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Sample records for multiple time-scale phenomena

  1. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due to the severe computational burden. Here we present such a unifying methodological and conceptual framework which detects assembly structure at many different time scales, levels of precision, and with arbitrary internal organization. Applying this methodology to multiple single unit recordings from various cortical areas, we find that there is no universal cortical coding scheme, but that assembly structure and precision significantly depends on the brain area recorded and ongoing task demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19428.001 PMID:28074777

  2. Multiple time scale complexity analysis of resting state FMRI.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert X; Yan, Lirong; Wang, Danny J J

    2014-06-01

    The present study explored multi-scale entropy (MSE) analysis to investigate the entropy of resting state fMRI signals across multiple time scales. MSE analysis was developed to distinguish random noise from complex signals since the entropy of the former decreases with longer time scales while the latter signal maintains its entropy due to a "self-resemblance" across time scales. A long resting state BOLD fMRI (rs-fMRI) scan with 1000 data points was performed on five healthy young volunteers to investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of entropy across multiple time scales. A shorter rs-fMRI scan with 240 data points was performed on a cohort of subjects consisting of healthy young (age 23 ± 2 years, n = 8) and aged volunteers (age 66 ± 3 years, n = 8) to investigate the effect of healthy aging on the entropy of rs-fMRI. The results showed that MSE of gray matter, rather than white matter, resembles closely that of f (-1) noise over multiple time scales. By filtering out high frequency random fluctuations, MSE analysis is able to reveal enhanced contrast in entropy between gray and white matter, as well as between age groups at longer time scales. Our data support the use of MSE analysis as a validation metric for quantifying the complexity of rs-fMRI signals.

  3. Multiple time scales in multi-state models.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, Simona; Carstensen, Bendix

    2013-12-30

    In multi-state models, it has been the tradition to model all transition intensities on one time scale, usually the time since entry into the study ('clock-forward' approach). The effect of time since an intermediate event has been accommodated either by changing the time scale to time since entry to the new state ('clock-back' approach) or by including the time at entry to the new state as a covariate. In this paper, we argue that the choice of time scale for the various transitions in a multi-state model should be dealt with as an empirical question, as also the question of whether a single time scale is sufficient. We illustrate that these questions are best addressed by using parametric models for the transition rates, as opposed to the traditional Cox-model-based approaches. Specific advantages are that dependence of failure rates on multiple time scales can be made explicit and described in informative graphical displays. Using a single common time scale for all transitions greatly facilitates computations of probabilities of being in a particular state at a given time, because the machinery from the theory of Markov chains can be applied. However, a realistic model for transition rates is preferable, especially when the focus is not on prediction of final outcomes from start but on the analysis of instantaneous risk or on dynamic prediction. We illustrate the various approaches using a data set from stem cell transplant in leukemia and provide supplementary online material in R. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. HMC algorithm with multiple time scale integration and mass preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, C.; Jansen, K.; Shindler, A.; Wenger, U.

    2006-01-01

    We present a variant of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning (Hasenbusch acceleration) and multiple time scale integration. We have tested this variant for standard Wilson fermions at β=5.6 and at pion masses ranging from 380 to 680 MeV. We show that in this situation its performance is comparable to the recently proposed HMC variant with domain decomposition as preconditioner. We give an update of the "Berlin Wall" figure, comparing the performance of our variant of the HMC algorithm to other published performance data. Advantages of the HMC algorithm with mass preconditioning and multiple time scale integration are that it is straightforward to implement and can be used in combination with a wide variety of lattice Dirac operators.

  5. Multiple time scale based reduction scheme for nonlinear chemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Ray, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    A chemical reaction is often characterized by multiple time scales governing the kinetics of reactants, products and intermediates. We eliminate the fast relaxing intermediates in autocatalytic reaction by transforming the original system into a new one in which the linearized part is diagonal. This allows us to reduce the dynamical system by identifying the associated time scales and subsequent adiabatic elimination of the fast modes. It has been shown that the reduced system sustains the robust qualitative signatures of the original system and at times the generic form of the return map for the chaotic system from which complex dynamics stems out in the original system can be identified. We illustrate the scheme for a three-variable cubic autocatalytic reaction and four-variable peroxidase-oxidase reaction.

  6. Satellite attitude prediction by multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. C.; Ramnath, R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made of the problem of predicting the attitude of satellites under the influence of external disturbing torques. The attitude dynamics are first expressed in a perturbation formulation which is then solved by the multiple scales approach. The independent variable, time, is extended into new scales, fast, slow, etc., and the integration is carried out separately in the new variables. The theory is applied to two different satellite configurations, rigid body and dual spin, each of which may have an asymmetric mass distribution. The disturbing torques considered are gravity gradient and geomagnetic. Finally, as multiple time scales approach separates slow and fast behaviors of satellite attitude motion, this property is used for the design of an attitude control device. A nutation damping control loop, using the geomagnetic torque for an earth pointing dual spin satellite, is designed in terms of the slow equation.

  7. Multiple time scale behaviors and network dynamics in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchi; Chakravarty, Charusita; Milotti, Edoardo

    2008-07-31

    Canonical ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of liquid methanol, modeled using a rigid-body, pair-additive potential, are used to compute static distributions and temporal correlations of tagged molecule potential energies as a means of characterizing the liquid state dynamics. The static distribution of tagged molecule potential energies shows a clear multimodal structure with three distinct peaks, similar to those observed previously in water and liquid silica. The multimodality is shown to originate from electrostatic effects, but not from local, hydrogen bond interactions. An interesting outcome of this study is the remarkable similarity in the tagged potential energy power spectra of methanol, water, and silica, despite the differences in the underlying interactions and the dimensionality of the network. All three liquids show a distinct multiple time scale (MTS) regime with a 1/ f (alpha) dependence with a clear positive correlation between the scaling exponent alpha and the diffusivity. The low-frequency limit of the MTS regime is determined by the frequency of crossover to white noise behavior which occurs at approximately 0.1 cm (-1) in the case of methanol under standard temperature and pressure conditions. The power spectral regime above 200 cm (-1) in all three systems is dominated by resonances due to localized vibrations, such as librations. The correlation between alpha and the diffusivity in all three liquids appears to be related to the strength of the coupling between the localized motions and the larger length/time scale network reorganizations. Thus, the time scales associated with network reorganization dynamics appear to be qualitatively similar in these systems, despite the fact that water and silica both display diffusional anomalies but methanol does not.

  8. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control In Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2000-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. Overall stability of a two-loop control system is addressed. An optimal control allocation algorithm is designed that allocates torque commands into end-effector deflection commands, which are executed by the actuators. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. Simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. This is a significant advancement in performance over that achieved with linear, gain scheduled control systems currently being used for launch vehicles.

  9. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control in Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri

    1999-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. 6DOF simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. It creates possibility to operate the X-33 vehicle in an aircraft-like mode with reduced pre-launch adjustment of the control system.

  10. Multiple-time-scale motion in molecularly linked nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    George, Christopher; Szleifer, Igal; Ratner, Mark

    2013-01-22

    We explore the transport of electrons between electrodes that encase a two-dimensional array of metallic quantum dots linked by molecular bridges (such as α,ω alkaline dithiols). Because the molecules can move at finite temperatures, the entire transport structure comprising the quantum dots and the molecules is in dynamical motion while the charge is being transported. There are then several physical processes (physical excursions of molecules and quantum dots, electronic migration, ordinary vibrations), all of which influence electronic transport. Each can occur on a different time scale. It is therefore not appropriate to use standard approaches to this sort of electron transfer problem. Instead, we present a treatment in which three different theoretical approaches-kinetic Monte Carlo, classical molecular dynamics, and quantum transport-are all employed. In certain limits, some of the dynamical effects are unimportant. But in general, the transport seems to follow a sort of dynamic bond percolation picture, an approach originally introduced as formal models and later applied to polymer electrolytes. Different rate-determining steps occur in different limits. This approach offers a powerful scheme for dealing with multiple time scale transport problems, as will exist in many situations with several pathways through molecular arrays or even individual molecules that are dynamically disordered.

  11. Reusable Launch Vehicle Control in Multiple Time Scale Sliding Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtessel, Yuri

    1999-01-01

    A reusable launch vehicle control problem during ascent is addressed via multiple-time scaled continuous sliding mode control. The proposed sliding mode controller utilizes a two-loop structure and provides robust, de-coupled tracking of both orientation angle command profiles and angular rate command profiles in the presence of bounded external disturbances and plant uncertainties. Sliding mode control causes the angular rate and orientation angle tracking error dynamics to be constrained to linear, de-coupled, homogeneous, and vector valued differential equations with desired eigenvalues placement. The dual-time scale sliding mode controller was designed for the X-33 technology demonstration sub-orbital launch vehicle in the launch mode. 6DOF simulation results show that the designed controller provides robust, accurate, de-coupled tracking of the orientation angle command profiles in presence of external disturbances and vehicle inertia uncertainties. It creates possibility to operate the X-33 vehicle in an aircraft-like mode with reduced pre-launch adjustment of the control system.

  12. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  13. Geometric integrators for multiple time-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhidong; Leimkuhler, Ben

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we review and extend recent research on averaging integrators for multiple time-scale simulation such as are needed for physical N-body problems including molecular dynamics, materials modelling and celestial mechanics. A number of methods have been proposed for direct numerical integration of multiscale problems with special structure, such as the mollified impulse method (Garcia-Archilla, Sanz-Serna and Skeel 1999 SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 20 930-63) and the reversible averaging method (Leimkuhler and Reich 2001 J. Comput. Phys. 171 95-114). Features of problems of interest, such as thermostatted coarse-grained molecular dynamics, require extension of the standard framework. At the same time, in some applications the computation of averages plays a crucial role, but the available methods have deficiencies in this regard. We demonstrate that a new approach based on the introduction of shadow variables, which mirror physical variables, has promised for broadening the usefulness of multiscale methods and enhancing accuracy of or simplifying computation of averages. The shadow variables must be computed from an auxiliary equation. While a geometric integrator in the extended space is possible, in practice we observe enhanced long-term energy behaviour only through use of a variant of the method which controls drift of the shadow variables using dissipation and sacrifices the formal geometric properties such as time-reversibility and volume preservation in the enlarged phase space, stabilizing the corresponding properties in the physical variables. The method is applied to a gravitational three-body problem as well as a partially thermostatted model problem for a dilute gas of diatomic molecules.

  14. Statistical Analysis of Sensor Network Time Series at Multiple Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granat, R. A.; Donnellan, A.

    2013-12-01

    Modern sensor networks often collect data at multiple time scales in order to observe physical phenomena that occur at different scales. Whether collected by heterogeneous or homogenous sensor networks, measurements at different time scales are usually subject to different dynamics, noise characteristics, and error sources. We explore the impact of these effects on the results of statistical time series analysis methods applied to multi-scale time series data. As a case study, we analyze results from GPS time series position data collected in Japan and the Western United States, which produce raw observations at 1Hz and orbit corrected observations at time resolutions of 5 minutes, 30 minutes, and 24 hours. We utilize the GPS analysis package (GAP) software to perform three types of statistical analysis on these observations: hidden Markov modeling, probabilistic principle components analysis, and covariance distance analysis. We compare the results of these methods at the different time scales and discuss the impact on science understanding of earthquake fault systems generally and recent large seismic events specifically, including the Tohoku-Oki earthquake in Japan and El Mayor-Cucupah earthquake in Mexico.

  15. Compression based entropy estimation of heart rate variability on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Baumert, Mathias; Voss, Andreas; Javorka, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate fluctuates beat by beat in a complex manner. The aim of this study was to develop a framework for entropy assessment of heart rate fluctuations on multiple time scales. We employed the Lempel-Ziv algorithm for lossless data compression to investigate the compressibility of RR interval time series on different time scales, using a coarse-graining procedure. We estimated the entropy of RR interval time series of 20 young and 20 old subjects and also investigated the compressibility of randomly shuffled surrogate RR time series. The original RR time series displayed significantly smaller compression entropy values than randomized RR interval data. The RR interval time series of older subjects showed significantly different entropy characteristics over multiple time scales than those of younger subjects. In conclusion, data compression may be useful approach for multiscale entropy assessment of heart rate variability.

  16. Multiple-time scales analysis of physiological time series under neural control.

    PubMed

    Peng, C K; Hausdorff, J M; Havlin, S; Mietus, J E; Stanley, H E; Goldberger, A L

    1998-01-01

    We discuss multiple-time scale properties of neurophysiological control mechanisms, using heart rate and gait regulation as model systems. We find that scaling exponents can be used as prognostic indicators. Furthermore, detection of more subtle degradation of scaling properties may provide a novel early warning system in subjects with a variety of pathologies including those at high risk of sudden death.

  17. Multiple-time scales analysis of physiological time series under neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Hausdorff, J. M.; Havlin, S.; Mietus, J. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss multiple-time scale properties of neurophysiological control mechanisms, using heart rate and gait regulation as model systems. We find that scaling exponents can be used as prognostic indicators. Furthermore, detection of more subtle degradation of scaling properties may provide a novel early warning system in subjects with a variety of pathologies including those at high risk of sudden death.

  18. Multiple-time scales analysis of physiological time series under neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, C. K.; Hausdorff, J. M.; Havlin, S.; Mietus, J. E.; Stanley, H. E.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss multiple-time scale properties of neurophysiological control mechanisms, using heart rate and gait regulation as model systems. We find that scaling exponents can be used as prognostic indicators. Furthermore, detection of more subtle degradation of scaling properties may provide a novel early warning system in subjects with a variety of pathologies including those at high risk of sudden death.

  19. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lilai; Gao, Peiqing; Cui, Shenghui; Liu, Chun

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ► The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ► At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ► At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ► At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to

  20. Stability analysis of nonlinear systems by multiple time scaling. [using perturbation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.

    1974-01-01

    The asymptotic solution for the transient analysis of a general nonlinear system in the neighborhood of the stability boundary was obtained by using the multiple-time-scaling asymptotic-expansion method. The nonlinearities are assumed to be of algebraic nature. Terms of order epsilon to the 3rd power (where epsilon is the order of amplitude of the unknown) are included in the solution. The solution indicates that there is always a limit cycle which is stable (unstable) and exists above (below) the stability boundary if the nonlinear terms are stabilizing (destabilizing). Extension of the solution to include fifth order nonlinear terms is also presented. Comparisons with harmonic balance and with multiple-time-scaling solution of panel flutter equations are also included.

  1. Virtual Testing of Large Composite Structures: A Multiple Length/Time-Scale Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigliotti, Luigi; Pinho, Silvestre T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper illustrates a multiple length/time-scale framework for the virtual testing of large composite structures. Such framework hinges upon a Mesh Superposition Technique (MST) for the coupling between areas of the structure modelled at different length-scales and upon an efficient solid-to-shell numerical homogenization which exploits the internal symmetries of Unit Cells (UCs). Using this framework, it is possible to minimize the areas of the structure modelled at the lowest- (and computationally demanding) scales and the computational cost required to calculate the homogenised to be used in the higher-scales subdomains of multiscale FE models, as well as to simulate the mechanical response of different parts of the structure using different solvers, depending on where they are expected to provide the most computationally efficient solution. The relevance and key-aspects of the multiple length/time-scale framework are demonstrated through the analysis of a real-sized aeronautical composite component.

  2. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  3. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  4. Nested stochastic simulation algorithms for chemical kinetic systems with multiple time scales

    SciTech Connect

    E, Weinan; Liu, Di . E-mail: diliu@math.msu.edu; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2007-01-20

    We present an efficient numerical algorithm for simulating chemical kinetic systems with multiple time scales. This algorithm is an improvement of the traditional stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA), also known as Gillespie's algorithm. It is in the form of a nested SSA and uses an outer SSA to simulate the slow reactions with rates computed from realizations of inner SSAs that simulate the fast reactions. The algorithm itself is quite general and seamless, and it amounts to a small modification of the original SSA. Our analysis of such multi-scale chemical kinetic systems allows us to identify the slow variables in the system, derive effective dynamics on the slow time scale, and provide error estimates for the nested SSA. Efficiency of the nested SSA is discussed using these error estimates, and illustrated through several numerical examples.

  5. A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lilai; Gao, Peiqing; Cui, Shenghui; Liu, Chun

    2013-06-01

    Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 - 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 - 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to develop integrated policies and measures for waste management over the long term. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Consequences of nonequilibrium resource availability across multiple time scales: the transient maxima hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Seastedt, T R; Knapp, A K

    1993-04-01

    Nonequilibrium biotic responses to changes in resource limitation dominate the behavior of tallgrass prairie ecosystems. Rates of leaf photosynthesis on a time scale of minutes, amounts of annual plant productivity, patterns in the productivity of certain consumer groups, and amounts of soil organic matter accumulation over millennia all reflect biotic responses to frequent and recurring shifts in limiting resources. Productivity is higher during a transition period when the relative importance of an essential resource is changing than during an equilibrium interval generated by single resource limitation. These "transient maxima" are both characteristic and easily measurable in the tallgrass prairie because of the unpredictable climate and ecological constraints such as grazing and recurrent fires that modify water, nitrogen, and light availability. Such diverse phenomena as overcompensation for herbivory, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, maximum levels of productivity observed in successional ecosystems, and widespread nitrogen limitation in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems can be explained by biotic response to shifts in limiting resources.

  7. Muscles innervated by a single motor neuron exhibit divergent synaptic properties on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Dawn M; Pritchard, Amy E; Latimer, John K; Wakefield, Andrew T

    2017-01-19

    Adaptive changes in the output of neural circuits underlying rhythmic behaviors are relayed to muscles via motor neuron activity. Pre- and postsynaptic properties of neuromuscular junctions can impact the transformation from motor neuron activity to muscle response. Further, synaptic plasticity occurring on the time scale of inter-spike intervals can differ between multiple muscles innervated by the same motor neuron. In rhythmic behaviors, motor neuron bursts can elicit additional synaptic plasticity. However, it is unknown if plasticity regulated by the longer time scale of inter-burst intervals also differs between synapses from the same neuron, and whether any such distinctions occur across a physiological activity range. To address these issues, we measured electrical responses in muscles innervated by a chewing circuit neuron, the lateral gastric (LG) motor neuron, in a well-characterized small motor system, the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) of the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis In vitro and in vivo, sensory, hormonal and modulatory inputs elicit LG bursting consisting of inter-spike intervals of 50-250 ms and inter-burst intervals of 2-24 s. Muscles expressed similar facilitation measured with paired stimuli except at the shortest inter-spike interval. However distinct decay time constants resulted in differences in temporal summation. In response to bursting activity, augmentation occurred to different extents and saturated at different inter-burst intervals in the three muscles. Further, augmentation interacted with facilitation, resulting in distinct intra-burst facilitation between muscles. Thus, responses of multiple target muscles diverge across a physiological activity range due to distinct synaptic properties sensitive to multiple time scales.

  8. Modeling Multiple Time Scales during Glass Formation with Phase-Field Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Joel; Grant, Martin

    2011-04-29

    The dynamics of glass formation in monatomic and binary liquids are studied numerically using a microscopic field theory for the evolution of the time-averaged atomic number density. A stochastic framework combining phase-field crystal free energies and dynamic density functional theory is shown to successfully describe several aspects of glass formation over multiple time scales. Agreement with mode coupling theory is demonstrated for underdamped liquids at moderate supercoolings, and a rapidly growing dynamic correlation length is found to be associated with fragile behavior.

  9. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1987-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  10. Network structure of cerebral cortex shapes functional connectivity on multiple time scales

    PubMed Central

    Honey, Christopher J.; Kötter, Rolf; Breakspear, Michael; Sporns, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal dynamics unfolding within the cerebral cortex exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns even in the absence of external input. Here we use a computational approach in an attempt to relate these features of spontaneous cortical dynamics to the underlying anatomical connectivity. Simulating nonlinear neuronal dynamics on a network that captures the large-scale interregional connections of macaque neocortex, and applying information theoretic measures to identify functional networks, we find structure–function relations at multiple temporal scales. Functional networks recovered from long windows of neural activity (minutes) largely overlap with the underlying structural network. As a result, hubs in these long-run functional networks correspond to structural hubs. In contrast, significant fluctuations in functional topology are observed across the sequence of networks recovered from consecutive shorter (seconds) time windows. The functional centrality of individual nodes varies across time as interregional couplings shift. Furthermore, the transient couplings between brain regions are coordinated in a manner that reveals the existence of two anticorrelated clusters. These clusters are linked by prefrontal and parietal regions that are hub nodes in the underlying structural network. At an even faster time scale (hundreds of milliseconds) we detect individual episodes of interregional phase-locking and find that slow variations in the statistics of these transient episodes, contingent on the underlying anatomical structure, produce the transfer entropy functional connectivity and simulated blood oxygenation level-dependent correlation patterns observed on slower time scales. PMID:17548818

  11. Multiple time-scales and the developmental dynamics of social systems

    PubMed Central

    Flack, Jessica C.

    2012-01-01

    To build a theory of social complexity, we need to understand how aggregate social properties arise from individual interaction rules. Here, I review a body of work on the developmental dynamics of pigtailed macaque social organization and conflict management that provides insight into the mechanistic causes of multi-scale social systems. In this model system coarse-grained, statistical representations of collective dynamics are more predictive of the future state of the system than the constantly in-flux behavioural patterns at the individual level. The data suggest that individuals can perceive and use these representations for strategical decision-making. As an interaction history accumulates the coarse-grained representations consolidate. This constrains individual behaviour and provides the foundations for new levels of organization. The time-scales on which these representations change impact whether the consolidating higher-levels can be modified by individuals and collectively. The time-scales appear to be a function of the ‘coarseness’ of the representations and the character of the collective dynamics over which they are averages. The data suggest that an advantage of multiple timescales is that they allow social systems to balance tradeoffs between predictability and adaptability. I briefly discuss the implications of these findings for cognition, social niche construction and the evolution of new levels of organization in biological systems. PMID:22641819

  12. Sediment dynamics over multiple time scales in Dyke Marsh Preserve (Potomac River, VA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.; Walters, D.

    2010-12-01

    Tidal freshwater marshes are critical components of fluvial and estuarine ecosystems, yet sediment dynamics within them have not received as much attention as their saltwater counterparts. This study examines sedimentation in Dyke Marsh Preserve, located on the Potomac River (VA), focusing on understanding the spatial variability present over multiple time scales. Bimonthly sediment data were collected using ceramic tiles, and seasonal- and decadal-scale sedimentation was determined via 7Be (half-life 53.3 days) and 210Pb (half-life 22.3 years), respectively. Results were also compared to SET data collected by the National Park Service since 2006. Preliminary data indicate that sites at lower elevations have higher sedimentation rates, likely related to their close proximity to the sediment source. Mass accumulation rates generally decreased with increasing time scale, such that the seasonal rates were greater than the SET-derived accretion rates, which were in turn greater than the decadal-scale rates. However, the bimonthly rates were the lowest observed, probably because the sampling period (May-October 2010) did not include the main depositional period of the year, which would be integrated by the other techniques.

  13. BME Estimation of Residential Exposure to Ambient PM10 and Ozone at Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christakos, George; Jerrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Long-term human exposure to ambient pollutants can be an important contributing or etiologic factor of many chronic diseases. Spatiotemporal estimation (mapping) of long-term exposure at residential areas based on field observations recorded in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Quality System often suffer from missing data issues due to the scarce monitoring network across space and the inconsistent recording periods at different monitors. Objective We developed and compared two upscaling methods: UM1 (data aggregation followed by exposure estimation) and UM2 (exposure estimation followed by data aggregation) for the long-term PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) and ozone exposure estimations and applied them in multiple time scales to estimate PM and ozone exposures for the residential areas of the Health Effects of Air Pollution on Lupus (HEAPL) study. Method We used Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) analysis for the two upscaling methods. We performed spatiotemporal cross-validations at multiple time scales by UM1 and UM2 to assess the estimation accuracy across space and time. Results Compared with the kriging method, the integration of soft information by the BME method can effectively increase the estimation accuracy for both pollutants. The spatiotemporal distributions of estimation errors from UM1 and UM2 were similar. The cross-validation results indicated that UM2 is generally better than UM1 in exposure estimations at multiple time scales in terms of predictive accuracy and lack of bias. For yearly PM10 estimations, both approaches have comparable performance, but the implementation of UM1 is associated with much lower computation burden. Conclusion BME-based upscaling methods UM1 and UM2 can assimilate core and site-specific knowledge bases of different formats for long-term exposure estimation. This study shows that UM1 can perform reasonably well when the aggregation process does not alter the

  14. Multiple time scales of adaptation in the auditory system as revealed by human evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Grimm, Sabine; Slabu, Lavinia; Díaz-Santaella, Francisco; Escera, Carles

    2011-06-01

    Single neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the cat show faster adaptation time constants to short- than long-term stimulus history. This ability to encode the complex past auditory stimulation in multiple time scales would enable the auditory system to generate expectations of the incoming stimuli. Here, we tested whether large neural populations exhibit this ability as well, by recording human auditory evoked potentials (AEP) to pure tones in a sequence embedding short- and long-term aspects of stimulus history. Our results yielded dynamic amplitude modulations of the P2 AEP to stimulus repetition spanning from milliseconds to tens of seconds concurrently, as well as amplitude modulations of the mismatch negativity AEP to regularity violations. A simple linear model of expectancy accounting for both short- and long-term stimulus history described our results, paralleling the behavior of neurons in the primary auditory cortex.

  15. On simulating flow with multiple time scales using a method of averages

    SciTech Connect

    Margolin, L.G.

    1997-12-31

    The author presents a new computational method based on averaging to efficiently simulate certain systems with multiple time scales. He first develops the method in a simple one-dimensional setting and employs linear stability analysis to demonstrate numerical stability. He then extends the method to multidimensional fluid flow. His method of averages does not depend on explicit splitting of the equations nor on modal decomposition. Rather he combines low order and high order algorithms in a generalized predictor-corrector framework. He illustrates the methodology in the context of a shallow fluid approximation to an ocean basin circulation. He finds that his new method reproduces the accuracy of a fully explicit second-order accurate scheme, while costing less than a first-order accurate scheme.

  16. The method of variation of constants and multiple time scales in orbital mechanics.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I; Efroimsky, Michael

    2003-06-01

    The method of variation of constants is an important tool used to solve systems of ordinary differential equations, and was invented by Euler and Lagrange to solve a problem in orbital mechanics. This methodology assumes that certain "constants" associated with a homogeneous problem will vary in time in response to an external force. It also introduces one or more constraint equations. We show that these constraints can be generalized in analogy to gauge theories in physics, and that different constraints can offer conceptual advances and methodological benefits to the solution of the underlying problem. Examples are given from linear ordinary differential equation theory and from orbital mechanics. However, a slow driving force in the presence of multiple time scales contained in the underlying (homogeneous) problem nevertheless requires special care, and this has strong implications to the analytic and numerical solutions of problems ranging from celestial mechanics to molecular dynamics. (c) 2003 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Turbulence intermittency in a multiple-time-scale Navier-Stokes-based reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-07-01

    Intermittency of small-scale motions is an ubiquitous facet of turbulent flows, and predicting this phenomenon based on reduced models derived from first principles remains an important open problem. Here, a multiple-time-scale stochastic model is introduced for the Lagrangian evolution of the full velocity gradient tensor in fluid turbulence at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers. Unlike previous phenomenological models of intermittency, in the proposed model the dynamics driving the growth of intermittency due to gradient self-stretching and rotation are derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations. Numerical solutions of the resulting set of stochastic differential equations show that the model predicts anomalous scaling for moments of the velocity gradient components and negative derivative skewness. It also predicts signature topological features of the velocity gradient tensor such as vorticity alignment trends with the eigen directions of the strain rate.

  18. Low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model and calculations of steady and pulsating shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1992-01-01

    A low Reynolds number multiple-time-scale turbulence model (LMS) and its application to fully developed turbulent channel flows and pulsating pipe flows are presented. The LMS can describe the inequilibrium turbulence phenomena down to the viscous sublayer. The calculated fluid flow and turbulence fields for the channel flows are in better agreement with the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results than those obtained using a Reynolds stress turbulence model, and the calculated near-wall dissipation rates are in qualitatively correct agreement with the DNS results. The LMS also successfully predicts the rapidly varying phase-lead of the wall shearing stress that occurs in a narrow range of the dimensionless frequency omega (+) = (omega x nu)/(upsilon x tau(exp2)) for the pulsating pipe flows while various other turbulence models fail to predict this phenomenon, and the LMS yields significantly improved numerical results for a wide range of the dimensionless frequency compared with those obtained using a rapid distortion theory (RDT).

  19. Multiple time scales and pressure forcing in discontinuous Galerkin approximations to layered ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, Robert L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses some issues involving the application of discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods to ocean circulation models having a generalized vertical coordinate. These issues include the following. (1) Determine the pressure forcing at cell edges, where the dependent variables can be discontinuous. In principle, this could be accomplished by solving a Riemann problem for the full system, but some ideas related to barotropic-baroclinic time splitting can be used to reduce the Riemann problem to a much simpler system of lower dimension. Such splittings were originally developed in order to address the multiple time scales that are present in the system. (2) Adapt the general idea of barotropic-baroclinic splitting to a DG implementation. A significant step is enforcing consistency between the numerical solution of the layer equations and the numerical solution of the vertically-integrated barotropic equations. The method used here has the effect of introducing a type of time filtering into the forcing for the layer equations, which are solved with a long time step. (3) Test these ideas in a model problem involving geostrophic adjustment in a multi-layer fluid. In certain situations, the DG formulation can give significantly better results than those obtained with a standard finite difference formulation.

  20. A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model and grid independence study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A two-layer multiple-time-scale turbulence model is presented. The near-wall model is based on the classical Kolmogorov-Prandtl turbulence hypothesis and the semi-empirical logarithmic law of the wall. In the two-layer model presented, the computational domain of the conservation of mass equation and the mean momentum equation penetrated up to the wall, where no slip boundary condition has been prescribed; and the near wall boundary of the turbulence equations has been located at the fully turbulent region, yet very close to the wall, where the standard wall function method has been applied. Thus, the conservation of mass constraint can be satisfied more rigorously in the two-layer model than in the standard wall function method. In most of the two-layer turbulence models, the number of grid points to be used inside the near-wall layer posed the issue of computational efficiency. The present finite element computational results showed that the grid independent solutions were obtained with as small as two grid points, i.e., one quadratic element, inside the near wall layer. Comparison of the computational results obtained by using the two-layer model and those obtained by using the wall function method is also presented.

  1. Numerical investigation of separated transonic turbulent flows with a multiple-time-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical investigation of transonic turbulent flows separated by curvature and shock wave - boundary layer interaction is presented. The free stream Mach numbers considered are 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.825, 0.85, 0.875, 0.90, and 0.925. In the numerical method, the conservation of mass equation is replaced by a pressure correction equation for compressible flows and thus incremental pressure is solved for instead of density. The turbulence is described by a multiple-time-scale turbulence model supplemented with a near-wall turbulence model. The present numerical results show that there exists a reversed flow region at all free stream Mach numbers considered whereas various k-epsilon turbulence models fail to predict such a reversed flow region at low free stream Mach numbers. The numerical results also show that the size of the reversed flow region grows extensively due to the shock wave - turbulent boundary layer interaction as the free stream Mach number is increased. These numerical results show that the turbulence model can resolve the turbulence field subjected to extra strains caused by the curvature and the shock wave - turbulent boundary layer interaction and that the numerical method yields a significantly accurate solution for the complex compressible turbulent flow.

  2. The multiple time scales of sleep dynamics as a challenge for modelling the sleeping brain.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Claussen, Jens Christian; Achermann, Peter

    2011-10-13

    A particular property of the sleeping brain is that it exhibits dynamics on very different time scales ranging from the typical sleep oscillations such as sleep spindles and slow waves that can be observed in electroencephalogram (EEG) segments of several seconds duration over the transitions between the different sleep stages on a time scale of minutes to the dynamical processes involved in sleep regulation with typical time constants in the range of hours. There is an increasing body of work on mathematical and computational models addressing these different dynamics, however, usually considering only processes on a single time scale. In this paper, we review and present a new analysis of the dynamics of human sleep EEG at the different time scales and relate the findings to recent modelling efforts pointing out both the achievements and remaining challenges.

  3. Analysis of characteristics of multiple time scale drought based on SPEI in the east of northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhilan; Li, Yaohui; Wang, Suping

    2017-04-01

    From characteristics of multiple time scale of drought, the Standardized Precipitation Evaportranspiration Index (SPEI) considering precipitation and temperature are calculated using CRU update data, and the characteristics of drought at different time scales from 1901 to 2012 in the east of northwest China have been investigated. In this paper, reliability for hundred years of the CRU data has been tested, and the adaptability of SPEI in study area has been discussed. The result shows that, the SPEI is confirmed to be applicable to analyze the drought in the east of northwest China from drought intensity and range. The time scale of SPEI is shorter, the fluctuation is more frequent, and the change is more significantly. The amplitude, period and phase of SPEI curve with different time scales are not the same. Short time scale mainly shows seasonal characteristics, and long time scale shows interannual and decadal characteristics. The study area is divided into the eastern of the Plateau area and the southern of Shaanxi area. There are three times extreme drought events in 48 months time scale of the SPEI index of less than -2.0 in the eastern of the Plateau area from 1901 to 2012, and only one time in the southern of Shaanxi area. Finally, the contribution of temperature anomaly to the drought is analyzed. The result indicates that high temperature contribution cannot be neglected by comparison with the SPI index.

  4. Network Events on Multiple Space and Time Scales in Cultured Neural Networks and in a Stochastic Rate Model.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Guido; Deco, Gustavo; Marom, Shimon; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Cortical networks, in-vitro as well as in-vivo, can spontaneously generate a variety of collective dynamical events such as network spikes, UP and DOWN states, global oscillations, and avalanches. Though each of them has been variously recognized in previous works as expression of the excitability of the cortical tissue and the associated nonlinear dynamics, a unified picture of the determinant factors (dynamical and architectural) is desirable and not yet available. Progress has also been partially hindered by the use of a variety of statistical measures to define the network events of interest. We propose here a common probabilistic definition of network events that, applied to the firing activity of cultured neural networks, highlights the co-occurrence of network spikes, power-law distributed avalanches, and exponentially distributed 'quasi-orbits', which offer a third type of collective behavior. A rate model, including synaptic excitation and inhibition with no imposed topology, synaptic short-term depression, and finite-size noise, accounts for all these different, coexisting phenomena. We find that their emergence is largely regulated by the proximity to an oscillatory instability of the dynamics, where the non-linear excitable behavior leads to a self-amplification of activity fluctuations over a wide range of scales in space and time. In this sense, the cultured network dynamics is compatible with an excitation-inhibition balance corresponding to a slightly sub-critical regime. Finally, we propose and test a method to infer the characteristic time of the fatigue process, from the observed time course of the network's firing rate. Unlike the model, possessing a single fatigue mechanism, the cultured network appears to show multiple time scales, signalling the possible coexistence of different fatigue mechanisms.

  5. Network Events on Multiple Space and Time Scales in Cultured Neural Networks and in a Stochastic Rate Model

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Guido; Deco, Gustavo; Marom, Shimon; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cortical networks, in-vitro as well as in-vivo, can spontaneously generate a variety of collective dynamical events such as network spikes, UP and DOWN states, global oscillations, and avalanches. Though each of them has been variously recognized in previous works as expression of the excitability of the cortical tissue and the associated nonlinear dynamics, a unified picture of the determinant factors (dynamical and architectural) is desirable and not yet available. Progress has also been partially hindered by the use of a variety of statistical measures to define the network events of interest. We propose here a common probabilistic definition of network events that, applied to the firing activity of cultured neural networks, highlights the co-occurrence of network spikes, power-law distributed avalanches, and exponentially distributed ‘quasi-orbits’, which offer a third type of collective behavior. A rate model, including synaptic excitation and inhibition with no imposed topology, synaptic short-term depression, and finite-size noise, accounts for all these different, coexisting phenomena. We find that their emergence is largely regulated by the proximity to an oscillatory instability of the dynamics, where the non-linear excitable behavior leads to a self-amplification of activity fluctuations over a wide range of scales in space and time. In this sense, the cultured network dynamics is compatible with an excitation-inhibition balance corresponding to a slightly sub-critical regime. Finally, we propose and test a method to infer the characteristic time of the fatigue process, from the observed time course of the network’s firing rate. Unlike the model, possessing a single fatigue mechanism, the cultured network appears to show multiple time scales, signalling the possible coexistence of different fatigue mechanisms. PMID:26558616

  6. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems is considered. The controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  7. Modeling Self-Regulation as a Process Using a Multiple Time-Scale Multiphase Latent Basis Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Jonathan Lee; Ram, Nilam; Cole, Pamela M.; Chow, Sy-Miin

    2016-01-01

    Measurement burst designs, wherein individuals are measured intensively during multiple periods (i.e., ‘bursts’), have created new opportunities for studying change at multiple time-scales. This paper develops a model that may be useful in situations where the functional form of short-term change is unknown, may consist of multiple phases, and may change over the long-term. Specifically, we combine measurement of intraindividual entropy, a latent basis growth model, a multiphase growth model, and a growth model with covariates into a unified framework that may help accommodate the complexity of patterns that emerge in multiple time-scale categorical data streams. Empirical data from a longitudinal study of young children's behavior during laboratory tasks designed to induce frustration are used to illustrate the utility of the proposed model for simultaneously describing intratask (short-term) change in self-regulation and developmental (long-term) shifts in intratask change. PMID:28255223

  8. Relative time scales reveal multiple origins of parallel disjunct distributions of African caecilian amphibians.

    PubMed

    Loader, Simon P; Pisani, Davide; Cotton, James A; Gower, David J; Day, Julia J; Wilkinson, Mark

    2007-10-22

    Parallel patterns of distribution in different lineages suggest a common cause. Explanations in terms of a single biogeographic event often imply contemporaneous diversifications. Phylogenies with absolute time scales provide the most obvious means of testing temporal components of biogeographic hypotheses but, in their absence, the sequence of diversification events and whether any could have been contemporaneous can be tested with relative date estimates. Tests using relative time scales have been largely overlooked, but because they do not require the calibration upon which absolute time scales depend, they make a large amount of existing molecular data of use to historical biogeography and may also be helpful when calibration is possible but uncertain. We illustrate the use of relative dating by testing the hypothesis that parallel, disjunct east/west distributions in three independent lineages of African caecilians have a common cause. We demonstrate that at least two biogeographic events are implied by molecular data. Relative dating analysis reveals the potential complexity of causes of parallel distributions and cautions against inferring common cause from common spatial patterns without considering the temporal dimension.

  9. Cerebral Hemodynamics in Asphyxiated Newborns Undergoing Hypothermia Therapy: Pilot Findings Using a Multiple-Time-Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chalak, Lina F; Tian, Fenghua; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Background Improved quantitative assessment of cerebral hemodynamics in newborns might enable us to optimize cerebral perfusion. Our objective was to develop an approach to assess cerebral hemodynamics across multiple time scales during the first 72 hours of life in newborns during hypothermia therapy. Methods Spontaneous oscillations in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and regional cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) were analyzed using a moving window correlation (MWC) method with time scales ranging from 0.15 to 8 hours in this pilot methodology study. Abnormal neurodevelopmental outcome was defined by Bayley III scores and/or cerebral palsy by 24 months of age using receiver operating curve (ROC). Results Multiple-time-scale correlations between MAP and SctO2 oscillations were tested in 10 asphyxiated newborns undergoing hypothermia therapy. Large non induced fluctuations in the blood pressure were observed during cooling in all five infants with abnormal outcomes. Notably, these infants had two distinct patterns of correlation: a positive in-phase correlation at the short time scales (15 min), and/or a negative anti-phase correlations observed at long time scales (4 hrs.). Both the in-phase (AUC 0.6, [95% CI 0.2–0.95]) and anti-phase correlations (AUC 0.75, [95% CI 0.4–0.95]) appeared to be related to an abnormal outcome. Conclusions Our observations suggest that the time scale is an important factor that needs to be standardized in the assessment of neonatal cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:26858217

  10. [Multiple time scales analysis of spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss within watershed].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-bing; Chen, Xing-wei; Chen, Ying

    2015-07-01

    Identification of the critical source areas of non-point source pollution is an important means to control the non-point source pollution within the watershed. In order to further reveal the impact of multiple time scales on the spatial differentiation characteristics of non-point source nitrogen loss, a SWAT model of Shanmei Reservoir watershed was developed. Based on the simulation of total nitrogen (TN) loss intensity of all 38 subbasins, spatial distribution characteristics of nitrogen loss and critical source areas were analyzed at three time scales of yearly average, monthly average and rainstorms flood process, respectively. Furthermore, multiple linear correlation analysis was conducted to analyze the contribution of natural environment and anthropogenic disturbance on nitrogen loss. The results showed that there were significant spatial differences of TN loss in Shanmei Reservoir watershed at different time scales, and the spatial differentiation degree of nitrogen loss was in the order of monthly average > yearly average > rainstorms flood process. TN loss load mainly came from upland Taoxi subbasin, which was identified as the critical source area. At different time scales, land use types (such as farmland and forest) were always the dominant factor affecting the spatial distribution of nitrogen loss, while the effect of precipitation and runoff on the nitrogen loss was only taken in no fertilization month and several processes of storm flood at no fertilization date. This was mainly due to the significant spatial variation of land use and fertilization, as well as the low spatial variability of precipitation and runoff.

  11. Using Atmospheric River Observations to Improve Integrated Water Management Across Multiple Space and Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, California has invested in emerging technologies to observe and track the landfall and evolution of atmospheric river events. The number of events, size, duration, location of landfall, and character of each event play key roles in water management over a range of space and time scales. In a changing climate, it is expected that the improtance of managing the water originating from atmospheric river events will increase. Some evidence of this expectation has been observed over the past three years with the ongoing Calfiornia drought. To that end, additional observation investments are being considered and a range of projects are in progress to develop applications to relate the atmospheric river observations into water management program activity. Applications range from local storm-water management to watershed and statewide storage and conveyance planning and operations. Time scales range from event evolution to water year and beyond outlooks. In this presentation, select atmospheric river events from the past three years are used to highlight the new observations and connect those observations to water management activities. Observation gaps and areas of need in the research arena will be identified.

  12. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible

  13. Characteristics of 20th Century Drought in the United States at Multiple Time Scales.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    John Steinbeck , from his Pulitzer Prize winning The Grapes of Wrath Drought may be the most devastating, yet least understood of all weather phenomena...He is also grateful to have had Dr. William Gray and Dr. Paul Mielke as members of his graduate committee. Daniel is indebted to John Kleist for his...8217thing so a man didn ’t get enough crop to plug up an ant’s ass. -Muley the preacher, from Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath For

  14. Mastering Uncertainty and Risk at Multiple Time Scales in the Future Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Bent, Russell W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2012-07-10

    Today's electrical grids enjoy a relatively clean separation of spatio-temporal scales yielding a compartmentalization of grid design, optimization, control and risk assessment allowing for the use of conventional mathematical tools within each area. In contrast, the future grid will incorporate time-intermittent renewable generation, operate via faster electrical markets, and tap the latent control capability at finer grid modeling scales; creating a fundamentally new set of couplings across spatiotemporal scales and requiring revolutionary advances in mathematics techniques to bridge these scales. One example is found in decade-scale grid expansion planning in which today's algorithms assume accurate load forecasts and well-controlled generation. Incorporating intermittent renewable generation creates fluctuating network flows at the hourly time scale, inherently linking the ability of a transmission line to deliver electrical power to hourly operational decisions. New operations-based planning algorithms are required, creating new mathematical challenges. Spatio-temporal scales are also crossed when the future grid's minute-scale fluctuations in network flows (due to intermittent generation) create a disordered state upon which second-scale transient grid dynamics propagate effectively invalidating today's on-line dynamic stability analyses. Addressing this challenge requires new on-line algorithms that use large data streams from new grid sensing technologies to physically aggregate across many spatial scales to create responsive, data-driven dynamic models. Here, we sketch the mathematical foundations of these problems and potential solutions.

  15. Evaluation of a WRF simulation over South Eastern Australia at multiple time scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jason

    2010-05-01

    The climate of the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) has been simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF was implemented using a 10km horizontal grid and integrated for 24 years from 1985 through 2008. The model simulated climate was evaluated against gridded precipitation and temperature observations from the Australian Water Availability Project (AWAP) and found to perform adequately at time scales ranging from daily to multi-year. WRF is able to reproduce daily and seasonal statistics well. It is able to capture the recent drought well for the basin except for an overestimation of the negative anomaly in the northernmost part of the domain. Examining ENSO cycles showed WRF has good skill at capturing the correct spatial distribution of precipitation anomalies associated with El Nino/La Nina events during this 24 year period. This high resolution simulation allows investigation of land - atmosphere coupling within the basin including identification of the dominant water vapour source regions for events and seasons, and quantification of the precipitation recycling.

  16. Analysis of Wind Power and Load Data at Multiple Time Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Katie; Eto, J.H.

    2010-12-20

    In this study we develop and apply new methods of data analysis for high resolution wind power and system load time series, to improve our understanding of how to characterize highly variable wind power output and the correlations between wind power and load. These methods are applied to wind and load data from the ERCOT region, and wind power output from the PJM and NYISO areas. We use a wavelet transform to apply mathematically well-defined operations of smoothing and differencing to the time series data. This approach produces a set of time series of the changes in wind power and load (or ?deltas?), over a range of times scales from a few seconds to approximately one hour. A number of statistical measures of these time series are calculated. We present sample distributions, and devise a method for fitting the empirical distribution shape in the tails. We also evaluate the degree of serial correlation, and linear correlation between wind and load. Our examination of the data shows clearly that the deltas do not follow a Gaussian shape; the distribution is exponential near the center and appears to follow a power law for larger fluctuations. Gaussian distributions are frequently used in modeling studies. These are likely to over-estimate the probability of small to moderate deviations. This in turn may lead to an over-estimation of the additional reserve requirement (hence the cost) for high penetration of wind. The Gaussian assumption provides no meaningful information about the real likelihood of large fluctuations. The possibility of a power law distribution is interesting because it suggests that the distribution shape for of wind power fluctuations may become independent of system size for large enough systems.

  17. Altered precipitation regime affects the function and composition of soil microbial communities on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, L H; Bottomley, P J; Jumpponen, A; Rice, C W; Arango, M; Lindsley, A; McGowan, A; Mfombep, P; Myrold, D D

    2013-10-01

    -up and between seasons and treatments. Overall, microbial activity may directly (C respiration) and indirectly (enzyme potential) reduce soil organic matter pools less in drier soils, and soil C sequestration potential (CUE) may be higher in soils with a history of extended dry periods between rainfall events. The implications include that soil C loss may be reduced or compensated for via different mechanisms at varying time scales, and that microbial taxa with better stress tolerance or growth efficiency may be associated with these functional shifts.

  18. Evaluating the status of individuals and populations: advantages of multiple approaches and time scales: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monson, Daniel H.; Bowen, Lizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Overall, a variety of indices used to measure population status throughout the sea otter’s range have provided insights for understanding the mechanisms driving the trajectory of various sea otter populations, which a single index could not, and we suggest using multiple methods to measure a population’s status at multiple spatial and temporal scales. The work described here also illustrates the usefulness of long-term data sets and/or approaches that can be used to assess population status retrospectively, providing information otherwise not available. While not all systems will be as amenable to using all the approaches presented here, we expect innovative researchers could adapt analogous multi-scale methods to a broad range of habitats and species including apex predators occupying the top trophic levels, which are often of conservation concern.

  19. Release of a single neurotransmitter from an identified interneuron coherently affects motor output on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Andrew M; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2013-05-01

    Neurotransmitters can have diverse effects that occur over multiple time scales often making the consequences of neurotransmission difficult to predict. To explore the consequences of this diversity, we used the buccal ganglion of Aplysia to examine the effects of GABA release by a single interneuron, B40, on the intrinsic properties and motor output of the radula closure neuron B8. B40 induces a picrotoxin-sensitive fast IPSP lasting milliseconds in B8 and a slow EPSP lasting seconds. We found that the excitatory effects of this slow EPSP are also mediated by GABA. Together, these two GABAergic actions structure B8 firing in a pattern characteristic of ingestive programs. Furthermore, we found that repeated B40 stimulation induces a persistent increase in B8 excitability that was occluded in the presence of the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen, suggesting that GABA affects B8 excitability over multiple time scales. The phasing of B8 activity during the feeding motor programs determines the nature of the behavior elicited during that motor program. The persistent increase in B8 excitability induced by B40 biased the activity of B8 during feeding motor programs causing the motor programs to become more ingestive in nature. Thus, a single transmitter released from a single interneuron can have consequences for motor output that are expressed over multiple time scales. Importantly, despite the differences in their signs and temporal characteristics, the three actions of B40 are coherent in that they promote B8 firing patterns that are characteristic of ingestive motor outputs.

  20. Priming of pop-out on multiple time scales during visual search.

    PubMed

    Brascamp, Jan W; Pels, Elmar; Kristjánsson, Arni

    2011-09-01

    When target-color repeats in pop-out visual search performance is faster than otherwise. While various characteristics of such priming of pop-out (PoP) are well known, relatively little is known about the temporal character of the memory traces underlying the effect. Recent findings on the perception of ambiguous stimuli show that the percept at any given moment is affected by perception over a long period, as well as by immediately preceding percepts. Intrigued by the existence of various parallels between this perceptual priming phenomenon and PoP, we here investigate whether similar multiplicity in timescales is seen for PoP. We contrasted long-term PoP build-up of a particular target color against shorter-term build-up for a different color. The priming effects from the two colors indeed reflect memory traces at different timescales: long-term priming build-up results in a more gradual decay than brief buildup, which is followed by faster decay. This is clearly demonstrated in Experiment 2 where sustained repetition of one target color is followed by a few repetitions of a second color. Following such a sequence, priming is initially stronger for the second target color, which was primed most recently; however, as more time passes longer-term priming starts to dominate, resulting in better search performance for the first color later on. Our results suggest that priming effects in visual search contain both transient and more sustained components. Similarities between the time courses of attentional priming and perception of ambiguous stimuli are striking and suggest compelling avenues of further research into the relation between the two effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  2. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  3. Climate-Related Flood and Sediment Transport From the Paria River to Grand Canyon: The Role of Multiple Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S.; Pulwarty, R. S.; Topping, D. J.; Melis, T. S.

    2004-12-01

    Since the 1963 closure of Glen Canyon Dam, the sole major supplier of sand to the Colorado River in the upper portion of Grand Canyon is the Paria River, which supplies about 6% of the pre-dam supply of sand at the upstream boundary of Grand Canyon National Park. Sand is delivered by the Paria River during short-duration (< 24 hours), large magnitude (up to 300 m3s-1) floods that occur primarily during the warm season (July-October). The planning and decision processes in the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (AMP) strive to balance numerous, often competing, objectives, such as, water supply, hydropower generation, low flow maintenance, maximizing conservation of the tributary supplied sediment, endangered species recovery, and cultural resources. In this work, we focus on a key concern identified by the AMP, related to the timing and volume of sediment input into Grand Canyon. Adequate sediment inputs into the Canyon combined with active management of the timed releases from Glen Canyon Dam support the restoration and maintenance of sandbars and instream ecology. For the Paria River, we relate the climatic drivers of episodic to interdecadal variations to the observed changes in the flood magnitude, timing and spatial scales as they affect the sediment inputs to the Colorado River. Variability in regional precipitation distribution on multiple time scales is diagnosed with emphasis on understanding the relative role of East Pacific tropical storms, North Pacific sea surface temperatures, and subtropical moisture sources. Better understanding of the coupled climate-hydrologic variations on multiple time scales is increasingly recognized as critical input for adaptive management (both passive and active). In collaboration with the AMP, this work deliberately identifies the entry-points for predictive hydroclimatic information at appropriate lead times. From the standpoint of this active adaptive management program, lead climate information allows

  4. Climatic and human impacts on quasi-periodic and abrupt changes of sedimentation rate at multiple time scales in Lake Taihu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiyu; Xu, Xiaojuan; Lin, Zhenshan; Zhang, Mingyang; Mi, Ying; Huang, Changchun; Yang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    With the ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition Method (EEMD) and the non-parametric Mann-Kendall Test, the quasi-periodic and abrupt changes of sedimentation rate at multiple time scales, and their relations to climate changes and human activities from 1951 to 2010 in Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu (China) were studied. The results showed the following. (1) The change in sedimentation rate can be completely decomposed into three quasi-periodic changes on 3.7, 6.4, and 24-yr time scales, and a long-term trend. (2) The quasi-periodic changes in sedimentation rate are significantly and positively related to changes in annual average temperature at 6.4 and 24-yr time scales and human activities at 3.7-yr time scales, and not significantly related to precipitation at these time scales. The trend of sedimentation rate has a negative relation with temperature, but positive relations with precipitation and human activities. As a whole, the total variance contribution of climate changes to the quasi-periodic changes of sedimentation rate is close to that of human activities; (3) Temperature and precipitation are possibly related to the abrupt change of sedimentation rate as a whole. Floods have significant impacts on abrupt changes in the sedimentation rate at 3.7, 6.4 and 24-yr time scales. Moreover, some abrupt changes of sedimentation rate at 3.7- and 6.4-yr time scales are partly related to the changes of precipitation at 3.1-yr time scale and temperature at 5-yr time scale. The results of this study will help identify the impacts of climate change and human activities on lake sedimentation at different time scales, and will be available for use as a guide for reasonable development and effective protection of lake resources.

  5. Examining the Interplay of Processes Across Multiple Time-Scales: Illustration With the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health, and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB)

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Lorek, Amy; Rebar, Amanda; Roche, Michael J.; Coccia, Michael; Morack, Jennifer; Feldman, Josh; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Human development is characterized by the complex interplay of processes that manifest at multiple levels of analysis and time-scales. We introduce the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB) as a model for how multiple time-scale study designs facilitate more precise articulation of developmental theory. Combining age heterogeneity, longitudinal panel, daily diary, and experience sampling protocols, the study made use of smartphone and web-based technologies to obtain intensive longitudinal data from 150 persons age 18–89 years as they completed three 21-day measurement bursts (t = 426 bursts, t = 8,557 days) wherein they provided reports on their social interactions (t = 64,112) as they went about their daily lives. We illustrate how multiple time-scales of data can be used to articulate bioecological models of development and the interplay among more ‘distal’ processes that manifest at ‘slower’ time-scales (e.g., age-related differences and burst-to-burst changes in mental health) and more ‘proximal’ processes that manifest at ‘faster’ time-scales (e.g., changes in context that progress in accordance with the weekly calendar and family influence processes). PMID:26989350

  6. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method. [with application to F-8 aircraft longitudinal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems. It is proved that the controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  7. Linear regulator design for stochastic systems by a multiple time scales method. [with application to F-8 aircraft longitudinal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teneketzis, D.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This paper develops a hierarchically-structured, suboptimal controller for a linear stochastic system composed of fast and slow subsystems. It is proved that the controller is optimal in the limit as the separation of time scales of the subsystems becomes infinite. The methodology is illustrated by design of a controller to suppress the phugoid and short period modes of the longitudinal dynamics of the F-8 aircraft.

  8. Life in the Frequency Domain: the Biological Impacts of Changes in Climate Variability at Multiple Time Scales.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Woods, H Arthur; Wang, George; Fey, Samuel B; Vasseur, David A; Telemeco, Rory S; Marshall, Katie; Pincebourde, Sylvain

    2016-07-01

    Over the last few decades, biologists have made substantial progress in understanding relationships between changing climates and organism performance. Much of this work has focused on temperature because it is the best kept of climatic records, in many locations it is predicted to keep rising into the future, and it has profound effects on the physiology, performance, and ecology of organisms, especially ectothermic organisms which make up the vast majority of life on Earth. Nevertheless, much of the existing literature on temperature-organism interactions relies on mean temperatures. In reality, most organisms do not directly experience mean temperatures; rather, they experience variation in temperature over many time scales, from seconds to years. We propose to shift the focus more directly on patterns of temperature variation, rather than on means per se, and present a framework both for analyzing temporal patterns of temperature variation and for incorporating those patterns into predictions about organismal biology. In particular, we advocate using the Fourier transform to decompose temperature time series into their component sinusoids, thus allowing transformations between the time and frequency domains. This approach provides (1) standardized ways of visualizing the contributions that different frequencies make to total temporal variation; (2) the ability to assess how patterns of temperature variation have changed over the past half century and may change into the future; and (3) clear approaches to manipulating temporal time series to ask "what if" questions about the potential effects of future climates. We first summarize global patterns of change in temperature variation over the past 40 years; we find meaningful changes in variation at the half day to yearly times scales. We then demonstrate the utility of the Fourier framework by exploring how power added to different frequencies alters the overall incidence of long-term waves of high and low

  9. Climate impact of beef: an analysis considering multiple time scales and production methods without use of global warming potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Eshel, G.

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of the climate impact of various forms of beef production is carried out, with a particular eye to the comparison between systems relying primarily on grasses grown in pasture (‘grass-fed’ or ‘pastured’ beef) and systems involving substantial use of manufactured feed requiring significant external inputs in the form of synthetic fertilizer and mechanized agriculture (‘feedlot’ beef). The climate impact is evaluated without employing metrics such as {{CO}}2{{e}} or global warming potentials. The analysis evaluates the impact at all time scales out to 1000 years. It is concluded that certain forms of pastured beef production have substantially lower climate impact than feedlot systems. However, pastured systems that require significant synthetic fertilization, inputs from supplemental feed, or deforestation to create pasture, have substantially greater climate impact at all time scales than the feedlot and dairy-associated systems analyzed. Even the best pastured system analyzed has enough climate impact to justify efforts to limit future growth of beef production, which in any event would be necessary if climate and other ecological concerns were met by a transition to primarily pasture-based systems. Alternate mitigation options are discussed, but barring unforseen technological breakthroughs worldwide consumption at current North American per capita rates appears incompatible with a 2 °C warming target.

  10. Decoupling between bacterial production and primary production over multiple time scales in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, Donn A.; Church, Matthew J.

    2017-03-01

    We measured rates of 3H-leucine (3H-Leu) incorporation, as a proxy for bacterial production, at Station ALOHA (22°45‧N, 158°W) in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG). We report measurements conducted between January 2011 and April 2013, examining variability in 3H-Leu incorporation over diel, daily, and monthly time scales. Rates of 3H-Leu were evaluated in the context of contemporaneous 14C-based primary productivity (14C-PP) to identify potential temporal coupling between these measures of productivity. Throughout the upper ocean (0-125 m), rates of 3H-Leu incorporation measured in the light (3H-LeuLight) were stimulated (1.5-fold, on average) relative to measurements in the dark (3H-LeuDark). At monthly scales, rates of 3H-LeuLight and 3H-LeuDark varied 4.9-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, while rates of 14C-PP varied 1.7-fold. Rates of 14C-PP were often elevated during summer months (May through August) when incident light flux was greatest, while rates of both 3H-LeuLight and 3H-LeuDark often peaked in early fall (August through October) when seawater temperatures were maximal. Near-daily measurements of 3H-Leu incorporation and 14C-PP conducted over a 62-day period in the summer of 2012 revealed that rates of 3H-LeuLight and 3H-LeuDark varied 2.5 and 2.0-fold, respectively, similar to 1.8-fold daily variability observed in rates of 14C-PP. Over diel time scales, rates of 3H-LeuLight and 3H-LeuDark demonstrated different patterns, with rates of 3H-LeuLight elevated at mid-day and rates of 3H-LeuDark greatest in the early evening. Together, these results suggest that in this oligotrophic ecosystem, photosynthetic production of organic matter and bacterial production can be temporally uncoupled across daily to seasonal scales.

  11. Precipitation Analysis at Fine Time Scales Using Multiple Satellites: Real-time and Research Products and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Curtis, Scott; Pierce, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-global precipitation analyses at fine time scales (3-hr) are described. TRMM observations (radar and passive microwave) are used to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I (and other satellites instruments, including AMSR and AMSU) and geosynchronous IR observations. The individual data sets are then merged using a priority order based on quality to form the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA). Raingauge information is used to help constrain the satellite-based estimates over land. The TRMM standard research product (Version 6 3B-42 of the TRMM products) will be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998-present) in 2004. The real-time version of this merged product has been produced over the past two years and is available on the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov) at 0.25" latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 5O"N-5O0S. Validation of daily totals indicates good results, with limitations noted in mid-latitude winter over land and regions of shallow, orographic precipitation. Various applications of these estimates are described, including: 1) detecting potential floods in near real-time; 2) analyzing Indian Ocean precipitation variations related to the initiation of El Nino; 3) determining characteristics of the African monsoon; and 4) analysis of diurnal variations.

  12. Precipitation Analysis at Fine Time Scales Using Multiple Satellites: Real-time and Research Products and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert; Huffman, George; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Curtis, Scott; Pierce, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Quasi-global precipitation analyses at fine time scales (3-hr) are described. TRMM observations (radar and passive microwave) are used to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I (and other satellites instruments, including AMSR and AMSU) and geosynchronous IR observations. The individual data sets are then merged using a priority order based on quality to form the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA). Raingauge information is used to help constrain the satellite-based estimates over land. The TRMM standard research product (Version 6 3B-42 of the TRMM products) will be available for the entire TRMM period (January 1998-present) in 2004. The real-time version of this merged product has been produced over the past two years and is available on the U.S. TRMM web site (trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov) at 0.25" latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 5O"N-5O0S. Validation of daily totals indicates good results, with limitations noted in mid-latitude winter over land and regions of shallow, orographic precipitation. Various applications of these estimates are described, including: 1) detecting potential floods in near real-time; 2) analyzing Indian Ocean precipitation variations related to the initiation of El Nino; 3) determining characteristics of the African monsoon; and 4) analysis of diurnal variations.

  13. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  14. Multiple length and time scales of dynamic heterogeneities in model glass-forming liquids: a systematic analysis of multi-point and multi-time correlations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang; Saito, Shinji

    2013-03-28

    We report an extensive and systematic investigation of the multi-point and multi-time correlation functions to reveal the spatio-temporal structures of dynamic heterogeneities in glass-forming liquids. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for the supercooled states of various prototype models of glass-forming liquids such as binary Kob-Andersen, Wahnström, soft-sphere, and network-forming liquids. While the first three models act as fragile liquids exhibiting super-Arrhenius temperature dependence in their relaxation times, the last is a strong glass-former exhibiting Arrhenius behavior. First, we quantify the length scale of the dynamic heterogeneities utilizing the four-point correlation function. The growth of the dynamic length scale with decreasing temperature is characterized by various scaling relations that are analogous to the critical phenomena. We also examine how the growth of the length scale depends upon the model employed. Second, the four-point correlation function is extended to a three-time correlation function to characterize the temporal structures of the dynamic heterogeneities based on our previous studies [K. Kim and S. Saito, Phys. Rev. E 79, 060501(R) (2009); and J. Chem. Phys. 133, 044511 (2010)]. We provide comprehensive numerical results obtained from the three-time correlation function for the above models. From these calculations, we examine the time scale of the dynamic heterogeneities and determine the associated lifetime in a consistent and systematic way. Our results indicate that the lifetime of the dynamical heterogeneities becomes much longer than the α-relaxation time determined from a two-point correlation function in fragile liquids. The decoupling between the two time scales is remarkable, particularly in supercooled states, and the time scales differ by more than an order of magnitude in a more fragile liquid. In contrast, the lifetime is shorter than the α-relaxation time in tetrahedral network-forming strong

  15. Flood/drought event identification using an effective indicator based on the correlations between multiple time scales of the Standardized Precipitation Index and river discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuefeng; Chen, Xingwei; Chen, Ying; Liu, Meibing; Gao, Lu

    2017-04-01

    In order to further investigate the capability of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) to identify flood/drought events, monthly precipitation data from 26 precipitation stations and monthly discharge data from four hydrological stations from 1960 to 2006 in the Minjiang River basin were used to analyze the correlations between multiple time scales of the SPI and river discharge. The SPI series that had a maximum correlation with discharge was chosen to detect flood/drought events in the basin, and the results were compared to historical flood/drought events. The results indicated the following. (1) High Pearson correlations between the SPI and discharge were identified at shorter time scales (1 to 3 months), and the maximum correlation was found on the time scale of 2 months. (2) Five floods among the six largest historical flood events in the Minjiang River basin were identified with the 2-month SPI, but the SPI does have shortcomings in identifying more general floods. The SPI also identified major drought events that were consistent with historical data. This demonstrates that the 2-month SPI is an effective indicator for the identification of major flood/drought events in the Minjiang River basin.

  16. Multiple time scale molecular dynamics for fluids with orientational degrees of freedom. II. Canonical and isokinetic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelyan, Igor P.; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2011-12-01

    We have developed several multiple time stepping techniques to overcome the limitations on efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations of complex fluids. They include the modified canonical and isokinetic schemes, as well as the extended isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain approach. The latter generalizes the method of Minary, Tuckerman, and Martyna for translational motion [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.150201 to systems with both translational and orientational degrees of freedom. Although the microcanonical integrators are restricted to relatively small outer time steps of order of 16 fs, we show on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of ambient water that in the canonical and isokinetic thermostats the size of these steps can be increased to 50 and 75 fs, respectively (at the same inner time step of 4 fs). Within the generalized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain algorithm we have derived, huge outer time steps of order of 500 fs can be used without losing numerical stability and affecting equilibrium properties

  17. Multiple length and time scales of dynamic heterogeneities in model glass-forming liquids: A systematic analysis of multi-point and multi-time correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kang; Saito, Shinji

    2013-03-01

    We report an extensive and systematic investigation of the multi-point and multi-time correlation functions to reveal the spatio-temporal structures of dynamic heterogeneities in glass-forming liquids. Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for the supercooled states of various prototype models of glass-forming liquids such as binary Kob-Andersen, Wahnström, soft-sphere, and network-forming liquids. While the first three models act as fragile liquids exhibiting super-Arrhenius temperature dependence in their relaxation times, the last is a strong glass-former exhibiting Arrhenius behavior. First, we quantify the length scale of the dynamic heterogeneities utilizing the four-point correlation function. The growth of the dynamic length scale with decreasing temperature is characterized by various scaling relations that are analogous to the critical phenomena. We also examine how the growth of the length scale depends upon the model employed. Second, the four-point correlation function is extended to a three-time correlation function to characterize the temporal structures of the dynamic heterogeneities based on our previous studies [K. Kim and S. Saito, Phys. Rev. E 79, 060501-R (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.060501; K. Kim and S. Saito, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 044511 (2010), 10.1063/1.3464331]. We provide comprehensive numerical results obtained from the three-time correlation function for the above models. From these calculations, we examine the time scale of the dynamic heterogeneities and determine the associated lifetime in a consistent and systematic way. Our results indicate that the lifetime of the dynamical heterogeneities becomes much longer than the α-relaxation time determined from a two-point correlation function in fragile liquids. The decoupling between the two time scales is remarkable, particularly in supercooled states, and the time scales differ by more than an order of magnitude in a more fragile liquid. In contrast, the lifetime is shorter

  18. Comments on the measurements of multiple muon phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Higashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    The extensive air showers in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV include those initiated by astrophysical primary gamma-rays. The observations need a precise measurement on the directions of primary particles. It is one of the methods to measure the directions of high-energy muons in air showers. The accuracy in measuring the direction, by calculating the cosmic-ray phenomena in the atmosphere at very high energy was investgated. The results calculated by Monte Carlo method suggest that one may determine the direction of primary cosmic-rays within errors of 10/3 rad in observing muons of above 100 GeV at sea level.

  19. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong-shan, Yin; Yu-ping, Gao; Shu-hong, Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observations are not evenly sampled, and the internals between two data points range from several hours to more than half a month. Further more, these data sets are sparse. All this makes it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, a cubic spline interpolation is used to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points uniform. Then, the Vondrak filter is employed to smooth the data set, and get rid of the high-frequency noises, and finally the weighted average method is adopted to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The newly released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set is used to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set includes the 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars observed by the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and the 305-meter Arecibo telescope. It is found that the algorithm used in this paper can reduce effectively the influence caused by the noises in pulsar timing residuals, and improve the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale. Results indicate that the long-term (> 1 yr) stability of the ensemble pulsar time scale is better than 3.4 × 10-15.

  20. Computational study of ion beam extraction phenomena through multiple apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wanpeng; Sang, Chaofeng; Tang, Tengfei; Wang, Dezhen; Li, Ming; Jin, Dazhi; Tan, Xiaohua

    2014-03-15

    The process of ion extraction through multiple apertures is investigated using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code. We consider apertures with a fixed diameter with a hydrogen plasma background, and the trajectories of electrons, H{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the self-consistently calculated electric field are traced. The focus of this work is the fundamental physics of the ion extraction, and not particular to a specific device. The computed convergence and divergence of the extracted ion beam are analyzed. We find that the extracted ion flux reaching the extraction electrode is non-uniform, and the peak flux positions change according to operational parameters, and do not necessarily match the positions of the apertures in the y-direction. The profile of the ion flux reaching the electrode is mainly affected by the bias voltage and the distance between grid wall and extraction electrode.

  1. Ensemble Pulsar Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, D. S.; Gao, Y. P.; Zhao, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Millisecond pulsars can generate another type of time scale that is totally independent of the atomic time scale, because the physical mechanisms of the pulsar time scale and the atomic time scale are quite different from each other. Usually the pulsar timing observational data are not evenly sampled, and the internals between data points range from several hours to more than half a month. What's more, these data sets are sparse. And all these make it difficult to generate an ensemble pulsar time scale. Hence, a new algorithm to calculate the ensemble pulsar time scale is proposed. Firstly, we use cubic spline interpolation to densify the data set, and make the intervals between data points even. Then, we employ the Vondrak filter to smooth the data set, and get rid of high-frequency noise, finally adopt the weighted average method to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. The pulsar timing residuals represent clock difference between the pulsar time and atomic time, and the high precision pulsar timing data mean the clock difference measurement between the pulsar time and atomic time with a high signal to noise ratio, which is fundamental to generate pulsar time. We use the latest released NANOGRAV (North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves) 9-year data set to generate the ensemble pulsar time scale. This data set is from the newest NANOGRAV data release, which includes 9-year observational data of 37 millisecond pulsars using the 100-meter Green Bank telescope and 305-meter Arecibo telescope. We find that the algorithm used in this paper can lower the influence caused by noises in timing residuals, and improve long-term stability of pulsar time. Results show that the long-term (> 1 yr) frequency stability of the pulsar time is better than 3.4×10-15.

  2. Irreversibility time scale.

    PubMed

    Gallavotti, G

    2006-06-01

    Entropy creation rate is introduced for a system interacting with thermostats (i.e., for a system subject to internal conservative forces interacting with "external" thermostats via conservative forces) and a fluctuation theorem for it is proved. As an application, a time scale is introduced, to be interpreted as the time over which irreversibility becomes manifest in a process leading from an initial to a final stationary state of a mechanical system in a general nonequilibrium context. The time scale is evaluated in a few examples, including the classical Joule-Thompson process (gas expansion in a vacuum).

  3. Pulsar time scale

    SciTech Connect

    Il'in, V.G.; Llyasov, Yu.P.; Kuz'min, A.D.; Pushkin, S.B.; Palii, G.N.; Shabanova, T.V.; Shchitov, Yu.P.

    1984-05-01

    In this article a new time scale is proposed, that of pulsar time PT which is based on the regular sequence of time intervals between pulses of a pulsar's radio emissions. In discussing variations in the arrival times of pulsar radio emissions, three kinds of variations in the radiation periods are described. PSR 0834 + 06 is used as the basic reference pulsar. Time scales are also determined for reference pulsars PSR 0905 + 08 and 1919 + 21. The initial parameters for the three reference pulsars needed for managing a PT scale are presented. The basic PT scale is defined as the continuous sequence of time intervals between radio-emission pulses of the basic reference pulsar.

  4. Predictability at intraseasonal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.; Sharma, A. S.

    2017-08-01

    Establishing the predictability of the climate system beyond the weather time scale of about 10 days is essential for extended range prediction. To overcome the limitation imposed by deterministic chaos on long-range prediction, we exploit the near-oscillatory behavior of monsoon intraseasonal oscillation (MISO) and other such phenomena in the tropical climate. These are nonlinear oscillations in the time range of 30-60 days. Based on the phase space reconstruction method of nonlinear dynamical systems theory, we have developed a prediction model using the time series of MISO. We demonstrate that the Indian monsoon intraseasonal oscillation can be predicted with more accuracy at extended range. The phase space reconstruction model performs better than the Climate Forecast System of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction in predicting the MISO. Our results show that intraseasonal variability can be modeled as a low-dimensional dynamical system and demonstrate extended predictability of climate.

  5. The Role of Time-Scales in Socio-hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöschl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water. Water Resour. Res., 51, 6988-7022, doi:10.1002/2015WR017896.

  6. Multiple sensor detection of process phenomena in laser powder bed fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Brandon; Whitenton, Eric; Moylan, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    Laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) is an additive manufacturing (AM) process in which a high power laser melts metal powder layers into complex, three-dimensional shapes. LPBF parts are known to exhibit relatively high residual stresses, anisotropic microstructure, and a variety of defects. To mitigate these issues, in-situ measurements of the melt-pool phenomena may illustrate relationships between part quality and process signatures. However, phenomena such as spatter, plume formation, laser modulation, and melt-pool oscillations may require data acquisition rates exceeding 10 kHz. This hinders use of relatively data-intensive, streaming imaging sensors in a real-time monitoring and feedback control system. Single-point sensors such as photodiodes provide the temporal bandwidth to capture process signatures, while providing little spatial information. This paper presents results from experiments conducted on a commercial LPBF machine which incorporated synchronized, in-situ acquisition of a thermal camera, high-speed visible camera, photodiode, and laser modulation signal during fabrication of a nickel alloy 625 AM part with an overhang geometry. Data from the thermal camera provides temperature information, the visible camera provides observation of spatter, and the photodiode signal provides high temporal bandwidth relative brightness stemming from the melt pool region. In addition, joint-time frequency analysis (JTFA) was performed on the photodiode signal. JTFA results indicate what digital filtering and signal processing are required to highlight particular signatures. Image fusion of the synchronized data obtained over multiple build layers allows visual comparison between the photodiode signal and relating phenomena observed in the imaging detectors.

  7. Time scale independent signal transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltin, L.

    1980-05-01

    The paper presents a method which permits the conversion of time scale variations occurring during signal transmission into time shifts proportionally related to these variations. It is demonstrated that the method can be used to reject the adverse effects of the time scale variations (such as wow and flutter in magnetic tape recordings) and/or to determine the scale change exactly (such as would be required in Doppler signal processing). Finally, it is noted that since the system performance degrades with rising frequency of the time scale distortions, an upper bound for this frequency is derived.

  8. Study of Starburst/Activity/Interaction Phenomena based on the Multiple Byurakan-IRAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Gohar S.; Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2014-07-01

    The Byurakan-IRAS Galaxy (BIG) sample is the result of optical identifications of IRAS PSC sources at high-galactic latitudes using the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-dispersion spectra. Among the 1178 objects most are spiral galaxies and many have been proved to be AGN and starburst by spectroscopic observations, as well as there is a number of ULIRGs among these objects. BIG objects contain galaxy pairs, multiples, and small groups that are subject for study on the matter of the real IR-emitter in these systems. Given that these objects are powerful IR sources, they are considered as young systems indicating high rate of evolution and starburst activity exceeding 100 M o /yr. Spectroscopic observations show that all these systems are physical ones and we were able to measure the mutual distances and sizes for all components. Cross-correlations with the recent more accurate IR catalogues, such as 2MASS and WISE, as well as radio ones (NVSS, FIRST), provided accurate coordinates of the IR source and possibility to find the individual galaxy responsible for the IR. However, in almost half of the cases, IR position indicates the intermediate region between the components, which means that it comes from the system as a whole. Some more MW data have been matched to IR and radio to have an overall understanding on these systems. Given that these systems are mostly interacting/merging ones often containing AGN and most of them may be considered as powerful starbursts, it is possible to study starburst/activity/interaction phenomena and their interrelationship.

  9. Convergence methods on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turan, Ceylan; Duman, Oktay

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concepts of lacunary statistical convergence and strongly lacunary Cesàro summability of delta measurable functions on time scales and obtain some inclusion results between them. We also display some examples containing discrete and continuous cases.

  10. Time Scales in Particulate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2013-06-01

    While there are many interests of studying interactions of individual particles, macroscopic collective behavior of particles are our main interest in many practical applications. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of the multiscale methods connecting the physics at individual particles to macroscopic quantities and averaged equations. The emphasis will be on dense dissipative particulate systems, such as powders. Unlike conservative particle systems, such as molecular systems, in a dissipative particle system the concept of thermodynamic equilibrium is not very useful unless in very special cases, because the only true thermodynamically equilibrium state in these systems is the state in which nothing moves. Other than idealized simple systems, mesoscale structures are common and important in many practical systems, especially in dissipative systems. Spatial correlations of these mesoscale structures, such as force chains in dense granular system, particle clusters and streamers in fluidized beds have received some recent attentions, partly because they can be visualized. This talk will emphasize the effects of time correlations related to the mesoscale structures. To consider time correlations and history information of the system, I will introduce the mathematical foundation of the Liouville equation, its applicability and limitations. I will derive the generalized Liouville equations for particulate systems with and without interstitial fluids, and then use them to study averaged transport equations and related closures. Interactions among the time scale of particle interactions, the time scale of the mesocale structures, and the time scale of the physical problem as represented by strain rate will be discussed. The effect of these interactions on the closure relations will be illustrated. I will also discuss possible numerical methods of solving the averaged equations, and multiscale numerical algorithms bridging the particle level calculations to

  11. Time scales of adaptive behavior and motor learning in the presence of stochastic perturbations.

    PubMed

    Schöllhorn, W I; Mayer-Kress, G; Newell, K M; Michelbrink, M

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the major assumptions of influential approaches to the structure of variability in practice conditions are discussed from the perspective of a generalized evolving attractor landscape model of motor learning. The efficacy of the practice condition effects is considered in relation to the theoretical influence of stochastic perturbations in models of gradient descent learning of multiple dimension landscapes. A model for motor learning is presented combining simulated annealing and stochastic resonance phenomena against the background of different time scales for adaptation and learning processes. The practical consequences of the model's assumptions for the structure of practice conditions are discussed, together with their implications for teaching and coaching.

  12. Atomic time scales and pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, G.

    2014-12-01

    I review the atomic time scales generated by the BIPM, International Atomic Time TAI and the realization of Terrestrial Time TT(BIPM). TT(BIPM) is shown to be now accurate to within a few 10..16 in relative frequency and the performances of TAI and TT(BIPM) are compared. Millisecond pulsars have a very regular period of rotation and data from several pulsars may be used to realize an ensemble pulsar timescale. It is shown that a pulsar timescale may detect past instabilities in TAI. However TT(BIPM) is much more stable than TAI and should be used as a reference in pulsar analysis. Since the beginning of regular millisecond pulsar observations in the 1980s, primary standards and atomic time have gained one order of magnitude in accuracy every ~ 12 years, and this trend should continue for some time.

  13. Time scale interactions and the coevolution of humans and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapalan, Murugesu; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-09-01

    We present a coevolutionary view of hydrologic systems, revolving around feedbacks between environmental and social processes operating across different time scales. This brings to the fore an emphasis on emergent phenomena in changing water systems, such as the levee effect, adaptation to change, system lock-in, and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system. Guidance is provided for the framing and modeling of these phenomena to test alternative hypotheses about how they arose. A plurality of coevolutionary models, from stylized to comprehensive system-of-system models, may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesize the observed dynamics in a wide range of case studies. Future research opportunities lie in exploring emergent phenomena arising from time scale interactions through historical, comparative, and process studies of human-water feedbacks.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Human-Water Interactions: The Role of Time-Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloeschl, G.; Sivapalan, M.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the interest in hydrological modeling in the past decades revolved around resolving spatial variability. With the rapid changes brought about by human impacts on the hydrologic cycle, there is now an increasing need to refocus on time dependency. We present a co-evolutionary view of hydrologic systems, in which every part of the system including human systems, co-evolve, albeit at different rates. The resulting coupled human-nature system is framed as a dynamical system, characterized by interactions of fast and slow time scales and feedbacks between environmental and social processes. This gives rise to emergent phenomena such as the levee effect, adaptation to change and system collapse due to resource depletion. Changing human values play a key role in the emergence of these phenomena and should therefore be considered as internal to the system in a dynamic way. The co-evolutionary approach differs from the traditional view of water resource systems analysis as it allows for path dependence, multiple equilibria, lock-in situations and emergent phenomena. The approach may assist strategic water management for long time scales through facilitating stakeholder participation, exploring the possibility space of alternative futures, and helping to synthesise the observed dynamics of different case studies. Future research opportunities include the study of how changes in human values are connected to human-water interactions, historical analyses of trajectories of system co-evolution in individual places and comparative analyses of contrasting human-water systems in different climate and socio-economic settings. Reference Sivapalan, M. and G. Blöschl (2015) Time Scale Interactions and the Co-evolution of Humans and Water. Water Resour. Res., 51, in press.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic propagation in bubbly liquids: Multiple scattering, softening and hardening phenomena.

    PubMed

    Doc, Jean-Baptiste; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Marchiano, Régis; Fuster, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The weakly nonlinear propagation of acoustic waves in monodisperse bubbly liquids is investigated numerically. A hydrodynamic model based on the averaged two-phase fluid equations is coupled with the Rayleigh-Plesset equation to model the dynamics of bubbles at the local scale. The present model is validated in the linear regime by comparing with the Foldy approximation. The analysis of the pressure signals in the linear regime highlights two resonance frequencies: the Minnaert frequency and a multiple scattering resonance that strongly depends on the bubble concentration. For weakly nonlinear regimes, the generation of higher harmonics is observed only for the Minnaert frequency. Linear combinations between the Minnaert harmonics and the multiple scattering resonance are also observed. However, the most significant effect observed is the appearance of softening-hardening effects that share some similarities with those observed for sandstones or cracked materials. These effects are related to the multiple scattering resonance. Downward or upward resonance frequency shifts can be observed depending on the characteristic of the incident wave when increasing the excitation amplitude. It is shown that the frequency shift can be explained assuming that the acoustic wave velocity depends on a law different from those usually encountered for sandstones or cracked materials.

  16. On the Relationship of Multiple Solutions in Tropospheric Photochemistry to Observable Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Multiple steady-state solutions are a fairly robust feature of simplified models of tropospheric photochemistry and have been reported for a range of different modeling assumptions. Multiple solutions occur through a bifurcation as changes in a control parameter induce a transition from low to high NO(x) conditions. The usual control parameters are the sources of NO and of CO, CH4 or non-methane hydrocarbons. Typically, with increasing NO source, bifurcations occur at NO(x). concentrations that are higher than would be expected of even heavily polluted conditions. However, there are other ways of inducing a low NO(x) - high NO(x) transition. In this paper the primary control parameter is solar zenith angle. This is varied throughout the year by computing noontime steady states on successive days. Background NO(x), varied by assuming different NO(x) sources values, is used as a secondary control parameter. It is found that bifurcations can occur from high to low NO(x) conditions, for reasonable background NO(x) levels, as the model progresses through spring and then from low to high NO,, during the progression through fall. A time dependent version of this model has been run for the same parameter values as in the steady state runs. This shows rapid spring and fall transitions between high and low NO(x) states. H2O2, for example, rises from sub-ppb levels to about 2 ppb over a five day period in spring and declines quickly, but less precipitously, in fall. This study supports the suggestions that the rapid change in peroxide concentrations between summer and winter conditions may be understood as a manifestation of different underlying steady-state behavior.

  17. On the Relationship of Multiple Solutions in Tropospheric Photochemistry to Observable Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Richard W.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Multiple steady-state solutions are a fairly robust feature of simplified models of tropospheric photochemistry and have been reported for a range of different modeling assumptions. Multiple solutions occur through a bifurcation as changes in a control parameter induce a transition from low to high NO(x) conditions. The usual control parameters are the sources of NO and of CO, CH4 or non-methane hydrocarbons. Typically, with increasing NO source, bifurcations occur at NO(x). concentrations that are higher than would be expected of even heavily polluted conditions. However, there are other ways of inducing a low NO(x) - high NO(x) transition. In this paper the primary control parameter is solar zenith angle. This is varied throughout the year by computing noontime steady states on successive days. Background NO(x), varied by assuming different NO(x) sources values, is used as a secondary control parameter. It is found that bifurcations can occur from high to low NO(x) conditions, for reasonable background NO(x) levels, as the model progresses through spring and then from low to high NO,, during the progression through fall. A time dependent version of this model has been run for the same parameter values as in the steady state runs. This shows rapid spring and fall transitions between high and low NO(x) states. H2O2, for example, rises from sub-ppb levels to about 2 ppb over a five day period in spring and declines quickly, but less precipitously, in fall. This study supports the suggestions that the rapid change in peroxide concentrations between summer and winter conditions may be understood as a manifestation of different underlying steady-state behavior.

  18. Modeling the influence of string collective phenomena on the long range rapidity correlations between the transverse momentum and the multiplicities

    SciTech Connect

    Andronov, E.; Vechernin, V.

    2016-01-22

    The long-range rapidity correlations between the multiplicities (n-n) and the transverse momentum and the multiplicity (pT-n) of charge particles are analyzed in the framework of the simple string inspired model with two types of sources. The sources of the first type correspond to the initial strings formed in a hadronic collision. The sources of the second type imitate the appearance of the emitters of a new kind resulting from interaction (fusion) of the initial strings. The model enabled to describe effectively the influence of the string fusion effects on the strength both the n-n and the pT-n correlations. It was found that in the region, where the process of string fusion comes into play, the calculation results predict the non-monotonic behaviour of the n-n and pT-n correlation coefficients with the growth of the mean number of initial strings, i.e. with the increase of the collision centrality. It was shown also that the increase of the event-by-event fluctuation in the number of primary strings leads to the change of the pT-n correlation sign from negative to positive. One can try to search these signatures of string collective phenomena in interactions of various nuclei at different energies varying the class of collision centrality and its width.

  19. Kalman plus weights: a time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    KPW is a time scale algorithm that combines Kalman filtering with the basic time scale equation (BTSE). A single Kalman filter that estimates all clocks simultaneously is used to generate the BTSE frequency estimates, while the BTSE weights are inversely proportional to the white FM variances of the clocks. Results from simulated clock ensembles are compared to previous simulation results from other algorithms.

  20. Russian national time scale long-term stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshina, A. P.; Gaigerov, B. A.; Koshelyaevsky, N. B.; Pushkin, S. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute of Metrology for Time and Space NPO 'VNIIFTRI' generates the National Time Scale (NTS) of Russia -- one of the most stable time scales in the world. Its striking feature is that it is based on a free ensemble of H-masers only. During last two years the estimations of NTS longterm stability based only on H-maser intercomparison data gives a flicker floor of about (2 to 3) x 10(exp -15) for averaging times from 1 day to 1 month. Perhaps the most significant feature for a time laboratory is an extremely low possible frequency drift -- it is too difficult to estimate it reliably. The other estimations, free from possible inside the ensemble correlation phenomena, are available based on the time comparison of NTS relative to the stable enough time scale of outer laboratories. The data on NTS comparison relative to the time scale of secondary time and frequency standards at Golitzino and Irkutsk in Russia and relative to NIST, PTB and USNO using GLONASS and GPS time transfer links gives stability estimations which are close to that based on H-maser intercomparisons.

  1. Long term stability of atomic time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, G.; Arias, F.

    2015-03-01

    We review the stability and accuracy achieved by the reference atomic time scales TAI and TT(BIPM). We show that they presently are in the low 10-16 in relative value, based on the performance of primary standards, of the ensemble time scale and of the time transfer techniques. We consider how the 1 × 10-16 value could be reached or superseded and which are the present limitations to attain this goal.

  2. Equilibration Time Scales of Physically Relevant Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pintos, Luis Pedro; Linden, Noah; Malabarba, Artur S. L.; Short, Anthony J.; Winter, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    We address the problem of understanding, from first principles, the conditions under which a quantum system equilibrates rapidly with respect to a concrete observable. On the one hand, previously known general upper bounds on the time scales of equilibration were unrealistically long, with times scaling linearly with the dimension of the Hilbert space. These bounds proved to be tight since particular constructions of observables scaling in this way were found. On the other hand, the computed equilibration time scales for certain classes of typical measurements, or under the evolution of typical Hamiltonians, are unrealistically short. However, most physically relevant situations fall outside these two classes. In this paper, we provide a new upper bound on the equilibration time scales which, under some physically reasonable conditions, give much more realistic results than previously known. In particular, we apply this result to the paradigmatic case of a system interacting with a thermal bath, where we obtain an upper bound for the equilibration time scale independent of the size of the bath. In this way, we find general conditions that single out observables with realistic equilibration times within a physically relevant setup.

  3. Observing Reality on Different Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyushin, Alexey

    2005-10-01

    In the first part of the paper, I examine cases of acceleration of perception and cognition and provide my explanation of the mechanism of the effect. The explanation rests on the conception of neuronal temporal frames, or windows of simultaneity. Frames have different standard durations and yield to stretching and compressing. I suggest it to be the cause of the effect, as well as the ground for differences in perceptive time scales of living beings. In the second part, I apply the conception of temporal frames to model observation in the extended time scales that reach far beyond the temporal perceptive niche of individual living beings. Duration of a frame is taken as the basic parameter setting a particular time scale. By substituting a different frame duration, we set a hypothetical time scale and emulate observing reality in a wider or a narrower angle of embracing events in time. I discuss the status of observer in its relation to objective reality, and examine how reality does change its appearance when observed in different time scales.

  4. Time scales involved in emergent market coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, J.; Drożdż, S.; Speth, J.

    2004-06-01

    In addressing the question of the time scales characteristic for the market formation, we analyze high-frequency tick-by-tick data from the NYSE and from the German market. By using returns on various time scales ranging from seconds or minutes up to 2 days, we compare magnitude of the largest eigenvalue of the correlation matrix for the same set of securities but for different time scales. For various sets of stocks of different capitalization (and the average trading frequency), we observe a significant elevation of the largest eigenvalue with increasing time scale. Our results from the correlation matrix study can be considered as a manifestation of the so-called Epps effect. There is no unique explanation of this effect and it seems that many different factors play a role here. One of such factors is randomness in transaction moments for different stocks. Another interesting conclusion to be drawn from our results is that in the contemporary markets the emergence of significant correlations occurs on time scales much smaller than in the more distant history.

  5. A Quaternary Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    Reversals and excursions of Earth's geomagnetic field create marker horizons that are readily detected in sedimentary and volcanic rocks worldwide. An accurate and precise chronology of these geomagnetic field instabilities is fundamental to understanding several aspects of Quaternary climate, dynamo processes, and surface processes. For example, stratigraphic correlation between marine sediment and polar ice records of climate change across the cryospheres benefits from a highly resolved record of reversals and excursions. The temporal patterns of dynamo behavior may reflect physical interactions between the molten outer core and the solid inner core or lowermost mantle. These interactions may control reversal frequency and shape the weak magnetic fields that arise during successive dynamo instabilities. Moreover, weakening of the axial dipole during reversals and excursions enhances the production of cosmogenic isotopes that are used in sediment and ice core stratigraphy and surface exposure dating. The Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS) is based on the direct dating of transitional polarity states recorded by lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar method, in parallel with astrochronologic age models of marine sediments in which O isotope and magnetic records have been obtained. A review of data from Quaternary lava flows and sediments yields a GITS comprising 10 polarity reversals and 27 excursions during the past 2.6 million years. Nine of the ten reversals bounding chrons and subchrons are associated with 40Ar/39Ar ages of transitionally-magnetized lava flows. The tenth, the Guass-Matuyama chron boundary, is tightly bracketed by 40Ar/39Ar dated ash deposits. Of the 27 well-documented excursions, 14 occurred during the Matuyama chron and 13 during the Brunhes chron; 19 have been dated directly using the 40Ar/39Ar method on transitionally-magnetized volcanic rocks and form the backbone of the GITS. Excursions are clearly not the rare phenomena once thought

  6. Conformable fractional Dirac system on time scales.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Tuba; Yilmaz, Emrah; Goktas, Sertac

    2017-01-01

    We study the conformable fractional (CF) Dirac system with separated boundary conditions on an arbitrary time scale [Formula: see text]. Then we extend some basic spectral properties of the classical Dirac system to the CF case. Eventually, some asymptotic estimates for the eigenfunction of the CF Dirac eigenvalue problem are obtained on [Formula: see text]. So, we provide a constructive procedure for the solution of this problem. These results are important steps to consolidate the link between fractional calculus and time scale calculus in spectral theory.

  7. Time-scale and branching ratios in sequential multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Phair, L.; Tso, K.; Jing, K.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions are shown to be binomial at all excitation energies. From these distributions a single binary event probability can be extracted that has the thermal dependence p= exp[{minus}B/T]. Thus, it is inferred that multi fragmentation is a sequence of thermal binary events. The increase of p with excitation energy implies a corresponding contraction of the time-scale and explains recently observed fragment-fragment and fragment-spectator Coulomb correlations.

  8. A multiple receiver - multiple transmitter VLF high-order differential analysis evaluation network for near real-time detection and discrimination of seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, Christos; Zaharis, Zaharias; Xenos, Thomas; Spatalas, Spyridon; Stratakis, Dimitrios; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Biagi, Pier francesco

    2016-04-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the application of high-order differential analysis on VLF signals on a multiple-receiver multiple-transmitter network. This application provides a method for near-real-time detection of disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena and can discriminate disturbances that could be classified as false positives and thus should be attributed to other geomagnetic influences. VLF data acquired in Thessaloniki, Greece (40.59N, 22,78E) Herakleion, Greece (35.31N, 25.10E), Nicosia, Cyprus (35.17N, 33.35E), Italy (42.42N, 13.08E) and transmitted by the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station 40.923N, 9.731E) and the station in Keflavik, Iceland (ICE 64.02N, 22.57W) from January 2015 to January 2016 were used for the purpose of this paper. The receivers have been developed by Elettronika Srl and are part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The process applied for this study has been further developed and is based on differential analysis. The signals undergo transformation using an enhanced version of the Hilbert Huang Transform, and relevant spectra are produced. On the product of this process, differential analysis is applied. Finally, the method produces the correlation coefficient of signals that are on the same path over an earthquake epicenter in order to highlight disturbances, and on the opposite can make comparisons with unrelated transmitted signals of different paths to eliminate disturbances that are not localized to the area of interest. This improvement provides a simple method of noise cancellation to signals that would otherwise be considered as false positives. A further evaluation of the method is provided with the presentation and discussion of sample results. The method seems to be a robust tool of analysis of VLF signals and also an automatic detection tool with built-in noise cancellation of outside disturbances.

  9. Paranormal phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    1996-08-01

    Critical analysis is given of some paranormal phenomena events (UFO, healers, psychokinesis (telekinesis))reported in Moldova. It is argued that correct analysis of paranormal phenomena should be made in the framework of electromagnetism.

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  11. Mouse Activity across Time Scales: Fractal Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Lima, G. Z. dos Santos; Lobão-Soares, B.; do Nascimento, G. C.; França, Arthur S. C.; Muratori, L.; Ribeiro, S.; Corso, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we devise a classification of mouse activity patterns based on accelerometer data using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis. We use two characteristic mouse behavioural states as benchmarks in this study: waking in free activity and slow-wave sleep (SWS). In both situations we find roughly the same pattern: for short time intervals we observe high correlation in activity - a typical 1/f complex pattern - while for large time intervals there is anti-correlation. High correlation of short intervals ( to : waking state and to : SWS) is related to highly coordinated muscle activity. In the waking state we associate high correlation both to muscle activity and to mouse stereotyped movements (grooming, waking, etc.). On the other side, the observed anti-correlation over large time scales ( to : waking state and to : SWS) during SWS appears related to a feedback autonomic response. The transition from correlated regime at short scales to an anti-correlated regime at large scales during SWS is given by the respiratory cycle interval, while during the waking state this transition occurs at the time scale corresponding to the duration of the stereotyped mouse movements. Furthermore, we find that the waking state is characterized by longer time scales than SWS and by a softer transition from correlation to anti-correlation. Moreover, this soft transition in the waking state encompass a behavioural time scale window that gives rise to a multifractal pattern. We believe that the observed multifractality in mouse activity is formed by the integration of several stereotyped movements each one with a characteristic time correlation. Finally, we compare scaling properties of body acceleration fluctuation time series during sleep and wake periods for healthy mice. Interestingly, differences between sleep and wake in the scaling exponents are comparable to previous works regarding human heartbeat. Complementarily, the nature of these sleep-wake dynamics could lead to a better

  12. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  13. Special Issue on Time Scale Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 IOP PUBLISHING METROLOGIA Metrologia 45 (2008) doi:10.1088/0026-1394/45/6/E01...special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the...Paris at the BIPM in 2002 (see Metrologia 40 (3), 2003) • 5th Symposium: in San Fernando, Spain at the ROA in 2008. The early symposia were concerned

  14. Liquidity crises on different time scales.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Francesco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We present an empirical analysis of the microstructure of financial markets and, in particular, of the static and dynamic properties of liquidity. We find that on relatively large time scales (15 min) large price fluctuations are connected to the failure of the subtle mechanism of compensation between the flows of market and limit orders: in other words, the missed revelation of the latent order book breaks the dynamical equilibrium between the flows, triggering the large price jumps. On smaller time scales (30 s), instead, the static depletion of the limit order book is an indicator of an intrinsic fragility of the system, which is related to a strongly nonlinear enhancement of the response. In order to quantify this phenomenon we introduce a measure of the liquidity imbalance present in the book and we show that it is correlated to both the sign and the magnitude of the next price movement. These findings provide a quantitative definition of the effective liquidity, which proves to be strongly dependent on the considered time scales.

  15. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  16. Liquidity crises on different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Francesco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    We present an empirical analysis of the microstructure of financial markets and, in particular, of the static and dynamic properties of liquidity. We find that on relatively large time scales (15 min) large price fluctuations are connected to the failure of the subtle mechanism of compensation between the flows of market and limit orders: in other words, the missed revelation of the latent order book breaks the dynamical equilibrium between the flows, triggering the large price jumps. On smaller time scales (30 s), instead, the static depletion of the limit order book is an indicator of an intrinsic fragility of the system, which is related to a strongly nonlinear enhancement of the response. In order to quantify this phenomenon we introduce a measure of the liquidity imbalance present in the book and we show that it is correlated to both the sign and the magnitude of the next price movement. These findings provide a quantitative definition of the effective liquidity, which proves to be strongly dependent on the considered time scales.

  17. Flow excursion time scales in the advanced neutron source reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sulfredge, C.D.

    1995-04-01

    Flow excursion transients give rise to a key thermal limit for the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor because its core involves many parallel flow channels with a common pressure drop. Since one can envision certain accident scenarios in which the thermal limits set by flow excursion correlations might be exceeded for brief intervals, a key objective is to determine how long a flow excursion would take to bring about a system failure that could lead to fuel damage. The anticipated time scale for flow excursions has been examined by subdividing the process into its component phenomena: bubble nucleation and growth, deceleration of the resulting two-phase flow, and finally overcoming thermal inertia to heat up the reactor fuel plates. Models were developed to estimate the time required for each individual stage. Accident scenarios involving sudden reduction in core flow or core exit pressure have been examined, and the models compared with RELAP5 output for the ANS geometry. For a high-performance reactor like the ANS, flow excursion time scales were predicted to be in the millisecond range, so that even very brief transients might lead to fuel damage. These results should prove useful whenever one must determine the time involved in any portion of a flow excursion transient.

  18. Short-time scale behavior modeling within long-time scale fuel cycle evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Tsvetkov, P.; Lucas, S.

    2012-07-01

    Typically, short-time and long-time scales in nuclear energy system behavior are accounted for with entirely separate models. However, long-term changes in system characteristics do affect short-term transients through material variations. This paper presents an approach to consistently account for short-time scales within a nuclear system lifespan. The reported findings and developments are of significant importance for small modular reactors and other nuclear energy systems operating in autonomous modes. It is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by the Bateman equations. (authors)

  19. Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motor.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zheng-Ming; Chang, Ching-Ming; Chen, Yen-Sheng

    2006-09-15

    Anti-control of chaos of single time-scale brushless DC motors is studied in this paper. In order to analyse a variety of periodic and chaotic phenomena, we employ several numerical techniques such as phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents. Anti-control of chaos can be achieved by adding an external constant term or an external periodic term.

  20. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Rozmus, W.; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  1. Stability of graph communities across time scales

    PubMed Central

    Delvenne, J.-C.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of biological, social, and engineering networks makes it desirable to find natural partitions into clusters (or communities) that can provide insight into the structure of the overall system and even act as simplified functional descriptions. Although methods for community detection abound, there is a lack of consensus on how to quantify and rank the quality of partitions. We introduce here the stability of a partition, a measure of its quality as a community structure based on the clustered autocovariance of a dynamic Markov process taking place on the network. Because the stability has an intrinsic dependence on time scales of the graph, it allows us to compare and rank partitions at each time and also to establish the time spans over which partitions are optimal. Hence the Markov time acts effectively as an intrinsic resolution parameter that establishes a hierarchy of increasingly coarser communities. Our dynamical definition provides a unifying framework for several standard partitioning measures: modularity and normalized cut size can be interpreted as one-step time measures, whereas Fiedler’s spectral clustering emerges at long times. We apply our method to characterize the relevance of partitions over time for constructive and real networks, including hierarchical graphs and social networks, and use it to obtain reduced descriptions for atomic-level protein structures over different time scales. PMID:20615936

  2. Multiple Time Scale Models in Sport and Exercise Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniel M.; Walls, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    In sport and exercise research, examining both within- and between-individual variation is crucial. The ability to investigate change both within competitive events and across a competitive season is a priority for many sport researchers. The aim of this article is to demonstrate an approach to analyzing intensive longitudinal data collected…

  3. Multiple Time Scale Models in Sport and Exercise Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniel M.; Walls, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    In sport and exercise research, examining both within- and between-individual variation is crucial. The ability to investigate change both within competitive events and across a competitive season is a priority for many sport researchers. The aim of this article is to demonstrate an approach to analyzing intensive longitudinal data collected…

  4. Conceptual design of a thermalhydraulic loop for multiple test geometries at supercritical conditions named Supercritical Phenomena Experimental Test Apparatus (SPETA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenariwo, Adepoju

    The efficiency of nuclear reactors can be improved by increasing the operating pressure of current nuclear reactors. Current CANDU-type nuclear reactors use heavy water as coolant at an outlet pressure of up to 11.5 MPa. Conceptual SuperCritical Water Reactors (SCWRs) will operate at a higher coolant outlet pressure of 25 MPa. Supercritical water technology has been used in advanced coal plants and its application proves promising to be employed in nuclear reactors. To better understand how supercritical water technology can be applied in nuclear power plants, supercritical water loops are used to study the heat transfer phenomena as it applies to CANDU-type reactors. A conceptual design of a loop known as the Supercritical Phenomena Experimental Apparatus (SPETA) has been done. This loop has been designed to fit in a 9 m by 2 m by 2.8 m enclosure that will be installed at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology Energy Research Laboratory. The loop include components to safely start up and shut down various test sections, produce a heat source to the test section, and to remove reject heat. It is expected that loop will be able to investigate the behaviour of supercritical water in various geometries including bare tubes, annulus tubes, and multi-element-type bundles. The experimental geometries are designed to match the fluid properties of Canadian SCWR fuel channel designs so that they are representative of a practical application of supercritical water technology in nuclear plants. This loop will investigate various test section orientations which are the horizontal, vertical, and inclined to investigate buoyancy effects. Frictional pressure drop effects and satisfactory methods of estimating hydraulic resistances in supercritical fluid shall also be estimated with the loop. Operating limits for SPETA have been established to be able to capture the important heat transfer phenomena at supercritical conditions. Heat balance and flow calculations have

  5. Cratering time scales for the Galilean satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, E. M.; Wolfe, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the present cratering rate for each Galilean satellite within the correct order of magnitude and to extend the cratering rates back into the geologic past on the basis of evidence from the earth-moon system. For collisions with long and short period comets, the magnitudes and size distributions of the comet nuclei, the distribution of their perihelion distances, and the completeness of discovery are addressed. The diameters and masses of cometary nuclei are assessed, as are crater diameters and cratering rates. The dynamical relations between long period and short period comets are discussed, and the population of Jupiter-crossing asteroids is assessed. Estimated present cratering rates on the Galilean satellites are compared and variations of cratering rate with time are considered. Finally, the consistency of derived cratering time scales with the cratering record of the icy Galilean satellites is discussed.

  6. Search for new phenomena in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse momentum with ATLAS using √{ s} = 13 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.

    2016-06-01

    Results are reported of a search for new phenomena, such as supersymmetric particle production, that could be observed in high-energy proton-proton collisions. Events with large numbers of jets, together with missing transverse momentum from unobserved particles, are selected. The data analysed were recorded by the ATLAS experiment during 2015 using the 13 TeV centre-of-mass proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. The search selected events with various jet multiplicities from ≥7 to ≥10 jets, and with various b-jet multiplicity requirements to enhance sensitivity. No excess above Standard Model expectations is observed. The results are interpreted within two supersymmetry models, where gluino masses up to 1400 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level, significantly extending previous limits.

  7. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  8. Colloidal Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, William B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Described is a graduate level engineering course offered at Princeton University in colloidal phenomena stressing the physical and dynamical side of colloid science. The course outline, reading list, and requirements are presented. (BT)

  9. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  10. EDITORIAL: Special issue on time scale algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Tavella, Patrizia

    2008-12-01

    This special issue of Metrologia presents selected papers from the Fifth International Time Scale Algorithm Symposium (VITSAS), including some of the tutorials presented on the first day. The symposium was attended by 76 persons, from every continent except Antarctica, by students as well as senior scientists, and hosted by the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada (ROA) in San Fernando, Spain, whose staff further enhanced their nation's high reputation for hospitality. Although a timescale can be simply defined as a weighted average of clocks, whose purpose is to measure time better than any individual clock, timescale theory has long been and continues to be a vibrant field of research that has both followed and helped to create advances in the art of timekeeping. There is no perfect timescale algorithm, because every one embodies a compromise involving user needs. Some users wish to generate a constant frequency, perhaps not necessarily one that is well-defined with respect to the definition of a second. Other users might want a clock which is as close to UTC or a particular reference clock as possible, or perhaps wish to minimize the maximum variation from that standard. In contrast to the steered timescales that would be required by those users, other users may need free-running timescales, which are independent of external information. While no algorithm can meet all these needs, every algorithm can benefit from some form of tuning. The optimal tuning, and even the optimal algorithm, can depend on the noise characteristics of the frequency standards, or of their comparison systems, the most precise and accurate of which are currently Two Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT) and GPS carrier phase time transfer. The interest in time scale algorithms and its associated statistical methodology began around 40 years ago when the Allan variance appeared and when the metrological institutions started realizing ensemble atomic time using more than

  11. Time Scales, Bedforms and Bedload Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in mountain streams may exhibit wide fluctuations even under constant flow conditions. A better understanding of bedload pulses is key to predict natural hazards induced by torrential activity and sediment issues in mountainous areas. Several processes such as bedforms migration, grain sorting and random particles' trajectories are evoked as the driving agents of pulse formation and development. Quantifying the effects of these processes is a difficult task. This work aims to investigate the interactions between bedload transport and bedform dynamics in steep gravel-bed rivers. Experiments are carried out in a 17-m long 60-cm wide flume inclined at an angle of 2.7%. The bed is initially flat and made of homogenous natural gravel with a mean diameter of 6 mm. We imposed 200 identical hydrographs (of 1 hr duration) at the flume inlet (the bed surface was not flattened out during these cycling floods). The input hydrograph and the input sediment discharge are nearly triangular. Bed topography is measured after each flood using ultrasound sensors while the bedload transport rate is steadily monitored at the outlet using accelerometers (accelerometers fixed on metallic plates record the impacts of the grains flowing out of the flume). For the sake of comparison, a similar experiment consisting of 19 floods of 10 hours is carried out under constant supply conditions. We show that accelerometers are a cost effective technique to obtain high-frequency bedload discharge data. Spectral analysis of the bedload timeseries is used to highlight the different time scales corresponding to different bedload transport processes. We show that long timeseries are necessary to capture the different processes that drive bedload transport, including the resilience time after a perturbation of the bed. The alternate bars that develop and migrate along the flume are found to significantly influence bedload transport rate fluctuations.

  12. Fluctuation phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Montroll, E.W.; Lebowitz, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject.

  13. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  14. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  15. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, Jeffery A; Kassoy, Dr. David R; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2006-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A nonlinear transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gas dynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  16. Detonation initiation on the microsecond time scale: DDTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kassoy, Dr. David R; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Nabity, Mr. Matthew W.; Clarke, Dr. John F.

    2008-01-01

    Spatially resolved, thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas is the initiator for a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) on the microsecond time scale. The reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics are used to derive novel formulas for velocity and temperature variation that describe the physical phenomena characteristic of DDTs. A transformation of the variables is shown to yield a canonical equation system, independent of the activation energy. Numerical solutions of the reactive Euler equations are used to describe the detailed sequence of reactive gasdynamic processes leading to an overdriven planar detonation far from the power deposition location. Results are presented for deposition into a region isolated from the planar boundary of the reactive gas as well as for that adjacent to the boundary. The role of compressions and shocks reflected from the boundary into the partially reacted hot gas is described. The quantitative dependences of DDT evolution on the magnitude of thermal power deposition and activation energy are identified.

  17. Noether theorem for Birkhoffian systems on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chuan-Jing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Birkhoff equations on time scales and Noether theorem for Birkhoffian system on time scales are studied. First, some necessary knowledge of calculus on time scales are reviewed. Second, Birkhoff equations on time scales are obtained. Third, the conditions for invariance of Pfaff action and conserved quantities are presented under the special infinitesimal transformations and general infinitesimal transformations, respectively. Fourth, some special cases are given. And finally, an example is given to illustrate the method and results.

  18. An optimal modification of a Kalman filter for time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Kalman filter in question, which was implemented in the time scale algorithm TA(NIST), produces time scales with poor short-term stability. A simple modification of the error covariance matrix allows the filter to produce time scales with good stability at all averaging times, as verified by simulations of clock ensembles.

  19. An optimal modification of a Kalman filter for time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Kalman filter in question, which was implemented in the time scale algorithm TA(NIST), produces time scales with poor short-term stability. A simple modification of the error covariance matrix allows the filter to produce time scales with good stability at all averaging times, as verified by simulations of clock ensembles.

  20. Modes of correlated angular motion in live cells across three distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Andrew W; Kenwright, David A; Waigh, Thomas A; Woodman, Philip G; Allan, Victoria J

    2013-06-01

    Particle tracking experiments with high speed digital microscopy yield the positions and trajectories of lipid droplets inside living cells. Angular correlation analysis shows that the lipid droplets have uncorrelated motion at short time scales (τ < 1 ms) followed by anti-persistent motion for lag times in the range of 1 ⩽ τ ⩽ 10 ms. The angular correlation at longer time scales, τ > 10 ms, becomes persistent, indicating directed movement. The motion at all time scales is associated with the lipid droplets being tethered to and driven along the microtubule network. The point at which the angular correlation changes from anti-persistent to persistent motion corresponds to the cross over between sub-diffusive and super diffusive motion, as observed by mean square displacement analysis. Correct analysis of the angular correlations of the detector noise is found to be crucial in modelling the observed phenomena.

  1. Predicting Regional Drought on Sub-Seasonal to Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Wang, Hailan; Suarez, Max; Koster, Randal

    2011-01-01

    Drought occurs on a wide range of time scales, and within a variety of different types of regional climates. It is driven foremost by an extended period of reduced precipitation, but it is the impacts on such quantities as soil moisture, streamflow and crop yields that are often most important from a users perspective. While recognizing that different users have different needs for drought information, it is nevertheless important to understand that progress in predicting drought and satisfying such user needs, largely hinges on our ability to improve predictions of precipitation. This talk reviews our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that drive precipitation variations on subseasonal to decadal time scales, and the implications for predictability and prediction skill. Examples are given highlighting the phenomena and mechanisms controlling precipitation on monthly (e.g., stationary Rossby waves, soil moisture), seasonal (ENSO) and decadal time scales (PD and AMO).

  2. Modeling orbital changes on tectonic time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic time series indicate significant 100 ka and 400 ka pre-Pleistocene climate fluctuations, prior to the time of such fluctuations in Pleistocene ice sheets. The origin of these fluctuations must therefore depend on phenomena other than the ice sheets. In a previous set of experiments, we tested the sensitivity of an energy balance model to orbital insolation forcing, specifically focusing on the filtering effect of the Earth's geography. We found that in equatorial areas, the twice-yearly passage of the sun across the equator interacts with the precession index to generate 100 ka and 400 ka power in our modeled time series. The effect is proportional to the magnitude of land in equatorial regions. We suggest that such changes may reflect monsoonal variations in the real climate system, and the subsequent wind and weathering changes may transfer some of this signal to the marine record. A comparison with observed fluctuations of Triassic lake levels is quite favorable. A number of problems remain to be studied or clarified: (1) the EBM experiments need to be followed up by a limited number of GCM experiments; (2) the sensitivity to secular changes in orbital forcing needs to be examined; (3) the possible modifying role of sedimentary processes on geologic time series warrants considerably more study; (4) the effect of tectonic changes on Earth's rotation rate needs to be studied; and (5) astronomers need to make explicit which of their predictions are robust and geologists and astronomers have to agree on which of the predictions are most testable in the geologic record.

  3. Modeling orbital changes on tectonic time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Geologic time series indicate significant 100 ka and 400 ka pre-Pleistocene climate fluctuations, prior to the time of such fluctuations in Pleistocene ice sheets. The origin of these fluctuations must therefore depend on phenomena other than the ice sheets. In a previous set of experiments, we tested the sensitivity of an energy balance model to orbital insolation forcing, specifically focusing on the filtering effect of the Earth's geography. We found that in equatorial areas, the twice-yearly passage of the sun across the equator interacts with the precession index to generate 100 ka and 400 ka power in our modeled time series. The effect is proportional to the magnitude of land in equatorial regions. We suggest that such changes may reflect monsoonal variations in the real climate system, and the subsequent wind and weathering changes may transfer some of this signal to the marine record. A comparison with observed fluctuations of Triassic lake levels is quite favorable. A number of problems remain to be studied or clarified: (1) the EBM experiments need to be followed up by a limited number of GCM experiments; (2) the sensitivity to secular changes in orbital forcing needs to be examined; (3) the possible modifying role of sedimentary processes on geologic time series warrants considerably more study; (4) the effect of tectonic changes on Earth's rotation rate needs to be studied; and (5) astronomers need to make explicit which of their predictions are robust and geologists and astronomers have to agree on which of the predictions are most testable in the geologic record.

  4. Ordering Phenomena in Undercooled Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fultz, Brent

    1997-07-17

    Much of the work performed under this grant was devoted to using modern ideas in kinetics to understand atom movements in metallic alloys far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Kinetics arguments were based explicitly on the vacancy mechanism for atom movements. The emphasis was on how individual atom movements are influenced by the local chemical environment of the moving atom, and how atom movements cause changes in the local chemical environments. The author formulated a kinetic master equation method to treat atom movements on a crystal lattice with a vacancy mechanism. Some of these analyses [3,10,16] are as detailed as any treatment of the statistical kinetics of atom movements in crystalline alloys. Three results came from this work. Chronologically they were (1) A recognition that tracking time dependencies is not necessarily the best way to study kinetic phenomena. If multiple order parameters can be measured in a material, the ''kinetic path'' through the space spanned by these order parameters maybe just as informative about the chemical factors that affect atom movements [2,3,5-7,9-11,14-16,18,19,21,23,24,26,36,37]. (2) Kinetic paths need not follow the steepest gradient of the free energy function (this should be well-known), and for alloys far from equilibrium the free energy function can be almost useless in describing kinetic behavior. This is why the third result surprised me. (3) In cluster approximations with multiple order parameters, saddle points are common features of free energy functions. Interestingly, kinetic processes stall or change time scale when the kinetic path approaches a state at a saddle point in the free energy function, even though these states exist far from thermodynamic equilibrium. The author calls such a state a ''pseudostable'' (falsely stable) state [6,21,26]. I have also studied these phenomena by more ''exact'' Monte Carlo simulations. The kinetic paths showed features similar to those found in analytical theories. The

  5. Combined use of meteorological drought indices at multi-time scales for improving hydrological drought detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Wang, Wen; Singh, Vijay P; Liu, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Prediction of hydrological drought in the absence of hydrological records is of great significance for water resources management and risk assessment. In this study, two meteorological drought indices, including standardized precipitation index (SPI) and standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) calculated at different time scales (1 to 12months), were analyzed for their capabilities in detecting hydrological droughts. The predictive skills of meteorological drought indices were assessed through correlation analysis, and two skill scores, i.e. probability of detection (POD) and false alarm rate (FAR). When used independently, indices of short time scales generally performed better than did those of long time scales. However, at least 31% of hydrological droughts were still missed in view of the peak POD score (0.69) of a single meteorological drought index. Considering the distinguished roles of different time scales in explaining hydrological droughts with disparate features, an optimization approach of blending SPI/SPEI at multiple time scales was proposed. To examine the robustness of the proposed method, data of 1964-1990 was used to establish the multiscalar index, then validate during 2000-2010. Results showed that POD exhibited a significant increase when more than two time scales were used, and the best performances were found when blending 8 time scales of SPI and 9 for SPEI, with the corresponding values of 0.82 and 0.85 for POD, 0.205 and 0.21 for FAR, in the calibration period, and even better performance in the validation period. These results far exceeded the performance of any single meteorological drought index. This suggests that when there is lack of streamflow measurements, blending climatic information of multiple time scales to jointly monitor hydrological droughts could be an alternative solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective attention to temporal features on nested time scales.

    PubMed

    Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-02-01

    Meaningful auditory stimuli such as speech and music often vary simultaneously along multiple time scales. Thus, listeners must selectively attend to, and selectively ignore, separate but intertwined temporal features. The current study aimed to identify and characterize the neural network specifically involved in this feature-selective attention to time. We used a novel paradigm where listeners judged either the duration or modulation rate of auditory stimuli, and in which the stimulation, working memory demands, response requirements, and task difficulty were held constant. A first analysis identified all brain regions where individual brain activation patterns were correlated with individual behavioral performance patterns, which thus supported temporal judgments generically. A second analysis then isolated those brain regions that specifically regulated selective attention to temporal features: Neural responses in a bilateral fronto-parietal network including insular cortex and basal ganglia decreased with degree of change of the attended temporal feature. Critically, response patterns in these regions were inverted when the task required selectively ignoring this feature. The results demonstrate how the neural analysis of complex acoustic stimuli with multiple temporal features depends on a fronto-parietal network that simultaneously regulates the selective gain for attended and ignored temporal features. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Search for new phenomena in events with high jet multiplicity and low missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-07-01

    A dedicated search is presented for new phenomena in inclusive 8- and 10-jet final states with low missing transverse momentum, with and without identification of jets originating from b quarks. The analysis is based on data from proton-proton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at √{ s} = 8TeV. The dominant multijet background expectations are obtained from low jet multiplicity control samples. Data agree well with the standard model background predictions, and limits are set in several benchmark models. Colorons (axigluons) with masses between 0.6 and 0.75 (up to 1.15) TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. Similar exclusion limits for gluinos in R-parity violating supersymmetric scenarios are from 0.6 up to 1.1 TeV. These results comprise the first experimental probe of the coloron and axigluon models in multijet final states.

  8. Search for New Phenomena in High-multiplicity Final States Using 8 TeV and 13 TeV LHC Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinthuprasith, Tutanon

    2017-01-01

    The first dedicated search based on data from proton-proton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at √{ s} = 8 TeV is presented for new phenomena in inclusive eight- and ten-jet final states with low missing transverse momentum, with and without identification of jets originating from b quarks. The dominant multijet background expectations are obtained from low jet multiplicity control samples. Data agree well with the standard model background predictions, and limits are set in several benchmark models -Colorons, axigluons, and gluinos in R-parity violating supersymmetric scenarios. These results comprise the first experimental probe of the coloron and axigluon models in multijet final states. The second search based on 13 TeV LHC data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 in 2015 is performed in energetic multi-particle final states. Model-independent limits on the cross section times acceptance of a new physics signal in these final states are set and further interpreted in terms of limits on the production of black holes.

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics of the geomagnetic diurnal variation anomalies prior to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) and the possible coupling of multiple pre-earthquake phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Peng; Hattori, Katsumi; Huang, Qinghua; Hirooka, Shinji; Yoshino, Chie

    2016-11-01

    Xu et al. (2013) and Han et al. (2015) have reported unusual behaviors of geomagnetic diurnal variation (GDV) in the vertical component prior to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0). To make a better understanding of this phenomenon, temporal-spatial analyses of GDV have been applied in this study. Geomagnetic data of long-term observations at 17 stations in Japan have been analyzed using the same method in Han et al. (2015). Ratios of diurnal variation range between the reference station KAK and the target stations have been computed. After removing seasonal variations, the 15-day backward running mean values of the ratios in the vertical component shows a clear anomaly exceeding the statistical threshold about 2 months before the mega event at both ESA and MIZ stations in the Tohoku Region. Locations of anomalies in spatial distribution show a good correlation with the epicenter of the Mw 9.0 earthquake. These spatiotemporal results are consistent with those obtained from other independent observations such as groundwater level and GPS displacements. The coupling of multiple pre-earthquake phenomena may help to understand the preparation process of a mega earthquake in the subduction zone.

  10. Time scales of porphyry Cu deposit formation: insights from titanium diffusion in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.; Reed, Mark H.; Mercer, Cameron M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyry dikes and hydrothermal veins from the porphyry Cu-Mo deposit at Butte, Montana, contain multiple generations of quartz that are distinct in scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images and in Ti concentrations. A comparison of microprobe trace element profiles and maps to SEM-CL images shows that the concentration of Ti in quartz correlates positively with CL brightness but Al, K, and Fe do not. After calibrating CL brightness in relation to Ti concentration, we use the brightness gradient between different quartz generations as a proxy for Ti gradients that we model to determine time scales of quartz formation and cooling. Model results indicate that time scales of porphyry magma residence are ~1,000s of years and time scales from porphyry quartz phenocryst rim formation to porphyry dike injection and cooling are ~10s of years. Time scales for the formation and cooling of various generations of hydrothermal vein quartz range from 10s to 10,000s of years. These time scales are considerably shorter than the ~0.6 m.y. overall time frame for each porphyry-style mineralization pulse determined from isotopic studies at Butte, Montana. Simple heat conduction models provide a temporal reference point to compare chemical diffusion time scales, and we find that they support short dike and vein formation time scales. We interpret these relatively short time scales to indicate that the Butte porphyry deposit formed by short-lived episodes of hydrofracturing, dike injection, and vein formation, each with discrete thermal pulses, which repeated over the ~3 m.y. generation of the deposit.

  11. Time scales in Galveston Bay: An unsteady estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayson, Matthew D.; Gross, Edward S.; Hetland, Robert D.; Fringer, Oliver B.

    2016-04-01

    Estuarine time scales including the turnover, particle e-folding time, the age (calculated with a passive tracer), and residence time (calculated with Lagrangian particles) were computed using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Galveston Bay, a low-flow, partially stratified estuary. Time scales were computed during a time period when river flow varied by several orders of magnitude and all time scales therefore exhibited significant temporal variability because of the unsteadiness of the system. The spatial distributions of age and residence time were qualitatively similar and increased from 15 days in a shipping channel to >45 days in the upper estuary. Volume-averaged age and residence time decreased during high-flow conditions. Bulk time scales, including the freshwater and salinity turnover times, were far more variable due to the changing river discharge and salt flux through the estuary mouth. A criterion for calculating a suitable averaging time is discussed to satisfy a steady state assumption and to estimate a more representative bulk time scale. When scaled with a freshwater advective time, all time scales were approximately equal to the advective time scale during high-flow conditions and many times higher during low-flow conditions. The mean age, Lagrangian residence, and flushing times exhibited a relationship that was weakly dependent on the freshwater advective time scale demonstrating predictability even in an unsteady, realistic estuary.

  12. Singular perturbation and time scale approaches in discrete control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, D. S.; Price, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    After considering a singularly perturbed discrete control system, a singular perturbation approach is used to obtain outer and correction subsystems. A time scale approach is then applied via block diagonalization transformations to decouple the system into slow and fast subsystems. To a zeroth-order approximation, the singular perturbation and time-scale approaches are found to yield equivalent results.

  13. Space and Time Scales in Human-Landscape Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. Mathias; Podolak, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring spatial and temporal scales provides a way to understand human alteration of landscape processes and human responses to these processes. We address three topics relevant to human-landscape systems: (1) scales of human impacts on geomorphic processes, (2) spatial and temporal scales in river restoration, and (3) time scales of natural disasters and behavioral and institutional responses. Studies showing dramatic recent change in sediment yields from uplands to the ocean via rivers illustrate the increasingly vast spatial extent and quick rate of human landscape change in the last two millennia, but especially in the second half of the twentieth century. Recent river restoration efforts are typically small in spatial and temporal scale compared to the historical human changes to ecosystem processes, but the cumulative effectiveness of multiple small restoration projects in achieving large ecosystem goals has yet to be demonstrated. The mismatch between infrequent natural disasters and individual risk perception, media coverage, and institutional response to natural disasters results in un-preparedness and unsustainable land use and building practices.

  14. Space and time scales in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Kondolf, G Mathias; Podolak, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Exploring spatial and temporal scales provides a way to understand human alteration of landscape processes and human responses to these processes. We address three topics relevant to human-landscape systems: (1) scales of human impacts on geomorphic processes, (2) spatial and temporal scales in river restoration, and (3) time scales of natural disasters and behavioral and institutional responses. Studies showing dramatic recent change in sediment yields from uplands to the ocean via rivers illustrate the increasingly vast spatial extent and quick rate of human landscape change in the last two millennia, but especially in the second half of the twentieth century. Recent river restoration efforts are typically small in spatial and temporal scale compared to the historical human changes to ecosystem processes, but the cumulative effectiveness of multiple small restoration projects in achieving large ecosystem goals has yet to be demonstrated. The mismatch between infrequent natural disasters and individual risk perception, media coverage, and institutional response to natural disasters results in un-preparedness and unsustainable land use and building practices.

  15. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives.

  16. The limit order book on different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Kertész, János; Lillo, Fabrizio

    2007-06-01

    Financial markets can be described on several time scales. We use data from the limit order book of the London Stock Exchange (LSE) to compare how the fluctuation dominated microstructure crosses over to a more systematic global behavior.

  17. On stabilisability of nonlinear systems on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosiewicz, Zbigniew; Piotrowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    In this article, stabilisability of nonlinear finite-dimensional control systems on arbitrary time scales is studied. The classical results on stabilisation of nonlinear continuous-time and discrete-time systems are extended to systems on arbitrary time scales with bounded graininess function. It is shown that uniform exponential stability of the linear approximation of a nonlinear system implies uniform exponential stability of the nonlinear system. Then this result is used to show a similar implication for uniform exponential stabilisability.

  18. Controllability of multiplex, multi-time-scale networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Márton; Gao, Jianxi; Cornelius, Sean P.; Barabási, Albert-László; D'Souza, Raissa M.

    2016-09-01

    The paradigm of layered networks is used to describe many real-world systems, from biological networks to social organizations and transportation systems. While recently there has been much progress in understanding the general properties of multilayer networks, our understanding of how to control such systems remains limited. One fundamental aspect that makes this endeavor challenging is that each layer can operate at a different time scale; thus, we cannot directly apply standard ideas from structural control theory of individual networks. Here we address the problem of controlling multilayer and multi-time-scale networks focusing on two-layer multiplex networks with one-to-one interlayer coupling. We investigate the practically relevant case when the control signal is applied to the nodes of one layer. We develop a theory based on disjoint path covers to determine the minimum number of inputs (Ni) necessary for full control. We show that if both layers operate on the same time scale, then the network structure of both layers equally affect controllability. In the presence of time-scale separation, controllability is enhanced if the controller interacts with the faster layer: Ni decreases as the time-scale difference increases up to a critical time-scale difference, above which Ni remains constant and is completely determined by the faster layer. We show that the critical time-scale difference is large if layer I is easy and layer II is hard to control in isolation. In contrast, control becomes increasingly difficult if the controller interacts with the layer operating on the slower time scale and increasing time-scale separation leads to increased Ni, again up to a critical value, above which Ni still depends on the structure of both layers. This critical value is largely determined by the longest path in the faster layer that does not involve cycles. By identifying the underlying mechanisms that connect time-scale difference and controllability for a simplified

  19. Detection of crossover time scales in multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Erjia; Leung, Yee

    2013-04-01

    Fractal is employed in this paper as a scale-based method for the identification of the scaling behavior of time series. Many spatial and temporal processes exhibiting complex multi(mono)-scaling behaviors are fractals. One of the important concepts in fractals is crossover time scale(s) that separates distinct regimes having different fractal scaling behaviors. A common method is multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The detection of crossover time scale(s) is, however, relatively subjective since it has been made without rigorous statistical procedures and has generally been determined by eye balling or subjective observation. Crossover time scales such determined may be spurious and problematic. It may not reflect the genuine underlying scaling behavior of a time series. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical procedure to model complex fractal scaling behaviors and reliably identify the crossover time scales under MF-DFA. The scaling-identification regression model, grounded on a solid statistical foundation, is first proposed to describe multi-scaling behaviors of fractals. Through the regression analysis and statistical inference, we can (1) identify the crossover time scales that cannot be detected by eye-balling observation, (2) determine the number and locations of the genuine crossover time scales, (3) give confidence intervals for the crossover time scales, and (4) establish the statistically significant regression model depicting the underlying scaling behavior of a time series. To substantive our argument, the regression model is applied to analyze the multi-scaling behaviors of avian-influenza outbreaks, water consumption, daily mean temperature, and rainfall of Hong Kong. Through the proposed model, we can have a deeper understanding of fractals in general and a statistical approach to identify multi-scaling behavior under MF-DFA in particular.

  20. Study of the long time-scale variability of cosmic rays with the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Alba; James, Irina; Salvini, Paola

    The long term modulation of the cosmic ray intensity includes both Sun and celestial anisotropies. The solar activity is due to high energy flares producing a decrease (known as Forbush Decrease, FD) in the cosmic ray intensity, with a time scale of the order of a few days, often accompained by a Ground Level Enhancement, due to direct Sun emission during the solar flare. The celestial anisotropies are due to the Earth motion in the cosmic rays reference system (solar anisotropy: Compton-Getting effect) and to the solar system location inside the Galaxy (sidereal anisotropies). These anisotropies are studied in ground-base experiments by means of EAS arrays, and the high energy solar emission is mainly studied from ground by neutron monitors. In the ARGO-YBJ experiment these phenomena are investigated by means of the "scaler mode" technique: the detector counting rates of four low multiplicity channels from singles to four-fold coincidences are recorded in a fixed time window of 0.5 s. The signal corresponds to a significant enhancement of the observed counting rate, after correcting the data for enviromental and instrumental parameters. In this paper we present the sensitivity of the ARGO-YBJ detector and the first results for both solar physics and cosmic ray anisotropy studies.

  1. Relative Time-scale for Channeling Events Within Chaotic Terrains, Margaritifer Sinus, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, D.

    1985-01-01

    A relative time scale for ordering channel and chaos forming events was constructed for areas within the Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Transection and superposition relationships of channels, chaotic terrain, and the surfaces surrounding them were used to create the relative time scale; crater density studies were not used. Channels and chaos in contact with one another were treated as systems. These systems were in turn treated both separately (in order to understand internal relationships) and as members of the suite of Martian erosional forms (in order to produce a combined, master time scale). Channeling events associated with chaotic terrain development occurred over an extended geomorphic period. The channels can be divided into three convenient groups: those that pre-date intercrater plains development post-plains, pre-chasma systems; and those associated with the development of the Vallis Marineris chasmata. No correlations with cyclic climatic changes, major geologic events in other regions on Mars, or triggering phenomena (for example, specific impact events) were found.

  2. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  3. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-12-15

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  4. Diffusion Time-Scale of Porous Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Teduka, Norikazu; Kameda, Masaharu; Asai, Keisuke

    2001-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) is an optical pressure sensor that utilizes the oxygen quenching of luminescence. PSP measurements in unsteady aerodynamic flows require fast time response of the paint. There are two characteristic time-scales that are related to the time response of PSP. One is the luminescent lifetime representing an intrinsic physical limit for the achievable temporal resolution of PSP. Another is the time-scale of oxygen diffusion across the PSP layer. When the time-scale of oxygen diffusion is much larger than the luminescent lifetime, the time response of PSP is controlled by oxygen diffusion. In a thin homogenous polymer layer where diffusion is Fickian, the oxygen concentration 1021 can be described by the diffusion equation in one-dimension.

  5. Modes and emergent time scales of embayed beach dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Katherine M.; Murray, A. Brad

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we use a simple numerical model (the Coastline Evolution Model) to explore alongshore transport-driven shoreline dynamics within generalized embayed beaches (neglecting cross-shore effects). Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identify two primary orthogonal modes of shoreline behavior that describe shoreline variation about its unchanging mean position: the rotation mode, which has been previously identified and describes changes in the mean shoreline orientation, and a newly identified breathing mode, which represents changes in shoreline curvature. Wavelet analysis of the PCA mode time series reveals characteristic time scales of these modes (typically years to decades) that emerge within even a statistically constant white-noise wave climate (without changes in external forcing), suggesting that these time scales can arise from internal system dynamics. The time scales of both modes increase linearly with shoreface depth, suggesting that the embayed beach sediment transport dynamics exhibit a diffusive scaling.

  6. Segregation time-scales in model granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, Lydie; Phillips, Jeremy C.

    2016-04-01

    Segregation patterns in natural granular systems offer a singular picture of the systems evolution. In many cases, understanding segregation dynamics may help understanding the system's history as well as its future evolution. Among the key questions, one concerns the typical time-scales at which segregation occurs. In this contribution, we present model granular flows simulated by means of the discrete Contact Dynamics method. The granular flows are bi-disperse, namely exhibiting two grain sizes. The flow composition and its dynamics are systematically varied, and the segregation dynamics carefully analyzed. We propose a physical model for the segregation that gives account of the observed dependence of segregation time scales on composition and dynamics. References L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Stress partition and micro-structure in size-segregating granular flows, Phys. Rev. E 92 022210 (2015) L. Staron and J. C. Phillips, Segregation time-scales in bi-disperse granular flows, Phys. Fluids 26 (3), 033302 (2014)

  7. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  8. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  9. Galaxy merger time-scales in the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Areli; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Hernquist, Lars E.; Wellons, Sarah; Moreno, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this project we are investigate merger time-scales, define as the time delays from dark matter halo viral crossing to galaxy-galaxy coalescence. Our project uses merger history trees drawn from the Illustris Simulation, a cosmological hydrodynamic run that follows the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time. Preliminary results indicate that merger time-scales are not sensitive to stellar mass or mass ratio, in stark contrast to what has been found earlier with cosmological dark-matter-only simulations. Work towards understanding the source of this disagreement is currently in progress.

  10. Time scale analysis of a digital flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, D. S.; Price, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, consideration is given to the fifth order discrete model of an aircraft (longitudinal) control system which possesses three slow (velocity, pitch angle and altitude) and two fast (angle of attack and pitch angular velocity) modes and exhibits a two-time scale property. Using the recent results of the time scale analysis of discrete control systems, the high-order discrete model is decoupled into low-order slow and fast subsystems. The results of the decoupled system are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the original system.

  11. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Keke; Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  12. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  13. Vorticity statistics and the time scales of turbulent strain.

    PubMed

    Moriconi, L; Pereira, R M

    2013-07-01

    Time scales of turbulent strain activity, denoted as the strain persistence times of first and second order, are obtained from time-dependent expectation values and correlation functions of Lagrangian rate-of-strain eigenvalues taken in particularly defined statistical ensembles. Taking into account direct numerical simulation data, our approach relies on heuristic closure hypotheses which allow us to establish a connection between the statistics of vorticity and strain. It turns out that softly divergent prefactors correct the usual "1/s" strain time-scale estimate of standard turbulence phenomenology, in a way which is consistent with the phenomenon of vorticity intermittency.

  14. Multi-time Scale Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources in Isolated Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony; Xie, Le; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2016-03-31

    In isolated power systems, including microgrids, distributed assets, such as renewable energy resources (e.g. wind, solar) and energy storage, can be actively coordinated to reduce dependency on fossil fuel generation. The key challenge of such coordination arises from significant uncertainty and variability occurring at small time scales associated with increased penetration of renewables. Specifically, the problem is with ensuring economic and efficient utilization of DERs, while also meeting operational objectives such as adequate frequency performance. One possible solution is to reduce the time step at which tertiary controls are implemented and to ensure feedback and look-ahead capability are incorporated to handle variability and uncertainty. However, reducing the time step of tertiary controls necessitates investigating time-scale coupling with primary controls so as not to exacerbate system stability issues. In this paper, an optimal coordination (OC) strategy, which considers multiple time-scales, is proposed for isolated microgrid systems with a mix of DERs. This coordination strategy is based on an online moving horizon optimization approach. The effectiveness of the strategy was evaluated in terms of economics, technical performance, and computation time by varying key parameters that significantly impact performance. The illustrative example with realistic scenarios on a simulated isolated microgrid test system suggests that the proposed approach is generalizable towards designing multi-time scale optimal coordination strategies for isolated power systems.

  15. Beyond trial-by-trial adaptation: A quantification of the time scale of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Aben, Bart; Verguts, Tom; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2017-03-01

    The idea that adaptation to stimulus or response conflict can operate over different time scales takes a prominent position in various theories and models of cognitive control. The mechanisms underlying temporal variations in control are nevertheless poorly understood, which is partly due to a lack of appropriate empirical measures. Inspired by reinforcement learning models, we developed a method to quantify the time scale of control behaviorally, by computing trial-by-trial effects that go beyond the preceding trial. Briefly, we extended the congruency sequence effect from 1 trial to multiple trials into the past and quantified the influence of previous trials on current-trial performance as a function of trial distance. The rate at which this influence changes across trials was taken as a measure of the time scale of control. We applied the method to a flanker task with different conflict frequencies and volatility. Results showed that the time scale of control was smaller in rare-conflict and volatile contexts, compared to frequent-conflict and neutral contexts. This is in agreement with theories differentiating transient from sustained control. The method offers new opportunities to reveal temporal differences in control modes and can easily be applied to various empirical paradigms. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. An algorithm for the Italian atomic time scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordara, F.; Vizio, G.; Tavella, P.; Pettiti, V.

    1994-01-01

    During the past twenty years, the time scale at the IEN has been realized by a commercial cesium clock, selected from an ensemble of five, whose rate has been continuously steered towards UTC to maintain a long term agreement within 3 x 10(exp -13). A time scale algorithm, suitable for a small clock ensemble and capable of improving the medium and long term stability of the IEN time scale, has been recently designed taking care of reducing the effects of the seasonal variations and the sudden frequency anomalies of the single cesium clocks. The new time scale, TA(IEN), is obtained as a weighted average of the clock ensemble computed once a day from the time comparisons between the local reference UTC(IEN) and the single clocks. It is foreseen to include in the computation also ten cesium clocks maintained in other Italian laboratories to further improve its reliability and its long term stability. To implement this algorithm, a personal computer program in Quick Basic has been prepared and it has been tested at the IEN time and frequency laboratory. Results obtained using this algorithm on the real clocks data relative to a period of about two years are presented.

  17. Time scale bias in erosion rates of glaciated landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Vamsi; von Hagke, Christoph; Scherler, Dirk; Lamb, Michael P.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering erosion rates over geologic time is fundamental for understanding the interplay between climate, tectonic, and erosional processes. Existing techniques integrate erosion over different time scales, and direct comparison of such rates is routinely done in earth science. On the basis of a global compilation, we show that erosion rate estimates in glaciated landscapes may be affected by a systematic averaging bias that produces higher estimated erosion rates toward the present, which do not reflect straightforward changes in erosion rates through time. This trend can result from a heavy-tailed distribution of erosional hiatuses (that is, time periods where no or relatively slow erosion occurs). We argue that such a distribution can result from the intermittency of erosional processes in glaciated landscapes that are tightly coupled to climate variability from decadal to millennial time scales. In contrast, we find no evidence for a time scale bias in spatially averaged erosion rates of landscapes dominated by river incision. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the proposed coupling between climate and tectonics, and interpreting erosion rate estimates with different averaging time scales through geologic time. PMID:27713925

  18. Time scale bias in erosion rates of glaciated landscapes.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Vamsi; von Hagke, Christoph; Scherler, Dirk; Lamb, Michael P; Fischer, Woodward W; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Deciphering erosion rates over geologic time is fundamental for understanding the interplay between climate, tectonic, and erosional processes. Existing techniques integrate erosion over different time scales, and direct comparison of such rates is routinely done in earth science. On the basis of a global compilation, we show that erosion rate estimates in glaciated landscapes may be affected by a systematic averaging bias that produces higher estimated erosion rates toward the present, which do not reflect straightforward changes in erosion rates through time. This trend can result from a heavy-tailed distribution of erosional hiatuses (that is, time periods where no or relatively slow erosion occurs). We argue that such a distribution can result from the intermittency of erosional processes in glaciated landscapes that are tightly coupled to climate variability from decadal to millennial time scales. In contrast, we find no evidence for a time scale bias in spatially averaged erosion rates of landscapes dominated by river incision. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the proposed coupling between climate and tectonics, and interpreting erosion rate estimates with different averaging time scales through geologic time.

  19. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  20. Speech Compensation for Time-Scale-Modified Auditory Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. Method: Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory…

  1. A methane-based time scale for Vostok ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddiman, William F.; Raymo, Maureen E.

    2003-02-01

    Tuning the Vostok methane signal to mid-July 30°N insolation yields a new ice-core gas time scale. This exercise has two rationales: (1) evidence supporting Kutzbach's theory that low-latitude summer insolation in the northern hemisphere controls the strength of tropical monsoons, and (2) interhemispheric CH 4 gradients showing that the main control of orbital-scale CH 4 variations is tropical (monsoonal) sources. The immediate basis for tuning CH 4 to mid-July insolation is the coincident timing of the most recent (pre-anthropogenic) CH 4 maximum at 11,000-10,500 calendar years ago and the most recent July 30°N insolation maximum (all ages in this paper are in calendar years unless specified as 14C years). The resulting CH 4 gas time scale diverges by as much as 15,000 years from the GT4 gas time scale (Petit et al., Nature 399 (1999) 429) prior to 250,000 years ago, but it matches fairly closely a time scale derived by tuning ice-core δ18O atm to a lagged insolation signal (Shackleton, Science 289 (2000) 1897). Most offsets between the CH 4 and δ18O atm time scales can be explained by assuming that tropical monsoons and ice sheets alternate in controlling the phase of the δ18O atm signal. The CH 4 time scale provides an estimate of the timing of the Vostok CO 2 signal against SPECMAP marine δ18O, often used as an index of global ice volume. On the CH 4 time scale, all CO 2 responses are highly coherent with SPECMAP δ18O at the orbital periods. CO 2 leads δ18O by 5000 years at 100,000 years (eccentricity), but the two signals are nearly in-phase at 41,000 years (obliquity) and 23,000 years (precession). The actual phasing between CO 2 and ice volume is difficult to infer because of likely SST overprints on the SPECMAP δ18O signal. CO 2 could lead, or be in phase with, ice volume, but is unlikely to lag behind the ice response.

  2. Time Scale Optimization and the Hunt for Astronomical Cycles in Deep Time Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    2016-04-01

    A valuable attribute of astrochronology is the direct link between chronometer and climate change, providing a remarkable opportunity to constrain the evolution of the surficial Earth System. Consequently, the hunt for astronomical cycles in strata has spurred the development of a rich conceptual framework for climatic/oceanographic change, and has allowed exploration of the geologic record with unprecedented temporal resolution. Accompanying these successes, however, has been a persistent skepticism about appropriate astrochronologic testing and circular reasoning: how does one reliably test for astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, especially when time is poorly constrained? From this perspective, it would seem that the merits and promise of astrochronology (e.g., a geologic time scale measured in ≤400 kyr increments) also serves as its Achilles heel, if the confirmation of such short rhythms defies rigorous statistical testing. To address these statistical challenges in astrochronologic testing, a new approach has been developed that (1) explicitly evaluates time scale uncertainty, (2) is resilient to common problems associated with spectrum confidence level assessment and 'multiple testing', and (3) achieves high statistical power under a wide range of conditions (it can identify astronomical cycles when present in data). Designated TimeOpt (for "time scale optimization"; Meyers 2015), the method employs a probabilistic linear regression model framework to investigate amplitude modulation and frequency ratios (bundling) in stratigraphic data, while simultaneously determining the optimal time scale. This presentation will review the TimeOpt method, and demonstrate how the flexible statistical framework can be further extended to evaluate (and optimize upon) complex sedimentation rate models, enhancing the statistical power of the approach, and addressing the challenge of unsteady sedimentation. Meyers, S. R. (2015), The evaluation of eccentricity

  3. Equilibrium distributions of simple biochemical reaction systems for time-scale separation in stochastic reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mélykúti, Bence; Hespanha, João P.; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Many biochemical reaction networks are inherently multiscale in time and in the counts of participating molecular species. A standard technique to treat different time scales in the stochastic kinetics framework is averaging or quasi-steady-state analysis: it is assumed that the fast dynamics reaches its equilibrium (stationary) distribution on a time scale where the slowly varying molecular counts are unlikely to have changed. We derive analytic equilibrium distributions for various simple biochemical systems, such as enzymatic reactions and gene regulation models. These can be directly inserted into simulations of the slow time-scale dynamics. They also provide insight into the stimulus–response of these systems. An important model for which we derive the analytic equilibrium distribution is the binding of dimer transcription factors (TFs) that first have to form from monomers. This gene regulation mechanism is compared to the cases of the binding of simple monomer TFs to one gene or to multiple copies of a gene, and to the cases of the cooperative binding of two or multiple TFs to a gene. The results apply equally to ligands binding to enzyme molecules. PMID:24920118

  4. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  5. Entropy Production of Nanosystems with Time Scale Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shou-Wen; Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Tang, Lei-Han

    2016-08-01

    Energy flows in biomolecular motors and machines are vital to their function. Yet experimental observations are often limited to a small subset of variables that participate in energy transport and dissipation. Here we show, through a solvable Langevin model, that the seemingly hidden entropy production is measurable through the violation spectrum of the fluctuation-response relation of a slow observable. For general Markov systems with time scale separation, we prove that the violation spectrum exhibits a characteristic plateau in the intermediate frequency region. Despite its vanishing height, the plateau can account for energy dissipation over a broad time scale. Our findings suggest a general possibility to probe hidden entropy production in nanosystems without direct observation of fast variables.

  6. Trends in Surface Radiation Budgets at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Zhang, B.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    For assessment of variability and trends in the Earth Radiation Balance, information is needed at climatic time scales. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of radiative balance at global scale, however, the length of available satellite records is limited due to the frequent changes in the observing systems. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize satellite observations from independent sources to estimates shortwave and longwave surface radiative fluxes at climatic time scales and use them to learn about their variability and trends at global scale with a focus on the tropics. An attempt will be made to learn from the comparison about possible causes of observed trends. The radiative fluxes were derived in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; they are evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention is given to updated knowledge on radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  7. Time scales of crystal mixing in magma mushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, Jillian M.; Bergantz, George W.; Breidenthal, Robert E.; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized as a means of producing compositional diversity and preconditioning magmas for eruption. However, the processes and associated time scales that produce the commonly observed expressions of magma mixing are poorly understood, especially under crystal-rich conditions. Here we introduce and exemplify a parameterized method to predict the characteristic mixing time of crystals in a crystal-rich magma mush that is subject to open-system reintrusion events. Our approach includes novel numerical simulations that resolve multiphase particle-fluid interactions. It also quantifies the crystal mixing by calculating both the local and system-wide progressive loss of the spatial correlation of individual crystals throughout the mixing region. Both inertial and viscous time scales for bulk mixing are introduced. Estimated mixing times are compared to natural examples and the time for basaltic mush systems to become well mixed can be on the order of 10 days.

  8. Time Scales for Energy Release in Hall Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2004-05-01

    We present a study of the time scales for energy release in 2D Hall magnetic reconnection. We use the NRL Hall MHD code VooDoo for this study. We consider a 2D reversed field current layer with a magnetic perturbation that initiates the reconnection process. We use boundary conditions that allow inflow and outflow (i.e., not periodic) and let the system reach a steady state. We find that the system goes through three stages: a relatively long current layer thinning process, a fast reconnection phase, and a final steady state phase. We define the time scale for energy release as the fast reconnection period: from onset to steady state. Preliminary results indicate that the time for energy release scales as the initial thickness of the current layer. We apply these results to the magnetotail and magnetopause. Research supported by NASA and ONR.

  9. Exponentials and Laplace transforms on nonuniform time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigueira, Manuel D.; Torres, Delfim F. M.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a coherent approach to signals and systems theory on time scales. The two derivatives from the time-scale calculus are used, i.e., nabla (forward) and delta (backward), and the corresponding eigenfunctions, the so-called nabla and delta exponentials, computed. With these exponentials, two generalised discrete-time Laplace transforms are deduced and their properties studied. These transforms are compatible with the standard Laplace and Z transforms. They are used to study discrete-time linear systems defined by difference equations. These equations mimic the usual continuous-time equations that are uniformly approximated when the sampling interval becomes small. Impulse response and transfer function notions are introduced. This implies a unified mathematical framework that allows us to approximate the classic continuous-time case when the sampling rate is high or to obtain the standard discrete-time case, based on difference equations, when the time grid becomes uniform.

  10. Time scales for molecule formation by ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained for nonlinear differential equations governing the time-dependence of molecular abundances in interstellar clouds. Three gas-phase reaction schemes are considered separately for the regions where each dominates. The particular case of CO, and closely related members of the Oh and CH families of molecules, is studied for given values of temperature, density, and the radiation field. Nonlinear effects and couplings with particular ions are found to be important. The time scales for CO formation range from 100,000 to a few million years, depending on the chemistry and regime. The time required for essentially complete conversion of C(+) to CO in the region where the H3(+) chemistry dominates is several million years. Because this time is longer than or comparable to dynamical time scales for dense interstellar clouds, steady-state abundances may not be observed in such clouds.

  11. Snoddy (1926) revisited: time scales of motor learning.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Shannon M; Liu, Yeou-Teh; Hong, Siang Lee; Mayer-Kress, Gottfried; Newell, Karl M

    2007-11-01

    The authors investigated the time scales of the learning of a mirror-tracing task to reexamine G. S. Snoddy's (1926) original claim and the received theoretical view (A. Newell & P. S. Rosenbloom, 1981) that motor learning follows a power law. Adult participants (N = 16) learned the tracing task in either a normal or a reversed visual-image condition over 5 consecutive days of practice and then performed 1 day of practice 1 week later and again 1 month later. The reversed-image group's performance was poorer than that of the normal-image group throughout the practice. An exponential was the best fitting function on individual data, but the power-law function was the best fit on the group-averaged data. The findings provided preliminary evidence that 2 characteristic time scales, (a) fast, dominated by warm-up, and (b) slow, dominated by persistent change, capture individuals' performance in the learning of the mirror-tracing task.

  12. Reconstructions of solar irradiance on centennial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.; Dasi Espuig, Maria; Kok Leng, Yeo

    Solar irradiance is the main external source of energy to Earth's climate system. The record of direct measurements covering less than 40 years is too short to study solar influence on Earth's climate, which calls for reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past with the help of appropriate models. An obvious requirement to a competitive model is its ability to reproduce observed irradiance changes, and a successful example of such a model is presented by the SATIRE family of models. As most state-of-the-art models, SATIRE assumes that irradiance changes on time scales longer than approximately a day are caused by the evolving distribution of dark and bright magnetic features on the solar surface. The surface coverage by such features as a function of time is derived from solar observations. The choice of these depends on the time scale in question. Most accurate is the version of the model that employs full-disc spatially-resolved solar magnetograms and reproduces over 90% of the measured irradiance variation, including the overall decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance over the last four cycles. Since such magnetograms are only available for about four decades, reconstructions on time scales of centuries have to rely on disc-integrated proxies of solar magnetic activity, such as sunspot areas and numbers. Employing a surface flux transport model and sunspot observations as input, we have being able to produce synthetic magnetograms since 1700. This improves the temporal resolution of the irradiance reconstructions on centennial time scales. The most critical aspect of such reconstructions remains the uncertainty in the magnitude of the secular change.

  13. Intrinsic time scaling in survival analysis: application to biological populations.

    PubMed

    Eakin, T

    1994-11-01

    A method of dimensionless time-scaling based on extrinsic expectation of life at birth but intrinsic to a system generating a survival distribution is introduced. Such scaling allows the survival fraction function and its associated mortality function to serve as Green's functions for their generalized equivalents, i.e., a "population" function and a "death" function. The analytical mechanics of utilizing these concepts are formulated, applied to the classical Gompertz and Weibull survival models, and discussed with respect to biological relevance.

  14. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  15. Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic: Time Scales and Variations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    2014 Carnegie Mellon University Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic : Time Scales and Variation Soumyo Moitra smoitra@sei.cmu.edu...number. 1. REPORT DATE 21 OCT 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inferring Patterns in Network Traffic : Time...method and metrics for Situational Awareness • SA  Monitoring trends and changes in traffic • Analysis over time  Time series data analysis • Metrics

  16. Terrestrial carbon-nitrogen interactions across time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaehle, Sönke; Sickel, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Through its role in forming amino acids, nitrogen (N) plays a fundamental role in terrestrial biogeochemistry, affecting for instance the photosynthetic rate of a leaf, and the amount of leaf area of a plant; with further consequences for quasi instantaneous terrestrial biophysical properties and fluxes. Because of the high energy requirements of transforming atmospheric N2 to biologically available form, N is generally thought to be limiting terrestrial productivity. Experimental evidence and modelling studies suggest that in temperate and boreal ecosystems, this N-"limitation" affects plant production at scales from days to decades, and potentially beyond. Whether these interactions play a role at longer timescales, such as during the transition from the last glacial maximum to the holocene, is currently unclear. To address this question, we present results from a 22000 years long simulation with dynamic global vegetation model including a comprehensive treatment of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen balance and their interactions (using the OCN-DGVM) driven by monthly, transient climate forcing obtained from the CESM climate model (TRACE). OCN couples carbon and nitrogen processes at the time-scale of hours, but simulates a comprehensive nitrogen balance as well as vegetation dynamics with time-scales of centuries and beyond. We investigate in particular, whether (and at with time scale) carbon-nitrogen interactions cause important lags in the response of the terrestrial biosphere to changed climate, and which processes (such as altered N inputs from fixation or altered losses through leaching and denitrification) contribute to these lags.

  17. Speech compensation for time-scale-modified auditory feedback.

    PubMed

    Ogane, Rintaro; Honda, Masaaki

    2014-04-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine speech compensation in response to time-scale-modified auditory feedback during the transition of the semivowel for a target utterance of /ija/. METHOD Each utterance session consisted of 10 control trials in the normal feedback condition followed by 20 perturbed trials in the modified auditory feedback condition and 10 return trials in the normal feedback condition. The authors examined speech compensation and the aftereffect in terms of 3 acoustic features: the maximum velocities on the (a) F1 and (b) F2 trajectories (VF1 and VF2) and (c) the F1-F2 onset time difference (TD) during the transition. They also conducted a syllable perception test on the feedback speech. RESULTS Speech compensation was observed in VF1, VF2, and TD. The magnitudes of speech compensation in VF1 and TD monotonically increased as the amount of the time-scale perturbation increased. The amount of speech compensation increased as the phonemic perception change increased. CONCLUSIONS Speech compensation for time-scale-modified auditory feedback is carried out primarily by changing VF1 and secondarily by adjusting VF2 and TD. Furthermore, it is activated primarily by detecting the speed change in altered feedback speech and secondarily by detecting the phonemic categorical change.

  18. TASEP on a Ring in Sub-relaxation Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jinho; Liu, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    Interacting particle systems in the KPZ universality class on a ring of size L with O( L) number of particles are expected to change from KPZ dynamics to equilibrium dynamics at the so-called relaxation time scale t=O(L^{3/2}). In particular the system size is expected to have little effect to the particle fluctuations in the sub-relaxation time scale 1≪ t≪ L^{3/2}. We prove that this is indeed the case for the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with two types of initial conditions. For flat initial condition, we show that the particle fluctuations are given by the Airy_1 process as in the infinite TASEP with flat initial condition. On the other hand, the TASEP on a ring with step initial condition is equivalent to the periodic TASEP with a certain shock initial condition. We compute the fluctuations explicitly both away from and near the shocks for the infinite TASEP with same initial condition, and then show that the periodic TASEP has same fluctuations in the sub-relaxation time scale.

  19. Backpropagation and ordered derivatives in the time scales calculus.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Wunsch, Donald C

    2010-08-01

    Backpropagation is the most widely used neural network learning technique. It is based on the mathematical notion of an ordered derivative. In this paper, we present a formulation of ordered derivatives and the backpropagation training algorithm using the important emerging area of mathematics known as the time scales calculus. This calculus, with its potential for application to a wide variety of inter-disciplinary problems, is becoming a key area of mathematics. It is capable of unifying continuous and discrete analysis within one coherent theoretical framework. Using this calculus, we present here a generalization of backpropagation which is appropriate for cases beyond the specifically continuous or discrete. We develop a new multivariate chain rule of this calculus, define ordered derivatives on time scales, prove a key theorem about them, and derive the backpropagation weight update equations for a feedforward multilayer neural network architecture. By drawing together the time scales calculus and the area of neural network learning, we present the first connection of two major fields of research.

  20. Improved jet noise modeling using a new time-scale.

    PubMed

    Azarpeyvand, M; Self, R H

    2009-09-01

    To calculate the noise emanating from a turbulent flow using an acoustic analogy knowledge concerning the unsteady characteristics of the turbulence is required. Specifically, the form of the turbulent correlation tensor together with various time and length-scales are needed. However, if a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stores calculation is used as the starting point then one can only obtain steady characteristics of the flow and it is necessary to model the unsteady behavior in some way. While there has been considerable attention given to the correct way to model the form of the correlation tensor less attention has been given to the underlying physics that dictate the proper choice of time-scale. In this paper the authors recognize that there are several time dependent processes occurring within a turbulent flow and propose a new way of obtaining the time-scale. Isothermal single-stream flow jets with Mach numbers 0.75 and 0.90 have been chosen for the present study. The Mani-Gliebe-Balsa-Khavaran method has been used for prediction of noise at different angles, and there is good agreement between the noise predictions and observations. Furthermore, the new time-scale has an inherent frequency dependency that arises naturally from the underlying physics, thus avoiding supplementary mathematical enhancements needed in previous modeling.

  1. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Dietze; Rodrigo Vargas; Andrew D. Richardson; Paul C. Stoy; Alan G. Barr; Ryan S. Anderson; M. Altaf Arain; Ian T. Baker; T. Andrew Black; Jing M. Chen; Philippe Ciais; Lawrence B. Flanagan; Christopher M. Gough; Robert F. Grant; David Hollinger; R. Cesar Izaurralde; Christopher J. Kucharik; Peter Lafleur; Shugang Liu; Erandathie Lokupitiya; Yiqi Luo; J. William Munger; Changhui Peng; Benjamin Poulter; David T. Price; Daniel M. Ricciuto; William J. Riley; Alok Kumar Sahoo; Kevin Schaefer; Andrew E. Suyker; Hanqin Tian; Christina Tonitto; Hans Verbeeck; Shashi B. Verma; Weifeng Wang; Ensheng Weng

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Despite the fact that ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales, most assessments of model performance do not discriminate different time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the...

  2. Earthquake prediction with electromagnetic phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Short-term earthquake (EQ) prediction is defined as prospective prediction with the time scale of about one week, which is considered to be one of the most important and urgent topics for the human beings. If this short-term prediction is realized, casualty will be drastically reduced. Unlike the conventional seismic measurement, we proposed the use of electromagnetic phenomena as precursors to EQs in the prediction, and an extensive amount of progress has been achieved in the field of seismo-electromagnetics during the last two decades. This paper deals with the review on this short-term EQ prediction, including the impossibility myth of EQs prediction by seismometers, the reason why we are interested in electromagnetics, the history of seismo-electromagnetics, the ionospheric perturbation as the most promising candidate of EQ prediction, then the future of EQ predictology from two standpoints of a practical science and a pure science, and finally a brief summary.

  3. The Importance of Rotational Time-scales in Accretion Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Gráinne; Vink, Joirck; Scholz, Aleks; Testi, Leonardo; Ray, Tom

    2013-07-01

    For the first few million years, one of the dominant sources of emission from a low mass young stellar object is from accretion. This process regulates the flow of material and angular moments from the surroundings to the central object, and is thought to play an important role in the definition of the long term stellar properties. Variability is a well documented attribute of accretion, and has been observed on time-scales of from days to years. However, where these variations come from is not clear. Th current model for accretion is magnetospheric accretion, where the stellar magnetic field truncates the disc, allowing the matter to flow from the disc onto the surface of the star. This model allows for variations in the accretion rate to come from many different sources, such as the magnetic field, the circumstellar disc and the interaction of the different parts of the system. We have been studying unbiased samples of accretors in order to identify the dominant time-scales and typical magnitudes of variations. In this way different sources of variations can be excluded and any missing physics in these systems identified. Through our previous work with the Long-term Accretion Monitoring Program (LAMP), we found 10 accretors in the ChaI region, whose variability is dominated by short term variations of 2 weeks. This was the shortest time period between spectroscopic observations which spanned 15 months, and rules out large scale processes in the disk as origins of this variability. On the basis of this study we have gone further to study the accretion signature H-alpha, over the time-scales of minutes and days in a set of Herbig Ae and T Tauri stars. Using the same methods as we used in LAMP we found the dominant time-scales of variations to be days. These samples both point towards rotation period of these objects as being an important time-scale for accretion variations. This allows us to indicate which are the most likely sources of these variations.

  4. Multiple spreading phenomena for a free boundary problem of a reaction-diffusion equation with a certain class of bistable nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Yusuke; Yamada, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    This paper deals with a free boundary problem for diffusion equation with a certain class of bistable nonlinearity which allows two positive stable equilibrium states as an ODE model. This problem models the invasion of a biological species and the free boundary represents the spreading front of its habitat. Our main interest is to study large-time behaviors of solutions for the free boundary problem. We will completely classify asymptotic behaviors of solutions and, in particular, observe two different types of spreading phenomena corresponding to two positive stable equilibrium states. Moreover, it will be proved that, if the free boundary expands to infinity, an asymptotic speed of the moving free boundary for large time can be uniquely determined from the related semi-wave problem.

  5. Undergraduates' understanding of cardiovascular phenomena.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joel A; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Modell, Harold I; Cliff, William; Horwitz, Barbara; McHale, Philip; Richardson, Daniel; Silverthorn, Dee; Williams, Stephen; Whitescarver, Shirley

    2002-12-01

    Undergraduates students in 12 courses at 8 different institutions were surveyed to determine the prevalence of 13 different misconceptions (conceptual difficulties) about cardiovascular function. The prevalence of these misconceptions ranged from 20 to 81% and, for each misconception, was consistent across the different student populations. We also obtained explanations for the students' answers either as free responses or with follow-up multiple-choice questions. These results suggest that students have a number of underlying conceptual difficulties about cardiovascular phenomena. One possible source of some misconceptions is the students' inability to apply simple general models to specific cardiovascular phenomena. Some implications of these results for teachers of physiology are discussed.

  6. Rate dependence of grain boundary sliding via time-scaling atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Farah; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2017-02-01

    Approaching experimentally relevant strain rates has been a long-standing challenge for molecular dynamics method which captures phenomena typically on the scale of nanoseconds or at strain rates of 107 s-1 and higher. Here, we use grain boundary sliding in nanostructures as a paradigmatic problem to investigate rate dependence using atomistic simulations. We employ a combination of time-scaling computational approaches, including the autonomous basin climbing method, the nudged elastic band method, and kinetic Monte Carlo, to access strain rates ranging from 0.5 s-1 to 107 s-1. Combined with a standard linear solid model for viscoelastic behavior, our simulations reveal that grain boundary sliding exhibits noticeable rate dependence only below strain rates on the order of 10 s-1 but is rate independent and consistent with molecular dynamics at higher strain rates.

  7. Time scales of foam stability in shallow conduits: Insights from analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Scheu, B.; Cimarelli, C.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic systems can exhibit periodical trends in degassing activity, characterized by a wide range of time scales. Understanding the dynamics that control such periodic behavior can provide a picture of the processes occurring in the feeding system. Toward this end, we analyzed the periodicity of outgassing in a series of decompression experiments performed on analogue material (argon-saturated silicone oil plus glass beads/fibers) scaled to serve as models of basaltic magma. To define the effects of liquid viscosity and crystal content on the time scale of outgassing, we investigated both: (1) pure liquid systems, at differing viscosities (100 and 1000 Pa s), and (2) particle-bearing suspensions (diluted and semidiluted). The results indicate that under dynamic conditions (e.g., decompressive bubble growth and fluid ascent within the conduit), the periodicity of foam disruption may be up to several orders of magnitude less than estimates based on the analysis of static conditions. This difference in foam disruption time scale is inferred to result from the contribution of bubble shear and bubble growth to inter-bubble film thinning. The presence of particles in the semidiluted regime is further linked to shorter bubble bursting times, likely resulting from contributions of the presence of a solid network and coalescence processes to the relative increase in bubble breakup rates. Finally, it is argued that these experiments represent a good analogue of gas-piston activity (i.e., the periodical rise-and-fall of a basaltic lava lake surface), implying a dominant role for shallow foam accumulation as a source process for these phenomena.

  8. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations.

    PubMed

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars' surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA's Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode.

  9. Precise stellar surface gravities from the time scales of convectively driven brightness variations

    PubMed Central

    Kallinger, Thomas; Hekker, Saskia; García, Rafael A.; Huber, Daniel; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2016-01-01

    A significant part of the intrinsic brightness variations in cool stars of low and intermediate mass arises from surface convection (seen as granulation) and acoustic oscillations (p-mode pulsations). The characteristics of these phenomena are largely determined by the stars’ surface gravity (g). Detailed photometric measurements of either signal can yield an accurate value of g. However, even with ultraprecise photometry from NASA’s Kepler mission, many stars are too faint for current methods or only moderate accuracy can be achieved in a limited range of stellar evolutionary stages. This means that many of the stars in the Kepler sample, including exoplanet hosts, are not sufficiently characterized to fully describe the sample and exoplanet properties. We present a novel way to measure surface gravities with accuracies of about 4%. Our technique exploits the tight relation between g and the characteristic time scale of the combined granulation and p-mode oscillation signal. It is applicable to all stars with a convective envelope, including active stars. It can measure g in stars for which no other analysis is now possible. Because it depends on the time scale (and no other properties) of the signal, our technique is largely independent of the type of measurement (for example, photometry or radial velocity measurements) and the calibration of the instrumentation used. However, the oscillation signal must be temporally resolved; thus, it cannot be applied to dwarf stars observed by Kepler in its long-cadence mode. PMID:26767193

  10. Degradation modeling of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells using dual time scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, E.; Maximini, M.; Bauschulte, A.; vom Schloß, J.; Hermanns, R. T. E.

    2015-02-01

    HT-PEM fuel cells suffer from performance losses due to degradation effects. Therefore, the durability of HT-PEM is currently an important factor of research and development. In this paper a novel approach is presented for an integrated short term and long term simulation of HT-PEM accelerated lifetime testing. The physical phenomena of short term and long term effects are commonly modeled separately due to the different time scales. However, in accelerated lifetime testing, long term degradation effects have a crucial impact on the short term dynamics. Our approach addresses this problem by applying a novel method for dual time scale simulation. A transient system simulation is performed for an open voltage cycle test on a HT-PEM fuel cell for a physical time of 35 days. The analysis describes the system dynamics by numerical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Furthermore, a performance assessment is performed in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach. The presented approach reduces the simulation time by approximately 73% compared to conventional simulation approach without losing too much accuracy. The approach promises a comprehensive perspective considering short term dynamic behavior and long term degradation effects.

  11. Improving the Geologic Time Scale (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.

    2010-05-01

    The Geologic Time Scale (GTS) provides the framework for the physical, chemical and biological processes on Earth. The time scale is the tool "par excellence" of the geological trade, and insight in its construction, strength, and limitations enhances its function and its utility. Earth scientists should understand how time scales are constructed and its myriad of physical and abstract data are calibrated, rather than merely using ages plucked from a convenient chart or card. Calibration to linear time of the succession of events recorded in the rocks on Earth has three components: (1) the standard stratigraphic divisions and their correlation in the global rock record, (2) the means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record, and (3) the methods of effectively joining the two scales, the stratigraphic one and the linear one. Under the auspices of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the international stratigraphic divisions and their correlative events are now largely standardized, especially using the GSSP (Global Stratigraphic Section and Point) concept. The means of measuring linear time or elapsed durations from the rock record are objectives in the EARTH TIME and GTS NEXT projects, that also are educating a new generation of GTS dedicated scientists. The U/Pb, Ar/Ar and orbital tuning methods are intercalibrated, and external error analysis improved. Existing Ar/Ar ages become almost 0.5% older, and U/Pb ages stratigraphically more realistic. The new Os/Re method has potential for directly dating more GSSP's and its correlative events. Such may reduce scaling uncertainty between the sedimentary levels of an age date and that of a stage boundary. Since 1981, six successive Phanerozoic GTS have been published, each new one achieving higher resolution and more users. The next GTS is scheduled for 2011/2012, with over 50 specialists taking part. New chapters include an expanded planetary time scale, sequence stratigraphy

  12. Formation processes and time scales for meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transition from small particles suspended in the solar nebula to the planetesimals (asteroids) that became the parent bodies of meteorites is examined. Planetesimals probably grew by coagulation of grain aggregates that collided due to different rates of settling and drag-induced orbital decay. Their growth was accompanied by radial transport of solids, possibly sufficient to deplete the primordial mass in the asteroid zone, but with relatively little mixing. The formation of asteroid-sized planetesimals was probably rapid, on a time scale less than 1 Myr.

  13. Anomalous multiphoton photoelectric effect in ultrashort time scales.

    PubMed

    Kupersztych, J; Raynaud, M

    2005-09-30

    In a multiphoton photoelectric process, an electron needs to absorb a given number of photons to escape the surface of a metal. It is shown for the first time that this number is not a constant depending only on the characteristics of the metal and light, but varies with the interaction duration in ultrashort time scales. The phenomenon occurs when electromagnetic energy is transferred, via ultrafast excitation of electron collective modes, to conduction electrons in a duration less than the electron energy damping time. It manifests itself through a dramatic increase of electron production.

  14. Time scales and relaxation dynamics in quantum-dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Erneux, Thomas; Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Mandel, Paul

    2007-08-15

    We analyze a three-variable rate equation model that takes into account carrier capture and Pauli blocking in quantum dot semiconductor lasers. The exponential decay of the relaxation oscillations is analyzed from the linearized equations in terms of three key parameters that control the time scales of the laser. Depending on their relative values, we determine two distinct two-variable reductions of the rate equations in the limit of large capture rates. The first case leads to the rate equations for quantum well lasers, exhibiting relaxation oscillations dynamics. The second case corresponds to dots nearly saturated by the carriers and is characterized by the absence of relaxation oscillations.

  15. Single-molecule binding experiments on long time scales.

    PubMed

    Elenko, Mark P; Szostak, Jack W; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2010-08-01

    We describe an approach for performing single-molecule binding experiments on time scales from hours to days, allowing for the observation of slower kinetics than have been previously investigated by single-molecule techniques. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is used to image the binding of labeled ligand to molecules specifically coupled to the surface of an optically transparent flow cell. Long-duration experiments are enabled by ensuring sufficient positional, chemical, thermal, and image stability. Principal components of this experimental stability include illumination timing, solution replacement, and chemical treatment of solution to reduce photodamage and photobleaching; and autofocusing to correct for spatial drift.

  16. Separation of Time Scales in a Quantum Newton's Cradle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, R.; Wouters, B.; Eliëns, S.; De Nardis, J.; Konik, R. M.; Caux, J.-S.

    2016-06-01

    We provide detailed modeling of the Bragg pulse used in quantum Newton's-cradle-like settings or in Bragg spectroscopy experiments for strongly repulsive bosons in one dimension. We reconstruct the postpulse time evolution and study the time-dependent local density profile and momentum distribution by a combination of exact techniques. We further provide a variety of results for finite interaction strengths using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock analysis and bosonization-refermionization techniques. Our results display a clear separation of time scales between rapid and trap-insensitive relaxation immediately after the pulse, followed by slow in-trap periodic behavior.

  17. Separation of Time Scales in a Quantum Newton's Cradle.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, R; Wouters, B; Eliëns, S; De Nardis, J; Konik, R M; Caux, J-S

    2016-06-03

    We provide detailed modeling of the Bragg pulse used in quantum Newton's-cradle-like settings or in Bragg spectroscopy experiments for strongly repulsive bosons in one dimension. We reconstruct the postpulse time evolution and study the time-dependent local density profile and momentum distribution by a combination of exact techniques. We further provide a variety of results for finite interaction strengths using a time-dependent Hartree-Fock analysis and bosonization-refermionization techniques. Our results display a clear separation of time scales between rapid and trap-insensitive relaxation immediately after the pulse, followed by slow in-trap periodic behavior.

  18. Time scaling of tree rings cell production in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkova, Margarita; Babushkina, Elena; Tychkov, Ivan; Shishov, Vladimir; Vaganov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    It is assumed that an annual tree-ring growth is adequately determined by a linear function of local or regional precipitation and temperature with a set of coefficients that are temporally invariant. But often that relations are non-linear. The process-based tree-ring VS-model can be used to resolve the critical processes linking climate variables to tree-ring formation. This work describes a new block of VS-model which allows to estimate a cell production in tree rings and transfer it into time scale based on the simulated integral growth rates of the model. In the algorithm of time identification for cell production we used a integral growth rates simulated by the VS-model for each growing season. The obtained detailed approach with a calculation of the time of each cell formation improves significantly the date accuracy of new cell formation in growing season. As a result for each cell in the tree-ring we estimate the temporal moment of the cell production corresponded to the seasonal growth rate in the same time scale. The approach was applied and tested for the cell measurements obtained for Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) for the period 1964-2013 in Malaya Minusa river (Khakassia, South Siberia). The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF # 14-14-00219)

  19. The role of time scales in extrinsic noise propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Pedraza, Juan Manuel; Jayaprakash, C.

    2009-03-01

    Cell-to cell variability in the number of proteins has been studied extensively experimentally. There are many sources of this stochastic variability or noise that can be classified as intrinsic, due to the stochasticity of chemical reactions and extrinsic, due to environmental differences. The different stages in the production of proteins in response to a stimulus, the signaling cascade before transcription, transcription, and translation are characterized by different time scales. We analyze how these time scales determine the effect of the reactions at each stage on different sources of noise. For example, even if intrinsic noise dominates the fluctuations in mRNA number, for typical degradation rates, extrinsic noise can dominate corresponding protein number fluctuations. Such results are important in determining the importance of intrinsic noise at earlier stages of a genetic network on the products of subsequent stages. We examine cases in which the dynamics of the extrinsic noise can lead to differences from cases in which extrinsic noise arises from static (in time) cell-to-cell variations. We will interpret the experiments of Pedraza et al*. in the light of these results. *J. M. Pedraza et al, Science 25 March 2005:Vol. 307. no. 5717, pp. 1965 - 1969.

  20. Tidal Energy Dissipation over long Geological Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, H.; Adcroft, A.; Ansong, J. K.; Arbic, B. K.; Austermann, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Maloof, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Over most of the history of the Earth-Moon system, tidal dissipation has been substantially lower than it is today. This is somewhat perplexing because in the past the moon was closer to the Earth and therefore tidal forces were larger. Previous work on this problem, done with highly idealized models, has shown that tidal dissipation is sensitive to Earth's rotation rate and the configuration of continents, which together set the time scale of the ocean's normal modes and hence their degree of resonance with the tidal forcing. Here, we employ a state-of-the-art global high-resolution ocean model, forced by the M2 tidal constituent, to explore the history of tidal resonance in a model with realistic bathymetries and continental geometries. Increasing Earth's rotation rate, while keeping geometries and bathymetries fixed to present-day values, yields substantially lower dissipation rates, consistent with the results of idealized models. We also show results from simulations with different continental configurations, increased tidal forcings, and smoother coastlines that mimic hundreds of millions of years without glacioeustasy in the Archaean and Proterozoic, to help unravel the puzzle of tidal dissipation over long geological time scales.

  1. Complex Processes from Dynamical Architectures with Time-Scale Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  2. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-02-10

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes.

  3. Time scale algorithms for an inhomogeneous group of atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, C.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Douglas, R. J.; Morris, D.; Cundy, S.; Lam, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Through the past 17 years, the time scale requirements at the National Research Council (NRC) have been met by the unsteered output of its primary laboratory cesium clocks, supplemented by hydrogen masers when short-term stability better than 2 x 10(exp -12)tau(sup -1/2) has been required. NRC now operates three primary laboratory cesium clocks, three hydrogen masers, and two commercial cesium clocks. NRC has been using ensemble averages for internal purposes for the past several years, and has a realtime algorithm operating on the outputs of its high-resolution (2 x 10(exp -13) s at 1 s) phase comparators. The slow frequency drift of the hydrogen masers has presented difficulties in incorporating their short-term stability into the ensemble average, while retaining the long-term stability of the laboratory cesium frequency standards. We report on this work on algorithms for an inhomogeneous ensemble of atomic clocks, and on our initial work on time scale algorithms that could incorporate frequency calibrations at NRC from the next generation of Zacharias fountain cesium frequency standards having frequency accuracies that might surpass 10(exp -15), or from single-trapped-ion frequency standards (Ba+, Sr+,...) with even higher potential accuracies. The requirements for redundancy in all the elements (including the algorithms) of an inhomogeneous ensemble that would give a robust real-time output of the algorithms are presented and discussed.

  4. Stellar differential rotation and coronal time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, G. P. S.; Jardine, M. M.; Mackay, D. H.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the time-scales of evolution of stellar coronae in response to surface differential rotation and diffusion. To quantify this, we study both the formation time and lifetime of a magnetic flux rope in a decaying bipolar active region. We apply a magnetic flux transport model to prescribe the evolution of the stellar photospheric field, and use this to drive the evolution of the coronal magnetic field via a magnetofrictional technique. Increasing the differential rotation (i.e. decreasing the equator-pole lap time) decreases the flux rope formation time. We find that the formation time is dependent upon the lap time and the surface diffusion time-scale through the relation τ_Form ∝ √{τ_Lapτ_Diff}. In contrast, the lifetimes of flux ropes are proportional to the lap time (τLife∝τLap). With this, flux ropes on stars with a differential rotation of more than eight times the solar value have a lifetime of less than 2 d. As a consequence, we propose that features such as solar-like quiescent prominences may not be easily observable on such stars, as the lifetimes of the flux ropes which host the cool plasma are very short. We conclude that such high differential rotation stars may have very dynamical coronae.

  5. Exploiting the diversity of time scales in the immune system: A B-cell antibody model

    SciTech Connect

    Segel, L.A. Los Alamos National Lab., NM ); Perelson, A.S. )

    1991-06-01

    Using the continuous shape-space formalism, the authors develop an immune system model involving both B lymphocytes and antibody molecules. The binding and cross-linking of receptors on B cells stimulates the cells to divide and, with a lag, to secrete antibody. Using the method of multiple scales, it is shown how to correctly formulate long-time-scale equations for the population dynamics of B cells, the total antibody concentration, and rate of antibody secretion. The authors model is compared with previous phenomenological formulations.

  6. An Experimental Study of Cyclic Foam Oscillation: Unveiling the Time-Scale of Foam Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    A defined periodicity in eruptive activity has been reported for different volcanoes. Lava lakes, for example are often characterized by periodic short-time scale fluctuations of the surface which has been termed "gas piston activity" (Swanson et al., 1971), as well as long-term periodical overturns. The latter have been also reported in extra-terrestrial volcanoes (e.g. Loki, Rathbun et al., 2002). This cyclic nature of volcanic eruptive activity, together with its characteristic time-scale, carries fundamental information on the degassing dynamics, and is thus more than worthy of further investigation. To this end, we have performed decompression experiments using Argon-saturated silicon oil, with viscosities of 10 to 1000 Pa s, as analogue for volatile-bearing mafic to intermediate magmas. The analogue samples were held to saturate in Argon in a shock tube for 72 hours, and then decompressed. In response to decompression, bubbles were nucleated and a foam layer developed at the top of the sample. Vigorous oscillations and periodical disruptions at the surface of the foam were observed, followed by foam restoration via bubble addition from below. This regime of periodical foam collapse and renewal was investigated through a monochromatic light-sensitive video camera. Also, in order to reconstruct the elastic energy due to the excitation mechanisms related to the foam collapse, 7 high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors (LDT Series, Measurement Specialties, Inc.) were distributed along of the shock tube. By tracking the flow front height trough time, joined with the observation of the micro-seismic signatures related to the foam disruption and growth, we were able to assess the time scale of foam collapse under dynamics conditions, and compare it to previous models (e.g. Proussevitch et al., 1993) and published data on natural cyclic phenomena in open conduit volcanoes. The laboratory investigation of bubbles coalescence and foam collapse in analogue materials

  7. Magnetic Reconnection Sites Observed by the Cluster Spacecraft: Measurement of Short time scale electron effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T. C.; Gough, M. P.; Chambers, E. C.

    Several events have been observed by the Cluster spacecraft passing close to magnetic reconnection sites in the tail and magnetopause when the fleet configuration is at short spatial scale (spacecraft separation approximately 100 km). These events are studied in the context of corresponding short time scale electron behaviour which contribute to and result from the reconnection process. This is done primarily using Particle Correlator data from the DWP instruments on Cluster in conjunction with other data sets. The particle correlators use captured time series of electron particle counts accumulated in 12 microsecond time bins measured over the energy range of the PEACE HEEA sensor (40 eV to 26 KeV) and on which an auto-correlation is performed. The phenomena studied concerns beam properties, electron acceleration, interaction with waves and any indications of the electron diffusion processes that are occurring. These phenomena are quantified using measures of the strength of particle-particle interactions (general second order statistics on the electrons) and the Index of Dispersion (variance to mean ratio) indicating bunching or scattering processes.

  8. Search for new phenomena in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse momentum using sqrt {s} = 7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Galtieri, A. Barbaro; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S. Behar; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Buttinger, W.; Urbán, S. Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Toro, R. Camacho; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Garrido, M. D. M. Capeans; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capriotti, D.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Montoya, G. D. Carrillo; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Hernandez, A. M. Castaneda; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Gimenez, V. Castillo; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Barajas, C. A. Chavez; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciba, K.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Clifft, R. W.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coe, P.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Muiño, P. Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Donszelmann, T. Cuhadar; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Daum, C.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lotto, B.; De Mora, L.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Debbe, R.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Pietra, M. Della; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Devetak, E.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Yagci, K. Dindar; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Wemans, A. Do Valle; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donadelli, M.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Anjos, A. Dos; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doxiadis, A. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Curull, X. Espinal; Esposito, B.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evangelakou, D.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fazio, S.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Parodi, A. Ferretto; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Fokitis, M.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Frank, T.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Torregrosa, E. Fullana; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garberson, F.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gershon, A.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillberg, D.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giunta, M.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Fajardo, L. S. Gomez; Gonçalo, R.; Da Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino; Gonella, L.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; de la Hoz, S. González; Silva, M. L. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Eschrich, I. Gough; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenfield, D.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guarino, V. J.; Guest, D.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Guo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gusakov, Y.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hackenburg, R.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Hauff, D.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Hazen, E.; He, M.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Correia, A. M. 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T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Prell, S.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Pueschel, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qian, J.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Ramstedt, M.; Randle-Conde, A. S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renaud, A.; Renkel, P.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; de Lima, J. G. Rocha; Roda, C.; Santos, D. Roda Dos; Rodier, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Roe, A.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, A.; Rose, M.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubinskiy, I.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadeh, I.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Ferrando, B. M. Salvachua; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchez, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scallon, O.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schöning, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schuh, S.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shichi, H.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E.; Soldevila, U.; Camillocci, E. Solfaroli; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockmanns, T.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, H. S.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suita, K.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szeless, B.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Castanheira, M. Teixeira Dias; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thadome, J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Viegas, F. J. Tique Aires; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Pastor, E. Torró; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Traynor, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Cakir, I. Turk; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Gallego, E. Valladolid; Vallecorsa, S.; Ferrer, J. A. Valls; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Rodriguez, F. Varela; Vari, R.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Boeriu, O. E. Vickey; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Perez, M. Villaplana; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vaque, F. Vives; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Milosavljevic, M. Vranjes; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walbersloh, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wunstorf, R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Xu, G.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Smit, G. V. Ybeles; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, Yo. K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2011-11-01

    Results are presented of a search for any particle(s) decaying to six or more jets in association with missing transverse momentum. The search is performed using 1.34fb-1 of sqrt {s} = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector during 2011. Data-driven techniques are used to determine the backgrounds in kinematic regions that require at least six, seven or eight jets, well beyond the multiplicities required in previous analyses. No evidence is found for physics beyond the Standard Model. The results are interpreted in the context of a supersymmetry model (MSUGRA/CMSSM) where they extend previous constraints.

  9. Liquidity Spillover in International Stock Markets through Distinct Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale. PMID:24465918

  10. The length and time scales of water's glass transitions.

    PubMed

    Limmer, David T

    2014-06-07

    Using a general model for the equilibrium dynamics of supercooled liquids, I compute from molecular properties the emergent length and time scales that govern the nonequilibrium relaxation behavior of amorphous ice prepared by rapid cooling. Upon cooling, the liquid water falls out of equilibrium whereby the temperature dependence of its relaxation time is predicted to change from super-Arrhenius to Arrhenius. A consequence of this crossover is that the location of the apparent glass transition temperature depends logarithmically on cooling rate. Accompanying vitrification is the emergence of a dynamical length-scale, the size of which depends on the cooling rate and varies between angstroms and tens of nanometers. While this protocol dependence clarifies a number of previous experimental observations for amorphous ice, the arguments are general and can be extended to other glass forming liquids.

  11. Plant succession as an integrator of contrasting ecological time scales.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lawrence R; Wardle, David A

    2014-09-01

    Ecologists have studied plant succession for over a hundred years, yet our understanding of the nature of this process is incomplete, particularly in relation to its response to new human perturbations and the need to manipulate it during ecological restoration. We demonstrate how plant succession can be understood better when it is placed in the broadest possible temporal context. We further show how plant succession can be central to the development of a framework that integrates a spectrum of ecological processes, which occur over time scales ranging from seconds to millions of years. This novel framework helps us understand the impacts of human perturbations on successional trajectories, ecosystem recovery, and global environmental change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Control of Systems With Slow Actuators Using Time Scale Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vehram; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a nonlinear plant with a slow actuator using singular perturbation method. For the known plant-actuator cascaded system the proposed scheme achieves tracking of a given reference model with considerably less control demand than would otherwise result when using conventional design techniques. This is the consequence of excluding the small parameter from the actuator dynamics via time scale separation. The resulting tracking error is within the order of this small parameter. For the unknown system the adaptive counterpart is developed based on the prediction model, which is driven towards the reference model by the control design. It is proven that the prediction model tracks the reference model with an error proportional to the small parameter, while the prediction error converges to zero. The resulting closed-loop system with all prediction models and adaptive laws remains stable. The benefits of the approach are demonstrated in simulation studies and compared to conventional control approaches.

  13. X-ray signatures: New time scales and spectral features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The millisecond bursts from Cyg X-1 are investigated and the overall chaotic variability for the bulk of the Cyg X-1 emission is compared to that of Sco X-1, showing that the essential character is remarkably similar (i.e. shot noise) although the fundamental time scales involved differ widely, from a fraction of a second (for Cyg X-1) to a fraction of a day (for Sco X-1). Recent OSO-8 observations of spectra features attributable to iron are reviewed. In particular, line emission is discussed within the context of a model for thermal radiation by a hot evolved gas in systems as different as supernova remnants and clusters of galaxies. Newly observed spectral structure in the emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1 is reported.

  14. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  15. Optimal Control Modification for Time-Scale Separated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new optimal control modification has been introduced that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. This modification is based on an optimal control formulation to minimize the L2 norm of the tracking error. The optimal control modification adaptive law results in a stable adaptation in the presence of a large adaptive gain. This study examines the optimal control modification adaptive law in the context of a system with a time scale separation resulting from a fast plant with a slow actuator. A singular perturbation analysis is performed to derive a modification to the adaptive law by transforming the original system into a reduced-order system in slow time. A model matching conditions in the transformed time coordinate results in an increase in the actuator command that effectively compensate for the slow actuator dynamics. Simulations demonstrate effectiveness of the method.

  16. Time sequence and time scale of intermediate mass fragment emission

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; Lanzano, G.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Wilczynski, J.

    2005-04-01

    Semiperipheral collisions in the {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni reaction at 35 MeV/nucleon were studied using the forward part of the Charged Heavy Ion Mass and Energy Resolving Array. Nearly completely determined ternary events involving projectilelike fragments (PLF), targetlike fragments (TLF), and intermediate mass fragments (IMF) were selected. A new method of studying the reaction mechanism, focusing on the analysis of the correlations between relative velocities in the IMF+PLF and IMF+TLF subsystems, is proposed. The relative velocity correlations provide information on the time sequence and time scale of the neck fragmentation processes leading to production of IMFs. It is shown that the majority of light IMFs are produced within 40-80 fm/c after the system starts to reseparate. Heavy IMFs are formed at times of about 120 fm/c or later and can be viewed as resulting from two-step (sequential) neck rupture processes.

  17. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool.

  18. Treatment Behaviour of Leprosy Patients on Time Scale.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Pandey, S S; Kaur, P

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is not a disease of modern civilization and industrialization, but its origin is as old as 4600 BC. Although the cure of leprosy is possible by MDT, there are certain misbelieves in the mind of leprosy patients leads to delay in disease reporting. Wandering of the patient from one healer to another healer also one of the cause that delays the start of MDT. It is known fact that the delayed response in getting medical treatment for leprosy causes permanent physical deformities in the patient. This study is aimed to identify the treatment behavior of leprosy patients on time scale. A total of 251 study subjects were selected randomly attending the Skin & VD OPD of S S Hospital of IMS, BHU, Varanasi. Questions related to treatment behavior on time scale were administered to leprosy patients aged 15 years or above by the interviewer himself. Time gap to start the initial treatment was significantly less in MB cases (5.3 months) as compared to PB cases (7.2 months). MB cases wasted significantly more time with allopathic treatment other than MDT. Urban patients (1.3 months) wasted more time with homeopathy than the rural patients (0.9 months). More than half the cases (51.4%) went for the treatment within three months of noticing symptoms of leprosy. There is a considerable delay in starting the MDT after noticing the first symptom of leprosy. As early as possible, measures to start the proper treatment i.e. MDT should be taken to avoid permanent disability due to leprosy.

  19. Terrestrial Waters and Sea Level Variations on Interannual Time Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; Alkama, R.; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B.

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multi-decadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost non-existent at global continental scale. However, global hydrological models developed for atmospheric and climatic studies can be used for estimating total water storage. For the recent years (since mid-2002), terrestrial water storage change can be directly estimated from observations of the GRACE space gravimetry mission. In this study, we analyse the interannual variability of total land water storage, and investigate its contribution to mean sea level variability at interannual time scale. We consider three different periods that, each, depend on data availability: (1) GRACE era (2003-2009), (2) 1993-2003 and (3) 1955-1995. For the GRACE era (period 1), change in land water storage is estimated using different GRACE products over the 33 largest river basins worldwide. For periods 2 and 3, we use outputs from the ISBA-TRIP (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere-Total Runoff Integrating Pathways) global hydrological model. For each time span, we compare change in land water storage (expressed in sea level equivalent) to observed mean sea level, either from satellite altimetry (periods 1 and 2) or tide gauge records (period 3). For each data set and each time span, a trend has been removed as we focus on the interannual variability. We show that whatever the period considered, interannual variability of the mean sea level is essentially explained by interannual fluctuations in land water storage, with the largest contributions arising from tropical river basins.

  20. Towards a stable numerical time scale for the early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgen, Frederik; Kuiper, Klaudia; Sierro, Francisco J.; Wotzlaw, Jorn; Schaltegger, Urs; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The construction of an astronomical time scale for the early Paleogene is hampered by ambiguities in the number, correlation and tuning of 405-kyr eccentricity related cycles in deep marine records from ODP cores and land-based sections. The two most competing age models result in astronomical ages for the K/Pg boundary that differ by ~750 kyr (~66.0 Ma of Vandenberghe et al. (2012) versus 65.25 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012); these ages in turn are consistent with proposed ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) that differ by ~300 kyr (28.201 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008) versus 27.89 Ma of Westerhold et al. (2012)); an even older age of 28.294 Ma is proposed based on a statistical optimization model (Renne et al., 2011). The astronomically calibrated FCs age of 28.201 ± 0.046 Ma of Kuiper et al. (2008), which is consistent with the astronomical age of ~66.0 Ma for the K/Pg boundary, is currently adopted in the standard geological time scale (GTS2012). Here we combine new and published data in an attempt to solve the controversy and arrive at a stable nuemrical time scale for the early Paleogene. Supporting their younger age model, Westerhold et al. (2012) argue that the tuning of Miocene sections in the Mediterranean, which underlie the older FCs age of Kuiper et al. (2008) and, hence, the coupled older early Paleogene age model of Vandenberghe et al. (2012), might be too old by three precession cycles. We thoroughly rechecked this tuning; distinctive cycle patterns related to eccentricity and precession-obliquity interference make a younger tuning that would be consistent with the younger astronomical age of 27.89 Ma for the FCs of Westerhold et al. (2012) challenging. Next we compared youngest U/Pb zircon and astronomical ages for a number of ash beds in the tuned Miocene section of Monte dei Corvi. These ages are indistinguishable, indicating that the two independent dating methods yield the same age when the same event is dated. This is consistent with results

  1. Search for new phenomena in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse momentum using $$\\sqrt {s}$$ = 7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2011-11-21

    Results are presented of a search for any particle(s) decaying to six or more jets in association with missing transverse momentum. The search is performed using 1.34 fb-1 ofmore » $$\\sqrt {s}$$ = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector during 2011. Data-driven techniques are used to determine the backgrounds in kinematic regions that require at least six, seven or eight jets, well beyond the multiplicities required in previous analyses. No evidence is found for physics beyond the Standard Model. The results are interpreted in the context of a supersymmetry model (MSUGRA/CMSSM) where they extend previous constraints.« less

  2. Halogens: From Annual To a Millennial Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbante, C.; Spolaor, A.; Vallelonga, P. T.; Schoenhardt, A.; Gabrieli, J.; Plane, J. M. C.; Curran, M. A.; Bjorkman, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The role of sea ice in the Earth climate system is poorly defined, although its influence albedo, ocean circulation and atmosphere-ocean heat and gas exchange, in particular there is lack of information about its behaviour in the past. Different approaches have been proposed and used for the past reconstruction of sea ice. Attention has been given to sediment core in which measurement of diatomean assemblage has been discovered to respond to sea ice fluctuations. Recently a class of compounds, the highly branched isoprenoids (in particular the IP25) have been proposed as possible tracers for past sea ice extension. Other strategies have been used to evaluate the sea ice changes, for example multy-proxy approach (Kinnard et al. 2011) but for ice cores the question is still open. Sodium (Na) and Methanesulphonic acid (MSA) are now suggested as possible proxy. Sodium reflects glacial-interglacial sea ice variability but on shorter timescales is strongly influenced by meteorology (Levine et al. 2014). Methanesulphonic Acid, correlates with satellite observations of sea ice extent off the East Antarctic coast, but is reactive and remobilized in ice cores over centennial time scales (Curran, et al. 2003; Rothlisberger et al. 2010). In parallel we propose iodine and bromine, as a possible tracers for past sea ice changes. Bromine is actively involved in destruction chemistry of polar ozone via auto-catalyzed reactions called "Bromine explosions", which occur above seasonal sea ice and causing an excess of bromine in the snow deposition compared to the sea water ratio. Iodine is emitted from algal communities growing under sea ice and then, percolating up to the sea ice surface, it is emitted into the polar atmosphere. We investigate the halogens signal in different sites and with different time coverage; measurements have been carried out in Greenland, Svalbard and Antarctica. We first investigate the conservation of the climate signal in the recent depositions (~3 years

  3. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  4. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  5. A universal time scale for vortex formation in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Morteza; Rambod, Edmond; Shariff, Karim

    1997-11-01

    The formation of vortex rings generated through impulsively started jets is studied through using a piston/cylinder arrangement. For a wide range of piston stroke to diameter ratios (L/D), the DPIV results indicate that the flow field generated by large L/D consists of a leading vortex ring followed by a trailing jet. The vorticity field of the formed leading vortex ring is disconnected from that of the trailing jet. On the other hand, flow fields generated by small stroke ratios show only a single vortex ring. The transition between these two distinct states is observed to occur at a stroke ratio of approximately 4, which, in this paper, is referred to as the "formation number". This number indicates the maximum circulation attainable by a vortex ring. The universality of this number was tested by generating vortex rings with different jet exit boundaries, as well as with various non- impulsive piston velocities. The mere existence of the "formation number" is intriguing since it hints at the possibility that nature uses this time scale for some evolutionary incentives such as optimum ejection of blood from the left atrium to the heart's left ventricle or locomotion process where ejection of vortices might have been utilized for the purposes of propulsion.

  6. Measurement of hyperpolarized gas diffusion at very short time scales

    PubMed Central

    Carl, Michael; Wilson Miller, G.; Mugler, John P.; Rohrbaugh, Scott; Tobias, William A.; Cates, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new pulse sequence for measuring very-short-time-scale restricted diffusion of hyperpolarized noble gases. The pulse sequence is based on concatenating a large number of bipolar diffusion-sensitizing gradients to increase the diffusion attenuation of the MR signal while maintaining a fundamentally short diffusion time. However, it differs in several respects from existing methods that use oscillating diffusion gradients for this purpose. First, a wait time is inserted between neighboring pairs of gradient pulses; second, consecutive pulse pairs may be applied along orthogonal axes; and finally, the diffusion-attenuated signal is not simply read out at the end of the gradient train but is periodically sampled during the wait times between neighboring pulse pairs. The first two features minimize systematic differences between the measured (apparent) diffusion coefficient and the actual time-dependent diffusivity, while the third feature optimizes the use of the available MR signal to improve the precision of the diffusivity measurement in the face of noise. The benefits of this technique are demonstrated using theoretical calculations, Monte-Carlo simulations of gas diffusion in simple geometries, and experimental phantom measurements in a glass sphere containing hyperpolarized 3He gas. The advantages over the conventional single-bipolar approach were found to increase with decreasing diffusion time, and thus represent a significant step toward making accurate surface-to-volume measurements in the lung airspaces. PMID:17936048

  7. Surface Radiation Budget Variability at Climatic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.; Nussbaumer, E.

    2014-12-01

    Information on Earth Radiation Balance is needed at climatic time scales for enabling assessment of variability and trends in the forcing functions of the climate system. Satellite observations have been instrumental for advancing the understanding of such balance at global scale; yet, the length of available records does not meet climatic needs. Major issues hindering such efforts are related to the frequent changes in satellite observing systems, including the specification of the satellite instruments, and changes in the quality of atmospheric inputs that drive the inference schemes. In this paper we report on an effort to synthesize estimates of shortwave, longwave and spectral surface radiative fluxes by fusing observations from numerous satellite platforms that include MODIS observations. This information was obtained in the framework of the MEaSURES and NEWS programs; it will be evaluated against ground observations and compared to independent satellite and model estimates. Attention will be given to updates on our knowledge on the radiative balance as compared to what is known from shorter time records.

  8. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Microturbulence in Transport Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. W.

    2003-10-01

    Recent investigations on Alfven waves in gyrokinetic plasmas and their relationship with those in the MHD theory have enabled us to extend the gyrokinetic particle simulation techniques into the kinetic-MHD regime when the finite-Larmor radius effects are important and the time step restrictions imposed by compressional Alfven waves are not desirable.[1,2] Some of the numerical schemes have already been devised based on their thermodynamic properties.[1,2] Here, we propose to use gyrokinetic particle simulation to study microturbulence in transport time scale. The procedures involve the use of finite-β microturbulence simulation as well as the use of transport coefficients in the steady state for predicting density,temperature and parallel current profile changes, along with the use of perpendicular current information for the establishment of equilibrium magnetic structure. Details will be given. [1] W. W. Lee and H. Qin, Phys. Plasmas, to appear (August 2003). [2] W. W. Lee, J. L. V. Lewandowski, T. S. Hahm, and Z. Lin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4435 (2001).

  9. Time scales in the context of general relativity.

    PubMed

    Guinot, Bernard

    2011-10-28

    Towards 1967, the accuracy of caesium frequency standards reached such a level that the relativistic effect could not be ignored anymore. Corrections began to be applied for the gravitational frequency shift and for distant time comparisons. However, these corrections were not applied to an explicit theoretical framework. Only in 1991 did the International Astronomical Union provide metrics (then improved in 2000) for a definition of space-time coordinates in reference systems centred at the barycentre of the Solar System and at the centre of mass of the Earth. In these systems, the temporal coordinates (coordinate times) can be realized on the basis of one of them, the International Atomic Time (TAI), which is itself a realized time scale. The definition and the role of TAI in this context will be recalled. There remain controversies regarding the name to be given to the unit of coordinate times and to other quantities appearing in the theory. However, the idea that astrometry and celestial mechanics should adopt the usual metrological rules is progressing, together with the use of the International System of Units, among astronomers.

  10. Forecasting decadal and shorter time-scale solar cycle features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi

    2016-07-01

    Solar energetic particles and magnetic fields reach the Earth through the interplanetary medium and affect it in various ways, producing beautiful aurorae, but also electrical blackouts and damage to our technology-dependent economy. The root of energetic solar outputs is the solar activity cycle, which is most likely caused by dynamo processes inside the Sun. It is a formidable task to accurately predict the amplitude, onset and peak timings of a solar cycle. After reviewing all solar cycle prediction methods, including empirical as well as physical model-based schemes, I will describe what we have learned from both validation and nonvalidation of cycle 24 forecasts, and how to refine the model-based schemes for upcoming cycle 25 forecasts. Recent observations indicate that within a solar cycle there are shorter time-scale 'space weather' features, such as bursts of various forms of activity with approximately one year periodicity. I will demonstrate how global tachocline dynamics could play a crucial role in producing such space weather. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  12. Functional neuroimaging of duration discrimination on two different time scales.

    PubMed

    Gutyrchik, Evgeny; Churan, Jan; Meindl, Thomas; Bokde, Arun Lawrence Warren; von Bernewitz, Henriette; Born, Christine; Reiser, Maximilian; Pöppel, Ernst; Wittmann, Marc

    2010-01-29

    Analyses of neural mechanisms of duration processing are essential for the understanding of psychological phenomena which evolve in time. Different mechanisms are presumably responsible for the processing of shorter (below 500 ms) and longer (above 500 ms) events but have not yet been a subject of an investigation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In the present study, we show a greater involvement of several brain regions - including right-hemispheric midline structures and left-hemispheric lateral regions - in the processing of visual stimuli of shorter as compared to longer duration. We propose a greater involvement of lower-level cognitive mechanisms in the processing of shorter events as opposed to higher-level mechanisms of cognitive control involved in longer events.

  13. Single event phenomena: A summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, W. E.; Coss, J. R.

    1989-04-01

    Single event phenomena (SEP) are effects resulting from a single particle inducing a significant response in an integrated circuit. SEP are of greatest concern to spacecraft designers but are becoming of concern to avionics and large earth-bound electronic systems due to the continual reduction in size (which increases SEP sensitivity) of circuit elements. The phenomena include soft error and multiple errors in memory cells or logic latches, latchup, MOSFET power device burnout, MNOS punch-through and transients. Cyclotron and Van de Graaff accelerators are used to produce heavy ions, protons and neutrons which induce SEP effects. Methods of testing are described. Solutions to SEP are varied, but include parts substitutions or redesign and software solutions which will be described.

  14. Ozone time scale decomposition and trend assessment from surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boleti, Eirini; Hueglin, Christoph; Takahama, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ozone precursors have been regulated in Europe since around 1990 with control measures primarily targeting to industries and traffic. In order to understand how these measures have affected air quality, it is now important to investigate concentrations of tropospheric ozone in different types of environments, based on their NOx burden, and in different geographic regions. In this study, we analyze high quality data sets for Switzerland (NABEL network) and whole Europe (AirBase) for the last 25 years to calculate long-term trends of ozone concentrations. A sophisticated time scale decomposition method, called the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) (Huang,1998;Wu,2009), is used for decomposition of the different time scales of the variation of ozone, namely the long-term trend, seasonal and short-term variability. This allows subtraction of the seasonal pattern of ozone from the observations and estimation of long-term changes of ozone concentrations with lower uncertainty ranges compared to typical methodologies used. We observe that, despite the implementation of regulations, for most of the measurement sites ozone daily mean values have been increasing until around mid-2000s. Afterwards, we observe a decline or a leveling off in the concentrations; certainly a late effect of limitations in ozone precursor emissions. On the other hand, the peak ozone concentrations have been decreasing for almost all regions. The evolution in the trend exhibits some differences between the different types of measurement. In addition, ozone is known to be strongly affected by meteorology. In the applied approach, some of the meteorological effects are already captured by the seasonal signal and already removed in the de-seasonalized ozone time series. For adjustment of the influence of meteorology on the higher frequency ozone variation, a statistical approach based on Generalized Additive Models (GAM) (Hastie,1990;Wood,2006), which corrects for meteorological

  15. Critical time scales for advection-diffusion-reaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellery, Adam J.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2012-04-01

    The concept of local accumulation time (LAT) was introduced by Berezhkovskii and co-workers to give a finite measure of the time required for the transient solution of a reaction-diffusion equation to approach the steady-state solution [A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2010.07.045 99, L59 (2010); A. M. Berezhkovskii, C. Sample, and S. Y. Shvartsman, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.83.051906 83, 051906 (2011)]. Such a measure is referred to as a critical time. Here, we show that LAT is, in fact, identical to the concept of mean action time (MAT) that was first introduced by McNabb [A. McNabb and G. C. Wake, IMA J. Appl. Math.IJAMDM0272-496010.1093/imamat/47.2.193 47, 193 (1991)]. Although McNabb's initial argument was motivated by considering the mean particle lifetime (MPLT) for a linear death process, he applied the ideas to study diffusion. We extend the work of these authors by deriving expressions for the MAT for a general one-dimensional linear advection-diffusion-reaction problem. Using a combination of continuum and discrete approaches, we show that MAT and MPLT are equivalent for certain uniform-to-uniform transitions; these results provide a practical interpretation for MAT by directly linking the stochastic microscopic processes to a meaningful macroscopic time scale. We find that for more general transitions, the equivalence between MAT and MPLT does not hold. Unlike other critical time definitions, we show that it is possible to evaluate the MAT without solving the underlying partial differential equation (pde). This makes MAT a simple and attractive quantity for practical situations. Finally, our work explores the accuracy of certain approximations derived using MAT, showing that useful approximations for nonlinear kinetic processes can be obtained, again without treating the governing pde directly.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics of Extended Hydrologic Systems over long time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    We often view our knowledge of hydrology and hence of nature as intransient, at least over the time scales over which we study processes we wish to predict and understand. Over the last few decades, this assumption has come under question, largely because of the vocal expression of a changing climate, but also the recurrent demonstration of significant land use change, both of which significantly affect the boundary conditions for terrestrial hydrology that is our forte. Most recently, the concepts of hydromorphology and social hydrology have entered the discussion, and the notion that climate and hydrology influence human action, which in turn shapes hydrology, is being recognized. Finally, as a field, we seem to be coming to the conclusion that the hydrologic system is an open system, whose boundaries evolve in time, and that the hydrologic system, at many scales, has a profound effect on the systems that drive it -- whether they be the ecological and climatic systems, or the social system. What a mess! Complexity! Unpredictability! At a certain level of abstraction, one can consider the evolution of these coupled systems with nonlinear feedbacks and ask what types of questions are relevant in terms of such a coupled evolution? What are their implications at the planetary scale? What are their implications for a subsistence farmer in an arid landscape who may under external influence achieve a new transient hydro-ecological equilibrium? What are the implications for the economy and power of nations? In this talk, I will try to raise some of these questions and also provide some examples with very simple dynamical systems that suggest ways of thinking about some practical issues of feedback across climate, hydrology and human behavior.

  17. Challenges of Integrated Modeling Across Space and Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagers, B.; Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Schellekens, J.; Winsemius, H.

    2015-12-01

    New data collection methods combined with rapid advances in processing technologies enabled by increases in data processing and storage capabilities are causing an significant shift in our modeling capabilities. Freely available global data sets allow us to build more quickly models for bigger areas. By linking the right data, models, and tools we gain significant insight at scales that hadn't considered possible a few decades ago. However, by increasing the spatial extent of our models, we risk missing regionally important critical elements by limitations of model resolution, processes selected, or blind spots in our big data world. At the same time we are pushing the time scales of our models from events and seasonal scale out to decades, centuries, or millennia to simulate the dynamics of the earth surface under varying external conditions. Also here we simplify and ignore to gain performance to resolve bigger time and space domains; are we including all the relevant elements in our models? These elements are often easy to spot from the right perspective. However, what is that perspective when you try to comprehend the results of baffling integrated global models and the amount of data is overwhelming? At the same time we want to know results with an ever increasing accuracy and detail: Will my house flood? Can we reduce flood risk, increase shipping capacity here, and at the same time reduce the maintenance costs by optimizing our dredging strategy? Can we build a number of interoperable cyberinfrastructures that when combined address all these questions? This presentation gives an overview of our work in this field at Deltares, and the main challenges that we foresee.

  18. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  19. Analysis of complex physiological systems by information flow: a time scale-specific complexity assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dirk; Frank, Birgit; Pompe, Bernd; Schmidt, Hendrik; Werdan, Karl; Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Baranowski, Rafal; Zebrowski, Jan J; Meissner, Winfried; Kletzin, Ulf; Adler, Daniela; Adler, Steffen; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2006-07-01

    In the last two decades conventional linear methods for biosignal analysis have been substantially extended by non-stationary, non-linear, and complexity approaches. So far, complexity is usually assessed with regard to one single time scale, disregarding complex physiology organised on different time scales. This shortcoming was overcome and medically evaluated by information flow functions developed in our research group in collaboration with several theoretical, experimental, and clinical partners. In the present work, the information flow is introduced and typical information flow characteristics are demonstrated. The prognostic value of autonomic information flow (AIF), which reflects communication in the cardiovascular system, was shown in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and in patients with heart failure. Gait information flow (GIF), which reflects communication in the motor control system during walking, was introduced to discriminate between controls and elderly patients suffering from low back pain. The applications presented for the theoretically based approach of information flow confirm its value for the identification of complex physiological systems. The medical relevance has to be confirmed by comprehensive clinical studies. These information flow measures substantially extend the established linear and complexity measures in biosignal analysis.

  20. HyetosR: An R package for temporal stochastic simulation of rainfall at fine time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossieris, P.; Koutsoyiannis, D.; Onof, C.; Tyralis, H.; Efstratiadis, A.

    2012-04-01

    A complete software package for the temporal stochastic simulation of rainfall process at fine time scales is developed in the R programming environment. This includes several functions for sequential simulation or disaggregation. Specifically, it uses the Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulses rainfall model for rainfall generation and proven disaggregation techniques which adjust the finer scale (hourly) values in order to obtain the required coarser scale (daily) value, without affecting the stochastic structure implied by the model. Additionally, a repetition scheme is incorporated in order to improve the Bartlett-Lewis model performance without significant increase of computational time. Finally, the package includes an enhanced version of the evolutionary annealing-simplex optimization method for the estimation of Bartlett-Lewis parameters. Multiple calibration criteria are introduced, in order to reproduce the statistical characteristics of rainfall at various time scales. This upgraded version of the original HYETOS program (Koutsoyiannis, D., and Onof C., A computer program for temporal stochastic disaggregation using adjusting procedures, European Geophysical Society, 2000) operates on several modes and combinations thereof (depending on data availability), with many options and graphical capabilities. The package, under the name HyetosR, is available free in the CRAN package repository.

  1. The learning of isometric force time scales is differentially influenced by constant and variable practice.

    PubMed

    King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2013-06-01

    This experiment was set up to investigate the influence of constant and variable practice on performance accuracy and the time- and frequency-dependent structure of the force output dynamics in the learning of an irregular isometric force pattern. Traditional approaches to the variability of practice hypothesis have demonstrated benefits of task-induced variability at the outcome level of behavior, but there have been limited investigations of the effect of practice conditions on movement execution and particularly the multiple time scale processes of force output. During the practice phase, variability was induced along the force-time dimension of the target pattern for the variable practice condition (different wave forms), but the wave forms exhibited the same distributional properties of the frequency content (1/f noise: β = -1.5) as the constant practice condition. The results showed that both practice conditions exhibited similar reductions in task error as a function of practice. However, constant practice produced greater changes in the time- and frequency-dependent properties of force output than variable practice, including a higher relative change in the contribution from faster (4-12 Hz) time scale mechanisms. Generalization tests to novel target patterns revealed that the task dynamics had a greater influence than the effect of practice conditions. Collectively, the findings support the adaptive nature of force output structure and the perspective that practice conditions can produce differential effects on the outcome and execution levels of motor behavior.

  2. Science and Paranormal Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H. Pierre

    1999-06-03

    In order to ground my approach to the study of paranormal phenomena, I first explain my operational approach to physics, and to the ''historical'' sciences of cosmic, biological, human, social and political evolution. I then indicate why I believe that ''paranormal phenomena'' might-but need not- fit into this framework. I endorse the need for a new theoretical framework for the investigation of this field presented by Etter and Shoup at this meeting. I close with a short discussion of Ted Bastin's contention that paranormal phenomena should be defined as contradicting physics.

  3. Dynamics of condensate formation in stochastic transport with pair-factorized steady states: Nucleation and coarsening time scales.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    Driven diffusive systems such as the zero-range process (ZRP) and the pair-factorized steady states (PFSS) stochastic transport process are versatile tools that lend themselves to the study of transport phenomena on a generic level. While their mathematical structure is simple enough to allow significant analytical treatment, they offer a variety of interesting phenomena. With appropriate dynamics, the ZRP and PFSS models feature a condensation transition where, for a supercritical density, the translational symmetry breaks spontaneously and excess particles form a single-site or spatially extended condensate, respectively. In this paper we numerically study the typical time scales of the two stages of this condensation process: Nucleation and coarsening. Nucleation is the first stage of condensation where the bulk system relaxes to its stationary distribution and droplet nuclei form in the system. These droplets then gradually grow or evaporate in the coarsening regime to coalesce in a single condensate when the system finally relaxes to the stationary state. We use the ZRP condensation model to discuss the choice of the estimation method for the nucleation time scale and present scaling exponents for the ZRP and PFSS condensation models with respect to the choice of the typical droplet nuclei mass. We then proceed to present scaling exponents in the coarsening regime of the ZRP for partially asymmetric dynamics and the PFSS model for symmetric and asymmetric dynamics.

  4. Dynamics of condensate formation in stochastic transport with pair-factorized steady states: Nucleation and coarsening time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    Driven diffusive systems such as the zero-range process (ZRP) and the pair-factorized steady states (PFSS) stochastic transport process are versatile tools that lend themselves to the study of transport phenomena on a generic level. While their mathematical structure is simple enough to allow significant analytical treatment, they offer a variety of interesting phenomena. With appropriate dynamics, the ZRP and PFSS models feature a condensation transition where, for a supercritical density, the translational symmetry breaks spontaneously and excess particles form a single-site or spatially extended condensate, respectively. In this paper we numerically study the typical time scales of the two stages of this condensation process: Nucleation and coarsening. Nucleation is the first stage of condensation where the bulk system relaxes to its stationary distribution and droplet nuclei form in the system. These droplets then gradually grow or evaporate in the coarsening regime to coalesce in a single condensate when the system finally relaxes to the stationary state. We use the ZRP condensation model to discuss the choice of the estimation method for the nucleation time scale and present scaling exponents for the ZRP and PFSS condensation models with respect to the choice of the typical droplet nuclei mass. We then proceed to present scaling exponents in the coarsening regime of the ZRP for partially asymmetric dynamics and the PFSS model for symmetric and asymmetric dynamics.

  5. A Group Simulation of the Development of the Geologic Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennington, J. Bret

    2000-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate to students that the relative dating of rock layers is redundant. Uses two column diagrams to simulate stratigraphic sequences from two different geological time scales and asks students to complete the time scale. (YDS)

  6. A Group Simulation of the Development of the Geologic Time Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennington, J. Bret

    2000-01-01

    Explains how to demonstrate to students that the relative dating of rock layers is redundant. Uses two column diagrams to simulate stratigraphic sequences from two different geological time scales and asks students to complete the time scale. (YDS)

  7. Changes in channel morphology over human time scales [Chapter 32

    Treesearch

    John M. Buffington

    2012-01-01

    Rivers are exposed to changing environmental conditions over multiple spatial and temporal scales, with the imposed environmental conditions and response potential of the river modulated to varying degrees by human activity and our exploitation of natural resources. Watershed features that control river morphology include topography (valley slope and channel...

  8. Charting the Transient Radio Sky on Sub-Second Time-Scales with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, J. W. T.; Hessels

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryThe LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a radio interferometric telescope that promises to open a largely unexplored window on transient sources in the ``radio sky'', from time-scales of nanoseconds to years. An important aspect of this will be the study of radio-emitting neutron stars in their various incarnations: slow pulsars, young pulsars, millisecond pulsars, magnetars, rotating radio transients, intermittent pulsars, et cetera. Pulsars and their brethren are the prototype of the more general ``fast transients'': sub-second, dispersed radio bursts which point the way to extreme, and potentially still unknown, phenomena. For instance, prompt radio bursts from supernovæ and other extra-galactic bursts have been hypothesized; these could prove to be powerful cosmological probes. This talk discussed LOFAR's impressive ability to observe pulsars and to enlarge greatly the discovery space for (even rarer) fast transients. It also presented the latest pulsar observations made during LOFAR's commissioning period. These are demonstrating powerful observing techniques that will be crucial for the next generation of radio telescopes as well as the effort to increase our understanding of the dynamic nature of the Universe. An expanded version of the talk can be found at http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011A

  9. The Dynamics of Cuspate Spits at Geological Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchette, F.; Manna, M.; Camps, N.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Zenkovitch (1959) first described cuspate spits as a limited category of shore-connected features that result from symmetrical wind/ wave forcings and/ or peculiar initial shore configuration. Later on, Asthon et al. (2001) and Asthon and Murray (2006) proned that cuspate spits, flying spits and other shoreline features derive from instabilities inherent in the relationship between alongshore sediment transport and local shoreline orientation. They exhibited a comprehensive weakly non-linear theory for cuspate and spit dynamics, and gave a striking numerical solutions to the problem. Recently, Bouchette et al. (2014) provided an alternative explicit formulation for the growth of cuspate spits through time. From this last formulation, it was demonstrated that there exists an exact relationship between the amplitude, the length of a cuspate on one side, and the longshore diffusivity and the time on the other side. In the present work, we explore how this relationship can be used to predict various coastal characteristics at decadal/geological time scales as soon as a cuspate develops in the area concerned. This formulation can be considered as a method for the datation of a cuspate spit. Alternatively, it can allow to estimate the mean fluxes of sediment trapped along the shore. The model is validated thanks to a comparison with observed cuspates. The cuspate law suggests that the length of the cuspate and its amplitude may be related through a power law (to the power of three). We demonstrate that this power law is not a simple mathematical result but does exist in the nature. The occurrence of a power law suggests also that more underlying physics remain to be analysed in the process of nucleation and growth of cuspate spits.Asthon, A., Murray, B., 2006. High-angle wave instability and emergent shoreline shapes: 1) modeling of sand waves, flying spits and capes. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, F04011. Asthon, A., Murray, B., Arnault, O., 2001. Formation of

  10. Advances in the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale--Developments and Integration with the Geologic Time Scale and Future Directions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Vine-Matthews/Morley-Larochelle hypothesis (Vine and Matthews, Nature, 1963, v. 199, #4897, p. 947-949), which integrated marine magnetic anomaly data with a rapidly evolving terrestrial-based geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The five decades of research since 1963 have witnessed the expansion and refinement of the GPTS, to the point where ages of magnetochron boundaries, in particular in the Cenozoic, can be estimated with uncertainties better than 0.1%. This has come about by integrating high precision geochronology, cyclostratigraphy at different time scales, and magnetic polarity data of increased quality, allowing extension of the GPTS back into the Paleozoic. The definition of a high resolution GPTS across time intervals of major events in Earth history has been of particular interest, as a specific magnetochron boundary correlated across several localities represents a singular global datum. A prime example is the end Permian, when some 80 percent of genus-level extinctions and a range of 75 to 96 percent species- level extinctions took place in the marine environment, depending upon clade. Much our understanding of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) is based on relatively slowly deposited marine sequences in Europe and Asia, yet a growing body of observations from continental sequences demonstrates a similar extinction event and new polarity data from some of these sequences are critical to refining the GPTS across the PTB and testing synchronicity of marine and terrestrial events. The data show that the end-Permian ecological crisis and the conodont calibrated biostratigraphic PTB both followed a key polarity reversal between a short interval (subchron) of reverse polarity to a considerably longer (chron) of normal polarity. Central European Basin strata (continental Permian and epicontinental Triassic) yield high-quality magnetic polarity stratigraphic records (Szurlies et al., 2003

  11. Physical phenomena in lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayless, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Electric lamps depend for their performance on an extraordinary range of natural phenomena, some of considerable subtlety or complexity, making them a fascinating field for the scientist or engineer. The author describes some of the less obvious phenomena which are crucial to the efficient performance of modern lamps. These include: thermal diffusion; resonance line broadening; hyperfine structure; metal halide cycles; ionic pumping; voids in tungsten; photoelectricity and electrolysis; and Penning effect

  12. Absolute calibration of the Greenland time scale: implications for Antarctic time scales and for Δ 14C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackleton, N. J.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Chiu, Tzu-chien; Parrenin, F.

    2004-07-01

    We propose a new age scale for the two ice cores (GRIP and GISP2) that were drilled at Greenland summit, based on accelerator mass spectrometry 14C dating of foraminifera in core MD95-2042 (Paleoceanography 15 (2000) 565), calibrated by means of recently obtained paired 14C and 230Th measurements on pristine corals (Marine radiocarbon calibration curve spanning 10,500 to 50,000 years BP (thousand years before present) Based on paired 230Th/ 234U/ 238U and 14C dates on Pristine Corals Geological Society of America Bulletin, 2003, submitted for publication). The record of core MD95-2042 can be correlated very precisely to the Greenland ice cores. Between 30 and 40 ka BP our scale is 1.4 ka older than the GRIP SS09sea time scale (Journal of Quaternary Science 16 (2001) 299). At the older end of Marine Isotope Stage 3 we use published 230Th dates from speleothems to calibrate the record. Using this scale we show a Δ 14C record that is broadly consistent with the modelled record (Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 200 (2002) 177) and with the data of Hughen et al. (Science 303 (2004) 202), but not consistent with the high values obtained by Beck et al. (Science 292 (2001) 2453) or by Voelker et al. (Radiocarbon 40 (1998) 517). We show how a set of age scales for the Antarctic ice cores can be derived that are both fully consistent with the Greenland scale, and glaciologically reasonable.

  13. Growing length and time scales in glass-forming liquids

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sastry, Srikanth

    2009-01-01

    The glass transition, whereby liquids transform into amorphous solids at low temperatures, is a subject of intense research despite decades of investigation. Explaining the enormous increase in relaxation times of a liquid upon supercooling is essential for understanding the glass transition. Although many theories, such as the Adam–Gibbs theory, have sought to relate growing relaxation times to length scales associated with spatial correlations in liquid structure or motion of molecules, the role of length scales in glassy dynamics is not well established. Recent studies of spatially correlated rearrangements of molecules leading to structural relaxation, termed “spatially heterogeneous dynamics,” provide fresh impetus in this direction. A powerful approach to extract length scales in critical phenomena is finite-size scaling, wherein a system is studied for sizes traversing the length scales of interest. We perform finite-size scaling for a realistic glass-former, using computer simulations, to evaluate the length scale associated with spatially heterogeneous dynamics, which grows as temperature decreases. However, relaxation times that also grow with decreasing temperature do not exhibit standard finite-size scaling with this length. We show that relaxation times are instead determined, for all studied system sizes and temperatures, by configurational entropy, in accordance with the Adam–Gibbs relation, but in disagreement with theoretical expectations based on spin-glass models that configurational entropy is not relevant at temperatures substantially above the critical temperature of mode-coupling theory. Our results provide new insights into the dynamics of glass-forming liquids and pose serious challenges to existing theoretical descriptions. PMID:19234111

  14. Noether theorem for nonholonomic nonconservative mechanical systems in phase space on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Qi-hang; Zhu, Jian-qing

    2016-08-01

    The paper focuses on studying the Noether theorem for nonholonomic nonconservative mechanical systems in phase space on time scales. First, the Hamilton equations of nonholonomic nonconservative systems on time scales are established, which is based on the Lagrange equations for nonholonomic systems on time scales. Then, based upon the quasi-invariance of Hamilton action of systems under the infinitesimal transformations with respect to the time and generalized coordinate on time scale, the Noether identity and the conserved quantity of nonholonomic nonconservative systems on time scales are obtained. Finally, an example is presented to illustrate the application of the results.

  15. Multiple-time scaling and universal behavior of the earthquake interevent time distribution.

    PubMed

    Bottiglieri, M; de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E

    2010-04-16

    The interevent time distribution characterizes the temporal occurrence in seismic catalogs. Universal scaling properties of this distribution have been evidenced for entire catalogs and seismic sequences. Recently, these universal features have been questioned and some criticisms have been raised. We investigate the existence of universal scaling properties by analyzing a Californian catalog and by means of numerical simulations of an epidemic-type model. We show that the interevent time distribution exhibits a universal behavior over the entire temporal range if four characteristic times are taken into account. The above analysis allows us to identify the scaling form leading to universal behavior and explains the observed deviations. Furthermore, it provides a tool to identify the dependence on the mainshock magnitude of the c parameter that fixes the onset of the power law decay in the Omori law.

  16. Multiple-Time Scaling and Universal Behavior of the Earthquake Interevent Time Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bottiglieri, M.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Arcangelis, L. de

    2010-04-16

    The interevent time distribution characterizes the temporal occurrence in seismic catalogs. Universal scaling properties of this distribution have been evidenced for entire catalogs and seismic sequences. Recently, these universal features have been questioned and some criticisms have been raised. We investigate the existence of universal scaling properties by analyzing a Californian catalog and by means of numerical simulations of an epidemic-type model. We show that the interevent time distribution exhibits a universal behavior over the entire temporal range if four characteristic times are taken into account. The above analysis allows us to identify the scaling form leading to universal behavior and explains the observed deviations. Furthermore, it provides a tool to identify the dependence on the mainshock magnitude of the c parameter that fixes the onset of the power law decay in the Omori law.

  17. Combat Casualties Undergoing Lifesaving Interventions Have Decreased Heart Rate Complexity at Multiple Time Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    almost half of the cases, related to delays in hemorrhage control during transportation or in resuscitation efforts. Earlier detection of hemorrhagic...restored to normal values with fluid resuscitation [311. On further analysis, we found that SampEn retained its ability to discriminate survivors from...information about HR dynamics in the neonatal ICU setting. They have developed a real time index, termed HR characteristics, which takes into

  18. Multiple-time-scale framework for understanding the progression of Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, D. S.; Gomez, F.; Ferrari, F. A. S.; Cerquetti, D.; Merello, M.; Viana, R.; Stoop, R.

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is marked by neurodegenerative processes that affect the pattern of discharge of basal ganglia neurons. The main features observed in the parkinsonian globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), a subdomain of the basal ganglia that is involved in the regulation of voluntary movement, are pathologically increased and synchronized neuronal activity. How these changes affect the implemented neuronal code is not well understood. Our experimental temporal structure-function analysis shows that in parkinsonian animals the rate-coding window of GPi neurons needed for the proper performance of voluntary actions is reduced. The model of the GPi network that we develop and discuss here reveals indeed that the size of the rate-coding window shrinks as the network activity increases and is expanded if the coupling strength among the neurons is increased. This leads to the novel interpretation that the pathological neuronal synchronization in Parkinson's disease in the GPi is the result of a collective attempt to counterbalance the shrinking of the rate-coding window due to increased activity in GPi neurons.

  19. Model Reduction Using Multiple Time Scales in Stochastic Gene Regulatory Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-28

    illustrate the efficiency of our method in two gene network examples, which describe two substantially different biological processes -- cellular heat shock response and expression of the pap gene in Escherichia coli bacteria .

  20. Exponentially Small Splitting and Arnold Diffusion for Multiple Time Scale Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procesi, Michela

    We consider the class of Hamiltonians: \\[ \\frac{1}{2}\\sum_{j=1}^{n-1} I_j^2 + \\frac{1}{2} ǎrepsilon I_n^2 + \\frac{p^2}{2} + ǎrepsilon [(cos q - 1) - b^2 (cos 2q - 1)] + ǎrepsilon \\mu f(q) \\sum_{i=1}^n \\sin(\\psi_i) , \\] where 0<= b < (1)/(2), and the perturbing function f(q) is a rational function of eiq. We prove upper and lower bounds on the splitting for such class of systems, in regions of the phase space characterized by one fast frequency. Finally using an appropriate Normal Form theorem we prove the existence of chains of heteroclinic intersections.

  1. Multiple-time-scale framework for understanding the progression of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Andres, D S; Gomez, F; Ferrari, F A S; Cerquetti, D; Merello, M; Viana, R; Stoop, R

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is marked by neurodegenerative processes that affect the pattern of discharge of basal ganglia neurons. The main features observed in the parkinsonian globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), a subdomain of the basal ganglia that is involved in the regulation of voluntary movement, are pathologically increased and synchronized neuronal activity. How these changes affect the implemented neuronal code is not well understood. Our experimental temporal structure-function analysis shows that in parkinsonian animals the rate-coding window of GPi neurons needed for the proper performance of voluntary actions is reduced. The model of the GPi network that we develop and discuss here reveals indeed that the size of the rate-coding window shrinks as the network activity increases and is expanded if the coupling strength among the neurons is increased. This leads to the novel interpretation that the pathological neuronal synchronization in Parkinson's disease in the GPi is the result of a collective attempt to counterbalance the shrinking of the rate-coding window due to increased activity in GPi neurons.

  2. Boundary Conditions for Hyperbolic Systems of Partial Differential Equations Having Multiple Time Scales.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMMER STAN-CS-81-8901 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) S. TYPE OP REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Boundary Conditions for...with the title in the original language. Make every effort’ to simplify the title before publication. Block 5. Type of Report and Period Covered...Indicate here whether report Is interim, final, etc., and, if applicable, inclusive dates of period covered, such as the life of a contract covered in a

  3. Dynamics of the sensory response to urethral flow over multiple time scales in rat

    PubMed Central

    Danziger, Zachary C; Grill, Warren M

    2015-01-01

    The pudendal nerve carries sensory information from the urethra that controls spinal reflexes necessary to maintain continence and achieve efficient micturition. Despite the key role urethral sensory feedback plays in regulation of the lower urinary tract, there is little information about the characteristics of urethral sensory responses to physiological stimuli, and the quantitative relationship between physiological stimuli and the evoked sensory activation is unknown. Such a relation is critical to understanding the neural control of the lower urinary tract and how dysfunction arises in disease states. We systematically quantified pudendal afferent responses to fluid flow in the urethra in vivo in the rat. We characterized the sensory response across a range of stimuli, and describe a previously unreported long-term neural accommodation phenomenon. We developed and validated a compact mechanistic mathematical model capable of reproducing the pudendal sensory activity in response to arbitrary profiles of urethral flows. These results describe the properties and function of urethral afferents that are necessary to understand how sensory disruption manifests in lower urinary tract pathophysiology. Key points Sensory information from the urethra is essential to maintain continence and to achieve efficient micturition and when compromised by disease or injury can lead to substantial loss of function. Despite the key role urethral sensory information plays in the lower urinary tract, the relationship between physiological urethral stimuli, such as fluid flow, and the neural sensory response is poorly understood. This work systematically quantifies pudendal afferent responses to a range of fluid flows in the urethra in vivo and describes a previously unknown long-term neural accommodation phenomenon in these afferents. We present a compact mechanistic mathematical model that reproduces the pudendal sensory activity in response to urethral flow. These results have implications for understanding urinary tract dysfunction caused by neuropathy or nerve damage, such as urinary retention or incontinence, as well as for the development of strategies to mitigate the symptoms of these conditions. PMID:26041695

  4. Using Derivative Estimates to Describe Intraindividual Variability at Multiple Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deboeck, Pascal R.; Montpetit, Mignon A.; Bergeman, C. S.; Boker, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The study of intraindividual variability is central to the study of individuals in psychology. Previous research has related the variance observed in repeated measurements (time series) of individuals to traitlike measures that are logically related. Intraindividual measures, such as intraindividual standard deviation or the coefficient of…

  5. Helium-3 Diffusion MR Imaging of the Human Lung over Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, John P.; Wang, Chengbo; Miller, G. Wilson; Cates, Gordon D.; Mata, Jaime F.; Brookeman, James R.; de Lange, Eduard E.; Altes, Talissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Diffusion MRI with hyperpolarized 3He gas is a powerful technique for probing the characteristics of the lung microstructure. A key parameter for this technique is the diffusion time, which is the period during which the atoms are allowed to diffuse within the lung for measurement of the signal attenuation. The relationship between diffusion time and the length scales that can be explored is discussed, and representative, preliminary results are presented from ongoing studies of the human lung for diffusion times ranging from milliseconds to several seconds. Materials and Methods 3He diffusion MR imaging of the human lung was performed on a 1.5T Siemens Sonata scanner. Using gradient-echo-based and stimulated-echo-based techniques for short and medium-to-long diffusion times, respectively, measurements were performed for times ranging from 2 ms to 6.5 s in two healthy subjects, a subject with sub-clinical chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a subject with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Results In healthy subjects, the apparent diffusion coefficient decreased by about 10-fold, from approximately 0.2 to 0.02 cm2/s, as the diffusion time increased from approximately 1 ms to 1 s. Results in subjects with disease suggest that measurements made at diffusion times substantially longer than 1 ms may provide improved sensitivity for detecting certain pathological changes in the lung microstructure. Conclusion With appropriately designed pulse sequences it is possible to explore the diffusion of hyperpolarized 3He in the human lung over more than a 1000-fold variation of the diffusion time. Such measurements provide a new opportunity for exploring and characterizing the microstructure of the healthy and diseased lung. PMID:18486006

  6. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  7. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  8. Flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creitzer, E. M.; Epstein, A. H.; Giles, M. B.; McCune, J. E.; Tan, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at MIT during the period 10/20/89 - 10/19/92, as part of our multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines. Within the overall project four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: (1) The Influence of Inlet Temperature Nonuniformities on Turbine Heat Transfer and Dynamics; (2) Assessment of Unsteady Losses in Stator/ Rotor Interactions; (3) Unsteady Phenomena and Flowfield instabilities in Multistage Axial Compressors; (4) Vortex Wake-Compressor Blade Interaction in Cascades - A New Rapid Method for Unsteady Separation and Vorticity Flux Calculations.

  9. Imaging of snapping phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Guillin, R; Marchand, A J; Roux, A; Niederberger, E; Duvauferrier, R

    2012-01-01

    Snapping phenomena result from the sudden impingement between anatomical and/or heterotopical structures with subsequent abrupt movement and noise. Snaps are variously perceived by patients, from mild discomfort to significant pain requiring surgical management. Identifying the precise cause of snaps may be challenging when no abnormality is encountered on routinely performed static examinations. In this regard, dynamic imaging techniques have been developed over time, with various degrees of success. This review encompasses the main features of each imaging technique and proposes an overview of the main snapping phenomena in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:22744321

  10. Stress pulse phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    McGlaun, M.

    1993-08-01

    This paper is an introductory discussion of stress pulse phenomena in simple solids and fluids. Stress pulse phenomena is a very rich and complex field that has been studied by many scientists and engineers. This paper describes the behavior of stress pulses in idealized materials. Inviscid fluids and simple solids are realistic enough to illustrate the basic behavior of stress pulses. Sections 2 through 8 deal with the behavior of pressure pulses. Pressure is best thought of as the average stress at a point. Section 9 deals with shear stresses which are most important in studying solids.

  11. Frost phenomena on Mars.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Gaffney, E S; Low, P F

    1967-01-20

    The hypothesis that the Martian wave of darkening might be a frostheaving phenomenon has been examined. Consideration of the water-vapor sorption characteristics of a silicate mineral surface at temperatures below freezing leads to the conclusion that, without strongly deliquescent salts to attract and retain liquid water in the Martian soil, frost-heaving phenomena are not to be expected on Mars. On the other hand frost-heaving phenomena involving the freezing and thawing of ammonia may be common in the soils of Jupiter.

  12. Generalizing the dynamic field theory of spatial cognition across real and developmental time scales

    PubMed Central

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Spencer, John P.; Schutte, Anne R.

    2008-01-01

    Within cognitive neuroscience, computational models are designed to provide insights into the organization of behavior while adhering to neural principles. These models should provide sufficient specificity to generate novel predictions while maintaining the generality needed to capture behavior across tasks and/or time scales. This paper presents one such model, the Dynamic Field Theory (DFT) of spatial cognition, showing new simulations that provide a demonstration proof that the theory generalizes across developmental changes in performance in four tasks—the Piagetian A-not-B task, a sandbox version of the A-not-B task, a canonical spatial recall task, and a position discrimination task. Model simulations demonstrate that the DFT can accomplish both specificity—generating novel, testable predictions—and generality—spanning multiple tasks across development with a relatively simple developmental hypothesis. Critically, the DFT achieves generality across tasks and time scales with no modification to its basic structure and with a strong commitment to neural principles. The only change necessary to capture development in the model was an increase in the precision of the tuning of receptive fields as well as an increase in the precision of local excitatory interactions among neurons in the model. These small quantitative changes were sufficient to move the model through a set of quantitative and qualitative behavioral changes that span the age range from 8 months to 6 years and into adulthood. We conclude by considering how the DFT is positioned in the literature, the challenges on the horizon for our framework, and how a dynamic field approach can yield new insights into development from a computational cognitive neuroscience perspective. PMID:17716632

  13. Continent-scale global change attribution in European birds - combining annual and decadal time scales.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Peter Søgaard; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Thorup, Kasper; Tøttrup, Anders P; Chylarecki, Przemysław; Jiguet, Frédéric; Lehikoinen, Aleksi; Noble, David G; Reif, Jiri; Schmid, Hans; van Turnhout, Chris; Burfield, Ian J; Foppen, Ruud; Voříšek, Petr; van Strien, Arco; Gregory, Richard D; Rahbek, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Species attributes are commonly used to infer impacts of environmental change on multiyear species trends, e.g. decadal changes in population size. However, by themselves attributes are of limited value in global change attribution since they do not measure the changing environment. A broader foundation for attributing species responses to global change may be achieved by complementing an attributes-based approach by one estimating the relationship between repeated measures of organismal and environmental changes over short time scales. To assess the benefit of this multiscale perspective, we investigate the recent impact of multiple environmental changes on European farmland birds, here focusing on climate change and land use change. We analyze more than 800 time series from 18 countries spanning the past two decades. Analysis of long-term population growth rates documents simultaneous responses that can be attributed to both climate change and land-use change, including long-term increases in populations of hot-dwelling species and declines in long-distance migrants and farmland specialists. In contrast, analysis of annual growth rates yield novel insights into the potential mechanisms driving long-term climate induced change. In particular, we find that birds are affected by winter, spring, and summer conditions depending on the distinct breeding phenology that corresponds to their migratory strategy. Birds in general benefit from higher temperatures or higher primary productivity early on or in the peak of the breeding season with the largest effect sizes observed in cooler parts of species' climatic ranges. Our results document the potential of combining time scales and integrating both species attributes and environmental variables for global change attribution. We suggest such an approach will be of general use when high-resolution time series are available in large-scale biodiversity surveys.

  14. Neutron Star Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruderman, Malvin

    1998-01-01

    Various phenomena involving neutron stars are addressed. Electron-positron production in the near magnetosphere of gamma-ray pulsars is discussed along with magnetic field evolution in spun-up and spinning-down pulsars. Glitches and gamma-ray central engines are also discussed.

  15. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  16. Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorrain, Paul; Corson, Dale R.; Lorrain, Francois

    Based on the classic Electromagnetic Fields and Waves by the same authors, Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Phenomena capitalizes on the older text's traditional strengths--solid physics, inventive problems, and an experimental approach--while offering a briefer, more accessible introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetism.

  17. Modelling financial markets with agents competing on different time scales and with different amount of information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Johannes; Andersen, Jørgen Vitting

    2006-05-01

    We use agent-based models to study the competition among investors who use trading strategies with different amount of information and with different time scales. We find that mixing agents that trade on the same time scale but with different amount of information has a stabilizing impact on the large and extreme fluctuations of the market. Traders with the most information are found to be more likely to arbitrage traders who use less information in the decision making. On the other hand, introducing investors who act on two different time scales has a destabilizing effect on the large and extreme price movements, increasing the volatility of the market. Closeness in time scale used in the decision making is found to facilitate the creation of local trends. The larger the overlap in commonly shared information the more the traders in a mixed system with different time scales are found to profit from the presence of traders acting at another time scale than themselves.

  18. Neonatal and infancy time scale for extension into childhood and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Paul, M H; Kardatzke, M L; Lapin, G D

    1989-12-01

    A logarithmic time scale is presented for exposition of clinical events and related data on a unified scale extending from neonatal time into childhood and adulthood. Such a scale preserves time scale proportions but has the advantage for certain applications of featuring early neonatal and infancy events. This type of time base avoids the disadvantages of a crowded and obscured linear scale or an arbitrary and non-unified split time scale. For clinical application all timed events are initially converted to a common unit such as days. A visually comprehensible logarithmic time scale can be derived by plotting the logarithmic scale (labeled in days, base 2) and then establishing conventional calendar interval marks (weeks, months, years) and the data plot points. A simple equation is presented for establishing the time scale graph markers and the plot data points for a logarithmic time scale of any scale axis length.

  19. Structure and dating errors in the geologic time scale and periodicity in mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Structure in the geologic time scale reflects a partly paleontological origin. As a result, ages of Cenozoic and Mesozoic stage boundaries exhibit a weak 28-Myr periodicity that is similar to the strong 26-Myr periodicity detected in mass extinctions of marine life by Raup and Sepkoski. Radiometric dating errors in the geologic time scale, to which the mass extinctions are stratigraphically tied, do not necessarily lessen the likelihood of a significant periodicity in mass extinctions, but do spread the acceptable values of the period over the range 25-27 Myr for the Harland et al. time scale or 25-30 Myr for the DNAG time scale. If the Odin time scale is adopted, acceptable periods fall between 24 and 33 Myr, but are not robust against dating errors. Some indirect evidence from independently-dated flood-basalt volcanic horizons tends to favor the Odin time scale.

  20. Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of the constraint mechanical systems on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ping-Ping; Fu, Jing-Li; Guo, Yong-Xin

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a new method to study Lie symmetries and conserved quantities of constraint mechanical systems which include Lagrangian systems, nonconservative systems and nonholonomic systems on time scales T. For the constraint mechanical systems on time scales, based on the transformation Lie group, we get a series of significant results including the variational principle of systems on time scales, the equations of motion, the determining equations, the structure equations, the restriction equations as well as the Lie theorems of the Lie symmetries of the systems on time scales. Furthermore, a set of new conserved quantities of the constraint mechanical systems on time scales are given. More significant is that this work unifies the theories of Lie symmetries of the two cases for the continuous and the discrete constraint mechanical systems by applying the time scales. And then taking the discrete (T = ℤ) nonholonomic system for example, we derive the corresponding discrete Lie symmetry theory. Finally, two examples are designed to illustrate these results.

  1. Wave phenomena in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhner-Böttcher, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Context: The dynamic atmosphere of the Sun exhibits a wealth of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. In the presence of strong magnetic fields, most spectacular and powerful waves evolve in the sunspot atmosphere. Allover the sunspot area, continuously propagating waves generate strong oscillations in spectral intensity and velocity. The most prominent and fascinating phenomena are the 'umbral flashes' and 'running penumbral waves' as seen in the sunspot chromosphere. Their nature and relation have been under intense discussion in the last decades. Aims: Waves are suggested to propagate upward along the magnetic field lines of sunspots. An observational study is performed to prove or disprove the field-guided nature and coupling of the prevalent umbral and penumbral waves. Comprehensive spectroscopic observations at high resolution shall provide new insights into the wave characteristics and distribution across the sunspot atmosphere. Methods: Two prime sunspot observations were carried out with the Dunn Solar Telescope at the National Solar Observatory in New Mexico and with the Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Teide Observatory on Tenerife. The two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were performed with the interferometric spectrometers IBIS and TESOS. Multiple spectral lines are scanned co-temporally to sample the dynamics at the photospheric and chromospheric layers. The time series (1 - 2.5 h) taken at high spatial and temporal resolution are analyzed according to their evolution in spectral intensities and Doppler velocities. A wavelet analysis was used to obtain the wave power and dominating wave periods. A reconstruction of the magnetic field inclination based on sunspot oscillations was developed. Results and conclusions: Sunspot oscillations occur continuously in spectral intensity and velocity. The obtained wave characteristics of umbral flashes and running penumbral waves strongly support the scenario of slow-mode magnetoacoustic wave propagation along the

  2. Singular perturbations and time scales (SPaTS) in discrete control systems-An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, D. S.; Hibey, J. L.; Price, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of singular perturbations and time scales (SPaTS) in discrete control systems are reviewed. Sources of discrete models and the effect of the discretizing interval on the model are examined. The analysis of two-time scale systems is presented to bring out typical characteristic features of SPaTS. In the control of the two-time scale systems, the important issue of multirate sampling is addressed.

  3. Singular perturbations and time scales (SPaTS) in discrete control systems-An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naidu, D. S.; Hibey, J. L.; Price, D. B.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of singular perturbations and time scales (SPaTS) in discrete control systems are reviewed. Sources of discrete models and the effect of the discretizing interval on the model are examined. The analysis of two-time scale systems is presented to bring out typical characteristic features of SPaTS. In the control of the two-time scale systems, the important issue of multirate sampling is addressed.

  4. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and approximate dynamic programming on time scales.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Sanyal, Suman; Wunsch, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The time scales calculus is a key emerging area of mathematics due to its potential use in a wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. We extend this calculus to approximate dynamic programming (ADP). The core backward induction algorithm of dynamic programming is extended from its traditional discrete case to all isolated time scales. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the solution of which is the fundamental problem in the field of dynamic programming, are motivated and proven on time scales. By drawing together the calculus of time scales and the applied area of stochastic control via ADP, we have connected two major fields of research.

  5. Time scales of the European surface air temperature variability: The role of the 7-8 year cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Kravtsov, Sergey; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Air temperature variability on different time scales exhibits recurring patterns and quasi-oscillatory phenomena. Climate oscillations with the period about 7-8 years have been observed in many instrumental records in Europe. Although these oscillations are weak if considering their amplitude, they might have nonnegligible influence on temperature variability on shorter time scales due to cross-scale interactions recently observed by Paluš (2014). In order to quantify the cross-scale influence, we propose a simple conditional mean approach which estimates the effect of the cycle with the period close to 8 years on the amplitude of the annual cycle in surface air temperature (SAT) in the range 0.7-1.4°C and the effect on the overall variability of the SAT anomalies (SATA) leads to the changes 1.5-1.7°C in the annual SATA means. The strongest effect in the winter SATA means reaches 4-5°C in central European station and reanalysis data.

  6. On the Use of Space-Environmental Satellite Data for Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations. Time-Scale Initialisation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Maibys Sierra; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mecías, Angela León; Menconi, Varlei Everton; Mendes, Odim

    2016-12-01

    A global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model describes the solar-terrestrial system and the physical processes that live in it. Information obtained from satellites provides input to MHD model to compose a more realistic initial state for the equations and, therefore, more accurate simulations. However, the use of high resolution in time data can produce numerical instabilities that quickly interrupt the simulations. Moreover, satellite time series may have gaps which could be a problem in this context. In order to contribute to the overcoming of such challenges, we propose in this work a methodology based on a variant of the continuous wavelet transform to introduce environmental satellite data on the global resistive MHD model originally developed by Prof. Ogino at the University of Nagoya. Our methodology uses a simplified time-scale version of the original data that preserves the most important spectral features of the phenomena of interest. Then, we can do a long-term integration using this MHD model without any computational instability, while preserving the main time-scale features of the original data set and even overcome possible occurrence of gaps on the satellite data. This methodology also contributes to keeping more realistic physical results.

  7. Membrane Transport Phenomena (MTP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Larry W.

    1997-01-01

    The third semi-annual period of the MTP project has been involved with performing experiments using the Membrane Transport Apparatus (MTA), development of analysis techniques for the experiment results, analytical modeling of the osmotic transport phenomena, and completion of a DC-9 microgravity flight to test candidate fluid cell geometries. Preparations were also made for the MTP Science Concept Review (SCR), held on 13 June 1997 at Lockheed Martin Astronautics in Denver. These activities are detailed in the report.

  8. Lunar transient phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W. S.

    1991-03-01

    Lunar transient phenomena (LTP) sightings are classified into five categories: brightenings, darkenings, reddish colorations, bluish colorations, and obscurations. There is evidence that the remaining LTP's are of lunar origin. A substantial number of sightings are independently confirmed. They have been recorded on film and spectrograms, as well as with photoelectric photometers and polarization equipment. It suggested that the LTP's may be gentle outgassings of less-than-volcanic proportions.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of drops and bubbles and chaotic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Leal, L. G.; Feng, Z. C.; Holt, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear phenomena associated with the dynamics of free drops and bubbles are investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Although newly developed levitation and measurement techniques have been implemented, the full experimental validation of theoretical predictions has been hindered by interfering artifacts associated with levitation in the Earth gravitational field. The low gravity environment of orbital space flight has been shown to provide a more quiescent environment which can be utilized to better match the idealized theoretical conditions. The research effort described in this paper is a closely coupled collaboration between predictive and guiding theoretical activities and a unique experimental program involving the ultrasonic and electrostatic levitation of single droplets and bubbles. The goal is to develop and to validate methods based on nonlinear dynamics for the understanding of the large amplitude oscillatory response of single drops and bubbles to both isotropic and asymmetric pressure stimuli. The first specific area on interest has been the resonant coupling between volume and shape oscillatory modes isolated gas or vapor bubbles in a liquid host. The result of multiple time-scale asymptotic treatment, combined with domain perturbation and bifurcation methods, has been the prediction of resonant and near-resonant coupling between volume and shape modes leading to stable as well as chaotic oscillations. Experimental investigations of the large amplitude shape oscillation modes of centimeter-size single bubbles trapped in water at 1 G and under reduced hydrostatic pressure, have suggested the possibility of a low gravity experiment to study the direct coupling between these low frequency shape modes and the volume pulsation, sound-radiating mode. The second subject of interest has involved numerical modeling, using the boundary integral method, of the large amplitude shape oscillations of charged and uncharged drops in the presence

  10. Paramutation phenomena in plants.

    PubMed

    Pilu, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is a particular epigenetic phenomenon discovered in Zea mays by Alexander Brink in the 1950s, and then also found in other plants and animals. Brink coined the term paramutation (from the Greek syllable "para" meaning beside, near, beyond, aside) in 1958, with the aim to differentiate paramutation from mutation. The peculiarity of paramutation with respect to other gene silencing phenomena consists in the ability of the silenced allele (named paramutagenic) to silence the other allele (paramutable) present in trans. The newly silenced (paramutated) allele remains stable in the next generations even after segregation from the paramutagenic allele and acquires paramutagenic ability itself. The inheritance behaviour of these epialleles permits a fast diffusion of a particular gene expression level/phenotype in a population even in the absence of other evolutionary influences, thus breaking the Hardy-Weinberg law. As with other gene silencing phenomena such as quelling in the fungus Neurospora crassa, transvection in Drosophila, co-suppression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) described in transgenic plants and RNA interference (RNAi) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, paramutation occurs without changes in the DNA sequence. So far the molecular basis of paramutation remains not fully understood, although many studies point to the involvement of RNA causing changes in DNA methylation and chromatin structure of the silenced genes. In this review I summarize all paramutation phenomena described in plants, focusing on the similarities and differences between them.

  11. From intracellular signaling to population oscillations: bridging size- and time-scales in collective behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sgro, Allyson E; Schwab, David J; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mestler, Troy; Mehta, Pankaj; Gregor, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Collective behavior in cellular populations is coordinated by biochemical signaling networks within individual cells. Connecting the dynamics of these intracellular networks to the population phenomena they control poses a considerable challenge because of network complexity and our limited knowledge of kinetic parameters. However, from physical systems, we know that behavioral changes in the individual constituents of a collectively behaving system occur in a limited number of well-defined classes, and these can be described using simple models. Here, we apply such an approach to the emergence of collective oscillations in cellular populations of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Through direct tests of our model with quantitative in vivo measurements of single-cell and population signaling dynamics, we show how a simple model can effectively describe a complex molecular signaling network at multiple size and temporal scales. The model predicts novel noise-driven single-cell and population-level signaling phenomena that we then experimentally observe. Our results suggest that like physical systems, collective behavior in biology may be universal and described using simple mathematical models. PMID:25617347

  12. Multiplicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    practice as a "[descent] into that inner circle of the Inferno where the damned endlessly degate multiplicity for sentencing." United States v. Barnard...select the charges to be brought in a particular case"). 19 Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. 161, 165 (1977). 20 Whalen v. United States, 445 U.S. at 689. 21...parte Lange, 8-5 U.S. (19 Wall.) 163 (1874). Cf. Brown v. Ohio, 432 U.S. at 165 ("once the legislature has acted courts may not impose more than one

  13. Top-Down Proteomics on a Chromatographic Time Scale Using Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform Hybrid Mass Spectrometers

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Bryan A.; Jiang, Lihua; Thomas, Paul M.; Wenger, Craig D.; Roth, Michael J.; Boyne, Michael T.; Burke, Patricia V.; Kwast, Kurt E.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2008-01-01

    Proteomics has grown significantly with the aid of new technologies that consistently are becoming more streamlined. While processing of proteins from a whole cell lysate is typically done in a bottom-up fashion utilizing MS/MS of peptides from enzymatically digested proteins, top-down proteomics is becoming a viable alternative that until recently has been limited largely to offline analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. Here we describe a method for high-resolution tandem mass spectrometery of intact proteins on a chromatographic time scale. In a single liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) run, we have identified 22 yeast proteins with molecular weights from 14 to 35 kDa. Using anion exchange chromatography to fractionate a whole cell lysate before online LC–MS/MS, we have detected 231 metabolically labeled (14N/15N) protein pairs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thirty-nine additional proteins were identified and characterized from LC–MS/MS of selected anion exchange fractions. Automated localization of multiple acetylations on Histone H4 was also accomplished on an LC time scale from a complex protein mixture. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of top-down proteomics (i.e., many identifications) on linear ion trap Fourier transform (LTQ FT) systems using high-resolution MS/MS data obtained on a chromatographic time scale. PMID:17915963

  14. Addition of random run FM noise to the KPW time scale algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    The KPW (Kalman plus weights) time scale algorithm uses a Kalman filter to provide frequency and drift information to a basic time scale equation. This paper extends the algorithm to three-state clocks nd gives results for a simulated eight-clock ensemble.

  15. The role of time scale separation in a nonequilibrium roughening transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llas, M.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; López, J. M.; Gleiser, P. M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work we analyze the role of time scale separation between the external driving and the avalanche relaxation dynamics in a one-dimensional model of propagation of innovations among economic agents. When the time scales are separated the model presents a nonequilibrium roughening transition. We show that when avalanche overlapping is permitted, only a rough phase is observed.

  16. Time scales of spike-train correlation for neural oscillators with common drive.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Andrea K; Shea-Brown, Eric; Thilo, Evan L

    2010-01-01

    We examine the effect of the phase-resetting curve on the transfer of correlated input signals into correlated output spikes in a class of neural models receiving noisy superthreshold stimulation. We use linear-response theory to approximate the spike correlation coefficient in terms of moments of the associated exit time problem and contrast the results for type I vs type II models and across the different time scales over which spike correlations can be assessed. We find that, on long time scales, type I oscillators transfer correlations much more efficiently than type II oscillators. On short time scales this trend reverses, with the relative efficiency switching at a time scale that depends on the mean and standard deviation of input currents. This switch occurs over time scales that could be exploited by downstream circuits.

  17. Emergence of cooperation through coevolving time scale in spatial prisoner's dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Zhihai; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2010-08-01

    We study evolutionary prisoner’s dilemma game by considering adaptive strategy-selection time scale among individuals according to a “win-slower, lose-faster” rule: if an individual successfully resists the invasion of an opponent, she is prone to hold her strategy for longer time through decreasing her strategy-selection time scale; otherwise, she increases the time scale because of losing. We find that the greater the losers increase their strategy-selection time scales, the better for cooperation. Interestingly, optimal cooperation can be induced by proper adaptive rate in the strategy-selection time scale. Our results may have potential implications in the design of consensus protocol in multiagent systems.

  18. Time-scales of crustal anatexis in the Himalaya revealed by petrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, G. W.; Cottle, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Accessory phases, such as monazite, xenotime, and zircon, record a wealth of information regarding the timing, duration, and sources of crustal melting. Combined U-Th/Pb and REE analysis of these petrochronometers by Laser Ablation Split Stream (LASS-) ICPMS reveals complex spatiotemporal relationships on a range of scales, from distinct chemical domains within a single crystal, to cross-cutting dikes within heterogeneous plutons composed of multiple melt batches. The anatectic core of the Himalaya exposes mid-crustal rocks well suited for investigations of the time-scales involved in melt processes, such as generation, segregation, amalgamation, mobilization, and emplacement. Three examples from different settings within the Himalayan orogen, including 1) the Leo Pargil leucogranite injection complex exposed in a gneiss dome in the hinterland, 2) the Manaslu pluton at the interface between the anatectic core and overlying metasediments, and 3) Everest region and Mahabharat granites from the anatectic core to the outermost crystalline thrust sheet of the foreland, illustrate the value of inherited monazite, xenotime, and zircon for deciphering crystallization in the source rock and/or earlier melt batches in addition to determining the age of granite emplacement.

  19. Incorporating tree-thinking and evolutionary time scale into developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Feiner, Nathalie; Keeley, Sean D; Hara, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic approaches are indispensable in any comparative molecular study involving multiple species. These approaches are in increasing demand as the amount and availability of DNA sequence information continues to increase exponentially, even for organisms that were previously not extensively studied. Without the sound application of phylogenetic concepts and knowledge, one can be misled when attempting to infer ancestral character states as well as the timing and order of evolutionary events, both of which are frequently exerted in evolutionary developmental biology. The ignorance of phylogenetic approaches can also impact non-evolutionary studies and cause misidentification of the target gene or protein to be examined in functional characterization. This review aims to promote tree-thinking in evolutionary conjecture and stress the importance of a sense of time scale in cross-species comparisons, in order to enhance the understanding of phylogenetics in all biological fields including developmental biology. To this end, molecular phylogenies of several developmental regulatory genes, including those denoted as "cryptic pan-vertebrate genes", are introduced as examples. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  20. Differential time scales of change to learning frequency structures of isometric force tracking.

    PubMed

    Studenka, Breanna E; King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple processes support the persistent (learning) and transient (adaptive) change in behavior over time. We investigated whether practice and rest influence similarly the learning and adaptation of slow and fast frequency structures in isometric force tracking of pathways that varied in their regularity. Participants practiced 25 trials on each of 5 days in either a constant force target or 1 with the 1/f distributional properties of brown or pink noise. There was a reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) as well as an increasing positive correlation between force output and the target pathway for all noise conditions over days. The spectral frequency analysis of force output and RMSE revealed task dependent outcomes of learning and adaptation as a function of the relatively slow (0-4 Hz) and fast (8-12 Hz) oscillatory time scales. These contrasting findings show that the persistent and transient properties of learning occur across different timescales and dimensions of behavior (force output and outcome-RMSE).

  1. Genome-Wide Motif Statistics are Shaped by DNA Binding Proteins over Evolutionary Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Long; Kussell, Edo

    2016-10-01

    The composition of a genome with respect to all possible short DNA motifs impacts the ability of DNA binding proteins to locate and bind their target sites. Since nonfunctional DNA binding can be detrimental to cellular functions and ultimately to organismal fitness, organisms could benefit from reducing the number of nonfunctional DNA binding sites genome wide. Using in vitro measurements of binding affinities for a large collection of DNA binding proteins, in multiple species, we detect a significant global avoidance of weak binding sites in genomes. We demonstrate that the underlying evolutionary process leaves a distinct genomic hallmark in that similar words have correlated frequencies, a signal that we detect in all species across domains of life. We consider the possibility that natural selection against weak binding sites contributes to this process, and using an evolutionary model we show that the strength of selection needed to maintain global word compositions is on the order of point mutation rates. Likewise, we show that evolutionary mechanisms based on interference of protein-DNA binding with replication and mutational repair processes could yield similar results and operate with similar rates. On the basis of these modeling and bioinformatic results, we conclude that genome-wide word compositions have been molded by DNA binding proteins acting through tiny evolutionary steps over time scales spanning millions of generations.

  2. Extending the length and time scales of Gram-Schmidt Lyapunov vector computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anthony B.; Green, Jason R.

    2013-08-01

    Lyapunov vectors have found growing interest recently due to their ability to characterize systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of orthogonal Gram-Schmidt vectors requires multiplication and QR decomposition of large matrices, which grow as N2 (with the particle count). This expense has limited such calculations to relatively small systems and short time scales. Here, we detail two implementations of an algorithm for computing Gram-Schmidt vectors. The first is a distributed-memory message-passing method using Scalapack. The second uses the newly-released MAGMA library for GPUs. We compare the performance of both codes for Lennard-Jones fluids from N=100 to 1300 between Intel Nahalem/Infiniband DDR and NVIDIA C2050 architectures. To our best knowledge, these are the largest systems for which the Gram-Schmidt Lyapunov vectors have been computed, and the first time their calculation has been GPU-accelerated. We conclude that Lyapunov vector calculations can be significantly extended in length and time by leveraging the power of GPU-accelerated linear algebra.

  3. Extending the length and time scales of Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vector computations

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Anthony B.; Green, Jason R.

    2013-08-01

    Lyapunov vectors have found growing interest recently due to their ability to characterize systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of orthogonal Gram–Schmidt vectors requires multiplication and QR decomposition of large matrices, which grow as N{sup 2} (with the particle count). This expense has limited such calculations to relatively small systems and short time scales. Here, we detail two implementations of an algorithm for computing Gram–Schmidt vectors. The first is a distributed-memory message-passing method using Scalapack. The second uses the newly-released MAGMA library for GPUs. We compare the performance of both codes for Lennard–Jones fluids from N=100 to 1300 between Intel Nahalem/Infiniband DDR and NVIDIA C2050 architectures. To our best knowledge, these are the largest systems for which the Gram–Schmidt Lyapunov vectors have been computed, and the first time their calculation has been GPU-accelerated. We conclude that Lyapunov vector calculations can be significantly extended in length and time by leveraging the power of GPU-accelerated linear algebra.

  4. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of stars showing Wolf-Rayet phenomena are outlined along with the direction of future work. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of W-R spectra. Specifically the following topics are covered: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions the mass loss rates; and the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. Also, a brief overview of current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R spectra are included.

  5. [Lateralization phenomena and headache].

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; Savi, L

    1984-09-08

    Ipsilateral carotid and vertebral vasomotor phenomena are marked components of a unilateral cluster headache crisis. Investigation of lateralisation at the height of a crisis has shown that Doppler findings supplement Heick's observation of the reversible opening of both intra and extracranial arteriovenous shunts. This observation is in line with personal thermographic evidence and that of Lance indicating local hypothermia, and with Wolff's demonstration of dilatation and congestion associated with the superficial temporal artery. Personal dynamographic findings now point to a local extra-intracranial artery pressure gradient as the cause of the peripheral component of lateralisation in cluster headache.

  6. Prospects for Improved Forecasts of Weather and Short-Term Climate Variability on Subseasonal (2-Week to 2-Month) Times Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Dole, Randall; vandenDool, Huug; Suarez, Max; Waliser, Duane

    2002-01-01

    This workshop, held in April 2002, brought together various Earth Sciences experts to focus on the subseasonal prediction problem. While substantial advances have occurred over the last few decades in both weather and seasonal prediction, progress in improving predictions on these intermediate time scales (time scales ranging from about two weeks to two months) has been slow. The goals of the workshop were to get an assessment of the "state of the art" in predictive skill on these time scales, to determine the potential sources of "untapped" predictive skill, and to make recommendations for a course of action that will accelerate progress in this area. One of the key conclusions of the workshop was that there is compelling evidence for predictability at forecast lead times substantially longer than two weeks. Tropical diabatic heating and soil wetness were singled out as particularly important processes affecting predictability on these time scales. Predictability was also linked to various low-frequency atmospheric "phenomena" such as the annular modes in high latitudes (including their connections to the stratosphere), the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern, and the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO). The latter, in particular, was highlighted as a key source of untapped predictability in the tropics and subtropics, including the Asian and Australian monsoon regions.

  7. Sub-Daily Runoff Simulations with Parameters Inferred at the Daily Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, J. E.; Xu, C. Y.; Seibert, J.; Halldin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Concentration times in small and medium-sized watersheds (~100-1000 km2) are commonly less than 24 hours. Flood-forecasting models then require data at sub-daily time scales, but time-series of input and runoff data with sufficient lengths are often only available at the daily time scale, especially in developing countries. This has led to a search for time-scale relationships to infer parameter values at the time scales where they are needed from the time scales where they are available. In this study, time-scale dependencies in the HBV-light conceptual hydrological model were assessed within the generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) approach. It was hypothesised that the existence of such dependencies is a result of the numerical method or time-stepping scheme used in the models rather than a real time-scale-data dependence. Parameter values inferred showed a clear dependence on time scale when the explicit Euler method was used for modelling at the same time steps as the time scale of the input data (1 to 24 h). However, the dependence almost fully disappeared when the explicit Euler method was used for modelling in 1-hour time steps internally irrespectively of the time scale of the input data. In other words, it was found that when an adequate time-stepping scheme was implemented, parameter sets inferred at one time scale (e.g., daily) could be used directly for runoff simulations at other time scales (e.g., 3 h or 6 h) without any time scaling and this approach only resulted in a small (if any) model performance decrease, in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe and volume-error efficiencies. The overall results of this study indicated that as soon as sub-daily driving data can be secured, flood forecasting in watersheds with sub-daily concentration times is possible with model parameter values inferred from long time series of daily data, as long as an appropriate numerical method is used.

  8. Observation of quantum particles on a large space-time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, L. J.

    1994-10-01

    A quantum particle observed on a sufficiently large space-time scale can be described by means of classical particle trajectories. The joint distribution for large-scale multiple-time position and momentum measurements on a nonrelativistic quantum particle moving freely in R v is given by straight-line trajectories with probabilities determined by the initial momentum-space wavefunction. For large-scale toroidal and rectangular regions the trajectories are geodesics. In a uniform gravitational field the trajectories are parabolas. A quantum counting process on free particles is also considered and shown to converge in the large-space-time limit to a classical counting process for particles with straight-line trajectories. If the quantum particle interacts weakly with its environment, the classical particle trajectories may undergo random jumps. In the random potential model considered here, the quantum particle evolves according to a reversible unitary one-parameter group describing elastic scattering off static randomly distributed impurities (a quantum Lorentz gas). In the large-space-time weak-coupling limit a classical stochastic process is obtained with probability one and describes a classical particle moving with constant speed in straight lines between random jumps in direction. The process depends only on the ensemble value of the covariance of the random field and not on the sample field. The probability density in phase space associated with the classical stochastic process satisfies the linear Boltzmann equation for the classical Lorentz gas, which, in the limit h→0, goes over to the linear Landau equation. Our study of the quantum Lorentz gas is based on a perturbative expansion and, as in other studies of this system, the series can be controlled only for small values of the rescaled time and for Gaussian random fields. The discussion of classical particle trajectories for nonrelativistic particles on a macroscopic spacetime scale applies also to

  9. The Time-Scaling Issue in the Frequency Analysis of Multidimensional Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Valdes, J. B.

    2004-05-01

    Extreme events, such as droughts, appear as a period of time where water availability differ exceptionally from normal condition. Several characteristic of this departure from the normality are important in analyzing droughts recurrence frequency (e.g. magnitude, maximum intensity, duration, severity,.). In this kind of problems, the time scale applied in the analyses may become an issue when applying conventional frequency analysis approaches, generally based on the run theory. Usually few (one or two) main event-characteristics may be used, and when the time-scale changes in orders of magnitude, the derived frequency significantly changes, so poor characterization is achieved. For example, sort time-scale empathies characteristic such as intensity, but long time scale does magnitude. That variability may be overcome using a new approach, where events are threatened as in-time-multidimensional. This is studied in this work by comparing analysis applying conventional approach and the new multidimensional approach, and using from daily to decadal time scale. The improve in the performance of applying multidimensional technique, whit which frequency remains characterized even using different time-scale order of magnitude, results the main outcome of the study. The ability of implicitly incorporate all event feature in the time distribution, made possible characterize the events, independently of the time-scale, if the scale does not hide the extreme features.

  10. On the Effects of Gaps and Uses of Approximation Functions on the Time-Scale Signal Analysis: A Case Study Based on Space Geophysical Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Luciano A.; Domingues, Margarete O.; Mendes, Odim

    2017-02-01

    The presence of gaps is quite common in signals related to space science phenomena. Usually, this presence prevents the direct use of standard time-scale analysis because this analysis needs equally spaced data; it is affected by the time series borders (boundaries), and gaps can cause an increase of internal borders. Numerical approximations can be used to estimate the records whose entries are gaps. However, their use has limitations. In many practical cases, these approximations cannot faithfully reproduce the original signal behaviour. Alternatively, in this work, we compare an adapted wavelet technique (gaped wavelet transform), based on the continuous wavelet transform with Morlet wavelet analysing function, with two other standard approximation methods, namely, spline and Hermite cubic polynomials. This wavelet method does not require an approximation of the data on the gap positions, but it adapts the analysing wavelet function to deal with the gaps. To perform our comparisons, we use 120 magnetic field time series from a well-known space geophysical phenomena and we select and classify their gaps. Then, we analyse the influence of these methods in two time-scale tools. As conclusions, we observe that when the gaps are small (very few points sequentially missing), all the methods work well. However, with large gaps, the adapted wavelet method presents a better performance in the time-scale representation. Nevertheless, the cubic Hermite polynomial approximation is also an option when a reconstruction of the data is also needed, with the price of having a worse time-scale representation than the adapted wavelet method.

  11. On the Effects of Gaps and Uses of Approximation Functions on the Time-Scale Signal Analysis: A Case Study Based on Space Geophysical Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Luciano A.; Domingues, Margarete O.; Mendes, Odim

    2017-04-01

    The presence of gaps is quite common in signals related to space science phenomena. Usually, this presence prevents the direct use of standard time-scale analysis because this analysis needs equally spaced data; it is affected by the time series borders (boundaries), and gaps can cause an increase of internal borders. Numerical approximations can be used to estimate the records whose entries are gaps. However, their use has limitations. In many practical cases, these approximations cannot faithfully reproduce the original signal behaviour. Alternatively, in this work, we compare an adapted wavelet technique (gaped wavelet transform), based on the continuous wavelet transform with Morlet wavelet analysing function, with two other standard approximation methods, namely, spline and Hermite cubic polynomials. This wavelet method does not require an approximation of the data on the gap positions, but it adapts the analysing wavelet function to deal with the gaps. To perform our comparisons, we use 120 magnetic field time series from a well-known space geophysical phenomena and we select and classify their gaps. Then, we analyse the influence of these methods in two time-scale tools. As conclusions, we observe that when the gaps are small (very few points sequentially missing), all the methods work well. However, with large gaps, the adapted wavelet method presents a better performance in the time-scale representation. Nevertheless, the cubic Hermite polynomial approximation is also an option when a reconstruction of the data is also needed, with the price of having a worse time-scale representation than the adapted wavelet method.

  12. Invited Review Article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Judah

    2012-02-15

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  13. A wavelet based approach to measure and manage contagion at different time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Theo

    2015-10-01

    We decompose financial return series of US stocks into different time scales with respect to different market regimes. First, we examine dependence structure of decomposed financial return series and analyze the impact of the current financial crisis on contagion and changing interdependencies as well as upper and lower tail dependence for different time scales. Second, we demonstrate to which extent the information of different time scales can be used in the context of portfolio management. As a result, minimizing the variance of short-run noise outperforms a portfolio that minimizes the variance of the return series.

  14. Invited review article: The statistical modeling of atomic clocks and the design of time scales.

    PubMed

    Levine, Judah; Ibarra-Manzano, O

    2012-02-01

    I will show how the statistical models that are used to describe the performance of atomic clocks are derived from their internal design. These statistical models form the basis for time scales, which are used to define international time scales such as International Atomic Time and Coordinated Universal Time. These international time scales are realized by ensembles of clocks at national laboratories such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and I will describe how ensembles of atomic clocks are characterized and managed.

  15. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  16. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  17. Thermal Wave Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This map from the MGS Horizon Sensor Assembly (HORSE) shows middle atmospheric temperatures near the 1 mbar level of Mars between Ls 170 to 175 (approx. July 14 - 23, 1999). Local Mars times between 1:30 and 4:30 AM are included. Infrared radiation measured by the Mars Horizon Sensor Assembly was used to make the map. That device continuously views the 'limb' of Mars in four directions, to help orient the spacecraft instruments to the nadir: straight down.

    The map shows thermal wave phenomena that are caused by the large topographic variety of Mars' surface, as well the latitudinally symmetric behavior expected at this time of year near the equinox.

  18. Fast Particle Methods for Multiscale Phenomena Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Wray, A.; Shariff, K.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We are developing particle methods oriented at improving computational modeling capabilities of multiscale physical phenomena in : (i) high Reynolds number unsteady vortical flows, (ii) particle laden and interfacial flows, (iii)molecular dynamics studies of nanoscale droplets and studies of the structure, functions, and evolution of the earliest living cell. The unifying computational approach involves particle methods implemented in parallel computer architectures. The inherent adaptivity, robustness and efficiency of particle methods makes them a multidisciplinary computational tool capable of bridging the gap of micro-scale and continuum flow simulations. Using efficient tree data structures, multipole expansion algorithms, and improved particle-grid interpolation, particle methods allow for simulations using millions of computational elements, making possible the resolution of a wide range of length and time scales of these important physical phenomena.The current challenges in these simulations are in : [i] the proper formulation of particle methods in the molecular and continuous level for the discretization of the governing equations [ii] the resolution of the wide range of time and length scales governing the phenomena under investigation. [iii] the minimization of numerical artifacts that may interfere with the physics of the systems under consideration. [iv] the parallelization of processes such as tree traversal and grid-particle interpolations We are conducting simulations using vortex methods, molecular dynamics and smooth particle hydrodynamics, exploiting their unifying concepts such as : the solution of the N-body problem in parallel computers, highly accurate particle-particle and grid-particle interpolations, parallel FFT's and the formulation of processes such as diffusion in the context of particle methods. This approach enables us to transcend among seemingly unrelated areas of research.

  19. Time scale algorithm: Definition of ensemble time and possible uses of the Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavella, Patrizia; Thomas, Claudine

    1990-01-01

    The comparative study of two time scale algorithms, devised to satisfy different but related requirements, is presented. They are ALGOS(BIPM), producing the international reference TAI at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, and AT1(NIST), generating the real-time time scale AT1 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. In each case, the time scale is a weighted average of clock readings, but the weight determination and the frequency prediction are different because they are adapted to different purposes. The possibility of using a mathematical tool, such as the Kalman filter, together with the definition of the time scale as a weighted average, is also analyzed. Results obtained by simulation are presented.

  20. Sensitivity of Southern Ocean overturning to wind stress changes: Role of surface restoring time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Munday, David R.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of different surface restoring time scales on the response of the Southern Ocean overturning circulation to wind stress changes is investigated using an idealised channel model. Regardless of the restoring time scales chosen, the eddy-induced meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is found to compensate for changes of the direct wind-driven Eulerian-mean MOC, rendering the residual MOC less sensitive to wind stress changes. However, the extent of this compensation depends strongly on the restoring time scale: residual MOC sensitivity increases with decreasing restoring time scale. Strong surface restoring is shown to limit the ability of the eddy-induced MOC to change in response to wind stress changes and as such suppresses the eddy compensation effect. These model results are consistent with qualitative arguments derived from residual-mean theory and may have important implications for interpreting past and future observations.

  1. Fine Scale Baleen Whale Behavior Observed Via Tagging Over Daily Time Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Over Daily Time Scales Mark Baumgartner Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Biology Department, MS #33 266 Woods Hole Road Woods Hole, MA 02543...cetacean behavior at intermediate daily time scales. Recent efforts to assess the impacts of sound on marine mammals and to estimate foraging...whale occurrence. Marine Ecology Progress Series 423:167-184. 4 Figure 1. Block diagram of tracking system based on whale-borne Wildlife

  2. A two-time-scale autopilot for high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Chatterji, G. B.; Cheng, V. H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-time-scale autopilot is proposed for the Aircraft Controls Design Challenge problem. This control law uses a nonlinear aircraft model constructed from the given vehicle simulation. The vehicle model is partitioned into slow translational dynamics and fast rotational dynamics. Feedback linearization is then employed to synthesize control laws for these two-time scales. Due to the nature of the synthesis, the control law is suitable for automatic trajectory following, and also for pilot control.

  3. Estimating the distribution of rest-frame time-scales for blazar jets: a statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodakis, I.; Blinov, D.; Papadakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.

    2017-03-01

    In any flux-density limited sample of blazars, the distribution of the time-scale modulation factor Δt΄/Δt, which quantifies the change in observed time-scales compared to the rest-frame ones due to redshift and relativistic compression follows an exponential distribution with a mean depending on the flux limit of the sample. In this work, we produce the mathematical formalism that allows us to use this information in order to uncover the underlining rest-frame probability density function of measurable time-scales of blazar jets. We extensively test our proposed methodology using a simulated Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar population with a 1.5 Jy flux-density limit in the simple case (where all blazars share the same intrinsic time-scale), in order to identify limits of applicability and potential biases due to observational systematics and sample selection. We find that for monitoring with time intervals between observations longer than ∼30 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale under investigation the method loses its ability to produce robust results. For time intervals of ∼3 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale, the error of the method is as low as 1 per cent in recovering the intrinsic rest-frame time-scale. We applied our method to rotations of the optical polarization angle of blazars observed by RoboPol. We found that the intrinsic time-scales of the longest duration rotation event in each blazar follows a narrow distribution, well described by a normal distribution with mean 87 d and standard deviation 5 d. We discuss possible interpretations of this result.

  4. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buhusi, Catalin V.; Oprisan, Sorinel A.

    2013-01-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion (interval timing) based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher-order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively-connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. PMID:23518297

  5. Task difficulty and the time scales of warm-up and motor learning.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Morina E; King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2013-01-01

    The authors investigated the influence of task difficulty on warm-up decrement and learning across practice sessions. Three groups of participants practiced a star-tracing task over 3 consecutive days with different levels (e.g., easy, medium, hard) of task difficulty. The performance data were modeled with a 2 time scale function that represented the transient, fast time scale process of warm-up decrement superimposed with the persistent, slow time scale process of learning. Movement time decreased as a function of practice with the most difficult condition exhibiting the greatest reduction though still the longest movement time. The 2 time scale model provided a better fit to the data than an exponential or power law function and showed that the 3 difficulty conditions exhibited similar rates of change for the respective slow (i.e., learning) and fast (i.e., warm-up decrement) time scale processes that varied by an order of magnitude. Task difficulty was inversely related to the initial level of warm-up decrement but not the rate of performance recovery early in a practice session. The findings support the postulation that there is a persistent learned component to the initial conditions in subsequent practice sessions but that there is a common time scale of accommodating the transient process of warm-up decrement.

  6. Time-scale invariance as an emergent property in a perceptron with realistic, noisy neurons.

    PubMed

    Buhusi, Catalin V; Oprisan, Sorinel A

    2013-05-01

    In most species, interval timing is time-scale invariant: errors in time estimation scale up linearly with the estimated duration. In mammals, time-scale invariance is ubiquitous over behavioral, lesion, and pharmacological manipulations. For example, dopaminergic drugs induce an immediate, whereas cholinergic drugs induce a gradual, scalar change in timing. Behavioral theories posit that time-scale invariance derives from particular computations, rules, or coding schemes. In contrast, we discuss a simple neural circuit, the perceptron, whose output neurons fire in a clockwise fashion based on the pattern of coincidental activation of its input neurons. We show numerically that time-scale invariance emerges spontaneously in a perceptron with realistic neurons, in the presence of noise. Under the assumption that dopaminergic drugs modulate the firing of input neurons, and that cholinergic drugs modulate the memory representation of the criterion time, we show that a perceptron with realistic neurons reproduces the pharmacological clock and memory patterns, and their time-scale invariance, in the presence of noise. These results suggest that rather than being a signature of higher order cognitive processes or specific computations related to timing, time-scale invariance may spontaneously emerge in a massively connected brain from the intrinsic noise of neurons and circuits, thus providing the simplest explanation for the ubiquity of scale invariance of interval timing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of time scale on performance of a psychrometric energy balance method to estimate precipitation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, P.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation phase determination is fundamental to estimating catchment hydrological response to precipitation in cold regions and is especially variable over time and space in mountains. Hydrological methods to estimate phase are predominantly calibrated, depend on air temperature and use daily time steps. Air temperature is not physically related to phase and precipitation events are very dynamic, adding significant uncertainty to the use of daily air temperature indices to estimate phase. Data for this study comes from high quality, high temporal resolution precipitation phase and meteorological observations at multiple elevations in a small Canadian Rockies catchment, the Marmot Creek Research Basin, from 2005 to 2012. The psychrometric energy balance of a falling hydrometeor, requiring air temperature and humidity observations, was employed to examine precipitation phase with respect to meteorological conditions via calculation of a hydrometeor temperature. The hydrometeor temperature-precipitation phase relationship was used to quantify temporal scaling in phase observations and to develop a method to estimate precipitation phase. Temporal scaling results show that the transition range of the distribution of hydrometeor temperatures associated with mixed rainfall and snowfall decreases with decreasing time interval. The amount of precipitation also has an influence as larger events lead to smaller transition ranges across all time scales. The uncertainty of the relationship between the hydrometeor temperature and phase was quantified and degrades significantly with an increase in time interval. The errors associated with the 15 minute and hourly intervals are small. Comparisons with other methods indicate that the psychrometric energy balance method performs much better than air temperature methods and that this improvement increases with decreasing time interval. These findings suggest that the physically based psychrometric method, employed on sub

  8. Hydrological connectivity of hillslopes and streams: Characteristic time scales and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Kevin J.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2010-10-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to streamflow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics through a wet-up period in watershed 10 of the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows. We examined the controls on hillslope-stream connectivity on the basis of observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components for a series of storms during the wet-up phase of the 2002-2003 winter rainy season. Hillslope discharge was distinctly threshold-like with a near linear response and average quick flow ratio of 0.58 when antecedent rainfall was greater than 20 mm. Hillslope and stream stormflow varied temporally and showed strong hysteretic relationships. Event water mean transit times (8-34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions demonstrated that subsurface contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, soil water and runoff mean transit times during nonstorm conditions were greater than the time scale of storm events. Soil water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment base flow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways, their synchronicity, threshold activation, hysteresis, and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  9. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea-ice variability on monthly to annual time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krikken, Folmer; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2015-04-01

    The strong decrease in Arctic sea-ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea-ice predictions on seasonal to decadal time scales. Hence, it is key to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. The authors report on an analysis of natural variability of Arctic sea-ice from an energy budget perspective, using 15 CMIP5 climate models, and comparing these results to atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses data. We quantify the persistence of sea ice anomalies and the cross-correlation with the surface and top energy budget components. The Arctic energy balance components primarily indicate the important role of the seasonal sea-ice albedo feedback, in which sea-ice anomalies in the melt season reemerge in the growth season. This is a robust anomaly reemergence mechanism among all 15 climate models. The role of ocean lies mainly in storing heat content anomalies in spring, and releasing them in autumn. Ocean heat flux variations only play a minor role. The role of clouds is further investigated. We demonstrate that there is no direct atmospheric response of clouds to spring sea-ice anomalies, but a delayed response is evident in autumn. Hence, there is no cloud-ice feedback in late spring and summer, but there is a cloud-ice feedback in autumn, which strengthens the ice-albedo feedback. Anomalies in insolation are positively correlated with sea-ice variability. This is primarily a result of reduced multiple-reflection of insolation due to an albedo decrease. This effect counteracts the sea-ice albedo effect up to 50%. ERA-Interim and ORAS4 confirm the main findings from the climate models.

  10. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  11. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  12. ON DETECTING TRANSIENT PHENOMENA

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, G.

    2013-08-10

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximize the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article, we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients which is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method makes use of all the information that is available in the data throughout the statistical decision-making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. Here we consider those most common in astrophysics, which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra, and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the case of a weak X-ray flare in a time series and a short-lived quasi-periodic oscillation in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting arbitrarily shaped models to a power density distribution, which is of general interest in all applications involving periodogram analysis.

  13. Hysteresis phenomena in hydraulic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, H. J.; Luo, X. W.; Chen, Y. L.; Xu, H. Y.; Farhat, M.

    2012-11-01

    Hysteresis phenomena demonstrate the lag between the generation and the removal of some physical phenomena. This paper studies the hysteresis phenomena of the head-drop in a scaled model pump turbine using experiment test and CFD methods. These lag is induced by complicated flow patterns, which influenced the reliability of rotating machine. Keeping the same measurement procedure is concluded for the hydraulic machine measurement.

  14. Insights from inside the spinodal: Bridging thermalization time scales with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, Martin; Nielaba, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We report the influence of the strength of heat bath coupling on the demixing behavior in spinodal decomposing one component liquid-vapor systems. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method with a van der Waals equation of state is used for the simulation. A thermostat for SPH is introduced that is based on the Berendsen thermostat. It controls the strength of heat bath coupling and allows for quenches with exponential temperature decay at a certain thermalization time scale. The present method allows us to bridge several orders of magnitude in the thermalization time scale. The early stage is highly affected by the choice of time scale. A transition from exponential growth to a 1 /2 ordinary power law scaling in the characteristic lengths is observed. At high initial temperatures the growth is logarithmic. The comparison with pure thermal simulations reveals latent heat to raise the mean system temperature. Large thermalization time scales and thermal conductivity are figured out to affect a stagnation of heating, which is explained with convective processes. Furthermore, large thermalization time scales are responsible for a stagnation of growth of domains, which is temporally embedded between early and late stage of phase separation. Therefore, it is considered as an intermediate stage. We present an aspect concerning this stage, namely that choosing larger thermalization time scales increases the duration. Moreover, it is observed that diffuse interfaces are formed during this stage, provided that the stage is apparent. We show that the differences in the evolution between pure thermal simulations and simulations with an instantaneously scaled mean temperature can be explained by the thermalization process, since a variation of the time scale allows for the bridging between these cases of limit.

  15. Increasing temperature forcing reduces the Greenland Ice Sheet's response time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick J.; Parizek, Byron R.; Nicholas, Robert E.; Alley, Richard B.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Damages from sea level rise, as well as strategies to manage the associated risk, hinge critically on the time scale and eventual magnitude of sea level rise. Satellite observations and paleo-data suggest that the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) loses mass in response to increased temperatures, and may thus contribute substantially to sea level rise as anthropogenic climate change progresses. The time scale of GIS mass loss and sea level rise are deeply uncertain, and are often assumed to be constant. However, previous ice sheet modeling studies have shown that the time scale of GIS response likely decreases strongly with increasing temperature anomaly. Here, we map the relationship between temperature anomaly and the time scale of GIS response, by perturbing a calibrated, three-dimensional model of GIS behavior. Additional simulations with a profile, higher-order, ice sheet model yield time scales that are broadly consistent with those obtained using the three-dimensional model, and shed light on the feedbacks in the ice sheet system that cause the time scale shortening. Semi-empirical modeling studies that assume a constant time scale of sea level adjustment, and are calibrated to small preanthropogenic temperature and sea level changes, may underestimate future sea level rise. Our analysis suggests that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in terms of avoided sea level rise from the GIS, may be greatest if emissions reductions begin before large temperature increases have been realized. Reducing anthropogenic climate change may also allow more time for design and deployment of risk management strategies by slowing sea level contributions from the GIS.

  16. Crossover Phenomena in Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Used in Financial Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shi-Hao

    2009-02-01

    A systematic analysis of Shanghai and Japan stock indices for the period of Jan. 1984 to Dec. 2005 is performed. After stationarity is verified by ADF (Augmented Dickey-Fuller) test, the power spectrum of the data exhibits a power law decay as a whole characterized by 1/fβ processes with possible long range correlations. Subsequently, by using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of the general volatility in the stock markets, we find that the long-range correlations are occurred among the return series and the crossover phenomena exhibit in the results obviously. Further, Shanghai stock market shows long-range correlations in short time scale and shows short-range correlations in long time scale. Whereas, for Japan stock market, the data behaves oppositely absolutely. Last, we compare the varying of scale exponent in large volatility between two stock markets. All results obtained may indicate the possibility of characteristic of multifractal scaling behavior of the financial markets.

  17. Hypervelocity impact phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-07-01

    There is a need to determine the equations of state of materials in regimes of extreme high pressures, temperatures and strain rates that are not attainable on current two-stage light-gas guns. Understanding high-pressure material behavior is crucial to address the physical processes associated with a variety of hypervelocity impact events related to space sciences-orbital-debris impact, debris-shield designs, high-speed plasma propagation, and impact lethality applications. At very high impact velocities material properties will be dominated by phase-changes, such as melting or vaporization, which cannot be achieved at lower impact velocities. Development of well-controlled and repeatable hypervelocity launch capabilities is the first step necessary to improve our understanding of material behavior at extreme pressures and temperatures not currently available using conventional two-stage light-gas gun techniques. In this paper, techniques that have been used to extend both the launch capabilities of a two-stage light gas gun to 16 km/s, and their use to determine the material properties at pressures and temperature states higher than those ever obtained in the laboratory are summarized. The newly developed hypervelocity launcher (HVL) can launch intact (macroscopic dimensions) plates to 16 km/s. Time-resolved interferometric techniques have been used to determine shock-loading/release characteristics of materials impacted by such fliers as well as shock-induced vaporization phenomena in fully vaporized states. High-speed photography or radiography has been used to evaluate the debris propagation characteristics resulting from disc impact of thin bumper sheets at hypervelocities in excess of 10 km/s using the HVL. Examples of these experiments are provided in this paper.

  18. Micro- and nano- second time scale, high power electrical wire explosions in water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, Alon; Efimov, Sergey; Sayapin, Arkadii; Fedotov, Alexander; Gurovich, Viktor; Krasik, Yakov

    2006-10-01

    Experimental and magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation results of micro- and nanosecond time scale underwater electrical Al, Cu and W wires explosions are presented. A capacitor bank with stored energy up to 6 kJ (discharge current up to 80 kA with 2.5 μs quarter period) was used in microsecond time scale experiments and water forming line generator with current amplitude up to 100 kA and pulse duration of 100 ns were used in nanosecond time scale experiments. Extremely high energy deposition of up to 60 times the atomization enthalpy was registered in nanosecond time scale explosions. A discharge channel evolution and surface temperature were analyzed by streak shadow imaging and using fast photo-diode with a set of interference filters, respectively. Microsecond time scale electrical explosion of cylindrical wire array showed extremely high pressure of converging shock waves at the axis, up to 0.2 MBar. A 1D and 2D magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation demonstrated good agreement with such experimental parameters as discharge channel current, voltage, radius, and temperature.

  19. Semantic and acoustic analysis of speech by functional networks with distinct time scales

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Siyi; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Speech perception requires the successful interpretation of both phonetic and syllabic information in the auditory signal. It has been suggested by Poeppel (2003) that phonetic processing requires an optimal time scale of 25 ms while the time scale of syllabic processing is much slower (150–250ms). To better understand the operation of brain networks at these characteristic time scales during speech perception, we studied the spatial and dynamic properties of EEG responses to five different stimuli: (1) amplitude modulated (AM) speech, (2) AM speech with added broadband noise, (3) AM reversed speech, (4) AM broadband noise, and (5) AM pure tone. Amplitude modulation at gamma band frequencies (40 Hz) elicited steady-state auditory evoked responses (SSAERs) bilaterally over primary auditory cortices. Reduced SSAERs were observed over the left auditory cortex only for stimuli containing speech. In addition, we found over the left hemisphere, anterior to primary auditory cortex, a network whose instantaneous frequencies in the theta to alpha band (4–16 Hz) are correlated with the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. This correlation was not observed for reversed speech. The presence of speech in the sound input activates a 4–16 Hz envelope tracking network and suppresses the 40-Hz gamma band network which generates the steady-state responses over the left auditory cortex. We believe these findings to be consistent with the idea that processing of the speech signals involves preferentially processing at syllabic time scales rather than phonetic time scales. PMID:20580635

  20. A multi-time scale approach to remaining useful life prediction in rolling bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yuning; Yan, Ruqiang; Gao, Robert X.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel multi-time scale approach to bearing defect tracking and remaining useful life (RUL) prediction, which integrates enhanced phase space warping (PSW) with a modified Paris crack growth model. As a data-driven method, PSW describes the dynamical behavior of the bearing being tested on a fast-time scale, whereas the Paris crack growth model, as a physics-based model, characterizes the bearing's defect propagation on a slow-time scale. Theoretically, PSW constructs a tracking metric by evaluating the phase space trajectory warping of the bearing vibration data, and establishes a correlation between measurement on a fast-time scale and defect growth variables on a slow-time scale. Furthermore, PSW is enhanced by a multi-dimensional auto-regression (AR) model for improved accuracy in defect tracking. Also, the Paris crack growth model is modified by a time-piecewise algorithm for real-time RUL prediction. Case studies performed on two run-to-failure experiments indicate that the developed technique is effective in tracking the evolution of bearing defects and accurately predict the bearing RUL, thus contributing to the literature of bearing prognosis .

  1. Time-scale and state dependence of the carbon-cycle feedback to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey; Dalmonech, Daniela; Foley, Aideen M.; Feulner, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Climate and atmospheric CO2 concentration are intimately coupled in the Earth system: CO2 influences climate through the greenhouse effect, but climate also affects CO2 through its impact on the amount of carbon stored on land and in the ocean. The change in atmospheric CO2 as a response to a change in temperature () is a useful measure to quantify the feedback between the carbon cycle and climate. Using an ensemble of experiments with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity we show a pronounced time-scale dependence of . A maximum is found on centennial scales with values for the model ensemble in the range 5-12 ppm °C-1, while lower values are found on shorter and longer time scales. These results are consistent with estimates derived from past observations. Up to centennial scales, the land carbon response to climate dominates the CO2 signal in the atmosphere, while on longer time scales the ocean becomes important and eventually dominates on multi-millennial scales. In addition to the time-scale dependence, modeled show a distinct dependence on the initial state of the system. In particular, on centennial time-scales, high values are correlated with high initial land carbon content. A similar relation holds also for the CMIP5 models, although for computed from a very different experimental setup. The emergence of common patterns like this could prove to usefully constrain the climate-carbon cycle feedback.

  2. Time-scales of close-in exoplanet radio emission variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Fares, R.; Donati, J.-F.; Moutou, C.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the variability of exoplanetary radio emission using stellar magnetic maps and 3D field extrapolation techniques. We use a sample of hot Jupiter hosting stars, focusing on the HD 179949, HD 189733 and τ Boo systems. Our results indicate two time-scales over which radio emission variability may occur at magnetized hot Jupiters. The first is the synodic period of the star-planet system. The origin of variability on this time-scale is the relative motion between the planet and the interplanetary plasma that is corotating with the host star. The second time-scale is the length of the magnetic cycle. Variability on this time-scale is caused by evolution of the stellar field. At these systems, the magnitude of planetary radio emission is anticorrelated with the angular separation between the subplanetary point and the nearest magnetic pole. For the special case of τ Boo b, whose orbital period is tidally locked to the rotation period of its host star, variability only occurs on the time-scale of the magnetic cycle. The lack of radio variability on the synodic period at τ Boo b is not predicted by previous radio emission models, which do not account for the co-rotation of the interplanetary plasma at small distances from the star.

  3. Joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis based on intrinsic time-scale decomposition for planetary gearbox fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhipeng; Lin, Xuefeng; Zuo, Ming J.

    2016-05-01

    Planetary gearbox vibration signals feature complex modulations, thus leading to intricate sideband structure and resulting in difficulty in fault characteristic frequency identification. Intrinsic time-scale decomposition has unique merits, such as high adaptability to changes in signals, low computational complexity, good capability to suppress mode mixing and to preserve temporal information of transients, and excellent suitability for mono-component decomposition of complex multi-component signals. In order to address the issue with planetary gearbox fault diagnosis due to the multiple modulation sources, a joint amplitude and frequency demodulation analysis method is proposed, by exploiting the merits of intrinsic time-scale decomposition. The signal is firstly decomposed into a series of mono-component proper rotational components. Then the one with its instantaneous frequency fluctuating around the gear meshing frequency or its harmonics is selected as the sensitive component. Next, Fourier transformation is applied to the instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency of the sensitive component to obtain the amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra respectively. Finally, a planetary gearbox fault is diagnosed by matching the peaks in the amplitude and frequency demodulated spectra with the theoretical gear fault characteristic frequencies. The proposed method is illustrated by a numerical simulated signal, and further validated by lab experimental signals of a planetary gearbox. The localized faults of sun, planet and ring gears are diagnosed, showing the effectiveness of the method.

  4. Complexity of the Taskless Mind at Different Time-Scales: an Empirically Weighted Approach to Decomposition and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aven, John L.; Mandell, Arnold J.; Holroyd, Tom; Coppola, Richard

    2011-04-01

    The neurodynamical state of an eyes closed at `rest' subject is an area of keen interest in the neuroscience community due to Raichle's field changing concept of the Default Mode Network [1]. The dynamic analysis of neurobiologically derived data commonly involves the computation of distributional measures and time-frequency transforms, and more recently the use of ergodic measures. However, many of the methods used in these computations rely upon questionable assumptions such as stationarity or approximate linearity. The Empirical Mode Decomposition of Huang et al.., [2], which preserves nonlinearity and non-stationarity, has led to alternative signal processing techniques. We append to this growing set of techniques a well-defined class of Weighting Functionals, WF. The strength is that they are easily applied to any number of time-frequency transforms and ergodic/complexity measurements because the WFs rescale all the results according to the proportion of energy contained at the individual time-scales. The application to er-godic/complexity measurements has not been addressed in the context of Intrinsic Mode Functions, and is done so here for the first time. Our interest is to take these methods and demonstrate time dependence of the signal across multiple time-scales in the comparison of normal controls and a variety of psychopathological and neuropathological conditions.

  5. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael C.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan G.; Anderson, Ryan S.; Arain, M. Altaf; Baker, Ian T.; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing M.; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Gough, Christopher M.; Grant, Robert F.; Hollinger, David; Izaurralde, R. Cesar; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shugang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. William; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William J.; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christina; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

    2011-12-01

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Despite the fact that ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales, most assessments of model performance do not discriminate different time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of 21 ecosystem models at 9 eddy covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level intercomparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model error are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites. To assess the significance of model error at different time scales, a novel Monte Carlo approach was developed to incorporate flux observation error. Failing to account for observation error leads to a misidentification of the time scales that dominate model error. These analyses show that model error (1) is largest at the annual and 20-120 day scales, (2) has a clear peak at the diurnal scale, and (3) shows large variability among models in the 2-20 day scales. Errors at the annual scale were consistent across time, diurnal errors were predominantly during the growing season, and intermediate-scale errors were largely event driven. Breaking spectra into discrete temporal bands revealed a significant model-by-band effect but also a nonsignificant model-by-site effect, which together suggest that individual models show consistency in their error patterns. Differences among models were related to model time step, soil hydrology, and the representation of photosynthesis and phenology but not the soil carbon or nitrogen cycles. These factors had the greatest impact on diurnal errors, were less important at annual scales, and had the least impact

  6. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  7. Teaching Optical Phenomena with Tracker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, M.; Carvalho, P. Simeão

    2014-01-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a…

  8. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, F; Müller-Staub, M; Needham, I; Van Achterberg, T

    2011-04-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric inpatient nursing care and to compare these phenomena with the labels and the definitions of the nursing diagnoses to elucidate how well this classification covers these phenomena. A search of journal articles took place in the databases MedLine, PsychInfo, Cochrane and CINAHL. A qualitative content analysis approach was used to identify nursing phenomena in the articles. Various phenomena were found in the articles. The study demonstrated that NANDA-I describes essential phenomena for the adult inpatient psychiatry on the level of labels and definitions. However, some apparently important nursing phenomena are not covered by the labels or definitions of NANDA-I. Other phenomena are assigned as defining characteristics or as related factors to construct nursing diagnoses. The further development of the classification NANDA-I will strengthen the application in the daily work of psychiatric nurses and enhance the quality of nursing care in the inpatient setting. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  9. Unifying catchment water balance models for different time scales through the maximum entropy production principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Wang, Dingbao; Yang, Hanbo; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a thermodynamic basis for water balance partitioning at the catchment scale, through formulation of flux-force relationships for the constituent hydrological processes, leading to the derivation of optimality conditions that satisfy the principle of Maximum Entropy Production (MEP). Application of these optimality principles at three different time scales leads to the derivation of water balance equations that mimic widely used, empirical models, i.e., Budyko-type model over long-term scale, the "abcd" model at monthly scale, and the SCS model at the event scale. The applicability of MEP in each case helps to draw connections between the water balances at the three different time scales, and to demonstrate a common thermodynamic basis for the otherwise empirical water balance models. In particular, it is concluded that the long time scale Budyko-type model and the event scale SCS model are both special cases of the monthly "abcd" model.

  10. Energy Landscapes Encoding Function in Enzymes Investigated Over Broad Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, Robert

    2011-03-01

    The operating hypothesis of much of our current work is that atomic motion, over broad time scales (femtoseconds to milliseconds, the latter being the time scale of most enzyme catalyzed reactions), contributes to enzymic catalysis in proteins. It is clear from our work that specific types of motions are important in binding of ligands to proteins and transition state formation in enzymatic catalysis. Since new experimental and theoretical approaches are needed to understand the dynamical nature of proteins broadly and enzymatic catalysis specifically, we have employed time-resolved ``pump-probe'' spectroscopic techniques because of the sensitivity of these type of approaches to all relevant time scales. And we have also developed and applied new theoretical methods. The talk will focus on how lactate dehydrogenase brings about catalysis based on current experimental and theoretical studies. Work supported by NIH Grant P01GM068036.

  11. Calibration of the geologic time scale: Cenozoic and Late Cretaceous glauconite and nonglauconite dates compared

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, L.E.; Smith, A.G. ); Armstrong, R.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Revision of the 1982 time scale of Harland et al. has led to the compilation of 377 isotopic dates for calibration of the Cenozoic to Cretaceous time interval. The results show that the ages of stage boundaries based on glauconite dates are on average about 2 m.y. younger than those based on nonglauconite dates, but for many Cenozoic and Late Cretaceous stages the differences are too small to require special consideration of glauconite dates. Future work may reveal an irreducible systematic difference between glauconite and nonglauconite time scales, but the progress made so far in recognizing those glauconites likely to yield reliable dates for the Cenozoic to Late Cretaceous interval may continue to provide useful time-scale calibration points.

  12. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-02

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  13. Analytical expression for gas-particle equilibration time scale and its numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anttila, Tatu; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Dal Maso, Miikka

    2016-05-01

    We have derived a time scale τeq that describes the characteristic time for a single compound i with a saturation vapour concentration Ceff,i to reach thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas and particle phases. The equilibration process was assumed to take place via gas-phase diffusion and absorption into a liquid-like phase present in the particles. It was further shown that τeq combines two previously derived and often applied time scales τa and τs that account for the changes in the gas and particle phase concentrations of i resulting from the equilibration, respectively. The validity of τeq was tested by comparing its predictions against results from a numerical model that explicitly simulates the transfer of i between the gas and particle phases. By conducting a large number of simulations where the values of the key input parameters were varied randomly, it was found out that τeq yields highly accurate results when i is a semi-volatile compound in the sense that the ratio of total (gas and particle phases) concentration of i to the saturation vapour concentration of i, μ, is below unity. On the other hand, the comparison of analytical and numerical time scales revealed that using τa or τs alone to calculate the equilibration time scale may lead to considerable errors. It was further shown that τeq tends to overpredict the equilibration time when i behaves as a non-volatile compound in a sense that μ > 1. Despite its simplicity, the time scale derived here has useful applications. First, it can be used to assess if semi-volatile compounds reach thermodynamic equilibrium during dynamic experiments that involve changes in the compound volatility. Second, the time scale can be used in modeling of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to check whether SOA forming compounds equilibrate over a certain time interval.

  14. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Julio Camarero, Jesús; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  15. The time scale of the silicate weathering negative feedback on atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbourn, G.; Ridgwell, A.; Lenton, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate fate of CO2 added to the ocean-atmosphere system is chemical reaction with silicate minerals and burial as marine carbonates. The time scale of this silicate weathering negative feedback on atmospheric pCO2 will determine the duration of perturbations to the carbon cycle, be they geological release events or the current anthropogenic perturbation. However, there has been little previous work on quantifying the time scale of the silicate weathering feedback, with the primary estimate of 300-400 kyr being traceable to an early box model study by Sundquist (1991). Here we employ a representation of terrestrial rock weathering in conjunction with the "GENIE" (Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system) model to elucidate the different time scales of atmospheric CO2 regulation while including the main climate feedbacks on CO2 uptake by the ocean. In this coupled model, the main dependencies of weathering—runoff, temperature, and biological productivity—were driven from an energy-moisture balance atmosphere model and parameterized plant productivity. Long-term projections (1 Myr) were conducted for idealized scenarios of 1000 and 5000 PgC fossil fuel emissions and their sensitivity to different model parameters was tested. By fitting model output to a series of exponentials we determined the e-folding time scale for atmospheric CO2 drawdown by silicate weathering to be ˜240 kyr (range 170-380 kyr), significantly less than existing quantifications. Although the time scales for reequilibration of global surface temperature and surface ocean pH are similar to that for CO2, a much greater proportion of the peak temperature anomaly persists on this longest time scale; ˜21% compared to ˜10% for CO2.

  16. Global scale precipitation from monthly to centennial scales: empirical space-time scaling analysis, anthropogenic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, Isabel; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of precipitation scaling regimes represents a key contribution to the improved understanding of space-time precipitation variability, which is the focus here. We conduct space-time scaling analyses of spectra and Haar fluctuations in precipitation, using three global scale precipitation products (one instrument based, one reanalysis based, one satellite and gauge based), from monthly to centennial scales and planetary down to several hundred kilometers in spatial scale. Results show the presence - similarly to other atmospheric fields - of an intermediate "macroweather" regime between the familiar weather and climate regimes: we characterize systematically the macroweather precipitation temporal and spatial, and joint space-time statistics and variability, and the outer scale limit of temporal scaling. These regimes qualitatively and quantitatively alternate in the way fluctuations vary with scale. In the macroweather regime, the fluctuations diminish with time scale (this is important for seasonal, annual, and decadal forecasts) while anthropogenic effects increase with time scale. Our approach determines the time scale at which the anthropogenic signal can be detected above the natural variability noise: the critical scale is about 20 - 40 yrs (depending on the product, on the spatial scale). This explains for example why studies that use data covering only a few decades do not easily give evidence of anthropogenic changes in precipitation, as a consequence of warming: the period is too short. Overall, while showing that precipitation can be modeled with space-time scaling processes, our results clarify the different precipitation scaling regimes and further allow us to quantify the agreement (and lack of agreement) of the precipitation products as a function of space and time scales. Moreover, this work contributes to clarify a basic problem in hydro-climatology, which is to measure precipitation trends at decadal and longer scales and to

  17. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change. PMID:23248309

  18. Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    The magnetic properties of low dimensional solid state matter is of the utmost interest both scientifically as well as technologically. In addition to the charge of the electron which is the base for current electronics, by taking into account the spin degree of freedom in future spintronics applications open a new avenue. Progress towards a better physical understanding of the mechanism and principles involved as well as potential applications of nanomagnetic devices can only be achieved with advanced analytical tools. Soft X-ray microscopy providing a spatial resolution towards 10nm, a time resolution currently in the sub-ns regime and inherent elemental sensitivity is a very promising technique for that. This article reviews the recent achievements of magnetic soft X-ray microscopy by selected examples of spin torque phenomena, stochastical behavior on the nanoscale and spin dynamics in magnetic nanopatterns. The future potential with regard to addressing fundamental magnetic length and time scales, e.g. imaging fsec spin dynamics at upcoming X-ray sources is pointed out.

  19. Fetal development assessed by heart rate patterns--time scales of complex autonomic control.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Dirk; Nowack, Samuel; Bauer, Stephan; Tetschke, Florian; Ludwig, Stefan; Moraru, Liviu; Rudoph, Anja; Wallwitz, Ulrike; Jaenicke, Franziska; Haueisen, Jens; Schleussner, Ekkehard; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-03-01

    The increasing functional integrity of the organism during fetal maturation is connected with increasing complex internal coordination. We hypothesize that time scales of complexity and dynamics of heart rate patterns reflect the increasing inter-dependencies within the fetal organism during its prenatal development. We investigated multi-scale complexity, time irreversibility and fractal scaling from 73 fetal magnetocardiographic 30min recordings over the third trimester. We found different scale dependent complexity changes, increasing medium scale time irreversibility, and increasing long scale fractal correlations (all changes p<0.05). The results confirm the importance of time scales to be considered in fetal heart rate based developmental indices.

  20. Small-time Scale Network Traffic Prediction Based on Complex-valued Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin

    2017-07-01

    Accurate models play an important role in capturing the significant characteristics of the network traffic, analyzing the network dynamic, and improving the forecasting accuracy for system dynamics. In this study, complex-valued neural network (CVNN) model is proposed to further improve the accuracy of small-time scale network traffic forecasting. Artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm is proposed to optimize the complex-valued and real-valued parameters of CVNN model. Small-scale traffic measurements data namely the TCP traffic data is used to test the performance of CVNN model. Experimental results reveal that CVNN model forecasts the small-time scale network traffic measurement data very accurately

  1. Technical Report on the 6th Time Scale Algorithm Symposium and Tutorials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-29

    Algorithms for the international time scales UTC and UTCr, Dr. Panfilo, BIPM 11:30-11:50 Tea/ coffee break 11:50-12:35 National Time Scales, Dr...NRL 16:00-16:20 Tea/ Coffee Break 16:20-17:05 Algorithms for GNSS Time Transfer, Dr. Defraigne, ORB 17:05-17:50 Algorithms to support time...de Carvalho, ONRJ, Brazil) 10:50 11:10 Algorithms for UTC(NIM) realization (Yuan Gao, NIM, China) 11:10 - 11:30 Tea I coffee break 11:30 1i:5o

  2. Can inertial electrostatic confinement work beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale?

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Inertial electrostatic confinement systems are predicated on a non-equilibrium ion distribution function. Coulomb collisions between ions cause this distribution to relax to a Maxwellian on the ion-ion collisional time-scale. The power required to prevent this relaxation and maintain the IEC configuration for times beyond the ion-ion collisional time scale is shown to be at least an order of magnitude greater than the fusion power produced. It is concluded that IEC systems show little promise as a basis for the development of commercial electric power plants.

  3. Some new stability properties of dynamic neural networks with different time-scales.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen; Sandoval, Alejandro Cruz

    2006-06-01

    Dynamic neural networks with different time-scales include the aspects of fast and slow phenomenons. Some applications require that the equilibrium points of these networks to be stable. The main contribution of the paper is that Lyapunov function and singularly perturbed technique are combined to access several new stable properties of different time-scales neural networks. Exponential stability and asymptotic stability are obtained by sector and bound conditions. Compared to other papers, these conditions are simpler. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  4. Characteristic time scales in the American dollar-Mexican peso exchange currency market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2002-06-01

    Daily fluctuations of the American dollar-Mexican peso exchange currency market are studied using multifractal analysis methods. It is found evidence of multiaffinity of daily fluctuations in the sense that the qth-order (roughness) Hurst exponent Hq varies with changes in q. It is also found that there exist several characteristic time scales ranging from week to year. Accordingly, the market exhibits persistence in the sense that instabilities introduced by market events acting around the characteristic time scales (mainly, quarter and year) would propagate through the future market activity. Some implications of our results on the regulation of the dollar-mexpeso market activity are discussed.

  5. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  6. On the variability of Pacific Ocean tides at seasonal to decadal time scales: Observed vs modelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, Adam Thomas

    forward in time to the predicted sea level in 2100. Results suggest that stations with large positive combined A-TATs produce total water levels that are greater than those predicted by an increase in MSL alone, increasing the chances of high-water events. Part II examines the mechanisms behind the yearly (TAT) variability in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean. Significant amplitude TATs are found at more than half of 26 gauges for each of the two strongest tidal constituents, K1 (diurnal) and M2 (semidiurnal). For the lesser constituents analyzed (O1 and S2), significant trends are observed at ten gauges. Part III analyzes the seasonal behavior of tides (STATs) at twenty tide gauges in the Southeast Asian waters, which exhibit variation by 10 -- 30% of mean tidal amplitudes. A barotropic ocean tide model that considers the seasonal effects of MSL, stratification, and geostrophic and Ekman velocity is used to explain the observed seasonal variability in tides due to variations in monsoon-influenced climate forcing, with successful results at about half of all gauges. The observed changes in tides are best explained by the influence of non-tidal velocities (geostrophic and Ekman), though the effect of changing stratification is also an important secondary causative mechanism. From the results of these surveys and investigations, it is concluded that short-term fluctuations in MSL and tidal properties at multiple time scales may be as important in determining the state of future water levels as the long-term trends. Global explanations for the observed tidal behavior have not been found in this study; however, significant regional explanations are found at the yearly time scale in the Solomon Sea, and at the seasonal time scale in Southeast Asia. It is likely that tidal sensitivity to annual and seasonal variations in MSL at other locations also are driven by locally specific processes, rather than factors with basin-wide coherence. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  7. A framework towards understanding mesoscopic phenomena: Emergent unpredictability, symmetry breaking and dynamics across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Ao, Ping; Tu, Yuhai; Wang, Jin

    2016-11-01

    By integrating four lines of thoughts: symmetry breaking originally advanced by Anderson, bifurcation from nonlinear dynamical systems, Landau's phenomenological theory of phase transition, and the mechanism of emergent rare events first studied by Kramers, we introduce a possible framework for understanding mesoscopic dynamics that links (i) fast microscopic (lower level) motions, (ii) movements within each basin-of-attraction at the mid-level, and (iii) higher-level rare transitions between neighboring basins, which have slow rates that decrease exponentially with the size of the system. In this mesoscopic framework, the fast dynamics is represented by a rapidly varying stochastic process and the mid-level by a nonlinear dynamics. Multiple attractors arise as emergent properties of the nonlinear systems. The interplay between the stochastic element and nonlinearity, the essence of Kramers' theory, leads to successive jump-like transitions among different basins. We argue each transition is a dynamic symmetry breaking, with the potential of exhibiting Thom-Zeeman catastrophe as well as phase transition with the breakdown of ergodicity (e.g., cell differentiation). The slow-time dynamics of the nonlinear mesoscopic system is not deterministic, rather it is a discrete stochastic jump process. The existence of these discrete states and the Markov transitions among them are both emergent phenomena. This emergent stochastic jump dynamics then serves as the stochastic element for the nonlinear dynamics of a higher level aggregates on an even larger spatial and slower time scales (e.g., evolution). This description captures the hierarchical structure outlined by Anderson and illustrates two distinct types of limit of a mesoscopic dynamics: A long-time ensemble thermodynamics in terms of time t → ∞ followed by the size of the system N → ∞ , and a short-time trajectory steady state with N → ∞ followed by t → ∞ . With these limits, symmetry breaking and cusp

  8. Misconceptions of Emergent Semiconductor Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Katherine G.

    The semiconductor field of Photovoltaics (PV) has experienced tremendous growth, requiring curricula to consider ways to promote student success. One major barrier to success students may face when learning PV is the development of misconceptions. The purpose of this work was to determine the presence and prevalence of misconceptions students may have for three PV semiconductor phenomena; Diffusion, Drift and Excitation. These phenomena are emergent, a class of phenomena that have certain characteristics. In emergent phenomena, the individual entities in the phenomena interact and aggregate to form a self-organizing pattern that can be observed at a higher level. Learners develop a different type of misconception for these phenomena, an emergent misconception. Participants (N=41) completed a written protocol. The pilot study utilized half of these protocols (n = 20) to determine the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions for the three phenomena. Once the presence of both general and emergent misconceptions was confirmed, all protocols (N=41) were analyzed to determine the presence and prevalence of general and emergent misconceptions, and to note any relationships among these misconceptions (full study). Through written protocol analysis of participants' responses, numerous codes emerged from the data for both general and emergent misconceptions. General and emergent misconceptions were found in 80% and 55% of participants' responses, respectively. General misconceptions indicated limited understandings of chemical bonding, electricity and magnetism, energy, and the nature of science. Participants also described the phenomena using teleological, predictable, and causal traits, indicating participants had misconceptions regarding the emergent aspects of the phenomena. For both general and emergent misconceptions, relationships were observed between similar misconceptions within and across the three phenomena, and differences in misconceptions were

  9. Automatic fault diagnosis of rotating machines by time-scale manifold ridge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang

    2013-10-01

    This paper explores the improved time-scale representation by considering the non-linear property for effectively identifying rotating machine faults in the time-scale domain. A new time-scale signature, called time-scale manifold (TSM), is proposed in this study through combining phase space reconstruction (PSR), continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and manifold learning. For the TSM generation, an optimal scale band is selected to eliminate the influence of unconcerned scale components, and the noise in the selected band is suppressed by manifold learning to highlight the inherent non-linear structure of faulty impacts. The TSM reserves the non-stationary information and reveals the non-linear structure of the fault pattern, with the merits of noise suppression and resolution improvement. The TSM ridge is further extracted by seeking the ridge with energy concentration lying on the TSM signature. It inherits the advantages of both the TSM and ridge analysis, and hence is beneficial to demodulation of the fault information. Through analyzing the instantaneous amplitude (IA) of the TSM ridge, in which the noise is nearly not contained, the fault characteristic frequency can be exactly identified. The whole process of the proposed fault diagnosis scheme is automatic, and its effectiveness has been verified by means of typical faulty vibration/acoustic signals from a gearbox and bearings. A reliable performance of the new method is validated in comparison with traditional enveloping methods for rotating machine fault diagnosis.

  10. Mountain erosion over 10 yr, 10 k.y., and 10 m.y. time scales

    Treesearch

    James W. Kirchner; Robert C. Finkel; Clifford S. Riebe; Darryl E. Granger; James L. Clayton; John G. King; Walter F. Megahan

    2001-01-01

    We used cosmogenic 10Be to measure erosion rates over 10 k.y. time scales at 32 Idaho mountain catchments, ranging from small experimental watersheds (0.2 km2) to large river basins (35 000 km2). These long-term sediment yields are, on average, 17 times higher than stream sediment fluxes measured over...

  11. Fixation of competing strategies when interacting agents differ in the time scale of strategy updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Weissing, Franz J.; Cao, Ming

    2016-09-01

    A commonly used assumption in evolutionary game theory is that natural selection acts on individuals in the same time scale; e.g., players use the same frequency to update their strategies. Variation in learning rates within populations suggests that evolutionary game theory may not necessarily be restricted to uniform time scales associated with the game interaction and strategy adaption evolution. In this study, we remove this restricting assumption by dividing the population into fast and slow groups according to the players' strategy updating frequencies and investigate how different strategy compositions of one group influence the evolutionary outcome of the other's fixation probabilities of strategies within its own group. Analytical analysis and numerical calculations are performed to study the evolutionary dynamics of strategies in typical classes of two-player games (prisoner's dilemma game, snowdrift game, and stag-hunt game). The introduction of the heterogeneity in strategy-update time scales leads to substantial changes in the evolution dynamics of strategies. We provide an approximation formula for the fixation probability of mutant types in finite populations and study the outcome of strategy evolution under the weak selection. We find that although heterogeneity in time scales makes the collective evolutionary dynamics more complicated, the possible long-run evolutionary outcome can be effectively predicted under technical assumptions when knowing the population composition and payoff parameters.

  12. Studying the time scale dependence of environmental variables predictability using fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuval; Broday, David M

    2010-06-15

    Prediction of meteorological and air quality variables motivates a lot of research in the atmospheric sciences and exposure assessment communities. An interesting related issue regards the relative predictive power that can be expected at different time scales, and whether it vanishes altogether at certain ranges. An improved understanding of our predictive powers enables better environmental management and more efficient decision making processes. Fractal analysis is commonly used to characterize the self-affinity of time series. This work introduces the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) fractal analysis method as a tool for assessing environmental time series predictability. The high temporal scale resolution of the CWT enables detailed information about the Hurst parameter, a common temporal fractality measure, and thus about time scale variations in predictability. We analyzed a few years records of half-hourly air pollution and meteorological time series from which the trivial seasonal and daily cycles were removed. We encountered a general trend of decreasing Hurst values from about 1.4 (good autocorrelation and predictability), in the sub-daily time scale to 0.5 (which implies complete randomness) in the monthly to seasonal scales. The air pollutants predictability follows that of the meteorological variables in the short time scales but is better at longer scales.

  13. The Space-Time Scales of Variability in Oceanic Thermal Structure Off the Central California Coast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    every third observation -------------------- 263 9. Partitioned variances for Granite Canyon, Pacific Grove, and the Farallons -------------- 267 10...Estimated time scales for Granite Canyon, Pacific Grove, and the Farallons --------------- 278 11. Spring transitions at Granite Canyon between March 1...205 67. Sea-surface temperatures at Granite Canyon, Pacific Grove, and the Farallons . Observations acquired with immersion thermometers (+0.2C

  14. Singular Perturbations and Time-Scale Methods in Control Theory: Survey 1976-1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    low order observers. IEEE Trans. on Aut. Control, AC-28, p. 510-513. EF13] Bingulac, S. and J. Medanic (1982). Two-time-scale design of output...Flight Mtechanics Conference, Danvers, MA., p. 337-347. (N9] Khalil, H.K. and J.V. Medanic (i9aU). Closed-loop Stackelberg strategies for singularly

  15. A new time scale based k-epsilon model for near wall turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Shih, T. H.

    1992-01-01

    A k-epsilon model is proposed for wall bonded turbulent flows. In this model, the eddy viscosity is characterized by a turbulent velocity scale and a turbulent time scale. The time scale is bounded from below by the Kolmogorov time scale. The dissipation equation is reformulated using this time scale and no singularity exists at the wall. The damping function used in the eddy viscosity is chosen to be a function of R(sub y) = (k(sup 1/2)y)/v instead of y(+). Hence, the model could be used for flows with separation. The model constants used are the same as in the high Reynolds number standard k-epsilon model. Thus, the proposed model will be also suitable for flows far from the wall. Turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers and turbulent boundary layer flows with and without pressure gradient are calculated. Results show that the model predictions are in good agreement with direct numerical simulation and experimental data.

  16. Fixation of competing strategies when interacting agents differ in the time scale of strategy updating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianlei; Weissing, Franz J; Cao, Ming

    2016-09-01

    A commonly used assumption in evolutionary game theory is that natural selection acts on individuals in the same time scale; e.g., players use the same frequency to update their strategies. Variation in learning rates within populations suggests that evolutionary game theory may not necessarily be restricted to uniform time scales associated with the game interaction and strategy adaption evolution. In this study, we remove this restricting assumption by dividing the population into fast and slow groups according to the players' strategy updating frequencies and investigate how different strategy compositions of one group influence the evolutionary outcome of the other's fixation probabilities of strategies within its own group. Analytical analysis and numerical calculations are performed to study the evolutionary dynamics of strategies in typical classes of two-player games (prisoner's dilemma game, snowdrift game, and stag-hunt game). The introduction of the heterogeneity in strategy-update time scales leads to substantial changes in the evolution dynamics of strategies. We provide an approximation formula for the fixation probability of mutant types in finite populations and study the outcome of strategy evolution under the weak selection. We find that although heterogeneity in time scales makes the collective evolutionary dynamics more complicated, the possible long-run evolutionary outcome can be effectively predicted under technical assumptions when knowing the population composition and payoff parameters.

  17. The Available Time Scale: Measuring Foster Parents' Available Time to Foster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Donna J.; Orme, John G.; Rhodes, Kathryn W.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new measure of available time specific to fostering, the Available Time Scale (ATS). It was tested with a national sample of 304 foster mothers and is designed to measure the amount of time foster parents are able to devote to fostering activities. The ATS has excellent reliability, and good support exists for its validity.…

  18. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2002-01-01

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions. PMID:11875208

  19. How Do Young Children's Spatio-Symbolic Skills Change over Short Time scales?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsubota, Yoko; Chen, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to examine how experience affects young children's spatio-symbolic skills over short time scales. Spatio-symbolic reasoning refers to the ability to interpret and use spatial relations, such as those encountered on a map, to solve symbolic tasks. We designed three tasks in which the featural and spatial…

  20. Review of time scales. [Universal Time-Ephemeris Time-International Atomic Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinot, B.

    1974-01-01

    The basic time scales are presented: International Atomic Time, Universal Time, and Universal Time (Coordinated). These scales must be maintained in order to satisfy specific requirements. It is shown how they are obtained and made available at a very high level of precision.

  1. A Dynamically Computed Convective Time Scale for the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many convective parameterization schemes define a convective adjustment time scale τ as the time allowed for dissipation of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The Kain–Fritsch scheme defines τ based on an estimate of the advective time period for deep con...

  2. Short Time-Scale Sensory Coding in S1 during Discrimination of Whisker Vibrotactile Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Toshio; Lee, Daniel J.; Smith, Katherine A.; Feldman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent whisker input consists of dense microvibration sequences that are often temporally integrated for perceptual discrimination. Whether primary somatosensory cortex (S1) participates in temporal integration is unknown. We trained rats to discriminate whisker impulse sequences that varied in single-impulse kinematics (5–20-ms time scale) and mean speed (150-ms time scale). Rats appeared to use the integrated feature, mean speed, to guide discrimination in this task, consistent with similar prior studies. Despite this, 52% of S1 units, including 73% of units in L4 and L2/3, encoded sequences at fast time scales (≤20 ms, mostly 5–10 ms), accurately reflecting single impulse kinematics. 17% of units, mostly in L5, showed weaker impulse responses and a slow firing rate increase during sequences. However, these units did not effectively integrate whisker impulses, but instead combined weak impulse responses with a distinct, slow signal correlated to behavioral choice. A neural decoder could identify sequences from fast unit spike trains and behavioral choice from slow units. Thus, S1 encoded fast time scale whisker input without substantial temporal integration across whisker impulses. PMID:27574970

  3. Time Scales in Turbulence and Sediment Concentration Over Mobile Sand Dunes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The relationship between turbulent fluid motions and sediment particles over mobile sand dunes may be better understood by examining the time scales over which the quantities fluctuate. In laboratory experiments performed at the USDA-ARS-National Sedimentation Laboratory, profiles of acoustic backs...

  4. Space and time scales of shoreline change at Cape Cod National Seashore, MA, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.R.; LaBash, C.L.; List, J.H.; Kraus, Nicholas C.; McDougal, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Different processes cause patterns of shoreline change which are exhibited at different magnitudes and nested into different spatial and time scale hierarchies. The 77-km outer beach at Cape Cod National Seashore offers one of the few U.S. federally owned portions of beach to study shoreline change within the full range of sediment source and sink relationships, and barely affected by human intervention. 'Mean trends' of shoreline changes are best observed at long time scales but contain much spatial variation thus many sites are not equal in response. Long-term, earlier-noted trends are confirmed but the added quantification and resolution improves greatly the understanding of appropriate spatial and time scales of those processes driving bluff retreat and barrier island changes in both north and south depocenters. Shorter timescales allow for comparison of trends and uncertainty in shoreline change at local scales but are dependent upon some measure of storm intensity and seasonal frequency. Single-event shoreline survey results for one storm at daily intervals after the erosional phase suggest a recovery time for the system of six days, identifies three sites with abnormally large change, and that responses at these sites are spatially coherent for now unknown reasons. Areas near inlets are the most variable at all time scales. Hierarchies in both process and form are suggested.

  5. Influence of the time scale on the construction of financial networks.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank; Dehmer, Matthias

    2010-09-30

    In this paper we investigate the definition and formation of financial networks. Specifically, we study the influence of the time scale on their construction. For our analysis we use correlation-based networks obtained from the daily closing prices of stock market data. More precisely, we use the stocks that currently comprise the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) and estimate financial networks where nodes correspond to stocks and edges correspond to none vanishing correlation coefficients. That means only if a correlation coefficient is statistically significant different from zero, we include an edge in the network. This construction procedure results in unweighted, undirected networks. By separating the time series of stock prices in non-overlapping intervals, we obtain one network per interval. The length of these intervals corresponds to the time scale of the data, whose influence on the construction of the networks will be studied in this paper. Numerical analysis of four different measures in dependence on the time scale for the construction of networks allows us to gain insights about the intrinsic time scale of the stock market with respect to a meaningful graph-theoretical analysis.

  6. A Dynamically Computed Convective Time Scale for the Kain–Fritsch Convective Parameterization Scheme

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many convective parameterization schemes define a convective adjustment time scale τ as the time allowed for dissipation of convective available potential energy (CAPE). The Kain–Fritsch scheme defines τ based on an estimate of the advective time period for deep con...

  7. Boundedness of solutions of measure differential equations and dynamic equations on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federson, M.; Grau, R.; Mesquita, J. G.; Toon, E.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the boundedness results for measure differential equations. In order to obtain our results, we use the correspondence between these equations and generalized ODEs. Furthermore, we prove our results concerning boundedness of solutions for dynamic equations on time scales, using the fact that these equations represent a particular case of measure differential equations.

  8. Short Time-Scale Sensory Coding in S1 during Discrimination of Whisker Vibrotactile Sequences.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Leah M; Telian, Gregory; Laboy-Juárez, Keven J; Miyashita, Toshio; Lee, Daniel J; Smith, Katherine A; Feldman, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Rodent whisker input consists of dense microvibration sequences that are often temporally integrated for perceptual discrimination. Whether primary somatosensory cortex (S1) participates in temporal integration is unknown. We trained rats to discriminate whisker impulse sequences that varied in single-impulse kinematics (5-20-ms time scale) and mean speed (150-ms time scale). Rats appeared to use the integrated feature, mean speed, to guide discrimination in this task, consistent with similar prior studies. Despite this, 52% of S1 units, including 73% of units in L4 and L2/3, encoded sequences at fast time scales (≤20 ms, mostly 5-10 ms), accurately reflecting single impulse kinematics. 17% of units, mostly in L5, showed weaker impulse responses and a slow firing rate increase during sequences. However, these units did not effectively integrate whisker impulses, but instead combined weak impulse responses with a distinct, slow signal correlated to behavioral choice. A neural decoder could identify sequences from fast unit spike trains and behavioral choice from slow units. Thus, S1 encoded fast time scale whisker input without substantial temporal integration across whisker impulses.

  9. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jon D

    2002-02-19

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions.

  10. Two time scale output feedback regulation for ill-conditioned systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Moerder, D. D.

    1986-01-01

    Issues pertaining to the well-posedness of a two time scale approach to the output feedback regulator design problem are examined. An approximate quadratic performance index which reflects a two time scale decomposition of the system dynamics is developed. It is shown that, under mild assumptions, minimization of this cost leads to feedback gains providing a second-order approximation of optimal full system performance. A simplified approach to two time scale feedback design is also developed, in which gains are separately calculated to stabilize the slow and fast subsystem models. By exploiting the notion of combined control and observation spillover suppression, conditions are derived assuring that these gains will stabilize the full-order system. A sequential numerical algorithm is described which obtains output feedback gains minimizing a broad class of performance indices, including the standard LQ case. It is shown that the algorithm converges to a local minimum under nonrestrictive assumptions. This procedure is adapted to and demonstrated for the two time scale design formulations.

  11. Existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for n-dimensional neutral dynamic equations on time scales.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Li, Yongkun; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by using the existence of the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales and the theory of calculus on time scales, we study the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for a class of n-dimensional neutral dynamic equations on time scales. We also present an example to illustrate the feasibility of our results. The results of this paper are completely new and complementary to the previously known results even in both the case of differential equations (time scale [Formula: see text]) and the case of difference equations (time scale [Formula: see text]).

  12. Is volcanic phenomena of fractal nature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, R.; Lopez, D. A. L.; Alparone, S.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Sagiya, T.; Barrancos, J.; Rodriguez-Santana, A. A.; Ramos, A.; Calvari, S.; Perez, N. M.

    2016-12-01

    A particular resonance waveform pattern has been detected beneath different physical volcano manifestations from recent 2011-2012 period of volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island, Canary Islands, and also from other worldwide volcanoes with different volcanic typology. This mentioned pattern appears to be a fractal time dependent waveform repeated in different time scales (periods of time). This time dependent feature suggests this resonance as a new approach to volcano phenomena for predicting such interesting matters as earthquakes, gas emission, deformation etc. as this fractal signal has been discovered hidden in a wide typical volcanic parameters measurements. It is known that the resonance phenomenon occurring in nature usually denote a structure, symmetry or a subjacent law (Fermi et al., 1952; and later -about enhanced cross-sections symmetry in protons collisions), which, in this particular case, may be indicative of some physical interactions showing a sequence not completely chaotic but cyclic provided with symmetries. The resonance and fractal model mentioned allowed the authors to make predictions in cycles from a few weeks to months. In this work an equation for this waveform has been described and also correlations with volcanic parameters and fractal behavior demonstration have been performed, including also some suggestive possible explanations of this signal origin.

  13. Semantic and acoustic analysis of speech by functional networks with distinct time scales.

    PubMed

    Deng, Siyi; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2010-07-30

    Speech perception requires the successful interpretation of both phonetic and syllabic information in the auditory signal. It has been suggested by Poeppel (2003) that phonetic processing requires an optimal time scale of 25 ms while the time scale of syllabic processing is much slower (150-250 ms). To better understand the operation of brain networks at these characteristic time scales during speech perception, we studied the spatial and dynamic properties of EEG responses to five different stimuli: (1) amplitude modulated (AM) speech, (2) AM speech with added broadband noise, (3) AM reversed speech, (4) AM broadband noise, and (5) AM pure tone. Amplitude modulation at gamma band frequencies (40 Hz) elicited steady-state auditory evoked responses (SSAERs) bilaterally over primary auditory cortices. Reduced SSAERs were observed over the left auditory cortex only for stimuli containing speech. In addition, we found over the left hemisphere, anterior to primary auditory cortex, a network whose instantaneous frequencies in the theta to alpha band (4-16 Hz) are correlated with the amplitude envelope of the speech signal. This correlation was not observed for reversed speech. The presence of speech in the sound input activates a 4-16 Hz envelope tracking network and suppresses the 40-Hz gamma band network which generates the steady-state responses over the left auditory cortex. We believe these findings to be consistent with the idea that processing of the speech signals involves preferentially processing at syllabic time scales rather than phonetic time scales. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatiotemporal patterns of drought at various time scales in Shandong Province of Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Depeng; Cai, Siyang; Xu, Zongxue; Li, Fulin; Sun, Wenchao; Yang, Xiaojing; Kan, Guangyuan; Liu, Pin

    2016-10-01

    The temporal variations and spatial patterns of drought in Shandong Province of Eastern China were investigated by calculating the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) at 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month time scales. Monthly precipitation and air temperature time series during the period 1960-2012 were collected at 23 meteorological stations uniformly distributed over the region. The non-parametric Mann-Kendall test was used to explore the temporal trends of precipitation, air temperature, and the SPEI drought index. S-mode principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to identify the spatial patterns of drought. The results showed that an insignificant decreasing trend in annual total precipitation was detected at most stations, a significant increase of annual average air temperature occurred at all the 23 stations, and a significant decreasing trend in the SPEI was mainly detected at the coastal stations for all the time scales. The frequency of occurrence of extreme and severe drought at different time scales generally increased with decades; higher frequency and larger affected area of extreme and severe droughts occurred as the time scale increased, especially for the northwest of Shandong Province and Jiaodong peninsular. The spatial pattern of drought for SPEI-1 contains three regions: eastern Jiaodong Peninsular and northwestern and southern Shandong. As the time scale increased to 3, 6, and 12 months, the order of the three regions was transformed into another as northwestern Shandong, eastern Jiaodong Peninsular, and southern Shandong. For SPEI-24, the location identified by REOF1 was slightly shifted from northwestern Shandong to western Shandong, and REOF2 and REOF3 identified another two weak patterns in the south edge and north edge of Jiaodong Peninsular, respectively. The potential causes of drought and the impact of drought on agriculture in the study area have also been discussed. The temporal variations and spatial patterns

  15. Evolution of equilibrium Pickering emulsions--a matter of time scales.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; Luigjes, Bob; de Folter, Julius W J; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-09-30

    A new class of equilibrium solid-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions harbors a competition of two processes on disparate time scales that affect the equilibrium droplet size in opposing ways. The aim of this work is to elucidate the molecular origins of these two time scales and demonstrate their effects on the evolution of the emulsion droplet size. First, spontaneous emulsification into particle-covered droplets occurs through in situ generation of surface-active molecules by hydrolysis of molecules of the oil phase. We show that surface tensions of the oil-water interfaces in the absence of stabilizing colloidal particles are connected to the concentration of these surface-active molecules, and hence also to the equilibrium droplet size in the presence of colloids. As a consequence, the hydrolysis process sets the time scale of formation of these solid-stabilized emulsions. A second time scale is governing the ultimate fate of the solid-stabilized equilibrium emulsions: by condensation of the in situ generated amphiphilic molecules onto the colloidal particles, their wetting properties change, leading to a gradual transfer from the aqueous to the oil phase via growth of the emulsion droplets. This migration is observed macroscopically by a color change of the water and oil phases, as well as by electron microscopy after polymerization of the oil phase in a phase separated sample. Surprisingly, the relative oil volume sets the time scale of particle transfer. Phase separation into an aqueous phase and an oil phase containing colloidal particles is influenced by sedimentation of the emulsion droplets. The two processes of formation of surface-active molecules through hydrolysis and condensation thereof on the colloidal surface have an opposite influence on the droplet size. By their interplay, a dynamic equilibrium is created where the droplet size always adjusts to the thermodynamically stable state.

  16. Unsteady flow phenomena in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, Edward M.; Epstein, Alan H.; Giles, Michael B.; McCune, James E.; Tan, Choon S.

    1990-01-01

    Work carried out at the Gas Turbine Laboratory at M.I.T. as part of the multi-investigator effort on basic unsteady flow phenomena is described. Within the overall project, four separate tasks are specified. These are, in brief: unsteady flow in compressors; computational techniques for unsteady flows; unsteady phenomena, inlet distortion, and flow instabilities in multistage compressors; and unsteady vortical wakes behind blade rows - prediction of relationships with blade properties.

  17. Schizoid phenomena in substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ralph H

    2002-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the spectrum of schizoid disorders, schizoid phenomena, and the underlying psychodynamics can often be found in the gamut of addictions and stand in the way of recovery. Features of schizoidness, the varieties of schizoid presentations, the etiology and pathogenesis of drug/alcohol abuse in the schizoid, and readily clinically apparent psychodynamic features are discussed. Schizoid phenomena can be dealt with effectively with an informed psychotherapy.

  18. Stratigraphy and Characteristic Time Scales of Northern Polar and Circumpolar Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2002-05-01

    The north polar region is dominated by the polar cap cut by troughs and Chasma Boreale, surrounded by the north polar erg and overlying the Vastitas Borealis Formation. A thin layer of mantle with characteristic "basketball" texture typical for high latitudes covers the surface of Vastitas Borealis Formation. Study of the high-resolution MGS MOC images showed that the dunes migrate over this mantle. The stratigraphic relationships of this mantle and icy deposits, as well as Chasma Boreale-related deposits are more complex. Chasma Boreale has been interpreted to be initiated as an outflow event (Fishbaugh and Head, JGR, JE001351, 2002). We estimate that the time scale of the meltwater accumulation at the base of the polar cap and the time scale of establishing the thermal equilibrium in the cap are on the order of 0.5 Myr or greater. We compare this time scale with the characteristic astronomically predicted time scales: the time scale of obliquity oscillations (0.05 Myr), the period of obliquity oscillations about 25 deg (3.5 Myr), and the time scale of chaotic obliquity variations (5 Myr). During the period 3.5 - 5 Myr ago the obliquity oscillated around 35 deg, which led to noticeably higher polar cap temperatures and a shallower depth of the melting isotherm than during the present epoch. Predictions of obliquity in the earlier epochs beyond 5 Myr are impossible. We conclude that the period of intensive reshaping of the polar cap and formation of Chasma Boreale occurred 3.5 Myr ago or earlier. During the last 3.5 Myr the cap was rather similar to present; minor erosion and deposition of the upper layers could occur, along with modest trough migration in the short epochs of the highest obliquity. The accumulation of the main mass of the finely layered deposits occurred at least 0.5 - 1 Myr (and may be much earlier) than the Chasma Boreale flood. The accumulation could occur in response to some obliquity-driven climate variation or due to some endogenic discharge

  19. The Sedimentary Charcoal Record of Regional and Global Biomass Burning on Multi-decadal-to-Orbital Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlein, P. J.; Marlon, J.; Global Palaeofire Working Group

    2011-12-01

    The global charcoal database (GCD) assembled by the Global Palaeofire Working Group (GPWG) over the past several years provides over 800 sedimentary charcoal records of biomass burning that allows wildfire to be examined on a range of spatial and temporal scales. These data, and other analyses of sedimentary charcoal records show that: (1) The data-analytical aspects of sedimentary charcoal have matured to the extent that we can show that biomass burning is well represented by these records, that charcoal influx is a general indicator of area or biomass burning, and that peaks of charcoal influx in records with annual-to-decadal resolution provide evidence of individual fires. (2) The spatial coverage of the records is extensive enough to represent much of the global climate space, although coverage of Africa, Siberia, and grassland and desert ecosystems in general could be improved. (3) The temporal coverage is sufficient to resolve millennial-scale environmental changes over the past glacial cycle, and hemispheric and regional variations in biomass burning from the LGM to present. (4) Global biomass burning was very low at the LGM, and increases in biomass burning into the Holocene tracked hemispheric and regional climate changes. (5) Abrupt climate changes during deglaciation caused specific responses in the charcoal records; these responses are replicated during the abrupt warming and cooling episodes accompanying D-O cycles. (6) During the Holocene, biomass burning reflects regional climate changes and does not support the early anthropocene hypothesis. (7) Over the last millennium, biomass burning also tracks regional climate changes, and shows an unambiguous human influence only over the past 250 years. (8) The variations in global biomass burning on multiple time scales described by the sedimentary charcoal record are supported by the emerging ice core records of biomass burning. (9) Increases in biomass burning are strongly linked to temperature increases

  20. Time-scale separation: Michaelis and Menten's old idea, still bearing fruit

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Michaelis and Menten introduced to biochemistry the idea of time-scale separation, in which part of a system is assumed to be operating sufficiently fast compared to the rest that it may be assumed to have reached a steady state. This allows, in principle, the fast components to be eliminated, resulting in a simplified description of the system's behaviour. Similar ideas have been widely used in different areas of biology, including enzyme kinetics, protein allostery, receptor pharmacology, gene regulation and post-translational modification. However, the methods used have been independent and ad hoc. Here, we review the use of time-scale separation as a means to simplify the description of molecular complexity and discuss recent work which sets out a single framework which unifies these separate calculations. The framework offers new capabilities for mathematical analysis and helps to do justice to Michaelis and Menten's insights about individual enzymes in the context of multi-enzyme biological systems. PMID:24103070

  1. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Fan, Jun-Hui; Pan, Jing

    2011-06-01

    Variability is one of the extremely observational properties. In the radio bands, variability is caused by the shock in the jet. In this case, emissions increase rapidly following an exponential curve, and then decrease rapidly also in an exponential curve. The variability time scale is important with regard to the physics carrying on in the jet. However, it is not easy to fit the light curve. In this paper, we proposed a method of light curve fitting on a PC machine, in which the theoretical exponential light curve is adopted to the observations using the least regression method. Using this method, anybody can fit the light curve and get the time scale by moving and clicking the mouse. We also used this method to some light curves obtained from the archive and compared our results with those in the literature.

  2. Virtual water trade and time scales for loss of water sustainability: A comparative regional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Prashant; Nishad, Shiv Narayan

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and policy design for sustainability in primary resources like arable land and water need to adopt long-term perspective; even small but persistent effects like net export of water may influence sustainability through irreversible losses. With growing consumption, this virtual water trade has become an important element in the water sustainability of a nation. We estimate and contrast the virtual (embedded) water trades of two populous nations, India and China, to present certain quantitative measures and time scales. Estimates show that export of embedded water alone can lead to loss of water sustainability. With the current rate of net export of water (embedded) in the end products, India is poised to lose its entire available water in less than 1000 years; much shorter time scales are implied in terms of water for production. The two cases contrast and exemplify sustainable and non-sustainable virtual water trade in long term perspective.

  3. Digital signal processing techniques for pitch shifting and time scaling of audio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buś, Szymon; Jedrzejewski, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present the techniques used for modifying the spectral content (pitch shifting) and for changing the time duration (time scaling) of an audio signal. A short introduction gives a necessary background for understanding the discussed issues and contains explanations of the terms used in the paper. In subsequent sections we present three different techniques appropriate both for pitch shifting and for time scaling. These techniques use three different time-frequency representations of a signal, namely short-time Fourier transform (STFT), continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and constant-Q transform (CQT). The results of simulation studies devoted to comparison of the properties of these methods are presented and discussed in the paper.

  4. Time-scale effects on the gain-loss asymmetry in stock indices.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Simonsen, Ingve; Nagy, Bálint Zsolt; Néda, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    The gain-loss asymmetry, observed in the inverse statistics of stock indices is present for logarithmic return levels that are over 2%, and it is the result of the non-Pearson-type autocorrelations in the index. These non-Pearson-type correlations can be viewed also as functionally dependent daily volatilities, extending for a finite time interval. A generalized time-window shuffling method is used to show the existence of such autocorrelations. Their characteristic time scale proves to be smaller (less than 25 trading days) than what was previously believed. It is also found that this characteristic time scale has decreased with the appearance of program trading in the stock market transactions. Connections with the leverage effect are also established.

  5. Reproductive numbers for nonautonomous spatially distributed periodic SIS models acting on two time scales.

    PubMed

    Marvá, M; Bravo de la Parra, R; Auger, P

    2012-06-01

    In this work we deal with a general class of spatially distributed periodic SIS epidemic models with two time scales. We let susceptible and infected individuals migrate between patches with periodic time dependent migration rates. The existence of two time scales in the system allows to describe certain features of the asymptotic behavior of its solutions with the help of a less dimensional, aggregated, system. We derive global reproduction numbers governing the general spatially distributed nonautonomous system through the aggregated system. We apply this result when the mass action law and the frequency dependent transmission law are considered. Comparing these global reproductive numbers to their non spatially distributed counterparts yields the following: adequate periodic migration rates allow global persistence or eradication of epidemics where locally, in absence of migrations, the contrary is expected.

  6. Advancing atmospheric river forecasts into subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Cory F.; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Maloney, Eric D.; Mundhenk, Bryan D.

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric rivers are elongated plumes of intense moisture transport that are capable of producing extreme and impactful weather. Along the West Coast of North America, they occasionally cause considerable mayhem—delivering flooding rains during periods of heightened activity and desiccating droughts during periods of reduced activity. The intrinsic chaos of the atmosphere makes the prediction of atmospheric rivers at subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales (3 to 5 weeks) an inherently difficult task. We demonstrate here that the potential exists to advance forecast lead times of atmospheric rivers into subseasonal-to-seasonal time scales through knowledge of two of the atmosphere's most prominent oscillations, the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Strong MJO and QBO activity modulates the frequency at which atmospheric rivers strike—offering an opportunity to improve subseasonal-to-seasonal forecast models and thereby skillfully predict atmospheric river activity up to 5 weeks in advance.

  7. Aerospace plane guidance using time-scale decomposition - A geometric approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Buren, Mark A.; Mease, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    A method is proposed for developing the necessary guidance logic to steer single-stage vehicles into orbit. The minimum-fuel ascent problem is first considered to analyze the effects of dynamic pressure, acceleration, and heating constraints on guidance systems to thereby develop the guidance logic. The optimal solution consists of behavior with two time scales, and the control law is used to develop near-optimal guidance. The solution uses the slow manifold to delineate the control for minimum-fuel reduced-order trajectory and a separate control for tracking the optimal reduced-order trajectory. A family of fast manifolds is then employed to resolve the tracking problem via the feedback linearization methodology from nonlinear geometric control theory. The two-time-scale decomposition is found to produce a near-optimal ascent by tracking the applicable state-constraint boundary, as well as to simplify the control-design task.

  8. Enzyme dynamics and activity: time-scale dependence of dynamical transitions in glutamate dehydrogenase solution.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R M; Finney, J L; Réat, V; Dunn, R; Ferrand, M; Smith, J C

    1999-10-01

    We have examined the temperature dependence of motions in a cryosolution of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and compared these with activity. Dynamic neutron scattering was performed with two instruments of different energy resolution, permitting the separate determination of the average dynamical mean square displacements on the sub-approximately 100 ps and sub-approximately 5 ns time scales. The results demonstrate a marked dependence on the time scale of the temperature profile of the mean square displacement. The lowest temperature at which anharmonic motion is observed is heavily dependent on the time window of the instrument used to observe the dynamics. Several dynamical transitions (inflexions of the mean squared displacement) are observed in the slower dynamics. Comparison with the temperature profile of the activity of the enzyme in the same solvent reveals dynamical transitions that have no effect on GDH function.

  9. Virtual water trade and time scales for loss of water sustainability: A comparative regional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Prashant; Nishad, Shiv Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and policy design for sustainability in primary resources like arable land and water need to adopt long-term perspective; even small but persistent effects like net export of water may influence sustainability through irreversible losses. With growing consumption, this virtual water trade has become an important element in the water sustainability of a nation. We estimate and contrast the virtual (embedded) water trades of two populous nations, India and China, to present certain quantitative measures and time scales. Estimates show that export of embedded water alone can lead to loss of water sustainability. With the current rate of net export of water (embedded) in the end products, India is poised to lose its entire available water in less than 1000 years; much shorter time scales are implied in terms of water for production. The two cases contrast and exemplify sustainable and non-sustainable virtual water trade in long term perspective. PMID:25790964

  10. Asymptotic properties of solutions of nonlinear systems of dynamic equations on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítovec, Jiří

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we study asymptotic properties of solutions of nonlinear dynamic systems on time scales of the form yΔ(t) = f (t, y(t)), where f : 𝕋 × ℝn → ℝn, and 𝕋 is a time scale. For a given set Ω ⊂ 𝕋 × ℝn, we formulate conditions for function f which guarantee that at least one solution y of the above system stays in Ω. Unlike previous papers, we assume the set Ω in more general shape or we formulate the conditions guaranteeing an existence of bounded solution in easier and better verifiable form. Thanks to this, we can find a wider range of equations with bounded solutions. The example illustrating this type of equations is added.

  11. Different Time-Scale Relaxation Dynamics in Organic Supramolecular Ferroelectrics Studied by Linear and Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umanodan, Tsugumi; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Naruse, Suguru; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Onda, Ken; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Horiuchi, Sachio; Okimoto, Yoichi

    2015-07-01

    Time-resolved linear and nonlinear optical responses were investigated in an organic supramolecular ferroelectric material composed of protonated 2,3-di(2-pyridinyl)pyrazine (H-dppz) and deprotonated chloranilic acid (Hca). We irradiated nanosecond laser pulses (λ = 532 nm) on the crystal, pumped the intramolecular excitation of the Hca molecule, and observed a clear redshift of the molecular vibrational modes of C=O and C-O- just after the photoexcitation. Each softened mode gradually relaxed on different time scales, indicating that the electrons of the Hca molecules were redistributed after the photoexcitation. By the same excitation, a large suppression of the second-harmonic (SH) intensity was observed, driven by the macroscopic disordering of the transferred protons. The decay time of the SH intensity was longer than those of the vibrational modes, suggesting that the microscopic vibrations and macroscopic ferroelectricity have dynamics on different time scales.

  12. On the magnetic field evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-08-01

    We revisit the various approximations employed to study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in neutron star cores and discuss their limitations and possible improvements. A recent controversy on the correct form of the induction equation and the relevant evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores is addressed and clarified. We show that this ambiguity in the estimation of time-scales arises as a consequence of nominally large terms that appear in the induction equation, but which are, in fact, mostly irrotational. This subtlety leads to a discrepancy by many orders of magnitude when velocity fields are absent or ignored. Even when internal velocity fields are accounted for, only the solenoidal part of the electric field contributes to the induction equation, which can be substantially smaller than the irrotational part. We also argue that stationary velocity fields must be incorporated in the slow evolution of the magnetic field as the next level of approximation.

  13. Time-scale effects on the gain-loss asymmetry in stock indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándor, Bulcsú; Simonsen, Ingve; Nagy, Bálint Zsolt; Néda, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    The gain-loss asymmetry, observed in the inverse statistics of stock indices is present for logarithmic return levels that are over 2 % , and it is the result of the non-Pearson-type autocorrelations in the index. These non-Pearson-type correlations can be viewed also as functionally dependent daily volatilities, extending for a finite time interval. A generalized time-window shuffling method is used to show the existence of such autocorrelations. Their characteristic time scale proves to be smaller (less than 25 trading days) than what was previously believed. It is also found that this characteristic time scale has decreased with the appearance of program trading in the stock market transactions. Connections with the leverage effect are also established.

  14. A Time Scale Separation Method for the Coordination of Voltage Controls for SVC and SVR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Miki, Takahiro; Yamato, Yuuki; Zoka, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    A time scale separation (TSS) method is proposed for the coordination of voltage controls of different time scales. The method is applied to a design of voltage regulator for static var compensator (SVC) which will be used with a step voltage regulator (SVR) in a distribution system. A simple filter, an input filter to the conventional SVC, is developed for the coordination with SVR controllers. The proposed filter can also be used as an input filter to AVR of the dispersed generators for the coordination controls with the conventional tap control devices. Effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical simulations in a distribution system having a large disturbance source of a wind power generator.

  15. Remote joule heating assisted carrier transport in MWCNTs probed at nanosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek; Shrivastava, Mayank

    2016-10-19

    Quantum model of joule heating relies on electron-phonon scattering in the high field region (hot side contact), which locally increases phonon population and forms hot spots. Hot spots in the high field region are known to suffer carrier transport. In this work, for the first time we report remote joule heating of the cold side contact, i.e. zero electric field region, through multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), which is discovered to assist in carrier transport through the MWCNT channels. To precisely capture the dynamics of remote joule heating assisted carrier transport, MWCNTs are probed at nanosecond time scales. This leverages investigations at time scales comparable to characteristic thermal diffusion times and allows electron-phonon interactions and the nature of carrier transport to be probed under non-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  17. Modeling heat dominated electric breakdown in air, with adaptivity to electron or ion time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, A.; Hundsdorfer, W.; Ebert, U.

    2017-09-01

    We model heat dominated electrical breakdown in air in a short planar gap. We couple the discharge dynamics in fluid approximation with the hydrodynamic motion of the air heated by the discharge. To be computationally efficient, we derive a reduced model on the ion time scale, and we switch between the full model on the electron time scale and the reduced model. We observe an ion pulse reaching the cathode, releasing electrons by secondary emission, and these electrons create another ion pulse. These cycles of ion pulses might lead to electrical breakdown. This breakdown is driven by Ohmic heating, thermal shocks and induced pressure waves, rather than by the streamer mechanism of local field enhancement at the streamer tip.

  18. Dynamic response of materials on sub-nanosecond time scales, and beryllium properties for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D C; Tierney, T E; Luo, S N; Paisley, D L; Kyrala, G A; Hauer, A; Greenfield, S R; Koskelo, A C; McClellan, K J; Lorenzana, H E; Knudson, M D; Peralta, P P; Loomis, E

    2004-12-09

    During the past few years, substantial progress has been made in developing experimental techniques capable of investigating the response of materials to dynamic loading on nanosecond time scales and shorter, with multiple diagnostics probing different aspects of the behavior. these relatively short time scales are scientifically interesting because plastic flow and phase changes in common materials with simple crystal structures--such as iron--may be suppressed, allowing unusual states to be induced and the dynamics of plasticity and polymorphism to be explored. Loading by laser ablation can be particularly convenient. The TRIDENT laser has been used to impart shocks and isentropic compression waves from {approx}1 to 200GPa in a range of elements and alloys, with diagnostics including surface velocimetry (line-imaging VISAR), surface displacement (framed area imaging), x-ray diffraction (single crystal and polycrystal), ellipsometry, and Raman spectroscopy. A major motivation has been the study of the properties of beryllium under conditions relevant to the fuel capsule in inertial confinement fusion: magnetically-driven shock and isentropic compression shots at Z were used to investigate the equation of state and shock melting characteristics, complemented by laser ablation experiments to investigate plasticity and heterogeneous response. These results will help to constrain acceptable tolerances on manufacturing, and possible loading paths, for inertial fusion ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Laser-based techniques are being developed further for future material dynamics experiments, where it should be possible to obtain high quality data on strength and phase changes up to at least 1TPa.

  19. Independent Metrics for Protein Backbone and Side-Chain Flexibility: Time Scales and Effects of Ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Waldner, Birgit J; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-03-10

    Conformational dynamics are central for understanding biomolecular structure and function, since biological macromolecules are inherently flexible at room temperature and in solution. Computational methods are nowadays capable of providing valuable information on the conformational ensembles of biomolecules. However, analysis tools and intuitive metrics that capture dynamic information from in silico generated structural ensembles are limited. In standard work-flows, flexibility in a conformational ensemble is represented through residue-wise root-mean-square fluctuations or B-factors following a global alignment. Consequently, these approaches relying on global alignments discard valuable information on local dynamics. Results inherently depend on global flexibility, residue size, and connectivity. In this study we present a novel approach for capturing positional fluctuations based on multiple local alignments instead of one single global alignment. The method captures local dynamics within a structural ensemble independent of residue type by splitting individual local and global degrees of freedom of protein backbone and side-chains. Dependence on residue type and size in the side-chains is removed via normalization with the B-factors of the isolated residue. As a test case, we demonstrate its application to a molecular dynamics simulation of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) on the millisecond time scale. This allows for illustrating different time scales of backbone and side-chain flexibility. Additionally, we demonstrate the effects of ligand binding on side-chain flexibility of three serine proteases. We expect our new methodology for quantifying local flexibility to be helpful in unraveling local changes in biomolecular dynamics.

  20. Wave phenomena in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhovich, Alexey

    Novel wave phenomena in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) phononic crystals were investigated experimentally using ultrasonic techniques. These ultrasonic techniques allow the full wave field to be imaged directly, which is a considerable advantage in fundamental studies of wave propagation in periodic media. Resonant tunnelling of ultrasonic waves was successfully observed for the first time by measuring the transmission of ultrasound pulses through a double barrier consisting of two 3D phononic crystals separated by a cavity. This effect is the classical analogue of resonant tunnelling of a quantum mechanical particle through a double potential barrier, in which transmission reaches unity at resonant frequencies. For phononic crystals, the tunnelling peak was found to be less than unity, an effect that was explained by absorption. Absorption introduces a small propagating component inside the crystals in addition to the dominant evanescent mode at band gap frequencies, and causes leakage of the pulse from the cavity. The dynamics of resonant tunnelling was explored by measuring the group velocities of the ultrasonic pulses. Very slow and very fast velocities were found at frequencies close to and at the resonance, respectively. These extreme values are less than the speed of sound in air and greater than the speed of sound in any of the crystal's constituent materials. Negative refraction and focusing effects in 2D phononic crystals were also observed. Negative refraction of ultrasound was demonstrated unambiguously in a prism-shaped 2D crystal at frequencies in the 2nd pass band, where the equifrequency contours are circular so that the wave vector and group velocity are antiparallel. The Multiple Scattering Theory and Snell's law allowed theoretical predictions of the refraction angles. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment. The negative refraction experiments revealed a mechanism that can be used to focus ultrasound using a flat

  1. Radial migration of preplanetary material - Implications for the accretion time scale problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hourigan, K.; Ward, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Radial drift of planetesimals due to density wave interaction with the solar nebula is considered. The mechanism is most effective for large masses and provides mobility over a size range where aerodynamic drag is unimportant. The process could shorten accretion time scales to O(100,000-1,000,000 years) throughout the solar system. Accumulation stalls down when growing objects are massive enough to open gaps in the gas disk. Implications of this process for current cosmogonic models are discussed.

  2. Time Scaling of the Rates of Produced Fluids in Laboratory Displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Laroche, Catherine; Chen, Min; Yortsos, Yanis C.; Kamath, Jairam

    2001-02-27

    In this report, the use of an asymptotic method, based on the time scaling of the ratio of produced fluids, to infer the relative permeability exponent of the displaced phase near its residual saturation, for immiscible displacements in laboratory cores was proposed. Sufficiently large injection rates, the existence of a power law can be detected, and its exponent inferred, by plotting in an appropriate plot the ratio of the flow rates of the two fluids at the effluent for some time after breakthrough.

  3. Eleven-year cyclicity of the sun on the 2000-year time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagovitsyn, Yu. A.; Georgieva, K.; Osipova, A. A.; Kuleshova, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the first reconstruction of the annual values of the total area and magnetic flux of sunspots, as well as the Wolf index, on the 2000-year time scale. The procedure was performed by combining data on solar cyclicity amplitudes obtained from a decadal reconstruction (Usoskin et al., 2014) and data on its phases acquired from the numbers of auroras, which is contained in catalogs by Křivský and Silverman.

  4. Lyapunov-type inequality for a higher order dynamic equation on time scales.

    PubMed

    Sun, Taixiang; Xi, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a Lyapunov-type inequality for the following dynamic equation [Formula: see text]on some time scale T under the anti-periodic boundary conditions [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], p is the quotient of two odd positive integers and [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text].

  5. A typology of time-scale mismatches and behavioral interventions to diagnose and solve conservation problems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Robyn S.; Hardisty, David J.; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca S.; Runge, Michael C.; Cottingham, Kathryn L.; Urban, Dean L.; Maguire, Lynn A.; Hastings, Alan; Mumby, Peter J.; Peters, Debra P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological systems often operate on time scales significantly longer or shorter than the time scales typical of human decision making, which causes substantial difficulty for conservation and management in socioecological systems. For example, invasive species may move faster than humans can diagnose problems and initiate solutions, and climate systems may exhibit long-term inertia and short-term fluctuations that obscure learning about the efficacy of management efforts in many ecological systems. We adopted a management-decision framework that distinguishes decision makers within public institutions from individual actors within the social system, calls attention to the ways socioecological systems respond to decision makers’ actions, and notes institutional learning that accrues from observing these responses. We used this framework, along with insights from bedeviling conservation problems, to create a typology that identifies problematic time-scale mismatches occurring between individual decision makers in public institutions and between individual actors in the social or ecological system. We also considered solutions that involve modifying human perception and behavior at the individual level as a means of resolving these problematic mismatches. The potential solutions are derived from the behavioral economics and psychology literature on temporal challenges in decision making, such as the human tendency to discount future outcomes at irrationally high rates. These solutions range from framing environmental decisions to enhance the salience of long-term consequences, to using structured decision processes that make time scales of actions and consequences more explicit, to structural solutions aimed at altering the consequences of short-sighted behavior to make it less appealing. Additional application of these tools and long-term evaluation measures that assess not just behavioral changes but also associated changes in ecological systems are needed.

  6. A typology of time-scale mismatches and behavioral interventions to diagnose and solve conservation problems.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robyn S; Hardisty, David J; Epanchin-Niell, Rebecca S; Runge, Michael C; Cottingham, Kathryn L; Urban, Dean L; Maguire, Lynn A; Hastings, Alan; Mumby, Peter J; Peters, Debra P C

    2016-02-01

    Ecological systems often operate on time scales significantly longer or shorter than the time scales typical of human decision making, which causes substantial difficulty for conservation and management in socioecological systems. For example, invasive species may move faster than humans can diagnose problems and initiate solutions, and climate systems may exhibit long-term inertia and short-term fluctuations that obscure learning about the efficacy of management efforts in many ecological systems. We adopted a management-decision framework that distinguishes decision makers within public institutions from individual actors within the social system, calls attention to the ways socioecological systems respond to decision makers' actions, and notes institutional learning that accrues from observing these responses. We used this framework, along with insights from bedeviling conservation problems, to create a typology that identifies problematic time-scale mismatches occurring between individual decision makers in public institutions and between individual actors in the social or ecological system. We also considered solutions that involve modifying human perception and behavior at the individual level as a means of resolving these problematic mismatches. The potential solutions are derived from the behavioral economics and psychology literature on temporal challenges in decision making, such as the human tendency to discount future outcomes at irrationally high rates. These solutions range from framing environmental decisions to enhance the salience of long-term consequences, to using structured decision processes that make time scales of actions and consequences more explicit, to structural solutions aimed at altering the consequences of short-sighted behavior to make it less appealing. Additional application of these tools and long-term evaluation measures that assess not just behavioral changes but also associated changes in ecological systems are needed.

  7. Radial migration of preplanetary material - Implications for the accretion time scale problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hourigan, K.; Ward, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Radial drift of planetesimals due to density wave interaction with the solar nebula is considered. The mechanism is most effective for large masses and provides mobility over a size range where aerodynamic drag is unimportant. The process could shorten accretion time scales to O(100,000-1,000,000 years) throughout the solar system. Accumulation stalls down when growing objects are massive enough to open gaps in the gas disk. Implications of this process for current cosmogonic models are discussed.

  8. New Insights on the Variability of Ecosystem Functioning Across Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Mahecha, M. D.; Frank, D. C.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Ecosystem functioning is monitored worldwide over several decades. However, a comparative in-depth characterization of the temporal variability of essential ecosystem processes, such as for example carbon assimilation and respiration is still lacking. The intra-annual (sub-diurnal, diurnal, and seasonal) variability of these processes can be well described by basic mechanisms such as the plant response to light. In contrast, the inter-annual variability and its origins and magnitude, remain highly uncertain. To date, there have only been a few attempts to investigate these issues across sites, ecosystems variables, and time scales, yet a general and comprehensive overview is outstanding. Here, we present a synthesis of a wide range of observations over Europe, namely: (i) eddy covariance measurements of carbon, energy, and water fluxes, (ii) satellite data of leaf area index and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by plants, (iii) tree-ring widths, and (iv) dendrometer measurements of tree stem radius changes, and we analyze their variability from the half-hourly to the decadal time scale. Our analysis shows that all ecosystems can be characterized by three distinct regimes of variability (sub-daily, daily-seasonal, and seasonal-annual) confined within the ranges of the available resources, i.e., water (precipitation) and energy (radiation and temperature). We find a convergence of the range of variability of hydrometeorological drivers. Surprisingly, such convergence is not reflected in the variability of the ecosystem responses across sites. Although the magnitude of variability of ecosystem functioning varies across sites, the temporal dependences present the same characteristics over time scales spanning five orders of magnitude. We show that this behaviour can be well simulated by combining simple stochastic models with deterministic harmonics (diurnal and annual cycles). This allows us to statistically characterize the short- and long

  9. Evaluation of the effects of 3D diffusion, crystal geometry, and initial conditions on retrieved time-scales from Fe-Mg zoning in natural oriented orthopyroxene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimer, Daniel; Costa, Fidel

    2017-01-01

    Volcano petrologists and geochemists increasingly use time-scale determinations of magmatic processes from modeling the chemical zoning patterns in crystals. Most determinations are done using one-dimensional traverses across a two-dimensional crystal section. However, crystals are three-dimensional objects with complex shapes, and diffusion and re-equilibration occurs in multiple dimensions. Given that we can mainly study the crystals in two-dimensional petrographic thin sections, the determined time-scales could be in error if multiple dimensional and geometrical effects are not identified and accounted for. Here we report the results of a numerical study where we investigate the role of multiple dimensions, geometry, and initial conditions of Fe-Mg diffusion in an orthopyroxene crystal with the view towards proper determinations of time scales from modeling natural crystals. We found that merging diffusion fronts (i.e. diffusion from multiple directions) causes 'additional' diffusion that has the greatest influence close to the crystal's corners (i.e. where two crystal faces meet), and with longer times the affected area widens. We also found that the one-dimensional traverses that can lead to the most accurate calculated time-scales from natural crystals are along the b- crystallographic axis on the ab-plane when model inputs (concentration and zoning geometry) are taken as measured (rather than inferred from other observations). More specifically, accurate time-scales are obtained if the compositional traverses are highly symmetrical and contain a concentration plateau measured through the crystal center. On the other hand, for two-dimensional models the ab- and ac-planes are better suited if the initial (pre-diffusion) concentration and zoning geometry inputs are known or can be estimated, although these are a priory unknown, and thus, may be difficult to use in practical terms. We also found that under certain conditions, a combined one-dimensional and two

  10. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

    2011-12-20

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

  11. Teaching optical phenomena with Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Simeão Carvalho, P.

    2014-11-01

    Since the invention and dissemination of domestic laser pointers, observing optical phenomena is a relatively easy task. Any student can buy a laser and experience at home, in a qualitative way, the reflection, refraction and even diffraction phenomena of light. However, quantitative experiments need instruments of high precision that have a relatively complex setup. Fortunately, nowadays it is possible to analyse optical phenomena in a simple and quantitative way using the freeware video analysis software ‘Tracker’. In this paper, we show the advantages of video-based experimental activities for teaching concepts in optics. We intend to show: (a) how easy the study of such phenomena can be, even at home, because only simple materials are needed, and Tracker provides the necessary measuring instruments; and (b) how we can use Tracker to improve students’ understanding of some optical concepts. We give examples using video modelling to study the laws of reflection, Snell’s laws, focal distances in lenses and mirrors, and diffraction phenomena, which we hope will motivate teachers to implement it in their own classes and schools.

  12. Active open boundary forcing using dual relaxation time-scales in downscaled ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzfeld, M.; Gillibrand, P. A.

    2015-05-01

    Regional models actively forced with data from larger scale models at their open boundaries often contain motion at different time-scales (e.g. tidal and low frequency). These motions are not always individually well specified in the forcing data, and one may require a more active boundary forcing while the other exert less influence on the model interior. If a single relaxation time-scale is used to relax toward these data in the boundary equation, then this may be difficult. The method of fractional steps is used to introduce dual relaxation time-scales in an open boundary local flux adjustment scheme. This allows tidal and low frequency oscillations to be relaxed independently, resulting in a better overall solution than if a single relaxation parameter is optimized for tidal (short relaxation) or low frequency (long relaxation) boundary forcing. The dual method is compared to the single relaxation method for an idealized test case where a tidal signal is superimposed on a steady state low frequency solution, and a real application where the low frequency boundary forcing component is derived from a global circulation model for a region extending over the whole Great Barrier Reef, and a tidal signal subsequently superimposed.

  13. On the simulation of protein folding by short time scale molecular dynamics and distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Fersht, Alan R

    2002-10-29

    There are proposals to overcome the current incompatibilities between the time scales of protein folding and molecular dynamics simulation by using a large number of short simulations of only tens of nanoseconds (distributed computing). According to the principles of first-order kinetic processes, a sufficiently large number of short simulations will include, de facto, a small number of long time scale events that have proceeded to completion. But protein folding is not an elementary kinetic step: folding has a series of early conformational steps that lead to lag phases at the beginning of the kinetics. The presence of these lag phases can bias short simulations toward selecting minor pathways that have fewer or faster lag steps and so miss the major folding pathways. Attempts to circumvent the lags by using loosely coupled parallel simulations that search for first-order transitions are also problematic because of the difficulty of detecting transitions in molecular dynamics simulations. Nevertheless, the procedure of using parallel independent simulations is perfectly valid and quite feasible once the time scale of simulation proceeds past the lag phases into a single exponential region.

  14. Effects of extinction on food web structures on an evolutionary time scale.

    PubMed

    Hironaga, Ryo; Yamamura, Norio

    2010-03-21

    Extinction affected food web structure in paleoecosystems. Recent theoretical studies that examined the effects of extinction intensity on food web structure on ecological time scales have considered extinction to involve episodic events, with pre-extinction food webs becoming established without dynamics. However, in terms of the paleontological time scale, food web structures are generated from feedback with repeated extinctions, because extinction frequency is affected by food web structure, and food web structure itself is a product of previous extinctions. We constructed a simulation model of changes in tri-trophic-level food webs to examine how continual extinction events affect food webs on an evolutionary time scale. We showed that under high extinction intensity (1) species diversity, especially that of consumer species, decreased; (2) the total population density at each trophic level decreased, while the densities of individual species increased; and (3) the trophic link density of the food web increased. In contrast to previous models, our results were based on an assumption of long-term food web development and are able to explain overall trends posited by empirical investigations based on fossil records.

  15. The Average Density of Extrasolar Habitable Planets Over Cosmological Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bloh, W.; Franck, S.; Bounama, C.; Schellnhuber, H. J.

    A general modelling scheme for assessing the suitability for life on any Earth-like ex- trasolar planet is presented. This approach is based on an integrated Earth system anal- ysis in order to calculate the habitable zone in main-sequence-star planetary systems. Within this model the evolution of the habitable zone over geological time scales is straightforward to calculate and allows an estimate of the probability that an Earth-like planet is within the habitable zone of an extrasolar planetary system. The probability depends explicitly on the time since planet formation. A new attempt by Lineweaver (2001) to estimate the formation rate of Earth-like planets over cosmological time scales is applied to calculate the average density of habitable planets as a function of time. This approach is based on a quantitative determination of metallicity from star formation rates as an ingredient for forming Earth-like planets. Combining this result with our estimations of extrasolar habitable zones yields the average density of habit- able planets over cosmological time scales. We find that there was a maximum density of habitable planets at the time of Earth's origin.

  16. Multiband optical-NIR variability of blazars on diverse time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Aditi; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, R.; Strigachev, A.; Semkov, E.; Wiita, Paul J.; Böttcher, M.; Boeva, S.; Gaur, H.; Gu, M. F.; Peneva, S.; Ibryamov, S.; Pandey, U. S.

    2015-08-01

    To search for optical variability on a wide range of time-scales, we have carried out photometric monitoring of two flat spectrum radio quasars, 3C 454.3 and 3C 279, plus one BL Lac, S5 0716+714, all of which have been exhibiting remarkably high activity and pronounced variability at all wavelengths. CCD magnitudes in B, V, R, and I passbands were determined for ˜7000 new optical observations from 114 nights made during 2011-2014, with an average length of ˜4 h each, at seven optical telescopes: four in Bulgaria, one in Greece, and two in India. We measured multiband optical flux and colour variations on diverse time-scales. Discrete correlation functions were computed among B, V, R, and I observations, to search for any time delays. We found weak correlations in some cases with no significant time lags. The structure function method was used to estimate any characteristic time-scales of variability. We also investigated the spectral energy distribution of the three blazars using B, V, R, I, J, and K passband data. We found that the sources almost always follow a bluer-when-brighter trend. We discuss possible physical causes of the observed spectral variability.

  17. Modeling Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Forcing on Centennial and Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R.; Rind, D.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a series of experiments to explore clima responses to two types of solar spectral forcing on decadal and centennial time scales - one based on prior reconstructions, and another implied by recent observations from the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral 1rradiance Monitor). We apply these forcings to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global/Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM). that couples atmosphere with ocean, and has a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full response to the two solar forcing scenarios. We show different climate responses to the two solar forCing scenarios on decadal time scales and also trends on centennial time scales. Differences between solar maximum and solar minimum conditions are highlighted, including impacts of the time lagged reSponse of the lower atmosphere and ocean. This contrasts with studies that assume separate equilibrium conditions at solar maximum and minimum. We discuss model feedback mechanisms involved in the solar forced climate variations.

  18. Estimation of Time Scales in Unsteady Flows in a Turbomachinery Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ashpis, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Time scales in turbulent and transitional flow provide a link between experimental data and modeling, both in terms of physical content and for quantitative assessment. The problem of interest here is the definition of time scales in an unsteady flow. Using representative samples of data from GEAE low pressure turbine experiment in low speed research turbine facility with wake-induced transition, we document several methods to extract dominant frequencies, and compare the results. We show that conventional methods of time scale evaluation (based on autocorrelation functions and on Fourier spectra) and wavelet-based methods provide similar information when applied to stationary signals. We also show the greater flexibility of the wavelet-based methods when dealing with intermittent or strongly modulated data, as are encountered in transitioning boundary layers and in flows with unsteady forcing associated with wake passing. We define phase-averaged dominant frequencies that characterize the turbulence associated with freestream conditions and with the passing wakes downstream of a rotor. The relevance of these results for modeling is discussed in the paper.

  19. A propagating freshwater mode in the Arctic Ocean with multidecadal time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Malskær Olsen, Steffen; Margrethe Ringgaard, Ida

    2017-04-01

    We apply Principal Oscillatory Pattern analysis to the Arctic Ocean fresh water content as simulated in a 500 year long control run with constant preindustrial forcing with the EC-Earth global climate model. Two modes emerge from this analysis. One mode is a standing mode with decadal time scale describing accumulation and release of fresh water in the Beaufort Gyre, known in the literature as the Beaufort Gyre flywheel. In addition, we identify a propagating mode with a time scale around 80 years, propagating along the rim of the Canadian Basin. This mode has maximum variability of the fresh water content in the Transpolar Drift and represents the bulk of the total variability of the fresh water content in the Arctic Ocean and also projects on the fresh water through the Fram Strait. Therefore, potentially, it can introduce a multidecadal variability to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. We will discuss the physical origin of this propagating mode. This include planetary-scale internal Rossby waves with multidecadal time scale, due to the slow variation of the Coriolis parameter at these high latitudes, as well as topographic steering of these Rossby waves.

  20. Time Scale Creator - A Visualization and Database Tool for Earth History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, A.; Ogg, J.

    2008-12-01

    Unravelling Earth's history requires the ability to compare biologic, lithologic, chemical, magnetic and other records from different regions. Published correlation charts provide some details, but tend to be unwieldy, difficult to update, and awkward to merge with other records. The Time Scale Creator program of the International Commission on Stratigraphy provides a suite of global and regional reference datasets (approximately 20,000 Phanerozoic datums, plus geochemical and other trends) within a visualization package. Users can append additional regional lithostratigraphic or other datasets, then create on-screen charts for any portion of the geologic time scale with any subsets of the extensive stratigraphic data. In addition to scalable-vector graphics (SVG) or PDF file output, the on-screen display contains "hot-cursor- points" which open up windows with additional information on events, zones, and URL links to external documentation. For example, a user can select from within a datapack with 50 representative stratigraphic columns spanning the British Isles, then display lithologic sections against models of global sea-level trends or adjacent to Sub-boreal ammonite zones, and the pop-up window for each formation is linked directly to the British Geologic Survey lexicon entry. Much in the way that GIS greatly enhances accessibility to spatial data, the Time Scale Creator and its temporal data are completely digital, allowing quick and easy distribution and updating. The database and visualization package are a convenient reference tool, chart-production device, and educational program.

  1. A multi-time-scale analysis of chemical reaction networks: II. Stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xingye; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Othmer, Hans G

    2016-11-01

    We consider stochastic descriptions of chemical reaction networks in which there are both fast and slow reactions, and for which the time scales are widely separated. We develop a computational algorithm that produces the generator of the full chemical master equation for arbitrary systems, and show how to obtain a reduced equation that governs the evolution on the slow time scale. This is done by applying a state space decomposition to the full equation that leads to the reduced dynamics in terms of certain projections and the invariant distributions of the fast system. The rates or propensities of the reduced system are shown to be the rates of the slow reactions conditioned on the expectations of fast steps. We also show that the generator of the reduced system is a Markov generator, and we present an efficient stochastic simulation algorithm for the slow time scale dynamics. We illustrate the numerical accuracy of the approximation by simulating several examples. Graph-theoretic techniques are used throughout to describe the structure of the reaction network and the state-space transitions accessible under the dynamics.

  2. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  3. Reproducibility in Psychological Science: When Do Psychological Phenomena Exist?

    PubMed Central

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence has recently been used to assert that certain psychological phenomena do not exist. Such claims, however, cannot be made because (1) scientific method itself is seriously limited (i.e., it can never prove a negative); (2) non-existence of phenomena would require a complete absence of both logical (theoretical) and empirical support; even if empirical support is weak, logical and theoretical support can be strong; (3) statistical data are only one piece of evidence and cannot be used to reduce psychological phenomena to statistical phenomena; and (4) psychological phenomena vary across time, situations and persons. The human mind is unreproducible from one situation to another. Psychological phenomena are not particles that can decisively be tested and discovered. Therefore, a declaration that a phenomenon is not real is not only theoretically and empirically unjustified but runs counter to the propositional and provisional nature of scientific knowledge. There are only “temporary winners” and no “final truths” in scientific knowledge. Psychology is a science of subtleties in human affect, cognition and behavior. Its phenomena fluctuate with conditions and may sometimes be difficult to detect and reproduce empirically. When strictly applied, reproducibility is an overstated and even questionable concept in psychological science. Furthermore, statistical measures (e.g., effect size) are poor indicators of the theoretical importance and relevance of phenomena (cf. “deliberate practice” vs. “talent” in expert performance), not to mention whether phenomena are real or unreal. To better understand psychological phenomena, their theoretical and empirical properties should be examined via multiple parameters and criteria. Ten such parameters are suggested. PMID:28626435

  4. High Resolution Global Climate Modeling with GEOS-5: Intense Precipitation, Convection and Tropical Cyclones on Seasonal Time-Scales.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, WilliamM.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 the World Modeling Summit for Climate Prediction concluded that "climate modeling will need-and is ready-to move to fundamentally new high-resolution approaches to capitalize on the seamlessness of the weather-climate continuum." Following from this, experimentation with very high-resolution global climate modeling has gained enhanced priority within many modeling groups and agencies. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model (GEOS-5) has been enhanced to provide a capability for the execution at the finest horizontal resolutions POS,SIOle with a global climate model today. Using this high-resolution, non-hydrostatic version of GEOS-5, we have developed a unique capability to explore the intersection of weather and climate within a seamless prediction system. Week-long weather experiments, to mUltiyear climate simulations at global resolutions ranging from 3.5- to 14-km have demonstrated the predictability of extreme events including severe storms along frontal systems, extra-tropical storms, and tropical cyclones. The primary benefits of high resolution global models will likely be in the tropics, with better predictions of the genesis stages of tropical cyclones and of the internal structure of their mature stages. Using satellite data we assess the accuracy of GEOS-5 in representing extreme weather phenomena, and their interaction within the global climate on seasonal time-scales. The impacts of convective parameterization and the frequency of coupling between the moist physics and dynamics are explored in terms of precipitation intensity and the representation of deep convection. We will also describe the seasonal variability of global tropical cyclone activity within a global climate model capable of representing the most intense category 5 hurricanes.

  5. Satellites reveals the biophysical effects of forest cover change on climate at diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duveiller, Gregory; Alkama, Ramdane; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Changing the planet's forest cover can have a profound impact of the climate system by altering its role as a carbon sink. However, deforestation and afforestation also changes the biophysical properties of the surface such as albedo, roughness and root depth, thus altering the energy balance and the resulting surface and air temperature. The result of these competing biophysical processes varies spatially and seasonally, and can lead to either warming or cooling depending on which process dominates. The main tools to characterize such plant-climate interactions for both the past and future are land surface models embedded in larger Earth System models, yet their capacity to model biophysical effects accurately across the globe remains unclear due to the complexity of the phenomena. Alternatively, with appropriate methodologies, the climate impacts of the biophysical effects of forest cover change can be derived from space by satellite measurements of surface temperature and energy fluxes. Here we present the confrontation of two dedicated assessments that have been specifically generated for this scope with contrasting methodologies. The first is based on identifying an actual change in the local climate following an observed forest cover transition. Although it directly measures the desired effect, this method can only be applied to the places where vegetation change has effectively occurred. The second method relies on a 'space-for-time' approximation that identifies the potential impact of a plant cover transition from differences in climate amongst neighboring areas with contrasting vegetation. We show how both approaches reinforce and complement each other to provide a consolidated result across diurnal, seasonal and inter-annual time scales. We anticipate that these evidences derived from satellite records may support the benchmarking and development of Earth system models and support the inclusion of vegetation-driven biophysical processes in climate

  6. The role of magnetostratigraphy in the development of geological time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailwood, E. A.

    1989-02-01

    One of the major targets of geochronology is the "calibration" of chronostratigraphic boundaries (defined principally from biostratigraphic information) in terms of numerical ages derived from isotopic age data. Few isotopic age determinations correspond precisely with such chronostratigraphic boundaries. Furthermore the analytical (and other) uncertainties in isotopic age data are often greater than the duration of the age or zone whose boundaries need to be dated. Consequently, it is necessary to synthesize isotopic age data which are distributed both in space and time in order to obtain age estimates for the geological boundaries themselves. This synthesis requires the introduction of some linearizing operator on which to base the necessary interpolations or extrapolations. Commonly used linearizing operators involve assumptions of uniform rates of sedimentation and/or biological evolution. However, such assumptions are often highly questionable. An alternative and potentially more reliable linearizing operator utilizes the assumption of a uniform seafloor spreading rate at certain midocean ridges for certain periods in the (post mid-Jurassic) geological past. The use of this operator for the Chronometric calibration of chronostratigraphic time scales is based upon the fact that successive polarity changes of the geomagnetic field are recorded simultaneously in the pattern of lineated magnetic anomalies formed by seafloor spreading and also in the paleomagnetic record of sedimentary sequences in which the chronostratigraphic boundaries can be defined. This approach provides a number of advantages over the use of more traditional linearizing operators, and these are reviewed in this paper. It has been used in several recent geological time scales. Its applicability depends upon a number of factors, including the reliability of the basic seafloor spreading polarity time scale and that of the paleomagnetic record in isotopically and/or biostratigraphically dated

  7. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  8. Earth History databases and visualization - the TimeScale Creator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogg, James; Lugowski, Adam; Gradstein, Felix

    2010-05-01

    The "TimeScale Creator" team (www.tscreator.org) and the Subcommission on Stratigraphic Information (stratigraphy.science.purdue.edu) of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (www.stratigraphy.org) has worked with numerous geoscientists and geological surveys to prepare reference datasets for global and regional stratigraphy. All events are currently calibrated to Geologic Time Scale 2004 (Gradstein et al., 2004, Cambridge Univ. Press) and Concise Geologic Time Scale (Ogg et al., 2008, Cambridge Univ. Press); but the array of intercalibrations enable dynamic adjustment to future numerical age scales and interpolation methods. The main "global" database contains over 25,000 events/zones from paleontology, geomagnetics, sea-level and sequence stratigraphy, igneous provinces, bolide impacts, plus several stable isotope curves and image sets. Several regional datasets are provided in conjunction with geological surveys, with numerical ages interpolated using a similar flexible inter-calibration procedure. For example, a joint program with Geoscience Australia has compiled an extensive Australian regional biostratigraphy and a full array of basin lithologic columns with each formation linked to public lexicons of all Proterozoic through Phanerozoic basins - nearly 500 columns of over 9,000 data lines plus hot-curser links to oil-gas reference wells. Other datapacks include New Zealand biostratigraphy and basin transects (ca. 200 columns), Russian biostratigraphy, British Isles regional stratigraphy, Gulf of Mexico biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy, high-resolution Neogene stable isotope curves and ice-core data, human cultural episodes, and Circum-Arctic stratigraphy sets. The growing library of datasets is designed for viewing and chart-making in the free "TimeScale Creator" JAVA package. This visualization system produces a screen display of the user-selected time-span and the selected columns of geologic time scale information. The user can change the

  9. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Sindo

    1996-10-01

    An extremely useful guide to the theory and applications of transport phenomena in materials processing This book defines the unique role that transport phenomena play in materials processing and offers a graphic, comprehensive treatment unlike any other book on the subject. The two parts of the text are, in fact, two useful books. Part I is a very readable introduction to fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer for materials engineers and anyone not yet thoroughly familiar with the subject. It includes governing equations and boundary conditions particularly useful for studying materials processing. For mechanical and chemical engineers, and anyone already familiar with transport phenomena, Part II covers the many specific applications to materials processing, including a brief description of various materials processing technologies. Readable and unencumbered by mathematical manipulations (most of which are allocated to the appendixes), this book is also a useful text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level courses in materials, mechanical, and chemical engineering. It includes hundreds of photographs of materials processing in action, single and composite figures of computer simulation, handy charts for problem solving, and more. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing: * Describes eight key materials processing technologies, including crystal growth, casting, welding, powder and fiber processing, bulk and surface heat treating, and semiconductor device fabrication * Covers the latest advances in the field, including recent results of computer simulation and flow visualization * Presents special boundary conditions for transport phenomena in materials processing * Includes charts that summarize commonly encountered boundary conditions and step-by-step procedures for problem solving * Offers a unique derivation of governing equations that leads to both overall and differential balance equations * Provides a list of publicly available computer

  10. Switching Phenomena in a System with No Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-02-01

    It is widely believed that switching phenomena require switches, but this is actually not true. For an intriguing variety of switching phenomena in nature, the underlying complex system abruptly changes from one state to another in a highly discontinuous fashion. For example, financial market fluctuations are characterized by many abrupt switchings creating increasing trends ("bubble formation") and decreasing trends ("financial collapse"). Such switching occurs on time scales ranging from macroscopic bubbles persisting for hundreds of days to microscopic bubbles persisting only for a few seconds. We analyze a database containing 13,991,275 German DAX Future transactions recorded with a time resolution of 10 msec. For comparison, a database providing 2,592,531 of all S&P500 daily closing prices is used. We ask whether these ubiquitous switching phenomena have quantifiable features independent of the time horizon studied. We find striking scale-free behavior of the volatility after each switching occurs. We interpret our findings as being consistent with time-dependent collective behavior of financial market participants. We test the possible universality of our result by performing a parallel analysis of fluctuations in transaction volume and time intervals between trades. We show that these financial market switching processes have properties similar to those of phase transitions. We suggest that the well-known catastrophic bubbles that occur on large time scales—such as the most recent financial crisis—are no outliers but single dramatic representatives caused by the switching between upward and downward trends on time scales varying over nine orders of magnitude from very large (≈102 days) down to very small (≈10 ms).

  11. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  12. Discovery potential for new phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, S.; Hewett, J.L.; Price, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examine the ability of future facilities to discover and interpret non-supersymmetric new phenomena. The authors first explore explicit manifestations of new physics, including extended gauge sectors, leptoquarks, exotic fermions, and technicolor models. They then take a more general approach where new physics only reveals itself through the existence of effective interactions at lower energy scales.

  13. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  14. Quantum Phenomena Observed Using Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tonomura, Akira

    2011-05-06

    Electron phase microscopy based on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect principle has been used to illuminate fundamental phenomena concerning magnetism and superconductivity by visualizing quantitative magnetic lines of force. This paper deals with confirmation experiments on the AB effect, the magnetization process of tiny magnetic heads for perpendicular recording, and vortex behaviors in high-Tc superconductors.

  15. Visualizing Chemical Phenomena in Microdroplets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sunghee; Wiener, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Phenomena that occur in microdroplets are described to the undergraduate chemistry community. Droplets having a diameter in the micrometer range can have unique and interesting properties, which arise because of their small size and, especially, their high surface area-to-volume ratio. Students are generally unfamiliar with the characteristics of…

  16. The pulse of driftwood export from a very large forested river basin over multiple time scales, Slave River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Natalie; Wohl, Ellen; Hess-Homeier, Brooke; Leisz, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    This study presents a case study of large wood transport on the great Slave River in northern Canada with the objective to better understand the processes of and variability in pulsed wood fluxes from large forested catchments. We use a varied approach, integrating field characterization of wood, historical anecdotes, repeat aerial imagery of stored wood, and time-lapse imagery of moving wood, for a robust analysis and synthesis of processes behind pulsed wood flux, from yearly uncongested export to rare congested wood floods. Repeat monitoring of known sites of temporary storage with new or historic imagery proved to be a very useful tool for constraining wood flux histories. Pulsed wood export on the Slave River is not an artifact of episodic recruitment from major up-basin disturbances, but rather reflects decadal- to half-century-scale discharge patterns that redistribute wood recruited from channel migration and bank slumping. We suggest that the multiyear flow history is of paramount importance for estimating wood flux magnitude, followed in declining importance by the yearly sequence of peaks and the magnitude and characteristics of the rising limb of individual floods.

  17. Steady-shear-enhanced microdiffusion with multiple time scales of confined, mesoscopic, two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquids.

    PubMed

    Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2009-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the multitime scale diffusion and the spatiotemporal behaviors of the degrees of enhancement for the longitudinal and the transverse diffusions in a confined mesoscopic quasi-two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquid sheared by two parallel counterpropagating laser beams. The steady external drive directly enhances the longitudinal cooperative hopping, associated with the shear bands that have high shear rate near boundaries. It drastically excites the slow hopping modes to high fluctuation level in the outer band region, accompanied by the enhanced superdiffusion. Through cascaded many-body interaction, the excitation flows from the outer region toward the center region, from the longitudinal modes to the transverse mode, and from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes, which are in better contact with the thermal bath. It causes the weaker enhancement of fluctuation level, and diffusion for the center region and the fast modes. The boundary confinement further breaks the system symmetry and enhances anisotropy. It has much stronger effect on the suppression of the transverse hopping modes than the longitudinal hopping mode. The degrees of enhancement of the fluctuations by the shear stress are highly anisotropic for the large amplitude slow modes, especially in the outer region but are more isotropic in the inner band.

  18. Functional connectivity dynamically evolves on multiple time-scales over a static structural connectome: Models and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Joana; Kringelbach, Morten L; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-03-23

    Over the last decade, we have observed a revolution in brain structural and functional Connectomics. On one hand, we have an ever-more detailed characterization of the brain's white matter structural connectome. On the other, we have a repertoire of consistent functional networks that form and dissipate over time during rest. Despite the evident spatial similarities between structural and functional connectivity, understanding how different time-evolving functional networks spontaneously emerge from a single structural network requires analyzing the problem from the perspective of complex network dynamics and dynamical system's theory. In that direction, bottom-up computational models are useful tools to test theoretical scenarios and depict the mechanisms at the genesis of resting-state activity. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanistic scenarios proposed over the last decade via computational models. Importantly, we highlight the need of incorporating additional model constraints considering the properties observed at finer temporal scales with MEG and the dynamical properties of FC in order to refresh the list of candidate scenarios.

  19. A molecular genetic time scale demonstrates Cretaceous origins and multiple diversification rate shifts within the order Galliformes (Aves).

    PubMed

    Stein, R Will; Brown, Joseph W; Mooers, Arne Ø

    2015-11-01

    The phylogeny of Galliformes (landfowl) has been studied extensively; however, the associated chronologies have been criticized recently due to misplaced or misidentified fossil calibrations. As a consequence, it is unclear whether any crown-group lineages arose in the Cretaceous and survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg; 65.5 Ma) mass extinction. Using Bayesian phylogenetic inference on an alignment spanning 14,539 bp of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, four fossil calibrations, and a combination of uncorrelated lognormally distributed relaxed-clock and strict-clock models, we inferred a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny for 225 of the 291 extant Galliform taxa. These analyses suggest that crown Galliformes diversified in the Cretaceous and that three-stem lineages survived the K-Pg mass extinction. Ideally, characterizing the tempo and mode of diversification involves a taxonomically complete phylogenetic hypothesis. We used simple constraint structures to incorporate 66 data-deficient taxa and inferred the first taxon-complete phylogenetic hypothesis for the Galliformes. Diversification analyses conducted on 10,000 timetrees sampled from the posterior distribution of candidate trees show that the evolutionary history of the Galliformes is best explained by a rate-shift model including 1-3 clade-specific increases in diversification rate. We further show that the tempo and mode of diversification in the Galliformes conforms to a three-pulse model, with three-stem lineages arising in the Cretaceous and inter and intrafamilial diversification occurring after the K-Pg mass extinction, in the Paleocene-Eocene (65.5-33.9 Ma) or in association with the Eocene-Oligocene transition (33.9 Ma). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Nonlinear Dynamic Approach Reveals a Long-Term Stroke Effect on Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation at Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kun; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Liu, Yanhui; Novak, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is an important vascular control mechanism responsible for relatively stable cerebral blood flow despite changes of systemic blood pressure (BP). Impaired CA may leave brain tissue unprotected against potentially harmful effects of BP fluctuations. It is generally accepted that CA is less effective or even inactive at frequencies >∼0.1 Hz. Without any physiological foundation, this concept is based on studies that quantified the coupling between BP and cerebral blood flow velocity (BFV) using transfer function analysis. This traditional analysis assumes stationary oscillations with constant amplitude and period, and may be unreliable or even invalid for analysis of nonstationary BP and BFV signals. In this study we propose a novel computational tool for CA assessment that is based on nonlinear dynamic theory without the assumption of stationary signals. Using this method, we studied BP and BFV recordings collected from 39 patients with chronic ischemic infarctions and 40 age-matched non-stroke subjects during baseline resting conditions. The active CA function in non-stroke subjects was associated with an advanced phase in BFV oscillations compared to BP oscillations at frequencies from ∼0.02 to 0.38 Hz. The phase shift was reduced in stroke patients even at > = 6 months after stroke, and the reduction was consistent at all tested frequencies and in both stroke and non-stroke hemispheres. These results provide strong evidence that CA may be active in a much wider frequency region than previously believed and that the altered multiscale CA in different vascular territories following stroke may have important clinical implications for post-stroke recovery. Moreover, the stroke effects on multiscale cerebral blood flow regulation could not be detected by transfer function analysis, suggesting that nonlinear approaches without the assumption of stationarity are more sensitive for the assessment of the coupling of nonstationary physiological signals. PMID:22807666

  1. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  2. THz time scale structural rearrangements and binding modes in lysozyme-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Woods, K N

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the conformational changes in proteins that are relevant for substrate binding is an ongoing challenge in the aim of elucidating the functional states of proteins. The motions that are induced by protein-ligand interactions are governed by the protein global modes. Our measurements indicate that the detected changes in the global backbone motion of the enzyme upon binding reflect a shift from the large-scale collective dominant mode in the unbound state towards a functional twisting deformation that assists in closing the binding cleft. Correlated motion in lysozyme has been implicated in enzyme function in previous studies, but detailed characterization of the internal fluctuations that enable the protein to explore the ensemble of conformations that ultimately foster large-scale conformational change is yet unknown. For this reason, we use THz spectroscopy to investigate the picosecond time scale binding modes and collective structural rearrangements that take place in hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) when bound by the inhibitor (NAG)3. These protein thermal motions correspond to fluctuations that have a role in both selecting and sampling from the available protein intrinsic conformations that communicate function. Hence, investigation of these fast, collective modes may provide knowledge about the mechanism leading to the preferred binding process in HEWL-(NAG)3. Specifically, in this work we find that the picosecond time scale hydrogen-bonding rearrangements taking place in the protein hydration shell with binding modify the packing density within the hydrophobic core on a local level. These localized, intramolecular contact variations within the protein core appear to facilitate the large cooperative movements within the interfacial region separating the α- and β- domain that mediate binding. The THz time-scale fluctuations identified in the protein-ligand system may also reveal a molecular mechanism for substrate recognition.

  3. Orbitally tuned time scale and astronomical forcing in the middle Eocene to early Oligocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerhold, T.; Röhl, U.; Pälike, H.; Wilkens, R.; Wilson, P. A.; Acton, G.

    2013-12-01

    Deciphering the driving mechanisms of Earth system processes, including the climate dynamics expressed as paleoceanographic events, requires a complete, continuous, and high-resolution stratigraphy that is very accurately dated. In this study, we construct a robust astronomically calibrated age model for the middle Eocene to early Oligocene interval (31-43 Ma) in order to permit more detailed study of the exceptional climatic events that occurred during this time, including the Middle Eocene Climate Optimum and the Eocene/Oligocene transition. A goal of this effort is to accurately date the middle Eocene to early Oligocene composite section cored during the Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT, IODP Exp. 320/321). The stratigraphic framework for the new time scale is based on the identification of the stable long eccentricity cycle in published and new high-resolution records encompassing bulk and benthic stable isotope, calibrated XRF core scanning, and magnetostratigraphic data from ODP Sites 171B-1052, 189-1172, 199-1218, and 207-1260 as well as IODP Sites 320-U1333, and -U1334 spanning magnetic polarity Chrons C12n to C20n. Subsequently we applied orbital tuning of the records to the La2011 orbital solution. The resulting new time scale revises and refines the existing orbitally tuned age model and the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale from 31 to 43 Ma. Our newly defined absolute age for the Eocene/Oligocene boundary validates the astronomical tuned age of 33.89 Ma identified at the Massignano (Italy) global stratotype section and point. Our compilation of geochemical records of climate-controlled variability in sedimentation through the middle-to-late Eocene and early Oligocene demonstrates strong power in the eccentricity band that is readily tuned to the latest astronomical solution. Obliquity driven cyclicity is only apparent during very long eccentricity cycle minima around 35.5, 38.3 and 40.1 Ma.

  4. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Turner, S P

    2002-12-15

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 10(2)-10(4) years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large (226)Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less.

  5. Epidemic mitigation via awareness propagation in communication networks: the role of time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Chen, Chuyi; Qu, Bo; Li, Daqing; Havlin, Shlomo

    2017-07-01

    The participation of individuals in multi-layer networks allows for feedback between network layers, opening new possibilities to mitigate epidemic spreading. For instance, the spread of a biological disease such as Ebola in a physical contact network may trigger the propagation of the information related to this disease in a communication network, e.g. an online social network. The information propagated in the communication network may increase the awareness of some individuals, resulting in them avoiding contact with their infected neighbors in the physical contact network, which might protect the population from the infection. In this work, we aim to understand how the time scale γ of the information propagation (speed that information is spread and forgotten) in the communication network relative to that of the epidemic spread (speed that an epidemic is spread and cured) in the physical contact network influences such mitigation using awareness information. We begin by proposing a model of the interaction between information propagation and epidemic spread, taking into account the relative time scale γ. We analytically derive the average fraction of infected nodes in the meta-stable state for this model (i) by developing an individual-based mean-field approximation (IBMFA) method and (ii) by extending the microscopic Markov chain approach (MMCA). We show that when the time scale γ of the information spread relative to the epidemic spread is large, our IBMFA approximation is better compared to MMCA near the epidemic threshold, whereas MMCA performs better when the prevalence of the epidemic is high. Furthermore, we find that an optimal mitigation exists that leads to a minimal fraction of infected nodes. The optimal mitigation is achieved at a non-trivial relative time scale γ, which depends on the rate at which an infected individual becomes aware. Contrary to our intuition, information spread too fast in the communication network could reduce the

  6. Determining long time-scale hyporheic zone flow paths in Antarctic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gooseff, M.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Runkel, R.L.; Vaughn, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    In the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, glaciers are the source of meltwater during the austral summer, and the streams and adjacent hyporheic zones constitute the entire physical watershed; there are no hillslope processes in these systems. Hyporheic zones can extend several metres from each side of the stream, and are up to 70 cm deep, corresponding to a lateral cross-section as large as 12 m2, and water resides in the subsurface year around. In this study, we differentiate between the near-stream hyporheic zone, which can be characterized with stream tracer experiments, and the extended hyporheic zone, which has a longer time-scale of exchange. We sampled stream water from Green Creek and from the adjacent saturated alluvium for stable isotopes of D and 18O to assess the significance and extent of stream-water exchange between the streams and extended hyporheic zones over long time-scales (days to weeks). Our results show that water residing in the extended hyporheic zone is much more isotopically enriched (up to 11??? D and 2.2??? 18O) than stream water. This result suggests a long residence time within the extended hyporheic zone, during which fractionation has occured owing to summer evaporation and winter sublimation of hyporheic water. We found less enriched water in the extended hyporheic zone later in the flow season, suggesting that stream water may be exchanged into and out of this zone, on the time-scale of weeks to months. The transient storage model OTIS was used to characterize the exchange of stream water with the extended hyporheic zone. Model results yield exchange rates (??) generally an order magnitude lower (10-5 s-1) than those determined using stream-tracer techniques on the same stream. In light of previous studies in these streams, these results suggest that the hyporheic zones in Antarctic streams have near-stream zones of rapid stream-water exchange, where 'fast' biogeochemical reactions may influence water chemistry, and extended

  7. On time scales and time synchronization using LORAN-C as a time reference signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The long term performance of the eight LORAN-C chains is presented in terms of the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO); and the use of the LORAN-C navigation system for maintaining the user's clock to a UTC scale is described. The atomic time scale and the UTC of several national laboratories and observatories relative to the international atomic time are reported. Typical performance of several NASA tracking station clocks, relative to the USNO master clock, is also presented.

  8. Hopping Time Scales and the Phonon-Liquid Electron-Crystal Picture in Thermoelectric Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voneshen, D. J.; Walker, H. C.; Refson, K.; Goff, J. P.

    2017-04-01

    The suppression of transverse phonons by liquidlike diffusion in superionic conductors has been proposed as a means to dramaticall