Stochastic cost optimization toolbox (SCOToolkit) is used for this purpose. SCOToolkit is an integrated semi-analytical model for contaminant transport and remediation (e.g., thermal source treatment, ISCO, electron donor injections, permeable reactive barriers) enabling inverse solution and Monte Carlo simulations. Four different aquifer settings, slow and fast Darcy velocities combined with low and high NOD conditions, are used for the evaluation. Preliminary results showed that ISCO-cont is effective for a full scale application without large investment while ISCO-int is more efficient to utilize oxidant in well-characterized sites. Pros and cons of each approach are discussed for the practical use of ISCO for various site conditions.

  6. In situ formation of cobalt oxide nanocubanes as efficient oxygen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Gregory S; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jian; Yonemoto, Bryan T; Zhou, Xinggui; Zhu, Kake; Jiao, Feng

    2015-04-01

    Oxygen evolution from water poses a significant challenge in solar fuel production because it requires an efficient catalyst to bridge the one-electron photon capture process with the four-electron oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Here, a new strategy was developed to synthesize nonsupported ultrasmall cobalt oxide nanocubanes through an in situ phase transformation mechanism using a layered Co(OH)(OCH3) precursor. Under sonication, the precursor was exfoliated and transformed into cobalt oxide nanocubanes in the presence of NaHCO3-Na2SiF6 buffer solution. The resulting cobalt catalyst with an average particle size less than 2 nm exhibited a turnover frequency of 0.023 per second per cobalt in photocatalytic water oxidation. X-ray absorption results suggested a unique nanocubane structure, where 13 cobalt atoms fully coordinated with oxygen in an octahedral arrangement to form 8 Co4O4 cubanes, which may be responsible for the exceptionally high OER activity.

  7. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  8. Smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic precursor stage of multiple myeloma (MM) characterized by clonal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) ≥ 10% and/or M protein level ≥ 30 g/L in the absence of end organ damage. It represents an intermediate stage between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and symptomatic MM. The risk of progression to symptomatic MM is not uniform, and several parameters have been reported to predict the risk of progression. These include the level of M protein and the percentage of BMPC, the proportion of immunophenotypically aberrant plasma cells, and the presence of immunoparesis, free light-chain (FLC) ratio, peripheral blood plasma cells (PBPC), pattern of serum M protein evolution, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytogenetic abnormalities, IgA isotype, and Bence Jones proteinuria. So far treatment is still not recommended for SMM, because several trials suggested that patients with SMM do not benefit from early treatment. However, the Mateos et al. trial showed a survival benefit after early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with high-risk SMM. This trial has prompted a reevaluation of early treatment in an asymptomatic patient population. PMID:26000300

  9. Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Minjie; Yang, Guang; Kong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic precursor stage of multiple myeloma (MM) characterized by clonal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPC) ≥ 10% and/or M protein level ≥ 30 g/L in the absence of end organ damage. It represents an intermediate stage between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and symptomatic MM. The risk of progression to symptomatic MM is not uniform, and several parameters have been reported to predict the risk of progression. These include the level of M protein and the percentage of BMPC, the proportion of immunophenotypically aberrant plasma cells, and the presence of immunoparesis, free light-chain (FLC) ratio, peripheral blood plasma cells (PBPC), pattern of serum M protein evolution, abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cytogenetic abnormalities, IgA isotype, and Bence Jones proteinuria. So far treatment is still not recommended for SMM, because several trials suggested that patients with SMM do not benefit from early treatment. However, the Mateos et al. trial showed a survival benefit after early treatment with lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in patients with high-risk SMM. This trial has prompted a reevaluation of early treatment in an asymptomatic patient population. PMID:26000300

  10. Smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM. PMID:25838344

  11. Smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Landgren, Ola; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2015-05-14

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder. SMM is distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance by a much higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM). There have been major advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of SMM in the last few years. These include a revised disease definition, identification of several new prognostic factors, a classification based on underlying cytogenetic changes, and new treatment options. Importantly, a subset of patients previously considered SMM is now reclassified as MM on the basis of biomarkers identifying patients with an ≥80% risk of progression within 2 years. SMM has assumed greater significance on the basis of recent trials showing that early therapy can be potentially beneficial to patients. As a result, there is a need to accurately diagnose and risk-stratify patients with SMM, including routine incorporation of modern imaging and laboratory techniques. In this review, we outline current concepts in diagnosis and risk stratification of SMM, and provide specific recommendations on the management of SMM. PMID:25838344

  12. Multiple symbol differential detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A differential detection technique for multiple phase shift keying (MPSK) signals is provided which uses a multiple symbol observation interval on the basis of which a joint decision is made regarding the phase of the received symbols. In accordance with the invention, a first difference phase is created between first and second received symbols. Next, the first difference phase is correlated with the possible values thereof to provide a first plurality of intermediate output signals. A second difference phase is next created between second and third received symbols. The second difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a second plurality of intermediate output signals. Next, a third difference phase is created between the first and third symbols. The third difference phase is correlated with plural possible values thereof to provide a third plurality of intermediate output signals. Each of the first plurality of intermediate outputs are combined with each of the second plurality of intermediate outputs and each of the third plurality of intermediate outputs to provide a plurality of possible output values. Finally, a joint decision is made by choosing from the plurality of possible output values the value which represents the best combined correlation of the first, second and third difference values with the possible values thereof.

  13. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Initially known as multiple system organ failure, the term multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was first described in the 1960s in adults with bleeding, respiratory failure, and sepsis. It is defined as "the development of potentially reversible physiologic derangement involving two or more organ systems not involved in the disorder that resulted in ICU admission, and arising in the wake of a potentially life threatening physiologic insult."(3) There are many risk factors predisposing to MODS; however, the most common risk factors are shock due to any cause, sepsis, and tissue hypoperfusion. A dysregulated immune response, or immuneparalysis, in which the homeostasis between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory reaction is lost is thought to be key in the development of MODS. The clinical course and evolution of MODS is dependent on a combination of acquired and genetic factors. There are several nonspecific therapies for the prevention and resolution of MODS, mostly care is supportive. Mortality from MODS in septic pediatric patients varies between 11% and 54%.

  14. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  15. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  16. Synthesis, Radical Reactivity, and Thermochemistry of Monomeric Cu(II) Alkoxide Complexes Relevant to Cu/Radical Alcohol Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Thomas R; Capitao, Dany; Kaminsky, Werner; Qian, Zhaoshen; Mayer, James M

    2016-06-01

    Two new monomeric Cu(II) alkoxide complexes were prepared and fully characterized as models for intermediates in copper/radical mediated alcohol oxidation catalysis: Tp(tBuR)Cu(II)OCH2CF3 with Tp(tBu) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 1 or Tp(tBuMe) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 2. These complexes were made as models for potential intermediates in enzymatic and synthetic catalytic cycles for alcohol oxidation. However, the alkoxide ligands are not readily oxidized by loss of H; instead, these complexes were found to be hydrogen atom acceptors. They oxidize the hydroxylamine TEMPOH, 2,4,6-tri-t-butylphenol, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to the nitroxyl radical, phenoxyl radical, and benzene, with formation of HOCH2CF3 (TFE) and the Cu(I) complexes Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)-MeCN in dichloromethane/1% MeCN or 1/2 [Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 in toluene. On the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics arguments, these reactions likely proceed through concerted proton-electron transfer mechanisms. Thermochemical analyses give lower limits for the "effective bond dissociation free energies (BDFE)" of the O-H bonds in 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 + TFE and upper limits for the free energies associated with alkoxide oxidations via hydrogen atom transfer (effective alkoxide α-C-H BDFEs). These values are summations of the free energies of multiple chemical steps, which include the energetically favorable formation of 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2. The effective alkoxide α-C-H bonds are very weak, BDFE ≤ 38 ± 4 kcal mol(-1) for 1 and ≤44 ± 5 kcal mol(-1) for 2 (gas-phase estimates), because C-H homolysis is thermodynamically coupled to one electron transfer to Cu(II) as well as the favorable formation of the 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 dimer. Treating 1 with the H atom acceptor (t)Bu3ArO(•) did not result in the expected alkoxide oxidation to an aldehyde, but rather net 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxyl radical transfer occurred to generate an unusual 2-substituted dienone-ether product. Treating 2

  17. Redox-active phosphines: synthesis and crystal structures of palladium(II) complexes of a metallaphosphine in two different oxidation states.

    PubMed

    Tohmé, Ayham; Labouille, Stéphanie; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Carmichael, Duncan; Paul, Frédéric

    2014-05-21

    The redox-active metallaphosphine [Fe(dppe)(η(5)-C5Me5)(C≡C-PPh2)] reacts with [Pd(1,5-cod)Cl2] to give mono- and bis-phosphine coordinated palladium centres as a function of stoichiometry, and these complexes provide a stable redox-active platform which allows reversible one-electron {Fe(II)→Fe(III)(+)} oxidations within the palladium coordination sphere. PMID:24710466

  18. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  19. The Functions of Multiple Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Shaaron

    1999-01-01

    Discusses multiple representations and multimedia learning environments; describes a functional taxonomy of MERs (multiple external representations); and considers how MERs are used to support cognitive processes in learning and problem solving with computers. (Contains 41 references.) (Author/LRW)

  20. Nitrous oxide fluxes in an ecosystem context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, P. M.; Burgin, A. J.; Morse, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous oxide fluxes are extremely difficult to quantify because this gas is produced by multiple processes that have complex controls that vary in time and space. Fluxes often exhibit extraordinary variability, with activity dominated by brief periods (hot moments) and small areas (hotspots) of flux. One approach to evaluating nitrous oxide is to focus on how flux is linked to overall patterns of nitrogen cycling in an ecosystem which can point to potential hotspots and hot moments that be incorporated into sampling campaigns. A key impediment to this approach, has been an inability to quantify the ratio of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen produced during dissimilatory processes, especially denitrification. Here we present data on nitrous oxide and dinitrogen fluxes from watershed/landscape studies at National Science Foundation funded Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in Maryland (Baltimore LTER) and New Hampshire (Hubbard Brook LTER). Fluxes were measured using a new direct flow soil core incubation system that allows for quantification of the nitrous oxide yield during denitrification and the watershed/landscape studies provide data on overall ecosystem nitrogen cycling. Results suggest that nitrous oxide flux and yield vary coherently with spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem nitrogen cycling. These patterns should allow us to develop more focused measurement and modeling campaigns that should result in improved understanding and estimates of nitrous oxide fluxes from forest ecosystems.

  1. Radical Chemistry and Cytotoxicity of Bioreductive 3-Substituted Quinoxaline Di-N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert F; Yadav, Pooja; Shinde, Sujata S; Hong, Cho R; Pullen, Susan M; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Wilson, William R; Hay, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    The radical chemistry and cytotoxicity of a series of quinoxaline di-N-oxide (QDO) compounds has been investigated to explore the mechanism of action of this class of bioreductive drugs. A series of water-soluble 3-trifluoromethyl (4-10), 3-phenyl (11-19), and 3-methyl (20-21) substituted QDO compounds were designed to span a range of electron affinities consistent with bioreduction. The stoichiometry of loss of QDOs by steady-state radiolysis of anaerobic aqueous formate buffer indicated that one-electron reduction of QDOs generates radicals able to initiate chain reactions by oxidation of formate. The 3-trifluoromethyl analogues exhibited long chain reactions consistent with the release of the HO(•), as identified in EPR spin trapping experiments. Several carbon-centered radical intermediates, produced by anaerobic incubation of the QDO compounds with N-terminal truncated cytochrome P450 reductase (POR), were characterized using N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps and were observed by EPR. Experimental data were well simulated for the production of strongly oxidizing radicals, capable of H atom abstraction from methyl groups. The kinetics of formation and decay of the radicals produced following one-electron reduction of the parent compounds, both in oxic and anoxic solutions, were determined using pulse radiolysis. Back oxidation of the initially formed radical anions by molecular oxygen did not compete effectively with the breakdown of the radical anions to form oxidizing radicals. The QDO compounds displayed low hypoxic selectivity when tested against oxic and hypoxic cancer cell lines in vitro. The results from this study form a kinetic description and explanation of the low hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity of QDOs against cancer cells compared to the related benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (BTO) class of compounds. PMID:27380897

  2. Radical Chemistry and Cytotoxicity of Bioreductive 3-Substituted Quinoxaline Di-N-Oxides.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert F; Yadav, Pooja; Shinde, Sujata S; Hong, Cho R; Pullen, Susan M; Reynisson, Jóhannes; Wilson, William R; Hay, Michael P

    2016-08-15

    The radical chemistry and cytotoxicity of a series of quinoxaline di-N-oxide (QDO) compounds has been investigated to explore the mechanism of action of this class of bioreductive drugs. A series of water-soluble 3-trifluoromethyl (4-10), 3-phenyl (11-19), and 3-methyl (20-21) substituted QDO compounds were designed to span a range of electron affinities consistent with bioreduction. The stoichiometry of loss of QDOs by steady-state radiolysis of anaerobic aqueous formate buffer indicated that one-electron reduction of QDOs generates radicals able to initiate chain reactions by oxidation of formate. The 3-trifluoromethyl analogues exhibited long chain reactions consistent with the release of the HO(•), as identified in EPR spin trapping experiments. Several carbon-centered radical intermediates, produced by anaerobic incubation of the QDO compounds with N-terminal truncated cytochrome P450 reductase (POR), were characterized using N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps and were observed by EPR. Experimental data were well simulated for the production of strongly oxidizing radicals, capable of H atom abstraction from methyl groups. The kinetics of formation and decay of the radicals produced following one-electron reduction of the parent compounds, both in oxic and anoxic solutions, were determined using pulse radiolysis. Back oxidation of the initially formed radical anions by molecular oxygen did not compete effectively with the breakdown of the radical anions to form oxidizing radicals. The QDO compounds displayed low hypoxic selectivity when tested against oxic and hypoxic cancer cell lines in vitro. The results from this study form a kinetic description and explanation of the low hypoxia-selective cytotoxicity of QDOs against cancer cells compared to the related benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (BTO) class of compounds.

  3. Screening and testing in multiples.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark I; Andriole, Stephanie

    2010-09-01

    The same principles for diagnosis and screening in singleton pregnancies apply to multiples. However, there can be significant differences in the safety and efficacy of all approaches with multiple gestations. This article deals with specific aspects of screening in multiple pregnancies.

  4. Nitroxyl (HNO): A Reduced Form of Nitric Oxide with Distinct Chemical, Pharmacological, and Therapeutic Properties.

    PubMed

    Shoman, Mai E; Aly, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide (NO), shows a distinct chemical and biological profile from that of NO. HNO is currently being viewed as a vasodilator and positive inotropic agent that can be used as a potential treatment for heart failure. The ability of HNO to react with thiols and thiol containing proteins is largely used to explain the possible biological actions of HNO. Herein, we summarize different aspects related to HNO including HNO donors, chemistry, biology, and methods used for its detection.

  5. A terminal and four-coordinate titanium alkylidene prepared by oxidatively induced alpha-hydrogen abstraction.

    PubMed

    Basuli, Falguni; Bailey, Brad C; Tomaszewski, John; Huffman, John C; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2003-05-21

    One-electron oxidation of the beta-diketiminate titanium(III) bis-neopentyl complex (Nacnac)Ti(CH2tBu)2 (Nacnac = [Ar]NC(Me)CHC(Me)N[Ar], Ar = 2,6-(CHMe2)2C6H3) promotes alpha-abstraction to afford the rare and terminal four-coordinate neopentylidene (Nacnac)Ti=CHtBu(OTf), which was structurally characterized. Alkylidene (Nacnac)Ti=CHtBu(OTf) reacts cleanly with benzophenone and the imine functionality of the Nacnac ligand to afford the corresponding Wittig-type products. PMID:12785824

  6. Nitroxyl (HNO): A Reduced Form of Nitric Oxide with Distinct Chemical, Pharmacological, and Therapeutic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Shoman, Mai E.; Aly, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    Nitroxyl (HNO), the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide (NO), shows a distinct chemical and biological profile from that of NO. HNO is currently being viewed as a vasodilator and positive inotropic agent that can be used as a potential treatment for heart failure. The ability of HNO to react with thiols and thiol containing proteins is largely used to explain the possible biological actions of HNO. Herein, we summarize different aspects related to HNO including HNO donors, chemistry, biology, and methods used for its detection. PMID:26770654

  7. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  8. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  9. MULTIPLE GALAXY COLLISIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Here is a sampling of 15 ultraluminous infrared galaxies viewed by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble's sharp vision reveals more complexity within these galaxies, which astronomers are interpreting as evidence of a multiple-galaxy pileup. These images, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are part of a three-year study of 123 galaxies within 3 billion light-years of Earth. The study was conducted in 1996, 1997, and 1999. False colors were assigned to these photos to enhance fine details within these coalescing galaxies. Credits: NASA, Kirk Borne (Raytheon and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.), Luis Colina (Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Spain), and Howard Bushouse and Ray Lucas (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.)

  10. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  11. Multiple asteroid rendezvous missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, D. F.; Friedlander, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    Asteroid missions, centered on multiple asteroid rendezvous missions to main belt asteroids, are discussed and the required solar electric propulsion for these missions as well as the current performance estimates are examined. A brief statistical analysis involving asteroid availability transfer requirements and propulsion system capabilities is given, leading to a prediction that 5 to 8 asteroids can be encountered with a single launch. Measurement techniques include visual imaging, radio tracking, magnetometry, and in the case of landers, seismometry. The spacecraft will be propelled by a solar electric system with a power level of 25 kW to 40 kW and tour possibilities for 13 different asteroids have been developed. Preliminary estimates of asteroid triaxiality are made to calculate the effect of close orbits.

  12. Multiple-port valve

    DOEpatents

    Doody, Thomas J.

    1978-08-22

    A multiple-port valve assembly is designed to direct flow from a primary conduit into any one of a plurality of secondary conduits as well as to direct a reverse flow. The valve includes two mating hemispherical sockets that rotatably receive a spherical valve plug. The valve plug is attached to the primary conduit and includes diverging passageways from that conduit to a plurality of ports. Each of the ports is alignable wih one or more of a plurality of secondary conduits fitted into one of the hemispherical sockets. The other hemispherical socket includes a slot for the primary conduit such that the conduit's motion along that slot with rotation of the spherical plug about various axes will position the valve-plug ports in respect to the secondary conduits.

  13. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived.

  14. On multiple Einstein rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, M. C.; An, J.; Evans, N. W.

    2008-12-01

    A number of recent surveys for gravitational lenses have found examples of double Einstein rings. Here, we analytically investigate the occurrence of multiple Einstein rings. We prove, under very general assumptions, that at the most one Einstein ring can arise from a mass distribution in a single plane lensing a single background source. Two or more Einstein rings can therefore only occur in multiplane lensing. Surprisingly, we show that it is possible for a single source to produce more than one Einstein ring. If two point masses, or two isothermal spheres, in different planes are aligned with observer and source on the optical axis, we show that there are up to three Einstein rings. We also discuss the image morphologies for these two models if axisymmetry is broken, and give the first instances of magnification invariants in the case of two-lens planes.

  15. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  16. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  17. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.; Schuler, Jason M.; Chandler, Meredith L.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that utilized multiple fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, for the design and assembly of a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, for the design and assembly of a portable four monitor hyper wall strip that could extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill that could be utilized on a next generation robot or rover, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and creation of a new outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory.

  18. Immunology of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Mireia; Martin, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a prototypic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). A complex genetic background with the HLA-DR15 haplotype as the main genetic risk factor and over 100 mostly immune-related minor risk alleles as well as several environmental factors contribute to the etiology of MS. With respect to pathomechanisms, autoimmune inflammation in early MS is primarily mediated by adaptive immune responses and involves autoreactive T cells, B cells, and antibodies, while the later, chronic stages of MS are characterized by a compartmentalized immune response in the CNS with activated microglia and macrophages. A host of immune cells and mediators can contribute to the autoimmune process, but CNS-related factors such as localization of lesions, vulnerability of oligodendrocytes, neurons/axons, and secondary metabolic changes all play a role in the heterogeneous expression of the disease, including different pathologic lesion patterns, neuroimaging findings, disease courses, and severity and response to treatment. PMID:27116718

  19. Aging and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Saini, Vasu; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Zivadinov, Robert; Teter, Barbara E; Ramanathan, Murali; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-05-01

    The life expectancy and average age of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have increased significantly during the last two decades. The introduction of disease-modifying therapies and a better delineation and understanding of the superimposed comorbidities often diagnosed in MS patients are probably the most important factors accountable for the increase in aging MS population worldwide. Healthcare teams must therefore address the problems arising due to advancing age superimposed on this chronic neurologic disease. In this review, we focus on the physiology of aging, its effects on MS disease course, and the pathological and immunological changes associated with aging and disease progression. Additionally, we discuss the common comorbidities that occur in aging persons with MS that may arise either as a result of the aging process or from relentless chronic MS disease progression as well as the challenges on differentiating the two processes for a more appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:26895718

  20. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  1. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  2. Aging and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Saini, Vasu; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Zivadinov, Robert; Teter, Barbara E; Ramanathan, Murali; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-05-01

    The life expectancy and average age of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have increased significantly during the last two decades. The introduction of disease-modifying therapies and a better delineation and understanding of the superimposed comorbidities often diagnosed in MS patients are probably the most important factors accountable for the increase in aging MS population worldwide. Healthcare teams must therefore address the problems arising due to advancing age superimposed on this chronic neurologic disease. In this review, we focus on the physiology of aging, its effects on MS disease course, and the pathological and immunological changes associated with aging and disease progression. Additionally, we discuss the common comorbidities that occur in aging persons with MS that may arise either as a result of the aging process or from relentless chronic MS disease progression as well as the challenges on differentiating the two processes for a more appropriate therapeutic approach.

  3. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy. PMID:26922172

  4. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  5. Neutron-multiplication measurement instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, K.V.; Dowdy, E.J.; France, S.W.; Millegan, D.R.; Robba, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Advanced Nuclear Technology Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory is now using intelligent data-acquisition and analysis instrumentation for determining the multiplication of nuclear material. Earlier instrumentation, such as the large NIM-crate systems, depended on house power and required additional computation to determine multiplication or to estimate error. The portable, battery-powered multiplication measurement unit, with advanced computational power, acquires data, calculates multiplication, and completes error analysis automatically. Thus, the multiplication is determined easily and an available error estimate enables the user to judge the significance of results.

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships for Rates of Aromatic Amine Oxidation by Manganese Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Bylaska, Eric J; Lyon, Molly A; Ness, Stuart C; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2016-05-17

    New energetic compounds are designed to minimize their potential environmental impacts, which includes their transformation and the fate and effects of their transformation products. The nitro groups of energetic compounds are readily reduced to amines, and the resulting aromatic amines are subject to oxidation and coupling reactions. Manganese dioxide (MnO2) is a common environmental oxidant and model system for kinetic studies of aromatic amine oxidation. In this study, a training set of new and previously reported kinetic data for the oxidation of model and energetic-derived aromatic amines was assembled and subjected to correlation analysis against descriptor variables that ranged from general purpose [Hammett σ constants (σ(-)), pKas of the amines, and energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO)] to specific for the likely rate-limiting step [one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox)]. The selection of calculated descriptors (pKa, EHOMO, and Eox) was based on validation with experimental data. All of the correlations gave satisfactory quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), but they improved with the specificity of the descriptor. The scope of correlation analysis was extended beyond MnO2 to include literature data on aromatic amine oxidation by other environmentally relevant oxidants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and phosphate and carbonate radicals) by correlating relative rate constants (normalized to 4-chloroaniline) to EHOMO (calculated with a modest level of theory). PMID:27074054

  7. Biological water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Nicholas; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2013-07-16

    Photosystem II (PSII), a multisubunit pigment-protein supercomplex found in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants, catalyzes a unique reaction in nature: the light-driven oxidation of water. Remarkable recent advances in the structural analysis of PSII now give a detailed picture of the static supercomplex on the molecular level. These data provide a solid foundation for future functional studies, in particular the mechanism of water oxidation and oxygen release. The catalytic core of the PSII is a tetramanganese-calcium cluster (Mn₄O₅Ca), commonly referred to as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The function of the OEC rests on its ability to cycle through five metastable states (Si, i = 0-4), transiently storing four oxidizing equivalents, and in so doing, facilitates the four electron water splitting reaction. While the latest crystallographic model of PSII gives an atomic picture of the OEC, the exact connectivity within the inorganic core and the S-state(s) that the X-ray model represents remain uncertain. In this Account, we describe our joint experimental and theoretical efforts to eliminate these ambiguities by combining the X-ray data with spectroscopic constraints and introducing computational modeling. We are developing quantum chemical methods to predict electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters for transition metal clusters, especially focusing on spin-projection approaches combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We aim to resolve the geometric and electronic structures of all S-states, correlating their structural features with spectroscopic observations to elucidate reactivity. The sequence of manganese oxidations and concomitant charge compensation events via proton transfer allow us to rationalize the multielectron S-state cycle. EPR spectroscopy combined with theoretical calculations provides a unique window into the tetramangenese complex, in particular its protonation states and metal ligand sphere evolution, far

  8. Analysis of monoclonal antibody oxidation by simple mixed mode chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pavon, Jorge Alexander; Li, Xiaojuan; Chico, Steven; Kishnani, Umesh; Soundararajan, Soundara; Cheung, Jason; Li, Huijuan; Richardson, Daisy; Shameem, Mohammed; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-29

    Analysis of oxidation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in most cases relies on peptide mapping and LC-MS, which is time consuming and labor-intensive. A robust chromatography based method that is able to resolve and quantitate mAb oxidation variants due to oxidized methionine or tryptophan is highly desired. Here we developed a novel mixed mode chromatography method using the unique property of Sepax Zenix SEC-300MK column to analyze mAb oxidation levels. The separation of oxidized species relied upon the mixed mode of size exclusion and hydrophobic interaction between the resin and antibodies. The chromatography was performed in a regular SEC mobile phase, PBS, containing NaCl at a concentration (0-2.4M) specific for individual antibodies. This method was able to resolve and quantitate the oxidized antibodies as prepeaks, of either methionine-oxidized species induced by the common oxidants TBHP, tryptophan-oxidized species triggered by AAPH, or oxidized species by UV photo-irradiation. The prepeaks were further characterized by SEC-MALLS as monomers and confirmed by LC-MS as oxidized antibody variants with a mass increase of 16 or 32Da. This method has been successfully applied to monitor multiple monoclonal antibodies of IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 subclasses. PMID:26774436

  9. Vascular oxidative stress, nitric oxide and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huige; Horke, Sven; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    In the vascular wall, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by several enzyme systems including NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. On the other hand, the vasculature is protected by antioxidant enzyme systems, including superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases and paraoxonases, which detoxify ROS. Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus enhance ROS generation, resulting in oxidative stress. This leads to oxidative modification of lipoproteins and phospholipids, mechanisms that contribute to atherogenesis. In addition, oxidation of tetrahydrobiopterin may cause eNOS uncoupling and thus potentiation of oxidative stress and reduction of eNOS-derived NO, which is a protective principle in the vasculature. This review summarizes the latest advances in the role of ROS-producing enzymes, antioxidative enzymes as well as NO synthases in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis.

  10. Multiple valence superatoms.

    PubMed

    Reveles, J U; Khanna, S N; Roach, P J; Castleman, A W

    2006-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that, in gas phase clusters containing aluminum and iodine atoms, an Al(13) cluster behaves like a halogen atom, whereas an Al(14) cluster exhibits properties analogous to an alkaline earth atom. These observations, together with our findings that Al(13)(-) is inert like a rare gas atom, have reinforced the idea that chosen clusters can exhibit chemical behaviors reminiscent of atoms in the periodic table, offering the exciting prospect of a new dimension of the periodic table formed by cluster elements, called superatoms. As the behavior of clusters can be controlled by size and composition, the superatoms offer the potential to create unique compounds with tailored properties. In this article, we provide evidence of an additional class of superatoms, namely Al(7)(-), that exhibit multiple valences, like some of the elements in the periodic table, and hence have the potential to form stable compounds when combined with other atoms. These findings support the contention that there should be no limitation in finding clusters, which mimic virtually all members of the periodic table.

  11. [Smoking and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Arruti, Maialen; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Egüés, Nerea; Olascoaga, Javier

    2015-02-16

    Introduccion. La esclerosis multiple (EM) es una enfermedad autoinmune de etiologia compleja, hoy por hoy desconocida, en la que factores geneticos y ambientales determinan la susceptibilidad. En los ultimos años, el efecto del tabaco ha sido uno de los factores ambientales que ha emergido en la EM, y se ha asociado tanto a un aumento de la susceptibilidad como a un aumento de la progresion. Objetivo. Revisar la evidencia actual sobre el papel del tabaco en la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados que han analizado distintos aspectos del tabaco en la EM: vias patogenicas implicadas, asociacion del tabaco y riesgo de EM, interaccion con otros factores de riesgo y efecto del tabaco en el curso de la enfermedad. Conclusiones. Los estudios observacionales demuestran que el tabaquismo incrementa de forma significativa el riesgo de EM (odds ratio ~ 1,5) y es un factor de riesgo independiente. Sin embargo, la EM es una enfermedad compleja y el aumento de riesgo por el tabaco puede diferir en funcion de la interaccion con otros factores geneticos y ambientales. El papel del tabaco como factor de progresion es mas controvertido, con resultados contradictorios y estudios de gran variabilidad, lo que dificulta establecer una conclusion firme. Los mecanismos por los que el tabaquismo modifica el riesgo y posiblemente la progresion de la enfermedad no son aun conocidos.

  12. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gregory P.; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P.; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  13. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  14. Neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has routinely been used to improve the accuracy of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and prognosis. Metrics derived from conventional MRI are now routinely used to detect therapeutic effects and extend clinical observations. However, conventional MRI measures, such as the use of lesion volume and count of gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions, have insufficient sensitivity and specificity to reveal the true degree of pathological changes occurring in MS. They cannot distinguish between inflammation, edema, demyelination, Wallerian degeneration, and axonal loss. In addition, they do not show a reliable correlation with clinical measures of disability and do not provide a complete assessment of therapeutic outcomes. Recent neuropathologic studies of typical chronic MS brains reveal macroscopic demyelination in cortical and deep gray matter (GM) that cannot be detected by currently available MRI techniques. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the development of newer MRI techniques to detect these lesions. Newer metrics of MRI analysis, including T1-weighted hypointense lesions, central nervous system atrophy measures, magnetization transfer imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, are able to capture a more global picture of the range of tissue alterations caused by inflammation and neurodegeneration. At this time, they provide the only proof--albeit indirect--that important occult pathology is occurring in the GM. However, evidence is increasing that these nonconventional MRI measures correlate better with both existing and developing neurological impairment and disability when compared to conventional metrics. PMID:17531854

  15. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  16. Multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies.

  17. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  18. Multiple valence superatoms

    PubMed Central

    Reveles, J. U.; Khanna, S. N.; Roach, P. J.; Castleman, A. W.

    2006-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that, in gas phase clusters containing aluminum and iodine atoms, an Al13 cluster behaves like a halogen atom, whereas an Al14 cluster exhibits properties analogous to an alkaline earth atom. These observations, together with our findings that Al13− is inert like a rare gas atom, have reinforced the idea that chosen clusters can exhibit chemical behaviors reminiscent of atoms in the periodic table, offering the exciting prospect of a new dimension of the periodic table formed by cluster elements, called superatoms. As the behavior of clusters can be controlled by size and composition, the superatoms offer the potential to create unique compounds with tailored properties. In this article, we provide evidence of an additional class of superatoms, namely Al7−, that exhibit multiple valences, like some of the elements in the periodic table, and hence have the potential to form stable compounds when combined with other atoms. These findings support the contention that there should be no limitation in finding clusters, which mimic virtually all members of the periodic table. PMID:17121987

  19. Viruses and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gregory P; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  20. Multiple stage railgun

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.; Scudder, Jonathan K.; Aaland, Kristian

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator (10) for accelerating a projectile (15) by movement of a plasma arc (13) along the rails (11,12). The railgun (10) is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages (10a-n) which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources (14a-n) as the projectile (15) moves through the bore (17) of the railgun (10). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end (29) of the railgun (10) can be prevented by connection of the energy sources (14a-n) to the rails (11,12) through isolation diodes (34a-n). Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails (11,12) into electrically isolated rail sections (11a-n, 12a-n). In such case means (55a-n) are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse (31) or laser device (61) is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage.

  1. [Diet and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pozuelo-Moyano, Beatriz; Benito-León, Julián

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. El tipo de dieta se ha relacionado con el proceso inflamatorio que forma parte de la esclerosis multiple (EM). En los ultimos años, distintas lineas de investigacion han generado una gran cantidad de conocimiento sobre la participacion de la dieta en la patogenesis de la EM. Objetivo. Elucidar de modo critico las evidencias que relacionan distintos tipos de dietas y alimentos con la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados mas significativos que han analizado el papel de la dieta en la patogenesis y en el tratamiento de la EM. Para explorar la asociacion entre la dieta y el riesgo de EM se ha revisado la evidencia disponible hasta el momento, pasando por estudios observacionales hasta terminar con estudios de intervencion. Conclusiones. Se necesita mas investigacion sobre la nutricion como factor de riesgo, ya que podria tener relacion con la enfermedad, y el control de esta podria llevar a una disminucion significativa de la incidencia o progresion de la patologia.

  2. [Familial multiple cavernomatosis].

    PubMed

    Terriza, F; Amrani, Y; Asencio, J J; Goberna, E; Casado, A; Peralta, J I

    1997-04-01

    We present a family study of multiple cavernomatosis which affected a boy of six, his mother and two brothers. It was seen clinically as epileptic crises, focal neurological defects and frequent headaches. In our case, the condition started as a syndrome of intracranial hypertension with progressive headache and vomiting. During the illness, localizing neurological signs due to bleeding were seen. Amongst these were acute left hemiparesia and paralysis of vertical gaze. Other members of the family remain symptom-free. In a search for angiomas at other sites none were found in the patient or his family. Recently the gene giving rise to the familial cerebral cavernosa malformation has been found to be a locus on chromosome 7. We discuss the findings on neuro-imaging, emphasizing the importance of magnetic resonance (MR) both in diagnosis and finding affected asymptomatic family members, because of its great sensitivity and specificity. Angiography is not a suitable technique for this since they behave as hidden malformations. We also point out its importance as a way of following-up the illness and for evaluation of possible complications due to progressive growth or sudden haemorrhage, which may indicate the need for treatment. Finally we emphasize the different characteristics of MR signals in this type of lesion since cavernomatasa malformations are dynamic lesions. PMID:9172920

  3. Electrolytic oxidation of anthracite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Patton, K.M.; Heard, I.

    1981-01-01

    An anthracite slurry can be oxidized only with difficulty by electrolytic methods in which aqueous electrolytes are used if the slurry is confined to the region of the anode by a porous pot or diaphragm. However, it can be easily oxidized if the anthracite itself is used as the anode. No porous pot or diaphragm is needed. Oxidative consumption of the coal to alkali-soluble compounds is found to proceed preferentially at the edges of the aromatic planes. An oxidation model is proposed in which the chief oxidants are molecular and radical species formed by the electrolytic decomposition of water at the coal surface-electrolyte interface. The oxidation reactions proposed account for the opening of the aromatic rings and the subsequent formation of carboxylic acids. The model also explains the observed anisotropic oxidation and the need for the porous pot or diaphragm used in previous studies of the oxidation of coal slurries. ?? 1981.

  4. Zinc oxide overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used ... prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of ...

  5. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  6. Mixed Acid Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1999-10-26

    Several non-thermal processes have been developed to destroy organic waste compounds using chemicals with high oxidation potentials. These efforts have focused on developing technologies that work at low temperatures, relative to incineration, to overcome many of the regulatory issues associated with obtaining permits for waste incinerators. One such technique with great flexibility is mixed acid oxidation. Mixed acid oxidation, developed at the Savannah River Site, uses a mixture of an oxidant (nitric acid) and a carrier acid (phosphoric acid). The carrier acid acts as a non-volatile holding medium for the somewhat volatile oxidant. The combination of acids allows appreciable amounts of the concentrated oxidant to remain in the carrier acid well above the oxidant''s normal boiling point.

  7. Mechanisms of oxidation of guanine in DNA by carbonate radical anion, a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Seog K; Margolin, Yelena; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is produced during inflammation and combines rapidly with carbon dioxide to yield the unstable nitrosoperoxycarbonate, which decomposes (in part) to CO(3) (.-) and (.)NO(2) radicals. The CO(3) (.-) radicals oxidize guanine bases in DNA through a one-electron transfer reaction process that ultimately results in the formation of stable guanine oxidation products. Here we have explored these mechanisms, starting with a spectroscopic study of the kinetics of electron transfer from 20-22mer double-stranded oligonucleotides to CO(3) (.-) radicals, together with the effects of base sequence on the formation of the end-products in runs of one, two, or three contiguous guanines. The distributions of these alkali-labile lesions were determined by gel electrophoresis methods. The cascade of events was initiated through the use of 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate CO(3) (.-) radicals by an established method based on the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radicals and the oxidation of bicarbonate. Although the Saito model (Saito et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6406-6407) predicts relative ease of one-electron oxidations in DNA, following the trend 5'-GGG > 5'-GG > 5'-G, we found that the rate constants for CO(3) (.-)-mediated oxidation of guanines in these sequence contexts (k(5)) showed only small variation within a narrow range [(1.5-3.0)x10(7) M(-1) s(-1)]. In contrast, the distributions of the end-products are dependent on the base sequence context and are higher at the 5'-G in 5'-GG sequences and at the first two 5'-guanines in the 5'-GGG sequences. These effects are attributed to a combination of initial hole distributions among the contiguous guanines and the subsequent differences in chemical reaction yields at each guanine. The lack of dependence of k(5) on sequence context indicates that the one-electron oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3) (.-) radicals occurs by an inner-sphere mechanism. PMID:17335089

  8. Method of making controlled morphology metal-oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan

    2016-05-17

    A method of making metal oxides having a preselected morphology includes preparing a suspension that includes a solvent, polymeric nanostructures having multiplicities of hydroxyl surface groups and/or carboxyl surface groups, and a metal oxide precursor. The suspension has a preselected ratio of the polymeric nanostructures to the metal oxide precursor of at least 1:3, the preselected ratio corresponding to a preselected morphology. Subsequent steps include depositing the suspension onto a substrate, removing the solvent to form a film, removing the film from the substrate, and annealing the film to volatilize the polymeric nanostructures and convert the metal oxide precursor to metal oxide nanoparticles having the preselected morphology or to a metal oxide nanosheet including conjoined nanoparticles having the preselected morphology.

  9. Dependence of DNA-protein cross-linking via guanine oxidation upon local DNA sequence as studied by restriction endonuclease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Madison, Amanda L; Perez, Zitadel A; To, Phuong; Maisonet, Tiffany; Rios, Eunice V; Trejo, Yuri; Ochoa-Paniagua, Carmen; Reno, Anita; Stemp, Eric D A

    2012-01-10

    Oxidative damage plays a causative role in many diseases, and DNA-protein cross-linking is one important consequence of such damage. It is known that GG and GGG sites are particularly prone to one-electron oxidation, and here we examined how the local DNA sequence influences the formation of DNA-protein cross-links induced by guanine oxidation. Oxidative DNA-protein cross-linking was induced between DNA and histone protein via the flash quench technique, a photochemical method that selectively oxidizes the guanine base in double-stranded DNA. An assay based on restriction enzyme cleavage was developed to detect the cross-linking in plasmid DNA. Following oxidation of pBR322 DNA by flash quench, several restriction enzymes (PpuMI, BamHI, EcoRI) were then used to probe the plasmid surface for the expected damage at guanine sites. These three endonucleases were strongly inhibited by DNA-protein cross-linking, whereas the AT-recognizing enzyme AseI was unaffected in its cleavage. These experiments also reveal the susceptibility of different guanine sites toward oxidative cross-linking. The percent inhibition observed for the endonucleases, and their pBR322 cleavage sites, decreased in the order: PpuMI (5'-GGGTCCT-3' and 5'-AGGACCC-3') > BamHI (5'-GGATCC-3') > EcoRI (5'-GAATTC-3'), a trend consistent with the observed and predicted tendencies for guanine to undergo one-electron oxidation: 5'-GGG-3' > 5'-GG-3' > 5'-GA-3'. Thus, it appears that in mixed DNA sequences the guanine sites most vulnerable to oxidative cross-linking are those that are easiest to oxidize. These results further indicate that equilibration of the electron hole in the plasmid DNA occurs on a time scale faster than that of cross-linking.

  10. Studies in zirconium oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Drunen, C. J.; Levitan, J.

    1968-01-01

    Study provides insight into the oxidation mechanism of zirconium by combining electrical measurements with oxidation data. The measurement of electrical potential across growing scale on zirconium and the determination of conventional weight-change oxidation data were carried out at 550, 700, and 800 degrees C.

  11. Congruently melting complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, S.C.; Brandle, C.D. Jr.

    1988-04-26

    A device is described comprising: a material including a complex oxide, characterized in that the complex oxide is essentially free of gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, gadolinium gallium garnet and lithium niobate, and the composition of the complex oxide is congruent and differs from stoichiometry by at least 0.1 atomic percent for at least one constituent element.

  12. Swamp Works- Multiple Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carelli, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    My Surface Systems internship over the summer 2013 session covered a broad range of projects that ranged multiple aspects and fields of engineering and technology. This internship included a project to create a command center for a 120 ton regolith bin, a design and build for a blast shield to add further protection for the Surface Systems engineers, a design for a portable four monitor hyper wall that can extend as large as needed, research and programming a nano drill for a next generation robot, and social media tasks including the making of videos, posting to social networking websites and implementation of a new weekly outreach program to help spread the word about the Swamp Works laboratory. The objectives for the command center were to create a central computer controlled area for the still in production lunar regolith bin. It needed to be easy to use and the operating systems had to be Linux. The objectives for the hyper wall were to build a mobile transport of monitors that could potentially attach to one another. It needed to be light but sturdy, and have the ability to last. The objectives for the blast shield included a robust design that could withstand a small equipment malfunction, while also being convenient for use. The objectives for the nano-drill included the research and implementation of programming for vertical and horizontal movement. The hyper wall and blasts shield project were designed by me in the Pro/Engineer/Creo2 software. Each project required a meeting with the Swamp Works engineers and was declared successful.

  13. Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a common genetically and clinically heterogeneous skeletal dysplasia characterized by early-onset osteoarthritis, mainly in the hip and knee, and mild-to-moderate short stature. Here we report on a 6-generation MED family with 17 affected members. Method The clinical and radiographic data on the 12 affected members still living were scrutinized. A structured inquiry comprising state of health and MED-related symptoms since birth up to the present time and the osteoarthritis outcome (KOOS) questionnaire were sent to all living family members with MED. The 5 known gene loci for autosomal dominant MED were analyzed for linkage, using fluorescence-labeled microsatellite markers. Linkage was ascertained with markers close to the COL9A2 gene, which was analyzed for mutations by sequencing. Results We identified an exon 3 donor splice mutation in the COL9A2 gene in all affected family members. Clinical, radiographic, and questionnaire data from affected family members suggested that MED caused by COL9A2 mutations starts in early childhood with knee pain accompanied by delayed ossification of femoral epiphyses. The disease then either stabilizes during puberty or progresses with additional joints becoming affected; joint surgery might be necessary. The progression of the disease also affects muscles, with increasing atrophy, resulting in muscle fatigue and pain. Muscular atrophy has not been reported earlier in cases with COL9A2 mutations. Interpretation In a patient with clinically suspected or verified MED, it is important to perform DNA-based analysis to identify a possible disease-causing mutation. This information can be used to carry out genetic risk assessment of other family members and to achieve an early and correct diagnosis in the children. PMID:19995321

  14. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  15. Zinc in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS. Searching the databases PubMed and EMBASE as well as going through reference lists in included articles 24 studies were found measuring Zn in patients with MS. Of these, 13 met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis shows a reduction in serum or plasma Zn levels in patients with MS with a 95% CI of [−3.66, −0.93] and a p value of .001 for the difference in Zn concentration in μM. One of six studies measuring cerebrospinal fluid, Zn levels found a significant increase in patients with MS with controls. The studies measuring whole blood and erythrocyte Zn levels found up to several times higher levels of Zn in patients with MS compared with healthy controls with decreasing levels during attacks in relapsing-remitting MS patients. Future studies measuring serum or plasma Zn are encouraged to analyze their data through homogenous MS patient subgroups on especially age, sex, and disease subtype since the difference in serum or plasma Zn in these subgroups have been found to be significantly different. It is hypothesized that local alterations of Zn may be actively involved in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:27282383

  16. Multiple chronic benign pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, L G; Schimmel, D H; Gamsu, G

    1976-11-01

    Four cases are discussed in which were found unusual multiple chronic pulmonary nodules: leiomyomatous hamartomas, rheumatoid nodules, multiple histoplasmomas, and possible multiple plasma cell granulomas (hyalinizing pulmonary nodules). In each case the initial impression of metastic malignancy was countered by more than 2 years' observation, during which time the lesions appeared to be benign. Histologic examination is necessary to exclude malignancy, although a definitive diagnosis may be difficult to establish. PMID:981596

  17. Multiplicative Thinking: Much More than Knowing Multiplication Facts and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Chris; Hurrell, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicative thinking is accepted as a "big idea" of mathematics that underpins important mathematical concepts such as fraction understanding, proportional reasoning, and algebraic thinking. It is characterised by understandings such as the multiplicative relationship between places in the number system, basic and extended number…

  18. Multiple-hypothesis multiple-model line tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Donald W.; Owen, Mark W.; Cox, Henry

    2000-07-01

    Passive sonar signal processing generally includes tracking of narrowband and/or broadband signature components observed on a Lofargram or on a Bearing-Time-Record (BTR) display. Fielded line tracking approaches to date have been recursive and single-hypthesis-oriented Kalman- or alpha-beta filters, with no mechanism for considering tracking alternatives beyond the most recent scan of measurements. While adaptivity is often built into the filter to handle changing track dynamics, these approaches are still extensions of single target tracking solutions to multiple target tracking environment. This paper describes an application of multiple-hypothesis, multiple target tracking technology to the sonar line tracking problem. A Multiple Hypothesis Line Tracker (MHLT) is developed which retains the recursive minimum-mean-square-error tracking behavior of a Kalman Filter in a maximum-a-posteriori delayed-decision multiple hypothesis context. Multiple line track filter states are developed and maintained using the interacting multiple model (IMM) state representation. Further, the data association and assignment problem is enhanced by considering line attribute information (line bandwidth and SNR) in addition to beam/bearing and frequency fit. MHLT results on real sonar data are presented to demonstrate the benefits of the multiple hypothesis approach. The utility of the system in cluttered environments and particularly in crossing line situations is shown.

  19. Surface analyses and modelling of rate multiplicity and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Harold, M.P.; Conner, W.C.

    1990-11-01

    Catalytic partial and complete oxidations of chemical species are a quite important class of reactions in the production of many commercial chemicals and in the elimination of environmental pollutants. This research focuses on a sub-class of oxidation reactions in which CO is a key player -- be it a reactant, intermediate, or product -- in the catalytic sequence and chemistry. The first three years of our research has followed two parallel paths which have a common destination and which together provide a framework for the proposed new research. The first path has involved the development of a combined experimental/modelling and analysis methodology for constructing feasible mechanistic sequences and their corresponding kinetic models of catalytic reactions that exhibit multiple rate behavior. The rather well-studied Pt catalyzed CO oxidation served as the test reaction. Our approach involves the measurement of basic kinetic features (apparent reaction orders, activation energy) and multiplicity features (location of ignition and extinction points) over a wide range of conditions (catalyst temperature, total pressure, feed composition), and a kinetic modelling part, in which potential reaction sequences are constructed and screened based on their ability to predict the experimentally observed kinetic and multiplicity features over a wide range of conditions. The second path has involved the development of an under-utilized (in catalysis) spectroscopic technique, Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIRES), to monitor the surface of a catalyst during reaction. Main accomplishments from both studies are summarized.

  20. Experimental investigations of multiple steady states in aerobic continuous cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lei, Frede; Olsson, Lisbeth; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-06-30

    The steady-state behavior of a glucose-limited, aerobic, continuous cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D was investigated around the critical dilution rate. Oxido-reductive steady states were obtained at dilution rates up to 0.09 h(-1) lower than the critical dilution rate by operating the bioreactor as a productostat, where the dilution rate was controlled on the basis of an ethanol measurement. Thus, the experimental investigations revealed that multiple steady states exist in a region of dilution rates below the critical dilution rate. The existence of multiple steady states was attributed to two distinct physiological effects occurring when growth changed from oxidative to oxido-reductive: (i) a decrease in the efficiency of ATP production and utilization (at ethanol concentrations below 3 g/L) and (ii) repression of the oxidative metabolism (at higher ethanol concentrations). The first effect was best observed at low ethanol concentrations, where multiple steady states were observed even when no repression of the oxidative metabolism was evident, i.e., the oxidative capacity was constant. However, at higher ethanol concentrations repression of the oxidative metabolism was observed (the oxidative capacity decreased), and this resulted in a broader range of dilution rates where multiple steady states could be found.

  1. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility

  2. Enriched Storable Oxidizers for Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, R. L.; Herdy, J. R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The name "enriched storable oxidizers" (ESOs) has been coined for a family of optimized mixtures of between two and four oxidizer fluids. For most applications, the constituents of these mixtures would be nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2); in some applications, the mixtures might include inhibited red fuming nitric acid [IRFN (which consists of red fuming nitric acid to which some hydrogen fluoride is added to reduce its corrosive effect]. The optimum proportions of these constituents would be different for different applications. ESOs were originally proposed for use in spacecraft and launch-rocket propulsion systems: ESOs could be especially useful in advanced spacecraft propulsion systems that could operate in multiple modes. ESOs might also be useful in special terrestrial applications that could include ramjet and scramjet aircraft engines.

  3. Characteristics of Biological Nitrogen Removal in a Multiple Anoxic and Aerobic Biological Nutrient Removal Process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huoqing; Guan, Yuntao; Li, Li; Wu, Guangxue

    2015-01-01

    Two sequencing batch reactors, one with the conventional anoxic and aerobic (AO) process and the other with the multiple AO process, were operated to examine characteristics of biological nitrogen removal, especially of the multiple AO process. The long-term operation showed that the total nitrogen removal percentage of the multiple AO reactor was 38.7% higher than that of the AO reactor. In the multiple AO reactor, at the initial SBR cycle stage, due to the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, no nitrite and/or nitrate were accumulated. In the multiple AO reactor, activities of nitrite oxidizing bacteria were inhibited due to the multiple AO operating mode applied, resulting in the partial nitrification. Denitrifiers in the multiple AO reactor mainly utilized internal organic carbon for denitrification, and their activities were lower than those of denitrifiers in the AO reactor utilizing external organic carbon. PMID:26491676

  4. Comet assay as an indirect measure of systemic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Neutzner, Albert; Turtschi, Stephanie; Flammer, Josef; Mozaffarieh, Maneli

    2015-05-22

    Higher eukaryotic organisms cannot live without oxygen; yet, paradoxically, oxygen can be harmful to them. The oxygen molecule is chemically relatively inert because it has two unpaired electrons located in different pi * anti-bonding orbitals. These two electrons have parallel spins, meaning they rotate in the same direction about their own axes. This is why the oxygen molecule is not very reactive. Activation of oxygen may occur by two different mechanisms; either through reduction via one electron at a time (monovalent reduction), or through the absorption of sufficient energy to reverse the spin of one of the unpaired electrons. This results in the production of reactive oxidative species (ROS). There are a number of ways in which the human body eliminates ROS in its physiological state. If ROS production exceeds the repair capacity, oxidative stress results and damages different molecules. There are many different methods by which oxidative stress can be measured. This manuscript focuses on one of the methods named cell gel electrophoresis, also known as "comet assay" which allows measurement of DNA breaks. If all factors known to cause DNA damage, other than oxidative stress are kept constant, the amount of DNA damage measured by comet assay is a good parameter of oxidative stress. The principle is simple and relies upon the fact that DNA molecules are negatively charged. An intact DNA molecule has such a large size that it does not migrate during electrophoresis. DNA breaks, however, if present result in smaller fragments which move in the electrical field towards the anode. Smaller fragments migrate faster. As the fragments have different sizes the final result of the electrophoresis is not a distinct line but rather a continuum with the shape of a comet. The system allows a quantification of the resulting "comet" and thus of the DNA breaks in the cell.

  5. Multiple system atrophy: pathogenic mechanisms and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A; Wenning, Gregor K

    2016-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a unique proteinopathy that differs from other α-synucleinopathies since the pathological process resulting from accumulation of aberrant α-synuclein (αSyn) involves the oligodendroglia rather than neurons, although both pathologies affect multiple parts of the brain, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous system. Both the etiology and pathogenesis of MSA are unknown, although animal models have provided insight into the basic molecular changes of this disorder. Accumulation of aberrant αSyn in oligodendroglial cells and preceded by relocation of p25α protein from myelin to oligodendroglia results in the formation of insoluble glial cytoplasmic inclusions that cause cell dysfunction and demise. These changes are associated with proteasomal, mitochondrial and lipid transport dysfunction, oxidative stress, reduced trophic transport, neuroinflammation and other noxious factors. Their complex interaction induces dysfunction of the oligodendroglial-myelin-axon-neuron complex, resulting in the system-specific pattern of neurodegeneration characterizing MSA as a synucleinopathy with oligodendroglio-neuronopathy. Propagation of modified toxic αSyn species from neurons to oligodendroglia by "prion-like" transfer and its spreading associated with neuronal pathways result in a multi-system involvement. No reliable biomarkers are currently available for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of MSA. Multidisciplinary research to elucidate the genetic and molecular background of the deleterious cycle of noxious processes, to develop reliable diagnostic biomarkers and to deliver targets for effective treatment of this hitherto incurable disorder is urgently needed.

  6. All-Oxide Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Kupfer, Benjamin; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Zaban, Arie

    2012-12-20

    Recently, a new field in photovoltaics (PV) has emerged, focusing on solar cells that are entirely based on metal oxide semiconductors. The all-oxide PV approach is very attractive due to the chemical stability, nontoxicity, and abundance of many metal oxides that potentially allow manufacturing under ambient conditions. Already today, metal oxides (MOs) are widely used as components in PV cells such as transparent conducting front electrodes or electron-transport layers, while only very few MOs have been used as light absorbers. In this Perspective, we review recent developments of all-oxide PV systems, which until today were mostly based on Cu2O as an absorber. Furthermore, ferroelectric BiFeO3-based PV systems are discussed, which have recently attracted considerable attention. The performance of all-oxide PV cells is discussed in terms of general PV principles, and directions for progress are proposed, pointing toward the development of novel metal oxide semiconductors using combinatorial methods.

  7. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  8. Oxidation of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water by Potassium Ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjin; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Huang, Rongfu; Elnakar, Haitham; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-04-19

    This paper investigates the oxidation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) by potassium ferrate(VI). Due to the selectivity of ferrate(VI) oxidation, two-ring and three-ring fluorescing aromatics were preferentially removed at doses <100 mg/L Fe(VI), and one-ring aromatics were removed only at doses ≥100 mg/L Fe(VI). Ferrate(VI) oxidation achieved 64.0% and 78.4% removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) at the dose of 200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Fe(VI) respectively, and NAs with high carbon number and ring number were removed preferentially. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra indicated that the oxidation of fluorescing aromatics resulted in the opening of some aromatic rings. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis detected signals of organic radical intermediates, indicating that one-electron transfer is one of the probable mechanisms in the oxidation of NAs. The inhibition effect of OSPW on Vibrio fischeri and the toxicity effect on goldfish primary kidney macrophages (PKMs) were both reduced after ferrate(VI) oxidation. The fluorescing aromatics in OSPW were proposed to be an important contributor to this acute toxicity. Degradation of model compounds with ferrate(VI) was also investigated and the results confirmed our findings in OSPW study. PMID:27008571

  9. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  10. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  11. Multiple Intelligences and Lab Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colannino, Noreen M.; Hoyt, William L.; Murray, Ann

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers who are committed to excellence in the classroom continually seek ways to improve teaching and learning, and the concept of multiple intelligences holds promise as a method for accomplishing this. The essence of the theory of multiple intelligences is to understand the many differences among students, the variations in the ways…

  12. Multiple Intelligences for Differentiated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, R. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    There is an intricate literacy to Gardner's multiple intelligences theory that unlocks key entry points for differentiated learning. Using a well-articulated framework, rich with graphic representations, Williams provides a comprehensive discussion of multiple intelligences. He moves the teacher and students from curiosity, to confidence, to…

  13. Multiple fractional Fourier transform holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yangsu; Zhang, Yixiao; Gao, Feng; Gao, Fuhua; Huang, Xiaoyang; Guo, Yongkang

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the recording and reconstruction theories of the multiple fractional Fourier transform hologram (M-FRTH). We fabricated a multiple fractional Fourier transform hologram, and obtained satisfying reconstruction results. The experimental result shows that the M-FRTH has a high anti-counterfeiting capacity and can be used in the fabrication of the trademark, ID, and the notes.

  14. Adult Multiple Intelligences and Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Meg Ryback

    In the Adult Multiple Intelligences (AMI) study, 10 teachers of adults from the northeastern region of the United States explored for 18 months the ways that multiple intelligences (MI) theory could support instruction and assessment in various adult learning contexts. The results of this research were published in a book by Julie Viens called MI…

  15. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Teresa C.; Castro, Wanda; Shah, Anjali; Courtney, Ardith; Ortstadt, Jeffrey; Davis, Scott L.; Logan, Diana; Abraham, Thomas; Abraham, Jaspreet; Remington, Gina; Treadaway, Katherine; Graves, Donna; Hart, John; Stuve, Olaf; Lemack, Gary; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults. The ability to impact the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis should not only incorporate therapies that are disease modifying, but should also include a course of action for the global multidisciplinary management focused on quality of life and functional capabilities. PMID:21694806

  16. The problem with multiple robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Marcus J.; Kenny, Patrick G.

    1994-01-01

    The issues that can arise in research associated with multiple, robotic agents are discussed. Two particular multi-robot projects are presented as examples. This paper was written in the hope that it might ease the transition from single to multiple robot research.

  17. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  18. Zirconium Oxide Nanostructures Prepared by Anodic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Ying Yi; Bhuiyan, Md S; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic films can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide film to flake off. Further studies are needed to define the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  19. Ambient-Temperature Sputtering Of Composite Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita

    1992-01-01

    Technique for deposition of homogeneous films of multicomponent oxides on substrates at ambient temperature based on sequential sputter deposition of individual metal components, as alternating ultra-thin layers, from multiple targets. Substrates rotated over sputtering targets of lead, zirconium, and titanium. Dc-magnetron sputtering of constituent metals in reactive ambient of argon and oxygen leads to formation of the respective metal oxides intermixed on extremely fine scale in desired composition. Compatible with low-temperature microelectronic processing.

  20. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  1. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious.

  2. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  3. Superconducting composite with multilayer patterns and multiple buffer layers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1993-10-12

    An article of manufacture is described including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of a material selected from the group consisting of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of cerium oxide, yttrium oxide, curium oxide, dysprosium oxide, erbium oxide, europium oxide, iron oxide, gadolinium oxide, holmium oxide, indium oxide, lanthanum oxide, manganese oxide, lutetium oxide, neodymium oxide, praseodymium oxide, plutonium oxide, samarium oxide, terbium oxide, thallium oxide, thulium oxide, yttrium oxide and ytterbium oxide over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductor. 5 figures.

  4. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  5. DNA base damage by reactive oxygen species, oxidizing agents, and UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean; Wagner, J Richard

    2013-02-01

    Emphasis has been placed in this article dedicated to DNA damage on recent aspects of the formation and measurement of oxidatively generated damage in cellular DNA in order to provide a comprehensive and updated survey. This includes single pyrimidine and purine base lesions, intrastrand cross-links, purine 5',8-cyclonucleosides, DNA-protein adducts and interstrand cross-links formed by the reactions of either the nucleobases or the 2-deoxyribose moiety with the hydroxyl radical, one-electron oxidants, singlet oxygen, and hypochlorous acid. In addition, recent information concerning the mechanisms of formation, individual measurement, and repair-rate assessment of bipyrimidine photoproducts in isolated cells and human skin upon exposure to UVB radiation, UVA photons, or solar simulated light is critically reviewed. PMID:23378590

  6. Iron porphyrin polymer films: Materials for the modification of electrode surfaces and the detection of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, M.; Drew, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    We are currently investigating a new method for the detection and quantification of nitric oxide (NO) based on a carbon electrode chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. Commercially available vinyl-substituted iron porphyrin monomers can be polymerized directly onto electrode surfaces through a published electrochemical polymerization process. We are also developing a synthesis for a new vinyl-substituted monomer, iron 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-vinyl porphyrin chloride, in hopes of improving polymer film stability. The electrochemistry of NO is also being investigated at electrodes chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. We are studying the catalytic oxidation of iron porphyrin bound NO to nitrate by molecular oxygen. The reaction with molecular oxygen is preceded by a one electron reduction of the iron porphyrin-NO complex. If currents proportional to nitric oxide concentration can be measured, a new NO electrochemical sensor will be designed.

  7. [Effect of calcium cations on acid-base properties and free radical oxidation of dopamine and pyrocatechol].

    PubMed

    Lebedev, A V; Ivanova, M V; Timoshin, A A; Ruuge, E K

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-induced increase in the rate of pyrocatechol and dopamine oxidation by dioxygen and Ca2+-dependent acid-base properties of the catechols were studied by potentiometric titration, UV/Vis-spectrophotometry, EPR-spectroscopy, and by measurement of oxygen consumption. The effect of Ca2+ on the chain reactions of oxidation can be explained by additional deprotonation (decrease in pKai) of the catechols that accelerates one electron transport to dioxygen and formation of calcium semiquinonate, undergoing further oxidation. The described Ca2+-dependent redox-conversion of ortho-phenols proposes that an additional function of calcium in the cell can be its involvement in free radical oxidoreductive reactions at pH > pKai.

  8. Multiple Access in Ultra-Wideband Communications Using Multiple Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2003-04-11

    Multiple access (MA) in UWB communication is an area of active research. To date several time-division or code-division pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) or pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes have been proposed to separate multiple users in UWB communications. Conventionally, all users employ the same pulse shape and modulate the transmit pulse based on changing amplitude or position. One concern with using the same pulse for all channels is that the multiple access interference (MAI) increases as the number of users increase. This is due to increased cross-correlation between similar pulses of the different channels, raising thus the noise floor in such systems. In this paper we introduce and study the performance of a new MA scheme in the context of multiple orthogonal transmitted-reference (T-R) short duration (nsec) chirp pulses in the presence of multipath and additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN).

  9. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  10. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  11. Multiple polymersomes for programmed release of multiple components.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Shum, Ho Cheung; Kim, Jin Woong; Cho, Jun-Cheol; Weitz, David A

    2011-09-28

    Long-term storage and controlled release of multiple components while avoiding cross-contamination have potentially important applications for pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Polymersomes are very promising delivery vehicles but cannot be used to encapsulate multiple independent components and release them in a controlled manner. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to produce multiple polymersomes, or polymersomes-in-polymersome by design, enabling encapsulation and programmed release of multiple components. Monodisperse polymersomes are prepared from templates of double-emulsion drops, which in turn are injected as the innermost phase to form the second level of double-emulsion drops, producing double polymersomes. Using the same strategy, higher-order polymersomes are also prepared. In addition, incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer into the different bilayers of the multiple polymersomes enables controlled and sequential dissociation of the different bilayer membranes in a programmed fashion. The high encapsulation efficiency of this microfluidic approach, as well as its programmability and the biocompatibility of the materials used to form the polymersomes, will provide new opportunities for practical delivery systems of multiple components. PMID:21838246

  12. Multiple polymersomes for programmed release of multiple components.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Shum, Ho Cheung; Kim, Jin Woong; Cho, Jun-Cheol; Weitz, David A

    2011-09-28

    Long-term storage and controlled release of multiple components while avoiding cross-contamination have potentially important applications for pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Polymersomes are very promising delivery vehicles but cannot be used to encapsulate multiple independent components and release them in a controlled manner. Here, we report a microfluidic approach to produce multiple polymersomes, or polymersomes-in-polymersome by design, enabling encapsulation and programmed release of multiple components. Monodisperse polymersomes are prepared from templates of double-emulsion drops, which in turn are injected as the innermost phase to form the second level of double-emulsion drops, producing double polymersomes. Using the same strategy, higher-order polymersomes are also prepared. In addition, incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer into the different bilayers of the multiple polymersomes enables controlled and sequential dissociation of the different bilayer membranes in a programmed fashion. The high encapsulation efficiency of this microfluidic approach, as well as its programmability and the biocompatibility of the materials used to form the polymersomes, will provide new opportunities for practical delivery systems of multiple components.

  13. Design for Oxidation Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Schaeffer, Jon C.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Alloys intended for use in high-temperature environment rely on the formation of a continuous, compact, slow-growing oxide layer for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. To be protective, this oxide layer must be chemically, thermodynamically stable. Successful alloy design for oxidative environment is best achieved by developing alloys that are capable of forming adherent scales of either alumina (Al2O3), chromia (Cr2O3), or silica (SiO2). In this article, emphasis has been placed on the issue related to high-temperature oxidation of superalloys used in gas turbine engine application. Despite the complexity of these alloys, optimal performance has been associated with protective alumina scale formation. As will be described below, both compositional makeup and protective coatings play key role in providing oxidation protection. Other high-temperature materials described include nickel and titanium aluminide intermetallics, refractory metal, and ceramics.

  14. [Syndrome of multiple organ failure].

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, P; Suisse, A

    1990-11-01

    The multiple organ failure syndrome (MOF) is a relatively new entity defined as the successive occurrence of respiratory (ARDS), hepatic, renal, myocardial, gastro-intestinal or neurological failure in patients with hyperkinetic haemodynamic and hypermetabolic states. The etiologies are: infection, septic and non-septic shock, burns and multiple injuries. The MOF syndrome is considered to be a generalised "inflammatory reaction" to tissue aggression involving a cascade of mediatory factors (TNF, interleukines...) of macrophagic, lymphocytic origin, causing multiple organ failure. The treatment depends on early correction of cellular hypoxia related to circulatory disturbances, nutritional support, anti-infective therapy and, in the near future, "control of mediator activity" (immunotherapy).

  15. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. PMID:25732950

  16. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  17. On Multiple-Layered Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to find ways to make vortex flow fields decompose more quickly, photographs and observations are presented of vortex flow fields that indicate the presence of multiple layers of fluid rotating about a common axis. A survey of the literature indicates that multiple-layered vortices form in waterspouts, tornadoes and lift-generated vortices of aircraft. An explanation for the appearance of multiple-layered structures in vortices is suggested. The observations and data presented are intended to improve the understanding of the formation and persistence of vortex flow fields.

  18. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  19. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  20. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  1. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  2. Multifunctional Oxide Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsymbal, E Y; Dagotto, Elbio R; Eom, Professor Chang-Beom; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to the rapidly developing field of oxide thin-films and heterostructures. Oxide materials combined with atomic-scale precision in a heterostructure exhibit an abundance of macroscopic physical properties involving the strong coupling between the electronic, spin, and structural degrees of freedom, and the interplay between magnetism, ferroelectricity, and conductivity. Recent advances in thin-film deposition and characterization techniques made possible the experimental realization of such oxide heterostructures, promising novel functionalities and device concepts.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the major cause of pulmonary disease in infants. The pathophysiology and management of BPD changed with the improvement of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) management and with the increase of survival rates. Despite the improvements made, BPD is still a public health concern, resulting in frequent hospitalizations with high rates of mortality, impaired weight and height growth, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Lung injury in the neonatal period has multiple etiologic factors – genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, mechanical, and infectious mechanisms – act in a cumulative and synergic way. Free radical (FR) generation is largely recognized as the major cause of lung damage. Oxidative stress (OS) is the final common endpoint for a complex convergence of events, some genetically determined and some triggered by in utero stressors. Inflammatory placental disorders and chorioamnionitis also play an important role due to the coexistence of inflammatory and oxidative lesions. In addition, the contribution of airway inflammation has been extensively studied. The link between inflammation and OS injury involves the direct activation of inflammatory cells, especially granulocytes, which potentiates the inflammatory reaction. Individualized interventions to support ventilation, minimize oxygen exposure, minimize apnea, and encourage growth should decrease both the frequency and severity of BPD. Future perspectives suggest supplementation with enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic antioxidants. The use of antioxidants in preterm newborns particularly exposed to OS and at risk for BPD represents a logical strategy to ameliorate FRs injury, but further studies are needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:24027702

  4. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  5. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  6. Multiple myeloma. Houses and spouses

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, R.A.; Greipp, P.R.

    1983-02-15

    Two families in which successive spouses who lived in the same house developed multiple myeloma are reported. In the first instance, a man whose first wife died of multiple myeloma remarried, and his second wife also developed myeloma. In the second family, a woman's first husband died of multiple myeloma and her second husband did too. Radiation studies of the houses and yards showed no increased radioactivity. No evidence was found for excessive exposure to chemicals or other environmental agents, for contact with other patients having similar malignancies, or for exposure to viruses or other transmissible factors. The significance of the occurrence of multiple myeloma in subsequent spouses is unknown. It is hoped that this report will stimulate research for other instances and lead to careful epidemiologic, radiologic, and virologic studies.

  7. Multiple Regression and Its Discontents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.; Marsh, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Multiple regression is part of a larger statistical strategy originated by Gauss. The authors raise questions about the theory and suggest some changes that would make room for Mandelbrot and Serendipity.

  8. Humanizing Outgroups Through Multiple Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Prati, Francesca; Crisp, Richard J.; Meleady, Rose; Rubini, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In three studies, we examined the impact of multiple categorization on intergroup dehumanization. Study 1 showed that perceiving members of a rival university along multiple versus simple categorical dimensions enhanced the tendency to attribute human traits to this group. Study 2 showed that multiple versus simple categorization of immigrants increased the attribution of uniquely human emotions to them. This effect was explained by the sequential mediation of increased individuation of the outgroup and reduced outgroup threat. Study 3 replicated this sequential mediation model and introduced a novel way of measuring humanization in which participants generated attributes corresponding to the outgroup in a free response format. Participants generated more uniquely human traits in the multiple versus simple categorization conditions. We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings and consider their role in informing and improving efforts to ameliorate contemporary forms of intergroup discrimination. PMID:26984016

  9. MULTIPLE SCALES FOR SUSTAINABLE RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will highlight recent research that incorporates the use of multiple scales and innovative environmental accounting to better inform decisions that affect sustainability, resilience, and vulnerability at all scales. Effective decision-making involves assessment at mu...

  10. Multiple test tubes stirred mechanically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. J.; Strong, I. J.

    1965-01-01

    Mechanical device simultaneously stirs multiple test tubes under controlled laboratory conditions. The invention provides a variable stirring rate, minimal amount of contamination of tube contents, unattended and simple operation, and easy maintenance and cleaning.

  11. The high-temperature oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezinsky, K.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical mechanisms of the atmospheric pressure, high-temperature (875-1500 K) gas-phase oxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and propylbenzene are described and discussed. Oxidation trends evident from turbulent flow reactor experiments serve as the basis for the mechanisms of the oxidation of benzene and alkylated aromatics. The potential effects of very high temperatures and pressures on the chemistry of oxidation of aromatics are described. The oxidation of benzene and phenyl radical has been found to proceed in a stepwise C6-C5-C4 sequence. Species profiles obtained from flow-reactor experiments suggest that the oxidation of benzene and phenyl radical follows the generalized route via phenoxy, cyclopentadienyl and butadienyl radical. The oxidation of the C4 species branches into multiple pathways that yield copious amounts of ethylene and acetylene. Certain major trends are evident: the alkylated aromatics on initial attack either form styrene, benzyl radical or benzene. The styrene reacts further to produce a benzyl radical or benzene. The oxidation of an alkylated aromatic hydrocarbon appears eventually to reduce to the oxidation of either phenyl radical or benzene.

  12. Determinants of basal fat oxidation in healthy Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Nagy, T R; Goran, M I; Weinsier, R L; Toth, M J; Schutz, Y; Poehlman, E T

    1996-05-01

    In a retrospective study, we examined several determinants of basal fat oxidation in 720 healthy Caucasian volunteers. Adult men (n = 427) and women (n = 293) were characterized for resting energy expenditure and substrate oxidation by indirect calorimetry (after a 12-h overnight fast), peak O2 consumption by a treadmill test to exhaustion, body composition by hydrodensitometry, food intake from a 3-day food diary, and hormonal status by fasting hormone concentrations. Fat oxidation was negatively correlated with fat mass in men (r = -0.11; P < 0.05), but no statistical relationship was found in women. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, fat oxidation was best predicted by peak O2 consumption and fat-free mass in men (model R2 = 0.142) and by free thyroxine, fat-free mass, and fasting insulin in women (model R2 = 0.153). Relative rates of fat oxidation (fat oxidation adjusted for differences in resting energy expenditure) were not correlated with fat mass in either gender. Women showed a lower rate of basal fat oxidation (both absolute and adjusted) than did men. Our results show that fat oxidation is not greater in individuals with a greater fat mass. Furthermore, our results support a sexual dimorphism in basal rates of fat oxidation. PMID:8727562

  13. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  14. Criteria for performing multiple dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Gupta, V.P.; Pryor, K.H.

    1995-10-01

    When radiation fields vary spatially as a result of job- or location-specific conditions, the use of more than one dosimeter may be necessary for a variety of radiation protection purposes. This paper contains a methodology for when and how to use multiple dosimeters under conditions incident to routine activities in the presence of ionizing radiation. It also describes a methodology for determining the effective dose equivalent when the use of multiple dosimeters has been deemed necessary by radiation protection professionals.

  15. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25732945

  16. Multiple phases of protien gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaka, Masahiko; Tanaka, Toyoichi

    1994-03-01

    A multiple phase transition was observed in gels made by covalently cross-linking proteins in either native or denatured state. The enzymatic activity of the gels prepared from native α-chymotrypsin was determined for each of the multiple phases. The reversibility of the swelling degrees and the enzymatic reaction rates upon phase transition suggests that the protein is at a free energy minimum and thus in a phase.

  17. Multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, G.; Glass, T.A.; D'Souza, V.J.; Formanek, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Renal oncocytoma, although rare, is being diagnosed more frequently, and criteria to differentiate it from other tumors have been described. Multiple oncocytomas have been reported, but an association between multiple oncocytomas and renal carcinoma in the same kidney has not been described. The authors report a case with two oncocytomas and a renal carcinoma in the right kidney as well as a right adrenal adenoma.

  18. The INEL beryllium multiplication experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; King, J.J.

    1991-03-01

    The experiment to measure the multiplication of 14-MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium has been completed. The experiment consists of determining the ratio of {sup 56}Mn activities induced in a large manganese bath by a central 14-MeV neutron source, with and without a beryllium sample surrounding the source. In the manganese bath method a neutron source is placed at the center of a totally-absorbing aqueous solution of MnSo{sub 4}. The capture of neutrons by Mn produces a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the emission rate of the source. As applied to the measurement of the multiplication of 14- MeV neutrons in bulk beryllium, the neutron source is a tritium target placed at the end of the drift tube of a small deuteron accelerator. Surrounding the source is a sample chamber. When the sample chamber is empty, the neutrons go directly to the surrounding MnSO{sub 4} solution, and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate. When the chamber contains a beryllium sample, the neutrons first enter the beryllium and multiply through the (n,2n) process. Neutrons escaping from the beryllium enter the bath and produce a {sup 56}Mn activity proportional to the neutron emission rate multiplied by the effective value of the multiplication in bulk beryllium. The ratio of the activities with and without the sample present is proportional to the multiplication value. Detailed calculations of the multiplication and all the systematic effects were made with the Monte Carlo program MCNP, utilizing both the Young and Stewart and the ENDF/B-VI evaluations for beryllium. Both data sets produce multiplication values that are in excellent agreement with the measurements for both raw and corrected values of the multiplication. We conclude that there is not real discrepancy between experimental and calculated values for the multiplication of neutrons in bulk beryllium. 12 figs., 11 tabs., 18 refs.

  19. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  20. A multiple armature railgun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Antonios; Maas, Brian L.; Bauer, David P.; Heyse, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Railgun launchers with multiple armatures, which can distribute the accelerating force on the projectile, supply each armature with gun current for acceleration through its own set of rails. Test results are reported which confirm the feasibility of this concept; it is shown that the control of current distribution to multiple armatures is possible. Attention is given to gun behavior for the case of high length/diameter projectiles.