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Sample records for multiquantum giant vortex

  1. Giant vortex state in mesoscopic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobacy García, Luis; Giraldo, Jairo

    2005-08-01

    Using the self-consistent solution of the nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equations, the superconducting state of a type II mesoscopic cylinder and of an infinite thin sheet with a circular hole (antidot), in the presence of an homogeneous magnetic field is studied. Close to the third critical field, the magnetic field penetrates the sample in the form of a vortex around the axis of the cylinder or of the antidot. This result has been found previously by other authors. The vortex, called a giant vortex, can carry several flux quanta. The giant vortex is persistent when the state is metastable and evolves to the so called paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME) within the cylinder. The behaviour of this effect as a function of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) parameter is studied and the results are discussed. Gibbs free energy, order parameter and magnetic induccion as a function of the applied field and of the GL parameter are also studied.

  2. Giant moving vortex mass in thick magnetic nanodots

    PubMed Central

    Guslienko, K. Y.; Kakazei, G. N.; Ding, J.; Liu, X. M.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic vortex is one of the simplest topologically non-trivial textures in condensed matter physics. It is the ground state of submicron magnetic elements (dots) of different shapes: cylindrical, square etc. So far, the vast majority of the vortex dynamics studies were focused on thin dots with thickness 5–50 nm and only uniform across the thickness vortex excitation modes were observed. Here we explore the fundamental vortex mode in relatively thick (50–100 nm) dots using broadband ferromagnetic resonance and show that dimensionality increase leads to qualitatively new excitation spectra. We demonstrate that the fundamental mode frequency cannot be explained without introducing a giant vortex mass, which is a result of the vortex distortion due to interaction with spin waves. The vortex mass depends on the system geometry and is non-local because of important role of the dipolar interaction. The mass is rather small for thin dots. However, its importance increases drastically with the dot thickness increasing. PMID:26355430

  3. Stable giant vortex annuli in microwave-coupled atomic condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jieli; Dong, Guangjiong; Malomed, Boris A.

    2016-11-01

    Stable self-trapped vortex annuli (VA) with large values of topological charge S (giant VA) not only are a subject of fundamental interest, but are also sought for various applications, such as quantum information processing and storage. However, in conventional atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) VA with S >1 are unstable. Here we demonstrate that robust self-trapped fundamental solitons (with S =0 ) and bright VA (with the stability checked up to S =5 ) can be created in the free space by means of the local-field effect (the feedback of the BEC on the propagation of electromagnetic waves) in a condensate of two-level atoms coupled by a microwave (MW) field, as well as in a gas of MW-coupled fermions with spin 1 /2 . The fundamental solitons and VA remain stable in the presence of an arbitrarily strong repulsive contact interaction (in that case, the solitons are constructed analytically by means of the Thomas-Fermi approximation). Under the action of the attractive contact interaction with strength β , which, by itself, would lead to collapse, the fundamental solitons and VA exist and are stable, respectively, at β <βmax(S ) and β <βst(S ) , with βst(S =0 ) =βmax(S =0 ) and βst(S ≥1 ) <βmax(S ≥1 ) . Accurate analytical approximations are found for both βst and βmax, with βst(S ) growing linearly with S . Thus, higher-order VA are more robust than their lower-order counterparts, in contrast to what is known in other systems that may support stable self-trapped vortices. Conditions for the experimental realizations of the VA are discussed.

  4. Solitons and Vortex Lattices in the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation with Spin-Orbit Coupling under Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Umeda, Kanji

    2016-06-01

    The Gross-Pitaevskii equation for two-component rotating Bose-Einstein condensates with the Rashba-type spin-orbit (SO) coupling is studied with numerical simulations and variational analyses. A multiquantum vortex state becomes a ground state in a harmonic potential when mutual interaction is absent. When the attractive interaction is strong, the multiquantum vortex state exhibits modulational instability in the azimuthal direction, and a soliton-like state appears. When the repulsive interaction is strong, a vortex lattice state with a multiquantum vortex at the center is created. We find that the vortex lattice state is approximated at a linear combination of multiquantum vortex states.

  5. Transition to the giant vortex state in a harmonic-plus-quartic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, H.; Zaremba, E.

    2006-01-15

    We consider a rapidly rotating Bose-condensed gas in a harmonic-plus-quartic trap. At sufficiently high rotation rates, the condensate acquires an annular geometry with the superposition of a vortex lattice. With increasing rotation rate, the lattice evolves into a single ring of vortices. Of interest is the transition from this state to the giant vortex state in which the circulation is carried by only a central vortex. By analyzing the Gross-Pitaevskii energy functional variationally, we have been able to map out the phase boundary between these two states as a function of the rotation rate and the various trapped gas parameters. For strong interactions, the transition is first order. Our variational results are in good qualitative agreement with those obtained by means of a direct numerical solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  6. Rotating superfluids in anharmonic traps: From vortex lattices to giant vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Correggi, Michele; Pinsker, Florian; Rougerie, Nicolas; Yngvason, Jakob

    2011-11-15

    We study a superfluid in a rotating anharmonic trap and explicate a rigorous proof of a transition from a vortex lattice to a giant vortex state as the rotation is increased beyond a limiting speed determined by the interaction strength. The transition is characterized by the disappearance of the vortices from the annulus where the bulk of the superfluid is concentrated due to centrifugal forces while a macroscopic phase circulation remains. The analysis is carried out within two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii theory at large coupling constant and reveals significant differences between ''soft'' anharmonic traps (like a quartic plus quadratic trapping potential) and traps with a fixed boundary: in the latter case the transition takes place in a parameter regime where the size of vortices is very small relative to the width of the annulus, whereas in soft traps the vortex lattice persists until the width of the annulus becomes comparable to the vortex cores. Moreover, the density profile in the annulus where the bulk is concentrated is, in the soft case, approximately Gaussian with long tails and not of the Thomas-Fermi type like in a trap with a fixed boundary.

  7. Haze and clouds properties of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex retrieved from Cassini VIMS-V data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; d'Aversa, E.

    2014-04-01

    This work is focused on the retrieval of the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the giant vortex observed in 2011 at Saturn, by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board of Cassini. The retrieval algorithm is based on the optimal estimation technique [15] and takes advantage of a forward radiative transfer model developed by adapting the LibRadtran code [13] to the atmosphere of Saturn. For each of the retrieved parameters - that are effective radii, top pressures and total number densities for each considered deck - a 2D spatial map has been produced.

  8. Clouds and hazes vertical structure mapping of Saturn 2011 - 2012 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; D'Aversa, E.

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe starting from May 2011 and it was still present in observations recorded on June 2013. In this work we have analyzed the vortex data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V) in August 2011 and January 2012. An inverse model, based on the Bayesian approach and using the Gauss-Newton iterative method to minimize the cost function, has been developed to analyze those data. The model takes advantage of the results of a supporting forward radiative transfer model which relies on the assumptions of plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, Mie theory to compute particles single scattering properties, and molecular scattering adapted to Saturn's atmosphere. Applying the inverse model we could retrieve the microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds and hazes overlying the vortex and produce spatial maps for each retrieved parameter. Thanks to this study, the vertical structure of the hazes in this region has been quantitatively addressed for the first time. The comparative analysis of the results from the two observations seems to suggest that in 6 months the atmospheric dynamics, responsible for the formation and subsistence of the vortex, is weakening and the atmosphere is returning to a more stationary state. In addition, we suggest a correction for the imaginary part of the refractive index of the tropopause haze. This new value, that allows a better convergence between observed and simulated spectra, does not yet identify a composition of the haze and further investigation is needed to understand the real nature of the need for such a modification.

  9. Vertical structure mapping of Saturn's 2011 giant vortex by means of Cassini VIMS-V data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Fabrizio; Adriani, Alberto; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Liberti, Gian Luigi

    On December 2010 a giant storm erupted in Saturn's North springtime hemisphere. A giant vortex formed in the storm wake and persisted after the principal outburst exhausted on July 2011. The vortex had been imaged several times by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini probe, starting from May 2011, and it was still present in the December 2012 observations In this work we have analyzed the data recorded by the visual channel of the spectrometer (VIMS-V). VIMS-V operates in the spectral range 350 - 1050 nm with a nominal spectral resolution of 7.3 nm and a nominal angular resolution of 500 μrad. Spectral data have been first analyzed by a forward radiative transfer model based on the LibRadtran code, then an inverse model has used to retrieve microphysical and geometrical properties of the clouds overlying the vortex. The forward model relies on the assumptions of a plane parallel atmosphere, multiple scattering, the Mie theory to compute single scattering properties and the molecular scattering adapted to Saturn’s atmosphere. The inverse code is based on the optimal estimation technique, it is robust and capable to handle several free parameters at a time. The best fits to the observed radiance spectra are obtained by means of a least square analysis, in which the cost function is minimized taking advantage of the Gauss-Newton method. Applying this procedure, we produced spatial maps for each of the free parameters, including: effective radii for the particles size distributions of each cloud or aerosol deck; total number densities of the particles; and top pressures of each deck. In this work we focused on the data retrieved by VIMS on August 2011. We plan to extend the analysis on data retrieved months later, to map the evolution the parameters undergo in time. The analysis extension to the range 1.0-5.0 micron, covered by the infrared channel of VIMS (VIMS-IR) is also planned.

  10. Clouds and hazes vertical structure of a Saturn's giant vortex from Cassini/VIMS-V data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, F.; Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Liberti, G. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Filacchione, G.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the evolution of a giant tropospheric vortex formed in the wake of the storm that encircled Saturn from December 2010 to July 2011 (Fletcher et al. [2011a] Science, 332, 1413-1417; Fletcher et al. [2012] Icarus, 221, 560-586; Sánchez-Lavega et al. [2011] Nature, 475, 71-74; Sánchez-Lavega et al. [2012] Icarus, 220, 561-576; Sayanagi et al. [2013] Icarus, 223, 460-478; Fischer et al. [2011] Nature, 475, 75-77) taking advantage of the observations acquired by the instruments on board the Cassini spacecraft. In particular, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) imaged the vortex several times. In this work we analyzed two observations registered by the visual channel of VIMS (VIMS-V) on 08/24/2011 and 01/04/2012, both after the active phase of the storm, and characterized quantitatively the vertical structure of the clouds and hazes above the vortex. Until now, VIMS-V dataset has been scarcely exploited to perform such an analysis. The IR channel of VIMS has always been preferred since it covers wavelengths containing spectral information on a wider range of altitudes in the atmosphere. Nevertheless, in our analysis we investigate the information content of VIMS-V observations and demonstrate that the covered spectral range contains valuable information that are helpful to improve our knowledge on the properties of Saturn's upper atmosphere. We developed a forward radiative transfer model to describe Saturn's atmosphere and simulate VIMS-V spectra in the 0.35-1.05 μm wavelength range. The analysis has then been performed by means of an inverse model that we built on the basis of the Bayesian approach. Spatial distributions of effective radii, column number densities and top pressures of the cloud decks have been mapped and as a by-product of our analysis we also suggest a modified spectral shape for the imaginary part of the refractive index of the tropospheric haze, with respect to the shape described in the study of Karkoschka and Tomasko

  11. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region.

    PubMed

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency omega< or =2omega(pl max) gives rise to a giant electromagnetic vortex. In contrast to electron acceleration by the well-known laser pulse wake, injected plasma electrons are accelerated up to vortex ponderomotive potential forming a quite monoenergetic distribution. A relatively high charge of such an electron source makes very efficient generation of soft gamma rays with homega>300 keV .

  12. Investigating aspects of dark spot structure and environment in relation to vortex drift on the Ice Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beau, Raymond P.; Palotai, Csaba J.

    2016-10-01

    Geophysical vortices called Dark Spots, whether directly observed like the original Great Dark Spot (GDS-89) or inferred as with "The Berg" cloud feature, that drift meridionally are distinctive atmospheric features of Uranus and Neptune. Numerical simulations of GDS-89 suggest a possible link between the environmental gradient of potential vorticity and the vortex drift rate (starting with LeBeau and Dowling, 1998). This mechanism could be similar to the "beta gyre" concept proposed for hurricane drift (Fiorino and Elsberry, 1989) in which the advection of environmental potential vorticity by and about the vortex generates a residual vortex dipole, effectively propelling the original vortex away or towards the equator. In the case of hurricanes, this effect is considered one part of the overall environmental wind that forms the steering flow driving hurricane drift. For the dark spots, such a gyre might be the dominant mechanism for north-south motions.Similar numerical simulations of vortices on Uranus have not been fully consistent with the GDS-89 results. Some vortices like the original Uranus Dark Spot (UDS) do appear to favor regions of low environmental PV gradients, which in simulations suggest increased stability (Hammel et al., 2009). However, even near-zero PV gradients result in significant drift on Uranus in contrast to Neptune. The effect of companion clouds on vortex drift also requires greater understanding, particularly on Uranus.To better understand these vortex dynamics, a parametric approach is now being applied in which vortex characteristics such as size and wind strength as well as environmental conditions are varied through a range of possible values. While these simulations are not necessarily designed to capture a particular known dark spots, the goal of these simulations is to determine what conditions lead to what types of vortex behavior.References:M. Fiorino and R.L. Elsberry. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 46:975-990, 1989H

  13. Ramsey patterns for multiquantum transitions in fountain experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McColm, D. |

    1996-12-01

    Ramsey patterns for radio-frequency multiquantum transitions among Zeeman levels of the ground state of thallium, cesium, and francium have been calculated. The narrowing of these patterns observed earlier by Gould is predicted to occur only when both static electric and magnetic fields are present. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Analysis of energy states in modulation doped multiquantum well heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, G.; Henderson, T.; Peng, C. K.; Huang, D.; Morkoc, H.

    1990-01-01

    A precise and effective numerical procedure to model the band diagram of modulation doped multiquantum well heterostructures is presented. This method is based on a self-consistent iterative solution of the Schroedinger equation and the Poisson equation. It can be used rather easily in any arbitrary modulation-doped structure. In addition to confined energy subbands, the unconfined states can be calculated as well. Examples on realistic device structures are given to demonstrate capabilities of this procedure. The numerical results are in good agreement with experiments. With the aid of this method the transitions involving both the confined and unconfined conduction subbands in a modulation doped AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, and in a strained layer InGaAs/GaAs superlattice are identified. These results represent the first observation of unconfined transitions in modulation doped multiquantum well structures.

  15. Hyperfine selectivity using multiquantum electron-nuclear-electron triple resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidis, T. C.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-06-01

    Hyperfine selectivity is demonstrated in a continuous wave electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiment. A multiquantum electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) signal is monitored as a function of the nuclear radio frequency. The signs and relative intensities of the ENDOR lines permit separating the case where both ELDOR and ENDOR frequencies match hyperfine couplings from the cases where this condition is not satisfied.

  16. Ferroelectric tunnel junctions with multi-quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Tianjin; Liang, Kun; Qi, Yajun; Wang, Duofa; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Juan

    2014-06-02

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) with multi-quantum well structures are proposed and the tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect is investigated theoretically. Compared with conventional FTJs with monolayer ferroelectric barriers, FTJs with single-well structures provide TER ratio improvements of one order of magnitude, while FTJs with optimized multi-well structures can enhance this improvement by another order of magnitude. It is believed that the increased resonant tunneling strength combined with appropriate asymmetry in these FTJs contributes to the improvement. These studies may help to fabricate FTJs with large TER ratio experimentally and put them into practice.

  17. Vortex anomaly in low-dimensional fermionic condensates: Quantum confinement breaks chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yajiang; Shanenko, A. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-02-01

    Chiral fermions are responsible for low-temperature properties of vortices in fermionic condensates, both superconducting (charged) and superfluid (neutral). One of the most striking consequences of this fact is that the core of a single-quantum vortex collapses at low temperatures, T →0 (i.e., the Kramer-Pesch effect for superconductors), due to the presence of chiral quasiparticles in the vortex-core region. We show that the situation changes drastically for fermionic condensates confined in quasi-one-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional geometries. Here quantum confinement breaks the chirality of in-core fermions. As a result, instead of the ultimate shrinking, the core of a single-quantum vortex extends at low temperatures, and the condensate profile surprisingly mimics the multiquantum vortex behavior. Our findings are relevant for nanoscale superconductors, such as recent metallic nanoislands on silicon, and also for ultracold superfluid Fermi gases in cigar-shaped and pancake-shaped atomic traps.

  18. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  19. Vulcanized vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Inyong; Lee, Youngone

    2009-01-15

    We investigate vortex configurations with the 'vulcanization' term inspired by the renormalization of {phi}{sub *}{sup 4} theory in the canonical {theta}-deformed noncommutativity. We focus on the classical limit of the theory described by a single parameter which is the ratio of the vulcanization and the noncommutativity parameters. We perform numerical calculations and find that nontopological vortex solutions exist as well as Q-ball type solutions, but topological vortex solutions are not admitted.

  20. Smell sensing and visualizing based on multi-quantum wells spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fengchun; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Jia, Pengfei; Liao, Hailin; Chen, Danyu; Liu, Shouqiong

    2014-09-01

    For the existing drawbacks of traditional detecting methods which use gratings or prisms to detect light intensity distribution at each wavelength of polychromatic light, a novel method based on multi-quantum wells spatial light modulator (MQWs-SLM) has been proposed in this paper. In the proposed method, MQWs-SLM serves as a distribution features detector of the signal light. It is on the basis of quantum-confine Stark effect (QCSE) that the vertical applied voltage can change the absorption features of exciton in multi-quantum wells, and further change the distribution features of the readout polychromatic light of MQWs-SLM. It can be not only an universal detecting method, but also especially recommended to use in the Electronic nose system for features detecting of signal light so as to realize smell sensing and visualizing. The feasibility of the proposed method has been confirmed by mathematical modeling and analysis, simulation experiments and research status analysis.

  1. Electrical tunability of infrared detectors using compositionally asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, E.; Luc, F.; Rosencher, E.; Bois, Ph.; Delaitre, S.

    1992-02-01

    For the first time, an electrically tunable infrared photoconductor is made with GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric step multiquantum wells, using the linear Stark shift of the intersubband transition. An applied electric field excursion of +/- 40 kV/cm is sufficient to shift the peak responsivity wavelength from 8.5 to 13.5 micron. The photoresponse tunability is studied by comparing photocurrent and absorption spectra for different applied electric fields.

  2. Standing on the shoulders of giants. Trojan Earths and vortex trapping in low mass self-gravitating protoplanetary disks of gas and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, W.; Johansen, A.; Klahr, H.; Piskunov, N.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Centimeter and meter-sized solid particles in protoplanetary disks are trapped within long-lived, high-pressure regions, creating opportunities for collapse into planetesimals and planetary embryos. Aims: We aim to study the effect of the high-pressure regions generated in the gaseous disks by a giant planet perturber. These regions consist of gas retained in tadpole orbits around the stable Lagrangian points as a gap is carved, and the Rossby vortices launched at the edges of the gap. Methods: We performed global simulations of the dynamics of gas and solids in a low mass non-magnetized self-gravitating thin protoplanetary disk. We employed the Pencil code to solve the Eulerian hydro equations, tracing the solids with a large number of Lagrangian particles, usually 100 000. To compute the gravitational potential of the swarm of solids, we solved the Poisson equation using particle-mesh methods with multiple fast Fourier transforms. Results: Huge particle concentrations are seen in the Lagrangian points of the giant planet, as well as in the vortices they induce at the edges of the carved gaps. For 1 cm to 10 cm radii, gravitational collapse occurs in the Lagrangian points in less than 200 orbits. For 5 cm particles, a 2M⊕ planet is formed. For 10 cm, the final maximum collapsed mass is around 3M⊕. The collapse of the 1 cm particles is indirect, following the timescale of gas depletion from the tadpole orbits. Vortices are excited at the edges of the gap, primarily trapping particles of 30 cm radii. The rocky planet that is formed is as massive as 17M⊕, constituting a Super-Earth. Collapse does not occur for 40 cm onwards. By using multiple particle species, we find that gas drag modifies the streamlines in the tadpole region around the classical L4 and L5 points. As a result, particles of different radii have their stable points shifted to different locations. Collapse therefore takes longer and produces planets of lower mass. Three super-Earths are

  3. Arctic Vortex

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-06-26

    article title:  A Vortex Street in the Arctic     View Larger Image ... 650 kilometers northeast of Iceland in the north Atlantic Ocean. Jan Mayen's Beerenberg volcano rises about 2.2 kilometers above the ...

  4. Vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  5. Silicon-Germanium multi-quantum well photodetectors in the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Onaran, Efe; Onbasli, M Cengiz; Yesilyurt, Alper; Yu, Hyun Yong; Nayfeh, Ammar M; Okyay, Ali K

    2012-03-26

    Single crystal Silicon-Germanium multi-quantum well layers were epitaxially grown on silicon substrates. Very high quality films were achieved with high level of control utilizing recently developed MHAH epitaxial technique. MHAH growth technique facilitates the monolithic integration of photonic functionality such as modulators and photodetectors with low-cost silicon VLSI technology. Mesa structured p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated with low reverse leakage currents of ~10 mA/cm² and responsivity values exceeding 0.1 A/W. Moreover, the spectral responsivity of fabricated detectors can be tuned by applied voltage.

  6. Photoinduced field modulation in multiquantum well heterostructures: A new photocurrent gain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Giancarlo; Capasso, Federico; Tsang, Won-Tien; Hutchinson, Albert L.

    A new photocurrent gain mechanism in multiquantum well structures has been observed. Unlike conventional photoconductors, the gain in these devices is caused not by a modulation of the conductivity, but by a modulation of the electric field. The physical basis of this phenomenon is the partial screening of the electric field in the wells due to the pile-up of photocarriers. At constant bias voltage this leads to an enhancement of the field in the barrier layers. In structures with injecting contacts this mechanism enhances electron injection and therefore gives rise to photocurrent gain.

  7. Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Lin, Jiayi; Darby, Ellis; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanical equilibrium at zero temperature does not necessarily imply thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature for a particle confined by a static but nonconservative force field. Instead, the diffusing particle can enter into a steady state characterized by toroidal circulation in the probability flux, which we call a Brownian vortex. The circulatory bias in the particle’s thermally driven trajectory is not simply a deterministic response to the solenoidal component of the force but rather reflects interplay between advection and diffusion in which thermal fluctuations extract work from the nonconservative force field. As an example of this previously unrecognized class of stochastic heat engines, we consider a colloidal sphere diffusing in a conventional optical tweezer. We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that nonconservative optical forces bias the particle’s fluctuations into toroidal vortexes whose circulation can reverse direction with temperature or laser power.

  8. Enhanced Computational Toolbox Including Multiquantum Vibration-Translation (VT) & Vibration-Electronic (VE) Exchanges, Dissociation and Radiation Effects. Deliverable 4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    of flow parameters. PETTT, HPC, HPCMP, Real gas , dissociation, Radiation effects, multiquantum energy exchanges, Master equation, State-to-state...TRANSITIONS ON THE RELAXATION OF A N2 GAS FLOW BEHIND A SHOCK...42 APPENDIX D: STATE-SPECIFIC MODELING OF RADIATION IN REACTIVE NONEQUILIBRIUM GAS FLOWS

  9. Wavy growth onset in strain-balanced InGaAs multi-quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasi, L.; Ferrari, C.; Lanzi, A.; Lazzarini, L.; Balboni, R.; Clarke, G.; Mazzer, M.; Rohr, C.; Abbott, P.; Barnham, K. W. J.

    2005-01-01

    Different strain-balanced InGaAs/InGaAs multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were grown on (0 0 1) InP to be used as active layers of thermophotovoltaic devices. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) were performed to correlate the evolution of the layer interfaces from planar to wavy and the consequent nucleation of extended defects with the well and barrier compositions and thicknesses and the growth temperature. The existence of a critical elastic energy density for the wavy growth onset has been experimentally confirmed by changing both the well and barrier misfit and the multi-quantum well layer thickness. A decrease of the growth temperature shifts the critical energy to higher values. An empirical model to predict the maximum number of layers that can be grown without modulations as a function of the strain energy stored in the MQW period and the growth temperature is presented and successfully applied for the growth of high quality 40 repetitions MQWs with a well misfit of about 1.5%.

  10. Effects of multiquantum transitions on molecular populations in grain-forming circumstellar environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Wiant, M.

    1985-01-01

    Simplification of astrophysical calculations can be achieved by invoking the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium; however, recent investigations suggest that this assumption may not be valid for certain astrophysical regions. To examine the effects of multiquantum translation to vibration transitions in expanding circumstellar envelopes, vibrational populations of the lowest 20 levels of CO have been calculated as a function of pressure and radiation density for H atom-CO collisions. Significant departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium is indicated, which implies lower dissociation rates for molecular components and a subsequent enhancement in the rate of grain formation by many orders of magnitude. Stabilization of intermediate species before they can dissociate may facilitate the formation of refractory grain cores in very hot, dilute outflows. As the present calculations indicate, laboratory measurements of state-to-state translation to vibration rates are needed for a more complete understanding of circumstellar chemistry.

  11. GaAlAs buried multiquantum well lasers fabricated by diffusion-induced disordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Tadashi; Semura, Shigeru; Saito, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tsuneaki; Uchida, Yoko; Nakashima, Hisao

    1984-07-01

    A new transverse-mode-controlled laser called a buried multiquantum-well (BMQW) laser has been developed. In order to make it possible to bury the MQW laser active region utilizing the diffusion-induced disordering (DID) of GaAs-GaAlAs MQW, zinc was selectively diffused into the MQW structure, resulting in a 3-8-μm-wide stripe region. The threshold current is as low as 33 mA with a 300-μm cavity length and a fundamental transverse mode can be achieved. As a result of studying the relation of the waveguide geometry to the longitudinal and transverse modes it was concluded that this BMQW laser made by a simple DID process acts as an index-guided laser.

  12. Carrier localization in green emitting InGaN/GaN multiquantum well structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chou-Jen; Mohanta, Antaryami; Jang, Der-Jun; Lee, Meng-En

    2015-03-01

    Green emitting InGaN/GaN multiquantum well sample is investigated using photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy. Carrier localization of energy ~ 12 meV due to inhomogeneous distribution of In in the InGaN quantum well (QW) layer is observed. The temperature dependence of PL peak energy exhibits S-shape phenomenon and is comparatively discussed with the Varshni's empirical formula. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the PL emission band shows increasing-decreasing-increasing behavior with increase in temperature. The temperature dependence of radiative life time (τr) show τr ~ T 3 / 2 dependence with temperature above 200 K which confirms the insignificant effect of carrier localization at room temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study reveals the absence of In-rich regions known for strong carrier localization in the InGaN QW layer which is consistent with the results of PL and TRPL.

  13. Switchable bicolor (5.5-9.0 microns) infrared detector using asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, E.; Rosencher, E.; Luc, F.; Bois, Ph.; Costard, E.; Delaitre, S.

    1992-07-01

    Electrical switching of a bispectral infrared photoconductor is demonstrated with GaAs/AlGaAs asymmetric step multiquantum wells, presenting bound-to-bound (tunable 8.5-9.0 microns) and bound-to-extended (about 5.5 microns) intersubband transitions of similar oscillator strengths. The bound-to-bound photoresponse is switched on by applying an electric field of sufficient magnitude to permit the collection of the photoexcited bound electrons of tunneling.

  14. Vortex Flow Aerodynamics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F. (Editor); Osborn, R. F. (Editor); Foughner, J. T., Jr. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Vortex modeling techniques and experimental studies of research configurations utilizing vortex flows are discussed. Also discussed are vortex flap investigations using generic and airplane research models and vortex flap theoretical analysis and design studies.

  15. Multi-Quantum Well Structures to Improve the Performance of Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samberg, Joshua Paul

    Current, lattice matched triple junction solar cell efficiency is approximately 44% at a solar concentration of 942x. Higher efficiency for such cells can be realized with the development of a 1eV bandgap material lattice matched to Ge. One of the more promising materials for this application is that of the InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum well (MQW) structure. By inserting a stress/strain-balanced InGaAs/GaAsP MQW structure into the iregion of a GaAs p-i-n diode, the absorption edge of the p-i-n diode can be red shifted with respect to that of a standard GaAs p-n diode. Compressive stress in the InGaAs wells are balanced via GaAsP barriers subjected to tensile stress. Individually, the InGaAs and GaAsP layers are grown below their critical layer thickness to prevent the formation of misfit and threading dislocations. Until recently InGaAs/GaAsP MQWs have been somewhat hindered by their usage of low phosphorus-GaAsP barriers. Presented within is the development of a high-P composition GaAsP and the merits for using such a high composition of phosphorus are discussed. It is believed that these barriers represent the highest phosphorus content to date in such a structure. By using high composition GaAsP the carriers are collected via tunneling (for barriers .30A) as opposed to thermionic emission. Thus, by utilizing thin, high content GaAsP barriers one can increase the percentage of the intrinsic region in a p-i-n structure that is comprised of the InGaAs well in addition to increasing the number of periods that can be grown for a given depletion width. However, standard MQWs of this type inherently possess undesirable compressive strain and quantum size effects (QSE) that cause the optical absorption of the InGaAs wells to blue shift. To circumvent these deleterious QSEs stress balanced, pseudomorphic InGaAs/GaAsP staggered MQWs were developed. Tunneling is still a viable mode for carrier transport in the staggered MQW structures. GaAs interfacial layers within the multi-quantum

  16. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    A Sadovskii vortex is a patch of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. Using a boundary element type method, we investigate the steady states of this flow in an incompressible, inviscid straining flow. Outside the vortex, the fluid is irrotational. In the limiting case where the entire circulation is due to the vortex patch, this is a patch vortex (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971). In the other limiting case, where all the circulation is due to the vortex sheet, this is a hollow vortex (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691, 2012). This flow has two governing nondimensional parameters, relating the strengths of the straining field, vortex sheet, and patch vorticity. We study the relationship between these two parameters, and examine the shape of the resulting vortices. We also work towards a bifurcation diagram of the steady states of the Sadovskii vortex in an attempt to understand the connection between vortex sheet and vortex patch desingularizations of the point vortex. Support from NSF-CMMI-0970113.

  17. Radiation response of multi-quantum well solar cells: Electron-beam-induced current analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Maximenko, S. I. Scheiman, D. A.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.; Lumb, M. P.; Hoheisel, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Messenger, S. R.; Tibbits, T. N. D.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S. I.

    2015-12-28

    Solar cells utilizing multi-quantum well (MQW) structures are considered promising candidate materials for space applications. An open question is how well these structures can resist the impact of particle irradiation. The aim of this work is to provide feedback about the radiation response of In{sub 0.01}Ga{sub 0.99}As solar cells grown on Ge with MQWs incorporated within the i-region of the device. In particular, the local electronic transport properties of the MQW i-regions of solar cells subjected to electron and proton irradiation were evaluated experimentally using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique. The change in carrier collection distribution across the MQW i-region was analyzed using a 2D EBIC diffusion model in conjunction with numerical modeling of the electrical field distribution. Both experimental and simulated findings show carrier removal and type conversion from n- to p-type in MQW i-region at a displacement damage dose as low as ∼6.06–9.88 × 10{sup 9} MeV/g. This leads to a redistribution of the electric field and significant degradation in charge carrier collection.

  18. Investigation of carrier collection in multi-quantum well solar cells by luminescence spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamarre, Amaury; Fujii, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2015-03-01

    Multi-Quantum well solar cells (MQWSC) have been shown to present several advantages, among which are low dark currents and tunable bandgaps. They are especially suited for implementation in multi-junction cells, and are highly promising for absorbers in Hot Carrier Solar Cells (HCSC). Such applications require high concentration ratio, which arises the issue of collection efficiency. Whereas it is usually considered that collection in MQW is very close to unity at one sun, it has been shown to not be the case under high concentration at the maximum power point. We propose in this work to take advantage of the luminescence spectral variation to investigate the depth collection efficiency. In order to validate the model, a series of strain compensated InGaAs/GaAsP MQW solar cells with intentional variation of the MQW doping concentration are grown. This has the effect of switching the space charge region position and width as well as the electric field intensity. Recording the luminescence spectra at various illumination intensities and applied voltages, we show that the in-depth quasi-Fermi level splitting and thus collection properties can be probed. Other measurements (EQE, luminescence intensity variation) are shown to be consistent with these results. Regarding their use as HCSC, the luminescence of MQW solar cells has been mainly used so far for investigating the quasi-Fermi level splitting and the temperature. Our results improve our understanding by adding information on carrier transport.

  19. Radiation response of multi-quantum well solar cells: Electron-beam-induced current analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, S. I.; Lumb, M. P.; Hoheisel, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Scheiman, D. A.; Messenger, S. R.; Tibbits, T. N. D.; Imaizumi, M.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S. I.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Solar cells utilizing multi-quantum well (MQW) structures are considered promising candidate materials for space applications. An open question is how well these structures can resist the impact of particle irradiation. The aim of this work is to provide feedback about the radiation response of In0.01Ga0.99As solar cells grown on Ge with MQWs incorporated within the i-region of the device. In particular, the local electronic transport properties of the MQW i-regions of solar cells subjected to electron and proton irradiation were evaluated experimentally using the electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique. The change in carrier collection distribution across the MQW i-region was analyzed using a 2D EBIC diffusion model in conjunction with numerical modeling of the electrical field distribution. Both experimental and simulated findings show carrier removal and type conversion from n- to p-type in MQW i-region at a displacement damage dose as low as ˜6.06-9.88 × 109 MeV/g. This leads to a redistribution of the electric field and significant degradation in charge carrier collection.

  20. Design of monocrystalline Si/SiGe multi-quantum well microbolometer detector for infrared imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Atia; Durmaz, Emre C.; Cetindogan, Barbaros; Yazici, Melik; Kaynak, Mehmet; Kaynak, Canan B.; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the design, modelling and simulation results of silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) multi-quantum well based bolometer detector for uncooled infrared imaging system. The microbolometer is designed to detect light in the long wave length infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm with pixel size of 25 x 25 μm. The design optimization strategy leads to achieve the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) 4.5%/K with maximum germanium (Ge) concentration of 50%. The design of microbolometer entirely relies on standard CMOS and MEMS processes which makes it suitable candidate for commercial infrared imaging systems.

  1. Active Q switching in a GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well laser with an intracavity monolithic loss modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakawa, Y.; Larsson, A.; Paslaski, J.; Yariv, A.

    1986-01-01

    Active Q switching in a GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well laser with an intracavity electroabsorption monolithic loss modulator is demonstrated. In this device, an efficient loss modulation is achieved through the quantum confined Stark effect in a modulator section and the enhanced carrier induced band shrinkage effect in an optical amplifier section. It is found that a picosecond pulse as narrow as 18.6 ps full width at half-maximum is generated and a high repetition rate of more than 3 GHz is obtained.

  2. Anomalous diffusion of isoelectronic antimony implant induced defects in GaAs-AlGaAs multiquantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, E. V. K.; Krauz, Ph.; Thibierge, H.; Azoulay, R.; Vieu, C.

    1994-03-01

    We present here evidence on the deep diffusion of isoelectronic Sb implant induced defects in thick GaAs-AlGaAs multiquantum well structures (MQW) to depths as far as ˜30 times the implant projected range (Rp). This observation has been confirmed by performing low temperature photoluminescence depth scanning measurements and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) analysis on room temperature Sb implanted thick MQW samples. An explanation based on the isoelectronic nature of Sb and its substitution on As site (SbAs) has been proposed to understand the anomalous diffusion of defects during implant and their contribution to Al/Ga disordering during post-implant annealing.

  3. Sadovskii vortex in strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freilich, Daniel; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Sadovskii vortices are patches of fluid with uniform vorticity surrounded by a vortex sheet. They were first constructed as models for wakes behind bluff objects. We investigate the Sadovskii vortex in a straining field and examine limiting cases to validate our computational method. One limit is the patch vortex in strain (Moore & Saffman, Aircraft wake turbulence and its detection 1971), where there is no vortex sheet. We solve this as a free-boundary problem, and show that a simple method using the Biot-Savart law quickly gives solutions for stable shapes. When used for the more elongated (stronger straining field) situations, the method also leads to new vortex shapes. In the hollow vortex case, where there is no vortex patch and the circulation is entirely due to the vortex sheet (Llewellyn Smith and Crowdy, J. Fluid Mech. 691 2012), we use the Birkhoff-Rott equation to calculate the velocity of the fluid on the vortex boundary. The combination of these two methods can then be used to calculate the shape and velocity field of the Sadovksii vortex in strain.

  4. Vortex-Surface Interactions: Vortex Dynamics and Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-16

    from the surface, in a 3D version of the "vortex rebound" in 2D vortex dynamics. Many of the discoveries of phenomena in this work are seen for the... 3D vortex-wall interactions. The key to the significant reorganization of vortex structure, is the rapid circulation decay at regions along the vortex...development of vortex configurations interacting with a surface. In further studies, the dynamics of secondary vorticity and the development of 3D

  5. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Koshelev, Alexei E.; Glatz, Andreas; Welp, Ulrich; Kwok, Wai-K.

    2015-03-01

    Unlike illusive magnetic field lines in vacuum, magnetic vortices in superconductors are real physical strings, which interact with the sample surface, crystal structure defects, and with each other. We address the complex and poorly understood process of vortex cutting via a comprehensive set of magneto-optic experiments which allow us to visualize vortex patterns at magnetization of a nearly twin-free YBCO crystal by crossing magnetic fields of different orientations. We observe a pronounced anisotropy in the flux dynamics under crossing fields and the filamentation of induced supercurrents associated with the staircase vortex structure expected in layered cuprates, flux cutting effects, and angular vortex instabilities predicted for anisotropic superconductors. At some field angles, we find formation of the vortex domains following a type-I phase transition in the vortex state accompanied by an abrupt change in the vortex orientation. To clarify the vortex cutting scenario we performed time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations, which confirmed formation of sharp vortex fronts observed in the experiment and revealed a left-handed helical instability responsible for the rotation of vortices. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  6. Effect of potential barrier height on the carrier transport in InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells and photoelectric properties of laser diode.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hailiang; Sun, Jing; Ma, Shufang; Liang, Jian; Lu, Taiping; Jia, Zhigang; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2016-03-07

    The growth and strain-compensation behaviour of InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells, which were fabricated by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, have been studied towards the application of these quantum wells in high-power laser diodes. The effect of the height of the potential barrier on the confined level of carrier transport was studied by incorporating different levels of phosphorus content into the GaAsP barrier. The crystal quality and interface roughness of the InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells with different phosphorus contents were evaluated by high resolution X-ray diffraction and in situ optical surface reflectivity measurements during the growth. The surface morphology and roughness were characterized by atomic force microscopy, which indicates the variation law of surface roughness, terrace width and uniformity with increasing phosphorus content, owing to strain accumulation. Moreover, the defect generation and structural disorder of the multi-quantum wells were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The optical properties of the multi-quantum wells were characterized by photoluminescence, which shows that the spectral intensity increases as the phosphorus content increases. The results suggest that more electrons are well bound in InGaAs because of the high potential barrier. Finally, the mechanism of the effect of the height of the potential barrier on laser performance was proposed on the basis of simulation calculations and experimental results.

  7. Control of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao-Lung

    Discrete vortex methods are used to provide computationally efficient simulations of vortex dynamics in fluid flows. An adaptive LQG controller is applied to reduce the oscillations in the wake caused by the vortex dynamics. The controller design is based on a discrete-time input/output model rather than the nonlinear differential equations of the discrete vortex model. The control philosophy is to identify time-varying parameters in the input/output model adaptively and use the identified parameters to update the control law. For numerically stable identification, an adaptive algorithm based on inverse QR decomposition is introduced. The derivation shows that this algorithm is a square-root implementation of recursive least squares estimation. For a preliminary test of the control strategy, the adaptive LQG controller is applied to a vortex street model simulated by discrete vortices. The identification shows that the stability of the identified zeros depends on whether the sensor is upstream or downstream of the actuator. Flow past a flat plate is another important application of the discrete vortex method. A control problem is studied and simulated in which suction at the back face of the plate is used to trap vortices behind the plate. Qualitatively, the results obtained with the discrete-vortex method used here agree with earlier results for a substantially different vortex method involving a small number of differential equations.

  8. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  9. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  11. Normal Shock Vortex Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    Figure 9: Breakdown map for normal-shock vortex-interaction. References [1] O. Thomer, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Numerical Simulation of Normal...and Oblique-Shock Vortex Interaction, ZAMM Band 80, Sub. 1, pp. 181-184, 2000. [2] O. Thomer, E. Krause, W. Schroder and M. Meinke , Computational

  12. Vortex cutting in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatz, A.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Kwok, W. K.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex cutting and reconnection is an intriguing and still-unsolved problem central to many areas of classical and quantum physics, including hydrodynamics, astrophysics, and superconductivity. Here, we describe a comprehensive investigation of the crossing of magnetic vortices in superconductors using time dependent Ginsburg-Landau modeling. Within a macroscopic volume, we simulate initial magnetization of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor followed by subsequent remagnetization with perpendicular magnetic fields, creating the crossing of the initial and newly generated vortices. The time resolved evolution of vortex lines as they approach each other, contort, locally conjoin, and detach, elucidates the fine details of the vortex-crossing scenario under practical situations with many interacting vortices in the presence of weak pinning. Our simulations also reveal left-handed helical vortex instabilities that accompany the remagnetization process and participate in the vortex crossing events.

  13. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  14. High Speed Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    A review of the research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data reviewed is for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft. These data are presented and discussed relative to the design of future vehicles. Also presented is a brief historical review of the extensive body of high-speed vortex flow research from the 1940s to the present in order to provide perspective of the NASA LaRC's high-speed research results. Data are presented which show the types of vortex structures which occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures to vehicle performance and control is discussed. The data presented shows the presence of both small- and large scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices and the downstream fins. It was shown that these vortex flow interference effects could be both positive and negative. Data are shown which highlights the effect that leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber has on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. The observed flow fields for delta wings (i.e. separation bubble, classical vortex, vortex with shock, etc.) are discussed in the context of' aircraft design. And data have been shown that indicate that aerodynamic performance improvements are available by considering vortex flows as a primary design feature. Finally a discussing of a design approach for wings which utilize vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speed is presented.

  15. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  16. Wake Vortex Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A 10% scale B-737-100 model was tested in the vicinity of a vortex wake generated by a wing mounted on a support in the forward section of the NASA-Langley 30 x 60 ft. Wind Tunnel. The wing span, angle of attack, and generating wing location were varied to provide vortex strengths consistent with a large variety of combinations of leader-follower aircraft pairs during vortex encounters. The test, conducted as part of the AST Terminal Area Productivity Program, will provide data for validation of aerodynamic models which will be used for developing safe separate standards to apply to aircraft in terminal areas while increasing airport capacity.

  17. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  18. Spectral linewidth and resonant frequency characteristics of InGaAsP/InP multiquantum well lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sasai, Y.; Ohya, J.; Ogura, M.

    1989-04-01

    The spectral linewidth and resonant frequency characteristics of 1.3 ..mu..m InGaAsP/InP multiquantum well (MQW) lasers grown by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) were investigated, compared to those of the conventional double heterostructure (DH) lasers. The result showed a decrease in spectral linewidth and an increase in resonant frequency f/sub r/ with decreasing well thickness. Moreover, it was recognized that the linewidth enhancement factor became smaller in well thicknesses of less than -- 200 A, namely, the factor ..cap alpha.. reduced to -- 2, while that of the DH laser was -- 6. The f/sub r/ of 9 GHz, which is about twice as large as that of conventional DH lasers, was achieved at an optical power of 5.3 mW/facet.

  19. Room temperature mid-infrared InAsSbN multi-quantum well photodiodes grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesaria, M.; de la Mare, M.; Krier, A.

    2016-11-01

    Room temperature photoresponse in the mid-infrared spectral region is demonstrated from InAsSbN/InAs multi-quantum well photodiodes grown by nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The structural quality of the InAsSbN MQWs was ascertained in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction and ex situ by high resolution x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements. The extended long wavelength photoresponse is identified to originate from the electron-heavy hole (e1-hh1) and electron-light hole (e1-lh1) transitions in the InAsSbN MQW, with a cut off wavelength ~4.20 µm and peak detectivity D *  =  1.25  ×  109 cm Hz1/2 W-1.

  20. Discrepancies between photocurrent and absorption spectroscopies in intersubband photoionization from GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosencher, E.; Martinet, E.; Luc, F.; Bois, Ph.; Böckenhoff, E.

    1991-12-01

    Intersubband transitions between a bound state and extended states in GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum wells are studied by simultaneous absorption and photocurrent spectroscopy under different electric field conditions. It is found that both types of spectra exhibit different line shapes, with the photocurrent maximum occurring at lower photon energy than in absorption spectra. Moreover, there is a blue shift of absorption peak and a red shift of photocurrent peak with increasing electric fields. These results suggest that a sequential mechanism is involved in the photocurrent collection from the quantum well. The blue shift is then well fitted by a quadratic Stark effect and the red shift by a barrier lowering mechanism.

  1. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  2. Dark current and optical properties in asymmetric GaAs/AlGaAs staircase-like multiquantum well structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, E.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, we investigate dark current voltage characteristics of GaAs/AlGaAs staircase-like asymmetric multiquantum well structure at various temperatures experimentally. Measured dark current density-voltage (Jd-V) characteristics are compared with the Levine Model. It is seen that the model fits well with the experimental dark current density. Ground state energy of electrons, heavy holes and light holes are calculated by Kronig-Penney Model. Optical properties of sample are characterized by photoluminescence and photoconductivity measurements. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the GaAs/GaAlAs QWIP show that the peaks corresponding interband transition from the ground heavy-hole subband to the ground electronic subband (Ehh1 - Ee1) are dominantly observed and the peak positions corresponding to the interband transitions of the PL spectrum are dependent on the temperature. Photoconductivity measurement is performed for different negative polarities at 37 K.

  3. Observation of weak carrier localization in green emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Wang, Shiang-Fu; Jang, Der-Jun; Young, Tai-Fa; Yeh, Ping-Hung; Ling, Dah-Chin; Lee, Meng-En

    2015-04-14

    Green emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well samples were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence (PL), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy. Weak carrier localization with characteristic energy of ∼12 meV due to an inhomogeneous distribution of In in the InGaN quantum (QW) layer is observed. The temperature dependence of the PL peak energy exhibits S-shape phenomenon and is comparatively discussed within the framework of the Varshni's empirical formula. The full width at half maximum of the PL emission band shows an increasing-decreasing-increasing behavior with increasing temperature arising from the localized states caused by potential fluctuations. The radiative life time, τ{sub r}, extracted from the TRPL profile shows ∼T{sup 3/2} dependence on temperature above 200 K, which confirms the absence of the effect of carrier localization at room temperature.

  4. Carrier dynamics in Ga(NAsP)/Si multi-quantum well heterostructures with varying well thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakfa, M. K.; Woscholski, R.; Gies, S.; Wegele, T.; Wiemer, M.; Ludewig, P.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.; Heimbrodt, W.; Koch, M.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements have been performed in Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP) multi-quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) with different well thicknesses. The studied structures have been pseudomorphically grown on Si substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) with an N content of about 7%. Experimental results reveal a shortening in the PL decay time with increasing QW thickness, meanwhile, accompanied by a decrease in the PL intensity. We attribute this behavior to an increasing non-radiative recombination rate for broader QWs which arises from an increasing number of defects in the QW material. The emission-energy distribution of the PL decay time is studied at various temperatures. The PL decay time strongly depends on the emission energy at low temperatures and becomes emission-energy-independent close to room temperature. This is discussed in terms of the carrier localization in the studied structures.

  5. Magnetic vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrkac, Gino; Keatley, Paul S.; Bryan, Matthew T.; Butler, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic vortex has sparked the interest of the academic and industrial communities over the last few decades. From their discovery in the 1970s for bubble memory devices to their modern application as radio frequency oscillators, magnetic vortices have been adopted to modern telecommunication and sensor applications. Basic properties of vortex structures in the static and dynamic regime, from a theoretical and experimental point of view, are presented as well as their application in spin torque driven nano-pillar and magnetic tunnel junction devices. Single vortex excitations and phase locking phenomena of coupled oscillators are discussed with an outlook of vortex oscillators in magnetic hybrid structures with imprinted domain confinement and dynamic encryption devices.

  6. Vortex flow hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  7. NASA wake vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Greene, George C.; Stewart, Eric C.; Stuever, Robert A.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Rivers, Robert A.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is conducting research that will enable safe improvements in the capacity of the nation's air transportation system. The wake-vortex hazard is a factor in establishing the minimum safe spacing between aircraft during landing and takeoff operations and, thus, impacts airport capacity. The ability to accurately model the wake hazard and determine safe separation distances for a wide range of aircraft and operational scenarios may provide the basis for significant increases in airport capacity. Current and planned NASA research is described which is focused on increasing airport capacity by safely reducing wake-hazard-imposed aircraft separations through advances in a number of technologies including vortex motion and decay prediction, vortex encounter modeling, wake-vortex hazard characterization, and in situ flow sensing.

  8. The singing vortex.

    PubMed

    Arndt, R; Pennings, P; Bosschers, J; van Terwisga, T

    2015-10-06

    Marine propellers display several forms of cavitation. Of these, propeller-tip vortex cavitation is one of the important factors in propeller design. The dynamic behaviour of the tip vortex is responsible for hull vibration and noise. Thus, cavitation in the vortices trailing from tips of propeller blades has been studied extensively. Under certain circumstances cavitating vortices have been observed to have wave-like disturbances on the surfaces of vapour cores. Intense sound at discrete frequencies can result from a coupling between tip vortex disturbances and oscillating sheet cavitation on the surfaces of the propeller blades. This research article focuses on the dynamics of vortex cavitation and more in particular on the energy and frequency content of the radiated pressures.

  9. The singing vortex

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, R.; Pennings, P.; Bosschers, J.; van Terwisga, T.

    2015-01-01

    Marine propellers display several forms of cavitation. Of these, propeller-tip vortex cavitation is one of the important factors in propeller design. The dynamic behaviour of the tip vortex is responsible for hull vibration and noise. Thus, cavitation in the vortices trailing from tips of propeller blades has been studied extensively. Under certain circumstances cavitating vortices have been observed to have wave-like disturbances on the surfaces of vapour cores. Intense sound at discrete frequencies can result from a coupling between tip vortex disturbances and oscillating sheet cavitation on the surfaces of the propeller blades. This research article focuses on the dynamics of vortex cavitation and more in particular on the energy and frequency content of the radiated pressures. PMID:26442147

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  11. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  12. Atmospheric-wake vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, A. J.; Hirsh, J. E.; Teske, M. E.; Hecht, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The interactions of a vortex wake with a turbulent stratified atmosphere are investigated with the computer code WAKE. It is shown that atmospheric shear, turbulence, and stratification can provide the dominant mechanisms by which vortex wakes decay. Computations included the interaction of a vortex wake with a viscous ground plane. The observed phenomenon of vortex bounce is explained in terms of secondary vorticity produced on the ground. This vorticity is swept off the ground and advected about the vortex pair, thereby altering the classic hyperbolic trajectory. The phenomenon of the solitary vortex is explained as an interaction of a vortex with crosswind shear. Here, the vortex having the sign opposite that of the sign of the vorticity in the shear is dispersed by a convective instability. This instability results in the rapid production of turbulence which in turn disperses the smoke marking the vortex.

  13. Dynamics of Giant Planet Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueshaber, Shawn R.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.

    2016-10-01

    The polar atmospheres of the giant planets have come under increasing interest since a compact, warm-core, stable, cyclonic polar vortex was discovered at each of Saturn's poles. In addition, the south pole of Neptune appears to have a similar feature, and Uranus' north pole is exhibiting activity that could indicate the formation of a polar vortex. We investigate the formation and maintenance of these giant planet polar vortices by varying several key atmospheric dynamics parameters in a forced-dissipative, 1.5-layer shallow water model. Our simulations are run using the EPIC (Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate) global circulation model, to which we have added a gamma-plane rectangular grid option appropriate for simulating polar atmospheric dynamics.In our numerical simulations, we vary the atmospheric deformation radius, planetary rotation rate, storm forcing intensity, and storm vorticity (cyclone-to-anticyclone) ratio to determine what combination of values favors the formation of a polar vortex. We find that forcing the atmosphere by injecting small-scale mass perturbations ("storms") to form either all cyclones, all anticyclones, or equal numbers of both, may all result in a cyclonic polar vortex. Additionally, we examine the role of eddy momentum convergence in the intensification and maintenance of a polar cyclone.Our simulation results are applicable to understanding all four of the solar system giant planets. In the future, we plan to expand our modeling effort with a more realistic 3D primitive equations model, also with a gamma-plane rectangular grid using EPIC. With our 3D primitive equations model, we will study how various vertical atmospheric stratification structures influence the formation and maintenance of a polar cyclone. While our shallow-water model only involves storms of a single layer, a 3D primitive equations model allows us to study how storms of finite vertical extent and at differing levels in the atmosphere may further favor

  14. Controlling vortex motion and vortex kinetic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco; Savel'ev, Sergey

    2006-05-01

    We summarize some recent results of vortex motion control and vortex kinetic friction. (1) We describe a device [J.E. Villegas, S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, E.M. Gonzalez, J.V. Anguita, R. Garcìa, J.L. Vicent, Science 302 (2003) 1188] that can easily control the motion of flux quanta in a Niobium superconducting film on an array of nanoscale triangular magnets. Even though the input ac current has zero average, the resulting net motion of the vortices can be directed along either one direction, the opposite direction, or producing zero net motion. We also consider layered strongly anisotropic superconductors, with no fixed spatial asymmetry, and show [S. Savel'ev, F. Nori, Nature Materials 1 (2002) 179] how, with asymmetric drives, the ac motion of Josephson and/or pancake vortices can provide a net dc vortex current. (2) In analogy with the standard macroscopic friction, we present [A. Maeda, Y. Inoue, H. Kitano, S. Savel'ev, S. Okayasu, I. Tsukada, F. Nori , Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 077001] a comparative study of the friction force felt by vortices in superconductors and charge density waves.

  15. Strained multiquantum-well corrugation-pitch-modulated distributed feedback laser with ultranarrow (3.6kHz) spectral linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, M.; Suzuki, M.; Taniwatari, T.

    1993-09-01

    Introducing a 1% compressive strained multiquantum-well (MQW) active layer into a corrugation-pitch-modulated distributed feedback (CPM-DFB) laser reduces the linewidth floor (residual linewidth for extrapolated infinite output power) to 2 kHz and results in a linewidth-power product of 140 kHz mW. Strained MQW CPM-DFB lasers produced a 55 mW output with a spectral linewidth of only 3.6 kHz.

  16. The effects of noradrenaline on the amplitude-time characteristics of multiquantum endplate currents and the kinetics of induced secretion of transmitter quanta.

    PubMed

    Bukharaeva, E A; Gainulov, R Kh; Nikol'skii, E E

    2002-01-01

    Experiments on frog neuromuscular junctions using a two-electrode membrane potential clamping method were used to study the effects of noradrenaline on the amplitude-time characteristics of multiquantum endplate current (EPC) parameters and the time course of secretion of transmitter quanta during the process of EPC generation. Noradrenaline (10 microM) induced significant increases in EPC amplitude (by 16%), with a decrease in the ratio of the duration of the leading front of the EPC to the duration of the leading front of the miniature endplate current (mEPC). Analysis of the time course of induced secretion, based on sequential subtraction of signals with displacement on the time scale, showed that noradrenaline induced synchronization of the process of secretion of quanta involved in generating multiquantum EPC, resulting in a 25% decrease in parameter P90, which characterizes the extent of synchronization of quantum release. The quantum composition of EPC, measured by dividing the area of induced and spontaneous signals and by analysis of the time course of the secretion of quanta, showed no changes in response to noradrenaline. Thus, in conditions in which responses to single stimuli applied to the motor nerve results in the release of several tens of quanta, noradrenaline can lead to increases in the amplitude of multiquantum EPC by increasing the level of synchronization of secretion of the transmitter quanta forming this signal.

  17. Magnetic vortex racetrack memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Liwei D.; Jin, Yongmei M.

    2017-02-01

    We report a new type of racetrack memory based on current-controlled movement of magnetic vortices in magnetic nanowires with rectangular cross-section and weak perpendicular anisotropy. Data are stored through the core polarity of vortices and each vortex carries a data bit. Besides high density, non-volatility, fast data access, and low power as offered by domain wall racetrack memory, magnetic vortex racetrack memory has additional advantages of no need for constrictions to define data bits, changeable information density, adjustable current magnitude for data propagation, and versatile means of ultrafast vortex core switching. By using micromagnetic simulations, current-controlled motion of magnetic vortices in cobalt nanowire is demonstrated for racetrack memory applications.

  18. Aircraft vortex marking program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompa, M. F.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, reliable device for identifying atmospheric vortices, principally as generated by in-flight aircraft and with emphasis on the use of nonpolluting aerosols for marking by injection into such vortex (-ices) is presented. The refractive index and droplet size were determined from an analysis of aerosol optical and transport properties as the most significant parameters in effecting vortex optimum light scattering (for visual sighting) and visual persistency of at least 300 sec. The analysis also showed that a steam-ejected tetraethylene glycol aerosol with droplet size near 1 micron and refractive index of approximately 1.45 could be a promising candidate for vortex marking. A marking aerosol was successfully generated with the steam-tetraethylene glycol mixture from breadboard system hardware. A compact 25 lb/f thrust (nominal) H2O2 rocket chamber was the key component of the system which produced the required steam by catalytic decomposition of the supplied H2O2.

  19. Electric vortex in MHD flow

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1995-05-01

    An electric vortex is the circulation of electron space charge about a magnetic field line that is transported by ion momentum. In cold, or low {beta} flow the vortex diameter is the minimum length scale of charge neutrality. The distinctive feature of the vortex is its radial electric field which manifests the interplay of electrostatics, magnetism, and motion.

  20. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  1. Wake Vortex Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A status report is presented on research directed at reducing the vortex disturbances of aircraft wakes. The objective of such a reduction is to minimize the hazard to smaller aircraft that might encounter these wakes. Inviscid modeling was used to study trailing vortices and viscous effects were investigated. Laser velocimeters were utilized in the measurement of aircraft wakes. Flight and wind tunnel tests were performed on scale and full model scale aircraft of various design. Parameters investigated included the effect of wing span, wing flaps, spoilers, splines and engine thrust on vortex attenuation. Results indicate that vortives may be alleviated through aerodynamic means.

  2. Quasi-steady vortices in protoplanetary disks. I. From dwarfs to giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surville, Clément; Barge, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We determine the size, structure, and evolution of persistent vortices in 2D and inviscid Keplerian flows. Methods: A Gaussian model of the vortices is built and compared with numerical solutions issued from non-linear hydrodynamical simulations. Test vortices are also produced using a fiducial method based on the Rossby wave instability to help explore the vortex parameters. Numerical simulations are performed using a second order finite volume method. We assume a perfect-gas law and a non-homentropic adiabatic flow. Results: The new model nicely fits the numerical vortex solution. In the vortex centre it is consistent with existing models, whereas in the outer regions it enables the vortex to be connected with the background flow. Two families of vortices can be distinguished following the importance of the compressional effects. The model also permitted a new class of vortices to be discovered corresponding to huge perturbations of pressure and density and whose radial sizes are significantly larger than the disk scale height, in contrast with the standard way to define the maximum vortex size. Conclusions: Our Gaussian model of the vortex solutions of the 2D Euler's equations is a useful tool for studying vortex properties. Among the large number of vortex solutions, the possible existence of giant vortices could open interesting perspectives in planetary formation, particularly during the building stage of the giant gas planets.

  3. Melting of Vortex Lattice in Bose-Einstein Condensate in Presence of Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Bishwajyoti

    We study the vortex lattice dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in presence of single impurity as well as random impurities or disorder. The single impurity is modeled by a Gaussian function while disorder is introduced in the system by a uniform random potential. Such potentials can be created experimentally by lasers. We solve the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation in two-dimensions using split-step Crank-Nicolson method. We first show that a single vortex can be pinned by an impurity. We then show that even a single impurity can distort the vortex lattice. For sufficiently strong impurity potential, the vortex lattice gets pinned to the impurity. We also show that a new type of giant hole with hidden vortices inside it can be created in the vortex lattice by a cluster of impurities. In presence of random impurity potential or disorder, the vortices get pinned at random positions leading to melting of the vortex lattice. We further show that the vortex lattice melting can also be induced by the pseudorandom potential generated by the superposition of two optical lattices. The absence of long-range order in the melted vortex lattice is demonstrated from the structure factor profile and the histogram of the distance between each pair of vortices. I would like to thank DST, India and BCUD SPPU, for financial assisance through research grants.

  4. Double-branched vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, E. R.; Westphal, R. V.; Mehta, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    In order to assess the suitability of using a double branched vortex generator in parametric studies involving vortex interactions, an experimental study of the main vortex and secondary flows produced by a double branched vortex generator was conducted in a 20-by-40 cm indraft wind tunnel. Measurements of the cross flow velocities were made with a five hole pressure probe from which vorticity contours and vortex parameters were derived. The results showed that the optimum configuration consisted of chord extensions with the absence of a centerbody.

  5. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  6. Vortex Apparatus and Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2010-01-01

    Vortex flow, from millimeter to kilometer in scale, is important in many scientific and technological areas. Examples are seen in water strider locomotion, from industrial pipe flow (wastewater treatment) to air traffic control (safe distance between aircrafts on a runway ready for takeoff) to atmospheric studies. In this paper, we focus on a…

  7. Micro Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An in house video made to show how NASA Langley scientists have found ways to improve airplane performance. Micro Vortex Generators placed on airplane wings can reduce drag, increase lift, and reduce fuel consumption. Nice animation and real footage of planes with this technology.

  8. Titan's Winter Polar Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F.M.; Achterberg, R.K.; Schinder, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere has provided an interesting study in contrasts and similarities with Earth's. While both have N$_2$ as the dominant constituent and comparable surface pressures $\\sim1$ bar, Titan's next most abundant molecule is CH$_4$, not O$_2$, and the dissociative breakup of CH$_4$ and N$_2$ by sunlight and electron impact leads to a suite of hydrocarbons and nitriles, and ultimately the photochemical smog that enshrouds the moon. In addition, with a 15.95-day period, Titan is a slow rotator compared to Earth. While the mean zonal terrestrial winds are geostrophic, Titan's are mostly cyclostrophic, whipping around the moon in as little as 1 day. Despite the different dynamical regime, Titan's winter stratosphere exhibits several characteristics that should be familiar to terrestrial meteorologists. The cold winter pole near the 1 -mbar level is circumscribed by strong winds (up to 190 m/s) that act as a barrier to mixing with airmasses at lower latitudes. There is evidence of enhancement of several organic species over the winter pole, indicating subsidence. The adiabatic heating associated with this subsidence gives rise to a warm anomaly at the 0.01-mbar level, raising the stratopause two scale heights above its location at equatorial latitudes. Condensate ices have been detected in Titan's lower stratosphere within the winter polar vortex from infrared spectra. Although not always unambiguously identified, their spatial distribution exhibits a sharp gradient, decreasing precipitously across the vortex away from the winter pole. The interesting question of whether there is important heterogeneous chemistry occurring within the polar vortex, analogous to that occurring in the terrestrial polar stratospheric clouds in the ozone holes, has not been addressed. The breakup of Titan's winter polar vortex has not yet been observed. On Earth, the polar vortex is nonlinearly disrupted by interaction with large-amplitude planetary waves. Large-scale waves have not

  9. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging.'' This active concept

  10. Control of submersible vortex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Donaldson, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Vortex flows produced by submersibles typically unfavorably influence key figures of merit such as acoustic and nonacoustic stealth, control effectiveness/maneuverability, and propulsor efficiency/body drag. Sources of such organized, primarily longitudinal, vorticity include the basic body (nose and sides) and appendages (both base/intersection and tip regions) such as the fairwater, dive planes, rear control surfaces, and propulsor stators/tips. Two fundamentally different vortex control approaches are available: (1) deintensification of the amplitude and/or organization of the vortex during its initiation process; and (2) downstream vortex disablement. Vortex control techniques applicable to the initiation region (deintensification approach) include transverse pressure gradient minimization via altered body cross section, appendage dillets, fillets, and sweep, and various appendage tip and spanload treatment along with the use of active controls to minimize control surface size and motions. Vortex disablement can be accomplished either via use of control vortices (which can also be used to steer the vortices off-board), direct unwinding, inducement of vortex bursting, or segmentation/tailoring for enhanced dissipation. Submersible-applicable vortex control technology is also included derived from various aeronautical applications such as mitigation of the wing wake vortex hazard and flight aircraft maneuverability at high angle of attack as well as the status of vortex effects upon, and mitigation of, nonlinear control forces on submersibles. Specific suggestions for submersible-applicable vortex control techniques are presented.

  11. Enhanced Light Emission due to Formation of Semi-polar InGaN/GaN Multi-quantum Wells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wan-Ru; Weng, Guo-En; Wang, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Jiang-Yong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Zhang, Bao-Ping

    2015-12-01

    InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) are grown on (0001) sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with special growth parameters to form V-shaped pits simultaneously. Measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrate the formation of MQWs on both (0001) and ([Formula: see text]) side surface of the V-shaped pits. The latter is known to be a semi-polar surface. Optical characterizations together with theoretical calculation enable us to identify the optical transitions from these MQWs. The layer thickness on ([Formula: see text]) surface is smaller than that on (0001) surface, and the energy level in the ([Formula: see text]) semi-polar quantum well (QW) is higher than in the (0001) QW. As the sample temperature is increased from 15 K, the integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) intensity of (0001) MQWs increases first and then decreases while that of the ([Formula: see text]) MQWs decreases monotonically. The integrated photoluminescence (PL) intensity of (0001) MQWs increases significantly from 15 to 70 K. These results are explained by carrier injection from ([Formula: see text]) to (0001) MQWs due to thermal excitation. It is therefore concluded that the emission efficiency of (0001) MQWs at high temperatures can be greatly improved due to the formation of semi-polar MQWs.

  12. Controlled manipulation of elastomers with radiation: Insights from multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance data and mechanical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T.; Dinh, L. N.; Gee, R. H.; Wilson, T.; Chinn, S.; Maxwell, R. S.

    2011-03-15

    Filled and cross-linked elastomeric rubbers are versatile network materials with a multitude of applications ranging from artificial organs and biomedical devices to cushions, coatings, adhesives, interconnects, and seismic-isolation, thermal, and electrical barriers. External factors such as mechanical stress, temperature fluctuations, or radiation are known to create chemical changes in such materials that can directly affect the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the polymer between cross-links and alter the structural and mechanical properties. From a materials science point of view it is highly desirable to understand, affect, and manipulate such property changes in a controlled manner. Unfortunately, that has not yet been possible due to the lack of experimental characterization of such networks under controlled environments. In this work we expose a known rubber material to controlled dosages of {gamma} radiation and utilize a newly developed multiquantum nuclear-magnetic-resonance technique to characterize the MWD as a function of radiation. We show that such data along with mechanical stress-strain measurements are amenable to accurate analysis by simple network models and yield important insights into radiation-induced molecular-level processes.

  13. Giant Magnons Meet Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Diego M.

    2008-07-28

    We study the worldsheet reflection matrix of a string attached to a D-brane in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. The D-brane corresponds to a maximal giant graviton that wraps an S{sup 3} inside S{sup 5}. In the gauge theory, the open string is described by a spin chain with boundaries. We focus on open strings with a large SO(6) charge and define an asymptotic boundary reflection matrix. Using the symmetries of the problem, we review the computation of the boundary reflection matrix, up to a phase. We also discuss weak and strong coupling computations where we obtain the overall phase factor and test our exact results.

  14. The shock-vortex interaction patterns affected by vortex flow regime and vortex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Barik, Hrushikesh; Chang, Se-Myong

    2009-08-01

    We have used a third-order essentially non-oscillatory method to obtain numerical shadowgraphs for investigation of shock-vortex interaction patterns. To search different interaction patterns, we have tested two vortex models (the composite vortex model and the Taylor vortex model) and as many as 47 parametric data sets. By shock-vortex interaction, the impinging shock is deformed to a S-shape with leading and lagging parts of the shock. The vortex flow is locally accelerated by the leading shock and locally decelerated by the lagging shock, having a severely elongated vortex core with two vertices. When the leading shock escapes the vortex, implosion effect creates a high pressure in the vertex area where the flow had been most expanded. This compressed region spreads in time with two frontal waves, an induced expansion wave and an induced compression wave. They are subsonic waves when the shock-vortex interaction is weak but become supersonic waves for strong interactions. Under a intermediate interaction, however, an induced shock wave is first developed where flow speed is supersonic but is dissipated where the incoming flow is subsonic. We have identified three different interaction patterns that depend on the vortex flow regime characterized by the shock-vortex interaction.

  15. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush. PMID:22963551

  16. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Congpu; Luo, Caiqin; Dong, Juan; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-09-01

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush.

  17. Enhanced giant magnetoimpedance in heterogeneous nanobrush.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Congpu; Luo, Caiqin; Dong, Juan; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2012-09-10

    A highly sensitive and large working range giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect is found in the novel nanostructure: nanobrush. The nanostructure is composed of a soft magnetic nanofilm and a nanowire array, respectively fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. The optimal GMI ratio of nanobrush is promoted to more than 250%, higher than the pure FeNi film and some sandwich structures at low frequency. The design of this structure is based on the vortex distribution of magnetic moments in thin film, and it can be induced by the exchange coupling effect between the interfaces of nanobrush.

  18. Vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-01-01

    The vortex unwinding method is used as a tool in performing vortex cancellation in a turbulent boundary layer. Sufficient reduction in the isotach variation was achieved to verify the usefulness of this technique, for the cases of both wall turbulence control and horseshoe vortex alleviation. More detailed measurements of vortex strength and position improve the optimization process and increase the amount of vortex unwinding.

  19. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  20. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  1. Vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H. B.; Campbell, J. F.; Young, A. D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The principal emphasis of the meeting was to be on the understanding and prediction of separation-induced vortex flows and their effects on vehicle performance, stability, control, and structural design loads. This report shows that a substantial amount of the papers covering this area were received from a wide range of countries, together with an attendance that was even more diverse. In itself, this testifies to the current interest in the subject and to the appropriateness of the Panel's choice of topic and approach. An attempt is made to summarize each paper delivered, and to relate the contributions made in the papers and in the discussions to some of the important aspects of vortex flow aerodynamics. This reveals significant progress and important clarifications, but also brings out remaining weaknesses in predictive capability and gaps in understanding. Where possible, conclusions are drawn and areas of continuing concern are identified.

  2. Polar vortex dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Recent work with high resolution, one-layer numerical models of fluid flows resembling those in the real stratosphere has suggested that: (1) the interiors of strong cyclonic vortices like the Antarctic polar vortex may be almost completely isolated laterally from their surroundings - perhaps even completely isolated, under some circumstances; (2) by contrast, material near the edge of such and isolated region can easily be eroded (or mixed one-sidedly) into the surrounding region; and (3) the erosion characteristically produces extremely steep gradients in isentropic distributions of potential vorticity (PV) and of other tracers, possibly down to horizontal length scales of a few kilometers only. Such length scales may occur both at the edge of the main polar vortex and in smaller features outside it, such as thin filamentary structures, produced by the erosion process.

  3. Geostrophic Vortex Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    been made in the study of the two-dimensional incompressible vorticity fields. Not only have new and powerful techniques been developed, but a whole new...it deserves a thorough investigation by itself. More fundamentally, however, the techniques that we intend to use are not well suited to handle such...been exposed to a great wealth of techniques and results for the vortex dynamics of the Euler equations in two dimensions, we are now confronted with

  4. Simulations of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  5. Control of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H.; Shtern, F.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    The paper develops means of vortex breakdown (VB) control with the help of Controlling Vortex Generators (CVGs). Vortex breakdown plays the crucial role in many practical swirling flows, e.g. (a) leading-edge vortices above delta wings create a strong lift and (b) trailing vortices behind large aircraft disturbances are potentially dangerous to subsequent aircraft. It is useful to prevent VB in case (a) and to stimulate VB in case (b). We have recently obtained significant theoretical and experimental results related to swirling flow prediction and control. Firstly, a theory has been developed which models jump transitions in swirling flow (e.g. jumps in VB locations) and predicts ranges of control parameters where multiple stable states occur. Secondly, our experiments have revealed that effective control (enhancement and suppression) of VB can be achieved using CVGs. In our experiments we have used a thin rotaing rod as a CVG, placed along the axis of the basic swirling flow in a sealed cylinder driven by the rotating bottom disc. The effect of the rod depends on the direction of the rotation. With increasing rod co-rotational speed, the VB 'bubble' (VBB) becomes smaller and then disappear, and a cone-shaped wake forms. Counter-rotation of the rod causes increases VBBs' diameter and makes the flow unsteady. The VBBs begin to advect downstream, undergo tearing and pairing, and, hence, enhance mixing.

  6. Application of a discretized vortex impulse framework to fish maneuvering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    In studies of biological propulsion, metrics for quantitative analysis of the vortex wake, including circulation, impulse, and their time derivatives, are a valuable indicator of performance. To better utilize volumetric PIV data in this type of analysis, a discretized method of deriving vortex impulse relying only on velocity data is developed. The impulse formulation is based on the geometry and distribution of circulation along the vortex core line, which can be detected using critical points in the velocity field. This analysis method is then applied to time-resolved velocity data of a turning giant danio (Devario aequipinnatus) and a jumping archer fish (Toxotes microlepis) obtained using Synthetic Aperture PIV (SAPIV). In the case of the danio, the vortex force vector derived from the impulse derivative shows good agreement with the kinematics of the fish tail during the turning maneuver. With the archer fish, the model is used to explore the relationship between the number of tail beats prior to the jump and the jump height.

  7. Vortex cores and vortex motion in superconductors with anisotropic Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvis, J. A.; Herrera, E.; Guillamón, I.; Vieira, S.; Suderow, H.

    2017-02-01

    Explaning static and dynamic properties of the vortex lattice in anisotropic superconductors requires a careful characterization of vortex cores. The vortex core contains Andreev bound states whose spatial extension depends on the anisotropy of the electronic band-structure and superconducting gap. This might have an impact on the anisotropy of the superconducting properties and on vortex dynamics. Here we briefly summarize basic concepts to understand anisotropic vortex cores and review vortex core imaging experiments. We further discuss moving vortex lattices and the influence of vortex core shape in vortex motion. We find vortex motion in highly tilted magnetic fields. We associate vortex motion to the vortex entry barrier and the screening currents at the surface. We find preferential vortex motion along the main axis of the vortex lattice. After travelling integers of the intervortex distance, we find that vortices move more slowly due to the washboard potential of the vortex lattice.

  8. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  9. Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  10. Interferometric optical vortex array generator

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented.These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  11. Electron-beam-induced current and cathodoluminescence characterization of InGaAs strain-balanced multiquantum well photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tundo, Stefania; Mazzer, Massimo; Nasi, Lucia; Lazzarini, Laura; Salviati, Giancarlo; Rohr, Carsten; Abbott, Paul; Bushnell, David B.; Barnham, Keith W. J.; Clarke, Graham; Peng, Ruwen

    2003-11-01

    InxGa1-xAs/InyGa1-yAs strain-balanced quantum well cells (QWCs) have been shown to be beneficial for photovoltaic applications in particular to extend the light absorption edge of a single-junction cell toward the near infrared with a lower reduction of the open-circuit voltage compared to a single band-gap cell. The strain-balancing condition ensures that the multi-quantum well as a whole does not relax. However, if the mismatch between wells and barriers exceeds a critical limit, the structure becomes vulnerable to morphological or compositional fluctuations, which can lead to a local structural breakdown with the generation of extended defects of a completely different nature from misfit dislocations. In this work, we investigated a series of strain-balanced InGaAs QWCs grown on InP for thermophotovoltaic applications by means of electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. Despite being electrically active, these defects appear to have a minor impact on the dark current of the cells but cause a drop of the photocurrent at relatively low forward bias voltage. The higher carrier collection efficiency revealed both by EBIC and CL at the boundaries of the defects suggests that a notch in the valence band edge limits the collection of holes generated in the MQW and the energy states, induced by the defects inside the energy gap, assist the tunneling of holes through the notch. At zero bias, the overall reduction of the collection efficiency is of the order of a few percent but the rate of recombination of photogenerated carriers increases dramatically with increasing forward-bias voltage as the junction built-in field drops more rapidly where the density of in-gap states is higher.

  12. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2013-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere {10^20 J}.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  13. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2014-10-01

    The 2009 impact and recent superbolides on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution (enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection) and rapid frame rates (enabling the 2010/2012 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements).We propose a ToO program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere (10^20 J).HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing (not achievable from the ground) is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  14. Giant impacts on giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2012-10-01

    The 2009 impact on Jupiter caught the world by surprise and cast doubt on impactor flux estimates for the outer solar system. Enhanced amateur planetary imaging techniques yield both high spatial resolution {enabling the 2009 impact debris field detection} and rapid frame rates {enabling the 2010 impact flash detections and lightcurve measurements}.We propose a Target of Opportunity program to image future impacts on Jupiter and Saturn. To remove the possibility of impact cloud non-detections, the program will be triggered only if an existing impact debris field is seen, an object on a collision course with Jupiter or Saturn is discovered, or an impact light curve is measured with an estimated total energy large enough to generate an impact cloud in a giant planet atmosphere.HST provides the only way to image these events in the ultraviolet, providing information on aerosol altitudes and on smaller particles that are less visible to ground-based infrared observations. High-resolution imaging with proper timing {not achievable from the ground} is required to measure precisely both the velocity fields of impact sites and the optical spectrum of impact debris. HST observations of past impacts on Jupiter have also served both as cornerstones of science investigations at other wavelengths and as vehicles for effective public outreach.Large outer solar system impacts are governed by the same physics as in the terrestrial events that dominate the impact threat to humans. Studying the behavior of impactors of various sizes and compositions, as they enter the atmosphere at varying angles and speeds, will better quantify terrestrial impact hazards.

  15. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  16. Vortex Flow Correlation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    ATTACK AND M = 0.70 (FROM REF. 195) ... ........... . 77 ix -. ( LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued) FIGURE PAGE 32 SURFACE PRESSURES AND SKIN -FRICTION...exemplifies the increased research activity related to this long-dormant concept. Northrop water tunnel studies have suggested that conventional 3 vortex...ATTACHMENT -0.6- LINE LINE -0.4( S-0.2 -OTURBULENT a +0.2 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 (A) SKIN -FRICTION LINE PATTERN ON UPPER 2ylb 0.6 SURFACEOFSLENDERWINGATLOW

  17. The Acoustically Driven Vortex Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Spencer B.; Gee, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    Vortex cannons have been used by physics teachers for years, mostly to teach the continuity principle. In its simplest form, a vortex cannon is an empty coffee can with a hole cut in the bottom and the lid replaced. More elaborate models can be purchased through various scientific suppliers under names such as "Air Cannon" and…

  18. Spontaneous superfluid unpinning and the inhomogeneous distribution of vortex lines in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K. S.; Pines, D.; Alpar, M. A.; Shaham, J.

    1988-01-01

    The equation of motion of the pinned superfluid which couples to the crust of neutron stars via thermal vortex creep is studied. Spontaneous unpinning at locations characterized by a very inhomogeneous distribution of vortex lines is examined as a possible mechanism for the initiation of glitches. It is suggested that structural inhomogeneities in the crust of neutron stars may be responsible for frequent microglitches which lead to pulsar timing noise. A generalization of the model shows promise for explaining the origin of the giant glitches in pulsars.

  19. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  20. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  1. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  2. Comparison between an experimental turbulent vortex and the Lundgren vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuypers, Yannis; Maurel, Agnès; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2004-08-01

    In a recent letter (Cuypers Y et al 2003 Phys. ReV. Lett. 91 194502), the authors presented experimental results on a structure resulting from a vortex burst. The temporal evolution of this structure results in the k-5/3 Kolmogorov spectrum and some common features with the Lundgren theoretical vortex have been shown. The purpose of the present paper is to go further in the comparison with the Lundgren model by a parallel analysis of the experimental structure and of a Lundgren single spiral vortex, whose evolution is numerically obtained based on the calculations of Pullin et al (1993 Phys. Fluids A 5 126; 1994 Phys. Fluids 6 3010).

  3. The Electric Giant Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Woude, A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Experimental Methods to Study Giant Resonances * Introduction * The Tools * Introduction * Tools for Isoscalar Scattering * INELASTIC α-SCATTERING * INELASTIC PROTON SCATTERING * Tools for Isovector Excitations * γ-ABSORPTION AND PARTICLE CAPTURE REACTIONS * CHARGE EXCHANGE REACTIONS - THE (π+, π0) REACTION * Tools For Isoscalar And Isovector Excitations * INELASTIC ELECTRON SCATTERING * GIANT RESONANCE EXCITATION BY FAST HEAVY IONS * From Multipole Cross Section To Multipole Strength * The Electric Isoscalar Resonances * The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance * Systematics on the GMR * Compressibility and the Giant Monopole Resonance * Introduction * The Compressibility of nuclear matter from the GMR energies * Discussion * The Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance * General Trends In Medium-Heavy and Heavy Nuclei * The GQR In Light Nuclei * The Isoscalar 3- Strength, LEOR and HEOR * Isoscalar 4+ Strength * Miscellaneous; Isoscalar 1- and L > 4-Strength * The Electric Isovector Giant Resonances * The Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance: GDR * The Isovector Giant Monopole Resonances: IVGMR * The Isovector Quadrupole Resonance: IVGQR * The Effect of Ground State Deformation on the Shape of Giant Resonance: Microscopic Picture * Giant Resonances Built on Excited States * Introduction * Capture Reactions on Light Nuclei * Statistical decay of GDR γ Emission in Heavy Compound Systems * Introduction * Theoretical Predictions * Some Experimental Results * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * General References * References

  4. On the vortex ring state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Richard; Gillies, E.; Giuni, M.; Hislop, J.; Savas, Omer

    2014-11-01

    The investigation considers the vortex ring state, a phenomenon normally associated with the collapse of a trailing, helical vortex wake into a unstable vortex ring, and is a problem encountered when a helicopter rotor descends into its own wake. A series of wind tunnel and towing tank experiments on rotor systems have been performed, and a comparison is then made with the behaviour of a specially designed open core, annular jet system that generates a mean flow velocity profile similar to that observed below a rotor. In experimentally simulated descents the jet system forms flow patterns that are topologically similar to the vortex ring state of a rotor system. Furthermore the dynamic behaviour of the flow shares many of the important characteristics of the rotor flow. This result suggests that the phenomenon of the vortex ring state of a rotor wake is decoupled from the detailed vortex dynamics of the helical vortex filaments themselves. The presentation will describe the principle behind the investigation, the details of the annular jet system and the results gained using PIV and flow visualisation of the wake and jet systems.

  5. Research into vortex breakdown control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Anthony M.; Délery, Jean

    2001-05-01

    Vortex breakdown remains a significant and intriguing phenomenon that can have detrimental or beneficial effects, depending on the application. Thus there is a strong need to both better understand the phenomenon and to control it, either to prevent breakdown or to promote it. For the past 50 years, multiple flow control techniques have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vortex breakdown location over slender delta wings at high angles of attack. An extensive historical review of these diverse control methods, mechanical and pneumatic, steady or periodic, is presented and discussed; however, none of these techniques has clearly demonstrated a superior efficiency or effectiveness in controlling either the vortical flow structure or the vortex breakdown location. Each technique, does, on the other hand, provide a unique approach to the control of the vortex breakdown depending on the desired outcome. There are still major obstacles to overcome before the control of vortex breakdown is implemented in flight. For example, oscillations of the vortex breakdown locations are difficult to quantify and to identify. The often poor effectiveness of control techniques can be in great part attributed to insufficient knowledge of breakdown and in an inability to accurately predict breakdown. When considering the large quantity of studies aimed at vortex breakdown control and their relative success, it is clear that decisive progress in this domain will require further basic investigations to clearly elucidate the physics of the phenomenon and to improve the predictive capability.

  6. Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Snapiro, I.B.

    1995-10-01

    We predict the Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation of an electromagnetic wave. We treat a long one-dimensional Josephson junction. We consider the wavelength of the radiated electromagnetic wave to be much less than the Josephson penetration depth. We use for calculations the nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics. We find the expression for the radiated power and for the radiation friction force acting on a Josephson vortex and arising due to the Cherenkov radiation. We calculate the relation between the density of the bias current and the Josephson vortex velocity.

  7. Holographic Vortex Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, David

    2010-01-01

    A holographic vortex coronagraph (HVC) has been proposed as an improvement over conventional coronagraphs for use in high-contrast astronomical imaging for detecting planets, dust disks, and other broadband light scatterers in the vicinities of stars other than the Sun. Because such light scatterers are so faint relative to their parent stars, in order to be able to detect them, it is necessary to effect ultra-high-contrast (typically by a factor of the order of 1010) suppression of broadband light from the stars. Unfortunately, the performances of conventional coronagraphs are limited by low throughput, dispersion, and difficulty of satisfying challenging manufacturing requirements. The HVC concept offers the potential to overcome these limitations.

  8. Entangled vector vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Carvacho, Gonzalo; Graffitti, Francesco; Vitelli, Chiara; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Light beams having a vectorial field structure, or polarization, that varies over the transverse profile and a central optical singularity are called vector vortex (VV) beams and may exhibit specific properties such as focusing into "light needles" or rotation invariance. VV beams have already found applications in areas ranging from microscopy to metrology, optical trapping, nano-optics, and quantum communication. Individual photons in such beams exhibit a form of single-particle quantum entanglement between different degrees of freedom. On the other hand, the quantum states of two photons can be also entangled with each other. Here, we combine these two concepts and demonstrate the generation of quantum entanglement between two photons that are both in VV states: a form of entanglement between two complex vectorial fields. This result may lead to quantum-enhanced applications of VV beams as well as to quantum information protocols fully exploiting the vectorial features of light.

  9. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  10. Dynamic signatures of driven vortex motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.; Lopez, D.; Olsson, R. J.; Paulius, L. M.; Petrean, A. M.; Safar, H.

    1999-09-16

    We probe the dynamic nature of driven vortex motion in superconductors with a new type of transport experiment. An inhomogeneous Lorentz driving force is applied to the sample, inducing vortex velocity gradients that distinguish the hydrodynamic motion of the vortex liquid from the elastic and-plastic motion of the vortex solid. We observe elastic depinning of the vortex lattice at the critical current, and shear induced plastic slip of the lattice at high Lorentz force gradients.

  11. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  12. Vortex dynamics in anisotropic traps

    SciTech Connect

    McEndoo, S.; Busch, Th.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the dynamics of linear vortex lattices in anisotropic traps in two dimensions and show that the interplay between the rotation and the anisotropy leads to a rich but highly regular dynamics.

  13. Wake Vortex Sensors Requirements Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation includes discussions of primary wake vortex system requirements, evolution models, sensor evolution, site specific sensor tradeoffs, wake sensor functions, deployment considerations, the operational test bed system and additional sensor requirements.

  14. Mathematical analysis of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Russel E.

    This review paper discusses the mathematical theory of vortex dynamics for incompressible, inviscid flow in two and three dimensions. The surveyed results include existence and uniqueness of time-dependent solutions, instability and singularity formation, convergence of numerical methods, and existence and stability of steady states. A simple integral formulation for the evolution of a three dimensional vortex sheet and a variational principle for the Batchelor flow problem are presented.

  15. Vortex-based all-optical manipulation of stored light at low light levels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu

    2015-11-16

    We exploit the giant cross-Kerr nonlinearity of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system in ultracold atoms to implement vortex-based multimode manipulation of stored light at low light levels. Using image-bearing signal light fields with angular intensity profiles, sinusoidal grating structures with phase-only modulation can be azimuthally imprinted on the stored probe light field, where the nonlinear absorption loss can be ignored. Upon retrieval of the probe light, collinearly superimposed vortex modes can be generated in the far field. Considering the finite size of atomic gas, the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns of the retrieved probe fields and their spiral spectra are numerically investigated, where the diffracted vortex modes can be efficiently controlled by tuning the weak signal fields. Our studies not only exhibit a fundamental diffraction phenomenon with angular grating structures in EIT system, but also provide a fascinating opportunity to realize multidimensional quantum information processing for stored light in an all-optical manner.

  16. Formation number for vortex dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Vahid; Krueger, Paul S.

    2016-11-01

    This investigation considers the axisymmetric formation of two opposite sign concentric vortex rings from jet ejection between concentric cylinders. This arrangement is similar to planar flow in that the vortex rings will travel together when the gap between the cylinders is small, similar to a vortex dipole, but it has the advantage that the vortex motion is less constrained than the planar case (vortex stretching and vortex line curvature is allowed). The flow was simulated numerically at a jet Reynolds number of 1,000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio (L / ΔR) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio (ΔR /Ro) in the range 0.01-0.1. Small gap ratios were chosen for comparison with 2D results. In contrast with 2D results, the closely paired vortices in this study exhibited pinch-off from the generating flow and finite formation numbers. The more complex flow evolution afforded by the axisymmetric model and its influence on the pinch-off process will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1133876 and SMU. This supports are gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Instability of spiral convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evgrafova, Anna; Andrey, Sukhanovsky; Elena, Popova

    2014-05-01

    Formation of large-scale vortices in atmosphere is one of the interesting problems of geophysical fluid dynamics. Tropical cyclones are examples of atmospheric spiral vortices for which convection plays an important role in their formation and evolution. Our study is focused on intensive cyclonic vortex produced by heating in the central part of the rotating layer. The previous studies made by Bogatyrev et al, showed that structure of such vortex is very similar to the structure of tropical cyclones. Qualitative observations described in (Bogatyrev, 2009) showed that the evolution of large-scale vortex in extreme regimes can be very complicated. Our main goal is the study of evolution of convective cyclonic vortex at high values of Grasshof number by PIV system. Experimental setup is a rotating cylindrical tank of fluid (radius 150 mm, depth 30 mm, free upper surface). Velocity fields for different values of heat flux were obtained and temporal and spatial structure of intensive convective vortex were studied in details. With the use of PIV data vorticity fields were reconstructed in different horizontal cross-sections. Physical interpretation of mechanisms that lead to the crucial change in the vortex structure with the growth of heat rate is described. Financial support from program of UD RAS, the International Research Group Program supported by Perm region Government is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Polarization and field dependent two-photon absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well waveguides in the half-band gap spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, H. K.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.; Grant, R. S.; Sibbett, W.; Soole, J. B. D.; LeBlanc, H. P.; Andreadakis, N. C.; Colas, E.; Kim, M. S.

    1991-12-01

    We report the observation of two photon absorption which is strongly dependent on the applied electric field and the optical polarization. At 1.55 μm wavelength, the two-photon absorption coefficient of the GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well (MQW) waveguides for transverse-magnetic light is about seven times lower than for transverse-electric polarized light and changes by a factor of approximately 4 for a change in applied direct-current electric field of ˜140 kV/cm. Ultrafast nonlinear refraction causing phase changes of over π radians without appreciable excess loss is observed. These measurements demonstrate that GaAs/AlGaAs MQW waveguides could be successfully used for subpicosecond all-optical switching near half-band gap, at wavelengths corresponding to the 1.55 μm optical communications band.

  19. Mid-infrared electro-luminescence and absorption from AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Daniel; Bour, David P.; Kirste, Lutz

    2014-06-16

    We present electro-modulated absorption and electro-luminescence measurements on chirped AlGaN/GaN-based multi-quantum well inter-subband structures grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy. The absorption signal is a TM-polarized, 70 meV wide feature centred at 230 meV. At medium injection current, a 58 meV wide luminescence peak corresponding to an inter-subband transition at 1450 cm{sup −1} (180 meV) is observed. Under high injection current, we measured a 4 meV wide structure peaking at 92.5 meV in the luminescence spectrum. The energy location of this peak is exactly at the longitudinal optical phonon of GaN.

  20. Characterization of cromolyn sodium hydrates and its formulation by (23) Na-multiquantum and magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Umino, Makoto; Higashi, Kenjirou; Masu, Hyuma; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2013-08-01

    We characterized cromolyn sodium (CS) hydrates and evaluated their molecular states in low-dose formulations using Na-multiquantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Two CS hydrates, low-water-content hydrated form and high-water-content hydrated form containing 2-3 and 5-6 hydrates, respectively, were prepared by humidification. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that these CS hydrates contained sodium channel structures and that water molecules were adsorbed on the sodium nucleus. (13) C-cross-polarization/MAS NMR spectra of these hydrates revealed similar results, confirming that the water molecules were adsorbed not on the cromolyn skeletons but mainly on the sodium nucleus. In contrast, (23) Na-MQMAS NMR analysis allowed us to clearly distinguish these hydrates without discernible effects from quadrupolar interaction. Thus, MQMAS NMR analysis is a valuable tool for evaluating salt drugs and their formulations.

  1. Optical and structural properties of GaN nanopillar and nanostripe arrays with embedded InGaN /GaN multi-quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, S.; Schaake, C.; Fichtenbaum, N. A.; Neufeld, C. J.; Wu, Y.; McGroddy, K.; David, A.; DenBaars, S. P.; Weisbuch, C.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2006-09-01

    GaN nanopillar and nanostripe arrays with embedded InGaN /GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) were fabricated by holographic lithography and subsequent reactive ion etching. Etch related damage of the nanostructures was successfully healed through annealing in NH3/N2 mixtures under optimized conditions. The nanopatterned samples exhibited enhanced luminescence in comparison to the planar wafers. X-ray reciprocal space maps recorded around the asymmetric (101¯5) reflection revealed that the MQWs in both nanopillars and nanostripes relaxed after nanopatterning and adopted a larger in-plane lattice constant than the underlying GaN layer. The pillar relaxation process had no measurable effect on the Stokes shift typically observed in MQWs on c-plane GaN, as evaluated by excitation power dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Angular-resolved PL measurements revealed the extraction of guided modes from the nanopillar arrays.

  2. Optical and structural characteristics of high indium content InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells with varying GaN cap layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Zhao, D. G. Jiang, D. S.; Chen, P.; Zhu, J. J.; Liu, Z. S.; Le, L. C.; Li, X. J.; He, X. G.; Liu, J. P.; Yang, H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Du, G. T.

    2015-02-07

    The optical and structural properties of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) with different thicknesses of low temperature grown GaN cap layers are investigated. It is found that the MQW emission energy red-shifts and the peak intensity decreases with increasing GaN cap layer thickness, which may be partly caused by increased floating indium atoms accumulated at quantum well (QW) surface. They will result in the increased interface roughness, higher defect density, and even lead to a thermal degradation of QW layers. An extra growth interruption introduced before the growth of GaN cap layer can help with evaporating the floating indium atoms, and therefore is an effective method to improve the optical properties of high indium content InGaN/GaN MQWs.

  3. Effect of strain relaxation on forward bias dark currents in GaAs/InGaAs multiquantum well p-i-n diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, P. R.; Barnes, J.; Barnham, K. W. J.; Haarpaintner, G.; Mazzer, M.; Zanotti-Fregonara, C.; Grünbaum, E.; Olson, C.; Rohr, C.; David, J. P. R.; Roberts, J. S.; Grey, R.; Pate, M. A.

    1996-11-01

    The effect of the dislocation line density produced by the relaxation of strain in GaAs/InxGa1-xAs multiquantum wells where x=0.155-0.23 has been studied. There is a strong correlation between the dark line density, observed by cathodoluminescence, before processing of the wafers into photodiode devices, and the subsequent low forward bias (<1.5 V) dark current densities of the devices. A comparison is made of the correlation between the reverse bias current density and dark line density and it is found that, in this range of strain, the forward bias current density varies more. Two growth methods, molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, have been used to produce the wafers and no difference between the growth methods has been found in dark line or current density variations with strain.

  4. Piezo-Phototronic Effect Controlled Dual-Channel Visible light Communication (PVLC) Using InGaN/GaN Multiquantum Well Nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunhua; Jiang, Chunyan; Zuo, Peng; Huang, Xin; Pu, Xiong; Zhao, Zhenfu; Zhou, Yongli; Li, Linxuan; Chen, Hong; Hu, Weiguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-12-02

    Visible light communication (VLC) simultaneously provides illumination and communication via light emitting diodes (LEDs). Keeping a low bit error rate is essential to communication quality, and holding a stable brightness level is pivotal for illumination function. For the first time, a piezo-phototronic effect controlled visible light communication (PVLC) system based on InGaN/GaN multiquantum wells nanopillars is demonstrated, in which the information is coded by mechanical straining. This approach of force coding is also instrumental to avoid LED blinks, which has less impact on illumination and is much safer to eyes than electrical on/off VLC. The two-channel transmission mode of the system here shows great superiority in error self-validation and error self-elimination in comparison to VLC. This two-channel PVLC system provides a suitable way to carry out noncontact, reliable communication under complex circumstances.

  5. Numerical simulation of vortex-wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ho; Lee, Duck-Joo

    1994-06-01

    Interactions between vortical flows and a solid surface cause one of the primary sources of noise and unsteady loading. The mechanism of the interaction is studied numerically for a single Rankine vortex impinging upon a wedge. An Euler-Lagrangian method is employed to calculate the unsteady, viscous, incompressible flows in two dimensions. A random vortex method is used to describe the vorticity dominant field. A fast vortex method is used to reduce the computational time in the calculation of the convection velocity of each vortex particle. A Schwarz-Christoffel transformation is used to map the numerical domain onto the physical domain. Vortex partical plots, velocity vectors, and streamlines are presented at selected times for both inviscid and viscous interactions. It is observed that the incident rankine vortex distorts and is split by the wedge as it nears and passes the wedge, and the vortices generated from the leading edge toward the underside of the wedge form into a single vortex. The vorticity orientation of the shed vortex is opposite to that of the incident vortex. It is found that the convection velocity of the shed vortex is changed wheen it comes off the leading edge of the wedge, and the strength of the shed vortex varies with the time during the vortex-wedge interaction. This strength variation is presumed to influence the shed vortex convection velocity. The overall features for the interaction agree well with the experimental results of Ziada and Rockwell.

  6. Green functions of vortex operators

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    1981-03-16

    In this paper, we study the euclidean Green functions of the 't Hooft vortex operator, primarily for abelian gauge theories. The operator is written in terms of elementary fields, with emphasis on a form in which it appears as the exponential of a surface integral. We explore the requirement that the Green functions depend only on the boundary of this surface. The Dirac veto problem appears in a new guise. We present a two-dimensional “solvable model” of a Dirac string, which suggests a new solution of the veto problem. The renormalization of the Green functions of the abelian Wilson loop and abelian vortex operator is studied with the aid of the operator product expansion. In each case, an overall multiplication of the operator makes all Green functions finite; a surprising cancellation of divergences occurs with the vortex operator. We present a brief discussion of the relation between the nature of the vacuum and the cluster properties of the Green functions of the Wilson and vortex operators, for a general gauge theory. Finally, the surface-like cluster property of the vortex operator in an abelian Higgs theory is explored in more detail.

  7. Quantitative vortex models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.

    2001-11-01

    This presentation will review attempts to develop models of turbulence, based on compact vortex elements, that can be used both to obtain quantitative estimates of various statistical properties of turbulent fine scales and also to formulate subgrid-transport models for large-eddy simulation (LES). Attention will be focused on a class of stretched-vortex models. Following a brief review of prior work, recent studies of vortex-based modeling of the small-scale behavior of a passive scalar will be discussed. The large-wavenumber spectrum of a passive scalar undergoing mixing by the velocity field of a stretched-spiral vortex will be shown to consist of the sum of two classical power laws, a k-1 Batchelor spectrum for wavenumbers up to the inverse Batchelor scale, and a k-5/3 Obukov-Corrsin spectrum for wavenumbers less than the inverse Kolmogorov scale (joint work with T.S. Lundgren). We will then focus on the use of stretched vortices as the basic subgrid structure in subgrid-scale (SGS) modeling for LES of turbulent flows. An SGS stress model and a vortex-based scalar-flux model for the LES of flows with turbulent mixing will be outlined. Application of these models to the LES of decaying turbulence, channel flow, the mixing of a passive scalar by homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a mean scalar gradient, and to the LES of compressible turbulence will be described.

  8. Vortex Formation in Shallow Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Donald

    2006-11-01

    Vortical structures having a scale much larger than the depth of the flow, which arise in bluff body wakes, jets, and mixing layers generated in shallow layers, show distinctive features due to the influence of bed friction. Cinema techniques of high-image-density particle image velocimetry are employed to characterize quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional aspects of the vortex development in terms of: patterns of vorticity; flow topology involving definition of critical points; and global spectral and cross-spectral analyses, based on simultaneous time records at thousands of grid points of the cinema imaging. Taken together, these representations lead to an understanding of the relationship between coherent vortex development and unsteadiness along the bed and, furthermore, provide a basis for exploration of concepts generic to separated shear layers in shallow flows. These concepts include: suppression of a primary mode of vortex formation due to bed friction and emergence of another mode; resonant coupling between a gravity wave of the shallow layer and vortex formation, leading to large-scale vortices; and passive and active (open loop) control, which can either retard or enhance the onset of vortex formation. These studies suggest opportunities for further investigation on both experimental and numerical fronts. Collaboration with Haojun Fu, Alis Ekmekci, Jung-Chang Lin, and Muammer Ozgoren is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  10. Vortex Flows at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of research conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) into high-speed vortex flows during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s is presented. The data are for flat plates, cavities, bodies, missiles, wings, and aircraft with Mach numbers of 1.5 to 4.6. Data are presented to show the types of vortex structures that occur at supersonic speeds and the impact of these flow structures on vehicle performance and control. The data show the presence of both small- and large-scale vortex structures for a variety of vehicles, from missiles to transports. For cavities, the data show very complex multiple vortex structures exist at all combinations of cavity depth to length ratios and Mach number. The data for missiles show the existence of very strong interference effects between body and/or fin vortices. Data are shown that highlight the effect of leading-edge sweep, leading-edge bluntness, wing thickness, location of maximum thickness, and camber on the aerodynamics of and flow over delta wings. Finally, a discussion of a design approach for wings that use vortex flows for improved aerodynamic performance at supersonic speeds is presented.

  11. NASA aircraft trailing vortex research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    A brief description is given of NASA's comprehensive program to study the aircraft trailing vortex problem. Wind tunnel experiments are used to develop the detailed processes of wing tip vortex formation and explore different means to either prevent trailing vortices from forming or induce early break-up. Flight tests provide information on trailing vortex system behavior behind large transport aircraft, both near the ground, as in the vicinity of the airport, and at cruise/holding pattern altitudes. Results from some flight tests are used to show how pilots might avoid the dangerous areas when flying in the vicinity of large transport aircraft. Other flight tests will be made to verify and evaluate trailing vortex elimination schemes developed in the model tests. Laser Doppler velocimeters being developed for use in the research program and to locate and measure vortex winds in the airport area are discussed. Field tests have shown that the laser Doppler velocimeter measurements compare well with those from cup anemometers.

  12. Vortex waves in sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Centeno, R.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Waves in the magnetized solar atmosphere are one of the favourite means of transferring and depositing energy into the solar corona. The study of waves brings information not just on the dynamics of the magnetized plasma, but also on the possible ways in which the corona is heated. Aims: The identification and analysis of the phase singularities or dislocations provide us with a complementary approach to the magnetoacoustic and Aflvén waves propagating in the solar atmosphere. They allow us to identify individual wave modes, shedding light on the probability of excitation or the nature of the triggering mechanism. Methods: We use a time series of Doppler shifts measured in two spectral lines, filtered around the three-minute period region. The data show a propagating magnetoacoustic slow mode with several dislocations and, in particular, a vortex line. We study under what conditions the different wave modes propagating in the umbra can generate the observed dislocations. Results: The observed dislocations can be fully interpreted as a sequence of sausage and kink modes excited sequentially on average during 15 min. Kink and sausage modes appear to be excited independently and sequentially. The transition from one to the other lasts less than three minutes. During the transition we observe and model the appearance of superoscillations inducing large phase gradients and phase mixing. Conclusions: The analysis of the observed wave dislocations leads us to the identification of the propagating wave modes in umbrae. The identification in the data of superoscillatory regions during the transition from one mode to the other may be an important indicator of the location of wave dissipation.

  13. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  14. Vortex chains travelling with discrete velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishevskii, A. S.; Silin, V. P.; Uryupin, S. A.; Uspenskii, S. G.

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that Swihart waves slowing down caused by Josephson junction spatial dispersion leads to the new field periodic nonlinear vortex states moving with discrete velocities. Swihart waves trapping by periodic vortex structures is discovered.

  15. Unstable giant gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2006-03-15

    We find giant graviton solutions in Frolov's three parameter generalization of the Lunin-Maldacena background. The background we study has {gamma}-tilde{sub 1}=0 and {gamma}-tilde{sub 2}={gamma}-tilde{sub 3}={gamma}-tilde. This class of backgrounds provides a nonsupersymmetric example of the gauge theory/gravity correspondence that can be tested quantitatively, as recently shown by Frolov, Roiban, and Tseytlin. The giant graviton solutions we find have a greater energy than the point gravitons, making them unstable states. Despite this, we find striking quantitative agreement between the gauge theory and gravity descriptions of open strings attached to the giant.

  16. Giant vortices in combined harmonic and quartic traps

    SciTech Connect

    Aftalion, Amandine; Danaila, Ionut

    2004-03-01

    We consider a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate confined in combined harmonic and quartic traps, following recent experiments [V. Bretin, S. Stock, Y. Seurin, and J. Dalibard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 050403 (2004)]. We investigate numerically the behavior of the wave function which solves the three-dimensional Gross Pitaevskii equation and analyze in detail the structure of vortices. For a quartic-plus-harmonic potential, as the angular velocity increases, the vortex lattice evolves into a vortex array with hole. The merging of vortices into the hole is highly three dimensional, starting from the top and bottom of the condensate to reach the center. We also investigate the case of a quartic-minus-harmonic potential, not covered by experiments or previous numerical works. For intermediate repulsive potentials, we show that the transition to a vortex array with hole takes place for lower angular velocities, when the lattice is made up of a small number of vortices. For the strong repulsive case, a transition from a giant vortex to a hole with a circle of vortices around is observed.

  17. Generation of vortex circular Airy beam through binary amplitude digital hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Lu, Rong-De

    2016-02-01

    Airy beam is a kind of wavepacket existing in the form of photons, electrons, and plasmonics. Well known as diffraction-free beam, optical Airy beam tends to accelerate in transverse space with a parabolic trajectory, and exhibits self-healing property when partially blocked. Those properties have attracted a great deal of research interests and applications. Circular Airy beam, exhibiting cylindrically symmetric intensity pattern and abruptly autofocusing characteristics in the linear media, is a variant of Airy-like wave. Optical vortex, on the other hand, is a kind of phase singularity. We present to shape the autofocusing Airy beam with a vortex phase structure, which was realized through the binary amplitude modulation with a digital micromirror device (DMD). Each mirror on the DMD could be electronically addressed to situate at either of the two solid positional states corresponding to on and off. Shaping the light into a specific mode requires the calculation of the amplitude pattern for display on the DMD. By reshaping individual DMD pixels into giant pixels, the complex field of the vortex Airy beam could be encoded with a super-pixel method. The propagation property of the vortex Airy beam was investigated through numerical simulation for different topological charges. Furthermore, the propagation characteristics of this beam in free space were verified and discussed through the experiments. We anticipate that the proposed vortex Airy beam in particle trapping, biological field and optical communications. This method with DMD can also be used to generate other beams with different characteristics.

  18. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. Two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies are emphasized. Robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, time-marching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming are treated. Operation counts for unbounded and periodic flows are given, and two algorithms designed to speed up the calculations are described.

  19. Magnetic Vortex Based Transistor Operations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, D.; Barman, S.; Barman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan–out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT). PMID:24531235

  20. The free compressible viscous vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of compressibility on free (unsteady) viscous heat-conducting vortices. Analytical solutions are found in the limit of large but finite Reynolds number and small but finite Mach number. It is shown that the spreading of the vortex causes a radial flow. This flow is given by the solution of an ordinary differential equation, which gives the dependence of the radial velocity on the tangential velocity, density, and temperature profiles of the vortex. Estimates of the radial velocity found by solving this equation are found to be in good agreement with numerical solutions of the full equations. The equations for the viscous evolution are expanded in powers of Mach number to obtain detailed analytical solutions. It is shown that swirling axisymmetric compressible flows generate negative radial velocities far from the vortex core owing to viscous effects, regardless of the initial distributions of vorticity, density, and entropy.

  1. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  2. Magnetic vortex based transistor operations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Barman, S; Barman, A

    2014-02-17

    Transistors constitute the backbone of modern day electronics. Since their advent, researchers have been seeking ways to make smaller and more efficient transistors. Here, we demonstrate a sustained amplification of magnetic vortex core gyration in coupled two and three vortices by controlling their relative core polarities. This amplification is mediated by a cascade of antivortex solitons travelling through the dynamic stray field. We further demonstrated that the amplification can be controlled by switching the polarity of the middle vortex in a three vortex sequence and the gain can be controlled by the input signal amplitude. An attempt to show fan-out operation yielded gain for one of the symmetrically placed branches which can be reversed by switching the core polarity of all the vortices in the network. The above observations promote the magnetic vortices as suitable candidates to work as stable bipolar junction transistors (BJT).

  3. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greengard, C. A.

    1984-08-01

    Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms. The method of Anderson in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field is discussed. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed.

  4. Cutting of bent vortex lines

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenleithner, P.

    1982-07-01

    One of the major problems in the application of type II superconductors is the appearance of resistivity in case where a current-carrying specimen is in a longitudinal magnetic field. This is explained by the onset of flux-line cutting events, followed by cross-joining of the line parts. The calculation given here shows the amount of repulsive force and energy between two curved vortex lines and examines the general stability of the vortex-vortex system. First, the actual interaction potential between curved vortices is computed. It includes all electromagnetic and core overlap terms of interactions and self-interaction, and allows computation of the system energy under all curved vortex-line configurations. A computer program is used to find the form of lowest free energy. To do this, special trial functions are established to describe the three-dimensional form of the vortex-vortex system. In these functions parameters determine the qualitative and quantitative form. The asymptotic boundary conditions are built into the nature of the trial functions. The computer program now minimizes the free energy with respect to these parameters. The resulting repulsive energy and force are more than ten times less than the known results for straight flux lines, especially for small asymptotic cutting angles. There is no sharp maximum in the plot of repulsive force versus flux-line separation. A remarkable results is the loss of general stability below a separation distance of several London penetration depths, depending on the cutting angle and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter. The explanation lies in the local attraction of central sections of the vortices as a result of configurational adaption. This explains the onset of resistance at small currents and small magnetic fields.

  5. Coulombic contribution and fat center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2007-02-27

    The fat (thick) center vortex model is one of the phenomenological models which is fairly successful to interpret the linear potential between static sources. However, the Coulombic part of the potential has not been investigated by the model yet. In an attempt to get the Coulombic contribution and to remove the concavity of the potentials, we are studying different vortex profiles and vortex sizes.

  6. Generation of Nonlinear Vortex Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yue-Yue; Feng, Xun-Li; Liu, Chengpu

    2016-07-01

    We numerically study the propagation of a few-cycle pulse carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a dense atomic system. Nonlinear precursors consisting of high-order vortex harmonics are generated in the transmitted field due to carrier effects associated with ultrafast Bloch oscillation. The nonlinear precursors survive to propagation effects and are well separated with the main pulse, which provides a straightforward way to measure precursors. By virtue of carrying high-order OAM, the obtained vortex precursors as information carriers have potential applications in optical information and communication fields where controllable loss, large information-carrying capacity, and high speed communication are required.

  7. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichhardt, Charles; Reichhardt, Cynthia J; Libal, Andras J

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  8. The Next Giant Step

    NASA Video Gallery

    Artist Robert McCall painted "The Next Giant Step" in 1979 to commemorate the heroism and courage of spaceflight pioneers. Located in the lobby of Johnson's building 2, the mural depicts America's ...

  9. The Giant Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Dennis

    1998-01-01

    Provides directions for the construction of giant plastic cells, including details for building and installing the organelles. Also contains instructions for preparing the ribosomes, nucleolus, nucleus, and mitochondria. (DDR)

  10. Chirality induced tilted-hill giant Nernst signal.

    PubMed

    Kotetes, P; Varelogiannis, G

    2010-03-12

    We reveal a novel source of a giant Nernst response exhibiting strong nonlinear temperature and magnetic field dependence, including the mysterious tilted-hill temperature profile observed in a pleiad of materials. The phenomenon results directly from the formation of a chiral ground state, e.g., a chiral d-density wave, which is compatible with the eventual observation of diamagnetism and is distinctly different from the usual quasiparticle and vortex Nernst mechanisms. Our picture provides a unified understanding of the anomalous thermoelectricity observed in materials as diverse as the hole-doped cuprates and heavy-fermion compounds like URu(2)Si(2).

  11. Scattering of electromagnetic wave by vortex flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jian-Ye; Liu, Jing-Yu; Mahmood, Waqas; Zhao, Qing

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the scattering behaviour of an electromagnetic wave by vortex flow is studied in detail by solving the first-order (in v / c) Maxwell's equation in the cylindrical coordinate system (r, φ, z) and the general solutions are obtained. From these solutions, the differential cross-section of the vortex flow is calculated and the electromagnetic scattering characteristics of the vortex flow are discussed. The dependence of differential cross-section on the velocity profile and the radius of the vortex flow is investigated independently. Besides, by considering the dependence of scattering characteristics on the frequency of an incident wave we conclude that the vortex flow has frequency selectivity.

  12. Evolution of a plasma vortex in air.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Chu, Hong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    We report the generation of a vortex-shaped plasma in air by using a capacitively coupled dielectric barrier discharge system. We show that a vortex-shaped plasma can be produced inside a helium gas vortex and is capable of propagating for 3 cm. The fluctuation of the plasma ring shows a scaling relation with the Reynolds number of the vortex. The transient discharge reveals the property of corona discharge, where the conducting channel within the gas vortex and the blur plasma emission are observed at each half voltage cycle.

  13. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique W.; Bauer, Ross O.; Grosberg, Alexander Y.; Grier, David G.

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  14. Vortex Whistle in Radial Intake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    RTO-MP-AVT-110 22 - 1 Vortex Whistle in Radial Intake Dr. Man-Chun Tse Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil , Quebec...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil , Quebec, Canada, J4G 1A1 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  15. Particle-vortex symmetric liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an effective theory with manifest particle-vortex symmetry for disordered thin films undergoing a magnetic field-tuned superconductor-insulator transition. The theory may enable one to access both the critical properties of the strong-disorder limit, which has recently been confirmed by Breznay et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 113, 280 (2016), 10.1073/pnas.1522435113] to exhibit particle-vortex symmetric electrical response, and the nearby metallic phase discovered earlier by Mason and Kapitulnik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 5341 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.5341] in less disordered samples. Within the effective theory, the Cooper-pair and field-induced vortex degrees of freedom are simultaneously incorporated into an electrically neutral Dirac fermion minimally coupled to a (emergent) Chern-Simons gauge field. A derivation of the theory follows upon mapping the superconductor-insulator transition to the integer quantum Hall plateau transition and the subsequent use of Son's particle-hole symmetric composite Fermi liquid. Remarkably, particle-vortex symmetric response does not require the introduction of disorder; rather, it results when the Dirac fermions exhibit vanishing Hall effect. The theory predicts approximately equal (diagonal) thermopower and Nernst signal with a deviation parameterized by the measured electrical Hall response at the symmetric point.

  16. Vortex cavitation: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.E.A.; Maines, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a significant problem. An important aspect is the need for a better understanding of the physics of cavitation in the vortices tailing from lifting surfaces such as propellers and hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This research was aimed at investigating the interrelated effects of vortex structure, including the details of the vortex roll-up process close to the tip, dissolved gas content, and water quality as it related to the amount of tension that can be sustained in the vortex before cavitation occurs. The experimental phase includes lift and drag measurements, oil flow visualization of the boundary layer flow on the lifting surfaces, and observation of both cavitation inception and desinence in strong and weak water. An improved photographic technique has been developed to study the complex bubble dynamics inherent in the inception process. Preliminary results indicate that the bubble growth process is strongly dependent on the size and number of nuclei in the free stream. Numerical simulations indicate that the minimum pressure in the vortex is very close to the tip of the lifting surface, in agreement with the observation that the inception process also occurs very close to the tip under most conditions.

  17. The 1987 Ground Vortex Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margason, Richard J. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the current understanding of the ground vortex phenomena and their effects on aircraft, and to establish directions for further research on advanced, high-performance aircraft designs, particularly those concepts utilizing powered-lift systems; e.g., V/STOL. ASTOVL, and STOL aircraft.

  18. Three-dimensional vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Greengard, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    Three-dimensional vortex methods for the computation of incompressible fluid flow are presented from a unified point of view. Reformulations of the filament method and of the method of Beale and Majda show them to be very similar algorithms; in both of them, the vorticity is evaluated by a discretization of the spatial derivative of the flow map. The fact that the filament method, the one which is most often used in practice, can be formulated as a version of the Beale and Majda algorithm in a curved coordinate system is used to give a convergence theorem for the filament method. The method of Anderson is also discussed, in which vorticity is evaluated by the exact differentiation of the approximate velocity field. It is shown that, in the inviscid version of this algorithm, each approximate vector of vorticity remains tangent to a material curve moving with the computed flow, with magnitude proportional to the stretching of this vortex line. This remains true even when time discretization is taken into account. It is explained that the expanding core vortex method converges to a system of equations different from the Navier-Stokes equations. Computations with the filament method of the inviscid interaction of two vortex rings are reported, both with single filaments in each ring and with a fully three-dimensional discretization of vorticity. The dependence on parameters is discussed, and convergence of the computed solutions is observed. 36 references, 4 figures.

  19. Perturbative theory for Brownian vortexes.

    PubMed

    Moyses, Henrique W; Bauer, Ross O; Grosberg, Alexander Y; Grier, David G

    2015-06-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic machines that use static nonconservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. Here we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak nonconservative driving. The first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers.

  20. Extended applications of the vortex lattice method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The application of the vortex lattice method to problems not usually dealt with by this technique is considered. It is shown that if the discrete vortex lattice is considered as an approximation to surface-distributed vorticity, then the concept of the generalized principal part of an integral yields a residual term to the vortex-induced velocity that renders the vortex lattice method valid for supersonic flow. Special schemes for simulating non-zero thickness lifting surfaces and fusiform bodies with vortex lattice elements are presented. Thickness effects of wing-like components are simulated by a double vortex lattice layer, and fusiform bodies are represented by a vortex grid arranged on a series of concentric cylindrical surfaces. Numerical considerations peculiar to the application of these techniques are briefly discussed.

  1. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  2. Vortex spin-torque oscillator using Co2FexMn1 -xSi Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Seki, Takeshi; Takanashi, Koki

    2016-09-01

    We show spin-transfer-torque-driven vortex oscillations in current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance junctions using epitaxially grown Co2FexMn1 -xSi (CFMS) Heusler alloy thin films. The soft magnetic property and high spin polarization of CFMS enable us to realize vortex oscillation emitting large microwave power with a low threshold current. The output power is maximized for a certain Fe-Mn composition ratio associated with a reduction of the threshold current for the oscillation, which is in agreement with a general model for spin-torque oscillation. Through comparison with an analytical theory that describes the translational motion of a vortex core, we show that the vortex core motion excited in the present device is inhomogeneous along the thickness direction. In spite of the inhomogeneity, the gyration radius at the CFMS/spacer interface region was estimated to be ˜75 % of the actual ferromagnetic layer radius, which indicates that the CFMS-based all-metallic junction is useful for achieving large-amplitude vortex core motion. This comprehensive investigation would also be useful for designing high-performance all-metallic nano-oscillators based on magnetic vortex dynamics.

  3. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus*

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion. PMID:24474093

  4. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus.

    PubMed

    Viana, Ana Carolina Leite; Gontijo, Bernardo; Bittencourt, Flávia Vasques

    2013-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevus is usually defined as a melanocytic lesion present at birth that will reach a diameter ≥ 20 cm in adulthood. Its incidence is estimated in <1:20,000 newborns. Despite its rarity, this lesion is important because it may associate with severe complications such as malignant melanoma, affect the central nervous system (neurocutaneous melanosis), and have major psychosocial impact on the patient and his family due to its unsightly appearance. Giant congenital melanocytic nevus generally presents as a brown lesion, with flat or mammilated surface, well-demarcated borders and hypertrichosis. Congenital melanocytic nevus is primarily a clinical diagnosis. However, congenital nevi are histologically distinguished from acquired nevi mainly by their larger size, the spread of the nevus cells to the deep layers of the skin and by their more varied architecture and morphology. Although giant congenital melanocytic nevus is recognized as a risk factor for the development of melanoma, the precise magnitude of this risk is still controversial. The estimated lifetime risk of developing melanoma varies from 5 to 10%. On account of these uncertainties and the size of the lesions, the management of giant congenital melanocytic nevus needs individualization. Treatment may include surgical and non-surgical procedures, psychological intervention and/or clinical follow-up, with special attention to changes in color, texture or on the surface of the lesion. The only absolute indication for surgery in giant congenital melanocytic nevus is the development of a malignant neoplasm on the lesion.

  5. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  6. Two vortex-blob regularization models for vortex sheet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik

    2014-04-01

    Evolving vortex sheets generally form singularities in finite time. The vortex blob model is an approach to regularize the vortex sheet motion and evolve past singularity formation. In this paper, we thoroughly compare two such regularizations: the Krasny-type model and the Beale-Majda model. It is found from a linear stability analysis that both models have exponentially decaying growth rates for high wavenumbers, but the Beale-Majda model has a faster decaying rate than the Krasny model. The Beale-Majda model thus gives a stronger regularization to the solution. We apply the blob models to the two example problems: a periodic vortex sheet and an elliptically loaded wing. The numerical results show that the solutions of the two models are similar in large and small scales, but are fairly different in intermediate scales. The sheet of the Beale-Majda model has more spiral turns than the Krasny-type model for the same value of the regularization parameter δ. We give numerical evidences that the solutions of the two models agree for an increasing amount of spiral turns and tend to converge to the same limit as δ is decreased. The inner spiral turns of the blob models behave differently with the outer turns and satisfy a self-similar form. We also examine irregular motions of the sheet at late times and find that the irregular motions shrink as δ is decreased. This fact suggests a convergence of the blob solution to the weak solution of infinite regular spiral turns.

  7. Vortex tube reconnection at Re = 104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rees, Wim M.; Hussain, Fazle; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2012-07-01

    We present simulations of the long-time dynamics of two anti-parallel vortex tubes with and without initial axial flow, at Reynolds number Re = Γ/ν = 104. Simulations were performed in a periodic domain with a remeshed vortex method using 785 × 106 particles. We quantify the vortex dynamics of the primary vortex reconnection that leads to the formation of elliptical rings with axial flow and report for the first time a subsequent collision of these rings. In the absence of initial axial flow, a -5/3 slope of the energy spectrum is observed during the first reconnection of the tubes. The resulting elliptical vortex rings experience a coiling of their vortex lines imparting an axial flow inside their cores. These rings eventually collide, exhibiting a -7/3 slope of the energy spectrum. Studies of vortex reconnection with an initial axial flow exhibit also the -7/3 slope during the initial collision as well as in the subsequent collision of the ensuing elliptical vortex rings. We quantify the detailed vortex dynamics of these collisions and examine the role of axial flow in the breakup of vortex structures.

  8. Interaction of Vortex Ring with Cutting Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex ring impinging on a thin cutting plate was made experimentally using Volumetric 3-component Velocitmetry (v3v) technique. The vortex rings were generated with piston-cylinder vortex ring generator using piston stroke-to-diameter ratios and Re at 2-3 and 1500 - 3000, respectively. The cutting of vortex rings below center line leads to the formation of secondary vortices on each side of the plate which is look like two vortex rings, and a third vortex ring propagates further downstream in the direction of the initial vortex ring, which is previously showed by flow visualization study of Weigand (1993) and called ``trifurcation''. Trifurcation is very sensitive to the initial Reynolds number and the position of the plate with respect to the vortex ring generator pipe. The present work seeks more detailed investigation on the trifurcation using V3V technique. Conditions for the formation of trifurcation is analyzed and compared with Weigand (1993). The formed secondary vortex rings and the propagation of initial vortex ring in the downstream of the plate are analyzed by calculating their circulation, energy and trajectories.

  9. Combined electrical and resonant optical excitation characterization of multi-quantum well InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presa, S.; Maaskant, P. P.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Corbett, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and electrical characteristics of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well light-emitting diode (LED) structures under resonant optical pumping and varying electrical bias. A 5 quantum well LED with a thin well (1.5 nm) and a relatively thick barrier (6.6 nm) shows strong bias-dependent properties in the emission spectra, poor photovoltaic carrier escape under forward bias and an increase in effective resistance when compared with a 10 quantum well LED with a thin (4 nm) barrier. These properties are due to a strong piezoelectric field in the well and associated reduced field in the thicker barrier. We compare the voltage ideality factors for the LEDs under electrical injection, light emission with current, photovoltaic mode (PV) and photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PV and PL methods provide similar values for the ideality which are lower than for the resistance-limited electrical method. Under optical pumping the presence of an n-type InGaN underlayer in a commercial LED sample is shown to act as a second photovoltaic source reducing the photovoltage and the extracted ideality factor to less than 1. The use of photovoltaic measurements together with bias-dependent spectrally resolved luminescence is a powerful method to provide valuable insights into the dynamics of GaN LEDs.

  10. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  11. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  12. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  13. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  14. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  15. The Helicity of Vortex Filaments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrich, Dean; Tao, Louis

    1996-03-01

    The helicity, defined by H = int dV v \\cdot nabla × v, is a conserved quantity of the three-dimensional Euler equations. Traditionally the helicity has been viewed as a measure of the topology of vortex lines, but it is shown that the helicity measures their geometry as well as their topology (J.D. Bekenstein, Physics Letters B), 282 (1992) 44-49.. The existence of helicity-preserving reconnection events is discussed.

  16. Numerical simulation of vortex breakdown by the vortex-filament method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The vortex filament method was applied to the simulation of vortex breakdown. The principal vortex region was represented by multiple filaments, and an axial velocity component was induced by a spiral winding of the filaments. First, an accuracy check was performed for a cylindrical swirling flow with simple analytical expressions for the axial and theta velocities. The result suggests that the flow field is simulated to any accuracy by increasing the number of filaments. Second, an axisymmetric type vortex breakdown was simulated, with experimental data serving as upstream conditions. The calculated axial and theta velocity contours show the breakdown of the vortex, including a rapid change in the vortex core, followed axially by a recovery zone and then a second breakdown. When three dimensional initial data are used the second breakdown appears to be of the spiral type in correspondence with experimental observations. The present method is easily used to simulate other types of vortex breakdown or other vortex flows with axial velocity.

  17. Prediction and Control of Vortex Dominated and Vortex-wake Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments under this research grant, including a list of publications and dissertations, produced in the field of prediction and control of vortex dominated and vortex wake flows.

  18. Vortex methods for separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, Philippe R.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations by Lagrangian vortex methods is discussed. The mathematical background is presented in an elementary fashion and includes the relationship with traditional point-vortex studies, the convergence to smooth solutions of the Euler equations, and the essential differences between two- and three-dimensional cases. The difficulties in extending the method to viscous or compressible flows are explained. The overlap with the excellent review articles available is kept to a minimum and more emphasis is placed on the area of expertise, namely two-dimensional flows around bluff bodies. When solid walls are present, complete mathematical models are not available and a more heuristic attitude must be adopted. The imposition of inviscid and viscous boundary conditions without conformal mappings or image vortices and the creation of vorticity along solid walls are examined in detail. Methods for boundary-layer treatment and the question of the Kutta condition are discussed. Practical aspects and tips helpful in creating a method that really works are explained. The topics include the robustness of the method and the assessment of accuracy, vortex-core profiles, timemarching schemes, numerical dissipation, and efficient programming. Calculations of flows past streamlined or bluff bodies are used as examples when appropriate.

  19. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  20. Topology of Vortex-Wing Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Chris; Rockwell, Donald

    2016-11-01

    Aircraft flying together in an echelon or V formation experience aerodynamic advantages. Impingement of the tip vortex from the leader (upstream) wing on the follower wing can yield an increase of lift to drag ratio. This enhancement is known to depend on the location of vortex impingement on the follower wing. Particle image velocimetry is employed to determine streamline topology in successive crossflow planes, which characterize the streamwise evolution of the vortex structure along the chord of the follower wing and into its wake. Different modes of vortex-follower wing interaction are created by varying both the spanwise and vertical locations of the leader wing. These modes are defined by differences in the number and locations of critical points of the flow topology, and involve bifurcation, attenuation, and mutual induction. The bifurcation and attenuation modes decrease the strength of the tip vortex from the follower wing. In contrast, the mutual induction mode increases the strength of the follower tip vortex. AFOSR.

  1. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  2. Giant optical manipulation.

    PubMed

    Shvedov, Vladlen G; Rode, Andrei V; Izdebskaya, Yana V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2010-09-10

    We demonstrate a new principle of optical trapping and manipulation increasing more than 1000 times the manipulation distance by harnessing strong thermal forces while suppressing their stochastic nature with optical vortex beams. Our approach expands optical manipulation of particles into a gas media and provides a full control over trapped particles, including the optical transport and pinpoint positioning of ∼100  μm objects over a meter-scale distance with ±10  μm accuracy.

  3. Giant scrotal elephantiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuepper, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    How much can a man carry? Penoscrotal elephantiasis is a debilitating syndrome. This is a case report of a patient with giant genital elephantiasis secondary to long-standing lymphogranuloma venereum infection in Ethiopia. Complete surgical resection of the pathologic tissue and penile reconstruction was undertaken with good cosmetic and functional results.

  4. Electroluminescence of Giant Stretchability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Can Hui; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Chen, Yong Mei; Suo, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new type of electroluminescent device achieves giant stretchability by integrating electronic and ionic components. The device uses phosphor powders as electroluminescent materials, and hydrogels as stretchable and transparent ionic conductors. Subject to cyclic voltage, the phosphor powders luminesce, but the ionic conductors do not electrolyze. The device produces constant luminance when stretched up to an area strain of 1500%.

  5. Point vortex modelling of the wake dynamics behind asymmetric vortex generator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, D.; Ferreira, C.; Ragni, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple inviscid point vortex model to study the dynamics of asymmetric vortex rows, as might appear behind misaligned vortex generator vanes. Starting from the existing solution of the infinite vortex cascade, a numerical model of four base-vortices is chosen to represent two primary counter-rotating vortex pairs and their mirror plane images, introducing the vortex strength ratio as a free parameter. The resulting system of equations is also defined in terms of the vortex row separation and the qualitative features of the ensuing motion are mapped. A translating and orbiting regime are identified for different cascade separations. The latter occurs for all unequal strength vortex pairs. Thus, the motion is further classified by studying the cyclic behaviour of the orbiting regime and it is shown that for small mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting length and time scales are sufficiently large as to appear, in the near wake, as translational (non-orbiting). However, for larger mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting motion approaches the order of the starting height of the vortex. Comparisons between experimental data and the potential flow model show qualitative agreement whilst viscous effects account for the major discrepancies. Despite this, the model captures the orbital mode observed in the measurements and provides an impetus for considering the impact of these complex interactions on vortex generator designs.

  6. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.; Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-01

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem," Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., "The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid," Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  7. Vectorial complex-source vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, S.; Banzer, P.

    2014-08-01

    The scalar complex source vortex model is an accurate description of highly focused scalar vortices. We use it to construct a variety of vectorial solutions of Maxwell's equations describing highly focused and variously polarized vector vortex beams accurately. Three different families of optical vector vortex beams are presented and studied in detail. In this model, optical vortices derived within Cartesian symmetry correspond to circularly and linearly polarized highly focused vortex beams in the focus of a high numerical aperture focusing system. In addition, we report on vortical complex-source beams derived within cylindrical and spherical symmetries which exhibit very special and intriguing properties.

  8. Optical vortex phase-shifting digital holography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-Shan; Cheng, Xin; Ren, Xiu-Yun; Ding, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2004-10-18

    We report a new optical vortex phase-shifting method for digital holography, in which an optical vortex mode is taken as the reference beam for holographic recording, and the required phase shifts are directly generated by rotating the vortex mode. In digital reconstruction, the complex amplitude of the object wave can be retrieved by use of the conventional phase shifting algorithm on condition that the digital illumination beam is replaced by an vortex beam with the same topological charge as the reference used. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  9. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  10. Leapfrogging of multiple coaxial viscous vortex rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M. Lou, J.; Lim, T. T.

    2015-03-15

    A recent theoretical study [Borisov, Kilin, and Mamaev, “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging, choreographies and the stability problem,” Regular Chaotic Dyn. 18, 33 (2013); Borisov et al., “The dynamics of vortex rings: Leapfrogging in an ideal and viscous fluid,” Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 031415 (2014)] shows that when three coaxial vortex rings travel in the same direction in an incompressible ideal fluid, each of the vortex rings alternately slips through (or leapfrogs) the other two ahead. Here, we use a lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscous vortex rings with an identical initial circulation, radius, and separation distance with the aim of studying how viscous effect influences the outcomes of the leapfrogging process. For the case of two identical vortex rings, our computation shows that leapfrogging can be achieved only under certain favorable conditions, which depend on Reynolds number, vortex core size, and initial separation distance between the two rings. For the case of three coaxial vortex rings, the result differs from the inviscid model and shows that the second vortex ring always slips through the leading ring first, followed by the third ring slipping through the other two ahead. A simple physical model is proposed to explain the observed behavior.

  11. Investigation of the Vortex Tab. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffler, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was made into the drag reduction capability of vortex tabs on delta wing vortex flaps. The vortex tab is an up-deflected leading edge portion of the vortex flap. Tab deflection augments vortex suction on the flap, thus improving its thrust, but the tab itself is drag producing. Whether a net improvement in the drag reduction can be obtained with vortex tabs, in comparison with plane vortex flaps of the same total area, was the objective of this investigation. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on two models, and analytical studies were performed on one of them using a free vortex sheet theory.

  12. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  13. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. we consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength Of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. We shall present simulation results of an oscillating plate at various Reynolds numbers and Strouhal frequencies.

  14. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  15. The effect of tip vortex structure on helicopter noise due to blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, T. L.; Widnall, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    A potential cause of helicopter impulsive noise, commonly called blade slap, is the unsteady lift fluctuation on a rotor blade due to interaction with the vortex trailed from another blade. The relationship between vortex structure and the intensity of the acoustic signal is investigated. The analysis is based on a theoretical model for blade/vortex interaction. Unsteady lift on the blades due to blade/vortex interaction is calculated using linear unsteady aerodynamic theory, and expressions are derived for the directivity, frequency spectrum, and transient signal of the radiated noise. An inviscid rollup model is used to calculate the velocity profile in the trailing vortex from the spanwise distribution of blade tip loading. A few cases of tip loading are investigated, and numerical results are presented for the unsteady lift and acoustic signal due to blade/vortex interaction. The intensity of the acoustic signal is shown to be quite sensitive to changes in tip vortex structure.

  16. Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs in the limit of vanishing vortex line curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, V.; Krueger, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    Pinch-off of axisymmetric vortex pairs generated by flow between concentric cylinders with radial separation ΔR was studied numerically and compared with planar vortex dipole behavior. The axisymmetric case approaches planar vortex dipole behavior in the limit of vanishing ΔR. The flow was simulated at a jet Reynolds number of 1000 (based on ΔR and the jet velocity), jet pulse length-to-gap ratio ( /L Δ R ) in the range 10-20, and gap-to-outer radius ratio ( /Δ R R o ) in the range 0.01-0.1. Contrary to investigations of strictly planar flows, vortex pinch-off was observed for all gap sizes investigated. This difference was attributed to the less constrained geometry considered, suggesting that even very small amounts of vortex line curvature and/or vortex stretching may disrupt the absence of pinch-off observed in strictly planar vortex dipoles.

  17. Vortex metrology using Fourier analysis techniques: vortex networks correlation fringes.

    PubMed

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Sierra-Sosa, Daniel; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Néstor

    2012-10-20

    In this work, we introduce an alternative method of analysis in vortex metrology based on the application of the Fourier optics techniques. The first part of the procedure is conducted as is usual in vortex metrology for uniform in-plane displacement determination. On the basis of two recorded intensity speckled distributions, corresponding to two states of a diffuser coherently illuminated, we numerically generate an analytical signal from each recorded intensity pattern by using a version of the Riesz integral transform. Then, from each analytical signal, a two-dimensional pseudophase map is generated in which the vortices are located and characterized in terms of their topological charges and their core's structural properties. The second part of the procedure allows obtaining Young's interference fringes when Fourier transforming the light passing through a diffracting mask with multiple apertures at the locations of the homologous vortices. In fact, we use the Fourier transform as a mathematical operation to compute the far-field diffraction intensity pattern corresponding to the multiaperture set. Each aperture from the set is associated with a rectangular hole that coincides both in shape and size with a pixel from recorded images. We show that the fringe analysis can be conducted as in speckle photography in an extended range of displacement measurements. Effects related with speckled decorrelation are also considered. Our experimental results agree with those of speckle photography in the range in which both techniques are applicable.

  18. InGaAs/GaAsP strain balanced multi-quantum wires grown on misoriented GaAs substrates for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Álvarez, D.; Thomas, T.; Führer, M.; Hylton, N. P.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Lackner, D.; Philipps, S. P.; Bett, A. W.; Sodabanlu, H.; Fujii, H.; Watanabe, K.; Sugiyama, M.; Nasi, L.; Campanini, M.

    2014-08-01

    Quantum wires (QWRs) form naturally when growing strain balanced InGaAs/GaAsP multi-quantum wells (MQW) on GaAs [100] 6° misoriented substrates under the usual growth conditions. The presence of wires instead of wells could have several unexpected consequences for the performance of the MQW solar cells, both positive and negative, that need to be assessed to achieve high conversion efficiencies. In this letter, we study QWR properties from the point of view of their performance as solar cells by means of transmission electron microscopy, time resolved photoluminescence and external quantum efficiency (EQE) using polarised light. We find that these QWRs have longer lifetimes than nominally identical QWs grown on exact [100] GaAs substrates, of up to 1 μs, at any level of illumination. We attribute this effect to an asymmetric carrier escape from the nanostructures leading to a strong 1D-photo-charging, keeping electrons confined along the wire and holes in the barriers. In principle, these extended lifetimes could be exploited to enhance carrier collection and reduce dark current losses. Light absorption by these QWRs is 1.6 times weaker than QWs, as revealed by EQE measurements, which emphasises the need for more layers of nanostructures or the use light trapping techniques. Contrary to what we expected, QWR show very low absorption anisotropy, only 3.5%, which was the main drawback a priori of this nanostructure. We attribute this to a reduced lateral confinement inside the wires. These results encourage further study and optimization of QWRs for high efficiency solar cells.

  19. Correlation of optical and structural properties of GaN/AlN multi-quantum wells—Ab initio and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminska, A.; Strak, P.; Sakowski, K.; Sobczak, K.; Domagala, J. Z.; Grzanka, E.

    2016-01-07

    The results of comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of binary GaN/AlN multi-quantum well (MQW) systems oriented along polar c-direction of their wurtzite structure are presented. A series of structures with quantum wells and barriers of various thicknesses were grown by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy and characterized by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that in general the structures of good quality were obtained, with the defect density decreasing with increasing quantum well thickness. The optical transition energies in these structures were investigated comparing experimental measurements with ab initio calculations of the entire GaN/AlN MQW structure depending on the QW widths and strains, allowing for direct determination of the energies of optical transitions and the electric fields in wells/barriers by electric potential double averaging procedure. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements revealed that the emission efficiency as well as the shape of luminescence spectra correlated well with their structural quality. Additionally, due to the Quantum-Confined Stark Effect, the emission energy decreased by over 1 eV for quantum well thicknesses increasing from 1 nm up to 6 nm, and this effect was accompanied by the drastic drop of the PL efficiency. The experimental results are consistent with theoretical models. Comparison of experimental data obtained by a number of different characterization techniques with the density functional theory results received on the same geometry structure allowed to prove directly the theoretical models and to determine the polarization and the oscillator strengths in the AlN/GaN nitride systems for the first time.

  20. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to continue a development project on a no moving parts vortex shedding flowmeter used for flow measurement of hypergols. The project involved the design and construction of a test loop to evaluate the meter for flow of Freon which simulates the hypergol fluids. Results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of the flow meter as a function of flow rate. A family of flow meters for larger size lines and ranges of flow was sized based on the results of the tested meter.

  1. Vortex motion on surfaces of small curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigoni, Daniele Dunajski, Maciej Manton, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-15

    We consider a single Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface Σ whose Gaussian curvature K is small relative to the size of the vortex, and analyse vortex motion by using geodesics on the moduli space of static solutions. The moduli space is Σ with a modified metric, and we propose that this metric has a universal expansion, in terms of K and its derivatives, around the initial metric on Σ. Using an integral expression for the Kähler potential on the moduli space, we calculate the leading coefficients of this expansion numerically, and find some evidence for their universality. The expansion agrees to first order with the metric resulting from the Ricci flow starting from the initial metric on Σ, but differs at higher order. We compare the vortex motion with the motion of a point particle along geodesics of Σ. Relative to a particle geodesic, the vortex experiences an additional force, which to leading order is proportional to the gradient of K. This force is analogous to the self-force on bodies of finite size that occurs in gravitational motion. -- Highlights: •We study an Abelian Higgs vortex on a surface with small curvature. •A universal expansion for the moduli space metric is proposed. •We numerically check the universality at low orders. •Vortex motion differs from point particle motion because a vortex has a finite size. •Moduli space geometry has similarities with the geometry arising from Ricci flow.

  2. An investigation of the vortex method

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Jr., Duaine Wright

    1994-05-01

    The vortex method is a numerical scheme for solving the vorticity transport equation. Chorin introduced modern vortex methods. The vortex method is a Lagrangian, grid free method which has less intrinsic diffusion than many grid schemes. It is adaptive in the sense that elements are needed only where the vorticity is non-zero. Our description of vortex methods begins with the point vortex method of Rosenhead for two dimensional inviscid flow, and builds upon it to eventually cover the case of three dimensional slightly viscous flow with boundaries. This section gives an introduction to the fundamentals of the vortex method. This is done in order to give a basic impression of the previous work and its line of development, as well as develop some notation and concepts which will be used later. The purpose here is not to give a full review of vortex methods or the contributions made by all the researchers in the field. Please refer to the excellent review papers in Sethian and Gustafson, chapters 1 Sethian, 2 Hald, 3 Sethian, 8 Chorin provide a solid introduction to vortex methods, including convergence theory, application in two dimensions and connection to statistical mechanics and polymers. Much of the information in this review is taken from those chapters, Chorin and Marsden and Batchelor, the chapters are also useful for their extensive bibliographies.

  3. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  4. Vortex avalanches in a type II superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Behnia, K.; Capan, C.; Mailly, D.; Etienne, B.

    1999-12-01

    The authors report on a study of the spatiotemporal variation of magnetic induction in a superconducting niobium sample during a slow sweep of external magnetic field. A sizable fraction of the increase in the local vortex population occurs in abrupt jumps. They compare the size distribution of these avalanches with the predictions of self-organized-criticality models for vortex dynamics.

  5. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  6. Spectral stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    In a global sense it is shown that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is absolutely and monotonically stable with respect to infinitesimal disturbances of all discrete frequencies as long as the viscosity is positive. It is suggested that the Taylor vortex array may also be stable with respect to finite amplitude disturbances.

  7. Vortex attraction and the formation of sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1992-01-01

    A downdraft vortex ring in a stratified atmosphere exhibits universal attraction for nearby vertical magnetic flux bundles. It is speculated that the magnetic fields emerging through the surface of the sun are individually encircled by one or more subsurface vortex rings, providing an important part of the observed clustering of magnetic fibrils to form pores and sunspots.

  8. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  9. Ice Giant Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, A. M.; Arridge, C. S.; Masters, A.; Turtle, E. P.; Simon, A. A.; Hofstadter, M. D.; Turrini, D.; Politi, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Ice Giants in our solar system, Uranus and Neptune, are fundamentally different from their Gas Giant siblings Jupiter and Saturn, from the different proportions of rock and ice to the configuration of their planetary magnetic fields. Kepler space telescope discoveries of exo-planets indicate that planets of this type are among the most ubiquitous universally and therefore a future mission to explore the nature of the Ice Giants in our own solar system will provide insights into the nature of extra-solar system objects in general. Uranus has the smallest self- luminosity of all the planets, potentially related to catastrophic events early in the planet's history, which also may explain Uranus' large obliquity. Uranus' atmosphere is subject to extreme seasonal forcing making it unique in the Solar System. Neptune is also unique in a number of ways, notably its large moon Triton which is likely a captured Kuiper Belt Object and one of only two moons in the solar system with a robustly collisional atmosphere. Similar to Uranus, the angle between the solar wind and the magnetic dipole axis is subject to large-amplitude variations on both diurnal and seasonal timescales, but peculiarly it has one of the quietest magnetospheres of the solar system, at least according to Voyager 2, the only spacecraft to encounter Neptune to date. A comprehensive mission, as advocated in the Decadal Survey, would provide enormous science return but is also challenging and expensive. In this presentation we will discuss mission scenarios and suggest how collaboration between disciplines and internationally can help us to pursue a mission that includes Ice Giant exploration.

  10. Giant cell arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Romero, J

    2003-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA), temporal arteritis or Horton's arteritis, is a systemic vasculitis which involves large and medium sized vessels, especially the extracranial branches of the carotid arteries, in persons usually older than 50 years. Permanent visual loss, ischaemic strokes, and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms are feared complications of GCA. The treatment consists of high dose steroids. Mortality, with a correct treatment, in patients with GCA seems to be similar that of controls. PMID:13679546

  11. Giant Cell Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S

    2016-11-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of giant cell arteritis, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  12. Origin of reversed vortex ratchet motion.

    PubMed

    Gillijns, W; Silhanek, A V; Moshchalkov, V V; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2007-12-14

    We experimentally demonstrate that the origin of multiply reversed rectified vortex motion in an asymmetric pinning landscape not only is a consequence of the vortex-vortex interactions but also essentially depends on the ratio between the characteristic interaction distance and the period of the asymmetric pinning potential. We study four samples with different periods d of the asymmetric potential. For large d the dc voltage V(dc) recorded under a ac excitation indicates that the average vortex drift is from bigger to smaller dots for all explored positive fields. As d is reduced, a series of sign reversals in the dc response are observed as a function of field. We show that the number of sign reversals increases as d decreases. These findings are in agreement with recent computer simulations and illustrate the relevance of the different characteristic lengths for the vortex rectification effects.

  13. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  14. Vortex ratchet induced by controlled edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbu, D.; Gladilin, V. N.; Cuppens, J.; Fritzsche, J.; Tempere, J.; Devreese, J. T.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Silhanek, A. V.; Van de Vondel, J.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the generation of rectified mean vortex displacement resulting from a controlled difference between the surface barriers at the opposite borders of a superconducting strip. Our investigation focuses on Al superconducting strips where, in one of the two sample borders, a saw tooth-like array of micro-indentations has been imprinted. The origin of the vortex ratchet effect is based on the fact that (i) the onset of vortex motion is mainly governed by the entrance/nucleation of vortices and (ii) the current lines bunching produced by the indentations facilitates the entrance/nucleation of vortices. Only for one current direction the indentations are positioned at the side of vortex entry and the onset of the resistive regime is lowered compared to the opposite current direction. This investigation points to the relevance of ubiquitous border effects typically neglected when interpreting vortex ratchet measurements on samples with arrays of local asymmetric pinning sites.

  15. Barotropic Vortex Evolution on a Beta Plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Lloyd J.; Ooyama, Katsuyuki V.

    1990-01-01

    A barotropic, primitive equation (shallow water) model is used on the beta plane to investigate the influence of divergence, total relative angular momentum (RAM) and advective nonlinearities on the evolution of a hurricane-like vortex. The multinested numerical model is based on the spectral application of a finite element representation. The undisturbed fluid depth is taken to be 1 km. Scaling of the vorticity equation, in conjunction with a Bessel function spectral decomposition, indicates that divergence should have a very small effect on the hurricane motion. Simulations with an initially symmetric cyclonic vortex in a resting environment confirm this analysis, and contradict previous published studies on the effect of divergence in a barotropic model.During a 120 h simulation the cyclonic vortex develops asymmetries that have an influence far from the initial circulation. The total RAM within a large circle centered on the vortex decreases with time, and then oscillates about zero. For circles with radii 1000 km, the total RAM approaches, but does not reach, zero. An angular momentum budget indicates that the horizontal angular momentum flux tends to counteract the net Coriolis torque on the vortex. If the total RAM of the initial symmetric vortex is zero, the weak far-field asymmetries are essentially eliminated. The motion of the vortex is not, however, related to the RAM in any simple way.Within a few days the near-vortex asymmetries reach a near-steady state. The Asymmetric Absolute vorticity (AAV) is nearly uniform within 350 km of the vortex center. The homogenization of AAV, which occurs within the closed vortex gyre, is likely due to shearing by the symmetric wind, combined with removal of energy at the smallest scales. The homogenization effectively neutralizes the planetary beta effect, as well as the vorticity associated with an environmental wind.

  16. Stirring properties of vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David

    1991-05-01

    Ring vortex evolution, from the initial roll-up phase through to the final turbulent phase, was experimentally studied to see the dependence of its stirring properties on both the initial (accelerating, constant, decelerating, slow, fast) piston motion as well as on the boundary (tube/hole geometry) conditions. Stirring between fluid initially upstream and that initially downstream of the nozzle plane is done more by convective entrainment at the beginning (roll-up and contraction phases), by diffusive entrainment during the laminar and wavy phases, and by mixed entrainment and ejection during the transition to turbulence and the turbulent phase itself. During vortex roll-up, it was found that tubes eject shorter streaklines than do holes, and that there is less Re dependence for this for tubes than for holes. During the contraction phase, entrainment ends, save for minimal entrainment due to axial inflow into the ring from along the cores of Goertler-type vortices. Generally, the rate of fluid ejected is largest during the transition from the wavy to the turbulent state. As far as the stability of the vortices is concerned, rings generated at holes are less stable than those generated at tubes. During the final turbulent phase, rings not only entrain fluid but eject it periodically into the wake: Between two and four hairpin vortices are generated and laid off in the wake during each ejection. The frequency at which such ejections takes place scales as a Strouhal number that takes on values of between 2 and 4.

  17. Vortex dynamics in R4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2012-01-01

    The vortex dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in {R}^4 is studied. Most of the paper focuses on singular Dirac delta distributions of the vorticity two-form ω in {R}^4. These distributions are supported on two-dimensional surfaces termed membranes and are the analogs of vortex filaments in {R}^3 and point vortices in {R}^2. The self-induced velocity field of a membrane is shown to be unbounded and is regularized using a local induction approximation. The regularized self-induced velocity field is then shown to be proportional to the mean curvature vector field of the membrane but rotated by 90° in the plane of normals. Next, the Hamiltonian membrane model is presented. The symplectic structure for this model is derived from a general formula for vorticity distributions due to Marsden and Weinstein ["Coadjoint orbits, vortices and Clebsch variables for incompressible fluids," Physica D 7, 305-323 (1983), 10.1016/0167-2789(83)90134-3]. Finally, the dynamics of the four-form ω ∧ ω is examined. It is shown that Ertel's vorticity theorem in {R}^3, for the constant density case, can be viewed as a special case of the dynamics of this four-form.

  18. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, A.; Piron, P.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Liège named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also aim to test other pre- and/or post-coronagraphic concepts such as optimal apodization.

  19. Generalized formulation of Brownian Vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyses, Henrique; Bauer, Ross; Grier, David

    2013-03-01

    Brownian vortexes are stochastic noise driven machines that arise from the motion of particles subjected to static non conservative force fields. This motion is characterized by a toroidal circulation in the probability flux whose direction can be tuned by changing the temperature of the system. A discrete minimal model for Brownian Vortexes were described by previous work done by B.Sun, D.G.Grier and A.Y.Grosberg. Here we theoretically look for a continuous model in the form of a generalization of the equilibrium Boltzmann relation for the probability density in the case where the driven forces have a non conservative solenoidal component. This generalized relation features the temperature induced probability flux reversal. We further extend our theory to time dependent force fields and study the possibility of stochastic resonance in the characteristic frequency of circulation of the driven particle. This model is experimentally applied to investigate the motion of colloidal spheres in an optical trap whose intensity is oscillatory in time.

  20. PREFACE: Special section on vortex rings Special section on vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Yasuhide

    2009-10-01

    This special section of Fluid Dynamics Research includes five articles on vortex rings in both classical and quantum fluids. The leading scientists of the field describe the trends in and the state-of-the-art development of experiments, theories and numerical simulations of vortex rings. The year 2008 was the 150th anniversary of 'vortex motion' since Hermann von Helmholtz opened up this field. In 1858, Helmholtz published a paper in Crelle's Journal which put forward the concept of 'vorticity' and made the first analysis of vortex motion. Fluid mechanics before that was limited to irrotational motion. In the absence of vorticity, the motion of an incompressible homogeneous fluid is virtually equivalent to a rigid-body motion in the sense that the fluid motion is determined once the boundary configuration is specified. Helmholtz proved, among other things, that, without viscosity, a vortex line is frozen into the fluid. This Helmholtz's law immediately implies the preservation of knots and links of vortex lines and its implication is enormous. One of the major trends of fluid mechanics since the latter half of the 20th century is to clarify the topological meaning of Helmholtz's law and to exploit it to develop theoretical and numerical methods to find the solutions of the Euler equations and to develop experimental techniques to gain an insight into fluid motion. Vortex rings are prominent coherent structures in a variety of fluid motions from the microscopic scale, through human and mesoscale to astrophysical scales, and have attracted people's interest. The late professor Philip G Saffman (1981) emphasized the significance of studies on vortex rings. One particular motion exemplifies the whole range of problems of vortex motion and is also a commonly known phenomenon, namely the vortex ring or smoke ring. Vortex rings are easily produced by dropping drops of one liquid into another, or by puffing fluid out of a hole, or by exhaling smoke if one has the skill

  1. Fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2004-07-01

    Of particular importance to the development of models for isolated vortex ring dynamics in a real fluid is knowledge of ambient fluid entrainment by the ring. This time-dependent process dictates changes in the volume of fluid that must share impulse delivered by the vortex ring generator. Therefore fluid entrainment is also of immediate significance to the unsteady forces that arise due to the presence of vortex rings in starting flows. Applications ranging from industrial and transportation, to animal locomotion and cardiac flows, are currently being investigated to understand the dynamical role of the observed vortex ring structures. Despite this growing interest, fully empirical measurements of fluid entrainment by isolated vortex rings have remained elusive. The primary difficulties arise in defining the unsteady boundary of the ring, as well as an inability to maintain the vortex ring in the test section sufficiently long to facilitate measurements. We present a new technique for entrainment measurement that utilizes a coaxial counter-flow to retard translation of vortex rings generated from a piston cylinder apparatus, so that their growth due to fluid entrainment can be observed. Instantaneous streamlines of the flow are used to determine the unsteady vortex ring boundary and compute ambient fluid entrainment. Measurements indicate that the entrainment process does not promote self-similar vortex ring growth, but instead consists of a rapid convection-based entrainment phase during ring formation, followed by a slower diffusive mechanism that entrains ambient fluid into the isolated vortex ring. Entrained fluid typically constitutes 30% to 40% of the total volume of fluid carried with the vortex ring. Various counter-flow protocols were used to substantially manipulate the diffusive entrainment process, producing rings with entrained fluid fractions up to 65%. Measurements of vortex ring growth rate and vorticity distribution during diffusive entrainment

  2. Vortex-induced vibrations of a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govardhan, R. N.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2005-05-01

    There are many studies on the vortex-induced vibrations of a cylindrical body, but almost none concerned with such vibrations for a sphere, despite the fact that tethered bodies are a common configuration. In this paper, we study the dynamics of an elastically mounted or tethered sphere in a steady flow, employing displacement, force and vorticity measurements. Within a particular range of flow speeds, where the oscillation frequency (f) is of the order of the static-body vortex shedding frequency (f_{vo}), there exist two modes of periodic large-amplitude oscillation, defined as modes I and II, separated by a transition regime exhibiting non-periodic vibration. The dominant wake structure for both modes is a chain of streamwise vortex loops on alternating sides of the wake. Further downstream, the heads of the vortex loops pinch off to form a sequence of vortex rings. We employ an analogy with the lift on an aircraft that is associated with its trailing vortex pair (of strength Gamma(*) and spacing b(*) ), and thereby compute the rate of change of impulse for the streamwise vortex pair, yielding the vortex force coefficient (cvortex): [ cvortex = {8}/{pi} {U^*_{v}}b^*( - Gamma^*). ] This calculation yields predicted forces in reasonable agreement with direct measurements on the sphere. This is significant because it indicates that the principal vorticity dynamics giving rise to vortex-induced vibration for a sphere are the motions of these streamwise vortex pairs. The Griffin plot, showing peak amplitudes as a function of the mass damping (m(*zeta) ), exhibits a good collapse of data, indicating a maximum response of around 0.9 diameters. Following recent studies of cylinder vortex-induced vibration, we deduce the existence of a critical mass ratio, m(*_{crit}) {≈} 0.6, below which large-amplitude vibrations are predicted to persist to infinite normalized velocities. An unexpected large-amplitude and highly periodic mode (mode III) is found at distinctly higher

  3. Rotor Wake Vortex Definition Using 3C-PIV Measurements: Corrected for Vortex Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; vanderWall, Berend; Richard, Hughues Richard; Raffel, Markus; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Lim, Joon W.; Yu, Yung H.; Tung, Chee

    2003-01-01

    Three-component (3-C) particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, within the wake across a rotor disk plane, are used to determine wake vortex definitions important for BVI (Blade Vortex Interaction) and broadband noise prediction. This study is part of the HART II test program conducted using a 40 percent scale BO-105 helicopter main rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW). In this paper, measurements are presented of the wake vortex field over the advancing side of the rotor operating at a typical descent landing condition. The orientations of the vortex (tube) axes are found to have non-zero tilt angles with respect to the chosen PIV measurement cut planes, often on the order of 45 degrees. Methods for determining the orientation of the vortex axis and reorienting the measured PIV velocity maps (by rotation/projection) are presented. One method utilizes the vortex core axial velocity component, the other utilizes the swirl velocity components. Key vortex parameters such as vortex core size, strength, and core velocity distribution characteristics are determined from the reoriented PIV velocity maps. The results are compared with those determined from velocity maps that are not corrected for orientation. Knowledge of magnitudes and directions of the vortex axial and swirl velocity components as a function of streamwise location provide a basis for insight into the vortex evolution.

  4. Vortex bursting and tracer transport of a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaka, T.; Holzäpfel, F.; Hennemann, I.; Gerz, T.; Manhart, M.; Schwertfirm, F.

    2012-02-01

    Large-eddy simulations of a coherent counter-rotating vortex pair in different environments are performed. The environmental background is characterized by varying turbulence intensities and stable temperature stratifications. Turbulent exchange processes between the vortices, the vortex oval, and the environment, as well as the material redistribution processes along the vortex tubes are investigated employing passive tracers that are superimposed to the initial vortex flow field. It is revealed that the vortex bursting phenomenon, known from photos of aircraft contrails or smoke visualization, is caused by collisions of secondary vortical structures traveling along the vortex tube which expel material from the vortex but do not result in a sudden decay of circulation or an abrupt change of vortex core structure. In neutrally stratified and weakly turbulent conditions, vortex reconnection triggers traveling helical vorticity structures which is followed by their collision. A long-lived vortex ring links once again establishing stable double rings. Key phenomena observed in the simulations are supported by photographs of contrails. The vertical and lateral extents of the detrained passive tracer strongly depend on environmental conditions where the sensitivity of detrainment rates on initial tracer distributions appears to be low.

  5. Topology of vortex-wing interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, C.; Rockwell, D.

    2016-10-01

    A trailing vortex incident upon a wing can generate different modes of vortex-wing interaction. These modes, which may involve either enhancement or suppression of the vortex generated at the tip of the wing, are classified on the basis of the present experiments together with computations at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Occurrence of a given mode of interaction is predominantly determined by the dimensionless location of the incident vortex relative to the tip of the wing and is relatively insensitive to the Reynolds number and dimensionless circulation of the incident vortex. The genesis of the basic interaction modes is clarified using streamline topology with associated critical points that show compatibility between complex streamline patterns in the vicinity of the tip of the wing. Whereas formation of an enhanced tip vortex involves a region of large upwash in conjunction with localized flow separation, complete suppression of the tip vortex is associated with a small-scale separation-reattachment bubble bounded by downwash at the wing tip.

  6. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    PubMed Central

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments. PMID:27883029

  7. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  8. On cooperative instabilities of parallel vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristol, R. L.; Ortega, J. M.; Marcus, P. S.; Savas, Ö.

    2004-10-01

    We present a combined analytical and numerical study of the instabilities of a pair of parallel unequal-strength vortices. We extend the analyses of a vortex in an external strain field (Crow, AIAA J. vol. 8, 1970, p. 2172; Widnall et al., J. Fluid Mech. vol. 66, 1974, p. 35) to include the orbital motion of the vortex pair. For counter-rotating pairs, the classic Crow-type periodic displacement perturbations are unstable for all vortex strength ratios, with fastest-growing wavelengths several times the vortex spacing. For co-rotating pairs, the orbital motion acts to suppress instability due to displacement perturbations. Instabilities in this case arise for elliptic perturbations at wavelengths that scale with the vortex core size. We also examine the influence of a second vortex pair by extending Crouch's (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 350, 1997, p. 311) analysis. Numerical results from a spectral initial-value code with subgrid-scale modelling agree with the growth rates from the theoretical models. Computations reveal the nonlinear evolution at late times, including wrapping and ring-rejection behaviour observed in experiments. A pair of co-rotating Gaussian vortices perturbed by noise develops elliptic instabilities, leading to the formation of vorticity bridges between the two vortices. The bridging is a prelude to vortex merger. Analytic, computational and experimental results agree well at circulation Reynolds numbers of order 10(5) .

  9. Phenomena, dynamics and instabilities of vortex pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, C. H. K.; Leweke, T.; Asselin, D. J.; Harris, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Our motivation for studying the dynamics of vortex pairs stems initially from an interest in the trailing wake vortices from aircraft and the dynamics of longitudinal vortices close to a vehicle surface. However, our motivation also comes from the fact that vortex-vortex interactions and vortex-wall interactions are fundamental to many turbulent flows. The intent of the paper is to present an overview of some of our recent work concerning the formation and structure of counter-rotating vortex pairs. We are interested in the long-wave and short-wave three-dimensional instabilities that evolve for an isolated vortex pair, but also we would like to know how vortex pairs interact with a wall, including both two-dimensional interactions, and also the influence of the surface on the three-dimensional instabilities. The emphasis of this presentation is on physical mechanisms by which vortices interact with each other and with surfaces, principally from an experimental approach, but also coupled with analytical studies.

  10. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  11. Vortex Ring Interaction with a Heated Screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous examinations of vortex rings impinging on porous screens has shown the reformation of the vortex ring with a lower velocity after passing through the screen, the creation of secondary vortices, and mixing. A heated screen could, in principle, alter the vortex-screen interaction by changing the local liquid viscosity and density. In the present investigation, a mechanical piston-cylinder vortex ring generator was used to create vortex rings in an aqueous sucrose solution. The rings impinged on a screen of horizontal wires that were heated using electrical current. The flow was visualized with food color and video imaging. Tests with and without heat were conducted at a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio of 4 and a jet Reynolds number (Re) of 1000. The vortex rings slowed after passing through the screen, but in tests with heat, they maintained a higher fraction of their before-screen velocity due to reduction in fluid viscosity near the wires. In addition, small ``fingers'' that developed on the front of the vortex rings as they passed through the screen exhibited positive buoyancy effects in the heated case.

  12. Helicity within the vortex filament model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, R.; Hietala, N.; Salman, H.

    2016-11-01

    Kinetic helicity is one of the invariants of the Euler equations that is associated with the topology of vortex lines within the fluid. In superfluids, the vorticity is concentrated along vortex filaments. In this setting, helicity would be expected to acquire its simplest form. However, the lack of a core structure for vortex filaments appears to result in a helicity that does not retain its key attribute as a quadratic invariant. By defining a spanwise vector to the vortex through the use of a Seifert framing, we are able to introduce twist and henceforth recover the key properties of helicity. We present several examples for calculating internal twist to illustrate why the centreline helicity alone will lead to ambiguous results if a twist contribution is not introduced. Our choice of the spanwise vector can be expressed in terms of the tangential component of velocity along the filament. Since the tangential velocity does not alter the configuration of the vortex at later times, we are able to recover a similar equation for the internal twist angle to that of classical vortex tubes. Our results allow us to explain how a quasi-classical limit of helicity emerges from helicity considerations for individual superfluid vortex filaments.

  13. Microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Hua-Zhou; Li, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Ren-Min

    2016-12-01

    A microscale vortex laser is a new type of coherent light source with small footprint that can directly generate vector vortex beams. However, a microscale laser with controlled topological charge, which is crucial for virtually any of its application, is still unrevealed. Here we present a microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge. The vortex laser eigenmode was synthesized in a metamaterial engineered non-Hermitian micro-ring cavity system at exceptional point. We also show that the vortex laser cavity can operate at exceptional point stably to lase under optical pumping. The microscale vortex laser with controlled topological charge can serve as a unique and general building block for next-generation photonic integrated circuits and coherent vortex beam sources. The method we used here can be employed to generate lasing eigenmode with other complex functionalities. Project supported by the “Youth 1000 Talent Plan” Fund, Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. 201421) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11574012 and 61521004).

  14. Evaluation of travelling vortex speed by means of vortex tracking and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the analysis of unsteady periodic flow field related to synthetic jet creation. The analyses are based on the data obtained using ANSYS Fluent solver. Numerical results are validated by hot wire anemometry data measured along the jet centerline. The speed of travelling vortex ring is evaluated by using vortex tracking method and by using dynamic mode decomposition method. Vortex identification is based on residual vorticity which allows identifying regions in the flow field where fluid particles perform the rotational motion. The regime of the synthetic jet with Re = 329 and S = 19.7 is chosen. Both the vortex tracking and the dynamic mode decomposition based vortex speed evaluation indicate an increase in the vortex speed close to the orifice and then decrease with maximum reaching almost one and half of orifice centerline velocity. The article contains extended version the article presented at the conference AEaNMiFMaE 2016.

  15. Comparison of two vortex models of wind turbines using a free vortex wake scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B. F.; Yuan, Y.; Wang, T. G.; Zhao, Z. Z.

    2016-09-01

    Developing suitably generalized models for rotor blade vortices that accurately predict their evolution continues to be a challenge for wind turbine analysts. During the past few decades, several vortex models have been developed according to the theoretical analysis and the experimental research. A comparison of two different vortex models is made for predicting wind turbine aerodynamic performance using a free vortex wake (FVW) model. The two models are the Lamb-Oseen vortex model for laminar vortices and the β-Vatistas model for turbulent vortices. A new formula that approximates parameter β, which represents the degree of turbulence in the β-Vatistas model, is proposed. The formula of parameter β is validated by comparison of simulated and measured aerodynamic performances of wind turbines of different blade tip vortex Reynolds numbers. Then, the induced velocity streamlines and the distribution of the axial velocity in the rotational plane are simulated. Also, the differences due to the vortex models are discussed.

  16. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N.; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-01

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  17. Phase diagrams of vortex matter with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyou; Varney, Christopher N; Fangohr, Hans; Babaev, Egor

    2017-01-25

    It was recently proposed to use the stray magnetic fields of superconducting vortex lattices to trap ultracold atoms for building quantum emulators. This calls for new methods for engineering and manipulating of the vortex states. One of the possible routes utilizes type-1.5 superconducting layered systems with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions. In order to explore the possible vortex states that can be engineered, we present two phase diagrams of phenomenological vortex matter models with multi-scale inter-vortex interactions featuring several attractive and repulsive length scales. The phase diagrams exhibit a plethora of phases, including conventional 2D lattice phases, five stripe phases, dimer, trimer, and tetramer phases, void phases, and stable low-temperature disordered phases. The transitions between these states can be controlled by the value of an applied external field.

  18. A vortex-filament and core model for wings with edge vortex separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    A vortex filament-vortex core method for predicting aerodynamic characteristics of slender wings with edge vortex separation was developed. Semi-empirical but simple methods were used to determine the initial positions of the free sheet and vortex core. Comparison with available data indicates that: (1) the present method is generally accurate in predicting the lift and induced drag coefficients but the predicted pitching moment is too positive; (2) the spanwise lifting pressure distributions estimated by the one vortex core solution of the present method are significantly better than the results of Mehrotra's method relative to the pressure peak values for the flat delta; (3) the two vortex core system applied to the double delta and strake wings produce overall aerodynamic characteristics which have good agreement with data except for the pitching moment; and (4) the computer time for the present method is about two thirds of that of Mehrotra's method.

  19. Contrasting vortex-gyration dispersions for different lattice bases in one-dimensional magnetic vortex arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dong-Soo; Jeong, Han-Byeol; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2013-09-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical and analytical calculations in studying the effects of change in the primitive unit cells of one-dimensional (1D) vortex arrays on collective vortex-gyration dispersion. As the primitive basis, we consider alternating constituent materials (NiMnSb vs. Permalloy) and alternating dimensions including constituent disk diameter and thickness. In the simplest case, that of one vortex-state disk of given dimensions and single material in the primitive cell, only a single branch of collective vortex-gyration dispersion appears. By contrast, two constituent disks' different alternating materials, thicknesses, and diameters yield characteristic two-branch dispersions, the band widths and gaps of which differ in each case. This work offers not only an efficient means of manipulating collective vortex-gyration band structures but also a foundation for the development of a rich variety of 1D or 2D magnonic crystals and their band structures based on dipolar-coupled-vortex arrays.

  20. On the Use of Vortex-Fitting in the Numerical Simulation of Blade-Vortex Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G. R.; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of vortex-fitting in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to preserve the vortex strength and structure while convecting in a uniform free stream is demonstrated through the numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions. The fundamental premise of the formulation is the velocity and pressure field of the interacting vortex are unaltered either in the presence of an airfoil or a rotor blade or by the resulting nonlinear interactional flowfield. Although, the governing Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are nonlinear and independent solutions cannot be superposed, the interactional flowfield can be accurately captured by adding and subtracting the flowfield of the convecting vortex at each instant. The aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of two- and three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions have been calculated in Refs. 1-6 using this concept. Some of the results from these publications and similar other published material will be summarized in this paper.

  1. Imaging Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.

    2016-10-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) imaging is a powerful technique to probe the architectures of planetary systems from the outside-in and survey the atmospheres of self-luminous giant planets. Direct imaging has rapidly matured over the past decade and especially the last few years with the advent of high-order AO systems, dedicated planet-finding instruments with specialized coronagraphs, and innovative observing and post-processing strategies to suppress speckle noise. This review summarizes recent progress in high-contrast imaging with particular emphasis on observational results, discoveries near and below the deuterium-burning limit, and a practical overview of large-scale surveys and dedicated instruments. I conclude with a statistical meta-analysis of deep imaging surveys in the literature. Based on observations of 384 unique and single young (≈5-300 Myr) stars spanning stellar masses between 0.1 and 3.0 M ⊙, the overall occurrence rate of 5-13 M Jup companions at orbital distances of 30-300 au is {0.6}-0.5+0.7 % assuming hot-start evolutionary models. The most massive giant planets regularly accessible to direct imaging are about as rare as hot Jupiters are around Sun-like stars. Dividing this sample into individual stellar mass bins does not reveal any statistically significant trend in planet frequency with host mass: giant planets are found around {2.8}-2.3+3.7 % of BA stars, <4.1% of FGK stars, and <3.9% of M dwarfs. Looking forward, extreme AO systems and the next generation of ground- and space-based telescopes with smaller inner working angles and deeper detection limits will increase the pace of discovery to ultimately map the demographics, composition, evolution, and origin of planets spanning a broad range of masses and ages.

  2. Effects of disorder on the vortex charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages, J.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2006-04-01

    We study the influence of disorder on the vortex charge, both due to random pinning of the vortices and due to scattering off nonmagnetic impurities. In the case when there are no impurities present, but the vortices are randomly distributed, the effect is very small, except when two or more vortices are close by. When impurities are present, they have a noticeable effect on the vortex charge. This, together with the effect of temperature, changes appreciably the vortex charge. In the case of an attractive impurity potential the sign of the charge naturally changes.

  3. Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foeppl, L.

    1983-01-01

    Vortex motion behind a circular cylinder moving through water is discussed. It is shown that a pair of vortices form behind a moving cylinder and that their centers will move along a predictable curve. This curve represents an equilibrium condition which, however, is subject to perturbation. The stability of the vortex pair is investigated. Movement of the vortex pair away from the cylinder is calculated as an explanation of the resistance of the cylinder. Finally, the principles elaborated are applied to the flow around a flat plate.

  4. Vortex line in the unitary Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Madeira, Lucas; Vitiello, Silvio A.; Gandolfi, Stefano; Schmidt, Kevin E.

    2016-04-06

    Here, we report diffusion Monte Carlo results for the ground state of unpolarized spin-1/2 fermions in a cylindrical container and properties of the system with a vortex-line excitation. The density profile of the system with a vortex line presents a nonzero density at the core. We also calculate the ground-state energy per particle, the superfluid pairing gap, and the excitation energy per particle. Finally, these simulations can be extended to calculate the properties of vortex excitations in other strongly interacting systems such as superfluid neutron matter using realistic nuclear Hamiltonians.

  5. All-electrical magnetic vortex array sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Gieraltowski, J.

    2016-08-01

    Vortex sensing magnetometers based on arrays of soft magnetic dots are good candidates for high-resolution and accurate spatial magnetic-field estimation. When the arrays are laid out along different spatial directions they can perform tensor gradiometry allowing the measurement of field components and their spatial derivatives as a function of orientation. Detection is based on using spin-polarized currents to counteract vortex displacements or to excite vortex oscillation modes triggered by magnetic-field application. Sensor linearization, field detection range and conditions to obtain large sensitivity electronic compatibility and scalability are discussed.

  6. Improved Flow-Controlling Vortex Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Marner, Wilbur J.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1989-01-01

    Symmetrical tangential streams control flow of radial primary streams. Vortex generator uses small secondary stream of fluid to control normally-larger primary stream. Improved version of vortex generator described in "Variable Control Port for Fluidic Control Device," (NPO-16603). Secondary, or control, flows entering tangentially through diametrically opposite ports set up swirling motion restraining primary flow. Pressure of secondary fluid in relation to primary fluid controlling factor. Like valve, vortex generator varies rate of flow of primary fluid from maximum value down to zero. When properly designed, requires low pressure differential between primary and secondary streams and expends relatively small amount of secondary fluid.

  7. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  8. Giant left ventricular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sumi; Garg, Nadish; Xie, Gong-Yuan; Dellsperger, Kevin C

    2010-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) pseudoaneurysm (PS) is an uncommon, often fatal complication associated with myocardial infarction, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, and, rarely, infective endocarditis. A 28-year-old man with prior history of bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement presented with congestive heart failure and bacteremia with Abiotrophia granulitica. Transesophageal echocardiogram showed bioprosthesis dysfunction, large vegetations, mitral regurgitation, and probable PS. Cardiac and chest CT confirmed a PS communicating with the left ventricle Patient had pulseless electrical activity and died. Autopsy showed a giant PS with layered thrombus and pseudo-endothelialized cavity. Our case highlights the importance of multimodality imaging as an important tool in management of PS.

  9. Vortex Structures of Whistler Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliznyak, Yu.; Davydova, T.; Yakimenko, A.

    Starting with two-dimensional nonlinear Scroedinger equation for a parallel electric field of spatially localized beam of whistler waves we investigate formation, evolu- tion and stability of nonlinear whistler waveguides (or ducts) which are frequently observed during heating active experiments in the ionosphere. When the generator frequency is close to the half of electron cyclotron frequency, one have take into ac- count the additional terms of the next order in the equation for the interpretation of existing experimental data. It is needed to use a full Maxwell's equation set to describe the propagation of whistlers and to account for the nonlinearity saturation at high val- ues of pump power. Nonlinear waveguides of vortex type (with topological charge 1, 2 and 3) are found and their stability properties are investigated by means of numerical simulations.

  10. Vortex generator for flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jr., Earl R. (Inventor); Marner, Wilbur J. (Inventor); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Fluidics flow control of a multiphase supply using a cylindrical chamber is achieved by introducing the supply flow radially into the chamber. The supply flow exits through a port in the center at the chamber. A control fluid is then introduced tangentially about 90.degree. upstream from the supply port. A second control fluid port may be added about 90.degree. upstream from the first control fluid port, but preferably two sets of supply and control ports are added with like ports diametrically opposite each other. The control fluid flows against the circular wall of the control chamber, which introduces a vortex in the flow of the supply flow that decays into a spiral path to the exit port in the center of the chamber. The control flow rate may thus be used to control the spiral path, and therefore the supply flow rate through the exit port.

  11. Vortex Dynamics in Anisotropic Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, David Gordon

    Measurements of the ac screening response and resistance of superconducting Bi_2Sr _2CaCu_2O _8 (BSCCO) crystals have been used to probe the dynamics of the magnetic flux lines within the mixed state as a function of frequency, temperature, and applied dc field. For the particular range of temperature and magnetic field in which measurements were made, the systematic behavior of the observed dissipation peak in the screening response is consistent with electromagnetic skin size effects rather than a phase transition. According to microscopic theories of the interaction between the flux lines and a driving ac field, such a skin size effect is expected for the case when the vortex motion is diffusive in nature. However, diffusive motion is inconsistent with simple activation models that use a single value for the pinning energy (derived from direct measurement of the dc resistance). This contradiction suggests a distribution of pinning energies within the sample. Interlayer vortex decoupling has been directly observed as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field using electronic transport perpendicular to the layers in synthetic amorphous MoGe/Ge multilayer samples. Perpendicular transport has been shown to be a far more sensitive measure of the phase coupling between layers than in-plane properties. Below the decoupling temperature T_{D} the resistivity anisotropy collapses and striking nonlinearities appear in the perpendicular current-voltage behavior, which are not observed in parallel transport. A crossover in behavior is also observed at a field H _{x}, in accordance with theory. The data suggest the presence of a phase transition into a state with finite in-plane resistivity. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  12. Prediction and control of vortex-dominated and vortex-wake flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama

    1993-01-01

    This progress report documents the accomplishments achieved in the period from December 1, 1992 until November 30, 1993. These accomplishments include publications, national and international presentations, NASA presentations, and the research group supported under this grant. Topics covered by documents incorporated into this progress report include: active control of asymmetric conical flow using spinning and rotary oscillation; supersonic vortex breakdown over a delta wing in transonic flow; shock-vortex interaction over a 65-degree delta wing in transonic flow; three dimensional supersonic vortex breakdown; numerical simulation and physical aspects of supersonic vortex breakdown; and prediction of asymmetric vortical flows around slender bodies using Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Vortex formation and instability in the left ventricle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung Bao; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Coffey, Dane; Keefe, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    We study the formation of the mitral vortex ring during early diastolic filling in a patient-specific left ventricle (LV) using direct numerical simulation. The geometry of the left ventricle is reconstructed from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data of a healthy human subject. The left ventricular kinematics is modeled via a cell-based activation methodology, which is inspired by cardiac electro-physiology and yields physiologic LV wall motion. In the fluid dynamics videos, we describe in detail the three-dimensional structure of the mitral vortex ring, which is formed during early diastolic filling. The ring starts to deform as it propagates toward the apex of the heart and becomes inclined. The trailing secondary vortex tubes are formed as the result of interaction between the vortex ring and the LV wall. These vortex tubes wrap around the circumference and begin to interact with and destabilize the mitral vortex ring. At the end of diastole, the vortex ring impinges on the LV wall and the large-scale intraventricular flow rotates in clockwise direction. We show for the first time that the mitral vortex ring evolution is dominated by a number of vortex-vortex and vortex-wall interactions, including lateral straining and deformation of vortex ring, the interaction of two vortex tubes with unequal strengths, helicity polarization of vortex tubes and twisting instabilities of the vortex cores.

  14. Giant papillary conjunctivitis.

    PubMed Central

    Donshik, P C

    1994-01-01

    Giant papillary conjunctivitis is a syndrome found frequently as a complication of contact lenses. Many variables can affect the onset and severity of the presenting signs and symptoms. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses appear to result in less severe signs and symptoms, with a longer time before the development of giant papillary conjunctivitis. Nonionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses tend to produce less severe signs and symptoms than ionic, low-water-content soft contact lenses. Enzymatic treatment appears to lessen the severity of signs and symptoms. The association of an allergy appears to play a role in the onset of the severity of the signs and symptoms but does not appear to affect the final ability of the individual to wear contact lenses. Using multiple treatment options, such as changing the polymer to a glyceryl methyl methacrylate or a rigid lens, or utilizing a soft lens on a frequent-replacement basis, can result in a success rate of over 90%. In individuals who still have a return of symptoms, the use of topical mast cell stabilizers or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug as an adjunctive therapy offers the added possibility of keeping these patients in contact lenses. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 11 C FIGURE 11 D PMID:7886881

  15. Giant extragenital Bowen's disease.

    PubMed

    Bakardzhiev, Ilko; Chokoeva, Anastasiya Atanasova; Tchernev, Georgi

    2015-12-01

    Giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen are extremely rare. The already described cases in the word literature are most commonly with periungual localization, as well as located on the foot and neck area. The clinical manifestation is presented most commonly by non-specific erythematous to erythematous-squamous plaques or papules, which is confusing to the clinician. From the pathogenic point of view, it is important to be confirmed or rejected the presence of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in each case of affected patient, as this information is mandatory in respect to the adequate selection of the subsequent regimen. If HPVs are detected, systemic antiviral therapy could be initiated to reduce the size of the lesions before subsequent surgical eradication. A postoperative prevention through vaccination could be also considered additionally. In cases of HPV-negative giant extragenital forms of Morbus Bowen (as in the described patient), the focus should be on local immunomodulation by substances such as imiquimod, which reduce the size of the lesions, thereby creating optimal opportunities for their future surgical eradication. Other possible options described in the literature include topical application of 5-fluorouracil, photodynamic therapy, cryotherapy, and laser therapy (carbon dioxide laser). The choice of the most appropriate regimen should have been an individual decision of the clinician, considering also the location and the extent of the lesion.

  16. Gas Giants Form Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's concept of a hypothetical 10-million-year-old star system. The bright blur at the center is a star much like our sun. The other orb in the image is a gas-giant planet like Jupiter. Wisps of white throughout the image represent traces of gas.

    Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have found evidence showing that gas-giant planets either form within the first 10 million years of a sun-like star's life, or not at all. The lifespan for sun-like stars is about 10 billion years.

    The scientists came to this conclusion after searching for traces of gas around 15 different sun-like stars, most with ages ranging from 3 million to 30 million years. With the help of Spitzer's Infrared Spectrometer instrument, they were able to search for relatively warm gas in the inner regions of these star systems, an area comparable to the zone between Earth and Jupiter in our own solar system. They also used ground-based radio telescopes to search for cooler gas in the outer regions of these systems, an area comparable to the zone around Saturn and beyond.

  17. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  18. Direct numerical simulations of vortex ring collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Pumir, Alain; Brenner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We numerically simulate the ring vortex collision experiment of Lim and Nickels in an attempt to understand the rapid formation of very fine scale turbulence (or 'smoke') from relatively smooth initial conditions. Reynolds numbers of up to Re = Γ / ν = 7500 , where Γ is the vortex ring circulation and ν the kinematic viscosity of the fluid are reached, which coincide with the highest Reynolds number case of the experiments. Different perturbations to the ring vortex are added, and their effect on the generation and amplification of turbulence is quantified. The underlying dynamics of the vortex core is analyzed, and compared to the dynamics arising from a simple Biot-Savart filament model for the core.

  19. Titan's South Polar Vortex in Motion

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie captured by NASA'S Cassini spacecraft shows a south polar vortex, or a swirling mass of gas around the pole in the atmosphere, at Saturn’s moon Titan. The swirling mass appears to exec...

  20. Optical Scully vortex and its spatial evolution.

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2012-04-01

    The structure of an optical vortex formed in a partially coherent Laguerre-Gauss laser beam was considered. The main object of study was the recorded vector field of wavefront tilts that consisted of the vortical and potential components. It was found that the vortical motion weakened as the coherence decreased. Main regularities in the behavior of the vortical component can be described by the Scully vortex model of vortical liquid flow. In the spatial evolution, the potential component of tilts may alternate the sign, thus determining the direction of energy flow to the center or to the periphery of the vortex. Energy flow lines in the beam demonstrate the pattern of decay of an optical vortex similar to the pattern of decaying vortical motion in viscous liquid.

  1. Vortex simulation of reacting shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    Issues involved in the vortex simulation of reacting shear flow are discussed. It is shown that maintaining accuracy in the vortex methods requires the application of elaborate vorticity-updating schemes as vortex elements are moved along particle trajectories when shear or a strong strain field is represented. Solutions using 2D and 3D methods are discussed to illustrate some of the most common instabilities encountered in nonreacting and reacting shear flows and to reveal the mechanisms by which the maturation of these instabilities enhance mixing and hence burning in a reacting flow. The transport element method is developed and its application to compute scalar mixing in a shear layer is reviewed. The method is then combined with the vortex method to solve the problem of nonuniform-density shear flow. The results of incompressible reacting flow models are used to examine reaction extinction due to the formation of localized regions of strong strains as instabilities grow into their nonlinear range.

  2. THz Cherenkov radiation of Josephson vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishevskii, A. S.; Silin, V. P.; Uryupin, S. A.; Uspenskii, S. G.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that Josephson vortices travelling in sandwich embedded in dielectric media radiate electromagnetic waves with THz frequencies. This phenomenon is caused by the Cherenkov effect and takes place if vortex velocity exceeds the speed of light in dielectric.

  3. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  4. NASA Wake Vortex Research for Aircraft Spacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, R. Brad; Hinton, David A.; Stuever, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several inter-related areas to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These areas include current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors, and operationally acceptable aircraft/wake interaction criteria. In today's ATC system, the AVOSS could inform ATC controllers when a fixed reduced separation becomes safe to apply to large and heavy aircraft categories. With appropriate integration into the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), AVOSS dynamic spacing could be tailored to actual generator/follower aircraft pairs rather than a few broad aircraft categories.

  5. Drift due to viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrell, Thomas; Spagnolie, Saverio; Thiffeault, Jean-Luc

    2016-11-01

    Biomixing is the study of fluid mixing due to swimming organisms. While large organisms typically produce turbulent flows in their wake, small organisms produce less turbulent wakes; the main mechanism of mixing is the induced net particle displacement (drift). Several experiments have examined this drift for small jellyfish, which produce vortex rings that trap and transport a fair amount of fluid. Inviscid theory implies infinite particle displacements for the trapped fluid, so the effect of viscosity must be included to understand the damping of real vortex motion. We use a model viscous vortex ring to compute particle displacements and other relevant quantities, such as the integrated moments of the displacement. Fluid entrainment at the tail end of a growing vortex 'envelope' is found to play an important role in the total fluid transport and drift. Partially supported by NSF Grant DMS-1109315.

  6. Analysis of vortex wake encounter upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. A.; Teper, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of an airplane being upset by encountering the vortex wake of a large transport on takeoff or landing is currently receiving considerable attention. This report describes the technique and results of a study to assess the effectiveness of automatic control systems in alleviating vortex wake upsets. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear digital simulation was used for this purpose. The analysis included establishing the disturbance input due to penetrating a vortex wake from an arbitrary position and angle. Simulations were computed for both a general aviation airplane and a commercial jet transport. Dynamic responses were obtained for the penetrating aircraft with no augmentation, and with various command augmentation systems, as well as with human pilot control. The results of this preliminary study indicate that attitude command augmentation systems can provide significant alleviation of vortex wake upsets; and can do it better than a human pilot.

  7. Laboratory Applications of the Vortex Tube.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Discussed are a brief explanation of the function of the vortex tube and some applications for the chemistry laboratory. It is a useful and inexpensive solution to many small-scale laboratory heating and cooling applications. (RH)

  8. Reinflating Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Two new, large gas-giant exoplanets have been discovered orbiting close to their host stars. A recent study examining these planets and others like them may help us to better understand what happens to close-in hot Jupiters as their host stars reach the end of their main-sequence lives.OversizedGiantsUnbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-65b. [Adapted from Hartman et al. 2016]The discovery of HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, two new transiting hot Jupiters, is intriguing. These planets have periods of just under 3 days and masses of roughly 0.5 and 0.8 times that of Jupiter, but their sizes are whats really interesting: they have inflated radii of 1.89 and 1.59 times that of Jupiter.These two planets, discovered using the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network (HATNet) in Arizona and Hawaii, mark the latest in an ever-growing sample of gas-giant exoplanets with radii larger than expected based on theoretical planetary structure models.What causes this discrepancy? Did the planets just fail to contract to the expected size when they were initially formed, or were they reinflated later in their lifetimes? If the latter, how? These are questions that scientists are only now starting to be able to address using statistics of the sample of close-in, transiting planets.Unbinned transit light curves for HAT-P-66b. [Hartman et al. 2016]Exploring Other PlanetsLed by Joel Hartman (Princeton University), the team that discovered HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b has examined these planets observed parameters and those of dozens of other known close-in, transiting exoplanets discovered with a variety of transiting exoplanet missions: HAT, WASP, Kepler, TrES, and KELT. Hartman and collaborators used this sample to draw conclusions about what causes some of these planets to have such large radii.The team found that there is a statistically significant correlation between the radii of close-in giant planets and the fractional ages of their host stars (i.e., the stars age divided by its full

  9. Allometry indicates giant eyes of giant squid are not exceptional

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The eyes of giant and colossal squid are among the largest eyes in the history of life. It was recently proposed that sperm whale predation is the main driver of eye size evolution in giant squid, on the basis of an optical model that suggested optimal performance in detecting large luminous visual targets such as whales in the deep sea. However, it is poorly understood how the eye size of giant and colossal squid compares to that of other aquatic organisms when scaling effects are considered. Results We performed a large-scale comparative study that included 87 squid species and 237 species of acanthomorph fish. While squid have larger eyes than most acanthomorphs, a comparison of relative eye size among squid suggests that giant and colossal squid do not have unusually large eyes. After revising constants used in a previous model we found that large eyes perform equally well in detecting point targets and large luminous targets in the deep sea. Conclusions The eyes of giant and colossal squid do not appear exceptionally large when allometric effects are considered. It is probable that the giant eyes of giant squid result from a phylogenetically conserved developmental pattern manifested in very large animals. Whatever the cause of large eyes, they appear to have several advantages for vision in the reduced light of the deep mesopelagic zone. PMID:23418818

  10. Shallow flow vortex formation and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Haojun

    Vortical structures in shallow flow past a vertical cylinder are addressed in this investigation. A cinema technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) provided quantitative representations of the wholefield flow patterns in both instantaneous and averaged forms. Techniques for passive and active control of these vortices, and their influence on the loading of the bed, were explored. In a fully-developed, laminar shallow flow, the unstable structure in the near-wake of the cylinder correlates with the horseshoe (necklace) vortex system about the upstream surface of the cylinder. A coherent varicose mode of vortex formation is observed in the near-wake, even though the classical large-scale vortex shedding is suppressed due to bed friction effects. It is also demonstrated that when the near-wake is stable at a sufficiently low value of Reynolds number, applications of external perturbations lead to destabilization of the wake. Classes of small-scale three-dimensional structures arise in a fully-turbulent shallow flow past a surface-piercing cylinder. A prevalent feature is an upward moving jet-like flow from the bed surface, through the center of the developing quasi-two-dimensional primary vortex, at a location in the very near-wake of the cylinder. Passive control via base-bleed through a narrow streamwise slot leads to substantially delay/attenuation of vortex formation in the near-wake. The large-scale near-wake structure is recoverable through combined positive-active control, in the form of rotational perturbations in the presence of small magnitude base bleed. These alterations of the near-wake structure occur in conjunction with modifications of the streamline topology and Reynolds stress at the bed, as well as the shallow approach flow. Active control via rotational perturbations of the cylinder at the most unstable shear-layer frequency promotes well-defined vortical structures in the separating shearlayer, which contribute to the earlier

  11. Vortex core identification in viscous hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Finn, Lucas I; Boghosian, Bruce M; Kottke, Christopher N

    2005-08-15

    We describe a software package designed for the investigation of topological fluid dynamics with a novel algorithm for locating and tracking vortex cores. The package is equipped with modules for generating desired vortex knots and links and evolving them according to the Navier-Stokes equations, while tracking and visualizing them. The package is parallelized using a message passing interface for a multiprocessor environment and makes use of a computational steering library for dynamic user intervention.

  12. Geo Spots and Vortex Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the convection currents of the mantle-lithosphere system with terrestrial dynamics has represented one of the main themes of tectonophysics for over a century, in addition to the relationships interwoven with crust dynamics. Likewise, the relevant debate has animated the scientific community for more than a century, as recalled by the work of Kreighauger (1902), Ampferer (1906), Schwinner (1919), Holmes (1928), Griggs (1932), Pekeris (1935), Kraus (1951), Hess (1962). Though never directly observed, the convection currents in the mantle manifest their effects in the Earth's crust in various ways, such as the flow of heat in the oceans and continents, and magnetic anomalies. These are the result of effects caused by ferromagnetic materials dragged upwards by convection movements, as demonstrated by the laboratory simulations carried out by Glatzmaier and Olson (2005). With respect to the initial simplified and theoretical modelling of the first authors of the last century, the studies by Bercovici, Schubert and Glatzmaier (1989) and those of Glatzmaier and Olson (2005) revealed a complex three-dimensional model of the dynamics of convection processes in the mantle, even if it is not yet clear to what extent this mechanism actually reflects reality. The differences in temperature in the Earth's inner shells causes convection movements that can manifest both on a large scale with laminar flows and plumes, and on a small scale with turbulent flows concentrated in limited areas of the globe. The trajectories in a vortex, also proposed by Gurevich (2012), generated by complex motions in the mantle-lithosphere system, are driven by the Coriolis Effect. The combination of these mechanisms together with the Coriolis force creates, on the whole, ascending helical motions with a similar effect to that of an atmospheric cyclone interacting with the lithospheric shell. In this study it is believed that the ascending whirling movements (Vortex Theory

  13. Thermal study of vortex states in mesoscopic superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Florian; Bourgeois, Olivier; Skipetrov, Sergey; Chaussy, Jacques

    2007-03-01

    We present low temperature highly sensitive heat capacity C measurements [1,2] of aluminum disks with diameters close to ξ(T), the superconducting coherence length. C(T) scans under fixed perpendicular magnetic fields H reveal a quasiperiodic modulation of the height δC of the C jump at the superconducting to normal phase transition. This behavior is due to transitions between several arrangements of vortices in the disks. Indeed giant vortex states or multivortex states can be observed, with a vorticity (an integer equal to the number of vortices threading a single disk) depending on H, T, and on the size of the disks. Heat capacity measurements enable to study phase transitions between such states, without contacting or biasing them. Thus phase boudaries in the H-T plane can be drawn in all the superconducting region. [1] O. Bourgeois, F. Ong, S.E. Skipetrov, and J. Chaussy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 057007 (2005) [2] F.R. Ong, O. Bourgeois, S.E. Skipetrov, and J. Chaussy, Phys. Rev. B 74, 140503(R) (2006)

  14. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  15. A distributed vortex method for computing the vortex field of a missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Vortex sheet development in the flow field of a missile was investigated by approximating the sheets in the cross-flow plane with short straight-line segments having distributed vorticity. In contrast with the method that represents the sheets as lines of discrete vortices, this distributed vortex method produced calculations with a high degree of computational stability.

  16. Giant resonances: Progress, new directions, new challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, J.R.; Beene, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A review of some recent developments in the field of giant multipole resonances is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on directions that the authors feel will be followed in this field during the next several years. In particular, the use of high-energy heavy ions to excite the giant resonances is shown to provide exciting new capabilities for giant resonance studies. Among subjects covered are: Coulomb excitation of giant resonances, photon decay of giant resonances, the recent controversy over the identity of the giant monopole resonance, the most recent value for incompressibility of nuclear matter from analysis of giant monopole data, the isospin character of the 63 A/sup /minus/1/3/ GQR, agreement between (e,e/prime/) and (hadron, hadron/prime/) excitation of the giant quadrupole resonance, prospects for multiphonon giant resonance observation, and isolation of the isovector giant quadrupole resonance. 55 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Giant Hedge-Hogs: Spikes on Giant Gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadri, D

    2004-01-28

    We consider giant gravitons on the maximally supersymmetric plane-wave background of type IIB string theory. Fixing the light-cone gauge, we work out the low energy effective light-cone Hamiltonian of the three-sphere giant graviton. At first order, this is a U(1) gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}. We place sources in this effective gauge theory. Although non-vanishing net electric charge configurations are disallowed by Gauss' law, electric dipoles can be formed. From the string theory point of view these dipoles can be understood as open strings piercing the three-sphere, generalizing the usual BIons to the giant gravitons, BIGGons. Our results can be used to give a two dimensional (worldsheet) description of giant gravitons, similar to Polchinski's description for the usual D-branes, in agreement with the discussions of hep-th/0204196.

  18. A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid.

    PubMed

    Van Roy, Peter; Briggs, Derek E G

    2011-05-26

    Anomalocaridids, giant lightly sclerotized invertebrate predators, occur in a number of exceptionally preserved early and middle Cambrian (542-501 million years ago) biotas and have come to symbolize the unfamiliar morphologies displayed by stem organisms in faunas of the Burgess Shale type. They are characterized by a pair of anterior, segmented appendages, a circlet of plates around the mouth, and an elongate segmented trunk lacking true tergites with a pair of flexible lateral lobes per segment. Disarticulated body parts, such as the anterior appendages and oral circlet, had been assigned to a range of taxonomic groups--but the discovery of complete specimens from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale showed that these disparate elements all belong to a single kind of animal. Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods. The anomalocaridids were the largest animals in Cambrian communities. The youngest unequivocal examples occur in the middle Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah but an arthropod retaining some anomalocaridid characteristics is present in the Devonian of Germany. Here we report the post-Cambrian occurrence of anomalocaridids, from the Early Ordovician (488-472 million years ago) Fezouata Biota in southeastern Morocco, including specimens larger than any in Cambrian biotas. These giant animals were an important element of some marine communities for about 30 million years longer than previously realized. The Moroccan specimens confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments; these blades probably functioned as gills.

  19. An experimental investigation of the parallel blade-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Laub, G. H.; Tung, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scheme for investigating the parallel blade vortex interaction (BVI) has been designed and tested. The scheme involves setting a vortex generator upstream of a nonlifting rotor so that the vortex interacts with the blade at the forward azimuth. The method has revealed two propagation mechanisms: a type C shock propagation from the leading edge induced by the vortex at high tip speeds, and a rapid but continuous pressure pulse associated with the proximity of the vortex to the leading edge. The latter is thought to be the more important source. The effects of Mach number and vortex proximity are discussed.

  20. Devices that Alter the Tip Vortex of a Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, Kenneth W.; Tung, Chee; Heineck, James T.

    2001-01-01

    Small devices were attached near the tip of a hovering rotor blade 'in order to alter the structure and trajectory of the trailing vortex. Stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) images were used to quantify the wake behind the rotor blade during the first revolution. A procedure for analyzing the 3D-velocity field is presented that includes a method for accounting for vortex wander. The results show that a vortex generator can alter the trajectory of the trailing vortex and that a major change in the size and intensity of the trailing vortex can be achieved by introducing a high level of turbulence into the core of the vortex.

  1. Low NOx Advanced Vortex Combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, R.G.; Williams, J.T.; Steele, R.C.; Straub, D.L.; Casleton, K.H.; Bining, Avtar

    2008-05-01

    A lean-premixed advanced vortex combustor (AVC) has been developed and tested. The natural gas fueled AVC was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, WV. All testing was performed at elevated pressures and inlet temperatures and at lean fuel-air ratios representative of industrial gas turbines. The improved AVC design exhibited simultaneous NOx /CO/unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions of 4/4/0 ppmv (all emissions corrected to 15% O2 dry). The design also achieved less than 3 ppmv NOx with combustion efficiencies in excess of 99.5%. The design demonstrated marked acoustic dynamic stability over a wide range of operating conditions, which potentially makes this approach significantly more attractive than other lean-premixed combustion approaches. In addition, the measured 1.75% pressure drop is significantly lower than conventional gas turbine combustors, which could translate into an overall gas turbine cycle efficiency improvement. The relatively high velocities and low pressure drop achievable with this technology make the AVC approach an attractive alternative for syngas fuel applications.

  2. Phenomenon of Alfvenic Vortex Shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszecki, M.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arber, T. D.

    2010-07-30

    Generation of Alfvenic (magnetohydrodynamic) vortices by the interaction of compressible plasma flows with magnetic-field-aligned blunt obstacles is modeled in terms of magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that periodic shedding of vortices with opposite vorticity is a robust feature of the interaction in a broad range of plasma parameters: for plasma beta from 0.025 to 0.5, and for the flow speeds from 0.1 to 0.99 of the fast magnetoacoustic speed. The Strouhal number is the dimensionless ratio of the blunt body diameter to the product of the period of vortex shedding and the inflow speed. It is found to be consistently in the range 0.15-0.25 in the whole range of parameters. The induced Alfvenic vortices are compressible and contain spiral-armed perturbations of the magnetic field strength and plasma mass density up to 50%-60% of the background values. The generated electric current also has the spiral-armed structuring.

  3. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines.

  4. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Javier; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; Del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2014-03-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1-74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m(2)/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound.

  5. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  6. Pharma giants swap research programs.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical giants Novartis and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) agreed in late April to swap some assets, with Novartis handing off its vaccine business to GSK and getting most of the British company's cancer portfolio in return.

  7. Theories of Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of planetary formation, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. While these models predict that rocky planets should form around most single stars, the frequency of formation of gas giant planets is more difficult to predict theoretically. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Most models for extrasolar giant planets suggest that they formed as did Jupiter and Saturn (in nearly circular orbits, far enough from the star that ice could), and subsequently migrated to their current positions, although some models suggest in situ formation.

  8. Lichens On Galapagos Giant Tortoises.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, J R; Weber, W A

    1964-06-19

    The association of Physcia picta with the giant Galdpagos tortoise is believed to be the first reported occurrence of lichens on land animals. The habitat is restricted to specific sites on the carapace of male tortoises.

  9. Landscape of the lost giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene megafauna extinction erased a group of remarkable animals. Whether humans had a prominent role in the extinction remains controversial, but it is emerging that the disappearance of the giants has markedly affected the environment.

  10. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The next decade will almost certainly see the direct imaging of extrasolar giant planets around nearby stars. Unlike purely radial velocity detections, direct imaging will open the door to characterizing the atmosphere and interiors of extrasola planets and ultimately provide clues on their formation and evolution through time. This process has already begun for the transiting planets, placing new constraints on their atmospheric structure, composition, and evolution. Indeed the key to understanding giant planet detectability, interpreting spectra, and constraining effective temperature and hence evolution-is the atmosphere. I will review the universe of extrasolar giant planet models, focusing on what we have already learned from modeling and what we will likely be able to learn from the first generation of direct detection data. In addition to these theoretical considerations, I will review the observations and interpretation of the - transiting hot Jupiters. These objects provide a test of our ability to model exotic atmospheres and challenge our current understanding of giant planet evolution.

  11. Analysis of Vortex Line Cutting and Reconnection by a Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Curtis; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The essence of vortex reconnection involves the cutting of vortex lines originating from one region and reconnecting to vortex lines originating from another region via the diffusion-regulated annihilation of vorticity. Vortex cutting by a blade is a special case of the more general class of vortex reconnection problems, with an important difference being that vorticity is generated at the reconnection site. In this study, a series of Navier-Stokes simulations of orthogonal vortex cutting by a blade with different values of vortex strength are reported. The three phases of vortex reconnection identified in the literature are found to have counterparts for the vortex cutting problem. However numerous differences between the mechanics of vortex cutting and reconnection within each phase are discussed. In addition, comparisons are made between the temporal changes of the maximum and minimum components of vorticity for vortices of differing strength but still within the vortex cutting regime. The vortex cutting results are also compared with predictions of a simple analytical model that incorporates the key elements of a stretched vorticity field interacting with a solid surface, which is representative of the vortex cutting mechanism near the blade leading edge. Funded by National Science Foundation project DGE-1144388.

  12. Vortex-Based Aero- and Hydrodynamic Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar Sam

    Flow control strategies often require knowledge of unmeasurable quantities, thus presenting a need to reconstruct flow states from measurable ones. In this thesis, the modeling, simulation, and estimator design aspects of flow reconstruction are considered. First, a vortex-based aero- and hydrodynamic estimation paradigm is developed to design a wake sensing algorithm for aircraft formation flight missions. The method assimilates wing distributed pressure measurements with a vortex-based wake model to better predict the state of the flow. The study compares Kalman-type algorithms with particle filtering algorithms, demonstrating that the vortex nonlinearities require particle filters to yield adequate performance. Furthermore, the observability structure of the wake is shown to have a negative impact on filter performance regardless of the algorithm applied. It is demonstrated that relative motions can alleviate the filter divergence issues associated with this observability structure. In addition to estimator development, the dissertation addresses the need for an efficient unsteady multi-body aerodynamics testbed for estimator and controller validation studies. A pure vortex particle implementation of a vortex panel-particle method is developed to satisfy this need. The numerical method is demonstrated on the impulsive startup of a flat plate as well as the impulsive startup of a multi-wing formation. It is clear, from these validation studies, that the method is able to accommodate the unsteady wake effects that arise in formation flight missions. Lastly, successful vortex-based estimation is highly dependent on the reliability of the low-order vortex model used in representing the flow of interest. The present treatise establishes a systematic framework for vortex model improvement, grounded in optimal control theory and the calculus of variations. By minimizing model predicted errors with respect to empirical data, the shortcomings of the baseline vortex model

  13. Giants in the Local Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luck, R. Earle; Heiter, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We present parameter and abundance data for a sample of 298 nearby giants. The spectroscopic data for this work have a resolution of R~60,000, S/N>150, and spectral coverage from 475 to 685 nm. Overall trends in the Z>10 abundances are dominated by Galactic chemical evolution, while the light-element abundances are influenced by stellar evolution, as well as Galactic evolution. We find several super-Li stars in our sample and confirm that Li abundances in the first giant branch are related to mixing depths. Once astration of lithium on the main sequence along with the overall range of main-sequence lithium abundances are taken into account, the lithium abundances of the giants are not dramatically at odds with the predictions of standard stellar evolution. We find the giants to be carbon-diluted in accord with standard stellar evolution and that the carbon and oxygen abundances determined for the local giants are consistent with those found in local field dwarfs. We find that there is evidence for systematic carbon variations in the red giant clump in the sense that the blue side of the clump is carbon-poor (more diluted) than the red side.

  14. Numerical analysis of slender vortex motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.

    1996-02-01

    Several numerical methods for slender vortex motion (the local induction equation, the Klein-Majda equation, and the Klein-Knio equation) are compared on the specific example of sideband instability of Kelvin waves on a vortex. Numerical experiments on this model problem indicate that all these methods yield qualitatively similar behavior, and this behavior is different from the behavior of a non-slender vortex with variable cross-section. It is found that the boundaries between stable, recurrent, and chaotic regimes in the parameter space of the model problem depend on the method used. The boundaries of these domains in the parameter space for the Klein-Majda equation and for the Klein-Knio equation are closely related to the core size. When the core size is large enough, the Klein-Majda equation always exhibits stable solutions for our model problem. Various conclusions are drawn; in particular, the behavior of turbulent vortices cannot be captured by these local approximations, and probably cannot be captured by any slender vortex model with constant vortex cross-section. Speculations about the differences between classical and superfluid hydrodynamics are also offered.

  15. Point vortex interactions on a toroidal surface.

    PubMed

    Sakajo, Takashi; Shimizu, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Owing to non-constant curvature and a handle structure, it is not easy to imagine intuitively how flows with vortex structures evolve on a toroidal surface compared with those in a plane, on a sphere and a flat torus. In order to cultivate an insight into vortex interactions on this manifold, we derive the evolution equation for N-point vortices from Green's function associated with the Laplace-Beltrami operator there, and we then formulate it as a Hamiltonian dynamical system with the help of the symplectic geometry and the uniformization theorem. Based on this Hamiltonian formulation, we show that the 2-vortex problem is integrable. We also investigate the point vortex equilibria and the motion of two-point vortices with the strengths of the same magnitude as one of the fundamental vortex interactions. As a result, we find some characteristic interactions between point vortices on the torus. In particular, two identical point vortices can be locally repulsive under a certain circumstance.

  16. Vortex-based line beam optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shubo; Tao, Shaohua

    2016-10-01

    A vortex-based line beam, which has a straight-line shape of intensity and possesses phase gradient along the line trajectory is developed and applied for optical manipulation in this paper. The intensity and phase distributions of the beam in the imaging plane of the Fourier transform are analytically studied. Simulation results show that the length of the line and phase gradient possessed by a vortex-based line beam are dependent on the topological charge and the azimuthal proportional constant. A superposition of multiple phase-only holograms with elliptical azimuthal phases can be used to generate an array of vortex-based line beams. Optical trapping with the vortex-based line beams has been implemented. Furthermore, the automatic transportation of microparticles along the line trajectory perpendicular to the optical axis is realized with an array of the beams. The generation method for the vortex-based line beam is simple. The beam would have potential applications in fields such as optical trapping, laser machining, and so on.

  17. NASA Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.; Charnock, James K.; Bagwell, Donald R.; Grigsby, Donner

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions through the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. Within TAP, the Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement at the NASA Langley Research Center is developing an Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS). AVOSS will integrate the output of several systems to produce weather dependent, dynamic wake vortex spacing criteria. These systems provide current and predicted weather conditions, models of wake vortex transport and decay in these weather conditions, and real-time feedback of wake vortex behavior from sensors. The goal of the NASA program is to provide the research and development to demonstrate an engineering model AVOSS in real-time operation at a major airport. The demonstration is only of concept feasibility, and additional effort is required to deploy an operational system for actual aircraft spacing reduction. This paper describes the AVOSS system architecture, a wake vortex facility established at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), initial operational experience with the AVOSS system, and emerging considerations for subsystem requirements. Results of the initial system operation suggest a significant potential for reduced spacing.

  18. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Marchant, N. G.; O’Dell, D. H. J.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose–Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross–Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas–Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition.

  19. Vortex Shedding Inside a Baffled Air Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Philip; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Common in the operation of both segmented and un-segmented large solid rocket motors is the occurrence of vortex shedding within the motor chamber. A portion of the energy within a shed vortex is converted to acoustic energy, potentially driving the longitudinal acoustic modes of the motor in a quasi-discrete fashion. This vortex shedding-acoustic mode excitation event occurs for every Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) operation, giving rise to subsequent axial thrust oscillations. In order to better understand this vortex shedding/acoustic mode excitation phenomena, unsteady CFD simulations were run for both a test geometry and the full scale RSRM geometry. This paper covers the results from the subscale geometry runs, which were based on work focusing on the RSRM hydrodynamics. Unsteady CFD simulation parameters, including boundary conditions and post-processing returns, are reviewed. The results were further post-processed to identify active acoustic modes and vortex shedding characteristics. Probable locations for acoustic energy generation, and subsequent acoustic mode excitation, are discussed.

  20. Vortices and vortex lattices in quantum ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Martin, A M; Marchant, N G; O'Dell, D H J; Parker, N G

    2017-03-15

    The experimental realization of quantum-degenerate Bose gases made of atoms with sizeable magnetic dipole moments has created a new type of fluid, known as a quantum ferrofluid, which combines the extraordinary properties of superfluidity and ferrofluidity. A hallmark of superfluids is that they are constrained to rotate through vortices with quantized circulation. In quantum ferrofluids the long-range dipolar interactions add new ingredients by inducing magnetostriction and instabilities, and also affect the structural properties of vortices and vortex lattices. Here we give a review of the theory of vortices in dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates, exploring the interplay of magnetism with vorticity and contrasting this with the established behaviour in non-dipolar condensates. We cover single vortex solutions, including structure, energy and stability, vortex pairs, including interactions and dynamics, and also vortex lattices. Our discussion is founded on the mean-field theory provided by the dipolar Gross-Pitaevskii equation, ranging from analytic treatments based on the Thomas-Fermi (hydrodynamic) and variational approaches to full numerical simulations. Routes for generating vortices in dipolar condensates are discussed, with particular attention paid to rotating condensates, where surface instabilities drive the nucleation of vortices, and lead to the emergence of rich and varied vortex lattice structures. We also present an outlook, including potential extensions to degenerate Fermi gases, quantum Hall physics, toroidal systems and the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

  1. The calculation of some Batchelor flows - The Sadovskii vortex and rotational corner flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. W.; Saffman, P. G.; Tanveer, S.

    1988-05-01

    Steady inviscid incompressible two-dimensional flows with vortex patches bounded by vortex sheets (Batchelor flows) are calculated with attention given to the vortex on a plane wall (Sadovskii vortex) and the vortex in a right-angled corner. Nonlinear integral equations derived for the shape of the bounding vortex sheet are solved numerically. Only symmetrical solutions are shown to exist.

  2. Universal statistics of vortex lines.

    PubMed

    Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J T

    2012-03-01

    We study the vortex lines that are a feature of many random or disordered three-dimensional systems. These show universal statistical properties on long length scales, and geometrical phase transitions analogous to percolation transitions but in distinct universality classes. The field theories for these problems have not previously been identified, so that while many numerical studies have been performed, a framework for interpreting the results has been lacking. We provide such a framework with mappings to simple supersymmetric models. Our main focus is on vortices in short-range-correlated complex fields, which show a geometrical phase transition that we argue is described by the CP(k|k) model (essentially the CP(n-1) model in the replica limit n→1). This can be seen by mapping a lattice version of the problem to a lattice gauge theory. A related field theory with a noncompact gauge field, the 'NCCP(k|k) model', is a supersymmetric extension of the standard dual theory for the XY transition, and we show that XY duality gives another way to understand the appearance of field theories of this type. The supersymmetric descriptions yield results relevant, for example, to vortices in the XY model and in superfluids, to optical vortices, and to certain models of cosmic strings. A distinct but related field theory, the RP(2l|2l) model (or the RP(n-1) model in the limit n→1) describes the unoriented vortices that occur, for instance, in nematic liquid crystals. Finally, we show that in two dimensions, a lattice gauge theory analogous to that discussed in three dimensions gives a simple way to see the known relation between two-dimensional percolation and the CP(k|k) σ model with a θ term.

  3. The Giant Magnetocaloric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    1998-03-01

    Since the discovery of the magnetocaloric effect in pure iron by E.Warburg in 1881, it has been measured experimentally on many magnetic metals and compounds. The majority of the materials studied order magnetically undergoing a second order phase transformation. The magnetocaloric effect, typically peaking near the Curie or the Néel temperature, generally ranges from 0.5 to 2 K (in terms of adiabatic temperature change) or at 1 to 4 J/kg K (in terms of isothermal magnetic entropy change) per 1 T magnetic field change. The giant magnetocaloric effect recently discovered in Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where x <= 0.5, is associated with a first order magnetic phase transition and it reaches values of 3 to 4 K and 6 to 10 J/kg K per 1 T field change, respectively. The refrigerant capacity, which is the measure of how much heat can be transferred from a cold to a hot reservoir in one ideal thermodynamic cycle, is larger than that of the best second order phase transition materials by 25 to 100%. When the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys are compared with other known materials, which show first order magnetic phase transition, such as Dy, Ho, Er, HoCo_2, NdMn_2Si_2, Fe_0.49Rh_0.51, and (Hf_0.83Ta_0.17)Fe_2+x, only Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 has comparable magnetocaloric properties. However, the first order magnetic phase transition in Fe_0.49Rh_0.51 is irreversible, and the magnetocaloric effect disappears after one magnetizing/demagnetizing cycle. A study of the crystal structure, thermodynamics, and magnetism of the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 alloys, where 0 <= x <= 1 allowed us to obtain a qualitative understanding of the basic relations between the composition, the crystal structure, and the change in thermodynamics and magnetocaloric properties, which occur in the Gd_5(Si_xGe_1-x)4 system, and which brings about the giant magnetocaloric effect when x <= 0.5.

  4. Vortex Filaments in Grids for Scalable, Fine Smoke Simulation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhang; Weixin, Si; Yinling, Qian; Hanqiu, Sun; Jing, Qin; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Vortex modeling can produce attractive visual effects of dynamic fluids, which are widely applicable for dynamic media, computer games, special effects, and virtual reality systems. However, it is challenging to effectively simulate intensive and fine detailed fluids such as smoke with fast increasing vortex filaments and smoke particles. The authors propose a novel vortex filaments in grids scheme in which the uniform grids dynamically bridge the vortex filaments and smoke particles for scalable, fine smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures. Using the vortex model, their approach supports the trade-off between simulation speed and scale of details. After computing the whole velocity, external control can be easily exerted on the embedded grid to guide the vortex-based smoke motion. The experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of using the proposed scheme for a visually plausible smoke simulation with macroscopic vortex structures.

  5. Sphagnum moss disperses spores with vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Dwight L; Edwards, Joan

    2010-07-23

    Sphagnum spores, which have low terminal velocities, are carried by turbulent wind currents to establish colonies many kilometers away. However, spores that are easily kept aloft are also rapidly decelerated in still air; thus, dispersal range depends strongly on release height. Vascular plants grow tall to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, but nonvascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently high. High-speed videos show that exploding capsules of Sphagnum generate vortex rings to efficiently carry spores high enough to be dispersed by turbulent air currents. Spores launched ballistically at similar speeds through still air would travel a few millimeters and not easily reach turbulent air. Vortex rings are used by animals; here, we report vortex rings generated by plants.

  6. Vortex generation in oscillatory canopy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Schlosser, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the generation of coherent vortices at the top of a canopy in oscillatory (i.e., wave-dominated) flow. Through a series of flow visualization experiments, vortex formation is shown to occur when two conditions described by the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) and Reynolds (Re) numbers are met. First, the wave period must be sufficiently long to allow the generation of the shear-driven instability at the top of the canopy; this occurs when KC ≳ 5. Second, the vortex instability must be able to overcome the stabilizing effects of viscosity; this occurs when Re ≳ 1000. The vortices greatly increase the rate of vertical mixing within the canopy, such that any prediction of residence time in a coastal canopy requires an understanding of whether vortex generation is occurring.

  7. Vortex noise from nonrotating cylinders and airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.; Fink, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of vortex-shedding noise was conducted in an acoustic research tunnel over a Reynolds-number range applicable to full-scale helicopter tail-rotor blades. Two-dimensional tapered-chord nonrotating models were tested to simulate the effect of spanwise frequency variation on the vortex-shedding mechanism. Both a tapered circular cylinder and tapered airfoils were investigated. The results were compared with data for constant-diameter cylinder and constant-chord airfoil models also tested during this study. Far-field noise, surface pressure fluctuations, and spanwise correlation lengths were measured for each configuration. Vortex-shedding noise for tapered cylinders and airfoils was found to contain many narrowband-random peaks which occurred within a range of frequencies corresponding to a predictable Strouhal number referenced to the maximum and minimum chord. The noise was observed to depend on surface roughness and Reynolds number.

  8. Global time evolution of viscous vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Y.

    2010-03-01

    This article gives an overview of growing knowledge of translation speed of an axisymmetric vortex ring, with focus on the influence of viscosity. Helmholtz-Lamb’s method provides a shortcut to manipulate the translation speed at both small and large Reynolds number, for a vortex ring starting from an infinitely thin core. The resulting asymptotics significantly improve Saffman’s formula (1970) and give closer lower and upper bounds on translation speed in an early stage. At large Reynolds numbers, Kelvin-Benjamin’s kinematic variational principle achieves a further simplification. At small Reynolds numbers, the whole life of a vortex ring is available from the vorticity obeying the Stokes equations, which is closely fitted, over a long time, by Saffman’s second formula.

  9. Development of a nonlinear vortex method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, O. A.

    1982-01-01

    Steady and unsteady Nonliner Hybrid Vortex (NHV) method, for low aspect ratio wings at large angles of attack, is developed. The method uses vortex panels with first-order vorticity distribution (equivalent to second-order doublet distribution) to calculate the induced velocity in the near field using closed form expressions. In the far field, the distributed vorticity is reduced to concentrated vortex lines and the simpler Biot-Savart's law is employed. The method is applied to rectangular wings in steady and unsteady flows without any restriction on the order of magnitude of the disturbances in the flow field. The numerical results show that the method accurately predicts the distributed aerodynamic loads and that it is of acceptable computational efficiency.

  10. Optical vortex beam generator at nanoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garoli, Denis; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Gorodetski, Yuri; Tantussi, Francesco; de Angelis, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can find tremendous applications in several fields. In order to apply these particular beams in photonic integrated devices innovative optical elements have been proposed. Here we are interested in the generation of OAM-carrying beams at the nanoscale level. We design and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic optical vortex emitter, based on a metal-insulator-metal holey plasmonic vortex lens. Our plasmonic element is shown to convert impinging circularly polarized light to an orbital angular momentum state capable of propagating to the far-field. Moreover, the emerging OAM can be externally adjusted by switching the handedness of the incident light polarization. The device has a radius of few micrometers and the OAM beam is generated from subwavelength aperture. The fabrication of integrated arrays of PVLs and the possible simultaneous emission of multiple optical vortices provide an easy way to the large-scale integration of optical vortex emitters for wide-ranging applications.

  11. Influence of inlet conditions on vortex characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essiptchouk, A.

    2011-09-01

    Vortex chambers are normally used for arc stabilization in linear plasma torches. In the present work, the effect of uniformity of the gas inlet channel distribution on the stabilizing characteristics of a swirled flow is studied numerically. The formation of a complex flow pattern with a toroidal recirculating flow area inside the vortex chamber is observed. For some regimes, two local maxima of the tangential velocity are observed in the middle section of the chamber. It is shown that an increment of the number of gas inlet channels leads to a more uniform gas input with disappearance of the second maximum, which increases the velocity amplification coefficient and, correspondingly, results in a better stabilizing effect. The obtained profiles of the radial distribution of the tangential velocity are compared with the results of Oseen's equation for an unconfined vortex.

  12. Collective magnetism at multiferroic vortex domain walls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Lee, N; Choi, Y J; Cheong, S-W; Wu, Weida

    2012-12-12

    Cross-coupled phenomena of multiferroic domains and domain walls are of fundamental scientific and technological interest. Using cryogenic magnetic force microscopy, we find alternating net magnetic moments at ferroelectric domain walls around vortex cores in multiferroic hexagonal ErMnO(3), which correlate with each other throughout the entire vortex network. This collective nature of domain wall magnetism originates from the uncompensated Er(3+) moments at domain walls and the self-organization of the vortex network. Our results demonstrate that the collective domain wall magnetism can be controlled by external magnetic fields and represent a major advancement in the manipulation of local magnetic moments by harnessing cross-coupled domain walls.

  13. Stabilization of vortex solitons in nonlocal nonlinear media

    SciTech Connect

    Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2007-12-15

    We study the evolution of vortex solitons in optical media with a nonlocal nonlinear response. We employ a modulation theory for the vortex parameters based on an averaged Lagrangian, and analyze the azimuthal evolution of both the vortex width and diffractive radiation. We describe analytically the physical mechanism for vortex stabilization due to the long-range nonlocal nonlinear response, the effect observed earlier in numerical simulations only.

  14. Relationship Between Vortex Meander and Ambient Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Meyn, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    Efforts are currently underway to increase the capacity of airports by use of closely-spaced parallel runways. If such an objective is to be achieved safely and efficiently during both visual and instrument flight conditions, it will be necessary to develop more precise methods for the prediction of the motion and spread of the hazard posed by the lift-generated vortex-wakes of aircraft, and their uncertainties. The purpose of the present study is to relate the motion induced in vortex filaments by turbulence in the ambient flow field to the measured turbulence in the flow field. The problem came about when observations made in the two largest NASA wind tunnels indicated that extended exposure of vortex wakes to the turbulence in the wind tunnel air stream causes the centers of the vortices to meander about with time at a given downstream station where wake measurements are being made. Although such a behavior was expected, the turbulence level based on the maximum amplitude of meander was much less than the root-mean-squared value measured in the free-stream of the wind tunnel by use of hot-film anemometers. An analysis of the time-dependent motion of segments of vortex filaments as they interact with an eddy, indicates that the inertia of the filaments retards their motion enough in the early part of their travel to account for a large part of the difference in the two determinations of turbulence level. Migration of vortex filaments from one turbulent eddy to another (probably with a different orientation), is believed to account for the remainder of the difference. Methods that may possibly be developed for use in the measurement of the magnitude of the more intense eddies in turbulent flow fields and how they should be adjusted to predict vortex meander are then discussed.

  15. The Structure of the Polar Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Lait, Leslie R.; Newman, Paul A.; Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1992-05-01

    Reconstruction of the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and Airborne Arctic Stratosphere Expedition aircraft constituent observations, radiative heating rate computations, and trajectory calculations are used to generate comparative pictures of the 1987 southern hemisphere (SH) late winter and 1989 northern hemisphere (NH) mid-winter, lower stratospheric, polar vortices. Overall, both polar vortices define a region of highly isolated air, where the exchange of trace gases occurs principally at the vortex edge through erosional wave activity. Aircraft measurement showed that (1) between 50 and 100 mbar, horizontally stratified long-lived tracers such as N2O are displaced downward 2-3 km on the cyclonic (poleward) side of the jet with the meridional tracer gradient sharpest at the jet core. (2) Eddy mixing rates, computed using parcel ensemble statistics, are an order of magnitude or more lower on the cyclonic side of the jet compared to those on the anticyclonic side. (3) Poleward zonal mean meridional flow on the anticyclonic side of the jet terminates in a descent zone at the jet core. Despite the similarities between the SH and NH winter vortices, there are important differences. During the aircraft campaign periods, the SH vortex jet core was located roughly 8°-10° equatorward of its NH counterpart after pole centering. As a result of the larger size of the SH vortex, the dynamical heating associated with the jet core descent zone is displaced further from the pole. The SH polar vortex can therefore approach radiative equilibrium temperatures over a comparatively larger area than the NH vortex. The subsequent widespread formation of polar stratospheric clouds within the much colder SH vortex core gives rise to the interhemispheric differences in the reconstructed H2O, NOy, ClO, and O3, species which are affected by polar stratospheric clouds.

  16. Vortex ventilation in the laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Meisenzahl, Lawrence R

    2014-01-01

    Assured containment at low airflow has long eluded the users of ventilated enclosures including chemical fume hoods used throughout industry. It is proposed that containment will be enhanced in a hood that has a particular interior shape that causes a natural vortex to occur. The sustained vortex improves the containment of contaminants within the enclosure at low airflow. This hypothesis was tested using the ASHRAE 110 tracer gas test. A known volume of tracer gas was emitted in the hood. A MIRAN SapphIRe infrared spectrometer was used to measure the concentration of tracer gas that escapes the enclosure. The design of the experiment included a written operating procedure, data collection plan, and statistical analysis of the data. A chemical fume hood of traditional design was tested. The hood interior was then reconstructed to enhance the development of a vortex inside the enclosure. The hood was retested using the same method to compare the performance of the traditional interior shape with the enhanced vortex shape. In every aspect, the vortex hood showed significant improvement over the traditional hood design. Use of the Hood Index characterizing the dilution of gas in an air stream as a logarithmic function indicates a causal relationship between containment and volumetric airflow through an enclosure. Use of the vortex effect for ventilated enclosures can provide better protection for the user and lower operating cost for the owner. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a data collection spreadsheet, data analysis, and data collection procedure.].

  17. Recent advances in applying Free Vortex Sheet theory to the estimation of vortex flow aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.; Schoonover, W. E., Jr.; Frink, N. T.

    1982-01-01

    Free Vortex Sheet theory has been applied to a variety of configurations for the estimation of three-dimensional pressure distributions for wings developing separation-induced leading-edge vortex flows. Correlations with experiment show reasonable estimates for the effects of compressibility, side-slip, side edges, swept-wing blast-induced loads, and leading-edge vortex flaps. Theoretical studies expand upon these correlations to show general aerodynamic trends. Consideration is also given to simple, yet effective techniques which expedite convergence and therefore reduce computational expense.

  18. A vortex-source combination, a source, and a vortex with distributed heat supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, A. N.

    1983-04-01

    An analysis is made of the effect of distributed heat supply on the gasdynamic characteristics of a vortex-source (vortex-sink) combination, a source (sink), and a vortex. It is shown that in all the cases considered, there is a minimum radius for which the radial component of M is equal to unity. It is also shown that there is a critical intensity of heat release (for a fixed similarity parameter) separating two families of integral curves and that for this critical value a solution exists only under certain conditions.

  19. A unique advantage for giant eyes in giant squid.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Warrant, Eric J; Johnsen, Sönke; Hanlon, Roger; Shashar, Nadav

    2012-04-24

    Giant and colossal deep-sea squid (Architeuthis and Mesonychoteuthis) have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom [1, 2], but there is no explanation for why they would need eyes that are nearly three times the diameter of those of any other extant animal. Here we develop a theory for visual detection in pelagic habitats, which predicts that such giant eyes are unlikely to evolve for detecting mates or prey at long distance but are instead uniquely suited for detecting very large predators, such as sperm whales. We also provide photographic documentation of an eyeball of about 27 cm with a 9 cm pupil in a giant squid, and we predict that, below 600 m depth, it would allow detection of sperm whales at distances exceeding 120 m. With this long range of vision, giant squid get an early warning of approaching sperm whales. Because the sonar range of sperm whales exceeds 120 m [3-5], we hypothesize that a well-prepared and powerful evasive response to hunting sperm whales may have driven the evolution of huge dimensions in both eyes and bodies of giant and colossal squid. Our theory also provides insights into the vision of Mesozoic ichthyosaurs with unusually large eyes.

  20. Dynamics of a vortex filament in a stratified medium

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, P. V.; Romanov, A. S.; Chukbar, K. V.

    2009-03-15

    The behavior of a vortex filament in a perfectly conducting stratified medium is analyzed. It is shown that the equation describing oscillations of a straight filament is linear, but becomes substantially non-linear with increasing inclination angle. Effects related to the finite radius of the vortex core are considered, and dispersion relations for linear oscillations of a vortex column are derived.

  1. Vortex reconnections between coreless vortices in binary condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, S.; Suthar, K.; Angom, D.

    2014-02-11

    Vortex reconnections plays an important role in the turbulent flows associated with the superfluids. To understand the dynamics, we examine the reconnections of vortex rings in the superfluids of dilute atomic gases confined in trapping potentials using Gross-Petaevskii equation. Further more we study the reconnection dynamics of coreless vortex rings, where one of the species can act as a tracer.

  2. Vortex lift research: Early contributions and some current challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The trend towards slender wing aircraft for supersonic cruise and the early chronology of research directed towards their vortex-lift characteristics are briefly reviewed. An overview of the development of vortex-lift theoretical methods is presented, and some current computational and experimental challenges related to the viscous flow aspects of this vortex flow are discussed.

  3. Strouhal-Reynolds number relationship for vortex streets.

    PubMed

    Ponta, Fernando L; Aref, Hassan

    2004-08-20

    A rationale for the empirically observed Strouhal-Reynolds number relation for vortex shedding in the wake of a cylinder is provided. This rationale derives from a mechanism of vortex formation observed in numerical simulations of two-dimensional vortex shedding coupled with an order of magnitude estimate of the terms in the vorticity transport equation based on this mechanism.

  4. Formation of the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  5. Clump Giants in the Hyades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor); Brickhouse, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The project is entitled 'Clump Giants in the Hyades.' This observation of one of the late-type Hyades giants (Gamma Tau) has implications for understanding the formation of late-type stellar coronae as a function of the evolutionary state of the star. The Hyades giants are interesting because they are all clump giants in the Helium burning phase, similar to the cool primary of Capella. The Hyades giants show significantly more magnetic activity than expected from their state of evolution (and slowed-down rotation). Thus these systems provide an important clue to dynamo action. The data were obtained by the satellite on 13 March 2001 for a total RGS exposure of 58220 seconds. These data were delivered to the PI on 7 August 2001. The data could not be reprocessed until SAS Version 5.3.3 which became available 7 June 2002. Although the guidelines for assessing background rates suggested that half the data were contaminated, it does not appear that the spectral region of the RGS was adversely affected by unusually high background. The spectra show strong lines of Fe XVII and XVIII, O VII and VIII, Ne IX and X, along with numerous weaker lines. The emission measure distribution is highly reminiscent of Capella; if anything, the emission measure distribution is steeper at 6 million K than for Capella. Gamma Tau is the second brightest of the Hyades clump giants. Pallavicini et al. have shown that the luminosity of the brightest Hyades giant (Theta Tau) is remarkably similar to its luminosity as measured by Einstein. Short-term variability is also modest. We are addressing the variability issue now for Gamma Tau. Initial results were reported at the 2003 Seattle AAS meeting. A paper is in preparation for submission to the Astrophysical Journal.

  6. Paramagnetic excited vortex states in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Rodolpho Ribeiro; Doria, Mauro M.; Romaguera, Antonio R. de C.

    2016-06-01

    We consider excited vortex states, which are vortex states left inside a superconductor once the external applied magnetic field is switched off and whose energy is lower than of the normal state. We show that this state is paramagnetic and develop here a general method to obtain its Gibbs free energy through conformal mapping. The solution for any number of vortices in any cross-section geometry can be read off from the Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. The method is based on the first-order equations used by Abrikosov to discover vortices.

  7. Two dimensional thick center vortex model

    SciTech Connect

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2016-01-22

    The potential between static color source is calculated in the SU (3) gauge group by introducing a two dimensional vortex flux. To generalize the model, the length of the Wilson loop is equal to R oriented along the x axis, and the vortex flux is considered as a function of x and y. The comparison between the generalized model and the original one shows that the intermediate linear regime is increased significantly and better agreement with Casimir scaling is achieved. Furthermore, the model is applied to calculate the potential between baryons.

  8. Effect of vortex flows on ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Beskov, V.S.; Shpinel', E.E.

    1988-09-01

    The oxidation of ammonia over platinum sieve catalysts was investigated given the vortex flows found in industrial contact units. Mathematical and physical models were used to assess the influence of vortices on ammonia oxidation. The flow pattern of the ammonia-air mixture in the reactor was modeled as a stream with a partial recycle. It is shown that vortex flows reduce the conversion of ammonia to nitrogen monoxide and increase the passage of unconverted ammonia through the catalyst sieve. Over long contact periods, the main effect of vortices is to increase the passage of unconverted ammonia, which may lead to the formation of explosive compounds.

  9. Quantum dynamics of a Bose superfluid vortex.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L; Stamp, P C E

    2012-05-04

    We derive a fully quantum-mechanical equation of motion for a vortex in a 2-dimensional Bose superfluid in the temperature regime where the normal fluid density ρ(n)(T) is small. The coupling between the vortex "zero mode" and the quasiparticles has no term linear in the quasiparticle variables--the lowest-order coupling is quadratic. We find that as a function of the dimensionless frequency Ω=ℏΩ/k(B)T, the standard Hall-Vinen-Iordanskii equations are valid when Ω≪1 (the "classical regime"), but elsewhere, the equations of motion become highly retarded, with significant experimental implications when Ω≳1.

  10. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  11. Wall reflection of a viscous vortex ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, J. Y.; Chang, K. S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of a viscous axisymmetric vortex ring being reflected from a wall is investigated. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations formulated in terms of the vorticity function and vector potential are numerically integrated by implicit finite difference methods. To specify the vector potential at a far boundary from the wall, the existing integral method used so far only for an unbounded domain is modified by a kind of image method. The trajectory of the vortex ring calcualted as a result closely resembles that observable from the experiment.

  12. Exotic statistics of leapfrogging vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Antti J

    2005-04-01

    The leapfrogging motion of vortex rings is a three-dimensional version of the motion that in two dimensions leads to exotic exchange statistics. The statistical phase factor can be computed using the hydrodynamical Euler equation, which suggests that three-dimensional exotic exchange statistics is a common property of vortex rings in a variety of quantum liquids and gases. Potential applications range from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases, metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases, and maybe even nuclear matter in extreme conditions.

  13. Vortex Generator Model Developed for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2002-01-01

    A computational model was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible uses of vortex generators (VG's) for improving the performance of turbomachinery. A vortex generator is a small, winglike device that generates vortices at its tip. The vortices mix high-speed core flow with low-speed boundary layer flow and, thus, can be used to delay flow separation. VG's also turn the flow near the walls and, thus, can be used to control flow incidence into a turbomachinery blade row or to control secondary flows.

  14. Vortex microscope: analytical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masajada, Jan; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Szatkowski, Mateusz; Plociniczak, Łukasz

    2015-11-01

    We present the analytical model describing the Gaussian beam propagation through the off axis vortex lens and the set of axially positioned ideal lenses. The model is derived on the base of Fresnel diffraction integral. The model is extended to the case of vortex lens with any topological charge m. We have shown that the Gaussian beam propagation can be represented by function G which depends on four coefficients. When propagating from one lens to another the function holds its form but the coefficient changes.

  15. Venus's southern polar vortex reveals precessing circulation.

    PubMed

    Luz, D; Berry, D L; Piccioni, G; Drossart, P; Politi, R; Wilson, C F; Erard, S; Nuccilli, F

    2011-04-29

    Initial images of Venus's south pole by the Venus Express mission have shown the presence of a bright, highly variable vortex, similar to that at the planet's north pole. Using high-resolution infrared measurements of polar winds from the Venus Express Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument, we show the vortex to have a constantly varying internal structure, with a center of rotation displaced from the geographic south pole by ~3 degrees of latitude and that drifts around the pole with a period of 5 to 10 Earth days. This is indicative of a nonsymmetric and varying precession of the polar atmospheric circulation with respect to the planetary axis.

  16. The viscous modulation of Lamb's dipole vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Fliert, B. W.

    1996-07-01

    A description of the adiabatic decay of the Lamb dipolar vortex is motivated by a variational characterization of the dipole. The parameters in the description are the values of the entrophy and linear momentum integrals, which change in time due to the dissipation. It is observed that the dipole dilates during the decay process [radius R˜(νt)1/2], while the amplitude of the vortex and its translation speed diminish in time proportional to (νt)-3/2 and (νt)-1.

  17. Multi-Model Ensemble Wake Vortex Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerner, Stephan; Holzaepfel, Frank; Ahmad, Nash'at N.

    2015-01-01

    Several multi-model ensemble methods are investigated for predicting wake vortex transport and decay. This study is a joint effort between National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt to develop a multi-model ensemble capability using their wake models. An overview of different multi-model ensemble methods and their feasibility for wake applications is presented. The methods include Reliability Ensemble Averaging, Bayesian Model Averaging, and Monte Carlo Simulations. The methodologies are evaluated using data from wake vortex field experiments.

  18. A vortex flow intensified by thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmalbaf, M. H.; Liu, Tianshu; Merati, Parviz

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a thermal-convection-intensified vortex flow within a rotating cylinder with a counter-rotating heated disk located below. This flow tends to mimic certain aspects of the intriguing flow structure of the great red spot in Jupiter by using a simple laboratory setup. Particle image velocimetry measurements reveal the counter-rotating torus vortices in the lower and upper domains and the complex mixing-layer features in the transitional domain between them. In particular, it is found that the vortex structures are significantly intensified by the thermal convection from the heated disk.

  19. Strong intrinsic mixing in vortex magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren; Solis, Kyle J

    2009-07-01

    We report a method of magnetic mixing wherein a "vortex" magnetic field applied to a suspension of magnetic particles creates strong homogeneous mixing throughout the fluid volume. Experiments designed to elucidate the microscopic mechanism of mixing show that the torque is quadratic in the field, decreases with field frequency, and is optimized at a vortex field angle of approximately 55 degrees . Theory and simulations indicate that the field-induced formation of volatile particle chains is responsible for these phenomena. This technique has applications in microfluidic devices and is ideally suited to applications such as accelerating the binding of target biomolecules to biofunctionalized magnetic microbeads.

  20. Open questions about giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Claverie, Jean-Michel; Abergel, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of giant viruses exhibiting double-stranded DNA genomes larger than a million base pairs, encoding more than a thousand proteins and packed in near micron-sized icosahedral particles, opened a new and unexpected chapter in virology. As of today, these giant viruses and their closest relatives of lesser dimensions infect unicellular eukaryotes found in aquatic environments, but belonging to a wide diversity of early branching phyla. This broad phylogenetic distribution of hosts is consistent with the hypothesis that giant viruses originated prior to the radiation of the eukaryotic domain and/or might have been involved in the partition of nuclear versus cytoplasmic functions in ancestral cells. The distinctive features of the known giant viruses, in particular the recurrent presence of components of the translation apparatus in their proteome, raise a number of fundamental questions about their origin, their mode of evolution, and the relationship they may entertain with other dsDNA viruses, the genome size of which exhibits the widest distribution among all biological entities, from less than 5 kb to more than 1.25 Mb (a ratio of 1:250). At a more conceptual level, the convergence between the discovery of increasingly reduced parasitic cellular organisms and that of giant viruses exhibiting a widening array of cellular-like functions may ultimately abolish the historical discontinuity between the viral and the cellular world.

  1. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  2. A vortex-filament and core model for wings with edge vortex separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for predicting aerodynamic characteristics of slender wings with edge vortex separation was developed. Semiempirical but simple methods were used to determine the initial positions of the free sheet and vortex core. Comparison with available data indicates that: the present method is generally accurate in predicting the lift and induced drag coefficients but the predicted pitching moment is too positive; the spanwise lifting pressure distributions estimated by the one vortex core solution of the present method are significantly better than the results of Mehrotra's method relative to the pressure peak values for the flat delta; the two vortex core system applied to the double delta and strake wing produce overall aerodynamic characteristics which have good agreement with data except for the pitching moment; and the computer time for the present method is about two thirds of that of Mehrotra's method.

  3. Vortex research facility improvements and preliminary density stratification effects on vortex wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satran, D. R.; Holbrook, G. T.; Greene, G. C.; Neuhart, D.

    1985-01-01

    Recent modernization of NASA's Vortex Research Facility is described. The facility has a 300-ft test section, scheduled for a 300-ft extension, with constant test speeds of the model up to 100 ft/sec. The data acquisition hardware and software improvements included the installation of a 24-channel PCM system onboard the research vehicle, and a large dedicated 16-bit minicomputer. Flow visualization of the vortex wake in the test section is by particle seeding, and a thin sheet of argon laser light perpendicular to the line of flight; detailed flow field measurements are made with a laser velocimeter optics system. The improved experimental capabilities of the facility were used in a study of atmospheric stratification effects on wake vortex decay, showing that the effects of temperature gradient must be taken into account to avoid misleading conclusions in wake vortex research.

  4. The Fluid Mechanics of Vortex Cutting by a Blade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-25

    the vortex by a thin blade with zero angle of attack. A spiral shock is shown in (a) for the case 2Ewoyo/F= - 0.26 and 2Uaco/l"=0. 19. A shock with... vortex filament model ( Lundgren and Ashurst, 1989, Marshall, 1991) which includes variation of vortex core area along the vortex axis, is used to solve...two structural forms, as shown in Figs. 12a and 12b. The disturbance in Fig. 12a appears similar to a spiral -type traveling vortex breakdown and that

  5. Metamorphosis of a Hairpin Vortex into a Young Turbulent Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    1995-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation was used to study the formation and growth of a hairpin vortex in a flat-plate boundary layer and its later development into a young turbulent spot. Fluid injection through a slit in the wall triggered the initial vortex. The legs of the vortex were stretched into a hairpin shape as it traveled downstream. Multiple hairpin vortex heads developed between the stretched legs. New vortices formed beneath the streamwise-elongated vortex legs. The continued development of additional vortices resulted in the formation of a traveling region of highly disturbed ow with an arrowhead shape similar to that of a turbulent spot.

  6. Spin Vortex Resonance in Non-planar Ferromagnetic Dots

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Junjia; Lapa, Pavel; Jain, Shikha; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Zhang, Wei; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Posada, Christian M.; Yefremenko, Volodymyr G.; Pearson, John E.; Hoffmann, Axel; Novosad, Valentine

    2016-01-01

    In planar structures, the vortex resonance frequency changes little as a function of an in-plane magnetic field as long as the vortex state persists. Altering the topography of the element leads to a vastly different dynamic response that arises due to the local vortex core confinement effect. In this work, we studied the magnetic excitations in non-planar ferromagnetic dots using a broadband microwave spectroscopy technique. Two distinct regimes of vortex gyration were detected depending on the vortex core position. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with micromagnetic simulations. PMID:27143405

  7. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trial Journal Articles Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis May 2016 Questions and Answers about Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Giant Cell Arteritis This publication contains general information about polymyalgia ...

  8. Effective vortex mass from microscopic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hoon; Kim, June Seo; Kim, Min Jae; Ao, Ping

    2005-03-01

    We calculate the effective mass of a single quantized vortex in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor at finite temperature. Based on effective action approach, we arrive at the effective mass of a vortex as integral of the spectral function J(ω) divided by ω3 over frequency. The spectral function is given in terms of the quantum-mechanical transition elements of the gradient of the Hamiltonian between two Bogoliubov-deGennes (BdG) eigenstates. Based on self-consistent numerical diagonalization of the BdG equation we find that the effective mass per unit length of vortex at zero temperature is of order m(kfξ0)2 ( kf=Fermi momentum, ξ0=coherence length), essentially equaling the electron mass displaced within the coherence length from the vortex core. Transitions between the core states are responsible for most of the mass. The mass reaches a maximum value at T≈0.5Tc and decreases continuously to zero at Tc .

  9. Coherent Vortex Evolution in Drift Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatto, R.; Terry, P. W.

    1998-11-01

    Localized structures in turbulence are subject to loss of coherence by mixing. Phase space structures, such as drift-hole, (P. W. Terry, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, Phys. Fluids B) 2 9 2048 (1990) possess a self-electric field, which if sufficiently large maintains particle trapping against the tidal deformations of ambient turbulence. We show here that intense vortices in fluid drift wave turbulence avoid mixing by suppressing ambient turbulence with the strong flow shear of the vortex edge. Analysis of turbulence evolution in the vortex edge recovers Rapid Distortion Theory (G. K. Batchelor and I. Proudman, Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math.) 7 83 (1954) as the short time limit and the shear suppression scaling theory (H. Biglari, P. H. Diamond and P. W. Terry, Phys. Fluids B) 2 1 (1990) as the long time limit. Shear suppression leads to an amplitude condition for coherence and delineates the Gaussian core from the non Gaussian tail of the probability distribution function. The amplitude condition of shear suppression is compared with the trapping condition for phase space holes. The possibility of nonlinear vortex growth will be examined by considering electron dynamics in the vortex evolution.

  10. Tip vortex computer code SRATIP. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.; Lin, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    This User's Guide applies to the three dimensional viscous flow forward marching analysis, PEPSIG, as used for the calculation of the helicopter tip vortex flow field. The guide presents a discussion of the program flow and subroutines, as well as a list of sample input and output.

  11. Vortex dynamics in nonlinear free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Christopher W.; Kalisch, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    The two-dimensional motion of point vortices in an inviscid fluid with a free surface and an impenetrable bed is investigated. The work is based on forming a closed system of equations for surface variables and vortex positions using a variant of the Ablowitz, Fokas, and Musslimani formulation [M. J. Ablowitz, A. S. Fokas, and Z. H. Musslimani, J. Fluid Mech. 562, 313-343 (2006)] of the water-wave free-surface problem. The equations are approximated with a dealiased spectral method making use of a high-order approximation of the Dirichlet-Neumann operator and a high-order time-stepping scheme. Numerical simulations reveal that the combination of vortex motion and solid bottom boundary yields interesting dynamics not seen in the case of vortex motion in an infinitely deep fluid. In particular, strong deformations of the free surface, including non-symmetric surface profiles and regions of large energy concentration, are observed. Our simulations also uncover a rich variety of vortex trajectories including orbiting and nearly parallel patterns of motion. The dynamics of the free surface and of the point vortices are strongly influenced by the initial placement and polarity of the vortices. The method put forward here is flexible enough to handle a large number of vortices and may easily be extended to include the effects of varying bathymetry, stratification, and background shear currents.

  12. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  13. Vortex streets in walking parametric wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Molina-Terriza, G; Torner, L; Petrov, D V

    1999-07-01

    The combined effects of diffraction and Poynting vector walk-off in second-harmonic generation with pump beams that contain screw phase dislocations is addressed for what is believed to be the first time. We predict the spontaneous nucleation of multiple vortex twins whose subsequent explosion can yield quasi-aligned patterns of single-charge vortices.

  14. Vortex shedding from solid rocket propellant inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, P. H.; Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Vortex shedding frequency caused by the protrusion of inhibitors into the flow field of a solid rocket motor is investigated by experimental and mathematical models. The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite difference technique assuming incompressible, two-dimensional flow under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. For laminar flow, explicit solutions are obtained using a vorticity-transport equation in place of the Navier-Stokes equations. For turbulent flow, a two-equation (k-epsilon) model is used for turbulent modeling and the SIMPLE algorithm is employed as the computational scheme. Cold flow tests were conducted to confirm the basic flow structure and to determine the vortex shedding frequency under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The vortex shedding frequencies were determined using a stroboscope to measure the oscillating frequency of yarn tufts which were fastened to one inhibitor in the models. A hot-film anemometer established the velocity history behind the inhibitor. Good agreement between the theoretical results and measurements of the vortex shedding frequencies is demonstrated.

  15. Vortex shedding from solid rocket propellant inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, P. H.; Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Vortex shedding frequency caused by the protrusion of inhibitors into the flow field of a solid rocket motor is investigated by experimental and mathematical models. The time dependent Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite difference technique assuming incompressible, two-dimensional flow under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. For laminar flow, explicit solutions are obtained using a vorticity-transport equation in place of the Navier-Stokes equations. For turbulent flow, a two-equation (k-epsilon) model is used for turbulent modeling and the SIMPLE algorithm is employed as the computational scheme. Cold flow tests were conducted to confirm the basic flow structure and to determine the vortex shedding frequency under both laminar and turbulent flow conditions. The vortex shedding frequencies were determined using a stroboscope to measure the oscillating frequency of yarn tufts which were fastened to one inhibitor in the models. A hot-film anemometer established the velocity history behind the inhibitor. Good agreement between the theoretical results and measurements of the vortex shedding frequencies is demonstrated.

  16. Thermodynamically Stable Vortex States in Superconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We develop a new condensed matter theory of the formation of thermodynamically stable vortex structures in quantum nanowires. We write down the Gibbs free energy functional for the systems and we minimise the free energy to obtain the optimal position of vortices for different applied fields and temperatures. We also study the nucleation of vortices in, and their escape from, the nanostructural superconductors.

  17. Thermodynamically Stable Vortex States in Superconducting Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2011-03-01

    We develop a new condensed matter theory of the formation of thermodynamically stable vortex structures in quantum nanowires. We write down the Gibbs free energy functional for the systems and we minimise the free energy to obtain the optimal position of vortices for different applied fields and temperatures. We also study the nucleation of vortices in, and their escape from, the nanostructural superconductors.

  18. Rotorcraft Blade-Vortex Interaction Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noises, sometimes referred to as 'blade slap', are avoided by increasing the absolute value of inflow to the rotor system of a rotorcraft. This is accomplished by creating a drag force which causes the angle of the tip-path plane of the rotor system to become more negative or more positive.

  19. Vortex induced motion in compliant structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Arnold; Tuttman, Max; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-11-01

    The coupling of the unsteady shedding of vortices from the leading and trailing edges of a flat plate can lead to large scale oscillations of a structure. Examples of these large motions abound in engineered structures (Traffic signs vibrating in the wind, wing flutter, chattering venetian blinds, etc.) and in nature (the rustling of leaves on a tree in the wind). In all of these examples, the efficiency of energy extraction from the flow to the structure increases dramatically as the vortex shedding and structural vibrations near resonance. As the motion becomes more exaggerated, the fluid-structure interaction becomes increasingly nonlinear as the motion of the plate becomes increasingly important to the vortex shedding dynamics. We present experimental results from two related systems tested in a low speed wind tunnel (using high-speed videography, PIV and hotwire anemometry) (i) a rectangular cantilevered flat plate free to bend and twist, and (ii) a flexible ribbon pinned at its two ends and exposed to the flow. In both systems, a rich phase map of vortex-induced vibrations is described in which both mechanisms for vortex shedding and structural vibration can be tuned independently using geometry, material properties and flow conditions.

  20. Resonant frequencies of the hydrodynamic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, H. S.

    We study the sound perturbation of the hydrodynamic vortex geometry and present an exact expression for the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum) of this geometry. Exact solution for the radial part of the covariant Klein-Gordon equation in this spacetime is obtained, and is given in terms of the double confluent Heun functions. We found that the resonant frequencies are complex number.

  1. Optical vortex behavior in dynamic speckle fields.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Sean J; Khaksari, Kosar; Thomas, Dennis; Duncan, Donald D

    2012-05-01

    The dynamic behavior of phase singularities, or optical vortices, in the pseudo-phase representation of dynamic speckle patterns is investigated. Sequences of band-limited, dynamic speckle patterns with predetermined Gaussian decorrelation behavior were generated, and the pseudo-phase realizations of the individual speckle patterns were calculated via a two-dimensional Hilbert transform algorithm. Singular points in the pseudo-phase representation are identified by calculating the local topological charge as determined by convolution of the pseudo-phase representations with a series of 2×2 nabla filters. The spatial locations of the phase singularities are tracked over all frames of the speckle sequences, and recorded in three-dimensional space (x,y,f), where f is frame number in the sequence. The behavior of the phase singularities traces 'vortex trails' which are representative of the speckle dynamics. Slowly decorrelating speckle patterns results in long, relatively straight vortex trails, while rapidly decorrelating speckle patterns results in tortuous, relatively short vortex trails. Optical vortex analysis such as described herein can be used as a descriptor of biological activity, flow, and motion.

  2. Vortex Formation with a Snapping Shrimp Claw

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David; Brücker, Christoph; Hegner, Franziska; Balmert, Alexander; Bleckmann, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Snapping shrimp use one oversized claw to generate a cavitating high speed water jet for hunting, defence and communication. This work is an experimental investigation about the jet generation. Snapping shrimp (Alpheus-bellulus) were investigated by using an enlarged transparent model reproducing the closure of the snapper claw. Flow inside the model was studied using both High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry (HS-PIV) and flow visualization. During claw closure a channel-like cavity was formed between the plunger and the socket featuring a nozzle-type contour at the orifice. Closing the mechanism led to the formation of a leading vortex ring with a dimensionless formation number of approximate ΔT*≈4. This indicates that the claw might work at maximum efficiency, i.e. maximum vortex strength was achieved by a minimum of fluid volume ejected. The subsequent vortex cavitation with the formation of an axial reentrant jet is a reasonable explanation for the large penetration depth of the water jet. That snapping shrimp can reach with their claw-induced flow. Within such a cavitation process, an axial reentrant jet is generated in the hollow cylindrical core of the cavitated vortex that pushes the front further downstream and whose length can exceed the initial jet penetration depth by several times. PMID:24244273

  3. Vortex-Induced Injectable Silk Fibroin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, Tuna; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A novel, to our knowledge, technique was developed to control the rate of β-sheet formation and resulting hydrogelation kinetics of aqueous, native silk solutions. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that vortexing aqueous solutions of silkworm silk lead to a transition from an overall protein structure that is initially rich in random coil to one that is rich in β-sheet content. Dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments collected under the same assembly conditions as the circular dichroism experiments indicated that the increase in β-sheet content due to intramolecular conformational changes and intermolecular self-assembly of the silk fibroin was directly correlated with the subsequent changes in viscoelastic properties due to hydrogelation. Vortexing low-viscosity silk solutions lead to orders-of-magnitude increase in the complex shear modulus, G∗, and formation of rigid hydrogels (G∗ ≈ 70 kPa for 5.2 wt % protein concentration). Vortex-induced, β-sheet-rich silk hydrogels consisted of permanent, physical, intermolecular crosslinks. The hydrogelation kinetics could be controlled easily (from minutes to hours) by changing the vortex time, assembly temperature and/or protein concentration, providing a useful timeframe for cell encapsulation. The stiffness of preformed hydrogels recovered quickly, immediately after injection through a needle, enabling the potential use of these systems for injectable cell delivery scaffolds. PMID:19804736

  4. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  5. Doppler radar detection of vortex hazard indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nespor, Jerald D.; Hudson, B.; Stegall, R. L.; Freedman, Jerome E.

    1994-01-01

    Wake vortex experiments were conducted at White Sands Missile Range, NM using the AN/MPS-39 Multiple Object Tracking Radar (MOTR). The purpose of these experiments was twofold. The first objective was to verify that radar returns from wake vortex are observed for some time after the passage of an aircraft. The second objective was to verify that other vortex hazard indicators such as ambient wind speed and direction could also be detected. The present study addresses the Doppler characteristics of wake vortex and clear air returns based upon measurements employing MOTR, a very sensitive C-Band phased array radar. In this regard, the experiment was conducted so that the spectral characteristics could be determined on a dwell to-dwell basis. Results are presented from measurements of the backscattered power (equivalent structure constant), radial velocity and spectral width when the aircraft flies transverse and axial to the radar beam. The statistics of the backscattered power and spectral width for each case are given. In addition, the scan strategy, experimental test procedure and radar parameters are presented.

  6. Wake Patterns Computed by a Vortex Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Velocity components are defined by u = Oy, v = -0., the partial derivatives being carried I out by analytically differentiating under the integral ... sign in Eq. (1). The velocity of the vortex sheet is defined by xt = u , Yt = v; the integrals here are evaluated on the curve and 3 are interpreted as

  7. Noise from Tip Vortex and Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    composantes spectrales. la directivit6 et la forme d’onde des sons dans le champ lointain en conditions correspondant essentiellement an champ libre, jusqu...disappeared completely, leaving only bubble cavitation. A small amount of huil , vortex cavitation also was present at speeds above 1300 rpm. The final

  8. Nonlinear stability of Taylor's vortex array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1987-01-01

    It is proved that the two-dimensional Taylor vortex array, which is an exact unsteady solution of the Navier-Stokes equation, is globally and asymptotically stable in the mean with respect to three-dimensional periodic disturbances. A time-dependent bound on the decay rate of the kinetic energy of disturbances is obtained.

  9. Vortex simulation of forced mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, O.; Leonard, A.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional, spatially growing, turbulent mixing layers are simulated numerically by a vortex method and the results are compared with those determined experimentally. The effects of artificial forcing on flow development are also studied. Many of the flow features which have been observed experimentally are reproduced, and good quantitative agreements between experiments and computations are obtained.

  10. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution. PMID:20074322

  11. Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J.; Seager, S.; Barman, T.

    The key to understanding an extrasolar giant planet's spectrum - and hence its detectability and evolution - lies with its atmosphere. Now that direct observations of thermal emission from extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) are in hand, atmosphere models can be used to constrain atmospheric composition, thermal structure, and ultimately the formation and evolution of detected planets. We review the important physical processes that influence the atmospheric structure and evolution of EGPs and consider what has already been learned from the first generation of observations and modeling. We pay particular attention to the roles of cloud structure, metallicity, and atmospheric chemistry in affecting detectable properties through Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transiting giant planets. Our review stresses the uncertainties that ultimately limit our ability to interpret EGP observations. Finally we will conclude with a look to the future as characterization of multiple individual planets in a single stellar system leads to the study of comparative planetary architectures.

  12. CMB lensing and giant rings

    SciTech Connect

    Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    We study the CMB lensing signature of a pre-inationary particle (PIP), assuming it is responsible for the giant rings anomaly that was found recently in the WMAP data. Simulating Planck-like data we find that generically the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio associated with such a PIP is quite small and it would be difficult to cross correlate the temperature giant rings with the CMB lensing signal. However, if the pre-inationary particle is also responsible for the bulk flow measured from the local large scale structure, which happens to point roughly at the same direction as the giant rings, then the CMB lensing signal to noise ratio is fairly significant.

  13. Structure of giant muscle proteins

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Logan C.; Wright, Nathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Giant muscle proteins (e.g., titin, nebulin, and obscurin) play a seminal role in muscle elasticity, stretch response, and sarcomeric organization. Each giant protein consists of multiple tandem structural domains, usually arranged in a modular fashion spanning 500 kDa to 4 MDa. Although many of the domains are similar in structure, subtle differences create a unique function of each domain. Recent high and low resolution structural and dynamic studies now suggest more nuanced overall protein structures than previously realized. These findings show that atomic structure, interactions between tandem domains, and intrasarcomeric environment all influence the shape, motion, and therefore function of giant proteins. In this article we will review the current understanding of titin, obscurin, and nebulin structure, from the atomic level through the molecular level. PMID:24376425

  14. INVITED PAPER: Azimuthal instability of a vortex ring computed by a vortex sheet panel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hualong; Kaganovskiy, Leon; Krasny, Robert

    2009-10-01

    A Lagrangian panel method is presented for vortex sheet motion in three-dimensional (3D) flow. The sheet is represented by a set of quadrilateral panels having a tree structure. The panels have active particles that carry circulation and passive particles used for adaptive refinement. The Biot-Savart kernel is regularized and the velocity is evaluated by a treecode. The method is applied to compute the azimuthal instability of a vortex ring, starting from a perturbed circular disc vortex sheet initial condition. Details of the core dynamics are clarified by tracking material lines on the sheet surface. Results are presented showing the following sequence of events: spiral roll-up of the sheet into a ring, wavy deformation of the ring axis, first collapse of the vortex core in each wavelength, second collapse of the vortex core out of phase with the first collapse, formation of loops wrapped around the core and radial ejection of ringlets. The collapse of the vortex core is correlated with converging axial flow.

  15. Wake Vortex Transport and Decay in Ground Effect: Vortex Linking with the Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out with a three-dimensional Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model to explore the sensitivity of vortex decay and transport in ground effect (IGE). The vortex decay rates are found to be strongly enhanced following maximum descent into ground effect. The nondimensional decay rate is found to be insensitive to the initial values of circulation, height, and vortex separation. The information gained from these simulations is used to construct a simple decay relationship. This relationship compares well with observed data from an IGE case study. Similarly, a relationship for lateral drift due to ground effect is constructed from the LES data. In the second part of this paper, vortex linking with the ground is investigated. Our numerical simulations of wake vortices for IGE show that a vortex may link with its image beneath the ground, if the intensity of the ambient turbulence is moderate to high. This linking with the ground (which is observed in real cases)gives the appearance of a vortex tube that bends to become vertically oriented and which terminates at the ground. From the simulations conducted, the linking time for vortices in the free atmosphere; i.e., a function of ambient turbulence intensity.

  16. Vortex and half-vortex dynamics in a nonlinear spinor quantum fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dominici, Lorenzo; Dagvadorj, Galbadrakh; Fellows, Jonathan M.; Ballarini, Dario; De Giorgi, Milena; Marchetti, Francesca M.; Piccirillo, Bruno; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Bramati, Alberto; Gigli, Giuseppe; Szymańska, Marzena H.; Sanvitto, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are archetypal objects that recur in the universe across the scale of complexity, from subatomic particles to galaxies and black holes. Their appearance is connected with spontaneous symmetry breaking and phase transitions. In Bose-Einstein condensates and superfluids, vortices are both point-like and quantized quasiparticles. We use a two-dimensional (2D) fluid of polaritons, bosonic particles constituted by hybrid photonic and electronic oscillations, to study quantum vortex dynamics. Polaritons benefit from easiness of wave function phase detection, a spinor nature sustaining half-integer vorticity, strong nonlinearity, and tuning of the background disorder. We can directly generate by resonant pulsed excitations a polariton condensate carrying either a full or half-integer vortex as initial condition and follow their coherent evolution using ultrafast imaging on the picosecond scale. The observations highlight a rich phenomenology, such as the spiraling of the half-vortex and the joint path of the twin charges of a full vortex, until the moment of their splitting. Furthermore, we observe the ordered branching into newly generated secondary couples, associated with the breaking of radial and azimuthal symmetries. This allows us to devise the interplay of nonlinearity and sample disorder in shaping the fluid and driving the vortex dynamics. In addition, our observations suggest that phase singularities may be seen as fundamental particles whose quantized events span from pair creation and recombination to 2D+t topological vortex strings. PMID:26665174

  17. Thin-tube vortex simulations for sinusoidal instability in a counter-rotating vortex pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. C.

    2002-06-01

    A thin-tube vortex method is developed to investigate the intrinsic instability within a counter-rotating vortex pair system and the effects from the core size and the wavenumbers (or wavelengths). The numerical accuracy and the advantages of the scheme are theoretically estimated. A nearest-neighbour-image method is employed in this three-dimensional vortex simulation. Agreement with Crow's instability analysis has been achieved numerically for the long-wave cases. A short-wave instability for the zeroth radial mode of bending instability has also been found using the thin-tube vortex simulations. Then, the combinations of long- and short-wave instability are investigated to elucidate the non-linear effects due to the interactions of two different modes. It is shown that instability is enhanced if both long- and short-wave instabilities occur simultaneously. Although the method used in the paper is not capable of including effects such as axial flow, vortex core deformation and other complicated viscous effects, it effectively predicts and clarifies the first-order factor that dominates the sinusoidal instability behaviour in a vortex pair. Copyright

  18. Vortex generation and wave-vortex interaction over a concave plate with roughness and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolotti, Fabio

    1993-01-01

    The generation and amplification of vortices by surface homogeneities, both in the form of surface waviness and of wall-normal velocity, is investigated using the nonlinear parabolic stability equations. Transients and issues of algebraic growth are avoided through the use of a similarity solution as initial condition for the vortex. In the absence of curvature, the vortex decays as the square root of 1/x when flowing over streamwise aligned riblets of constant height, and grows as the square root of x when flowing over a corresponding streamwise aligned variation of blowing/suction transpiration velocity. However, in the presence of wall inhomogeneities having both streamwise and spanwise periodicity, the growth of the vortex can be much larger. In the presence of curvature, the vortex develops into a Gortler vortex. The 'direct' and 'indirect' interaction mechanisms possible in wave-vortex interaction are presented. The 'direct' interaction does not lead to strong resonance with the flow conditions investigated. The 'indirect' interaction leads to K-type transition.

  19. The stratospheric polar vortex: evolving perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, R. A.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of dramatic Antarctic ozone depletion occurred at a time of rapid change in our understanding of stratospheric dynamics. The existence of the polar vortex, encircled by the polar night jet, had been well known for some time, as had the planetary scale Rossby waves that so dominate stratospheric meteorology. But, 25 years ago, the concepts of Rossby wave breaking, and of the "surf zone" and the sharpness of its boundaries at the vortex edge and in the subtropics, were relatively new, and the role of these waves in the driving of the mean diabatic circulation was not fully appreciated. While the local importance of gravity wave drag in the mesosphere was recognized by that time, its impact in the stratosphere was by no means clear. For a time, it was thought by many that the "ozone hole" was produced by anomalous polar upwelling, whose existence seemed to be demanded by observations of widespread, anomalously low temperatures in high southern latitudes in spring, which (at first) did not appear to be a consequence of depleted ozone. In the event, of course, chemical observations provided overwhelming support for the chemical depletion theory, while tracer observations, as well as revised radiative calculations, undermined the case for polar upwelling. The demands of stratospheric chemistry have always required that dynamical understanding of the stratosphere should extend beyond traditional meteorology to include questions of the transport of chemical species. Stratospheric transport has many facets, of which one - the impermeability of the vortex edge - was brought into focus by the appearance of the ozone hole and the need to understand the degree to which vortex air is isolated from its environment. The issue was controversial for a time, but analyses of tracer observations have confirmed expectations based on dynamical theory and on modeling studies that the isolation is strong, except during major vortex disturbances. Interest in polar vortex

  20. On the evolution of vortex rings with swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Takashi; Okura, Nobuyuki; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2014-06-15

    A laminar vortex ring with swirl, which has the meridional velocity component inside the vortex core, was experimentally generated by the brief fluid ejection from a rotating outlet. The evolution of the vortex ring was investigated with flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in order to find the influence of swirling flow in particular upon the transition to turbulence. Immediately after the formation of a vortex ring with swirl, a columnar strong vortex along the symmetric axis is observed in all cases of the present experiment. Then the characteristic fluid discharging from a vortex ring with swirl referred to as “peeling off” appears. The amount of discharging fluid due to the “peeling off” increases with the angular velocity of the rotating outlet. We conjectured that the mechanism generating the “peeling off” is related to the columnar strong vortex by close observations of the spatio-temporal development of the vorticity distribution and the cutting 3D images constructed from the successive cross sections of a vortex ring. While a laminar vortex ring without swirl may develop azimuthal waves around its circumference at some later time and the ring structure subsequently breaks, the swirling flow in a vortex ring core reduces the amplification rate of the azimuthal wavy deformation and preserved its ring structure. Then the traveling distance of a vortex ring can be extended using the swirl flow under certain conditions.

  1. Effects of quantum confinement in nanoscale superconductors: From electronic density of states to vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingfeng

    Due to quantum confinement, nanoscale superconductivity exhibits richer phenomena than bulk superconductivity. This will allow us to artificially design the electronic properties by changing the size and geometry of the superconductor, leading to the desired control and enhancement of superconductivity. However, the interplay between superconductivity and quantum confinement effect has not been fully understood yet. In this thesis, we theoretically investigated several aspects of nanoscale superconductivity by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The topics that are covered range from vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement to the electronic structure in various nano-structures. The density of states (DOS) obtained in this thesis can be compared with results from Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments. In Chapter. 3 and 4, we studied vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement effect. We found that the shape resonances of the order parameter results in an additional contribution to quantum topological confinement - leading to unconventional vortex configurations. Our results reveal a plethora of asymmetric, giant multi-vortex, and vortex-antivortex structures. They are relevant for high-Tc nanograins, confined Bose-Einstein condensates, and graphene fakes with proximity-induced superconductivity. In Chapter. 5, we studied the effect of non-magnetic impurities in superconducting nanowires. We found that: 1) impurities strongly affect the transport properties, 2) the effect is impurity position-dependent, and 3) it exhibits opposite behavior for resonant and off-resonant wire widths due to the sub-band energy spectrum induced by lateral quantum confinement. These effects can be used to manipulate the Josephson current, filter electrons by subband. In Chapter. 6, we investigated the Tomasch effect on the electronic structure in nanoscale superconductors. Here it is the quasiparticle interference effect induced by an

  2. Dynamic origin of vortex core switching in soft magnetic nanodots.

    PubMed

    Guslienko, Konstantin Yu; Lee, Ki-Suk; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2008-01-18

    The magnetic vortex with in-plane curling magnetization and out-of-plane magnetization at the core is a unique ground state in nanoscale magnetic elements. This kind of magnetic vortex can be used, through its downward or upward core orientation, as a memory unit for information storage, and thus, controllable core switching deserves some special attention. Our analytical and micromagnetic calculations reveal that the origin of vortex core reversal is a gyrotropic field. This field is induced by vortex dynamic motion and is proportional to the velocity of the moving vortex. Our calculations elucidate the physical origin of the vortex core dynamic reversal, and, thereby, offer a key to effective manipulation of the vortex core orientation.

  3. Glory, Vortex Street off Baja California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On June 19, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured both a vortex street and a glory visible amid the lattice of clouds over the Pacific Ocean off Baja California. In this image, the swirling clouds known as vortex streets appear along the left edge of the image, stretching southward from Isla Guadalupe. Another NASA satellite captured an earlier example of vortex streets in June 2000. These atmospheric vortices, known as Von Karman vortex streets, often occur in the wake of an obstacle to air flow, such as an island. Stratocumulus clouds--low-lying, sheets of puffy clouds-- over the ocean show the impact of the island on air flow visible though their alternating pattern of clockwise and counter-clockwise swirls. Southeast of the vortex street, a glory, which resembles a rainbow, hovers above the cloud cover. The glory is faint but large, 200 to 300 kilometers long, along a north-south orientation. This phenomenon can occur when the satellite passes directly between the Sun and a bank of clouds below. (People also observe them while looking down on clouds from airplanes.) Not just any kind of cloud can produce a glory; only clouds composed entirely of water droplets (as opposed to ice crystals) can make them. The droplets that form glories generally have diameters of less than 50 micrometers (a micrometers is a millionth of a meter). The water droplets bend the light, showing its different wavelengths, or colors. In this glory, reds and oranges are most visible. NASA image by Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  5. A mesoscale vortex over Halley Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.; Lachlan-Cope, T.A.; Warren, D.E. ); Duncan, C.N. )

    1993-05-01

    A detailed analysis of the evolution and structure of a mesoscale vortex and associated cloud comma that developed at the eastern edge of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica, during the early part of January 1986 is presented. The system remained quasi-stationary for over three days close to the British research station Halley (75[degrees]36'S, 26'42[degrees]W) and gave severe weather with gale-force winds and prolonged snow. The formation and development of the system were investigated using conventional surface and upper-air meteorological observations taken at Halley, analyses from the U.K. Meteorological Office 15-level model, and satellite imagery and sounder data from the TIROS-N-NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites. The thermal structure of the vortex was examined using atmospheric profiles derived from radiance measurements from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder. Details of the wind field were examined using cloud motion vectors derived from a sequence of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer images. The vortex developed inland of the Brunt Ice Shelf in a strong baroclinic zone separating warm air, which had been advected polewards down the eastern Weddell Sea, and cold air descending from the Antarctic Plateau. The system intensified when cold, continental air associated with an upper-level short-wave trough was advected into the vortex. A frontal cloud band developed when slantwise ascent of warm air took place at the leading edge of the cold-air outbreak. Most of the precipitation associated with the low occurred on this cloud band. The small sea surface-atmospheric temperature differences gave only limited heat fluxes and there was no indication of deep convection associated with the system. The vortex was driven by baroclinic forcing and had some features in common with the baroclinic type of polar lows that occur in the Northern Hemisphere. 25 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Borneo vortex and mesoscale convective rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, S.; Koh, T.-Y.; Teo, C.-K.

    2014-05-01

    We have investigated how the Borneo vortex develops over the equatorial South China Sea under cold surge conditions in December during the Asian winter monsoon. Composite analysis using reanalysis and satellite data sets has revealed that absolute vorticity and water vapour are transported by strong cold surges from upstream of the South China Sea to around the Equator. Rainfall is correspondingly enhanced over the equatorial South China Sea. A semi-idealized experiment reproduced the Borneo vortex over the equatorial South China Sea during a "perpetual" cold surge. The Borneo vortex is manifested as a meso-α cyclone with a comma-shaped rainband in the northeast sector of the cyclone. Vorticity budget analysis showed that the growth/maintenance of the meso-α cyclone was achieved mainly by the vortex stretching. This vortex stretching is due to the upward motion forced by the latent heat release around the cyclone centre. The comma-shaped rainband consists of clusters of meso-β-scale rainfall cells. The intense rainfall in the comma head (comma tail) is generated by the confluence of the warmer and wetter cyclonic easterly flow (cyclonic southeasterly flow) and the cooler and drier northeasterly surge in the northwestern (northeastern) sector of the cyclone. Intense upward motion and heavy rainfall resulted due to the low-level convergence and the favourable thermodynamic profile at the confluence zone. In particular, the convergence in the northwestern sector is responsible for maintenance of the meso-α cyclone system. At both meso-α and meso-β scales, the convergence is ultimately caused by the deviatoric strain in the confluence wind pattern but is significantly self-enhanced by the nonlinear dynamics.

  7. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Ramos Cuadra, José Angel; Lara Toral, Juan; Lozano Cabezas, Cristobal; Fernández Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery.

  8. Giant right atrial thrombi treated with thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; López-Caler, Carmen; Castillo-Rivera, Ana; Rucabado-Aguilar, Luis; Cuadra, José Ángel Ramos; Toral, Juan Lara; Cabezas, Cristobal Lozano; Guerrero, Juan Carlos Fernández

    2008-01-01

    The present report describes giant atrial thrombi that were treated with thrombolysis in a community hospital. Two patients with giant atrial thrombi whose treatment involved complications are presented. Both patients developed cardiogenic shock and were treated unsuccessfully with thrombolysis. Because thrombolysis of giant thrombi may be ineffective, patients in this situation may require surgery. PMID:18401474

  9. Cabergoline treatment in invasive giant prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically.

  10. Charting the Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    zero expansion asymptotically after an infinite time and has a flat geometry). All three observational tests by means of supernovae (green), the cosmic microwave background (blue) and galaxy clusters converge at a Universe around Ωm ~ 0.3 and ΩΛ ~ 0.7. The dark red region for the galaxy cluster determination corresponds to 95% certainty (2-sigma statistical deviation) when assuming good knowledge of all other cosmological parameters, and the light red region assumes a minimum knowledge. For the supernovae and WMAP results, the inner and outer regions corespond to 68% (1-sigma) and 95% certainty, respectively. References: Schuecker et al. 2003, A&A, 398, 867 (REFLEX); Tonry et al. 2003, ApJ, 594, 1 (supernovae); Riess et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 665 (supernovae) Galaxy clusters are far from being evenly distributed in the Universe. Instead, they tend to conglomerate into even larger structures, "super-clusters". Thus, from stars which gather in galaxies, galaxies which congregate in clusters and clusters tying together in super-clusters, the Universe shows structuring on all scales, from the smallest to the largest ones. This is a relict of the very early (formation) epoch of the Universe, the so-called "inflationary" period. At that time, only a minuscule fraction of one second after the Big Bang, the tiny density fluctuations were amplified and over the eons, they gave birth to the much larger structures. Because of the link between the first fluctuations and the giant structures now observed, the unique REFLEX catalogue - the largest of its kind - allows astronomers to put considerable constraints on the content of the Universe, and in particular on the amount of dark matter that is believed to pervade it. Rather interestingly, these constraints are totally independent from all other methods so far used to assert the existence of dark matter, such as the study of very distant supernovae (see e.g. ESO PR 21/98) or the analysis of the Cosmic Microwave background (e

  11. Persistence of metastable vortex lattice domains in MgB2 in the presence of vortex motion.

    PubMed

    Rastovski, C; Schlesinger, K J; Gannon, W J; Dewhurst, C D; DeBeer-Schmitt, L; Zhigadlo, N D; Karpinski, J; Eskildsen, M R

    2013-09-06

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  12. Persistence of Metastable Vortex Lattice Domains in MgB2 in the Presence of Vortex Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rastovski, Catherine; Schlesinger, Kimberly; Gannon, William J; Dewhurst, Charles; Debeer-Schmitt, Lisa M; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Eskildsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Recently, extensive vortex lattice metastability was reported in MgB2 in connection with a second-order rotational phase transition. However, the mechanism responsible for these well-ordered metastable vortex lattice phases is not well understood. Using small-angle neutron scattering, we studied the vortex lattice in MgB2 as it was driven from a metastable to the ground state through a series of small changes in the applied magnetic field. Our results show that metastable vortex lattice domains persist in the presence of substantial vortex motion and directly demonstrate that the metastability is not due to vortex pinning. Instead, we propose that it is due to the jamming of counterrotated vortex lattice domains which prevents a rotation to the ground state orientation.

  13. Origin of hot Super-Earths and the vortex-assisted mode of planet formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, Wladimir

    In spite of steady advances, planet formation remains, by and large, a mystery. Although a relatively consistent theory has been developed in the past two decades, its application to the observed distribution of exoplanets has not fared too well. If the statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently, there are still fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of grains in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. State-of-the-art theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem, and recent high-resolution observations of protoplanetary disks show a highcontrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star, originating from millimetersized grains. The favored hypothesis borrows from the planet formation literature by suggesting that this asymmetry is the result of dust trapping in giant anticyclonic vortices. This idea, however, is not without problems. Vortices have been extensively studied, and some of their understood properties conflict with them being the culprit of the observed asymmetries. Understanding these conflicts will provide constraints for the theory and advance our interpretation of the observations. In this proposal, we aim to show that vortex trapping is a viable mechanism for planet formation. This is possible because 1) large-scale vortices are expected at turbulent/quiescent transitions in the disk 2) vortices are expected in the laminar zones 3) vortices should be excellent traps for grains and thus planet formation sites; 4) grain drift from outer radii brings more planet building blocks to the vortex; and 5) The turbulent/laminar zone boundary is also a migration stopping point. We propose a set of hydrodynamical simulations including embedded solid particles to decisively demonstrate the efficiency of vortex-assisted planet formation.

  14. Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management

    PubMed Central

    Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GSΛs), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

  15. On the Shoulders of Giants...

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    REFERENCES 1. Newton I. Turnbull HW, ed. Correspondence of Isaac Newton . Vol I: 1661Y1675. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press; 1959:416...calendar), Sir Isaac Newtonopined to Robert Hooke, ‘‘If I have seen further [than you and Descartes], it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.’’1 That

  16. The giant panda gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fuwen; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    Giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are bamboo specialists that evolved from carnivores. Their gut microbiota probably aids in the digestion of cellulose and this is considered an example of gut microbiota adaptation to a bamboo diet. However, this issue remains unresolved and further functional and compositional studies are needed.

  17. Probing Vortex Matter Phase Transition and the Peak Effect in Type-II Superconductors using SANS and NSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryul Park, Sang

    2002-03-01

    The existence and the nature of the phase transition in the Abrikosov vortex state in weak-pinning type-II superconductors have been a prominant problem in condensed matter physics in recent years. I'll first discuss our recent discovery [1] of the hysteresis effect in the structure function of vortex matter using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), providing the first structural evidence for an order-disorder (melting) transition at the peak effect. I'll also describe our recent rocking curve measurements [2] in which a giant hysteresis effect is observed for the longitudinal correlation length. It is found that the melting of the Bragg glass is a single first-order transition, accompanied by a disentanglement-entanglement transition. We also found preliminary evidence [2] from neutron spin echo (NSE) that the vortex phase above the peak of the peak effect is a viscous liquid matter. This work was supported by NSF-DMR and was done in collaboration with X.S. Ling, B.A. McClain, J.W. Lynn, S.M. Choi. D.C. Dender, F. Mezei, G. Kali, and M. Russina. [1] X.S. Ling et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 712 (2001). [2] S.R. Park et al., to be published.)

  18. On the Origin of Polar Vortex Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, J. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The existence of the multi-year HALOE CH4 data set, together with some comparisons of forward with back trajectory calculations which we have carried out, has motivated us to reexamine the question of polar vortex descent. Three-dimensional diabatic trajectory calculations have been carried out for the seven month fall to spring period in both the northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH) polar stratosphere for the years 1992-1999. These computations are compared to fixed descent computations where the parcels were fixed at their latitude-longitude locations and allowed to descend without circulating. The forward trajectory computed descent is always less than the fixed descent due to horizontal parcel motions and variations in heating rates with latitude and longitude. Although the forward calculations estimate the maximum amount of descent that can occur, they do not necessarily indicate the actual origin of springtime vortex air. This is because more equator-ward air can be entrained within the vortex during its formation. To examine the origin of the springtime vortex air, the trajectory model was run backward for seven months from spring to fall. The back trajectories show a complex distribution of parcels in which one population originates in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and experiences considerable descent in the polar regions, while the remaining parcels originate at lower altitudes of the middle and lower stratosphere and are mixed into the polar regions during vortex formation without experiencing as much vertical transport. The amount of descent experienced by the first population shows little variability from year to year, while the computed descent and mixing of the remaining parcels show considerable interannual variability due to the varying polar meteorology. Because of this complex parcel distribution it is not meaningful to speak of a net amount of descent experienced over the entire winter period. Since the back trajectories

  19. Nursery of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the

  20. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  1. Dynamics of quasi 2D co-rotating vortex merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Akshay G.

    Merger of vortices is examined experimentally to compare the merger of slender parallel vortices generated coincidentally. It is known that like-sign vortices rotate around a common center of circulation and merger between the vortices may occur under certain conditions. This merger is dependent on the strength of the vortex circulation, distance of separation between the centers of the two vortices, ReGamma, and vorticity distribution. Quasi-2D experimental data is examined and merger relations are derived. The 2D experiments conducted in a vortex generator tank uses high aspect ratio rotating paddles. The vortex merger tank generates slender co-rotating vortices and are examined using PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). Merger characteristics are compared at centerline, 25% span and 5% span for different circulation strengths. Symmetric and asymmetric mergers are studied and it is found that in both cases, the vortex pair rotates around an axis perpendicular to the plane of the vortex pair. Symmetric merger is seen to occur at the center between the two vortices whereas in asymmetric merger the stronger vortex breaks the weaker vortex filaments and continues to follow its path. Wall effects seem to have an effect of vortex braiding and vortex stretching. Closer to the wall, the merger time increases while the merged vortex dissipates faster than at the centerline.

  2. Vortex generation and control in a microfluidic chamber with actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaopeng; Huang, Xiaoyang; Yang, Chun

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for vortex generation and control in a resonator-shaped microfluidic chamber with actuations. By varying the actuation conditions, including the working transducers, frequency, and voltage, two regimes of vortices, clockwise vortex (CW vortex) and counter-clockwise vortex (CCW vortex), are generated in the chamber. We show that the direction of the vortex can be conveniently shifted from clockwise to counterclockwise by switching the working transducers without interrupting the flow, and the intensity of the vortex can be regulated by the actuation frequency and voltage. It is proposed that the vortex generation in the present case is due to the instability of the actuation-induced pulsatile flow through the sudden expansion part at the outlet of the chamber, while the vortex control is realized through the asymmetric flows in the chamber induced by the upper or lower transducers. The reported method of vortex generation and control can be applied in microfluidic operations for mixing enhancement of multiple reagents and distribution of microparticles and nanoparticles.

  3. Dynamic decay of a single vortex into vortex-antivortex pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Lendínez, Sergi; Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn Fradin, Frank Y.; Pearson, John E.; Tejada, Javier; Bader, Samuel D.

    2014-05-07

    A variety of metastable states, including vortices, antivortices, and their combinations, is typical for magnetically soft, thin films and patterned structures. The physics of individual spin vortices in patterned structures has been rather extensively explored. In contrast, there are few studies of the vortex–antivortex–vortex (v-av-v) system, in part because the configuration is rather challenging to obtain experimentally. We demonstrate herein how a recently proposed resonant-spin-ordering technique can be used to induce the dynamic decay of a single vortex into v-av states in elongated elements. The approach is based on first driving the system from the linear regime of constant vortex gyrations to the non-linear regime of vortex-core reversals at a fixed excitation frequency, and then subsequently reducing the excitation field back to the linear regime. This procedure stabilizes the system into a v-av-v state that is completely decoupled from the initialization excitation frequency. The newly acquired state is stable in remanence. The dynamic response of this system is expected to demonstrate a number of collective modes, depending on the combination of the vortex core polarities, and/or the excitation field direction, and, hence, is of interest for future studies.

  4. Vortex Generators to Control Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, Holger (Inventor); Loth, Eric (Inventor); Lee, Sang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Devices for generating streamwise vorticity in a boundary includes various forms of vortex generators. One form of a split-ramp vortex generator includes a first ramp element and a second ramp element with front ends and back ends, ramp surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends, and vertical surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends adjacent the ramp surfaces. A flow channel is between the first ramp element and the second ramp element. The back ends of the ramp elements have a height greater than a height of the front ends, and the front ends of the ramp elements have a width greater than a width of the back ends.

  5. Observations on Leading-Edge Vortex Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Michael; Lang, Amy; Wahidi, Redha; Wilroy, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Most of an insect's lift comes from the leading edge vortex (LEV) that they produce when flapping their wings. There are many variables that make a LEV either stronger or weaker such as: roughness from the scales on their wings, angle of attack (AoA) of wing, size of the wing, and speed of the wing during flapping motion. Experiments were conducted to study LEV development to gain a better understanding of butterfly flight and the importance of LEV formation. The variables emphasized in this particular experiment were the chord length Reynolds numbers. Two smooth plates of 4 inches and 7 inches were compared in this experiment with Re of 1500 and 3000. Matlab was used to track the LEV location and calculate the vorticity and circulation magnitudes. Differences in LEV vortex strength as a function of chord length will be presented. Funding was provided by NSF REU site Grant EEC 1358991 and CBET Grant 1628600.

  6. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  7. Vortex burst as a source of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuypers, Yannis; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2003-11-01

    An important issue in turbulence is to understand what kinds of elementary structures are responsible for the part of the turbulent energy spectrum described by Kolmogorov'S celebrated k-5/3 law. A model for such a structure has been proposed by Lundgren 1982 in the form of a spiral vortex subjected to an axially straining field . We report experimental results of a vortex burst in a laminar flow environment showing that this structure is responsible for a k-5/3 part in the energy spectrum. If there are many experimental evidences of vortices with spiral structure in turbulent flows, it is the first time that such an elementary structure is experimentally shown to provide an inertial range spectrum of Kolmogorov type.

  8. Vortex Burst as a Source of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuypers, Yannis; Maurel, Agnès; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2003-11-01

    An important issue in turbulence theory is to understand what kinds of elementary flow structures are responsible for the part of the turbulent energy spectrum described by Kolmogorov's celebrated k-5/3 law. A model for such structure has been proposed by Lundgren [

    Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-6631 25, 2193 2203 (1982)
    ] in the form of a vortex with spiral structure subjected to an axially straining field. We report experimental results of a vortex burst in a laminar-flow environment showing that this structure is responsible for a k-5/3 part in the energy spectrum. If there are many experimental evidences of the existence of vortices with spiral structures in turbulent flows, it is the first time that such an elementary structure is experimentally shown to be responsible for the turbulent energy cascade.

  9. Numerical Study of Tip Vortex Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Hafez, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and summary of the many different research work related to tip vortex flows and wake/trailing vortices as applied to practical engineering problems. As a literature survey paper, it outlines relevant analytical, theoretical, experimental and computational study found in literature. It also discusses in brief some of the fundamental aspects of the physics and its complexities. An appendix is also included. The topics included in this paper are: 1) Analytical Vortices; 2) Experimental Studies; 3) Computational Studies; 4) Wake Vortex Control and Management; 5) Wake Modeling; 6) High-Lift Systems; 7) Issues in Numerical Studies; 8) Instabilities; 9) Related Topics; 10) Visualization Tools for Vertical Flows; 11) Further Work Needed; 12) Acknowledgements; 13) References; and 14) Appendix.

  10. Vortex Ring State and Asymmetric Thrust Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Gregory; Savas, Omer; Caradonna, Francis

    2008-11-01

    When the helical vortices of a rotor are not convected away, the vortices may form a ring-like structure about the rotor disk. This vortex ring state (VRS) is most common during rapid descent and leads to thrust oscillations coupled to the formation and subsequent breakdown of the ring. Experimental observations at and near VRS were made using strobed particle image velocimetry on a three-blade rotor in a towing tank. Simultaneous strain gage readings allowed direct measurement of the rotor's thrust history in this state. Operating conditions near the cusp of VRS were investigated to offer insight into the initial evolution of this undesirable state. In addition, asymmetries in the periodic thrust histories during non-axial descent are analyzed in conjunction with corresponding vorticity evolutions. Salient features of the vortex wake structure during highly asymmetric thrust oscillations are discussed in contrast to VRS cases with nearly symmetric thrust oscillations.

  11. Geometric symmetries in superfluid vortex dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kozik, Evgeny; Svistunov, Boris

    2010-10-01

    Dynamics of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid feature symmetries associated with the geometric character of the complex-valued field, w(z)=x(z)+iy(z), describing the instant shape of the line. Along with a natural set of Noether's constants of motion, which - apart from their rather specific expressions in terms of w(z) - are nothing but components of the total linear and angular momenta of the fluid, the geometric symmetry brings about crucial consequences for kinetics of distortion waves on the vortex lines, the Kelvin waves. It is the geometric symmetry that renders Kelvin-wave cascade local in the wave-number space. Similar considerations apply to other systems with purely geometric degrees of freedom.

  12. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  13. Vortex flow for a holographic superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Kengo; Okamura, Takashi

    2011-03-15

    We investigate energy dissipation associated with the motion of the scalar condensate in a holographic superconductor model constructed from the charged scalar field coupled to the Maxwell field. Upon application of constant magnetic and electric fields, we analytically construct the vortex-flow solution and find the vortex-flow resistance near the second-order phase transition where the scalar condensate begins. The characteristic feature of the nonequilibrium state agrees with the one predicted by the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) theory. We evaluate the kinetic coefficient in the TDGL equation along the line of the second-order phase transition. At zero magnetic field, the other coefficients in the TDGL equation are also evaluated just below the critical temperature.

  14. Vortex identification and tracking in unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berson, Arganthaël; Michard, Marc; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    The present Note deals with the identification and tracking of vortices in a time-resolved unsteady flow. The approach is based on the combination of two existing post-processing tools that are Galilean invariant functions: feature flow field f and vortex identification algorithm γ. An analytical development shows that the joint use of γ and the streamlines of f allows to identify and track the location of the center of a vortex core with a non-zero convection velocity. We discuss the applicability of this procedure to actual flows for which the assumptions of the analytical approach may not be strictly valid. The procedure is validated using PIV measurements performed in an oscillating flow in a model of thermoacoustic refrigerator. This method proves to be efficient for the automated analysis of convection processes when large numbers of vortices are involved. To cite this article: A. Berson et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. Energy separation in a vortex street

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosaka, M.; Gertz, J. B.; Graham, J. E.; Goodman, J. R.; Sundaram, P.

    1987-05-01

    The mechanism responsible for the Eckert-Wiese effect (EWE, the reduction in total temperature in the wake of a bluff body in a cross flow, with negative values of the recovery factor R on the rearmost surface) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In experiments performed in a low-noise wind tunnel at freestream Mach numbers 0.1-0.5, vortex shedding in the wake of a hollow PVC cylinder is enhanced by acoustic synchronization (resonance with standing acoustic waves injected into the test section). The results are presented graphically, and vortex shedding is identified as the cause of the EWE. A theoretical model is proposed and tested by means of numerical simulations. In this model, the EWE results from the fact that a separation of the instantaneous total temperature into hot and cold spots near the vortices is interpreted by the time-averaged temperature distribution as a colder wake.

  16. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  17. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  18. ''Soft'' Anharmonic Vortex Glass in Ferromagnetic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Radzihovsky, Leo; Ettouhami, A. M.; Saunders, Karl; Toner, John

    2001-07-09

    Ferromagnetic order in superconductors can induce a spontaneous vortex (SV) state. For external field H=0 , rotational symmetry guarantees a vanishing tilt modulus of the SV solid, leading to drastically different behavior than that of a conventional, external-field-induced vortex solid. We show that quenched disorder and anharmoinc effects lead to elastic moduli that are wave-vector dependent out to arbitrarily long length scales, and non-Hookean elasticity. The latter implies that for weak external fields H , the magnetic induction scales universally like B(H){approx}B(0)+cH{sup {alpha}} , with {alpha}{approx}0.72 . For weak disorder, we predict the SV solid is a topologically ordered glass, in the ''columnar elastic glass'' universality class.

  19. Simulations Of On Demand Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.; Mansour, N. N.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The development of a two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow generated by an off center thin oscillating bd on top of a cavity is studied computationally as a prototype of vortex generators. The lid is placed asymmetrically over the cavity so that the gap size is different on either side of the cavity. An adaptive numerical scheme, based on high resolution viscous vortex methods, is used to integrate the vorticity/velocity formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations with the no-slip boun.lary condition enforced on the lid and cavity walls. Depending on the a amplitude and frequency of the oscillation as well as the the gap size, vorticity is ejected in the fluid above the cavity either from the large and/or the small gap. The results of the computations complement ongoing experimental work.

  20. Particle-Vortex Interaction in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    The application of the classical Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in liquid helium has opened the way to better visualization of superfluid turbulence. To interpret the data, it is necessary to understand the interaction between micron-size tracer particles and vortex lines. This talk summarizes current understanding of this interaction resulting from theoretical and numerical calculations. In collaboration with Yuri A. Sergeev, Newcastle University.

  1. Historical evolution of vortex-lattice methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the beginning and some orientation of the vortex-lattice method were given. The historical course of this method was followed in conjunction with its field of computational fluid dynamics, spanning the period from L.F. Richardson's paper in 1910 to 1975. The following landmarks were pointed out: numerical analysis of partial differential equations, lifting-line theory, finite-difference method, 1/4-3/4 rule, block relaxation technique, application of electronic computers, and advanced panel methods.

  2. Creating electron vortex beams with light.

    PubMed

    Handali, Jonathan; Shakya, Pratistha; Barwick, Brett

    2015-02-23

    We propose an all-optical method of creating electron vortices utilizing the Kapitza-Dirac effect. This technique uses the transfer of orbital angular momentum from photons to free electrons creating electron vortex beams in the process. The laser intensities needed for this experiment can be obtained with available pulsed lasers and the resulting electron beams carrying orbital angular momentum will be particularly useful in the study of magnetic materials and chiral plasmonic structures in ultrafast electron microscopy.

  3. Motion, decay and merging of vortex filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Ting, L.

    1988-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for vortex filaments of finite strength with small effective vortical cores are summarized. Emphases are placed on the physical meaning and the practical limit to the applicability of the asymptotic solution. Finite-difference solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for the merging of the filament(s) are described. It is focused on the development of the approximate boundary conditions for the computational domain.

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  5. The evolution of a turbulent vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorin, A. J.

    1982-12-01

    The evolution of a perturbed vortex in a periodic box is numerically examined. The fluid is inviscid and the vorticity blows up. The support of the L2 norm of the vorticity converges to a set of Hausdorff dimension of about 2.5, and the distribution of the vorticity seems to converge to a lognormal distribution. A convergence of the highe; statistics towards universal statistics is not seen, but a strong temporal intermittency is observed.

  6. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  7. Hawkmoth flight stability in turbulent vortex streets.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Greeter, Jeremy S M; Mittal, Rajat; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2013-12-15

    Shedding of vortices is a common phenomenon in the atmosphere over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, it is unclear how these vortices of varying scales affect the flight performance of flying animals. In order to examine these interactions, we trained seven hawkmoths (Manduca sexta) (wingspan ~9 cm) to fly and feed in a wind tunnel under steady flow (controls) and in the von Kármán vortex street of vertically oriented cylinders (two different cylinders with diameters of 10 and 5 cm) at speeds of 0.5, 1 and 2 m s(-1). Cylinders were placed at distances of 5, 25 and 100 cm upstream of the moths. Moths exhibited large amplitude yaw oscillations coupled with modest oscillations in roll and pitch, and slight increases in wingbeat frequency when flying in both the near (recirculating) and middle (vortex dominated) wake regions. Wingbeat amplitude did not vary among treatments, except at 1 m s(-1) for the large cylinder. Yaw and roll oscillations were synchronized with the vortex shedding frequencies in moths flying in the wake of the large cylinder at all speeds. In contrast, yaw and pitch were synchronized with the shedding frequency of small vortices at speeds ≤1 m s(-1). Oscillations in body orientation were also substantially smaller in the small cylinder treatment when compared with the large cylinder, regardless of temporal or non-dimensional spatial scale. Moths flying in steady conditions reached a higher air speed than those flying into cylinder wakes. In general, flight effects produced by the cylinder wakes were qualitatively similar among the recirculating and vortex-dominated wake regions; the magnitude of those effects, however, declined gradually with downstream distance.

  8. Vortex Reconnection in Normal and Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplik, Joel

    An example of vortex reconnection is shown in a time sequence in Fig. 1, wherein two distinct vortex filaments in a fluid move together, merge, and then divide into two or more filaments moving away, with part of one initial filament connected to part of the other. The physics underlying this example [1] will be presented later, but the key feature is the evident change in the topology of the vortices. In this lecture, we will discuss vortex reconnection in both normal and superfluids, emphasizing the relevance of the process to their respective turbulent flows, the similarities between the two cases, and the computational issues. The lecture is aimed at a fairly general audience: no detailed knowledge of fluid mechanics is assumed beyond a nodding acquaintance with the Navier-Stokes equation, and nothing about superfluidity beyond the idea of a two-fluid system with an quantum-mechanically condensed component, and a willingness to accept the Gross-Pitaevskii model for the latter. My emp hasis will be on the superfluid case, and the reconnection process in normal fluids is discussed in more detail in the cited literature. My original work reviewed here was done in collaboration with Herbert Levine. Related and more recent work along these lines is described in the lectures by Adams and Roberts in this volume.

  9. Evolution of Vortex Rings Exiting Inclined Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, E. K.; Webster, D. R.; Reetz, M.; Gefroh, D.

    1996-11-01

    Vortex rings initiated in cylinders with exit incline lengths of 0, D/4, and D/2 were investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 30,000. The fluid exiting each cylinder was visualized with an ionized bromothymol blue solution, and velocity fields were obtained with PIV. In each inclined case, vortex rings form at angles smaller than the cylinder incline angle. Entrainment of ambient fluid on the short side of the cylinder is much stronger than that on the long side. This results in a larger circulation about the short side of the ring and a greater propagation velocity on that side. The incline angle of the ring thus decreases as it moves downstream. Behind the ring core, an impulsive wave of entrained ambient fluid flows parallel to the cylinder exit plane. Some of this fluid is wrapped into the core, while the rest is ejected outward past the long cylinder edge. The vortex ring dynamics differ significantly from those observed in jets from inclined nozzles where neighboring rings are connected by straining zones, and ring incline angles increase with downstream distance.

  10. The Many Faces of the Heterotic Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, S.

    2010-01-01

    We address the problem of non-Abelian super-QCD, with a Fayet-Iliopoulos term, as seen from the vortex worldsheet perspective. Together with the FI term ξ, also a mass μ for the adjoint superfield Φ enters into the game. This mass allows the interpolation between {N} = 2 and {N} = 1 super-QCD. We distinguish, inside the parameter space spanned by ξ and μ, four different corners where some quantitative statements can be made. We focus on two questions: 1) Is the quantum vortex BPS or non-BPS? 2) What is the phase of the internal non-Abelian moduli? We find that the answer to these questions depends upon the choice of the linear term in the superpotential. We then address the problem of multiple non-Abelian vortices, in the presence of the {N} = 1 deformation. We show that the tension of the "Abelian" vortex is not affected by the heterotic deformation, and in particular it remains BPS-saturated when μ is also switched on.

  11. A Visual Study of Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, Debora A.; Stadnicki, John

    1997-11-01

    A jet which issues from a small hole in a flow surface, pitched and skewed relative to the crossflow, creates a single streamwise vortex which resembles the flow downstream of a half-delta-wing vortex generator. The term ``vortex generator jet'' (VGJ) has been used to describe such a flow. Investigators of jet-generated vortices have recognized their applicability to active control and their flexibility in terms of being activated and deactivated. We have installed a spanwise array of VGJ's in a turbulent boundary layer in the zero-pressure-gradient test section of the 12" × 36" boundary layer wind tunnel at Boston University. The Reynolds number based on jet diameter is in the range 4000 < Re < 10000. Our experimental investigations include flow visualization of a single pitched and skewed jet in crossflow, as well as wall shear stress measurements downstream of the array of jets. To capture still images of a cross-section of the jet flow, a light sheet formed by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used to illuminate smoke-tagged jet fluid. The wall shear stress measurements are made using an oil-film interferometry technique. Parameters varied include jet velocity and angles of jet pitch and skew.

  12. Simulating marine propellers with vortex particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youjiang; Abdel-Maksoud, Moustafa; Song, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    The vortex particle method is applied to compute the open water characteristics of marine propellers. It is based on the large-eddy simulation technique, and the Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale model is implemented for the eddy viscosity. The vortex particle method is combined with the boundary element method, in the sense that the body is modelled with boundary elements and the slipstream is modelled with vortex particles. Rotational periodic boundaries are adopted, which leads to a cylindrical sector domain for the slipstream. The particle redistribution scheme and the fast multipole method are modified to consider the rotational periodic boundaries. Open water characteristics of three propellers with different skew angles are calculated with the proposed method. The results are compared with the ones obtained with boundary element method and experiments. It is found that the proposed method predicts the open water characteristics more accurately than the boundary element method, especially for high loading condition and high skew propeller. The influence of the Smagorinsky constant is also studied, which shows the results have a low sensitivity to it.

  13. Optical vortex beam generator at nanoscale level

    PubMed Central

    Garoli, Denis; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Gorodetski, Yuri; Tantussi, Francesco; De Angelis, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) can find tremendous applications in several fields. In order to apply these particular beams in photonic integrated devices innovative optical elements have been proposed. Here we are interested in the generation of OAM-carrying beams at the nanoscale level. We design and experimentally demonstrate a plasmonic optical vortex emitter, based on a metal-insulator-metal holey plasmonic vortex lens. Our plasmonic element is shown to convert impinging circularly polarized light to an orbital angular momentum state capable of propagating to the far-field. Moreover, the emerging OAM can be externally adjusted by switching the handedness of the incident light polarization. The device has a radius of few micrometers and the OAM beam is generated from subwavelength aperture. The fabrication of integrated arrays of PVLs and the possible simultaneous emission of multiple optical vortices provide an easy way to the large-scale integration of optical vortex emitters for wide-ranging applications. PMID:27404659

  14. Fast vortex core switching at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, Kristof M.; Legut, Dominik

    2016-08-01

    Fast ferromagnetic vortex core switching is investigated employing micromagnetic simulations. Short pulse (in the range of a few hundreds of picoseconds) of an in-plane oscillating magnetic field is applied to a thin disk (diameter 200 nm and thickness 20 nm) with material parameters resembling permalloy. Fundamental frequency of this excitation field is close to the resonance with the material spin waves. Thermal effects are introduced by replacing the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation by the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation. Temperature from 300 K to 850 K is considered, just below the Curie temperature TC = 870 K. Calculations are done within the OOMMF simulation framework. We find that: (i) Period of the field necessary to switch the vortex increases approximately from 141 ps at 300 K to 572 ps for the high-temperature limit. (ii) Amplitude of the field necessary to switch the vortex core decreases roughly from 60 mT to 15 mT - even at high temperatures this amplitude is nonzero, contrary to the case of quasi-static switching. (iii) Time span between the excitation and switching (switching time) seems not to depend on the temperature. (iv) Duration of the switching itself (movement of the Bloch point in the sample) increases from a few picoseconds at low temperatures to tens of picoseconds at high temperatures.

  15. Feasibility of wake vortex monitoring systems for air terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Lawrence, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    Wake vortex monitoring systems, especially those using laser Doppler sensors, were investigated. The initial phases of the effort involved talking with potential users (air traffic controllers, pilots, etc.) of a wake vortex monitoring system to determine system requirements from the user's viewpoint. These discussions involved the volumes of airspace to be monitored for vortices, and potential methods of using the monitored vortex data once the data are available. A subsequent task led to determining a suitable mathematical model of the vortex phenomena and developing a mathematical model of the laser Doppler sensor for monitoring the vortex flow field. The mathematical models were used in combination to help evaluate the capability of laser Doppler instrumentation in monitoring vortex flow fields both in the near vicinity of the sensor (within 1 kilometer and at long ranges(10 kilometers).

  16. Distinct magnetic signatures of fractional vortex configurations in multiband superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R. M. da; Domínguez, D.; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2014-12-08

    Vortices carrying fractions of a flux quantum are predicted to exist in multiband superconductors, where vortex core can split between multiple band-specific components of the superconducting condensate. Using the two-component Ginzburg-Landau model, we examine such vortex configurations in a two-band superconducting slab in parallel magnetic field. The fractional vortices appear due to the band-selective vortex penetration caused by different thresholds for vortex entry within each band-condensate, and stabilize near the edges of the sample. We show that the resulting fractional vortex configurations leave distinct fingerprints in the static measurements of the magnetization, as well as in ac dynamic measurements of the magnetic susceptibility, both of which can be readily used for the detection of these fascinating vortex states in several existing multiband superconductors.

  17. Analytical study of vortex flaps on highly swept delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, N. T.

    1982-01-01

    This paper highlights some current results from ongoing analytical studies of vortex flaps on highly swept delta wings. A brief discussion of the vortex flow analysis tools is given along with comparisons of the theories to vortex flap force and pressure data. Theoretical trends in surface pressure distribution for both angle-of-attack variation and flap deflection are correctly predicted by Free Vortex Sheet theory. Also shown are some interesting calculations for attached-flow and vortex-flow flap hinge moments that indicate flaps utilizing vortex flow may generate less hinge moment than attached flow flaps. Finally, trailing-edge flap effects on leading-edge flap thrust potential are investigated and theory-experiment comparisons made.

  18. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

  19. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; ...

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row ofmore » vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.« less

  20. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing. PMID:26337704

  1. Giant Herbig-Haro Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Bally, John; Devine, David

    1997-12-01

    We present the discovery of a number of Herbig-Haro flows which extend over parsec-scale distances. The largest of these is the well known HH 111 jet complex, which is shown, through CCD images and a proper motion study, to have an angular extent of almost one degree on the sky, corresponding to 7.7 pc, making it the largest known HH flow. In our imaging survey we also found that T Tauri is at the center of a huge bipolar HH flow, HH 355, with a total extent of 38 arcmin, corresponding to 1.55 pc, and aligned with the axis of the tiny HH 255 flow surrounding the infrared companion T Tau S. We additionally have found a number of other giant HH flow candidates, including HH 315 at PV Cep, HH 41/295 at Haro 5a/6a, HH 300 in Bl8w, HH 354 in Li 165, HH 376 in Li 152, and HH 114/115 and HH 243/244/245/179 in the X Orionis molecular ring. It thus appears that it is common for HH flows to attain parsec-scale dimensions. The ubiquity of parsec-scale HH flows profoundly alters our view of the impact of young stars on their environment. Giant flows have dynamical ages comparable to the duration of the accretion phase of the sources, and provide a fossil record of their mass loss and accretion history. Multiple internal working surfaces and their S-shaped point symmetry provide evidence for variability of ejection velocity and orientation of the source jets. Giant HH flows are either longer or comparable in length to associated CO outflows, providing evidence for unified models in which HH flows power CO flows. Many giant flows have burst out of their source cloud cores and are dissociating molecules and injecting momentum and kinetic energy into the interclump medium of the host clouds. They contribute to the UV radiation field, and may produce C I and C ii in cloud interiors. Giant flows may contribute to the chemical rejuvenation of clouds, the generation of turbulent motions, and the self-regulation of star formation. The terminal working surfaces of giant flows may be

  2. An Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) for Dynamical Wake Vortex Spacing Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    A concept is presented for the development and implementation of a prototype Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to use current and short-term predictions of the atmospheric state in approach and departure corridors to provide, to ATC facilities, dynamical weather dependent separation criteria with adequate stability and lead time for use in establishing arrival scheduling. The AVOSS will accomplish this task through a combination of wake vortex transport and decay predictions, weather state knowledge, defined aircraft operational procedures and corridors, and wake vortex safety sensors. Work is currently underway to address the critical disciplines and knowledge needs so as to implement and demonstrate a prototype AVOSS in the 1999/2000 time frame.

  3. Robust vortex lines, vortex rings, and hopfions in three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    DOE PAGES

    Bisset, R. N.; Wang, Wenlong; Ticknor, Christopher; ...

    2015-12-07

    Performing a systematic Bogoliubov–de Gennes spectral analysis, we illustrate that stationary vortex lines, vortex rings, and more exotic states, such as hopfions, are robust in three-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, for large parameter intervals. Importantly, we find that the hopfion can be stabilized in a simple parabolic trap, without the need for trap rotation or inhomogeneous interactions. We supplement our spectral analysis by studying the dynamics of such stationary states; we find them to be robust against significant perturbations of the initial state. In the unstable regimes, we not only identify the unstable mode, such as a quadrupolar or hexapolar mode,more » but we also observe the corresponding instability dynamics. Moreover, deep in the Thomas-Fermi regime, we investigate the particlelike behavior of vortex rings and hopfions.« less

  4. Robust vortex lines, vortex rings, and hopfions in three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, R. N.; Wang, Wenlong; Ticknor, Christopher; Carretero-Gonzalez, R.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Collins, Lee A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-12-07

    Performing a systematic Bogoliubov–de Gennes spectral analysis, we illustrate that stationary vortex lines, vortex rings, and more exotic states, such as hopfions, are robust in three-dimensional atomic Bose-Einstein condensates, for large parameter intervals. Importantly, we find that the hopfion can be stabilized in a simple parabolic trap, without the need for trap rotation or inhomogeneous interactions. We supplement our spectral analysis by studying the dynamics of such stationary states; we find them to be robust against significant perturbations of the initial state. In the unstable regimes, we not only identify the unstable mode, such as a quadrupolar or hexapolar mode, but we also observe the corresponding instability dynamics. Moreover, deep in the Thomas-Fermi regime, we investigate the particlelike behavior of vortex rings and hopfions.

  5. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Wavelength Red-Shift of Long Wavelength InGaN/GaN Multi-Quantum Well by Using an InGaN Underlying Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li-Rong; Wen, Feng; Tong, Liang-Zhu; Huang, De-Xiu

    2009-07-01

    Long-wavelength GaN based light-emitting diodes are of importance in full color displays, monolithic white light- emitting diodes and solid-state lighting, etc. However, their epitaxial growth faces great challenges because high indium (In) compositions of InGaN are difficult to grow. In order to enhance In incorporation and lengthen the emission wavelength of a InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well (MQW), we insert an InGaN underlying layer underneath the MQW. InGaN/GaN MQWs with various InGaN underlying layers, such as graded InyGa1-yN material with linearly increasing In content, or InyGa1-yN with fixed In content but different thicknesses, are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Experimental results demonstrate the enhancement of In incorporation and the emission wavelength redshift by the insertion of an InGaN underlying layer.

  6. Vortex-dominated flow with viscous core structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Krause, E.; Ting, L.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of vortex-dominated flows are reviewed with special emphasis on those for which the viscous core structures play an important role. The problems to be described are: The interaction and merging of two-dimensional vortices and of curved vortex filaments, the roll-up and decay of trailing far wakes, and the initiation of vortex breakdown. The analysis utilizes finite-difference solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations complemented by asymptotic expansion techniques.

  7. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  8. Wake Vortex Field Measurement Program at Memphis, Tennessee: Data Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, S. D.; Dasey, T. J.; Freehart, R. E.; Heinrichs, R. M.; Mathews, M. P.; Perras, G. H.; Rowe, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Eliminating or reducing current restrictions in the air traffic control system due to wake vortex considerations would yield increased capacity, decreased delays, and cost savings. Current wake vortex separation standards are widely viewed as very conservative under most conditions. However, scientific uncertainty about wake vortex behavior under different atmospheric conditions remains a barrier to development of an adaptive vortex spacing system. The objective of the wake vortex field measurement efforts during December, 1994 and August, 1995 at Memphis, TN were to record wake vortex behavior for varying atmospheric conditions and types of aircraft. This effort is part of a larger effort by the NASA Langley Research Center to develop an Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) as an element of the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The TAP program is being performed in concert with the FAA Terminal Air Traffic Control Automation (TATCA) program and ATC Automation. Wake vortex behavior was observed using a mobile continuous-wave (CW) coherent laser Doppler radar (lidar) developed at Lincoln Laboratory. This lidar features a number of improvements over previous systems, including the first-ever demonstration of an automatic wake vortex detection and tracking algorithm.

  9. Three-dimensional mean flow experimental study of 'vortex unwinding'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.

    1988-01-01

    A seven-hole flow-angularity pressure probe was used to assess the effectiveness of vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer. The vortex center moved in the spanwise and vertical direction with increasing longitudinal distance. Initially, the vortex moved rapidly; it achieved 60 percent of its total 41 mm spanwise travel before it had completed half of its travel in the longitudinal direction. The flow was studied behind the single vortex combined with the most successful unwinder. The unwinder was found to be very effective in reducing the amount of secondary flow in the boundary layer.

  10. Vortex reconnections in atomic condensates at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A. J.; Zuccher, S.; Caliari, M.; Proukakis, N. P.; Parker, N. G.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2014-07-01

    The study of vortex reconnections is an essential ingredient of understanding superfluid turbulence, a phenomenon recently also reported in trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. In this work we show that, despite the established dependence of vortex motion on temperature in such systems, vortex reconnections are actually temperature independent on the typical length and time scales of atomic condensates. Our work is based on a dissipative Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate, coupled to a semiclassical Boltzmann equation for the thermal cloud (the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin formalism). Comparison to vortex reconnections in homogeneous condensates further shows reconnections to be insensitive to the inhomogeneity in the background density.

  11. Vortex dynamics and correlated disorder in high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, V.M.

    1993-08-01

    We develop a theory for the vortex motion in the presence of correlated disorder in the form of the twin boundaries and columnar defects. Mapping vortex trajectories onto boson world lines enables us to establish the duality of the vortex transport in the systems with correlated disorder and hopping conductivity of charged particles in 2D systems. A glassy-like dynamics of the vortex lines with zero linear-resistivity and strongly nonlinear current-voltage behavior as V {proportional_to} exp[{minus} const/J{sup {mu}}] in a Bose glass state is predicted.

  12. Microscopic vortex velocity and implications for neutron star dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gügercinoǧlu, Erbil; Alpar, Mehmet Ali

    2016-07-01

    Rotational dynamics of a neutron star is governed by the distribution and motion of vortex lines within the neutron superfluid. Interaction of the vortex lines with the ambient matter plays an important role in the glitches, thermal evolution and magnetic field evolution of pulsars. Thus, correctly treating the vortex motion both in the inner crust and in the outer core of neutron stars is a key ingredient in modeling a great variety of observational phenomena of pulsars. In this work we outline the first principles to calculate the microscopic vortex velocity in the inner crust as well as in the outer core. Then we discuss some implications for neutron star's dynamics.

  13. Core contribution to magnetotransport of ferromagnetic dots in vortex state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, A.; Gerber, A.

    2012-04-01

    We study the influence of the vortex core on magnetotransport of ferromagnetic dots in a vortex state. The extraordinary Hall effect generated in the core region has a different field symmetry compared to contributions of anisotropic magnetoresistance and the planar Hall effect, which can be used to detect chirality and polarity of the vortex. We propose a method for realization of two-bit per dot magnetic random access memory, in which two states are contributed by clockwise and counter-clockwise chirality and two by up and down core polarity. Dependence of the signal on vortex location, core diameter, and other parameters is discussed.

  14. Vortex liquid crystals in anisotropic type II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Carlson, E W; Castro Neto, A H; Campbell, D K

    2003-02-28

    In an isotropic type II superconductor in a moderate magnetic field, the transition to the normal state occurs by vortex lattice melting. In certain anisotropic cases, the vortices acquire elongated cross sections and interactions. Systems of anisotropic, interacting constituents generally exhibit liquid crystalline phases. We examine the possibility of a two step melting in homogeneous type II superconductors with anisotropic superfluid stiffness from a vortex lattice into first a vortex smectic and then a vortex nematic at high temperature and magnetic field. We find that fluctuations of the ordered phase favor an instability to an intermediate smectic-A in the absence of intrinsic pinning.

  15. 2D Vortex Motion Driven by a Background Vorticity Gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schecter, D. A.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    1999-11-01

    A background vorticity gradient can strongly influence the motion of vortices in 2D fluids. Examples are vortex motion in magnetized electron plasmas and hurricane tracks in planetary atmospheres.(See for example Huang, Fine and Driscoll, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4424 (1995); C.G. Rossby, J. Mar. Res. 7, 175 (1948). Here, the vortex motion is examined numerically and analytically for the case of a point-like vortex in a background shear flow that is initially axisymmetric. The vortex acts to level the local background vorticity gradient. Conservation of angular momentum dictates that positive vortices (``clumps'') and negative vortices (``holes'') react oppositely: clumps move up the gradient, whereas holes move down the gradient. Both clumps and holes can be classified as either prograde or retrograde, depending on whether they rotate with or against the local background shear. An analysis, in which the background response to the vortex is linearized, gives the trajectory of a small retrograde vortex. When the vortex is prograde, the background response is nonlinear. A prograde vortex moves along the gradient at a slower rate that is given by a simple ``mix-and-move'' estimate. This rate vanishes when the local shear is sufficiently large, due to the trapping of background fluid around the vortex.

  16. Balance equations for triple-joint vortex-sheet structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xi; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-11-01

    A vortex sheet is the limiting case for a viscous shear layer as the thickness approaches zero. Recently, vortex-sheet based flow models have been demonstrated to provide significant reduction for numerical simulations of viscous and inviscid flows. In such modeling approaches, a prominent phenomenon is the formation of a new vortex sheet from existing vortex sheets, thereby creating a triple-joint vortex-sheet structure. In this study, the formation of the new vortex sheet is analytically determined by applying conservation laws of mass and momentum to flow surrounding the entire triple-joint vortex-sheet structure, together with the boundary conditions specific to any application. As a result, a general condition is obtained to determine the angle, strength, and velocity of the new vortex sheet. This model is validated by simulating airfoils in steady and unsteady background flows and comparing the flow structures and force calculations with experimental data. While the performance of this model is demonstrated in this study for the vortex shedding problem at the trailing edge, its future applications could be extended to flow separation on a smooth surface and triple contact point of multi-phase flows.

  17. A topological method for vortex identification in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiang; Chen, Qigang; Chen, Huai; Li, Danxun

    2017-02-01

    We present a novel vortex identification method based on structured vorticity (ω s) of the direction field of flow (velocity vectors set to unit magnitude). As a direct measure of streamline curvature is insensitive to vortex strength, ω s is effective in detecting vortices of various strengths. The effectiveness has been tested against both analytical flows (pure shear flow, Oseen vortex flow, strong outward spiraling motion, straining flow, Taylor-Green flow) and experimental flows (closed cavity flow, closed and open channel flow). Comparison of the new method with the swirling-strength method indicates that the new method shows promise as being a simple and effective criterion for vortex identification.

  18. Octave-band tunable optical vortex parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Abulikemu, Aizitiaili; Yusufu, Taximaiti; Mamuti, Roukuya; Araki, Shungo; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2016-07-11

    We developed an octave-band tunable optical vortex laser based on a 532 nm optical vortex pumped optical parametric oscillator with a simple linear-cavity configuration by employing cascaded non-critical phase-matching LiB3O5 crystals. The optical vortex output was tunable from 735 to 1903 nm. For a pump energy of 9 mJ, an optical vortex pulse energy of 0.24-2.36 mJ was obtained, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 0.3-26%.

  19. Trailing Vortex-Induced Loads During Close Encounters in Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J; Kelly, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The trailing vortex induced aerodynamic loads on a Falcon 20G business jet flying in the wake of a DC-8 are predicted to provide a preflight estimate of safe trail distances during flight test measurements in the wake. Static and dynamic loads on the airframe flying in the near wake are shown at a matrix of locations, and the dynamic motion of the Falcon 20G during traverses of the DC-8 primary trailing vortex is simulated. Safe trailing distances for the test flights are determined, and optimum vortex traverse schemes are identified to moderate the motion of the trailing aircraft during close encounters with the vortex wake.

  20. Performance and flow analysis of vortex wind power turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwalla, A.A.; Hsu, C.T.

    1982-10-01

    The theoretical study presented investigates some possible vortex flow solutions in the tornado-type wind energy system and evaluates the power coefficient that can be obtained theoretically. The actuator disc concept is applied to the vortex wind turbine configuration. The Burgers vortex model is then introduced and the performance of a turbine using it is derived. A generalized analytical solution of the model is given, followed by a numerical solution of the complete equations. The stability of a Burgers vortex is discussed. (LEW)

  1. Novel vortex generator and mode converter for electron beams.

    PubMed

    Schattschneider, P; Stöger-Pollach, M; Verbeeck, J

    2012-08-24

    A mode converter for electron vortex beams is described. Numerical simulations, confirmed by experiment, show that the converter transforms a vortex beam with a topological charge m=±1 into beams closely resembling Hermite-Gaussian HG(10) and HG(01) modes. The converter can be used as a mode discriminator or filter for electron vortex beams. Combining the converter with a phase plate turns a plane wave into modes with topological charge m=±1. This combination serves as a generator of electron vortex beams of high brilliance.

  2. Resonance in flows with vortex sheets and edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the vortex sheet in a slot between two semi-infinite plates does not admit incompressible resonant perturbations. The semi-infinite vortex sheet entering a duct does admit incompressible resonance. These results indicate that the vortex-sheet approximation is less useful for impinging shear flows than for non-impinging flows. They also suggest an important role of downstream vortical disturbances in resonant flows. The general solution for perturbations to flow with a vortex sheet and edges is written in terms of a Cauchy integral. Requirements on the behavior of this solution at edges and at downstream infinity fix the criteria for resonance.

  3. On the self-induced motion of a helical vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, J.; Wood, D. H.

    1999-04-01

    The velocity field in the immediate vicinity of a curved vortex comprises a circulation around the vortex, a component due to the vortex curvature, and a ‘remainder’ due to the more distant parts of the vortex. The first two components are relatively well understood but the remainder is known only for a few specific vortex geometries, most notably, the vortex ring. In this paper we derive a closed form for the remainder that is valid for all values of the pitch of an infinite helical vortex. The remainder is obtained firstly from Hardin's (1982) solution for the flow induced by a helical line vortex (of zero thickness). We then use Ricca's (1994) implementation of the Moore & Saffman (1972) formulation to obtain the remainder for a helical vortex with a finite circular core over which the circulation is distributed uniformly. It is shown analytically that the two remainders differ by 1/4 for all values of the pitch. This generalizes the results of Kuibin & Okulov (1998) who obtained the remainders and their difference asymptotically for small and large pitch. An asymptotic analysis of the new closed-form remainders using Mellin transforms provides a complete representation by a residue series and reveals a minor correction to the asymptotic expression of Kuibin & Okulov (1998) for the remainder at small pitch.

  4. Center manifold analysis of a point vortex model of vortex shedding with control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we use methods of dynamical systems theory to provide a precise mathematical characterization of the behavior of the point vortex Föppl system with a linear feedback control. The Föppl system was used in an earlier investigation as a simple model for control design for vortex shedding and numerical studies indicated that the state of the controlled system converges to a closed orbit. In this investigation we prove rigorously that this observed behavior in fact represents periodic oscillations on the center manifold of the closed-loop nonlinear system. This manifold is shown to coincide with the uncontrollable subspace of the linearized system.

  5. Documentation for Three Wake Vortex Model Data Sets from Simulation of Flight 587 Wake Vortex Encounter Accident Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, George F.

    2008-01-01

    This document contains a general description for data sets of a wake vortex system in a turbulent environment. The turbulence and thermal stratification of the environment are representative of the conditions on November 12, 2001 near John F. Kennedy International Airport. The simulation assumes no ambient winds. The full three dimensional simulation of the wake vortex system from a Boeing 747 predicts vortex circulation levels at 80% of their initial value at the time of the proposed vortex encounter. The linked vortex oval orientation showed no twisting, and the oval elevations at the widest point were about 20 meters higher than where the vortex pair joined. Fred Proctor of NASA?s Langley Research Center presented the results from this work at the NTSB public hearing that started 29 October 2002. This document contains a description of each data set including: variables, coordinate system, data format, and sample plots. Also included are instructions on how to read the data.

  6. User's manual for interfacing a leading edge, vortex rollup program with two linear panel methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desilva, B. M. E.; Medan, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    Sufficient instructions are provided for interfacing the Mangler-Smith, leading edge vortex rollup program with a vortex lattice (POTFAN) method and an advanced higher order, singularity linear analysis for computing the vortex effects for simple canard wing combinations.

  7. Proteorhodopsin genes in giant viruses.

    PubMed

    Yutin, Natalya; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-10-04

    Viruses with large genomes encode numerous proteins that do not directly participate in virus biogenesis but rather modify key functional systems of infected cells. We report that a distinct group of giant viruses infecting unicellular eukaryotes that includes Organic Lake Phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus encode predicted proteorhodopsins that have not been previously detected in viruses. Search of metagenomic sequence data shows that putative viral proteorhodopsins are extremely abundant in marine environments. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that giant viruses acquired proteorhodopsins via horizontal gene transfer from proteorhodopsin-encoding protists although the actual donor(s) could not be presently identified. The pattern of conservation of the predicted functionally important amino acid residues suggests that viral proteorhodopsin homologs function as sensory rhodopsins. We hypothesize that viral rhodopsins modulate light-dependent signaling, in particular phototaxis, in infected protists.

  8. Giant viruses come of age.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G

    2016-06-01

    Viruses with genomes up to a few megabases in length are a common occurrence in nature, even though they have escaped our notice until recently. These giant viruses infect mainly single-celled eukaryotes and isolation efforts concentrating on amoebal hosts alone have spawned hundreds of viral isolates, featuring viruses with previously unseen virion morphologies and the largest known viral genomes and particles. One of the challenges that lie ahead is to analyze and categorize the available data and to establish an approved classification system that reflects the evolutionary relationships and biological properties of these viruses. Extensive sampling of Acanthamoeba-infecting mimiviruses and initial characterization of their virophage parasites have provided a first blueprint of the genetic diversity and composition of a giant virus clade that will facilitate the taxonomic grouping of these fascinating microorganisms.

  9. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  10. Observed Properties of Giant Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa; Colegrove, Owen

    2014-01-01

    The existence of Giant Cells has been suggested by both theory and observation for over 45 years. We have tracked the motions of supergranules in SDO/HMI Doppler velocity data and find larger (Giant Cell) flows that persist for months. The flows in these cells are clockwise around centers of divergence in the north and counter-clockwise in the south. Equatorward flows are correlated with prograde flows - giving the transport of angular momentum toward the equator that is needed to maintain the Sun's rapid equatorial rotation. The cells are most pronounced at mid- and high-latitudes where they exhibit the rotation rates representative of those latitudes. These are clearly large, long-lived, cellular features, with the dynamical characteristics expected from the effects of the Sun's rotation, but the shapes of the cells are not well represented in numerical models. While the Giant Cell flow velocities are small (<10 m/s), their long lifetimes should nonetheless substantially impact the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's near surface layers.

  11. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  12. Hairpin Furans and Giant Biaryls.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xin; Mague, Joel T; Donahue, James P; Pascal, Robert A

    2016-05-06

    The thermal reaction of two cyclopentadienones with 5,5'-binaphthoquinone or 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in refluxing nitrobenzene (210 °C) gives, in a single synthetic step that includes two Diels-Alder additions, two decarbonylations, and two dehydrogenations, giant biaryl bisquinones (compounds 13, 14, 15, 18, and 21). However, when two cyclopentadienones react with 6,6'-dimethoxy-5,5'-binaphthoquinone in nitrobenzene at higher temperatures (250-260 °C), the resulting products are molecular ribbons composed of two twisted aromatic systems fused to a heteropentahelicene (19, 20, and 22). These molecules are representatives of a new class of chiral polycyclic aromatic compounds, the "hairpin furans". Interestingly, reheating a dimethoxy-substituted giant biaryl (e.g., 21) in nitrobenzene at 260 °C does not yield the corresponding hairpin furan (22), and mechanistic studies indicate that some intermediate or byproduct of the synthesis of the giant biaryls is a reagent or catalyst necessary for the conversion of the dimethoxybiaryl to the furan.

  13. Electrodynamics in Giant Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheres of close-in extrasolar giant planets such as HD209458b are strongly ionized by the UV flux of their host stars. We show that photoionization on such planets creates a dayside ionosphere that extends from the thermosphere to the 100 mbar level. The resulting peak electron density near the 1 mbar level is higher than that encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the model conductivity is in fact comparable to the atmospheres of Sun-like stars. As a result, the momentum and energy balance in the upper atmosphere of HD209458b and similar planets can be strongly affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Despite much weaker ionization, electrodynamics is nevertheless also important on the giant planets of the solar system. We use a generic framework to constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in extrasolar planets, and compare the results with conductivites based on the same approach for Jupiter and Saturn. By using a generalized Ohm's law and assumed magnetic fields, we then demonstrate the basic effects of wind-driven ion drag in giant planet atmospheres. Our results show that ion drag is often significant in the upper atmosphere where it can also substantially alter the energy budget through resistive heating.

  14. Longitudinal vortex control - Techniques and applications (The 32nd Lanchester Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented of vortex control applications and current techniques for the control of longitudinal vortices produced by bodies, leading edges, tips and intersections. Vortex control has up till now been performed by many approaches in an empirical fashion, assisted by the essentially inviscid nature of much of longitudinal vortex behavior. Attention is given to Reynolds number sensitivities, vortex breakdown and interactions, vortex control on highly swept wings, and vortex control in juncture flows.

  15. Vortex motion rectification in Josephson junction arrays with a ratchet potential.

    PubMed

    Shalóm, D E; Pastoriza, H

    2005-05-06

    By means of electrical transport measurements we have studied the rectified motion of vortices in ratchet potentials engineered on overdamped Josephson junction arrays. The rectified voltage as a function of the vortex density shows a maximum efficiency close a matching condition to the period of the ratchet potential indicating a collective vortex motion. Vortex current reversals were detected varying the driving force and vortex density revealing the influence of vortex-vortex interaction in the ratchet effect.

  16. Handedness control in a 2-μm optical vortex parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Yusufu, Taximaiti; Tokizane, Yu; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2013-10-07

    We present the first handedness control of an optical vortex output from a vortex-pumped optical parametric oscillator. The handedness of the optical vortex was identical to that of the pump vortex beam. Over 2 mJ, 2-μm optical vortex with a topological charge of ± 1 was achieved. We found that the handedness of a fractional vortex with a half integer topological charge can also be selectively controlled.

  17. Three-dimensional parallel vortex rings in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Crasovan, Lucian-Cornel; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Danaila, Ionut; Mihalache, Dumitru; Torner, Lluis

    2004-09-01

    We construct three-dimensional structures of topological defects hosted in trapped wave fields, in the form of vortex stars, vortex cages, parallel vortex lines, perpendicular vortex rings, and parallel vortex rings, and we show that the latter exist as robust stationary, collective states of nonrotating Bose-Einstein condensates. We discuss the stability properties of excited states containing several parallel vortex rings hosted by the condensate, including their dynamical and structural stability.

  18. Giant-cell granuloma of the axis.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, Emilio; Santamarta, David; Lomas-García, Jesús; Ibáñez-Plágaro, F Javier; Fernández-Fernández, J Javier; Ariño, Teresa Ribas; García-Cosamalón, José

    2012-02-01

    Giant-cell granuloma is a benign and nonneoplastic lesion with an expansive and locally destructive behavior. It typically involves the mandible and the maxilla. Only 1 case arising from the odontoid process of the axis has been reported previously. The authors report on a 64-year-old man with a giant-cell granuloma of the axis. They review this uncommon entity, emphasizing the complexity of differentiating between this lesion and other giant-cell tumors.

  19. Cabergoline Treatment in Invasive Giant Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

    2014-01-01

    Patients with invasive giant prolactinoma suffer from a constellation of symptoms including headache, blurred vision, lethargy, and sexual dysfunction. Cabergoline, a potent dopamine agonist, is a known medication prescribed for the treatment of invasive giant prolactinoma. Here, we report a case of invasive giant prolactinoma in a 52-year-old Saudi male with dramatic response to cabergoline treatment clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. PMID:25002819

  20. Guiding the Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination < -17.5°) was carried out in the 1970's with the ESO 1-metre Schmidt Telescope in support of the work at the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory. However, while until recently most observational programmes could rely on samples of objects found on photographic plates, this is no longer possible. New image surveys must match the fainter limiting magnitudes reached by the new and larger telescopes. Modern digital, multi-colour, deep imaging surveys have thus become an indispensable complement to the 8-m telescopes. The new generation of imaging surveys will, without