Science.gov

Sample records for multisite spectroscopic observations

  1. Spectroscopic Observations of Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, C. J.; Pastoriza, M. G.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we describe the spectroscopic and infrared properties of a sample of 25 merging galaxy pairs, selected from the catalog of Arp & Madore, and we compare them with those observed in a similar sample of interacting galaxies (Donzelli & Pastoriza). It is noted that mergers as well as interacting systems comprise a wide range of spectral types, going from those corresponding to well-evolved stellar populations (older than 200 Myr) to those that show clear signatures of H II regions with stellar populations younger than 8 Myr. However, merger galaxies show on average more excited spectra than interacting pairs, which could be attributed to lower gas metallicity. From the emission lines we also found that merging systems show on average higher (about a factor of 2) star formation rates than interacting galaxies. Classical diagnostic diagrams show that only three of 50 of the galaxies (6%) present some form of nuclear activity: two Seyfert galaxies and one LINER. However, through a detailed analysis of the pure emission-line spectra, we conclude that this fraction may raise up to 23% of the mergers if we consider that some galaxies host a low-luminosity active nucleus surrounded by strong star-forming regions. This latter assumption is also supported by the infrared colors of the galaxies. Regarding to the total infrared luminosities, the merging galaxies show on average an IR luminosity, log(Lir)=10.7, lower than that of interacting systems, log(Lir)=10.9. We find that only three mergers of the sample (12%) can be classified as luminous infrared galaxies, while this fraction increases to 24% in the interacting sample. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  2. Unification of VW Arietis observations obtained in multisite campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhova, T. N.

    1999-04-01

    The two-channel photometric observations of the δ Scuti star VW Arietis (BDS 1269A) obtained at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag Station of the Odessa Astron. Obs., Turkmenistan, were combined with the STEPHI Network four-channel photometry made at Xinglong Obs., China, and Observatorio del Teide, Spain, during the same season. The data set 164.9 hours long (16 days in October 1993) was analyzed. A five-frequency solution is proposed at the present stage of investigation. The suggestion that VW Arietis belongs to a small group of peculiar λ Bootis stars removes some contradictions in previous results, the existence of a binary system with a peculiar and a normal star finds a natural explanation. A possible pulsation mode identification is suggested.

  3. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Capella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Wood, B. E.; Redfield, S.; Linsky, J. L.; Ake, T. B.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-07-01

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations of the binary system Capella reveal a rich emission-line spectrum containing neutral and ionic species, among them H I, O I, C III, O VI, S VI, Ne V, and Ne VI. In addition, Fe XVIII λ974.85, formed at temperatures of ~6×106 K, is detected. Whereas the strong transition region lines principally come from the G1 giant, consistent with results from previous ultraviolet observations, Fe XVIII is formed largely in the G8 giant atmosphere. Line ratios from C III suggest densities of (2-8)×1010 cm-3, although anomalous line profiles of the 1176 Å transition may signal optical depth effects. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, which is operated for NASA by Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  4. Spectroscopic observation of 5 SN candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias-Rosa, N.; Pursimo, T.; Korhonen, H.; Pastorello, A.; Derlopa, the NEON school PhD students S.; Marian, V.; Scognamiglio, D.; Szigeti, L.; Cabezas, M.; Fernandes, C. S.; McWhirter, P. R.; Zervas, K.

    2017-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of SNe 2017gla, 2017glz, 2017gop, and 2017gqq, and the verification of SN2017gmr. The targets were supplied by the following surveys: ATLAS survey, see Tonry et al. (2011, PASP, 123, 58) and Tonry et al. (ATel #8680); Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (Chambers et al. 2016, arXiv:1612.05560, and http://pswww.ifa.hawaii.edu ), the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS, http://www.cneost.org/ptss/ ); and the D The observations were performed with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope equipped with ALFOSC (range 350-950 nm; resolution 1.4 nm FWHM).

  5. Asiago spectroscopic observation of four transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of PSN J23164332+3359476 in UGC 12474, discovered by C. Emmanouilidi; PS15bom in SDSS J232637.06-001723.0, discovered by the PS1 Science Consortium (Atel #7864); PSN J02484234+1418454 in UGC 2282, discovered by S. Leonini, M. Conti, P. Rosi, L.M. Tinjaca Ramirez and G. Guerrini of the Italian Supernovae Search Project (ISSP); and ASASSN-15mr, discovered by the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN; ATel #7811).

  6. Speckle observations of visual and spectroscopic binaries. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Noriaki; Baba, Naoshi; Ni-Ino, Mikinori; Ohtsubo, Junji; Noguchi, Motokazu; Isobe, Syuzo

    This is the fourth paper of this series giving results of speckle observations for 22 visual and 161 spectroscopic binaries. The observation was carried out by using the 212 cm telescope of San Pedro Martir Observatory in Mexico on 7 nights from July 20 to July 26, 1991. We obtained fringes in power spectra of 19 visual and 11 spectroscopic binaries (6 newly resolved ones) with angular separation larger than 0.06 arcsec. We introduced a new ICCD TV camera in this observation, and were able to achieve the diffraction-limit resolution of the 212 cm telescope.

  7. Theoretical backgrounds for interpretation of spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadrava, P.

    2013-02-01

    The advantage of analysis of observed data using their fit with theoretical model of the directly observed quantities is shown as well as the need for simultaneous solution of all available data. Some particular problems of disentangling of stellar spectra and model atmospheres of component stars of multiple systems are discussed.

  8. Using a Two-Staged Propensity Score Matching Strategy and Multilevel Modeling to Estimate Treatment Effects in a Multisite Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.

    2012-01-01

    The study is designed to demonstrate and test the utility of the proposed two-stage matching method compared to other analytic methods traditionally employed for multisite observational studies. More specifically, the study addresses the following research questions: (1) How do different specifications of the matching method influence covariate…

  9. Spectroscopic observations of comet Kohoutek (1973f)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohoutek, L.; Rahe, J.

    1976-01-01

    Coude spectrograms of comet Kohoutek obtained with the ESO 152-cm telescope in La Silla, Chile are discussed. Emission features of the C3, CH, and CO(+) molecules found in the blue region of the spectrum are considered along with measured emissions in the visual region of the spectrum. The observational and cometary data are given in tabular form.

  10. Spectroscopic observations of spatial and temporal variations on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Young, L. G.; Woszczyk, A.

    1974-01-01

    Details of the Table Mountain spectroscopic patrol of Venus in September-October 1972 are given. The data indicate systematic variation over the disc, with more CO2 absorption near the terminator than at the limb, and slightly more in the southern than in the northern hemisphere. The semiregular four-day variation, reported to occur simultaneously over the disk at 8689 A by Young et al. (1973), is confirmed by observations of the 7820 A and 7883 A CO2 bands.

  11. User acceptance of observation and response charts with a track and trigger system: a multisite staff survey.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Doug; Allen, Emily; McKinley, Sharon; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Fry, Margaret; Gallagher, Robyn; Iedema, Rick; Roche, Michael

    2016-08-01

    To examine user acceptance with a new format of charts for recording observations and as a prompt for responding to episodes of clinical deterioration in adult medical-surgical patients. Improving recognition and response to clinical deterioration remains a challenge for acute healthcare institutions globally. Five chart templates were developed in Australia, combining human factors design principles with a track and trigger system for escalation of care. Two chart templates were previously tested in simulations, but none had been evaluated in clinical practice. Prospective multisite survey of user acceptance of the charts in practice. New observation and response charts were trialled in parallel with existing charts for 24 hours across 36 adult acute medical-surgical wards, covering 108 shifts, in five Australian states. Surveys were completed by 477 staff respondents, with open-ended comments and narrative from short informal feedback groups providing elaboration and context of user experiences. Respondents were broadly supportive of the chart format and content for monitoring patients, and as a prompt for escalating care. Some concerns were noted for chart size and style, use of ranges to graph vital signs and with specific human factors design features. Information and training issues were identified to improve usability and adherence to chart guidelines and to support improved detection and response for patients with clinical deterioration. This initial evaluation demonstrated that the charts were perceived as appropriate for documenting observations and as a prompt to detect clinical deterioration. Further evaluation after some minor modifications to the chart is recommended. Explicit training on the principles and rationale of human factors chart design, use of embedded change management strategies and addressing practical issues will improve authentic engagement, staff acceptance and adoption by all clinical users when implementing a similar observation

  12. A Two-Stage Propensity Score Matching Strategy for Treatment Effect Estimation in a Multisite Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.; Seltzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    When nonrandom treatments occur across sites, within-site matching (WM) is often desirable. This approach, however, can significantly reduce treatment group sample size and exclude substantively important subgroups. To limit these drawbacks, we extend a matching approach developed by Stuart and Rubin to a multisite study. We demonstrate the…

  13. A Two-Stage Propensity Score Matching Strategy for Treatment Effect Estimation in a Multisite Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.; Seltzer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    When nonrandom treatments occur across sites, within-site matching (WM) is often desirable. This approach, however, can significantly reduce treatment group sample size and exclude substantively important subgroups. To limit these drawbacks, we extend a matching approach developed by Stuart and Rubin to a multisite study. We demonstrate the…

  14. Using and Experiencing the Academic Library: A Multisite Observational Study of Space and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Francine; Swabey, Alice

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how students are using academic library spaces and the role these spaces are playing in the campus community. Data were collected on five campuses (two community colleges, two undergraduate universities, and one technical institute) via observational seating sweeps and questionnaires. The study found remarkably similar usage…

  15. Using and Experiencing the Academic Library: A Multisite Observational Study of Space and Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Francine; Swabey, Alice

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how students are using academic library spaces and the role these spaces are playing in the campus community. Data were collected on five campuses (two community colleges, two undergraduate universities, and one technical institute) via observational seating sweeps and questionnaires. The study found remarkably similar usage…

  16. A multi-site intercomparison of integrated water vapour observations for climate change analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Malderen, R.; Brenot, H.; Pottiaux, E.; Beirle, S.; Hermans, C.; De Mazière, M.; Wagner, T.; De Backer, H.; Bruyninx, C.

    2014-08-01

    Water vapour plays a dominant role in the climate change debate. However, observing water vapour over a climatological time period in a consistent and homogeneous manner is challenging. On one hand, networks of ground-based instruments able to retrieve homogeneous integrated water vapour (IWV) data sets are being set up. Typical examples are Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observation networks such as the International GNSS Service (IGS), with continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) observations spanning over the last 15+ years, and the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), providing long-term observations performed with standardized and well-calibrated sun photometers. On the other hand, satellite-based measurements of IWV already have a time span of over 10 years (e.g. AIRS) or are being merged to create long-term time series (e.g. GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2). This study performs an intercomparison of IWV measurements from satellite devices (in the visible, GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2, and in the thermal infrared, AIRS), in situ measurements (radiosondes) and ground-based instruments (GPS, sun photometer), to assess their use in water vapour trends analysis. To this end, we selected 28 sites world-wide for which GPS observations can directly be compared with coincident satellite IWV observations, together with sun photometer and/or radiosonde measurements. The mean biases of the different techniques compared to the GPS estimates vary only between -0.3 to 0.5 mm of IWV. Nevertheless these small biases are accompanied by large standard deviations (SD), especially for the satellite instruments. In particular, we analysed the impact of clouds on the IWV agreement. The influence of specific issues for each instrument on the intercomparison is also investigated (e.g. the distance between the satellite ground pixel centre and the co-located ground-based station, the satellite scan angle, daytime/nighttime differences). Furthermore, we checked if the properties of

  17. A multi-site techniques intercomparison of integrated water vapour observations for climate change analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Malderen, R.; Brenot, H.; Pottiaux, E.; Beirle, S.; Hermans, C.; De Mazière, M.; Wagner, T.; De Backer, H.; Bruyninx, C.

    2014-02-01

    Water vapour plays a dominant role in the climate change debate. However, observing water vapour over a climatological time period in a consistent and homogeneous manner is challenging. At one hand, networks of ground-based instruments allowing to retrieve homogeneous Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) datasets are being set up. Typical examples are Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observation networks such as the International GNSS Service (IGS), with continuous GPS (Global Positioning System) observations spanning over the last 15+ yr, and the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), providing long-term observations performed with standardized and well-calibrated sun photometers. On the other hand, satellite-based measurements of IWV already have a time span of over 10 yr (e.g. AIRS) or are being merged in order to create long-term time series (e.g. GOME, SCIAMACHY, and GOME-2). The present study aims at setting up a techniques intercomparison of IWV measurements from satellite devices (in the visible, GOME/SCIAMACHY/GOME-2, and in the thermal infrared, AIRS), in-situ measurements (radiosondes) and ground-based instruments (GPS, sun photometer), to assess the applicability of either dataset for water vapour trends analysis. To this end, we selected 28 sites worldwide at which GPS observations can directly be compared with coincident satellite IWV observations, together with sun photometer and/or radiosonde measurements. We found that the mean biases of the different techniques w.r.t. the GPS estimates vary only between -0.3 to 0.5 mm of IWV, but the small bias is accompanied by large Root Mean Square (RMS) values, especially for the satellite instruments. In particular, we analysed the impact of the presence of clouds on the techniques IWV agreement. Also, the influence of specific issues for each instrument on the intercomparison is investigated, e.g. the distance between the satellite ground pixel centre and the co-located ground-based station, the satellite scan

  18. Seasonal Variation of Methane Emissions in California's Urban and Rural Regions Using Multi-site Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S.; Hsu, Y.; Andrews, A. E.; Bianco, L.; Newman, S.; Cui, X.; Bagley, J.; Graven, H. D.; Salameh, P.; Sloop, C.; LaFranchi, B.; Michelsen, H. A.; Bambha, R.; Weiss, R. F.; Keeling, R. F.; Fischer, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    California's commitment (Assembly Bill 32) to reduce total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 requires quantification of current GHG emissions. We present seasonal variation of California's total CH4 emissions for summer 2013 - spring 2014, using data from a dozen sites covering urban and rural areas of California that include South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area. We apply a Bayesian inverse model to estimate CH4 emissions from discrete regions of California and source sectors by combining atmospheric measurements, upstream background, updated high-resolution prior emission maps developed for California, and predicted atmospheric transport from WRF-STILT. We quantify site-specific model-measurement uncertainties due to transport using simulated and observed meteorology, background estimated from oceanic and aircraft observations, and the prior emissions. In particular, we evaluate predicted transport variables in WRF with networks of surface and upper air observations. Preliminary inversion results during summer of 2013 suggest that state total CH4 emissions are 1.2 - 1.7 times higher than the current CARB inventory. Here, we extend and improve upon earlier analyses to provide a full seasonal cycle of CH4 emissions across all major urban and rural regions in California.

  19. On VI Imaging Instrumentation and Spectroscopic Observations in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, M. N.

    2003-12-01

    For my thesis, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O vi λ λ 1032/1038 Å \\space behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining arcsecond imaging at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O vi in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant. This work was supported by NASA grants NAG5-5096, NAG5-7465, NAG5-8955, and NAG5-10319. M. Beasley was supported by a Graduate Student Research Program fellowship NGT5-50340.

  20. On VI imaging instrumentation and spectroscopic observations in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Matthew Nelson

    2003-10-01

    For my thesis project, I designed and built a high resolution imaging spectrograph, the Imaging Spectrograph for Interstellar Shocks (ISIS), that flew on a sub-orbital rocket from White Sands Missile Range on November 18th, 2002. This rocket-borne instrument was designed to image hot plasma at O VI lambdalambda1032/1038 A behind a shock front in the Cygnus Loop. The new type of instrument developed for this application is a novel type of spectrograph that relies on a standard telescope for its optical layout. This layout, in conjunction with aberration-corrected holography, is capable of arcsecond quality imaging in diffracted light while maintaining an arcsecond image at the telescope focus. The follow-up research is based on observations of N132D, a young, oxygen rich supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These new spectroscopic observations from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer of emitting O VI in the shocked stellar ejecta were used to distinguish between different models of the ejecta and demonstrate that there is lack of appropriate observations of this type of remnant.

  1. Implementation of nursing conceptual models: observations of a multi-site research team.

    PubMed

    Shea, H; Rogers, M; Ross, E; Tucker, D; Fitch, M; Smith, I

    1989-01-01

    The general acceptance by nursing of the nursing process as the methodology of practice enabled nurses to have a common grounding for practice, research and theory development in the 1970s. It has become clear, however, that the nursing process is just that--a process. What is sorely needed is the nursing content for that process and consequently in the past 10 years nursing theorists have further developed their particular conceptual models (CM). Three major teaching hospitals in Toronto have instituted a conceptual model (CM) of nursing as a basis of nursing practice. Mount Sinai Hospital has adopted Roy's adaptation model; Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Kings's goal attainment model; and Toronto General Hospital, Orem's self-care deficit theory model. All of these hospitals are affiliated through a series of cross appointments with the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto. Two community hospitals, Mississauga and Scarborough General, have also adopted Orem's model and are related to the University through educational, community and interest groups. A group of researchers from these hospitals and the University of Toronto have proposed a collaborative project to determine what impact using a conceptual model will make on nursing practice. Discussions among the participants of this research group indicate that there are observations associated with instituting conceptual models that can be identified early in the process of implementation. These observations may be of assistance to others contemplating the implementation of conceptually based practice in their institution.

  2. Unification of the VW Arietis observation results obtained in multisite campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhova, T. N.

    Results of the two-channel photometric observations of the δ Sct star VW Ari (BDS 1269 A) made at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag Station of the Odessa Astronomical Observatory (Turkmenistan) were combined with the STEPHI network four-channel photometry made at the Xinglong Observatory (China) and Observatorio del Teide (Spain) during the same season. A five-frequency solution is proposed at the present stage of investigation. The suggestion that VW Ari belongs to the small group of peculiar λ Boo stars eliminates some discrepancies in the earlier results, and the existence of a binary system with a star with a peculiar abundance and a star with the normal abundance finds its natural explanation. A possible identification of pulsation modes is suggested.

  3. Is HD 147787 a double-lined binary with two pulsating components? Preliminary results from a spectroscopic multi-site campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cat, P.; Wright, D. J.; Pollard, K. R.; Maisonneuve, F.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Laney, D.

    2009-09-01

    The double-lined binary HD 147787 has been observed from three southern observatories to gather a time series of high-quality, high-resolution spectroscopic data. We here report upon the first analysis of the 2008 data obtained with the spectrographs HARPS and HERCULES. An eccentric orbit of 39.880(2) days was obtained. For the primary component. we derived a projected rotational velocity νsin i of 7(2) km s-1 and found that the temporal changes of the line profiles are dominated by 0.6897(8) d-1, which is the main frequency known from photometry. There is evidence for multiperiodicity. For the secondary component, we derived a νsin i of 33(2) km s 1, but there is no firm evidence for pulsations.

  4. Multi-site model-observations comparison shows the diurnal effects of hydrodynamic stress on evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic limitations are known to control transpiration in forest ecosystems when the soil is drying or when the vapor pressure deficit between the air and stomata is very large, but they can also impact stomatal apertures under conditions of adequate soil moisture and lower evaporative demand. We use the NACP dataset of latent heat flux (LE) measurements and model observations for multiple site/model intercomparisons to evaluate the degree to which currently un-resolved high-frequency (sub-daily) hydrodynamic stresses affect the error in model prediction of latent heat flux. Particularly, we see that models have difficulty resolving the dynamics of intra-daily hysteresis. We hypothesize that this is a result of un-resolved afternoon stomata closure due to hydrodynamic stresses. We find that although no model or stomata parameterization was consistently best or worst in terms of ability to predict LE, errors in model-simulated LE were consistently largest and most variable when soil moisture and VPD were moderate to limiting. This suggests that models have trouble simulating the dynamics that cause stomata to close due to high VPD and moderate to low soil-water availability. Errors in LE occur most frequently when vegetative dynamics dominate. The majority of models tend to underestimate LE in the pre-noon hours and overestimate in the late evening. These diurnal error patterns are consistent with models' diminished ability to accurately simulate the natural hysteresis of transpiration. Nearly all models demonstrate a marked tendency to underestimate the degree of maximum hysteresis which, across all sites studied, is most pronounced during moisture limited conditions. The assumed empirical or semi-empirical coupling between stomatal conductance and soil moisture used by these current models does not resolve the hydrodynamic process of water movement from the soil to the leaves. This approach does not take advantage of advances in our understanding of water flow

  5. Development and initial validation of the Observer-Rated Housing Quality Scale (OHQS) in a multisite trial of housing first.

    PubMed

    Adair, Carol E; Kopp, Brianna; Lavoie, Jennifer; Distasio, Jino; Hwang, Stephen W; Watson, Aimee; Veldhuizen, Scott; Chislett, Katherine; Voronka, Jijian; Ahmad, Muznah; Ahmed, Naveed; Goering, Paula

    2014-04-01

    Quality of housing has been shown to be related to health outcomes, including mental health and well-being, yet "objective" or observer-rated housing quality is rarely measured in housing intervention research. This may be due to a lack of standardized, reliable, and valid housing quality instruments. The objective of this research was to develop and validate the Observer-Rated Housing Quality Scale (OHQS) for use in a multisite trial of a "housing first" intervention for homeless individuals with mental illness. A list of 79 housing unit, building, and neighborhood characteristics was generated from a review of the relevant literature and three focus groups with consumers and housing service providers. The characteristics were then ranked by 47 researchers, consumers, and service providers on perceived importance, generalizability, universality of value, and evidence base. Items were then drafted, scaled (five points, half values allowed), and pretested in seven housing units and with seven raters using cognitive interviewing techniques. The draft scale was piloted in 55 housing units in Toronto and Winnipeg, Canada. Items were rated independently in each unit by two trained research assistants and a housing expert. Data were analyzed using classical psychometric approaches and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for inter-rater reliability. The draft scale consisted of 34 items assessing three domains: the unit, the building, and the neighborhood. Five of 18 unit items and 3 of 7 building items displayed ceiling or floor effects and were adjusted accordingly. Internal consistency was very good (Cronbach's alpha = 0.90 for the unit items, 0.80 for the building items, and 0.92 total (unit and building)). Percent agreement ranged from 89 to 100 % within one response scale value and 67 to 91 % within one half scale value. Inter-rater reliability was also good (ICCs were 0.87 for the unit, 0.85 for the building, and 0.93 for the total scale). Three

  6. Irradiation effects on canvas oil painting: Spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Mihaela Maria; Negut, C. D.; Stanculescu, Ioana Rodica; Ponta, C. C.

    2012-10-01

    "Winter" oil painting, by Romanian contemporary artist George Alexandrescu was used as experimental model for the substantiation of gamma radiation treatment, as the best choice to stop the biological attack of paintings. In this purpose, spectroscopic and colorimetric methods were used to analyse in situ, non-destructively and non-contact, the experimental model before and after 60Co gamma irradiation. Chemical structure and colour changes were monitored by FTIR, FT-Raman and Vis reflectance spectroscopy. Negligible Infrared spectral transformations have been observed after irradiation. Furthermore, it was found that gamma irradiation did not induce any significant colour alterations. Insignificant structural and colour changes observed, recommend the use of gamma irradiation in the disinfection of oil paintings.

  7. Spectroscopic and video observations of fullerene production arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D.C.; Stalder, K.R.; Keegan, D.M.; Ruoff, R.S.; Malhotra, R.M.

    1993-12-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopic studies of a carbon arc operating under fullerene production conditions have been made across the visible wavelength range using an imaging Optical Multichannel Analyzer. C{sub 2} Swan bands are observed to be the major visible emissions although strong CI and CII as well as He I atomic lines are also observed. Video and photographic studies of the arc characteristics show the Swan-band emissions to be concentrated most intensely near the anode but also to appear strongly in regions well outside the electrode gap region. Vibrational and rotational temperatures of these bands provide information on the temperatures in various regions of the arc. The characteristic spatial structure of the arcs observed in the Swan-band light suggests that they are excited by electrons whose trajectories are controlled by the local electric and magnetic fields. The arc exhibits complex and interesting temporal behavior that has been observed with a video camera using short exposure times. Video film taken through a Swan-band filter clearly shows the dominant spatial features of the C{sub 2} emissions.

  8. Spectroscopic observations of the exoplanet WASP-32b transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauzhanina, A. O.; Valyavin, G. G.; Gadelshin, D. R.; Baklanova, D. N.; Plachinda, S. I.; Antonyuk, K. A.; Pit, N. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Valeev, A. F.; Burlakova, T. E.; Kholtygin, A. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present first results of spectroscopic observations of transiting exoplanets in the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the Main Stellar Spectrograph of the 6-m BTA telescope. For the exoplanetWASP-32b, we detected a significant variation of intensity and equivalent width in the Hα spectral line of the parent star at the time of a transit. The equivalent width of the line during transit is by 8-10% larger than outside the planet passage. Residual intensity in the core of the line reveals the following tendency: the line is by 10-15% deeper inside transit than outside it. Observations with the long-slit spectrograph of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory at the 2.6-m ZTSh telescope also showed a transit event in the Hα line, although, with a smaller amplitude and shape inverted in relation to the data from the 6-m telescope. While in the observations with the BTA the Hα line becomes deeper during the transit, in the ZTSh observations, the residual intensity of the Hα line decreases during the transit. Reducing and analysis of the archive data of WASP-32b observations with the HARPS spectrograph also confirm the Hα line modulation at the time of the transit. The observed data give evidence of the envelope in WASP-32b filling the Roche lobe and a comet-like tail of changing geometry and orientation relative to the observer. These changes determine different depths and shapes of the Hα spectral line at the time of transits.

  9. ISO spectroscopic observations of short-period comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, J.; Encrenaz, Th.; Lellouch, E.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Altieri, B.; Leech, K.; Salama, A.; Griffin, M. J.; de Graauw, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Knacke, R.; Brooke, T. Y.

    1999-03-01

    Two Infrared Space Observatory programmes (guaranteed time and open time) were devoted to high-resolution spectroscopic observations of short-period comets. 22P/Kopff was observed on October-December 1996 with SWS and LWS. Due to the weakness of the object, only the ν3 ro-vibrational lines of water were detected, with SWS. Comet 103P/Hartley 2 was observed close to its perihelion (at 1.04 AU from Sun and 0.82 AU from Earth) on January 1998 with SWS, LWS and CAM. The bands of H2O and CO2 at 2.7 and 4.3 μm are detected, with [CO2]/[H2O] = 10 %. The 2.7 μm band of H2O is observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio with SWS, which permits to evaluate the rotational temperature of water to 16-20 K and its ortho-to-para ratio to ~ 2.7, corresponding to a spin temperature of ~ 35 K. The 5-17 μm spectrum of comet Hartley 2 observed with CAM-CVF shows the 9-12 μm signature of silicates. Silicate emission around 10 μm is present at a level of about 20 % of the continuum, with a peak at 11.3 μm indicative of crystalline silicates. This is the first time crystalline silicates are found in a short-period comet. The ISO observations of the Jupiter-family comet P/Hartley 2, presumably originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt, are compared to those of comet Hale-Bopp which came from the Oort cloud.

  10. Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Lin, L.; Li, J. R.; Zhou, X.; Zou, H.; Li, H. Y.; Chen, F. Z.; Du, W.; Fan, Z.; Mao, Y. W.; Wang, J.; Zhu, Y. N.; Zhou, Z. M.

    2014-01-01

    During the late 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the 8˜10 m scale ground-based telescopes are helping astronomers learn much more about how galaxies develop. The existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes become less important for astrophysical researches. To use the existing 2˜4 m scale telescopes to address important issues in cosmology and extragalactic and galactic astronomy, we have to consider very carefully which kind of things we can do, and which we can not. For this reason, the Time Allocation Committee (TAC) of the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) 2.16 m telescope decides to support some key projects since 2013. Nearby galaxies supply us with the opportunity to study galaxy dynamics and star formation on large scales, yet are close enough to reveal the details. Star formation regions in nearby galaxies provide an excellent laboratory to study the star formation processes, the evolution of massive stars, and the properties of the surrounding interstellar medium. A wealth of information can be obtained from the spectral analysis of the bright emission lines and the stellar continuum. Considering these, we proposed a long-term project ``Spectroscopic Observations of the Star Formation Regions in Nearby Galaxies'', and it becomes the key project of the NAOC 2.16 m telescope since 2013, supported with 30 dark/grey nights per year. The primary goal of this project is to observe the spectroscopy of star formation regions in 20 nearby galaxies, with the NAOC 2.16 m telescope and the Hectospec/MMT (Multiple Mirror Telescope) multifiber spectrograph by Telescope Access Program (TAP). With the spectra of a large sample of star formation regions, combining multi-wavelength data from UV to IR, we can investigate, understand, and quantify the nature of the deviation from the starbursts' IRX-β (the IR/UV ratio ``IRX'' versus the UV color ``β'') correlation. It will be important for a better understanding of the interaction of dust and

  11. Constructing Counterfactuals in a Multisite Observational Study Using Propensity Score Matching and Multilevel Modeling: An Empirical Example Looking at the Effect of 8th Grade Algebra across Students and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan H.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to demonstrate a method for treatment effect estimation in a multisite observational study where the treatment is highly selective and the assignment mechanism varies across sites. The method is demonstrated by addressing three primary research questions about the effect of 8th grade algebra: (1) For students who take algebra in…

  12. Spectroscopic and photometric observations in Bochum 10 and 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M. Pim; Mehta, Sanju

    1987-10-01

    Stars were selected for photometry in and around Bochum 10 from candidates in the general cluster region and near the BSC star HR4177, and stars in Bochum 11 were selected in the general cluster region. Bochum 10 is found to be a loose B0 cluster of about 21 stars whose members are probably brighter than M(v) = -1. The modulus and marginally variable photometric extinction are not significantly different than those found spectroscopically. Bochum 11 is shown to be a sparse cluster with a possible premain sequence and an age of roughly 0.3-3 million years. Nebulosity and variable extinction are noted in the stellar spectrum.

  13. Spectroscopic observations of the optical candidate for Cygnus X-1.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucato, R.; Kristian, J.

    1973-01-01

    The spectroscopic binary BD+34 3815 (= HDE 226868) with a period of 5.6 days, which is the brightest object in the position box for the X-ray source Cyg X-1, is studied to determine whether it meets all the requirements for being a black hole. Evidence is presented that the mass of the secondary is larger than the upper limits for white dwarfs or neutron stars, but there is no conclusive evidence that the optical binary is an X-ray source, and that the secondary is a collapsed object.

  14. Spectroscopic Observation of Chemical Interaction Between Impact-induced Vapor Clouds and the Ambient Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, S.; Heineck, J. T.; Schultz, P. H.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions within impact-induced vapor clouds were observed in laboratory experiments using a spectroscopic method. The results indicate that projectile-derived carbon-rich vapor reacts intensively with atmospheric nitrogen.

  15. Spectroscopic observations of X-ray selected late type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takalo, L. O.

    1988-01-01

    A spectroscopic survey of nine X-ray selected late type stars was conducted. These stars are serendipitously discovered EINSTEIN X-ray sources, selected from two large x-ray surveys: the Columbia Astrophysical Laboratory survey (five stars) and the CFA Medium Sensitivity survey (four stars). Four of the Columbia survey stars were found to be short period binaries. The fifth was found to be an active single G dwarf. None of the Medium Sensitivity survey stars were found to be either binaries or active stars. Activity was measured by comparing the H-alpha and the CaII infrared triplet (8498, 8542) lines in these stars to the lines in inactive stars of similar spectral type. A correlation was found between the excess H-alpha lime emission and V sin(i) and between the excess H-alpha line emission and X-ray luminosity. No correlation was found between the infrared line emission and any other measured quantity.

  16. Spectroscopic and photometric observations of M supergiants in Carina.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, R. M.; Strecker, D. W.; Ney, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Spectroscopic study of 30 Southern-Hemisphere M supergiants mostly in Carina in the blue and near-infrared, and photometrical study of these stars from 0.4 to 18 microns. The uncertainties in the determinations of interstellar extinction are discussed, and the spatial distribution of the M supergiants in the Carina arm is shown. The presence of the 11-micron excess attributed to silicate dust is a common feature. Stars of the same spectral type and luminosity class are remarkably homogeneous in their long-wave behavior. The silicate feature becomes more prominent in the more luminous stars and in stars of later spectral type. Four composite systems show little long-wave excess. The two VV Cephei objects have excesses probably produced by gas emission, and the other two have little or no excess - supporting the suggestion that the presence of the early star prohibits the formation of a dust envelope. Three stars - VY CMa, VX Sgr, and HD 9767 - appear to be extreme examples of stars with large excesses over the entire long-wave region. It is suggested that these objects are surrounded by large amounts of particulate material over a great range of distances from the stars.

  17. Spectroscopic Observations of the Bright Afterglow of GRB021004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2001-09-01

    One of the holy grails of gamma-ray burst research is to detect X-ray line signatures from an afterglow with high statistical significance. Of all possible observations, this perhaps offers the best chance of constraining the GRB mechanism and environment, and could provide the "smoking gun" signature connecting GRBs to massive stellar deaths. In order to accomplish this, we know long observations within one day of the event are necessary.

  18. HERSCHEL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF LITTLE THINGS DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cigan, Phil; Young, Lisa; Cormier, Diane; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Madden, Suzanne; Brinks, Elias; Elmegreen, Bruce; Schruba, Andreas; Heesen, Volker; Collaboration: LITTLE THINGS Team

    2016-01-15

    We present far-infrared (FIR) spectral line observations of five galaxies from the Little Things sample: DDO 69, DDO 70, DDO 75, DDO 155, and WLM. While most studies of dwarfs focus on bright systems or starbursts due to observational constraints, our data extend the observed parameter space into the regime of low surface brightness dwarf galaxies with low metallicities and moderate star formation rates. Our targets were observed with Herschel at the [C ii] 158 μm, [O i] 63 μm, [O iii] 88 μm, and [N ii] 122 μm emission lines using the PACS Spectrometer. These high-resolution maps allow us for the first time to study the FIR properties of these systems on the scales of larger star-forming complexes. The spatial resolution in our maps, in combination with star formation tracers, allows us to identify separate photodissociation regions (PDRs) in some of the regions we observed. Our systems have widespread [C ii] emission that is bright relative to continuum, averaging near 0.5% of the total infrared (TIR) budget—higher than in solar-metallicity galaxies of other types. [N ii] is weak, suggesting that the [C ii] emission in our galaxies comes mostly from PDRs instead of the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (ISM). These systems exhibit efficient cooling at low dust temperatures, as shown by ([O i]+[C ii])/TIR in relation to 60 μm/100 μm, and low [O i]/[C ii] ratios which indicate that [C ii] is the dominant coolant of the ISM. We observe [O iii]/[C ii] ratios in our galaxies that are lower than those published for other dwarfs, but similar to levels noted in spirals.

  19. Spectroscopic Observations of the 2011 Draconids Meteor Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, Regina; Zender, Joe; Jenniskens, Peter; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Koten, Pavel; Margonis, Anastasios; Tóth, Juraj; McAuliffe, Jonathan; Koschny, Detlef

    2014-08-01

    Some past October Draconid shower meteoroids fell apart in a spray of fragments at the end of their trajectory before slowing down, from which it was concluded that these were among the most fragile meteoroids known. In those instances, the dust could not be reliably traced to a particular return of the parent comet 21P/Giaconini-Zinner. On October 8th, 2011, Earth was predicted to transverse the 1900 A.D. dust ejecta of the comet. In 1900, the comet's perihelion distance first moved significantly inwards to the Sun and ejection conditions could have been unusual. An airborne observing campaign was organized, with several teams contributing imaging and spectrographic cameras to study the manner in which these meteoroids released the volatile element sodium during the ablation process in the Earth's atmosphere. IMCCE, ESA, and the SETI Institute contributed spectrographic cameras based on low-light WATEC 902H2 Ultimate, low-light LCC1, and GenII XX1332 image intensified cameras. An outburst was observed, much as predicted. Despite a lack of bright meteors, a total of 15 Draconid spectra were recorded. All show evidence of an early release of sodium. The loss of sodium was observed to coincide with the formation of a distinct wake of fragments. The observations show that 21P/Giacobini-Zinner ejected fragile meteoroids during the return in 1900. Those grains may have lost some sodium even before impacting Earth.

  20. ISO Far-Infrared Spectroscopic Observations of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdorf, M. J.; Encrenaz, Th.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Davis, G. R.; Fouchet, Th.; Gautier, D.; Lellouch, E.; Orton, G. S.; Sidher, S. D.

    2001-07-01

    We present the far-infrared spectrum of Jupiter that was measured with the Short and Long Wavelength Spectrometers (SWS and LWS) aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The region between 38 and 44 microns was observed in grating mode, where the SWS provides a spectral resolution of about 1300. For longer waves up to 197 microns the LWS-FP (Fabry-Perot) was used to achieve a resolution of several thousand. The observations were made between 23 and 26 May 1997 during ISO's revolutions 554, 556 and 557. The Jovian spectrum in the far-infrared is compared to an atmospheric radiative transfer model using expected values for the vertical profiles of the atmospheric constituents. Rotational transitions of ammonia and phosphine are responsible for the absorption features observed: Strong ammonia absorption manifolds are obvious against the background continuum slope, appearing at 39, 42, 46, 51, 56, 63, 72, 84, 100 and 125 microns in both the data and the model. Also PH3 features are present at the expected wavelengths of 113 and 141 microns in both the data and the model. This is the first time that most of these far-infrared features have been detected. The ISO observations are therefore of interest for the preparation of the planned submillimeter studies of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets with FIRST.

  1. SOHO/UVCS spectroscopic observations of coronal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Salvatore; Raymond, John C.; Rubinetti, Sara; Taricco, Carla

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the temporal evolution of the intensities and Doppler shifts of two sets of high-cadence sit-and-stare observations acquired with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite to detect the possible signature of wave and oscillatory motions in the solar corona. The first set of data consisted of H I Lyα observations collected on 1997 December 14 at 1.43 RS above the eastern limb of the Sun. Spectral analysis of the data revealed clear Doppler-shift oscillations with period P = 14.3 min over a portion of the UVCS slit. The origin of these oscillations is attributable to the excitation of propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic kink waves along a narrow, jet-like ejection observed higher up in the white-light corona. The second set of data consisted of O VI 1032 Å observations collected on 1996 December 19 at 1.38 RS above the north polar coronal hole. In this case, clear intensity oscillations (P = 19.5 min) and Doppler-shift oscillations (P = 7.2 min) over two different portions of the UVCS slit were detected. The origin of these oscillations is attributable to the excitation of slow-mode magnetoacoustic waves propagating along polar plumes that may partially account for heating of the plasma in the corona.

  2. Spectroscopic observations of southern nearby galaxies. I. NGC 2442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaja, E.; Agüero, E.; Paolantonio, S.

    1999-04-01

    The galaxy NGC 2442 was observed with a REOSC spectrograph, installed in the 2.15 m CASLEO telescope, in order to derive galactic parameters from the observed optical lines and to compare them with the results of radioastronomical observations made in the continuum, at 843 MHz, with the MOST and in the CO lines with the SEST telescope. Recent publications allowed us to extend the comparison to results from interferometric observations of Hα and H I 21 cm lines and of the continuum at 1415 MHz. The long slit observations were made placing the 5farcm 8 slit at six different positions on the optical image of the galaxy. The emission line intensity ratios at the nuclear region indicate that NGC 2442 is a LINER. The electron temperature and volume density are Te ~ 14 000 K and Ne ~ 530 cm(-3) , respectively. In contrast, a spectrum of a region 87arcsec to the NE shows the typical characteristics of a H Ii region. In this case Te ~ 6,500 K and Ne ~ 10 cm(-3) . Good correlations between the distributions of intensities, velocity fields and rotation curves have been found for the optical and radio lines. It is shown that the three intensity peaks along the line at PA = 40degr were not resolved by the observations at radio frequencies. The steep central rotation curve seen in CO has been confirmed and improved showing the existence of a disc or a ring, with a radius of 12.5 arcsec, rotating at 216/sin(i) km s(-1). Two velocity components in three optical spectra obtained in the nuclear region, have been related to two small Hα regions close to the nucleus and to the central ring. Asymmetries in the distributions of the emitting sources and irregularities in their velocity fields indicate the need of modelling the galaxy before any dynamical study is attempted. Based on observations made in the Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito, operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas de la Republica Argentina and the National

  3. Using a Two-Stage Propensity Score Matching Strategy and Multilevel Modeling to Estimate Treatment Effects in a Multisite Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickles, Jordan Harry

    2012-01-01

    In this study I present, demonstrate, and test a method that extends the Stuart and Rubin (2008) multiple control group matching strategy to a multisite setting. Three primary phases define the proposed method: (1) a design phase, in which one uses a two-stage matching strategy to construct treatment and control groups that are well balanced along…

  4. Infrared imaging-spectroscopic observations of Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, Shoko; Sagawa, Hideo; Ueno, Munetaka

    2005-01-01

    We present a report on our recent observations of Venus atmosphere which we have performed in infrared wavelength at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. The data show important results on the CO distribution and on O2 IRA (0,0) 1.27μm airglow in the atmosphere. The infrared windows of the Venusian atmosphere are rather developing areas and will give us important information on the dynamics of Venus atmosphere.

  5. A Spectroscopic Census of L Dwarfs Observed By Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocco, Federico; Smart, Richard L.; Caballero, José A.; Pinfield, David J.; Beamín, Juan Carlos; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; García-Álvarez, David

    2016-08-01

    The ESA cornerstone mission Gaia will revolutionise astronomy observing objects as diverse as minor planets, stars,and galaxies out to QSOs. We estimate that Gaia will observe directly 500 L0 to L4 dwarfs and a handful ofbr /> L5 to T1 dwarfs, providing precision of 0.1-0.3 mas in parallax for these objects, and tangential velocities at thenbsp;level of 10-30 m s-1. As these objects are very close, the perspective acceleration will change both the parallaxnbsp;and the proper motion over the time frame of the mission, leading to ldquo;astrometricrdquo; radial velocities with errorsnbsp;of 50 km s-1. However, to fully exploit the extremely accurate and precise astrometric data, it is fundamentalnbsp;to obtain better radial velocities. In this contribution we present the preliminary results from a large campaignnbsp;conducted with OSIRIS on the GTC and X-shooter on the VLT to measure radial velocities for L dwarfs that willnbsp;be observed by Gaia. The spectra will be used to determine radial velocities, spectral indices, identify possiblebr /> unresolved binaries, and further investigate the peculiar objects in the sample. Combined with the Gaia resultsnbsp;this will be a incomparable dataset for many studies./p>

  6. The avoidance of activities due to fear of falling contributes to sedentary behavior among community-dwelling older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain: a multisite observational study.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brendon; Patchay, Sandhi; Soundy, Andy; Schofield, Pat

    2014-11-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior (SB) are leading causes of mortality. We investigated if older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) are more sedentary than a group of similar age and sex without CMP and possible contributory factors to this. In this multisite observational study, 285 community-dwelling older adults (response rate 71%) took part. One hundred forty-four had CMP (78.4 years, 65.9% female), and 141 formed the comparison group without CMP. Details regarding falls were collected, and all participants completed the brief pain inventory (BPI), modified version of the survey of activities and fear of falling in elderly scale (mSAFFE), and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) to measure SB. Data were analyzed with hierarchical regression analysis. Older adults with CMP spent approximately 3 1/2 hours a day more being sedentary than the comparison group (11.5 hours vs 7.9, P<0.001). The addition of BPI interference and mSAFFE scores in the regression analysis resulted in an R(2) change of 10.4% in IPAQ scores, over and above the variance explained by the background demographic, medical, and mobility factors. Excessive concerns about the consequences of falling did not increase the variance in SB. Within the final model, mSAFFE scores were the largest independent predictor of SB (β=0.461, P<0.001). Older adults with CMP are significantly more sedentary than those of a similar sex and age without CMP. It appears that the avoidance of activities due to fear of falling is a significant contributory factor to SB in older adults with CMP. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Patterns and loss of sexual activity in the year following hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction (a United States National Multisite Observational Study).

    PubMed

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Abramsohn, Emily; Gosch, Kensey; Wroblewski, Kristen; Spatz, Erica S; Chan, Paul S; Spertus, John; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2012-05-15

    A multisite observational study of sexual activity-related outcomes in patients enrolled in the TRIUMPH registry during hospitalization for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was conducted to identify patterns and loss of sexual activity 1 year after hospitalization for AMI. Gender-specific multivariable hierarchical models were used to identify correlates of loss of sexual activity including physician counseling. Main outcome measurements included "loss of sexual activity" (less frequent or no sexual activity 1 year after an AMI in those who were sexually active in the year before the AMI) and 1-year mortality. Mean ages were 61.1 years for women (n = 605) and 58.6 years for men (n = 1,274). Many were sexually active in the year before and 1 year after hospitalization (44% and 40% of women, 74% and 68% of men, respectively). One third of women and 47% of men reported receiving hospital discharge instructions about resuming sex. Those who did not receive instructions were more likely to report loss of sexual activity (women, adjusted relative risk 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 1.79; men, adjusted relative risk 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.46). One year mortality after AMI was similar in those who reported sexual activity in the first month after AMI (2.1%) and those who were sexually inactive (4.1%, p = 0.08). In conclusion, although many patients were sexually active before AMI, only a minority received discharge counseling about resuming sexual activity. Lack of counseling was associated with loss of sexual activity 1 year later. Mortality was not significantly increased in patients who were sexually active soon after their AMI.

  8. Physical properties of orbital debris from spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, K.; Africano, J.; Hamada, K.; Stansbery, E.; Sydney, P.; Kervin, P.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, certain physical properties, such as material type and albedo, of orbital debris are assumed when used to determine the size of the objects. A study to ascertain whether or not the assumed values are valid has begun using reflectance spectroscopy as a means of determining the material type of the object. What appears to some as a squiggly line is actually the reflectance of sunlight from the object. By comparing the location, depth, and width of the absorption features on the squiggly lines, the material type of the debris object is identified. Once the material type is known, the albedo of the object can be determined. This paper discusses the results from observations of large rocket bodies and satellites in both lower and geosynchronous Earth orbits (LEO and GEO, respectively) taken at the air force maui optical and supercomputing (AMOS) site located in Maui, Hawaii. Using the 1.6-m telescope and a spectral range of 0.3-0.9 μm, differences between rocket bodies of different types and launch dates, as well as satellites of different types and launch dates are determined. Variations seen in the squiggle lines are due to colors of paint, space weathering, and for the satellites, orientation and size of the solar panels. Future direction of the project will be discussed as well as plans for future observations.

  9. Cloud structure of brown dwarfs from spectroscopic variability observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenzli, E.; Marley, M. S.; Apai, D.; Lupu, R. E.

    Recent discoveries of variable brown dwarfs have provided us with a new window into their three-dimensional cloud structure. The highest variables are found at the L/T transition, where the cloud cover is thought to break up, but variability has been found to occur also for both cloudy L dwarfs and (mostly) cloud-free mid T dwarfs. We summarize results from recent HST programs measuring the spectral variability of brown dwarfs in the near-infrared and compare to results from ground-based programs. We discuss the patchy cloud structure of L/T transition objects, for which it is becoming increasingly certain that the variability does not arise from cloud holes into the deep hot regions but from varying cloud thickness. We present a new patchy cloud model to explain the spectral variability of 2MASSJ21392676+0220226. We also discuss the curious multi-wavelength variability behavior of the recently discovered very nearby early T dwarf WISE J104915.57-531906.1B (Luhman 16B) and the mid T dwarf 2MASS J22282889-431026. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program # 12314 and 13280

  10. Spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary RW Hydrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Fernandez-Castro, Telmo

    1987-01-01

    Ultraviolet/optical spectrophotometry and infrared photometry show that the symbiotic binary RW Hya is comprised of an M giant (with L of about 1000 solar luminosities) and a compact object (with L of about 200 solar luminosities) which resembles the central star of a planetary nebula. The luminosity of the hot component is produced by a nuclear shell source which is replenished by the wind of the red giant at a rate of about 10 to the -8th solar mass/yr. Results indicate that the binary is surrounded by an H II region (of radius of about 10 AU) which gives rise to the observed emission lines and radio emission. The He(2+) and O(2+) regions are found to be confined to the immediate vicinity of the hot component.

  11. Spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula ME 2-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, H.; Gutierrez-Moreno, A.; Cortes, G.; Hamuy, M.

    1994-06-01

    Observations of the planetary nebula Me 2-1 were obtained with different setups, in order to analyze some effects of contamination produced by the second-order ultraviolet spectrum in the first-order red, for wavelengths longer than approximately 6000 A. This contamination problem will be discussed elsewhere. Here we present the obervations of Me 2-1, which include a wide wavelength range, from about 3100 to 10,200 A. A comparison with previous results is shown for the wavelength intervals in common. From these data, the most relevant nebular parameters are derived, using lines in the optical and near IR regions. Some parameters corresponding to the central star are also determined. The results are compared with previously obtained values.

  12. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Cool Stars: The DUNES Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Eiroa, C.; Martínez-Arnáiz, R. M.; Montes, D.

    2010-10-01

    The detection of faint dusty exo-zodies and exo-EKBs around mature stars is a direct proof of planetesimal systems. Relating the properties of such structures with the hosting stars is fundamental to get clear clues concerning how common planetary systems are, and how the form and evolve. DUNES (DUst around NEarby Stars (see http://www.mpia-hd.mpg.de/DUNES/) is a Herschel Open Time Key Project with the aim of detecting cool faint exo-solar analogues to the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB). Since the success of DUNES depends on very accurate determination of the stellar properties and age, we have started a high resolution observing program of the DUNES targets, with the first results are presented here.

  13. Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopic and Spectrophotometric Observations of NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon Cruz, J.; Licandro, J.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2003-05-01

    In august 2002 we started an observational program to obtain physical information of a significant number of Near Earth Objects by means of simultaneous visible and near infrared spectroscopy and spectrophotometry using telescope facilities of Teide and El Roque de los Muchachos Observatories (Canary Islands, Spain). Near infrared spectroscopy is done using the 3.5-m TNG telescope with the NICS camera-spectrograph and its low resolution Amici prism disperser (Licandro et al. 2001, A&A 373, 29L). Visible spectroscopy is done using the 2.5-m NOT telescope with the ALFOSC camera-spectrograph. At present we have some spectra taken with both telescopes, and 4 nights schedulled for simultaneous observations next semester. Simultaneous visible and near-infrared photometry is done using the CCD camera attached to the 80-cm IAC80 telescope and B,V,R,I filters, and the 1.5-m Carlos Sanchez Telescope with CAIN camera (Nicmos 256x256 array) and J,H,K filters. Until this moment we have spent almost 50 nights for the photometric program, and schedulled 4 nights per month next semester. Our spectral analysis at visible wavelengths of these objects uses some of the techniques and taxonomic system developed by Bus (1999, PhD thesis), studying the presence or absence of specific spectral features in their reflectance spectra. In addition, near infrared spectra obtained for a number of NEOs enhances the compositional interpretation of our sample. Broad band spectrophotometric colors also provide low resolution spectra that can be compared with taxonomic classes defined by Tholen (1984, PhD Thesis). We also compare our spectral data with laboratory measurements of meteorites (Gaffey 1976, JGR 81,905) in order to stablish a possible link between main belt asteroids, near-Earth objects and meterorites, and to detect the effects of space weathering in the surface composition of our objects. A description of the program and preliminary results is presented.

  14. Multi-site Observations of the March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse: Calibration of Images to Simulate Continuous Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosh, Robert; Penn, Matthew J.; McKay, Myles; Baer, Robert; Garrison, David; Gelderman, Richard; Hare, Honor; Isberner, Fred; Jensen, Logan; Kovac, Sarah; Mitchell, Adriana; Pierce, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Ursache, Andrei; Varsik, John R.; Walter, Donald K.; Watson, Zachary; Young, David; Citizen Cate Team

    2017-01-01

    During the total solar eclipse of March 9, 2016, five teams of astronomers participating in the Citizen Continental America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) experiment, traveled to different locations in Indonesia to observe the eclipse. Data was acquired to continuously monitor the progression of features in the inner solar corona: a region of the solar atmosphere where time evolution is not well understood. Image data from the eclipse consisted of sets of 7 exposure times 0.4, 1.3, 4, 13, 40, 130, and 400 milliseconds which are used to create a high dynamic range composite image. Eclipse data from these sites were then processed and calibrated using sets of dark and flat images. Further data processing included the compilation of exposures into high dynamic range images and were subsequently spatially filtered. Using these processing techniques, data from each site was aligned and compiled as frames in videos of the eclipse, each consisting of over 140 frames with the goal of being combined. Lessons learned from the data obtained in the observations of the 2016 total solar eclipse are being used to improve the procedure which will be used in the CATE experiment during the North American 2017 total solar eclipse.

  15. Spectroscopic observations of the detached binary PG 1413 + 015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Liebert, James; Bergeron, P.; Green, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We present improved estimates of the stellar parameters of the eclipsing, precataclysmic binary system PG 1413 + 015 (GH Vir), which has an orbital period of only 8h16m. Model atmosphere fits a Balmer line profiles yield T(eff) = 48,800 +/- 1200 K and log g = 7.70 +/- 0.11 for the DAO white dwarf primary star, from which a mass of 0.51 +/- 0.04 solar mass is inferred using evolutionary models. An ultraviolet spectrum obtained with the IUE Observatory has a slope consistent with this temperature and the assumption of no interstellar extinction. A red CCD spectrum of the secondary star during the 12-minute total eclipse indicates a spectral type of M3 V-M5 V. Reanalysis of the eclipse light curve leads to an inferred radius of 0.15 solar radius and a mass of 0.10 solar mass for the secondary, the latter being marginally consistent with the spectral type. Reprocessing on the facing side of the secondary produces phase-dependent Balmer line emission and detectable variations in the continuum from 6500-9000 A. The observed levels of reprocessing are consistent with expectations based on the above stellar parameters.

  16. Spectroscopic identification of amyl alcohol hydrates through free OH observation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minjun; Shin, Kyuchul; Lee, Huen

    2009-08-06

    In this study, we identify the crystal structures of amyl alcohol + CH(4) hydrates and demonstrate that the free OH observation of alcohol hydrates provides evidence of OH incorporation into the host framework occurring in some amyl alcohols. While two amyl alcohols, 3-methyl-2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-butanol, were identified as encaged in the 5(12)6(8) large cage of structure-H hydrate, as expected from their molecular sizes above 7.5 A, two other amyl alcohols, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2,2-dimethyl-1-propanol, were identified to be abnormally included in the 5(12)6(4) large cage of structure-II hydrate in spite of their too large sizes of 9.04 and 7.76 A, respectively. The Raman spectra of two "normal" amyl alcohol hydrates evolved free OH peaks around 3,600 cm(-1), implying that there is no strong hydrogen bonding interaction between alcohol guest and water host; however, for two "abnormal" amyl alcohol hydrates, the corresponding peaks were not detected, which indicates that the OH is incorporated into the host lattice in order to make the large alcohol guest fit into the relatively small 5(12)6(4) cage of structure-II. The present findings are expected to provide useful information for a better understanding of alcohol guest dynamic behavior that might be significantly affected by structural dimensions and host-guest interactions.

  17. Spitzer mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, H.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Guerrero, M. A.; Nigoche-Netro, A.; Toalá, J. A.; Fang, X.; Rubio, G.; Kemp, S. N.; Navarro, S. G.; Corral, L. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope archival mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy of a sample of 11 planetary nebulae (PNe). The observations, acquired with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), cover the spectral range 5.2-14.5 μm that includes the H2 0-0 S(2) to S(7) rotational emission lines. This wavelength coverage has allowed us to derive the Boltzmann distribution and calculate the H2 rotational excitation temperature (Tex). The derived excitation temperatures have consistent values ≃900 ± 70 K for different sources despite their different structural components. We also report the detection of mid-IR ionic lines of [Ar III], [S IV], and [Ne II] in most objects, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features in a few cases. The decline of the [Ar III]/[Ne II] line ratio with the stellar effective temperature can be explained either by a true neon enrichment or by high density circumstellar regions of PNe that presumably descend from higher mass progenitor stars.

  18. Estimating CH4 and CO Emissions in California's Urban and Rural Regions Using Multi-site Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S.; Andrews, A. E.; Bianco, L.; Graven, H. D.; Hsu, Y.; Newman, S.; Novakovskaia, E.; Vaca, P.; Salameh, P.; Sloop, C.; Weiss, R. F.; Keeling, R. F.; Fischer, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    California's commitment (Assembly Bill 32) to reduce total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 (~20% reduction) requires quantification of current GHG emissions. We will present atmospheric inversion estimates of California's total CH4 emissions for summer 2013, using data from multiple sites covering urban and rural areas of California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area. We will also use measured CO from two tall-tower sites (Central Valley and SoCAB) to quantify CO emissions as well as to evaluate atmospheric transport. We use Bayesian inverse modeling to estimate the CH4 and CO emissions from discrete regions of California by combining the atmospheric measurements, upstream background, high-resolution prior emission maps, and predicted atmospheric transport from WRF-STILT. We quantify site-specific model-measurement uncertainties due to transport using meteorological data from a network of atmospheric profilers and in-situ sensors, due to background using oceanic and aircraft observations, and the prior emissions. To reduce the uncertainty in transport, we assimilate available meteorological measurements from surface and upper air stations, and wind profilers into the WRF model. Preliminary inversion results during September 2010 - June 2011 and summer of 2012 suggest that state total CH4 emissions are 1.2 - 1.8 times higher than the current CARB inventory and we will update these estimates. We expect the results of this study will significantly improve upon existing work in quantifying CH4 and CO emissions in California's urban and rural regions.

  19. Emergency Department Triage of Traumatic Head Injury Using a Brain Electrical Activity Biomarker: A Multisite Prospective Observational Validation Trial.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel; Prichep, Leslie S; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Huff, J Stephen; Naunheim, Rosanne; Garrett, John; Jones, Elizabeth B; Wright, David W; O'Neill, John; Badjatia, Neeraj; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Curley, Kenneth C; Chiacchierini, Richard; O'Neil, Brian; Hack, Dallas C

    2017-05-01

    A brain electrical activity biomarker for identifying traumatic brain injury (TBI) in emergency department (ED) patients presenting with high Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) after sustaining a head injury has shown promise for objective, rapid triage. The main objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of an automated classification algorithm to determine the likelihood of being computed tomography (CT) positive, in high-functioning TBI patients in the acute state. Adult patients admitted to the ED for evaluation within 72 hours of sustaining a closed head injury with GCS 12 to 15 were candidates for study. A total of 720 patients (18-85 years) meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria were enrolled in this observational, prospective validation trial, at 11 U.S. EDs. GCS was 15 in 97%, with the first and third quartiles being 15 (interquartile range = 0) in the study population at the time of the evaluation. Standard clinical evaluations were conducted and 5 to 10 minutes of electroencephalogram (EEG) was acquired from frontal and frontal-temporal scalp locations. Using an a priori derived EEG-based classification algorithm developed on an independent population and applied to this validation population prospectively, the likelihood of each subject being CT+ was determined, and performance metrics were computed relative to adjudicated CT findings. Sensitivity of the binary classifier (likely CT+ or CT-) was 92.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 87.8%-95.5%) for detection of any intracranial injury visible on CT (CT+), with specificity of 51.6% (95% CI = 48.1%-55.1%) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.0% (95% CI = 93.2%-97.9%). Using ternary classification (likely CT+, equivocal, likely CT-) demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to traumatic hematomas (≥1 mL of blood), 98.6% (95% CI = 92.6%-100.0%), and NPV of 98.2% (95% CI = 95.5%-99.5%). Using an EEG-based biomarker high accuracy of predicting the likelihood of being CT+ was obtained, with

  20. Photoelectric and Spectroscopic Observations Related to a Possible Optical Counterpart for Pulsar CP 1919+21.

    PubMed

    Lynds, R; Maran, S P; Trumbo, D E

    1968-07-05

    Spectroscopic observations of the two stars near the pulsar CP 1919+21 are not sufficiently conclusive to permit an identification of either object with the source of the radio pulses. However, our most extensive series of photometric observations of a region of sky near the radio source position, which region includes the brighter of the two stars, suggests an approximately sinusoidal variation. It is significant that the period of the variation is double the period of the radio pulsations.

  1. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates. VI. Further Observations from TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR, and Magellan Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Landoni, M.; Chavushyan, V.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Masetti, N.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Katagiri, H.; Kagaya, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-04-01

    Blazars, one of the most extreme classes of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of γ-ray sources, and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However, in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition, about one-third of the γ-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower-energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 γ-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, William Herschel Telescope, Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, and Magellan Telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects, while the remaining targets are classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi-stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of γ-ray blazar candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the Fermi unidentified gamma-ray sources and to confirm the nature of BCUs.

  2. Spectroscopic Observations of Geo-Stationary Satellites Over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. K.; Kim, S. J.; Han, W. Y.; Park, J. S.; Min, S. W.

    2001-11-01

    Low resolution spectroscopic observations of geo-stationary satellites over the Korean peninsula have been carried out at the KyungHee Optical Satellite Observing Facility (KOSOF) with a 40cm telescope. We have observed 9 telecommunication satellites and 1 weather satellite of 6 countries. The obtained spectral data showed that satellites could be classified and grouped with similar basic spectral feature. We divided the 10 satellites into 4 groups based on spectral slop and reflectance. It is suggested that the material types of the satellites can be determined through spectral comparisons with the ground laboratory data. We will continuously observe additional geo-stationary satellites for the accurate classification of spectral features.

  3. Flows along arch filaments observed in the GRIS `very fast spectroscopic mode'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Manrique, S. J.; Denker, C.; Kuckein, C.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Collados, M.; Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Diercke, A.; Fischer, C. E.; Gömöry, P.; Bello González, N.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Cubas Armas, M.; Berkefeld, T.; Feller, A.; Hoch, S.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2017-10-01

    A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the `very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the `very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.

  4. MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER. I. SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION FROM SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; RamIrez, Solange V.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-08-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone, which spans the central {approx}300 pc region of the Milky Way. We obtained IRS spectra over 5-35 {mu}m using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 {mu}m shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice, suggestive of CO{sub 2} ice mixed with CH{sub 3}OH ice on grains. This 15.4 {mu}m shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that nine massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8-23 M{sub sun}, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of {approx}0.07 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} at the GC.

  5. Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center. 1; Spectroscopic Identification from Spitzer/IRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Cotera, Angela S.; Smith, Howard A.; Stolovy, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    We present results from our spectroscopic study, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, designed to identify massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Galactic Center (GC). Our sample of 107 YSO candidates was selected based on IRAC colors from the high spatial resolution, high sensitivity Spitzer/IRAC images in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which spans the central approximately 300 pc region of the Milky Way Galaxy. We obtained IRS spectra over 5 micron to 35 micron using both high- and low-resolution IRS modules. We spectroscopically identify massive YSOs by the presence of a 15.4 micron shoulder on the absorption profile of 15 micron CO2 ice, suggestive of CO2 ice mixed with CH30H ice on grains. This 15.4 micron shoulder is clearly observed in 16 sources and possibly observed in an additional 19 sources. We show that 9 massive YSOs also reveal molecular gas-phase absorption from C02, C2H2, and/or HCN, which traces warm and dense gas in YSOs. Our results provide the first spectroscopic census of the massive YSO population in the GC. We fit YSO models to the observed spectral energy distributions and find YSO masses of 8 - 23 solar Mass, which generally agree with the masses derived from observed radio continuum emission. We find that about 50% of photometrically identified YSOs are confirmed with our spectroscopic study. This implies a preliminary star formation rate of approximately 0.07 solar mass/yr at the GC.

  6. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF AN EVOLVING FLARE RIBBON SUBSTRUCTURE SUGGESTING ORIGIN IN CURRENT SHEET WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, S. R.; Longcope, D. W.; Qiu, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopic observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph of the evolution of the flare ribbon in the SOL2014-04-18T13:03 M-class flare event, at high spatial resolution and time cadence. These observations reveal small-scale substructure within the ribbon, which manifests as coherent quasi-periodic oscillations in both position and Doppler velocities. We consider various alternative explanations for these oscillations, including modulation of chromospheric evaporation flows. Among these, we find the best support for some form of wave localized to the coronal current sheet, such as a tearing mode or Kelvin–Helmholtz instability.

  7. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. VI. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS FROM TNG, WHT, OAN, SOAR, AND MAGELLAN TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Landoni, M.; Chavushyan, V.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Masetti, N.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; Katagiri, H.; Kagaya, M.; Cheung, C. C.; D’Abrusco, R.; Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; and others

    2016-04-15

    Blazars, one of the most extreme classes of active galaxies, constitute so far the largest known population of γ-ray sources, and their number is continuously growing in the Fermi catalogs. However, in the latest release of the Fermi catalog there is still a large fraction of sources that are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) for which optical spectroscopic observations are necessary to confirm their nature and their associations. In addition, about one-third of the γ-ray point sources listed in the Third Fermi-LAT Source Catalog (3FGL) are still unassociated and lacking an assigned lower-energy counterpart. Since 2012 we have been carrying out an optical spectroscopic campaign to observe blazar candidates to confirm their nature. In this paper, the sixth of the series, we present optical spectroscopic observations for 30 γ-ray blazar candidates from different observing programs we carried out with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, William Herschel Telescope, Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, and Magellan Telescopes. We found that 21 out of 30 sources investigated are BL Lac objects, while the remaining targets are classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars showing the typical broad emission lines of normal quasi-stellar objects. We conclude that our selection of γ-ray blazar candidates based on their multifrequency properties continues to be a successful way to discover potential low-energy counterparts of the Fermi unidentified gamma-ray sources and to confirm the nature of BCUs.

  8. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of the 9 March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse in Palangkaraya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholish, Abdul Majid Al; Jihad, Imanul; Taufik Andika, Irham; Puspitaningrum, Evaria; Ainy, Fathin Q.; Ramadhan, Sahlan; Ikbal Arifyanto, M.; Malasan, Hakim L.

    2016-11-01

    The March 9th 2016 total solar eclipse observation was carried out at Universitas Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan. Time-resolved imaging of the Sun has been conducted before, after, and during totality of eclipse while optical spectroscopic observation has been carried out only at the totality. The imaging observation in white light was done to take high resolution images of solar corona. The images were taken with a DSLR camera that is attached to a refractor telescope (d=66 mm, f/5.9). Despite cloudy weather during the eclipse moments, we managed to obtain the images with lower signal-to-noise ratio, including identifiable diamond ring, prominence and coronal structure. The images were processed using standard reduction procedure to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and to enhance the corona. Then, the coronal structure is determined and compared with ultraviolet data from SOHO to analyze the correlation between visual and ultraviolet corona. The spectroscopic observation was conducted using a slit-less spectrograph and a DSLR camera to obtain solar flash spectra. The flash spectra taken during the eclipse show emissions of H 4861 Å, He I 5876 Å, and H 6563 Å. The Fe XIV 5303 Å and Fe X 6374 Å lines are hardly detected due to low signal-to-noise ratio. Spectral reduction and analysis are conducted to derive the emission lines intensity relative to continuum intensity. We use the measured parameters to determine the temperature of solar chromosphere.

  9. Photometric and spectroscopic gamma-ray observations of solar transient phenomena using long duration balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M. R.; Duttweiler, F.; Lin, R. F.; Levedahl, W. K.; Primbach, H.; Curtis, D. W.; Burley, K. C.

    1985-01-01

    A program currently in progress to conduct extended duration spectroscopic and photometric observation of solar X-ray phenomena from balloons is described. High photometric sensitivity to weak hard X-ray bursts is attained using a 600 sq cm array of phoswich scintillators. High spectral resolution for stronger bursts is available from an array of planar germanium detectors. These instruments are carried in a novel balloon gondola dssigned for the 15 to 20 day float durations available through using conventional zero pressure balloons in the radiation controlled (RACOON) mode.

  10. Spectroscopic observations of V443 Herculis - A symbiotic binary with a low mass white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrzycka, Danuta; Kenyon, Scott J.; Mikolajewska, Joanna

    1993-01-01

    We present an analysis of new and existing photometric and spectroscopic observations of the symbiotic binary V443 Herculis. This binary system consists of a normal M5 giant and a hot compact star. These two objects have comparable luminosities: about 1500 solar for the M5 giant and about 1000 solar for the compact star. We identify three nebular regions in this binary: a small, highly ionized volume surrounding the hot component, a modestly ionized shell close to the red giant photosphere, and a less dense region of intermediate ionization encompassing both binary components. The system parameters for V443 Her suggest the hot component currently declines from a symbiotic nova eruption.

  11. Low X-Ray Luminosity Galaxy Clusters: Main Goals, Sample Selection, Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, José Luis; Alonso, M. Victoria; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; O'Mill, Ana Laura; Cuevas, Héctor; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Ramírez, Amelia; Astudillo, José M.; Ramos, Felipe; Jaque Arancibia, Marcelo; Ulloa, Natalie; Órdenes, Yasna

    2016-06-01

    We present our study of 19 low X-ray luminosity galaxy clusters (L{}X ˜ 0.5-45 × 1043 erg s-1), selected from the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters Pointed Observations and the revised version of Mullis et al. in the redshift range of 0.16-0.7. This is the introductory paper of a series presenting the sample selection, photometric and spectroscopic observations, and data reduction. Photometric data in different passbands were taken for eight galaxy clusters at Las Campanas Observatory; three clusters at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory; and eight clusters at the Gemini Observatory. Spectroscopic data were collected for only four galaxy clusters using Gemini telescopes. Using the photometry, the galaxies were defined based on the star-galaxy separation taking into account photometric parameters. For each galaxy cluster, the catalogs contain the point-spread function and aperture magnitudes of galaxies within the 90% completeness limit. They are used together with structural parameters to study the galaxy morphology and to estimate photometric redshifts. With the spectroscopy, the derived galaxy velocity dispersion of our clusters ranged from 507 km s-1 for [VMF98]022 to 775 km s-1 for [VMF98]097 with signs of substructure. Cluster membership has been extensively discussed taking into account spectroscopic and photometric redshift estimates. In this sense, members are the galaxies within a projected radius of 0.75 Mpc from the X-ray emission peak and with clustercentric velocities smaller than the cluster velocity dispersion or 6000 km s-1, respectively. These results will be used in forthcoming papers to study, among the main topics, the red cluster sequence, blue cloud and green populations, the galaxy luminosity function, and cluster dynamics.

  12. Comparison of dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables with mid-infrared interferometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2006-02-01

    We present a comparison of dynamical model atmospheres with mid-infrared (~11 μm) interferometric and spectroscopic observations of the Mira variable o Cet. The dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables pulsating in the fundamental mode can fairly explain, without assuming ad-hoc components, the seemingly contradictory mid-infrared spectroscopic and interferometric observations of o Cet: the 11 μm sizes measured in the bandpass without any salient spectral features are about twice as large as those measured in the near-infrared. Our calculations of synthetic spectra show that the strong absorption due to a number of optically thick H2O lines is filled in by the emission of these H2O lines originating in the geometrically extended layers, providing a possible physical explanation for the picture proposed by Ohnaka (2004a) based on a semi-empirical modeling. This filling-in effect results in rather featureless, continuum-like spectra in rough agreement with the observed high-resolution 11 μm spectra, although the models still predict the H2O lines to be more pronounced than the observations. The inverse P-Cyg profiles of some strong H2O lines observed in the 11 μm spectra can also be reasonably reproduced by our dynamical model atmospheres. The presence of the extended H2O layers manifests itself as mid-infrared angular diameters much larger than the continuum diameter. The 11 μm uniform-disk diameters predicted by our dynamical model atmospheres are in fair agreement with those observed with the Infrared Spatial Interferometer (ISI), but still somewhat smaller than the observed diameters. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy and problems with the current dynamical model atmospheres of Mira variables.

  13. Spectroscopic Follow-Up Observations of Transiting Planet Candidates Identified by the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David; Sasselov, D. D.; Szentgyorgyi, A. H.

    2006-12-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission is expected to identify many hundreds of transiting planet candidates in four years of continuous photometric monitoring of 100 square degrees in Cygnus and Lyra. To sort out true planets from eclipsing stellar systems that are masquerading as transiting planets, a variety of follow-up observations are planned. High resolution ground-based spectroscopy at modest signal-to-noise ratio will be used to detect orbital motion induced by stellar companions, for example by small M dwarf secondaries eclipsing solar-type primaries. The most challenging stellar imposters are blends of eclipsing binaries with nearby bright stars; even high-quality spectra may have difficulty resolving such systems. A workhorse for this initial phase of spectroscopic follow up will be TRES, a new fiber-fed echelle spectrograph on the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple Observatory. Ultimate confirmation of a transiting planet comes with the solution for a spectroscopic orbit and the derivation of an actual mass of the planet compared to the parent star. A primary goal of the Kepler Mission is to find earth-sized planets in or near the habitable zones of their host stars. The radial-velocity precision needed to derive spectroscopic orbits for the most interesting cases will require considerable improvement beyond 1 m/s. The Geneva Observatory and Harvard University have joined in a collaboration to develop such a capability at a northern site with access to the Kepler field of view. A version of the HARPS spectrograph, now in highly successful operation on the 3.6-m telescope at ESO on La Silla, is being built. Negotiations are underway to site HARPS North at the William Herschel Telescope operated by the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes on La Palma. The goal is to achieve velocity performance at the level of 20 cm/s and to push the determination of planetary masses into the terrestrial planet regime.

  14. Optimizing hydroxyl airglow retrievals from long-slit astronomical spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Christoph; Hibbins, Robert Edward; Espy, Patrick Joseph; Djupvik, Anlaug Amanda

    2017-08-01

    Astronomical spectroscopic observations from ground-based telescopes contain background emission lines from the terrestrial atmosphere's airglow. In the near infrared, this background is composed mainly of emission from Meinel bands of hydroxyl (OH), which is produced in highly excited vibrational states by reduction of ozone near 90 km. This emission contains a wealth of information on the chemical and dynamical state of the Earth's atmosphere. However, observation strategies and data reduction processes are usually optimized to minimize the influence of these features on the astronomical spectrum. Here we discuss a measurement technique to optimize the extraction of the OH airglow signal itself from routine J-, H-, and K-band long-slit astronomical spectroscopic observations. As an example, we use data recorded from a point-source observation by the Nordic Optical Telescope's intermediate-resolution spectrograph, which has a spatial resolution of approximately 100 m at the airglow layer. Emission spectra from the OH vibrational manifold from v' = 9 down to v' = 3, with signal-to-noise ratios up to 280, have been extracted from 10.8 s integrations. Rotational temperatures representative of the background atmospheric temperature near 90 km, the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region, can be fitted to the OH rotational lines with an accuracy of around 0.7 K. Using this measurement and analysis technique, we derive a rotational temperature distribution with v' that agrees with atmospheric model conditions and the preponderance of previous work. We discuss the derived rotational temperatures from the different vibrational bands and highlight the potential for both the archived and future observations, which are at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions, to contribute toward the resolution of long-standing problems in atmospheric physics.

  15. Chemical Nature Of Titan’s Organic Aerosols Constrained from Spectroscopic and Mass Spectrometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanaka, Hiroshi; Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    The Cassini-Huygens observations greately extend our knowledge about Titan’s organic aerosols. The Cassini INMS and CAPS observations clearly demonstrate the formation of large organic molecules in the ionosphere [1, 2]. The VIMS and CIRS instruments have revealed spectral features of the haze covering the mid-IR and far-IR wavelengths [3, 4, 5, 6]. This study attempts to speculate the possible chemical nature of Titan’s aerosols by comparing the currently available observations with our laboratory study. We have conducted a series of cold plasma experiment to investigate the mass spectrometric and spectroscopic properties of laboratory aerosol analogs [7, 8]. Titan tholins and C2H2 plasma polymer are generated with cold plasma irradiations of N2/CH4 and C2H2, respectively. Laser desorption mass spectrum of the C2H2 plasma polymer shows a reasonable match with the CAPS positive ion mass spectrum. Furthermore, spectroscopic features of the the C2H2 plasma polymer in mid-IR and far-IR wavelegths qualitatively show reasonable match with the VIMS and CIRS observations. These results support that the C2H2 plasma polymer is a good candidate material for Titan’s aerosol particles at the altitudes sampled by the observations. We acknowledge funding supports from the NASA Cassini Data Analysis Program, NNX10AF08G, and from the NASA Exobiology Program, NNX09AM95G, and the Cassini Project. [1] Waite et al. (2007) Science 316, 870-875. [2] Crary et al. (2009) Planet. Space Sci. 57, 1847-1856. [3] Bellucci et al. (2009) Icarus 201, 198-216. [4] Anderson and Samuelson (2011) Icarus 212, 762-778. [5] Vinatier et al. (2010) Icarus 210, 852-866. [6] Vinatier et al. (2012) Icarus 219, 5-12. [7] Imanaka et al. (2004) Icarus 168, 344-366. [8] Imanaka et al. (2012) Icarus 218, 247-261.

  16. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated software to support the observational programs of the Earth Observing System (EOS). In particular, the focus is on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied, but usually call for additional spectral parameters or improvements to existing molecular bands. In addition, cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use of HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  17. Direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike donor state in insulating SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Salman, Z; Prokscha, T; Amato, A; Morenzoni, E; Scheuermann, R; Sedlak, K; Suter, A

    2014-10-10

    We present a direct spectroscopic observation of a shallow hydrogenlike muonium state in SrTiO(3) which confirms the theoretical prediction that interstitial hydrogen may act as a shallow donor in this material. The formation of this muonium state is temperature dependent and appears below ∼ 70K. From the temperature dependence we estimate an activation energy of ∼ 50 meV in the bulk and ∼ 23 meV near the free surface. The field and directional dependence of the muonium precession frequencies further supports the shallow impurity state with a rare example of a fully anisotropic hyperfine tensor. From these measurements we determine the strength of the hyperfine interaction and propose that the muon occupies an interstitial site near the face of the oxygen octahedron in SrTiO(3). The observed shallow donor state provides new insight for tailoring the electronic and optical properties of SrTiO(3)-based oxide interface systems.

  18. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of γ-Ray Blazar Candidates. I. Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, A.; Milisavljevic, D.; Masetti, N.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Chavushyan, V.; D'Abrusco, R.; Massaro, F.; Giroletti, M.; Smith, H. A.; Margutti, R.; Tosti, G.; Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Otí-Floranes, H.; Landoni, M.; Grindlay, J. E.; Funk, S.

    2014-05-01

    A significant fraction (~30%) of the γ-ray sources listed in the second Fermi/LAT (2FGL) catalog is still of unknown origin, being not yet associated with counterparts at lower energies. Using the available information at lower energies and optical spectroscopy on the selected counterparts of these γ-ray objects, we can pinpoint their exact nature. Here, we present a pilot project pointing to assess the effectiveness of the several classification methods developed to select γ-ray blazar candidates. To this end, we report optical spectroscopic observations of a sample of five γ-ray blazar candidates selected on the basis of their infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) colors or of their low-frequency radio properties. Blazars come in two main classes, BL Lac objects and FSRQs, showing similar optical spectra except for the stronger emission lines of the latter. For three of our sources, the almost featureless optical spectra obtained confirm their BL Lac nature, while for the source WISEJ022051.24+250927.6 we observe emission lines with equivalent width EW ~ 31 Å, identifying it as a FSRQ with z = 0.48. The source WISEJ064459.38+603131.7, although not featuring a clear radio counterpart, shows a blazar-like spectrum with weak emission lines with EW ~ 7 Å, yielding a redshift estimate of z = 0.36. In addition, we report optical spectroscopic observations of four WISE sources associated with known γ-ray blazars without a firm classification or redshift estimate. For the latter sources, we confirm a BL Lac classification, with a tentative redshift estimate for the source WISEJ100800.81+062121.2 of z = 0.65.

  19. 3-D velocities of a whole filament channel obtained by imaging and spectroscopic observations of IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Linfeng

    2017-08-01

    The dynamics of a filament channel are of great importance to understand its formation and evolution. In this work, we try to make the best use of IRIS’s imaging and spectroscopic observations at the same time. With IRIS’s high spatial resolutions, we can clearly see that material in the filament channel moves in two opposite directions in the form of streams. It implies that counter-streamings may also be caused by siphon flows, as well as the common ways of thread longitudinal oscillations. Furthermore, the 3-D velocities of the whole filament channel are able to provide its exact information of magnetic configurations, which are mainly relied on magnetic extrapolation before.

  20. Quantum simulation. Spectroscopic observation of SU(N)-symmetric interactions in Sr orbital magnetism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Bishof, M; Bromley, S L; Kraus, C V; Safronova, M S; Zoller, P; Rey, A M; Ye, J

    2014-09-19

    SU(N) symmetry can emerge in a quantum system with N single-particle spin states when spin is decoupled from interparticle interactions. Taking advantage of the high measurement precision offered by an ultrastable laser, we report a spectroscopic observation of SU(N ≤ 10) symmetry in (87)Sr. By encoding the electronic orbital degree of freedom in two clock states while keeping the system open to as many as 10 nuclear spin sublevels, we probed the non-equilibrium two-orbital SU(N) magnetism via Ramsey spectroscopy of atoms confined in an array of two-dimensional optical traps; we studied the spin-orbital quantum dynamics and determined the relevant interaction parameters. This study lays the groundwork for using alkaline-earth atoms as testbeds for important orbital models. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Implementation of Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques to Simultaneously Observe Native and Mutated Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cull, Brennan; Ben, Kelty; Link, Justin

    A protein's natural, correctly folded structure can determine the protein's ability to carry out its function. If the unfolding process of proteins can be observed, then the relative stability can be better understood between native and mutated proteins. A global picture of the unfolding process may be completed through the studies of strategically mutated proteins using tryptophan as a probe. Horse heart cytochrome c, a thoroughly studied, model protein was used in our investigation to explore this idea. Various spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism (CD), absorbance, and fluorescence were simultaneously applied while slowly unfolding our protein by increasing the concentration of a chemical denaturant, guanidine hydrochloride. This provided us information about the thermodynamic properties of the protein and several mutants which can then be interpreted to gain relative stability information among mutations. Efforts to utilize these techniques on native and mutated proteins in comparison to current scientific unfolding theories will be presented in this session.

  2. Submillimetric Spectroscopic Observations of Volatiles in Comet C-2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVal-Borro, M.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Rengel, M.; Villanueva, G. L.; Kueppers, M.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.

    2012-01-01

    Submillimeter spectroscopic observations of comets provide an important tool for understanding their chemical composition and enable a taxonomic classification. Aims. We aim to determine the production rates of several parent- and product volatiles and the C-12/C-13 isotopic carbon ratio in the long-period comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), which is likely to originate from the Oort Cloud. Methods. The line emission from several molecules in the coma was measured with high signal-to-noise ratio in January 2005 at heliocentric distance of 1.2 AU by means of high-resolution spectroscopic observations using the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) at the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Results. We have obtained production rates of several volatiles (CH3OH, HCN, H(sup 13)CN, HNC, H2CO, CO, and CS) by comparing the observed and simulated line-integrated intensities. We calculated the synthetic profiles using a radiative transfer code that includes collisions between neutrals and electrons, and the effects of radiative pumping of the fundamental vibrational levels by solar infrared radiation. Furthermore, multiline observations of the CH3OH J = 7-6 series allow us to estimate the rotational temperature using the rotation diagram technique. We find that the CH3OH population distribution of the levels sampled by these lines can be described by a rotational temperature of 40 +/- 3 K. Derived mixing ratios relative to hydrogen cyanide are CO/CH3OH/H2CO/CS/HNC/HC-13N/HCN= 30.9/24.6/4.8/0.57/0.031/0.013/1 assuming a pointing offset of 8" due to the uncertain ephemeris at the time of the observations and the telescope pointing error. Conclusions. The measured relative molecular abundances in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) are between low- to typical values of those obtained in Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that it has visited the inner solar system previously and undergone thermal processing. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio of approx 3.1% is comparable to that found in other comets, accounting for the

  3. High-dispersion infrared spectroscopic observations of comet 8P/Tuttle with VLT/CRIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Kawakita, H.; Dello Russo, N.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Smette, A.; Hutsemékers, D.; Stüwe, J.; Weiler, M.; Arpigny, C.; Biver, N.; Cochran, A.; Crovisier, J.; Magain, P.; Sana, H.; Schulz, R.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H.; Zucconi, J.-M.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the composition of the Halley-family comet (HFC) 8P/Tuttle investigated with high-dispersion near-infrared spectroscopic observations. The observations were carried out at the ESO VLT (Very Large Telescope) with the CRIRES instrument as part of a multi-wavelength observation campaign of 8P/Tuttle performed in late January and early February 2008. Radar observations suggested that 8P/Tuttle is a contact binary, and it was proposed that these components might be heterogeneous in chemistry. We determined mixing ratios of organic volatiles with respect to H2O and found that mixing ratios were consistent with previous near infrared spectroscopic observations obtained in late December 2007 and in late January 2008. It has been suggested that because 8P/Tuttle is a contact binary, it might be chemically heterogeneous. However, we find no evidence for chemical heterogeneity within the nucleus of 8P/Tuttle. We also compared the mixing ratios of organic molecules in 8P/Tuttle with those of both other HFCs and long period comets (LPCs) and found that HCN, C2H2, and C2H6 are depleted whereas CH4 and CH3OH have normal abundances. This may indicate that 8P/Tuttle was formed in a different region of the early solar nebula than other HFCs and LPCs. We estimated the conversion efficiency from C2H2 to C2H6 by hydrogen addition reactions on cold grains by employing the C2H6/(C2H6+C2H2) ratio. The C2H6/(C2H6+C2H2) ratio in 8P/Tuttle is consistent with the ratios found in other HFCs and LPCs within the error bars. We also discuss the source of C2 and CN based on our observations and conclude that the abundances of C2H2 and C2H6 are insufficient to explain the C2 abundances in comet 8P/Tuttle and that the abundance of HCN is insufficient to explain the CN abundances in the comet, so at least one additional parent is needed for each species, as pointed out in previous study. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Prog. 080.C

  4. High Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project has been to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated software to support the observational programs of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Emphasis has been on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The HITRAN program is also involved in the Ozone Monitoring Experiment (OMI). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied with respect to constituents being observed, required remote-sensing parameters, and spectral coverage. A general requisite is for additional spectral parameters and improvements to existing molecular bands sufficient for the simulation of the observations leading to retrieval of the atmospheric state. In addition, cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use of HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  5. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Database for the NASA Earth Observing System Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Laurence S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and enhance the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic database and associated - software to support the observational programs of the Earth observing System (EOS). In particular, the focus is on the EOS projects: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT), the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III). The HITRAN program is also involved in the Ozone Monitoring Experiment (OMI). The data requirements of these programs in terms of spectroscopy are varied with respect to constituents being observed, required remote-sensing parameters, and spectral coverage. A general requisite is for additional spectral parameters and improvements to existing molecular bands sufficient for the simulation of the observations leading to retrieval of the atmospheric state. In addition cross-section data for heavier molecular species must be expanded and made amenable to modeling in remote sensing. The effort in the project also includes developing software and distribution to make access, manipulation, and use HITRAN functional to the EOS program.

  6. Revised spectroscopic parameters of SH(+) from ALMA and IRAM 30m observations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Holger S P; Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, José; Agúndez, Marcelino; Pety, Jérôme; Cuadrado, Sara; Gerin, Maryvonne; Dumas, Gaëlle; Chapillon, Edwige

    2014-09-19

    Hydrides represent the first steps of interstellar chemistry. Sulfanylium (SH(+)), in particular, is a key tracer of energetic processes. We used ALMA and the IRAM 30 m telescope to search for the lowest frequency rotational lines of SH(+) toward the Orion Bar, the prototypical photo-dissociation region illuminated by a strong UV radiation field. On the basis of previous Herschel/HIFI observations of SH(+), we expected to detect emission of the two SH(+) hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the NJ = 10-01 fine structure (FS) component near 346 GHz. While we did not observe any lines at the frequencies predicted from laboratory data, we detected two emission lines, each ~15 MHz above the SH(+) predictions and with relative intensities and HFS splitting expected for SH(+). The rest frequencies of the two newly detected lines are more compatible with the remainder of the SH(+) laboratory data than the single line measured in the laboratory near 346 GHz and previously attributed to SH(+). Therefore, we assign these new features to the two SH(+) HFS components of the NJ = 10-01 FS component and re-determine its spectroscopic parameters, which will be useful for future observations of SH(+), in particular if its lowest frequency FS components are studied. Our observations demonstrate the suitability of these lines for SH(+) searches at frequencies easily accessible from the ground.

  7. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  8. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  9. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of the Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy Markarian 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuan, Trinh X.; Lecavelier des Etangs, Alain; Izotov, Yuri I.

    2002-02-01

    New Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) far-UV spectroscopy of the nearby metal-deficient (Zsolar/8) cometary blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Markarian (Mrk) 59 is discussed. The data are used to investigate element abundances in its interstellar medium. The H I absorption lines are characterized by narrow cores that are interstellar in origin and by broad wings that are stellar in origin. The mean interstellar H I column density is ~7×1020 cm-2 in Mrk 59. No H2 lines are seen and N(H2) is <~1015 cm-2 at the 10 σ level. The lack of diffuse H2 is due to the combined effect of a strong UV radiation field that destroys the H2 molecules and a low metallicity that leads to a scarcity of dust grains necessary for H2 formation. P Cygni profiles of the S VI λλ933.4, 944.5 and O VI λλ1031.9, 1037.6 lines are seen, indicating the presence of very hot O stars and a stellar wind terminal velocity of ~1000 km s-1. By fitting the line profiles with multiple components having each a velocity dispersion b=7 km s-1 and spanning a radial velocity range of 100 km s-1, some of which can be saturated, we derive heavy element abundances in the neutral gas. We find logN(O I)/N(H I)=-5.0+/-0.3 or [O I/H I]=-1.5 for the neutral gas, about a factor of 10 below the oxygen abundance of the supergiant H II region, implying self-enrichment of the latter. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  10. Challenges and opportunities in establishing a collaborative multisite observational study of chronic diseases and lifestyle factors among adults in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Josiemer; Rodríguez-Orengo, José F; Tamez, Martha; Corujo, Francheska; Claudio, Aida; Villanueva, Héctor; Campos, Hannia; Willett, Walter C; Tucker, Katherine L; Ríos-Bedoya, Carlos F

    2017-01-31

    Prevalence of chronic diseases and unhealthy lifestyle behaviors among the adult population of Puerto Rico (PR) is high; however, few epidemiological studies have been conducted to address these. We aimed to document the methods and operation of establishing a multisite cross-sectional study of chronic diseases and risk factors in PR, in partnership with academic, community, clinical, and research institutions. The Puerto Rico Assessment of Diet, Lifestyle and Diseases (PRADLAD) documented lifestyle and health characteristics of adults living in PR, with the goal of informing future epidemiological and intervention projects, as well as public health, policy, and clinical efforts to help improve the population's health. The study was conducted in three primary care clinics in the San Juan, PR metropolitan area. Eligible volunteers were 30-75y, living in PR for at least 10 months of the previous year, and able to answer interviewer-administered questionnaires without assistance. Questions were recorded electronically by trained interviewers, and included socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle behaviors, self-reported medically-diagnosed diseases, and psychosocial factors. Waist and hip circumferences were measured following standardized protocols. A subset of participants answered a validated food frequency questionnaire, a legumes questionnaire, and had medical record data abstracted. Process and outcome evaluation indicators were assessed. The study screened 403 participants in 5 months. Of these, 396 (98%) were eligible and 380 (94%) had reliable and complete information. A subset of 242 participants had valid dietary data, and 236 had medical record data. The mean time to complete an interview was 1.5 h. Participants were generally cooperative and research collaborators were fully engaged. Having multiple sites helped enhance recruitment and sociodemographic representation. Diagnosed conditions were prevalent across sites. Challenges in data monitoring

  11. Visible Spectroscopic Observation Of Asteroid 162173 (1999ju3) With The Gemini-s Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Seiji; Kuroda, D.; Kameda, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Kamata, S.; Abe, M.; Ishiguro, M.; Takato, N.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2012-10-01

    Asteroid 162173 (1999JU3; hereafter JU3) is the target of the Hayabusa-2 mission. Its visible reflectance spectra have been observed a few times [1,2], and obtained spectra exhibit a wide variety of spectral patterns ranging from a spectra with absorption in the UV region (May 1999) to a flat spectrum with a faint broad absorption centered around 0.6 microns (September 2007) and that with UV absorption and strong broad absorption centered around 0.7 micron (July 2007). The apparent large spectral variation may be due to variegation on the asteroid surface. Such variegation would make a large influence on remote sensing strategy for Hayabusa-2 before its sampling operations. In order to better constraint the spectral properties of JU3, we conducted visible spectroscopic observations at the GEMINI-South observatory 8.1-m telescope with the GMOS instrument. We could obtain three different sets of data in June and July 2012. Although the JU3 rotation phases of two of the observation are close to each other, the other is about 120 degrees away from the two. Our preliminary analyses indicate that these three spectra are slightly reddish but generally flat across the observed wavelength range (0.47 - 0.89 microns). The observed flat spectra are most similar to the spectrum obtained in September 2007, which probably has the highest signal-to-noise ratio among the previous three spectra. This result suggests that material with a flat spectrum probably covers a dominant proportion of the JU3 surface and that the other two types of previously obtained spectra may not cover a very large fraction of the JU3 surface. [1] Binzel, R. P. et al. (2001) Icarus, 151, 139-149; [2] Vilas, F. (2008) AJ, 135, 1101-1105.

  12. A SURVEY OF FAR ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPIC EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, Cynthia S.; Long, Knox S.; Gaensicke, Boris; Szkody, Paula E-mail: long@stsci.edu E-mail: szkody@alicar.astro.washington.edu

    2012-03-01

    During its lifetime, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) was used to observe 99 cataclysmic variables (CVs) in 211 separate observations. Here, we present a survey of the moderate-resolution (R {approx_equal} 10, 000), far-ultraviolet (905-1188 A), time-averaged FUSE spectra of CVs. The FUSE spectra are morphologically diverse. They show contributions from the accretion disk, the disk chromosphere, disk outflows, and the white dwarf (WD), but the relative contribution of each component varies widely as a function of CV subtype, orbital period and evolutionary state, inclination, mass accretion rate, and magnetic field strength of the WD. The data reveal information about the structure, temperature, density and mass flow rates of the disk and disk winds, the temperature of the WD and the effects of ongoing accretion on its structure, and the long-term response of the systems to disk outbursts. The complete atlas of time-averaged FUSE spectra of CVs is available at the Multimission Archive at Space Telescope Science Institute as a High Level Science Product.

  13. Mid-infrared Spectroscopic Observations of the Dust-forming Classical Nova V2676 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Arai, Akira; Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Nagashima, Masayoshi

    2017-02-01

    The dust-forming nova V2676 Oph is unique in that it was the first nova to provide evidence of C2 and CN molecules during its near-maximum phase and evidence of CO molecules during its early decline phase. Observations of this nova have revealed the slow evolution of its lightcurves and have also shown low isotopic ratios of carbon (12C/13C) and nitrogen (14N/15N) in its envelope. These behaviors indicate that the white dwarf (WD) star hosting V2676 Oph is a CO-rich WD rather than an ONe-rich WD (typically larger in mass than the former). We performed mid-infrared spectroscopic and photometric observations of V2676 Oph in 2013 and 2014 (respectively 452 and 782 days after its discovery). No significant [Ne ii] emission at 12.8 μm was detected at either epoch. These provided evidence for a CO-rich WD star hosting V2676 Oph. Both carbon-rich and oxygen-rich grains were detected in addition to an unidentified infrared feature at 11.4 μm originating from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules or hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains in the envelope of V2676 Oph. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  14. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of asteroid (21) Lutetia three months before the Rosetta fly-by

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de León, J.; Duffard, R.; Lara, L. M.; Lin, Z.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    Context. On its journey to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the International Rosetta Mission (ESA) was planned to fly-by two asteroids: (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia. Although classified as an M-type asteroid because of its high albedo, its reflectance spectrum in the near and mid-infrared region, suggests a primitive composition, more typical of C-type asteroids. Results from ground-based observations are indicative of compositional variegation and of at least one significantly large crater on the surface of this asteroid. Aims: We analyse photometric and spectroscopic data of the asteroid, obtained from ground-based observations, to support the data taken by the spacecraft. Methods: We obtained uvbyIRi' photometric measurements covering the complete rotational period of the asteroid (about 8 h), using both the BUSCA instrument at the 2.2 m telescope in Calar Alto Observatory (CSIC-MPIA), and the 1 m telescope at Lulin Observatory (Taiwan, NCU). We also obtained visible and near-infrared spectra, covering the range 0.4-2.5 μm, with CAFOS at the 2.2 m (Calar Alto) and NICS at the 3.6 m telescope TNG ("El Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory). The spectroscopic data were taken at different rotational phases to search for any significant inhomogeneities in the surface of the asteroid. Results: The simultaneous photometric lightcurves in five filters obtained with the BUSCA instrument, and the lightcurves obtained at Lulin Observatory reveal a brightness variation around a rotational phase 0.1. We took visible and near-infrared spectra at that rotational phase, and a different rotational phase for comparison. Differences in the visible spectral slope among the spectra are indicative of a crater as the most likely cause of this variation. Table 2 is only available at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/527/A42

  15. Spectroscopic observations of AT2016hvu and PNV J00424181+4113433 with the Nordic Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somero, A.; Kangas, T.; Harmanen, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Barcewicz, S.; Heikkila, T.; Hon, S.; Kumar, T.; Mattila, S.; Gafton, E.

    2016-11-01

    We report spectroscopic observations of the transient AT2016hvu in NGC7316 discovered by the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009, ApJ, 696, 870 ; http://crts.caltech.edu/) and the nova candidate PNV J00424181+4113433 reported in ATel #9716.

  16. Clinical utility of an observation and response chart with human factors design characteristics and a track and trigger system: study protocol for a two-phase multisite multiple-methods design.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Doug; McKinley, Sharon; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Iedema, Rick; Gallagher, Robyn; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael; Allen, Emily

    2014-08-12

    Clinical deterioration of adult patients in acute medical-surgical wards continues to occur, despite a range of systems and processes designed to minimize this risk. In Australia, a standardized template for adult observation charts using human factors design principles and decision-support characteristics was developed to improve the detection of and response to abnormal vital signs. To describe the study protocol for the clinical testing of these observation and response charts (ORCs). We propose a two-phase multisite multiple-methods design to test the initial clinical utility of the charts in 10 hospitals of differing types and sizes across state jurisdictions in Australia. Data collection in the first phase includes user surveys, observations and field notes by project officers, handover de-briefs (short interviews with small groups of staff), and an audit of ORC documentation completion compared to the site's existing observation chart. For the second phase, data will be collected using a retrospective audit of observation documentation from the previous hospital observation chart, prospective audit of observation documentation following implementation of the selected ORC, user focus groups, observational field notes, and patient outcome data from routinely collected organizational data sources. Site selection and preparation, project officer training, chart selection and implementation, participant recruitment, and data collection has been completed and the analysis of these results are in progress. This detailed description of these study methods and data collection approaches will enable a comprehensive assessment of the clinical utility of these newly developed track and trigger charts and will be useful for clinicians and researchers when planning and implementing similar studies. Potential methodological limitations are also noted.

  17. Clinical Utility of an Observation and Response Chart With Human Factors Design Characteristics and a Track and Trigger System: Study Protocol for a Two-Phase Multisite Multiple-Methods Design

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Sharon; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Iedema, Rick; Gallagher, Robyn; Fry, Margaret; Roche, Michael; Allen, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical deterioration of adult patients in acute medical-surgical wards continues to occur, despite a range of systems and processes designed to minimize this risk. In Australia, a standardized template for adult observation charts using human factors design principles and decision-support characteristics was developed to improve the detection of and response to abnormal vital signs. Objective To describe the study protocol for the clinical testing of these observation and response charts (ORCs). Methods We propose a two-phase multisite multiple-methods design to test the initial clinical utility of the charts in 10 hospitals of differing types and sizes across state jurisdictions in Australia. Data collection in the first phase includes user surveys, observations and field notes by project officers, handover de-briefs (short interviews with small groups of staff), and an audit of ORC documentation completion compared to the site’s existing observation chart. For the second phase, data will be collected using a retrospective audit of observation documentation from the previous hospital observation chart, prospective audit of observation documentation following implementation of the selected ORC, user focus groups, observational field notes, and patient outcome data from routinely collected organizational data sources. Results Site selection and preparation, project officer training, chart selection and implementation, participant recruitment, and data collection has been completed and the analysis of these results are in progress. Conclusions This detailed description of these study methods and data collection approaches will enable a comprehensive assessment of the clinical utility of these newly developed track and trigger charts and will be useful for clinicians and researchers when planning and implementing similar studies. Potential methodological limitations are also noted. PMID:25116446

  18. Spectroscopic observation of SN2017gkk by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onori, F.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Losada, Illa R.; Gafton, E.; NUTS Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of supernova SN2017gkk (=MASTER OT J091344.71762842.5) in host galaxy NGC 2748.

  19. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2017pp by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Tronsgaard, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017pp in PGC 1378162. The candidate was discovered by F. Ciabattari, E. Mazzoni, S. Donati (ISSP; http://italiansupernovae.org).

  20. [In situ Raman spectroscopic observation of micro-processes of methane hydrate formation and dissociation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Ling; Ye, Yu-Guang; Meng, Qing-Guo; Lü, Wan-Jun; Wang, Fei-Fei

    2011-06-01

    Micro laser Raman spectroscopic technique was used for in situ observation of the micro-processes of methane hydrate formed and decomposed in a high pressure transparent capillary. The changes in clathrate structure of methane hydrate were investigated during these processes. The results show that, during hydrate formation, the Raman peak (2 917 cm(-1)) of methane gas gradually splits into two peaks (2 905 and 2 915 cm(-1)) representing large and small cages, respectively, suggesting that the dissolved methane molecules go into two different chemical environments. In the meantime, the hydrogen bonds interaction is strengthened because water is changing from liquid to solid state gradually. As a result, the O-H stretching vibrations of water shift to lower wavenumber. During the decomposition process of methane hydrates, the Raman peaks of the methane molecules both in the large and small cages gradually clear up, and finally turn into a single peak of methane gas. The experimental results show that laser Raman spectroscopy can accurately demonstrate some relevant information of hydrate crystal structure changes during the formation and dissociation processes of methane hydrate.

  1. Near-Simultaneous Spectroscopic and Broadband Polarimetric Observations of Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, K.; Iyengar, K. V. K.; Ramsey, B. D.; Austin, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    Near simultaneous optical spectroscopic (on four nights) and broadband linear continuum (B, V, R, and I bands) polarimetric (on seven nights) observations of 29 Be stars were carried out during 1993 November-December. The program Be stars displayed wavelength dependence of intrinsic polarizations with no frequency dependence of polarimetric position angles. Some of the Be stars displayed long-term polarization variability. The Be and Be-shell stars could not be distinguished from one another solely on the basis of their polarization values. Full widths at half-maximum of the H.alpha profiles and the intrinsic linear continuum polarizations are closely correlated with the projected rotational velocities of the program stars. Photospheric-absorption-corrected equivalent widths of H.alpha profiles [W(alpha)] and the radii of H.alpha-emitting or -absorbing envelopes (R(sub e) or R(sub a)) are nonlinearly correlated with the intrinsic continuum polarizations of these stars. However, W(alpha) and R(sub e) are linearly correlated. With large uncertainties, there is a trend of spectral dependence of polarization. Detailed discussion of these results is presented in this paper.

  2. Spectroscopic Observation of the Re-Entry Capsule of HAYABUSA Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Kouji; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Mikiya; Ohkawa, Takuya; Ebizuka, Noboru

    2011-10-01

    We performed low-resolution spectroscopic observations of the capsule of the HAYABUSA spacecraft during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere on 2010 June 13 UT as an artificial meteor. We obtained the photometric magnitude of the HAYABUSA capsule using zeroth-order spectra. The efficiency of the zeroth-order spectra was too low for us to measure the magnitude of the capsule without any saturation at all times. The altitude at the maximal flux of the capsule was at around 56 km (13h52m19s.81 UT), which is almost similar to the case GENESIS, i.e., the maximal flux at around 55 km. We examined the change in the spectrum shape of the capsule as a function of its altitude, and investigated the emission from the shock layer and the blackbody radiation from the surface of the capsule. It is found that the shock-layer emission was dominant, and/or on the same order of the blackbody radiation at the early phase of re-entry; also, the emission from blackbody radiation was dominant during the last phase of re-entry. We measured the surface temperature of the capsule along the trajectory; during the last phase before dark flight, we found that the blackbody temperature of the capsule was 3100 ± 300 K at an altitude of around 50 km, and 2400 ± 300 K at an altitude of around 40 km.

  3. Spectroscopic Observations and Analysis of the Unusual Type Ia SN1999ac

    SciTech Connect

    Garavini, G.; Aldering, G.; Amadon, A.; Amanullah, R.; Astier,P.; Balland, C.; Blanc, G.; Conley, A.; Dahlen, T.; Deustua, S.E.; Ellis,R.; Fabbro, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Fan, X.; Folatelli, G.; Frye, B.; Gates,E.L.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goldman, B.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Haissinski, J.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D.A.; Kent, S.; Kim, A.G.; Knop, R.A.; Kowalski, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lee, B.C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez,J.; Miller, G.J.; Moniez, M.; Mouchet, M.; Mourao, A.; Newberg, H.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P.E.; Pain, R.; Perdereau, O.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Richards, G.T.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schaefer, B.E.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A.L.; Stanishev,V.; Thomas, R.C.; Walton, N.A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.

    2005-07-12

    The authors present optical spectra of the peculiar Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 1999ac. The data extend from -15 to +42 days with respect to B-band maximum and reveal an event that is unusual in several respects. prior to B-band maximum, the spectra resemble those of SN 1999aa, a slowly declining event, but possess stronger Si II and Ca II signatures (more characteristic of a spectroscopically normal SN). Spectra after B-band maximum appear more normal. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from the Iron lines appear to be lower than average; whereas, the expansion velocity inferred from Calcium H and K are higher than average. The expansion velocities inferred from Si II are among the slowest ever observed, though SN 1999ac is not particularly dim. The analysis of the parameters v{sub 10}(Si II), R(Si II), v, and {Delta}m{sub 15} further underlines the unique characteristics of SN 1999ac. They find convincing evidence of C II {lambda}6580 in the day -15 spectrum with ejection velocity v > 16,000 km s{sup -1}, but this signature disappears by day -9. This rapid evolution at early times highlights the importance of extremely early-time spectroscopy.

  4. New spectroscopic and photometric observations of CV J0644+3344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    We report photometric and simultaneous spectroscopic observations of the cataclysmic variable J0644+3344 and present calibrated Doppler tomography results of the object. We have calibrated the spectra for slit losses using simultaneous photometry. This has been used to construct reliable Doppler images in the Halpha , Hbeta and He II 4686 Å@ emission lines. We have also performed a radial velocity analysis using these emission lines to derive the primary semi-amplitude and used a cophasing method to determine the secondary K_2 best value. We have improved the ephemeris of the object based on the published and our new photometric eclipse timings to obtain HJD=254474.7927+0.26937446E. We derived a K_1=123.2±6.6 {km s}-1 and K_2=205.4±6.7. Assuming a i>76, the orbital parameters are M_1=0.91±0.04 M⊙, M_2=0.83±0.04 M⊙ and a=2.10±0.03 R⊙. Based on the Doppler tomography we conclude that J0644+3344 is a nova-like SW Sex type system.

  5. Reconciling Spectroscopic Electron Temperature Measurements in the Solar Corona with In Situ Charge State Observations.

    PubMed

    Esser; Edgar

    2000-03-20

    It has been a puzzle for quite some time that spectroscopic measurements in the inner corona indicate electron temperatures far too low to produce the ion fractions observed in situ in the solar wind. In the present Letter, we show that in order to reconcile the two sets of measurements, a number of conditions have to exist in the inner corona: (1) The electron distribution function has to be Maxwellian or close to Maxwellian at the coronal base, (2) the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution has to develop rapidly as a function of height and has to reach close to interplanetary properties inside of a few solar radii, and (3) ions of different elements have to flow with significantly different speeds to separate their "freezing-in" distances sufficiently so that they can encounter different distribution functions. We choose two examples to demonstrate that these conditions are general requirements if both coronal electron temperatures and in situ ion fractions are correct. However, these two examples also show that the details of the required distribution functions are very sensitive to the exact electron temperature, density, and ion flow speed profiles in the region of the corona where the ions predominantly form.

  6. Spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 - A catalogue of 84 spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.; Mellier, Y.; Fort, B.; Cailloux, M.

    1988-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric data are presented on 84 objects in the field of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 (z = 0.374) obtained with the multiaperture spectroscopic systems PUMA developed at the Toulouse Observatory for the CFHT and ESO. The redshift and the spectral types as well as CCD photometry in the B and R bands are given with a discussion on the accuracy of the different data and measurements.

  7. NIR SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES IN THE PROTOCLUSTER AT z = 3.09

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Mariko; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tanaka, Ichi

    2015-01-20

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the K-band-selected candidate galaxies in the protocluster at z = 3.09 in the SSA22 field. We observed 67 candidates with K {sub AB} < 24 and confirmed redshifts of the 39 galaxies at 2.0 < z {sub spec} < 3.4. Of the 67 candidates, 24 are certainly protocluster members with 3.04 ≤ z {sub spec} ≤ 3.12, which are massive red galaxies that have been unidentified in previous optical observations of the SSA22 protocluster. Many distant red galaxies (J – K {sub AB} > 1.4), hyper extremely red objects (J – K {sub AB} > 2.1), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm sources, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as well as the counterparts of Lyα blobs and the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm sources in the SSA22 field are also found to be protocluster members. The mass of the SSA22 protocluster is estimated to be ∼2-5 × 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉}, and this system is plausibly a progenitor of the most massive clusters of galaxies in the current universe. The reddest (J – K {sub AB} ≥ 2.4) protocluster galaxies are massive galaxies with M {sub star} ∼ 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} showing quiescent star formation activities and plausibly dominated by old stellar populations. Most of these massive quiescent galaxies host moderately luminous AGNs detected by X-ray. There are no significant differences in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratios and [O III] λ5007 line widths and spatial extents of the protocluster galaxies from those of massive galaxies at z ∼ 2-3 in the general field.

  8. NIR Spectroscopic Observation of Massive Galaxies in the Protocluster at z = 3.09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Mariko; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Kajisawa, Masaru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Tanaka, Ichi

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the K-band-selected candidate galaxies in the protocluster at z = 3.09 in the SSA22 field. We observed 67 candidates with K AB < 24 and confirmed redshifts of the 39 galaxies at 2.0 < z spec < 3.4. Of the 67 candidates, 24 are certainly protocluster members with 3.04 <= z spec <= 3.12, which are massive red galaxies that have been unidentified in previous optical observations of the SSA22 protocluster. Many distant red galaxies (J - K AB > 1.4), hyper extremely red objects (J - K AB > 2.1), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm sources, active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as well as the counterparts of Lyα blobs and the AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm sources in the SSA22 field are also found to be protocluster members. The mass of the SSA22 protocluster is estimated to be ~2-5 × 1014 M ⊙, and this system is plausibly a progenitor of the most massive clusters of galaxies in the current universe. The reddest (J - K AB >= 2.4) protocluster galaxies are massive galaxies with M star ~ 1011 M ⊙ showing quiescent star formation activities and plausibly dominated by old stellar populations. Most of these massive quiescent galaxies host moderately luminous AGNs detected by X-ray. There are no significant differences in the [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratios and [O III] λ5007 line widths and spatial extents of the protocluster galaxies from those of massive galaxies at z ~ 2-3 in the general field.

  9. Spectroscopic Observations of a Solar Flare and the Associated Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S.; Tian, H.; McKillop, S.

    2013-12-01

    We used data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode to examine a coronal mass ejection and a preceding flare observed on 21 November 2012 between 15:00 and 17:00 UT. Images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used to align the data from EIS with specific events occurring. We analyzed spectra of a few emission lines at three locations on the flare site and one location in the erupting prominence. On the flare site, we found line profiles showing typical characteristics of chromospheric evaporation: downflows at cooler lines and upflows at hotter lines. At one particular location on the flare site, we clearly identified dominant downflows on the order of 100 km/s in lines through Fe VIII to Fe XVI. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such strong high-speed downflows have been spectroscopically observed in the impulsive phase of solar flares. The profile of the Fe VIII 184.54 line reveals two peaks and we were able to use the double Gaussian fit to separate the rapid downflows of dense material from the nearly stationary coronal background emission. For the erupting prominence, we were able to analyze multiple lines, cooler and warmer, of interest using this double Gaussian fit to separate the background emission from the emission of the ejected material. Our results show that the LOS velocities of the ejected material are about 100 km/s in the lower corona. Additionally, in each region of interest, we used the ratio of the density-sensitive line pair FeXII 195/186 to determine the electron density. Our results clearly show that the coronal densities were greatly enhanced during the flare. The density of the ejected material is also much larger than the typical coronal density. This research was supported by the NSF grant for the Solar Physics REU Program at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (AGS-1263241).

  10. Vertical profiling of methane and carbon dioxide using high resolution near-infrared heterodyne spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Alexander; Klimchuk, Artem; Churbanov, Dmitry; Pereslavtseva, Anastasia; Spiridonov, Maxim; Nadezhdinskyi, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    We present new method of monitoring greenhouse gases using spectroscopic observations of solar radiation passed through the atmosphere with spectral resolution ΛvδΛ up to 108. Such a high resolution is achieved by heterodyne technique and allows to retrieve full information about spectral line shape which, in turn, is used to distinguish contribution of different atmospheric layers to the resulting absorption. Weak absorption line at 6056.5 cm-1 was selected for CO2 measurements and a quartet of lines centered at 6057 cm-1for CH4. The instrument setup includes Sun tracker with a microtelescope and chopper, diode DFB laser used as a local oscillator, a bundle of single mode optical fibers that provides medium for radiation transfer and beam coupling, reference cell with depressurized methane for LO frequency stabilization, and Fabry-Perot etalon for LO frequency calibration. A commercial p-i-n diode with squared detector replaces a mixer and IF spectrometer, providing measurement of heterodyne beating within a bandpass of few MHz, which determines the effective spectral resolution of the instrument. Spectral coverage within narrow range (about 1 cm-1) is provided by ramping the LO frequency based on feedback from the reference channel. Observations of Sun in the Moscow region have resulted for the first time in measurements of the atmospheric transmission near 1.65 μm with sub-Doppler spectral resolution. In order to retrieve vertical profiles of methane and carbon dioxide we developed the inversion algorithm implementing Tikhonov regularization approach. With measured transmission having S/N ratio of 100 or higher, the uncertainty of CH4 profile is about 10 ppb, with the uncertainty of CO2 profile at 1 ppm. This techniques is promising an affordable opportunity or widespread monitoring of greenhouse gases and may be implemented on existing ground-based stations. This work has been supported by the grant of Russian Ministry of education and science #11.G34.31.0074

  11. 2-D Spectroscopic Observations of O II Recombination Lines in the Planetary Nebula NGC 7009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sehyun; Dinerstein, H.; Hill, G.; MacQueen, P.; Adams, J.; Blanc, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present preliminary results from 2-D spatially-resolved spectroscopic observations of the planetary nebula NGC 7009, obtained in September 2007 on the McDonald Observatory 2.7m telescope utilizing the integral field unit (IFU) VIRUS-P (Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph-Prototype; Hill et al., 2006, New Astronomy Reviews, 50, 378). The instrument delivers simultaneous spectra in 247 fibers over the wavelength range 3550-5850Å at a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 5000Å. By taking three spatially dithered integrations, fully-sampled maps can be obtained for a region of 112"×112" with an angular resolution of 4.1". These observations are part of an observing program to investigate the enigma of the optical recombination lines (ORLs) such as those of O II, that appear to indicate higher oxygen abundances than the collisionally excited lines (CELs) from the same ion, in some planetary nebulae. In order to resolve this abundance discrepancy, Liu et al. (2000, MNRAS, 312, 585) proposed a dual-abundance model, which postulates that the nebulae which display this behavior contain cold, metal-rich, H-deficient inclusions where the ORLs are produced, embedded in hotter material of more normal composition from which the CELs arise. This model can provide a good fit to the integrated-light spectra, but the cold, metal-rich inclusions have yet to be spatially resolved or isolated. We have obtained fully-sampled maps of several planetary nebulae that display this anomaly, in an effort to find evidence for localized variations in the strengths of the ORLs relative to the CELs that would be expected if the cold, metal-rich gas is concentrated in spatially distinct clumps. In this poster we will present results from our observations to date, in particular from a recent VIRUS-P observing set of NGC 7009. [This research was supported by NSF grants AST-0408609/-0708245 to H.L.D., and VIRUS-P has been by the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation.

  12. Fatty infiltration of the liver: demonstration by proton spectroscopic imaging: preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.T.; Dixon, W.T.; Ling, D.; Levitt, R.G.; Murphy, W.A. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two normal volunteers and three patients with CT evidence of fatty infiltration of the liver were studied to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging using a pulse sequence designed to differentiate fat and water could be used to detect fatty infiltration of the liver in human being. The magnetic resonance technique used a modified spin echo technique (simple proton spectroscopic imaging). Quantitative data showed that fatty liver can be separated from normal liver using the spin echo technique, and that the opposed image of the proton spectroscopic technique is more sensitive to small changes in hepatic fatty content than in-phase images with any echo time.

  13. First spectroscopic observations of the substellar companion of the young debris disk star PZ Telescopii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Vogt, N.; Witte, S.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Helling, Ch.; Seifahrt, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. In 2010 a substellar companion to the solar analog pre-main sequence star PZ Tel and member of the approximately 12 Myr old β Pic moving group was found by high-contrast direct imaging independently by two teams. Aims: In order to determine the basic parameters of this companion more precisely and independent of evolutionary models, hence age-independent, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of the primary and companion. Methods: We used the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) at the Very Large Telescope Unit 4/Yepun of ESO's Paranal Observatory in the H + K band and processed the data using the spectral deconvolution technique. The resulting spectrum of the companion was then compared to a grid of Drift-Phoenix synthetic model spectra, a combination of a general-purpose model atmosphere code with a non-equilibrium, stationary cloud and dust model, using a χ2 minimization analysis. Results: We find a best fitting spectral type of G6.5 for PZ Tel A. The extracted spectrum of the substellar companion, at a spatial position compatible with earlier orbit estimates, yields a temperature Teff = 2500-115+138 K, a visual extinction AV = 0.53-0.53+0.84 mag, a surface gravity of log g = 3.50-0.30+0.51 dex, and a metallicity at the edge of the grid of [M/H] = 0.30-0.30 dex. Conclusions: We derive a luminosity of log(Lbol/L⊙) = -2.66-0.08+0.06, a radius of R = 2.42-0.34+0.28 RJup, and a mass of M = 7.5-4.3+16.9 MJup for the PZ Tel companion, which is consistent with most earlier estimates using photometry alone. Combining our results with evolutionary models, we find a best-fitting mass of about 21 Jupiter masses at an age corresponding to the recently determined lithium depletion age of 7-2+4 Myr. Hence, the PZ Tel companion is most likely a wide brown dwarf companion in the 12-4+8 Myr old β Pic moving group. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 087

  14. The Tarantula Massive Binary Monitoring. I. Observational campaign and OB-type spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, L. A.; Sana, H.; Taylor, W.; Barbá, R.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Crowther, P.; Damineli, A.; de Koter, A.; de Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gieles, M.; Grin, N. J.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D.; Lockwood, S.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Neijssel, C.; Norman, C.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Richardson, N. D.; Schootemeijer, A.; Shenar, T.; Soszyński, I.; Tramper, F.; Vink, J. S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Massive binaries play a crucial role in the Universe. Knowing the distributions of their orbital parameters is important for a wide range of topics from stellar feedback to binary evolution channels and from the distribution of supernova types to gravitational wave progenitors, yet no direct measurements exist outside the Milky Way. Aims: The Tarantula Massive Binary Monitoring project was designed to help fill this gap by obtaining multi-epoch radial velocity (RV) monitoring of 102 massive binaries in the 30 Doradus region. Methods: In this paper we analyze 32 FLAMES/GIRAFFE observations of 93 O- and 7 B-type binaries. We performed a Fourier analysis and obtained orbital solutions for 82 systems: 51 single-lined (SB1) and 31 double-lined (SB2) spectroscopic binaries. Results: Overall, the binary fraction and orbital properties across the 30 Doradus region are found to be similar to existing Galactic samples. This indicates that within these domains environmental effects are of second order in shaping the properties of massive binary systems. A small difference is found in the distribution of orbital periods, which is slightly flatter (in log space) in 30 Doradus than in the Galaxy, although this may be compatible within error estimates and differences in the fitting methodology. Also, orbital periods in 30 Doradus can be as short as 1.1 d, somewhat shorter than seen in Galactic samples. Equal mass binaries (q> 0.95) in 30 Doradus are all found outside NGC 2070, the central association that surrounds R136a, the very young and massive cluster at 30 Doradus's core. Most of the differences, albeit small, are compatible with expectations from binary evolution. One outstanding exception, however, is the fact that earlier spectral types (O2-O7) tend to have shorter orbital periods than later spectral types (O9.2-O9.7). Conclusions: Our results point to a relative universality of the incidence rate of massive binaries and their orbital properties in the

  15. Synergies between spectroscopic and time-series photometric surveys - LAMOST observations for the Kepler field and K2 fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianning; De Cat, Peter; Smith, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Synergies between spectroscopic and time-series photometric surveys can provide valuable information for studies in Galactic archaeology. The Kepler satellite has provided unprecedented high duty-cycle, high-precision time-series photometric observations for a large number of stars. After a continuous monitoring of the Kepler field for 4 years, it started to observe K2 fields, which include multiple stellar populations, for about 80 days each. These observed fields are all good targets for Galactic archaeology, provided that spectroscopic observations can be made for hundreds of thousands of stars within these fields in a homogeneous way.In 2010, we initiated the LAMOST-Kepler project with the aim to collect low-resolution spectra for as many objects from the KIC10 catalogue as possible with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST). This is a 4-m telescope equipped with 4,000 optical fibers covering a circular field of view with a diameter of 5 degrees on the sky. The observations since 2012 have resulted in 150,567 low-resolution spectra with the Signal-Noise-Ratio in r larger than 20. The stellar atmospheric parameters were derived and calibrated with the values determined from either high-resolution spectroscopy or asteroseismology. Since the end of 2015, five K2 fields have been observed with LAMOST and the qualified spectra were used to derive the stellar atmospheric parameters for 59,213 stars.In this presentation we introduce the LAMOST-Kepler project, whose data have a great potential for Galactic archaeology. It includes an update on the progress and a summary of the existing scientific works based on the data provided by this project.

  16. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of emitting and absorbing gas in the Local Interstellar Chimney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, B. Y.; Sallmen, S.; Sfeir, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Lallement, R.

    2002-11-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite measurements of the absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar gas associated with the Local Interstellar Chimney, which is an extension of the rarefied Local Bubble cavity that extends outward from the galactic disk towards the lower galactic halo. Far ultraviolet (FUV) diffuse background emission has been detected in the high ionization line of O VI (lambda 1032 Å) for two lines-of-sight (l = 162.7deg, b = +57.0deg) and (l = 156.3deg, b = +57.8deg) at emission levels of 2500+/-700 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (LU) and 3300+/-1100 LU respectively. These levels of O VI emission are very similar to those found for four other lines-of-sight sampled thus far by the FUSE satellite, implying a fairly constant level of average O VI surface brightness emission at high galactic latitudes of about 2700 LU with a standard deviation of 450 LU. These emission-line data are supplemented by FUV interstellar absorption line measurements taken towards the hot DA white dwarf star, REJ 1032+532 (l = 157.5deg, b = +53.2deg), whose distance of 116 pc places it within the Local Bubble region. No high ionization interstellar O VI lambda 1032 Å absorption has been detected (N(O VI) < 13.0 cm-2), which is consistent with the non-detections of interstellar C IV and Si IV absorption reported towards this star by Holberg et al. (\\cite{holberg99a}). Taken together, our FUV absorption and emission data may be explained by a scenario in which the O VI emission and absorption lines are both formed at the conductive interface of the neutral boundary to the Local Bubble. For the presently sampled sight-lines we have found no correlation between the OVI emission line intensity and the associated 0.25 keV soft X-ray background flux as measured in the R1 and R2 bands by the ROSAT satellite. The OVI line intensities also show no correlation with the soft X-ray background flux attributable to emission from the million degree K

  17. Comments: Statistical Analysis for Multisite Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on statistical analysis for multisite trials, and focuses on the contribution of Stephen Raudenbush, Sean Reardon, and Takako Nomi to future research. Raudenbush, Reardon, and Nomi provide a major contribution to future research on variation in program impacts by showing how to use multisite trials…

  18. Comments: Statistical Analysis for Multisite Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Howard S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on statistical analysis for multisite trials, and focuses on the contribution of Stephen Raudenbush, Sean Reardon, and Takako Nomi to future research. Raudenbush, Reardon, and Nomi provide a major contribution to future research on variation in program impacts by showing how to use multisite trials…

  19. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. IV. RESULTS OF THE 2014 FOLLOW-UP CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, F.; Massaro, F.; Landoni, M.; D’Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Stern, D.; Masetti, N.; Tosti, G.

    2015-05-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ∼1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85−035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  20. Psychological Factors, Beliefs About Medication, and Adherence of Youth with HIV-1 in a Multisite Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Garvie, Patricia A.; Flynn, Patricia M.; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D.; Spector, Stephen A.; Gaur, Aditya H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Examine psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with HIV-1 on HAART in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Methods Youth with behaviorally-acquired HIV (n=20; 65% female; median age 21 years) with adherence problems, received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT) and week 24 (follow-up). Results Baseline to week 12 comparisons: 55% of youth reported clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. Substance use: Borderline clinical range (Tscore=68), with clinical but statistically non-significant improvement (Tscore=61). Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased Cognitive Avoidance (p=0.02), Emotional Discharge (p=0.004), and Acceptance/Resignation (“nothing I can do,” p=0.004); Positive Reappraisal and Seeking Support emerged. Aside from depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p=0.05), Beliefs About Medicine (p=0.006) and Perceived Threat of illness scores (p=0.03). Discussion Youth with behaviorally-acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, Beliefs About Medicine and viewing HIV as a threat predicted better DOT adherence. PMID:21575827

  1. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program - I. Observations, data reduction and spectroscopic sample of 582 low-redshift Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Foley, Ryan J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Barth, Aaron J.; Chornock, Ryan; Griffith, Christopher V.; Kong, Jason J.; Lee, Nicholas; Leonard, Douglas C.; Matheson, Thomas; Miller, Emily G.; Steele, Thea N.; Barris, Brian J.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cobb, Bethany E.; Coil, Alison L.; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Gates, Elinor L.; Ho, Luis C.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kandrashoff, Michael T.; Li, Weidong; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Modjaz, Maryam; Moore, Matthew R.; Mostardi, Robin E.; Papenkova, Marina S.; Park, Sung; Perley, Daniel A.; Poznanski, Dovi; Reuter, Cassie A.; Scala, James; Serduke, Franklin J. D.; Shields, Joseph C.; Swift, Brandon J.; Tonry, John L.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wong, Diane S.

    2012-09-01

    In this first paper in a series, we present 1298 low-redshift (z ≲ 0.2) optical spectra of 582 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed from 1989 to 2008 as part of the Berkeley Supernova Ia Program (BSNIP). 584 spectra of 199 SNe Ia have well-calibrated light curves with measured distance moduli, and many of the spectra have been corrected for host-galaxy contamination. Most of the data were obtained using the Kast double spectrograph mounted on the Shane 3 m telescope at Lick Observatory and have a typical wavelength range of 3300-10 400 Å, roughly twice as wide as spectra from most previously published data sets. We present our observing and reduction procedures, and we describe the resulting SN Database, which will be an online, public, searchable data base containing all of our fully reduced spectra and companion photometry. In addition, we discuss our spectral classification scheme (using the SuperNova IDentification code, SNID; Blondin & Tonry), utilizing our newly constructed set of SNID spectral templates. These templates allow us to accurately classify our entire data set, and by doing so we are able to reclassify a handful of objects as bona fide SNe Ia and a few other objects as members of some of the peculiar SN Ia subtypes. In fact, our data set includes spectra of nearly 90 spectroscopically peculiar SNe Ia. We also present spectroscopic host-galaxy redshifts of some SNe Ia where these values were previously unknown. The sheer size of the BSNIP data set and the consistency of our observation and reduction methods make this sample unique among all other published SN Ia data sets and complementary in many ways to the large, low-redshift SN Ia spectra presented by Matheson et al. and Blondin et al. In other BSNIP papers in this series, we use these data to examine the relationships between spectroscopic characteristics and various observables such as photometric and host-galaxy properties.

  2. Spectroscopic observation of simultaneous bi-directional reconnection outflows in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Cothran, C. D.; Gray, T.; Myers, C. E.; Belova, E. V.

    2012-08-01

    We report a precise, direct spectroscopic measurement of simultaneous bi-directional outflows from a reconnection event in a laboratory plasma. Outflow speeds are as Alfvénic and Abel analysis shows that the outflows are generated in the plasma core. A Sweet-Parker like analysis of outflow speed coupled with external measurements of reconnection electric field and assumption of Spitzer resistivity predict an aspect ratio of the reconnection layer and reconnection rate that are close to that measured in the experiment and in simulations. However, this analysis underestimates the absolute scale of the layer, indicating other than 2D resistive physics is at play.

  3. Psychological factors, beliefs about medication, and adherence of youth with human immunodeficiency virus in a multisite directly observed therapy pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Patricia A; Flynn, Patricia M; Belzer, Marvin; Britto, Paula; Hu, Chengcheng; Graham, Bobbie; Neely, Michael; McSherry, George D; Spector, Stephen A; Gaur, Aditya H

    2011-06-01

    This study examined psychological functioning and beliefs about medicine in adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on highly active antiretroviral therapy in a community-based directly observed therapy (DOT) pilot feasibility study. Participants were youth with behaviorally acquired HIV (n = 20; 65% female; median age, 21 years) with adherence problems, who received once-daily DOT. Youth were assessed at baseline, week 12 (post-DOT), and week 24 (follow-up). At baseline, 55% of youth reported having clinical depressive symptoms compared to 27% at week 12 with sustained improvements at week 24. At baseline, substance use was reported within the borderline clinical range (T(score) = 68), with clinical but statistically nonsignificant improvement (T(score) = 61) at week 12. Hopelessness scores reflected optimism for the future. Coping strategies showed significantly decreased cognitive avoidance (p = .02), emotional discharge (p = .004), and acceptance/resignation ("nothing I can do," p = .004), whereas positive reappraisal and seeking support emerged. With the exception of depressive symptoms, week 12 improvements were not sustained at week 24. DOT adherence was predicted by higher baseline depression (p = .05), beliefs about medicine (p = .006) and perceived threat of illness scores (p = .03). Youth with behaviorally acquired HIV and adherence problems who participated in a community-based DOT intervention reported clinically improved depressive symptoms, and temporarily reduced substance use and negative coping strategies. Depressive symptoms, beliefs about medicine, and viewing HIV as a potential threat predicted better DOT adherence. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. User compliance with documenting on a track and trigger-based observation and response chart: a two-phase multi-site audit study.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Doug; Allen, Emily; McKinley, Sharon; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Fry, Margaret; Gallagher, Robyn; Iedema, Rick; Roche, Michael

    2017-03-22

    To examine user compliance and completeness of documentation with a newly designed observation and response chart and whether a rapid response system call was triggered when clinically indicated. Timely recognition and responses to patient deterioration in hospital general wards remain a challenge for healthcare systems globally. Evaluating practice initiatives to improve recognition and response are required. Two-phase audit. Following introduction of the charts in ten health service sites in Australia, an audit of chart completion was conducted during a short trial for initial usability (Phase 1; 2011). After chart adoption as routine use in practice, retrospective and prospective chart audits were conducted (Phase 2; 2012). Overall, 818 and 1,058 charts were audited during the two phases respectively. Compliance was mixed but improved with the new chart (4%-14%). Contrary to chart guidelines, numbers rather than dots were written in the graphing section in 60% of cases. Rates of recognition of abnormal vital signs improved slightly with new charts in use, particularly for higher levels of surveillance and clinical review. Based on local calling criteria, an emergency call was initiated in 33% of cases during the retrospective audit and in 41% of cases with the new chart. User compliance was less than optimal, limiting full function of the chart sections and compliance with local calling criteria. Overcoming apparent behavioural and work culture barriers may improve chart completion, aiding identification of abnormal vital signs and triggering a rapid response system activation when clinical deterioration is detected. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. ESPRESSO — An Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets Search and Stable Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, F.; Cristiani, S.; Rebolo, R.; Santos, N. C.; Dekker, H.; Mégevand, D.; Zerbi, F. M.; Cabral, A.; Molaro, P.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Abreu, M.; Affolter, M.; Aliverti, M.; Allende Prieto, C.; Amate, M.; Avila, G.; Baldini, V.; Bristow, P.; Broeg, C.; Cirami, R.; Coelho, J.; Conconi, P.; Coretti, I.; Cupani, G.; D'Odorico, V.; De Caprio, V.; Delabre, B.; Dorn, R.; Figueira, P.; Fragoso, A.; Galeotta, S.; Genolet, L.; Gomes, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; Hughes, I.; Iwert, O.; Kerber, F.; Landoni, M.; Lizon, J.-L.; Lovis, C.; Maire, C.; Mannetta, M.; Martins, C.; Monteiro, M. A.; Oliveira, A.; Poretti, E.; Rasilla, J. L.; Riva, M.; Santana Tschudi, S.; Santos, P.; Sosnowska, D.; Sousa, S.; Spanò, P.; Tenegi, F.; Toso, G.; Vanzella, E.; Viel, M.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2013-09-01

    ESPRESSO is the next generation European exoplanet hunter, combining the efficiency of a modern echelle spectrograph with extreme radial velocity and spectroscopic precision. ESPRESSO will be installed in the Combined Coudé Laboratory of the VLT and linked to the four Unit Telescopes (UT) through optical coudé trains, operated either with a single UT or with up to four UTs for 1.5 magnitude gain. The instrumental radial velocity precision will reach the 10 cm s-1 level and ESPRESSO will achieve a gain of two magnitudes with respect to its predecessor HARPS. This is the first VLT instrument using the incoherent combination of light from four telescopes and, together with the extreme precision requirements, calls for many innovative design solutions while ensuring the technical heritage of HARPS.

  6. Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012dn, a Super-Chandra Candidate Type-Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrent, Jerod T.; Transient Factory, Palomar; Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Las

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is no singular standard model picture of type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) with a parameter-space of predictions that overlap the observed, diverse array of SN Ia properties. The same can be said for the super-luminous versions of SNe Ia, those thought to originate from up to 2.4 solar mass progenitor systems. To make matters worse, we remain in the dark-ages of astronomy regarding the interpretation of their observed spectra. In short, line-blending due to resonant line-scattering alone prevents making clear the compositional makeup of the outermost ejected layers. Since simulations of violent merger and single degenerate scenarios are both able to roughly reproduce spectroscopic observations, the direct mapping of the ejecta via spectrum synthesis measurements is of high importance. For example, with the closest SN Ia to date, SN 2011fe, we were able to map (in velocity space) the composition of the outer layers of ejecta. We did this by evolving simple P-Cygni-blends of synthetic spectra over the course of the first month (post-explosion), with an average of 1.8 days between observations by which to compare. As a result, SN 2011fe gave a clearer picture of the compositional structure of a ''normal'' SN Ia. We now have another chance to put this measure of SN Ia diversity into practice with the discovery of a brighter than normal southern hemisphere object, SN 2012dn. Here we present g-, r-, and i-band photometric observations obtained at Faulkes Telescope South, as well as optical time-series spectra from Gemini-North, Gemini-South, SALT, and MMT facilities. With 19 spectroscopic observations spanning its first month, post-explosion, we are able to measure the relative velocities of the periodic table in the outermost layers of ejected material. This serves as a means for distinguishing the origin of SNe Ia and their various forms.

  7. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nizioł, Jacek

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  8. Near Infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of the bright optical transient J212444.87+321738.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Soumen; Das, Ramkrishna; Ashok, N. M.; Banerjee, D. P. K.; Dutta, Somnath; Ghosh, Supriyo; Mondal, Anindita

    2013-04-01

    We report near infrared JHK-band photometry and spectroscopic observations of the recently reported bright optical transient J212444.87+321738.3 using the Near-IR Imager cum spectrograph (NICMOS-3) installed on the Mount Abu 1.2-m telescope of the Physical Research Laboratory, India following the outburst announcement by Tiurina et al. in ATel #4888. The photometric observations were carried out on 2013 March 21.020 UT and 23.010 UT yielding magnitudes of J = 5.85 +/- 0.06, H = 4.47 +/- 0.06, K = 3.77 +/- 0.05; and J= 5.64 +/- 0.04, H= 4.48 +/- 0.04, K = 3.77 +/- 0.03 respectively.

  9. Mercury: Mid-infrared (7.3 - 13.5 microns) spectroscopic observations showing features characteristic of plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, R. W. H.; Sprague, A. L.; Witteborn, F. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Wooden, D.; Snyder, K. D.

    1994-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of the surface of Mercury are reported for the wavelength range 7.3 to 13.5 microns. The observed spectral radiance emanated from equatorial and low latitude regions between 110-130 deg Mercurian longitude. The area is primarily an intercrater plain. The spectra show distinct and recognizable features, the principal Christiansen emission peak being the most prominent. The Christiansen feature strongly suggests the presence of plagioclase (Ca,Na)(Al,Si)AlSi2O8, (in particular labradorite: Ab(50) - Ab(30)). In addition we have studied the effects of thermal gradients to gain insight into the effects of thermal conditions on the spectral radiance of rock samples. This simulates the thermophysical effects as the rotating surface of Mercury is alternately heated and cooled. The spectral features of the samples are retained; however, the relative and absolute amplitudes vary as illustrated by laboratory reflectance and emittance spectra from quartzite.

  10. Simulation-optimization framework for multi-site multi-season hybrid stochastic streamflow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Roshan; Srinivasan, K.; Sudheer, K. P.

    2016-11-01

    able to predict the characteristics of the multi-site multi-season streamflows under uncertain future. Also, the AMHMABB model is found to perform better than the linear multi-site disaggregation model (MDM) in preserving the statistical as well as the multi-site critical deficit run characteristics of the observed flows. However, a major drawback of the hybrid models persists in case of the AMHMABB model as well, of not being able to synthetically generate enough number of flows beyond the observed extreme flows, and not being able to generate values that are quite different from the observed flows.

  11. The OmegaWhite survey for short-period variable stars - III: follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, S. A.; Woudt, P. A.; Groot, P. J.; Ramsay, G.; Toma, R.; Motsoaledi, M.; Crause, L. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; O'Donoghue, D.; Potter, S. B.; Sickafoose, A. A.; van Gend, C.; Worters, H. L.

    2017-02-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of short-period variables discovered in the OmegaWhite survey, a wide-field high-cadence g-band synoptic survey targeting the Galactic Plane. We have used fast photometry on the SAAO 1.0- and 1.9-m telescopes to obtain light curves of 27 variables, and use these results to validate the period and amplitude estimates from the OmegaWhite processing pipeline. Furthermore, 57 sources (44 unique, 13 with new light curves) were selected for spectroscopic follow-up using either the SAAO 1.9-m telescope or the Southern African Large Telescope. We find that many of these variables have spectra which are consistent with being δ Scuti-type pulsating stars. At higher amplitudes, we detect four possible pulsating white dwarf/subdwarf sources and an eclipsing cataclysmic variable. Due to their rarity, these targets are ideal candidates for detailed follow-up studies. From spectroscopy, we confirm the symbiotic binary star nature of two variables identified as such in the SIMBAD database. We also report what could possibly be the first detection of the `Bump Cepheid' phenomena in a δ Scuti star, with OW J175848.21-271653.7 showing a pronounced 22 per cent amplitude dip lasting 3 min during each pulsational cycle peak. However, the precise nature of this target is still uncertain as it exhibits the spectral features of a B-type star.

  12. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of γ-Ray Blazar Candidates. III. The 2013/2014 Campaign in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoni, M.; Massaro, F.; Paggi, A.; D'Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Masetti, N.; Smith, H. A.; Tosti, G.; Chomiuk, L.; Strader, J.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of our exploratory program carried out with the southern Astrophysical Research telescope aimed at associating counterparts and establishing the nature of the Fermi Unidentified γ-ray Sources (UGSs). We selected the optical counterparts of six UGSs from the Fermi catalog on the basis of our recently discovered tight connection between infrared and γ-ray emission found for the γ-ray blazars detected by the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer in its all-sky survey. We perform for the first time a spectroscopic study of the low-energy counterparts of the Fermi UGSs, in the optical band, confirming the blazar-like nature of the whole sample. We also present new spectroscopic observations of six active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources which appear to be BL Lac objects. Finally, we report the spectra collected for six known γ-ray blazars belonging to the Roma BZCAT that were obtained to establish their nature or better estimate their redshifts. Two interesting cases of high redshift and extremely luminous BL Lac objects (z ≥ 1.18 and z ≥ 1.02, based on the detection of Mg ii intervening systems) are also discussed. Based on observations obtained at the southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  13. Detection of High-Frequency Oscillations and Damping from Multi-slit Spectroscopic Observations of the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, T.; Singh, J.; Sindhuja, G.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-01-01

    During the total solar eclipse of 11 July 2010, multi-slit spectroscopic observations of the solar corona were performed from Easter Island, Chile. To search for high-frequency waves, observations were taken at a high cadence in the green line at 5303 Å that is due to [Fe xiv] and the red line at 6374 Å that is due to [Fe x]. The data were analyzed to study the periodic variations in intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width using wavelet analysis. The data with high spectral and temporal resolution enabled us to study the rapid dynamical changes within coronal structures. We find that at certain locations, each parameter shows significant oscillation with periods ranging from 6 - 25 s. For the first time, we were able to detect damping of high-frequency oscillations with periods of about 10 s. If the observed damped oscillations are due to magnetohydrodynamic waves, then they can contribute significantly to the heating of the corona. From a statistical study we try to characterize the nature of the observed oscillations while considering the distribution of power in different line parameters.

  14. An Overview of Ultraviolet Through Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopic Observations of Mercury During the First MESSENGER Flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izenberg, N. R.; McClintock, W. E.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Domingue, D. L.; Head, J. W.; Jensen, E. A.; Kochte, M. C.; Lankton, M. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Sprague, A. L.; Vilas, F.; Solomon, S. C.

    2008-05-01

    During the first MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on January 14, 2008, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) measured reflectance spectra from Mercury's surface over the wavelength range 220-1450 nm. These are the first high-spatial-resolution (<10 km) spectra at any wavelength and the first reported ultraviolet (UV, wavelength < 360 nm) observations of the surface. MASCS observed the sunlit surface for approximately 14 minutes after closest approach, acquiring over 650 spectra with the Visible and Infrared Spectrograph (VIRS) detectors of MASCS sensitive to wavelengths of 350-1450 nm. MASCS also obtained just under four grating scans in the middle ultraviolet (220-320 nm) using MASCS's Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) component. Most of the near-equatorial ground track of the observation covered terrain in the previously unseen hemisphere of Mercury but also crossed into the hemisphere viewed by Mariner 10 south of Mozart crater and in Tir Planitia. Ground-based observations of Mercury reveal a surface with a red, nearly featureless spectrum in the visible and near-infrared (wavelengths greater than ~ 500 nm) that has been interpreted as evidence for a largely iron-poor feldspathic composition. Initial analyses of VIRS spectra also show strongly red-sloped, near featureless spectra, appearing to support contentions of low iron abundance in surface materials. However, interpretation of Mercury's spectral reflectance is complicated by our lack of knowledge about the effects on its surface materials of space weathering, which both suppresses the strength of spectral absorption features and reddens the spectrum. Brightness variations and absorption bands in ultraviolet reflectance may help determine both the nature and extent of processes that modify observed reflectance at longer wavelengths. MASCS surface observation data demonstrate spectral variations across the Mercury surface that can be related to previous telescopic

  15. Direct Spectroscopic Observation of the Structural Origin of Peroxide Generation from Co-Based Pyrolyzed Porphyrins for ORR Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelbauer,J.; Olson, T.; Pylypenko, S.; Alamgir, F.; Jaye, C.; Atanassov, P.; Mukerjee, S.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrolyzed transition metal based porphyrins present an attractive alternative to state of the art Pt-based electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications based on their comparatively low cost. Unfortunately, the large array of precursors and synthetic strategies has led to considerable ambiguity regarding the specific structure/property relationships that give rise to their activity for oxygen reduction. Specifically, considerable debate exists in actual chemical structure of the pyrolyzed reaction centers, and their relationship to membrane-damaging peroxide yield. In this manuscript a comprehensive electrochemical and spectroscopic study of pyrolyzed CoTMPP produced via a self-templating process is presented. The resulting electrocatalysts are not carbon-supported, but are highly porous self-supported pyropolymers. Rotating ring disk electrode measurements showed that the materials pyrolyzed at 700 C exhibited the highest performance, whereas pyrolysis at 800 C resulted in a significant increase in the peroxide yield. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Co L and K edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies confirm that the majority of the Co-N4 active site has broken down to Co-N2 at 800 C. Application of ?{mu} analysis (an X-ray absorption near-edge structure difference technique) to the in situ Co K edge EXAFS data allowed for direct spectroscopic observation of the geometry of Oads on the pyropolymer active sites. The specific geometrical adsorption of molecular oxygen with respect to the plane of the Co-Nx moieties highly influences the oxygen reduction reaction pathway. The application of the ?{mu} technique to other transition metal based macrocycle electrocatalyst systems is expected to provide similarly detailed information.

  16. Time Series Spectroscopic and Photometric Observations of the Massive DAV BPM 37093

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Atsuko; Kepler, S. O.; Chene, Andre–Nicolas; Koester, D.; Provencal, J. L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Chote, Paul; Safeko, Ramotholo; Kanaan, Antonio; Romero, Alejandra; Corti, Mariela; Corti, Mariela; Kilic, Mukremin; Winget, D. E.

    2015-06-01

    BPM 37093 was the first of only a handful of massive (1.05+/-0.05 M⊙; Bergeron 2004;Koester & Allard 2000) white dwarf pulsators discovered (Kanaan et al. 1992). These stars are particularly interesting because the crystallized mass-fraction as a function of mass and temperature is poorly constrained by observation, yet this process adds 1-2 Gyr uncertainty in ages of the oldest white dwarf stars observed and hence, in the ages of associations that contain them (Abrikosov 1960; Kirzhnits 1960; Salpeter 1961). Last year, we discovered that ESO uses BPM 37093 as a standard star and extracted corresponding spectra from the public archive. The data suggested a large variation in the observed hydrogen line profiles that could potentially be due to pulsations, but the measurement did not reach a detection-quality threshold. To further explore this possibility, though, we obtained 4hrs of continuous time series spectroscopy of BPM 37093 with Gemini in the Northern Spring of 2014. We present our preliminary results from these data along with those from the accompanying time series photometric observations we gathered from Mt. John (New Zealand), South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), Panchromatic Robotic optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes (PROMPT) in Chile, and Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (Argentina) to support the Gemini observations.

  17. Special configuration of a very large Schmidt telescope for extensive astronomical spectroscopic observation.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Su, D Q; Chu, Y Q; Cui, X; Wang, Y N

    1996-09-01

    A special reflecting Schmidt telescope is used to observe celestial objects. The telescope has an aperture of 4m, f ratio of 5, and a 5° field of view. Its optical axis is fixed and tilted 25° to the horizontal that runs from south to north. The celestial objects were observed for 1.5 h as they passed through the meridian. The shape of the reflecting Schmidt plate has to be changed with each different declination δ and in the tracking process. This is achieved with active optics. The sky area to be observed is -10° ≤ δ ≤ +90°. There are plans to place ~4000 optical fibers on the telescope focal surface that will lead to a dozen spectrographs.

  18. Spectroscopic Observation of Comet P/de Vico: Comparison with P/Halley and P/Brorsen-Metcalf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Ayani, Kazuya; Matsubara, Keiji

    1998-06-01

    A spectroscopic observation of Comet P/de Vico in the visible region was made at Bisei Astronomical Observatory on 1995 October 11. The obtained spectrum covers the wavelengths from 5200 to 7200 Angstroms, and includes several emissions, such as C_2, NH_2, and [O I]. The ratios of the gas-production rates of C_2 and NH_2 relative to that of H_2O, Q(C_2)/Q(H_2O), and Q(NH_2)/Q(H_2O), were determined from our observation based on the Haser model. The production-rate ratio and gas-to-dust ratio were: Q(C_2)/Q(H_2O) = 0.25%, Q(NH_2)/Q(H_2O) = 0.14%, and log_ {10}[ Q(H_2O)/Af rho ] = 26.9 at the time of observation. Comet P/de Vico was similar to P/Halley from the viewpoint of the chemical composition (C_2 and NH_2 relative to the H_2O), and P/de Vico was comparable to P/Brorsen-Metcalf concerning the gas-to-dust ratio. P/de Vico was one of the most gas-rich comets ever known.

  19. Spectroscopic observations of the Uranus' satellite Miranda in Near-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgeot, F.; Dumas, C.; Merlin, F.; Vernazza, P.; Alvarez-Candal, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present new Near-IR spectra of the Uranus' icy satellite Miranda. This body is probably the most remarkable of all satellites of Uranus, displaying series of surface features such as faults, craters and largescale upwelling, remnant of a geologically very active past. The observations were performed first at the Palomar Observatory with the PHARO instrument (Palomar High Angular Resolution Observer) and then at the Mauna Kea Observatory with SpeX instrument based on the IRTF (Infra-Red Telescope Facility). Water ice is clearly visible in K-band (large 2.0 μm absorption band) and crystalline water ice (at 1.65 μm) seems to cover the most part of the satellite's surface. We focused the study in H band on the 1.42-1.72 μm range at observations dates corresponding to the leading and trailing hemispheres of Miranda. Contrary to the other outer Uranus' moons (Grundy et al. 2006), we did not found any significative differences between both hemispheres in this spectral range. We also studied the possible presence of volatiles like ammonia hydrate and do not exclude the possible presence of a tiny 2.22 μm band yet observed by Bauer et al. 2002. No significant features of carbon dioxide were identified on any spectra. We performed spectral models, based on bi-hemispherical reflectance theory (Hapke 1993) in order to obtain more details on the chemical compounds possibly present on the surface of this Uranian satellite.

  20. Advanced techniques for high resolution spectroscopic observations of cosmic gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Pelling, M. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Pehl, R. H.; Hurley, K. C.; Vedrenne, G.; Sniel, M.; Durouchoux, P.

    1985-01-01

    An advanced gamma-ray spectrometer that is currently in development is described. It will obtain a sensitivity of 0.0001 ph/sq cm./sec in a 6 hour balloon observation and uses innovative techniques for background reduction and source imaging.

  1. IN-SITU SEQUESTRATION OF ZINC: SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS FROM A FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc concentrations in the soil and groundwater at the Indian Head Naval Warfare Center, located in Charles County Maryland, have been observed at levels exceeding 20 g/kg and 25 mg/L respectively due to the operation of a zinc recovery furnace during WWI. Erosion of the site due...

  2. Inferential monitoring of chlorinated solvents through Raman spectroscopic observation of the vibrational modes of water.

    PubMed

    Sinfield, Joseph V; Monwuba, Chike

    2016-02-01

    Recent improvements in diode laser, fiber optic, and data acquisition technology have rejuvenated interest in field applications of Raman spectroscopy in a wide range of settings. One such application involves the observation of chlorinated solvents to facilitate the practice of "monitored natural attenuation." In this context, this manuscript focuses on means to improve the sensitivity of in-situ Raman analysis of chlorinated solvents. In particular, the work explores the performance limits of a Time-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy (TRRS) system employed to observe chlorinated solvents in aqueous samples via laboratory tests conducted on both liquid standards of trichloroethylene (TCE) and simulated biodegraded field samples. Quantitative assessment of TCE in solution is carried out through both direct observation of TCE Raman functional groups (381 cm(-1) (δ skeletal), 840 cm(-1) (νCCl) and 1242 cm(-1) (δCH)) and indirect observation of the broad OH stretching (2700-3800 cm(-1)) Raman modes of water. Results from tests on simple solutions show that the TRRS system can detect TCE at aqueous concentrations as low as 70 ppm by directly monitoring the 381 cm(-1) TCE line, whereas observation of the OH stretching line of water (3393 cm(-1)) provides an indirect indication of TCE presence with nearly a 9× improvement in detection level. This unique and counterintuitive mechanism to detect the presence of chlorinated compounds in solution takes advantage of the influence of chlorine on the vibrational modes of water. This influence, which is believed to be attributed to the formation of hydrogen bonds and their resultant interactions with the solvation shell, may serve as a more sensitive and robust indication of the presence of aggregate chlorinated solvent contamination in aqueous systems. Tests performed on simulated biodegraded field samples demonstrate that the indirect detection mechanism is apparent even in complex samples representative of typical field

  3. The composition of M-type asteroids II: Synthesis of spectroscopic and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeley, J. R.; Clark, B. E.; Ockert-Bell, M. E.; Shepard, M. K.; Conklin, J.; Cloutis, E. A.; Fornasier, S.; Bus, S. J.

    2014-08-01

    This work updates and expands on results of our long-term radar-driven observational campaign of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) focused on Bus-DeMeo Xc- and Xk-type objects (Tholen X and M class asteroids) using the Arecibo radar and NASA Infrared Telescope Facilities (Ockert-Bell, M.E., Clark, B.E., Shepard, M.K., Rivkin, A.S., Binzel, R.P., Thomas, C.A., DeMeo, F.E., Bus, S.J., Shah, S. [2008]. Icarus 195, 206-219; Ockert-Bell, M.E., Clark, B.E., Shepard, M.K., Issacs, R.A., Cloutis, E.A., Fornasier, S., Bus, S.J. [2010]. Icarus 210, 674-692; Shepard, M.K. et al. [2008a]. Icarus 193, 20-38; Shepard, M.K. et al. [2008b]. Icarus 195, 184-205; Shepard, M.K. et al. [2010]. Icarus 215, 547-551). Eighteen of our targets were near-simultaneously observed with radar and those observations are described in Shepard et al. (Shepard, M.K. et al. [2010]. Icarus 215, 547-551). We combine our near-infrared data with available visible wavelength data for a more complete compositional analysis of our targets. Compositional evidence is derived from our target asteroid spectra using two different methods, a χ2 search for spectral matches in the RELAB database and parametric comparisons with meteorites. We present four new methods of parametric comparison, including discriminant analysis. Discriminant analysis identifies meteorite type with 85% accuracy. This paper synthesizes the results of these two analog search algorithms and reconciles those results with analogs suggested from radar data (Shepard, M.K. et al. [2010]. Icarus 215, 547-551). We have observed 29 asteroids, 18 in conjunction with radar observations. For eighteen out of twenty-nine objects observed (62%) our compositional predictions are consistent over two or more methods applied. We find that for our Xc and Xk targets the best fit is an iron meteorite for 34% of the samples. Enstatite chondrites were best fits for 6 of our targets (21%). Stony-iron meteorites were best fits for 2 of our targets (7%). A discriminant

  4. Non-LTE Inversion of Spectropolarimetric and Spectroscopic Observations of a Small Active-region Filament Observed at the VTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, P.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; Koza, J.; Gömöry, P.; Rybák, J.; Kučera, A.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    An active region mini-filament was observed by VTT simultaneously in the HeI 10 830 Å triplet by the TIP 1 spectropolarimeter, in Hα by the TESOS Fabry-Pérot interferometer, and in Ca II 8542 Å by the VTT spectrograph. The spectropolarimetric data were inverted using the HAZEL code and Hα profiles were modelled solving a NLTE radiative transfer in a simple isobaric and isothermal 2D slab irradiated both from bottom and sides. It was found that the mini-filament is composed of horizontal fluxtubes, along which the cool plasma of T˜10 000 K can flow by very large - even supersonic - velocities.

  5. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopic Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    An X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 was observed by multiple spectrometers in UV, EUV and X-ray (Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI), and multi-wavelength imaging observations (SDO/AIA and HMI). We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. We calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg II triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3-7.7)x1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30-40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg II subordinate line is about (4.6-6.7)×109 erg cm-2 s-1: ˜6%-22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  6. Preliminary results of the solar corona spectroscopic observation of 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungging Mumpuni, Emanuel; Zamzam Nurzaman, Muhamad; Suryana, Nana

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopy observation of solar corona has been carried out from 9th March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse expedition in Maba, East Halmahera. Due to limitation by the weather condition during the observation, the obtained data were not favorable. Because of the low signal to noise ratio, the wavelength calibration was not straightforward. To obtain the optimum results, steps for data reduction were performed as the following: selecting the finest data, extracting the 1D spectrum from 2D spectrum, and calibrating spectrum wavelength (including careful interpolation). In this preliminary result, we discuss the instrumentation, the data under investigation, the extraction process of spectrum, and the polynomial interpolation that has been used for extracting information from our data.

  7. Evidence for CO in Jupiter's atmosphere from airborne spectroscopic observations at 5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, H. P.; Fink, U.; Treffers, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    High-altitude (12.4 km) spectra of Jupiter recorded at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory are analyzed for the presence of CO absorption lines. A line-by-line comparison of Jupiter's spectrum with that of carbon monoxide is presented, as well as a correlation analysis that includes the influence of other gases present in Jupiter's atmosphere (CH4, NH3, H2O, PH3, and GeH4). The resulting evidence points strongly to the presence of carbon monoxide in Jupiter's atmosphere, thus strengthening Beer's evidence for it. Possible explanations for the existence and observability of Jovian CO, including convection from hotter, deeper layers or decomposition of organic molecules, are explored. A recent suggestion that the Jovian CO is restricted to stratospheric levels is not supported by the observations.

  8. Spectroscopic observations of the extended corona during the SOHO whole sun month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, L.; Raymond, J. C.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Fineschi, S.; Gardner, L. D.; Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Romoli, M.; Noci, G.; Kohl, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The spatial distribution of plasma parameters in the extended corona, derived from the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer (UVCS) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), was investigated. The observations were carried out during the SOHO whole month campaign. Daily coronal scans in the H I Lyman alpha and O VI lambda-lambda 1032 A and 1037 A were used. Maps of outflow velocities of O(5+), based on Doppler dimming of the O VI lines, are discussed. The velocity distribution widths of O(5+) are shown to be a clear signature of coronal holes while the velocity distributions for H(0) show a much smaller effect. The possible physical explanations for some of the observed features are discussed.

  9. Spectroscopic observations of the displacement dynamics of physically adsorbed molecules-CO on C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we observed physically adsorbed CO molecules on C60 surface being displaced by impinging noble gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr), either through a dynamic displacement process or an exothermic replacement process, depending on their adsorption energies. This displacement mechanism could shift from one to the other depending on the surface coverage and temperature. Furthermore, rotational energy of the impinging molecules may also contribute to the dynamic displacement process by supplying additional energy.

  10. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-11-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2.3 μm. Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  11. SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE NORTHERN SPUR OF M31

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, X.; Liu, X.-W.; Zhang, Y.; Garcia-Benito, R.

    2013-09-10

    We present spectroscopy of three planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Northern Spur of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) obtained with the Double Spectrograph on the 5.1 m Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The samples were selected from the observations of Merrett et al. Our purpose is to investigate the formation of the substructures of M31 using PNe as a tracer of chemical abundances. The [O III] {lambda}4363 line is detected in the spectra of two objects, enabling temperature determinations. Ionic abundances are derived from the observed collisionally excited lines, and elemental abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. We study the correlations between oxygen and the {alpha}-element abundance ratios using our sample and the M31 disk and bulge PNe from the literature. In one of the three PNe, we observed a relatively higher oxygen abundance compared to the disk sample of M31 at similar galactocentric distances. The results of at least one of the three Northern Spur PNe might be in line with the proposed possible origin of the Northern Spur substructure of M31, i.e., the Northern Spur is connected to the Southern Stream and both substructures comprise the tidal debris of the satellite galaxies of M31.

  12. Spectroscopic Observations of Planetary Nebulae in the Northern Spur of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Zhang, Y.; García-Benito, R.; Liu, X.-W.; Yuan, H.-B.

    2013-09-01

    We present spectroscopy of three planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Northern Spur of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) obtained with the Double Spectrograph on the 5.1 m Hale Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The samples were selected from the observations of Merrett et al. Our purpose is to investigate the formation of the substructures of M31 using PNe as a tracer of chemical abundances. The [O III] λ4363 line is detected in the spectra of two objects, enabling temperature determinations. Ionic abundances are derived from the observed collisionally excited lines, and elemental abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur, and argon are estimated. We study the correlations between oxygen and the α-element abundance ratios using our sample and the M31 disk and bulge PNe from the literature. In one of the three PNe, we observed a relatively higher oxygen abundance compared to the disk sample of M31 at similar galactocentric distances. The results of at least one of the three Northern Spur PNe might be in line with the proposed possible origin of the Northern Spur substructure of M31, i.e., the Northern Spur is connected to the Southern Stream and both substructures comprise the tidal debris of the satellite galaxies of M31.

  13. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopic Observations of the Upper Scorpius Eclipsing Binary EPIC 203868608

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marshall C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Kaplan, Kyle; McLane, Jacob; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2017-06-01

    EPIC 203868608 is a source in the ~10 Myr old Upper Scorpius OB association. Using K2 photometry and ground-based follow-up observations, David et al. (2016) found that it consists of two brown dwarfs with a tertiary object at a projected separation of ~20 AU; the former objects appear to be a double-lined eclipsing binary with a period of 4.5 days. This is one of only two known eclipsing SB2s where both components are below the hydrogen-burning limit. We present additional follow-up observations of this system from the IGRINS high-resolution near-infrared spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. Our measured radial velocities do not follow the orbital solution presented by David et al. (2016). Instead, our combined IGRINS plus literature radial velocity dataset appears to indicate a period significantly different than that of the eclipsing binary obvious from the K2 light curve. We will discuss possible scenarios to account for the conflicting observations of this system.

  14. How Can Multi-Site Evaluations Be Participatory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrenz, Frances; Huffman, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Multi-site evaluations are becoming increasingly common in federal funding portfolios. Although much thought has been given to multi-site evaluation, there has been little emphasis on how it might interact with participatory evaluation. Therefore, this paper reviews several National Science Foundation educational, multi-site evaluations for the…

  15. Spectroscopic observations of winds on Venus. I - Technique and data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, A. T.; Crisp, D.; Barker, E. S.; Schorn, R. A.; Young, L. D. G.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of measurement and reduction of high-dispersion photographic spectra of Venus are presented. Preliminary results are consistent with slow direct or no rotation at the level sample, and disagree strongly with a 4-day retrograde rotation. A serious systematic error, which affects much published work, is due to blending of solar lines in the sky with those reflected from the planet. This always tends to produce a spurious retrograde 'rotation'. Only data obtained in a dark sky, or daytime observations from which the sky lines have been accurately subtracted, can be relied upon. All such data give low wind speeds.

  16. Future prospects for spectroscopic and direct work - Optical and UV. [astronomical observations with Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the main features and proposed instrumentation of the 2.4 m Space Telescope is given. Highlights of work that can be planned on active nuclei of galaxies, QSOs, and BL Lac objects are briefly outlined, involving spectroscopy over wavelengths from 1200 A to 1 mm, direct imaging with 0.1 sec resolution, and the capability for 0.1 sec resolution along the spectrograph slit. The resolution, the much reduced sky background, and the full wavelength coverage also make possible important observations relevant to cosmology.

  17. The FUor Candidate V582 Aurigae: First Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkov, Evgeni H.; Peneva, Stoyanka P.; Dennefeld, Michel

    One of the most attractive events in the pre-main sequence evolution is the FU Orionis (FUor) outburst. Because only a small number of FUor stars have been detected to date, photometric and spectral studies of every new object are of great interest. Recently, a new FUor candidate was discovered by Anton Khruslov - V582 Aur. To confirm the FUors nature of this object we started regular photometric observations with the telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen (Bulgaria). A high-resolution spectrum of V582 Aur was obtained with the 1.93 m telescope in Haute-Provence Observatory (France).

  18. In Situ Spectroscopic Observation of Activation and Transformation of Tantalum Suboxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Zhi; Cruz, Tirma Herranz; Salmeron, Miquel; Liang, Hong

    2009-12-16

    Using ambient pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (AP-XPS), we were able to observe the process of oxidation of tantalum with different morphological parameters. Being able to trace surface evolution during oxidation, we evaluated activation energy of oxidation under the influence of strain and grain boundaries. It was found that the metal oxidized through three different stages and there was a transition stage where the phase transformation from suboxides to the equilibrium state of pentoxide. The applied stress and surface defects reduced the activation energy oxidation.

  19. Probing the IRC+10 ° 216 circumstellar envelope using spectroscopic observations of background stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Tim; Mauron, Nicolas; McCombie, June; Sarre, Peter

    2004-02-01

    A unique and novel set of observations has been undertaken to study the circumstellar envelope (CSE) of the nearby (130 pc) carbon star IRC +10° 216 using optical absorption spectroscopy towards twobackground stars lying beyond the envelope.The primary aim of the observations is to search for diffuse band (DIB)carriers in the CSE. The circumstellar H+2H2column density expected along the line of sight towards the targets islarge compared to that derived from the small interstellar reddening inthis region, E B-V< 0.03 mag. We summarise our mainfindings, already reported in Kendall et al. (2002): The 6284Å DIB is detected in the VLT/UVES spectrum of one target, but clearly arises inthe foreground ISM. No other DIB is seen. Hence the DIB carriers, if present in the CSE, have a low abundance relative to H in the C-rich envelope of IRC +10°216, in comparison with this ratio in theISM. An important new result, previously unreported, concerns the detectionof circumstellar C2 via absorption of the Phillips bandnear 8760Å.

  20. A Photometric and Spectroscopic Study of 3 Vulpeculae: An Observer's Nightmare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, Robert J., Jr.; Kubinec, William R.; Kubinec, Angela; Adelman, Saul J.

    2003-07-01

    We describe photometry of 3 Vulpeculae obtained with the Four College Automated Photoelectric Telescope and spectroscopy obtained with the 1.22 m telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. We have analyzed differential uvby photometric observations obtained over 7 yr. Three main frequencies (f1=0.9719, f2=0.7923, and f3=0.8553 cycles day-1) were found, as well as a sum frequency (f1+f2=1.76420 cycles day-1). A study of the photographic region using high-dispersion spectrograms obtained with a Reticon detector at the coudé spectrograph confirms the variable nature of 3 Vul as a 53 Persei star and indicates that the star's abundances are normal for main-sequence band B stars. The new spectra were combined with those previously published to confirm an orbital period very close to 1 yr. Finally, comparison with models yielded both a mass (4.16 Msolar) and an age (25 Myr), and a mass range for the companion (0.6-1.1 Msolar). With an orbital period of almost 1 yr and a pulsation period of almost 1 day, this star is indeed an observer's nightmare.

  1. New photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciroi, S.; Afanasiev, V. L.; Moiseev, A. V.; Botte, V.; Di Mille, F.; Dodonov, S. N.; Rafanelli, P.; Smirnova, A. A.

    2005-06-01

    We present new important results about the intermediate-type Seyfert galaxy Mrk 315, recently observed through optical imaging and integral-field spectroscopy. Broad-band images were used to study the morphology of the host galaxy, narrow-band Hα images to trace the star-forming regions, and middle-band [OIII] images to evidence the distribution of the highly ionized gas. Some extended emission regions were isolated and their physical properties studied by means of flux-calibrated spectra. High-resolution spectroscopy was used to separate different kinematic components in the velocity fields of gas and stars. Some peculiar features characterize this apparently undisturbed and moderately isolated active galaxy. Such features, already investigated by other authors, are re-analysed and discussed in the light of these new observations. The most relevant results we obtained are: the multitiers structure of the disc; the presence of a quasi-ring of regions with star formation much higher than previous claims; a secondary nucleus confirmed by a stellar component kinematically decoupled by the main galaxy; a new hypothesis about the controversial nature of the long filament, initially described as hook shaped, and more likely made of two independent filaments caused by interaction events between the main galaxy and two dwarf companions.

  2. Spatially resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of colorectal and pancreatic field carcinogenesis observed by inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Azarin, Samira Michelle; Horcher, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Michael J.; Bianchi, Laura K.; Bajaj, Shailesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Field carcinogenesis is the initial stage of cancer progression. Understanding field carcinogenesis is valuable for both cancer biology and clinical medicine. Here, we used inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography to study colorectal cancer (CRC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) field carcinogenesis. Depth-resolved optical and ultrastructural properties of the mucosa were quantified from histologically normal rectal biopsies from patients with and without colon adenomas (n=85) as well as from histologically normal peri-ampullary duodenal biopsies from patients with and without PC (n=22). Changes in the epithelium and stroma in CRC field carcinogenesis were separately quantified. In both compartments, optical and ultra-structural alterations were consistent. Optical alterations included lower backscattering (μb) and reduced scattering (μs′) coefficients and higher anisotropy factor g. Ultrastructurally pronounced alterations were observed at length scales up to ∼450  nm, with the shape of the mass density correlation function having a higher shape factor D, thus implying a shift to larger length scales. Similar alterations were found in the PC field carcinogenesis despite the difference in genetic pathways and etiologies. We further verified that the chromatin clumping in epithelial cells and collagen cross-linking caused D to increase in vitro and could be among the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in epithelium and stroma, respectively. PMID:24643530

  3. Ultrafast spectroscopy and computational study of the photochemistry of diphenylphosphoryl azide: direct spectroscopic observation of a singlet phosphorylnitrene.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Shubham; Muthukrishnan, Sivaramakrishnan; Kubicki, Jacek; McCulla, Ryan D; Burdzinski, Gotard; Sliwa, Michel; Platz, Matthew S; Hadad, Christopher M

    2010-12-01

    The photochemistry of diphenylphosphoryl azide was studied by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, by chemical analysis of light-induced reaction products, and by RI-CC2/TZVP and TD-B3LYP/TZVP computational methods. Theoretical methods predicted two possible mechanisms for singlet diphenylphosphorylnitrene formation from the photoexcited phosphoryl azide. (i) Energy transfer from the (π,π*) singlet excited state, localized on a phenyl ring, to the azide moiety, thereby leading to the formation of the singlet excited azide, which subsequently loses molecular nitrogen to form the singlet diphenylphosphorylnitrene. (ii) Direct irradiation of the azide moiety to form an excited singlet state of the azide, which in turn loses molecular nitrogen to form the singlet diphenylphosphorylnitrene. Two transient species were observed upon ultrafast photolysis (260 nm) of diphenylphosphoryl azide. The first transient absorption, centered at 430 nm (lifetime (τ) ∼ 28 ps), was assigned to a (π,π*) singlet S(1) excited state localized on a phenyl ring, and the second transient observed at 525 nm (τ ∼ 480 ps) was assigned to singlet diphenylphosphorylnitrene. Experimental and computational results obtained from the study of diphenyl phosphoramidate, along with the results obtained with diphenylphosphoryl azide, supported the mechanism of energy transfer from the singlet excited phenyl ring to the azide moiety, followed by nitrogen extrusion to form the singlet phosphorylnitrene. Ultrafast time-resolved studies performed on diphenylphosphoryl azide with the singlet nitrene quencher, tris(trimethylsilyl)silane, confirmed the spectroscopic assignment of singlet diphenylphosphorylnitrene to the 525 nm absorption band.

  4. Imaging and spectroscopic observations of a filament channel and the implications for the nature of counter-streamings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. F.; Fang, C.; Harra, L. K.

    2014-03-20

    The dynamics of a filament channel are observed with imaging and spectroscopic telescopes before and during the filament eruption on 2011 January 29. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral observations reveal that there are no EUV counterparts of the Hα counter-streamings in the filament channel, implying that the ubiquitous Hα counter-streamings found by previous research are mainly due to longitudinal oscillations of filament threads, which are not in phase between each other. However, there exist larger-scale patchy counter-streamings in EUV along the filament channel from one polarity to the other, implying that there is another component of unidirectional flow (in the range of ±10 km s{sup –1}) inside each filament thread in addition to the implied longitudinal oscillation. Our results suggest that the flow direction of the larger-scale patchy counter-streaming plasma in the EUV is related to the intensity of the plage or active network, with the upflows being located at brighter areas of the plage and downflows at the weaker areas. We propose a new method to determine the chirality of an erupting filament on the basis of the skewness of the conjugate filament drainage sites. This method suggests that the right-skewed drainage corresponds to sinistral chirality, whereas the left-skewed drainage corresponds to dextral chirality.

  5. The "Cool Algol" BD+05 706 : Photometric observations of a new eclipsing double-lined spectroscopic binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Torres, G.; Neuhauser, R.

    1998-05-01

    BVRI Observations of the star BD+05 706, carried out between January, 1997, and April 1998 using the 0.4m reflector and Photometrics CCD camera at the Gettysburg College Observatory, show that the star is an eclipsing binary system with a light curve characteristic of a class of semi-detached binaries known as the "cool Algols". These results are in good agreement with the previous report of BD+05 706 as a cool Algol by Torres, Neuhauser, and Wichmann,(Astron. J., 115, May 1998) who based their classification on the strong X-ray emission detected by Rosat and on a series of spectroscopic observations of the radial velocities of both components of the system obtained at the Oak Ridge Observatory, the Fred L. Whipple Observatory, and the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Only 10 other examples of cool Algols are known, and the current photometric light curve, together with the radial velocity curves obtained previously, allows us to derive a complete solution for the physical parameters of each component, providing important constraints on models for these interesting systems.

  6. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey - III. An observed link between AGN Eddington ratio and narrow-emission-line ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lamperti, Isabella; Ricci, Claudio; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Berney, Simon; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Masetti, Nicola; Soto, Kurt T.; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the observed relationship between black hole mass (MBH), bolometric luminosity (Lbol) and Eddington ratio (λEdd) with optical emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6583/Hα, [S II] λλ6716, 6731/Hα, [O I] λ6300/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ, [Ne III] λ3869/Hβ and He II λ4686/Hβ) of hard X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey. We show that the [N II] λ6583/Hα ratio exhibits a significant correlation with λEdd (RPear = -0.44, p-value = 3 × 10-13, σ = 0.28 dex), and the correlation is not solely driven by MBH or Lbol. The observed correlation between [N II] λ6583/Hα ratio and MBH is stronger than the correlation with Lbol, but both are weaker than the λEdd correlation. This implies that the large-scale narrow lines of AGN host galaxies carry information about the accretion state of the AGN central engine. We propose that [N II] λ6583/Hα is a useful indicator of Eddington ratio with 0.6 dex of rms scatter, and that it can be used to measure λEdd and thus MBH from the measured Lbol, even for high-redshift obscured AGN. We briefly discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this correlation, such as the mass-metallicity relation, X-ray heating, and radiatively driven outflows.

  7. Probing the Impact of Stellar Duplicity on Planet Occurrence with Spectroscopic and Imaging Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggenberger, Anne; Udry, Stéphane

    Over the past 14 years, Doppler spectroscopy has been very successful in detecting and characterizing extrasolar planets, providing us with a wealth of information on these distant worlds (e.g., Marcy et al. 2005a; Udry and Santos 2007b; Udry et al. 2007a). One important and considerably unexpected fact these new data have taught us is that diversity is the rule in the planetary world. Diversity is found not only in the characteristics and orbital properties of the ˜ 340 planets detected thus far,1 but also in the types of environments in which they reside and are able to form. This observation has prompted a serious revision of the theories of planet formation (e.g., Lissauer and Stevenson 2007; Durisen et al. 2007; Nagasawa et al. 2007), leading to the idea that planet formation may be a richer and more robust process than originally thought.

  8. Spectroscopic observation of jet-cooled 2,5-dichlorobenzyl radical generated by corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Eun Hye; Yoon, Young Wook; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2014-07-01

    Vibronically excited but jet-cooled 2,5-dichlorobenzyl radical was generated from 2,5-dichlorotoluene precursor in a large excess of helium carrier gas, from which the visible vibronic emission spectrum was recorded. From an analysis of the spectrum observed, it was found that the origin band shows larger shift to red than those expected from mono-substitutions, which has been discussed in terms of orientation of substituents. Also, the electronic energy of the D1 → D0 transition and vibrational mode frequencies at the ground electronic state of the 2,5-dichlorobenzyl radical were determined in comparison with the known vibrational data of precursor and ab initio calculations.

  9. Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observation of Direct Coronal Heating During a C-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (9.8 s) stare mode during a C6.6 flare on the solar disk, we observed a sudden brightening of Fe xix line emission (formed at temperature T ˜ 8 MK) above the pre-flare noise without a corresponding brightening of emission from ions formed at lower temperatures, including He i (0.01 MK), Ov (0.25 MK), and Si xii (2 MK). The sudden brightening persisted as a plateau of Fe xix intensity that endured more than 11 minutes. The Fe xix emission at the rise and during the life of the plateau showed no evidence of significant bulk velocity flows, and hence cannot be attributed to chromospheric evaporation. However, the line width showed a significant broadening at the rise of the plateau, corresponding to nonthermal velocities of at least 89 km s-1 due to reconnection outflows or turbulence. During the plateau He i, Ov, and Si xii brightened at successively later times starting about 3.5 minutes after Fe xix, which suggests that these brightenings were produced by thermal conduction from the plasma that produced the Fe xix line emission; however, we cannot rule out the possibility that they were produced by a weak beam of nonthermal particles. We interpret an observed shortening of the Ov wavelength for about 1.5 minutes toward the middle of the plateau to indicate new upward motions driven by the flare, as occurs during gentle chromospheric evaporation; relative to a quiescent interval shortly before the flare, the Ov upward velocity was around -10 km s-1.

  10. New spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the A0 supergiant HD 92207

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Schöller, M.; Anderson, R. I.; Saesen, S.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.; Briquet, M.

    2015-02-01

    Our recent search for the presence of a magnetic field in the bright early A-type supergiant HD 92207 using FORS 2 in spectropolarimetric mode revealed the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field of the order of a few hundred Gauss. However, the definite confirmation of the magnetic nature of this object remained pending due to the detection of short-term spectral variability probably affecting the position of line profiles in left- and right-hand polarized spectra. We present new magnetic field measurements of HD 92207 obtained on three different epochs in 2013 and 2014 using FORS 2 in spectropolarimetric mode. A 3σ detection of the mean longitudinal magnetic field using the entire spectrum, _all=104±34 G, was achieved in observations obtained in 2014 January. At this epoch, the position of the spectral lines appeared stable. Our analysis of spectral line shapes recorded in opposite circularly polarized light, i.e. in light with opposite sense of rotation, reveals that line profiles in the light polarized in a certain direction appear slightly split. The mechanism causing such a behaviour in the circularly polarized light is currently unknown. Trying to settle the issue of short-term variability, we searched for changes in the spectral line profiles on a time scale of 8-10 min using HARPS polarimetric spectra and on a time scale of 3-4 min using time series obtained with the CORALIE spectrograph. No significant variability was detected on these time scales during the epochs studied. Based on observations collected with the CORALIE echelle spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at La Silla Observatory, data obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO Prg. 092.D-0209(A), and data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request MSCHOELLER 102067).

  11. Spectroscopic Coronal Observations During the Total Solar Eclipse of 11 July 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgaris, A. G.; Gaintatzis, P. S.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Economou, T. E.

    2012-05-01

    The flash spectra of the solar chromosphere and corona were measured with a slitless spectrograph before, after, and during the totality of the solar eclipse of 11 July 2010, at Easter Island, Chile. This eclipse took place at the beginning of Solar Cycle 24, after an extended minimum of solar activity. The spectra taken during the eclipse show a different intensity ratio of the red and green coronal lines compared with those taken during the total solar eclipse of 1 August 2008, which took place toward the end of Solar Cycle 23. The characteristic coronal emission line of forbidden Fe xiv (5303 Å) was observed on the east and west solar limbs in four areas relatively symmetrically located with respect to the solar rotation axis. Subtraction of the continuum flash-spectrum background led to the identification of several extremely weak emission lines, including forbidden Ca xv (5694 Å), which is normally detected only in regions of very high excitation, e.g., during flares or above large sunspots. The height of the chromosphere was measured spectrophotometrically, using spectral lines from light elements and compared with the equivalent height of the lower chromosphere measured using spectral lines from heavy elements.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopic Observations of the Secondary Stars of Short-period Sub-gap Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Ryan T.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Tappert, Claus; Howell, Steve B.

    2011-02-01

    We present K-band spectroscopy of short-period, "sub-gap" cataclysmic variable (CV) systems obtained using ISAAC on the Very Large Telescope. We show the infrared (IR) spectra for nine systems below the 2-3 hr period gap: V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, WX Hyi, V893 Sco, RZ Leo, and TY PsA. We are able to clearly detect the secondary star in all but WX Hyi, V893 Sco, and TY PsA. We present the first direct detection of the secondary stars of V2051 Oph, V436 Cen, and determine new spectral classifications for EX Hya, VW Hyi, Z Cha, and RZ Leo. We find that the CO band strengths of all but Z Cha appear normal for their spectral types, in contrast to their longer period cousins above the period gap. This brings the total number of CVs and pre-CVs with moderate resolution (R >~ 1500) IR spectroscopy to 61 systems: 19 pre-CVs, 31 non-magnetic systems, and 11 magnetic or partially magnetic systems. We discuss the trends seen in the IR abundance patterns thus far and highlight a potential link between anomalous abundances seen in the IR with the C IV/N V anomaly seen in the ultraviolet. We present a compilation of all systems with sufficient resolution IR observations to assess the CO band strengths and, by proxy, obtain an estimate on the C abundance on the secondary star.

  13. High-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi; Hitomi, Kobayashi; Decock, Alice; Jehin, Emmanuel; Boice, Daniel C.

    2014-11-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON).

  14. Spectroscopic observation of helium-ion- and hydrogen-catalyzed hydrino transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.; Lu, Ying; Akhtar, Kamran

    2010-06-01

    Four predictions of Mills’ Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics (GUTCP) regarding atomic hydrogen undergoing a catalytic reaction with certain atomized elements and ions which resonantly, nonradiatively accept integer multiples of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, m · 27.2 eV wherein m is an integer, have been confirmed experimentally. Specifically, a catalyst comprises a chemical or physical process with an enthalpy change equal to an integer multiple m of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, 27.2 eV. For He+ m = 2, due to its ionization reaction to He2+, and two H atoms formed from H2 by collision with a third, hot H can also act as a catalyst with m = 2 for this third H. The product is H(1/ p), fractional Rydberg states of atomic hydrogen called “hydrino atoms” wherein n = 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, …, 1/ p( p≤137 is an integer) replaces the well-known parameter n = integer in the Rydberg equation for hydrogen excited states. The predictions for the hydrino reaction of (1) pumping of the catalyst excited states, (2) characteristic EUV continuum radiation, (3) fast H, and (4) hydrino products were observed in multiple catalyst-hydrogen plasma systems.

  15. Spectroscopic observation of helium-ion- and hydrogen-catalyzed hydrino transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell; Lu, Ying; Akhtar, Kamran

    2010-06-01

    Four predictions of Mills' Grand Unified Theory of Classical Physics (GUTCP) regarding atomic hydrogen undergoing a catalytic reaction with certain atomized elements and ions which resonantly, nonradiatively accept integer multiples of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, m · 27.2 eV wherein m is an integer, have been confirmed experimentally. Specifically, a catalyst comprises a chemical or physical process with an enthalpy change equal to an integer multiple m of the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, 27.2 eV. For He+ m = 2, due to its ionization reaction to He2+, and two H atoms formed from H2 by collision with a third, hot H can also act as a catalyst with m = 2 for this third H. The product is H(1/p), fractional Rydberg states of atomic hydrogen called "hydrino atoms" wherein n = 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, …, 1/p(p≤137 is an integer) replaces the well-known parameter n = integer in the Rydberg equation for hydrogen excited states. The predictions for the hydrino reaction of (1) pumping of the catalyst excited states, (2) characteristic EUV continuum radiation, (3) fast H, and (4) hydrino products were observed in multiple catalyst-hydrogen plasma systems.

  16. The Mass Function of GX 339–4 from Spectroscopic Observations of Its Donor Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, M.; Jonker, P. G.; Torres, M. A. P.; Chiavassa, A.

    2017-09-01

    We obtained 16 VLT/X-shooter observations of GX 339‑4 in quiescence during the period 2016 May–September and detected absorption lines from the donor star in its NIR spectrum. This allows us to measure the radial velocity curve and projected rotational velocity of the donor for the first time. We confirm the 1.76 day orbital period and we find that K 2 = 219 ± 3 km s‑1, γ = 26 ± 2 km s‑1, and v\\sin i = 64 ± 8 km s‑1. From these values we compute a mass function f(M) = 1.91 ± 0.08 {M}ȯ , a factor ∼3 lower than previously reported, and a mass ratio q = 0.18 ± 0.05. We confirm the donor is a K-type star and estimate that it contributes ∼ 4 % {--}50 % of the light in the J- and H-bands. We constrain the binary inclination to 37° < i < 78° and the black hole (BH) mass to 2.3 {M}ȯ < {M}{BH} < 9.5 {M}ȯ . GX 339‑4 may therefore be the first BH to fall in the “mass-gap” of 2–5 M ⊙. Based on ESO program IDs 097.D-0915 and 297.D-5048.

  17. X-Ray Spectroscopic Observations with ASCA and BeppoSAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, J. S.

    Introduction X-ray spectroscopy The ASCA and BeppoSAX missions The most prominent spectral features observable with ASCA and - BeppoSAX A Few Notes on Spectral Data Fitting Introduction Data binning Model binning Calibration uncertainties Spectral deconvolution Statistics Low count rates Data presentation Plasma models Stellar Coronae Introduction Differential emission measure distribution techniques Temperature structure Abundances Flares Stellar evolution Hot Stars Introduction Normal O and B stars Luminous blue variables Wolf-Rayet stars Protostars and T Tauri Stars Introduction X-ray emission from protostars X-ray emission from T Tauri stars Cataclysmic Variables Introduction Non-magnetic cataclysmic variables Intermediate polars Polars High-Mass X-Ray Binaries Introduction Vela X-1 Cyg X-3 Cen X-3 SS 433 Other cases Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries Introduction 4U 1626-67 Cir X-1 Supernova Remnants Introduction Oxygen-ricg remnats: Cas A Young type Ia remnants Old shell-like remnants Synchrotron X-ray emission from SNRs Crab-like remnants Center-filled thermal remnants Jets interacting with SNRs Isolated pulsars The Magellanic Cloud SNRs Supernova explosions in distant galaxies Extended X-Ray Emission from Normal Galaxies The galactic ridge The galactic center X-ray emission from other normal galaxies Seyfert 1 Galaxies The iron line Warm absorbers The power law component Soft components Low-luminosity AGN Broad-line radio galaxies Seyfert 2 Galaxies Introduction NGC 1068 NGC 6552 NGC 4945 NGC 1808 Other cases Intermediate cases: narrow-line emission galaxies and others Quasars Radio-quiet quasars Radio-loud quasars Type 2 quasars BL Lac objects Clusters of Galaxies Temperature distribtuion of the hot medium The cooling flow and the central temperature distribtuion Mass distribution Groups of galaxies Cluster mergers and dynamical evolution Optical-depth effects The quest for the Hubble constant Abundances in nearby clusters Abundances in distant clusters Abundances

  18. Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations of the Algol Type Binary V Triangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, A. B.; Zhang, X. B.; Fu, J. N.; Zhang, Y. P.; Cang, T. Q.; Fox-Machado, L.; Li, C. Q.; Khokhuntod, P.; Luo, Y. P.

    2017-06-01

    Time-series, multi-color photometry and high-resolution spectra of the short-period eclipsing binary V Tri were obtained through observation. The completely covered light and radial velocity (RV) curves of the binary system are presented. All times of light minima derived from both photoelectric and CCD photometry were used to calculate the orbital period and new ephemerides of the eclipsing system. The analysis of the O - C diagram reveals that the orbital period is 0.58520481 days, decreasing at a rate of dP/dt = -7.80 × 10-8 day yr-1. The mass transfer between the two components and the light-time-travel effect due to a third body could be used to explain the period decrease. However, a semi-detached configuration with the lower-mass component filling and the primary nearly filling each of their Roche lobes was derived from the synthesis of the light and RV curves by using the 2015 version of the Wilson-Devinney code. We consider the period decrease to be the nonconservative mass transfer from the secondary component to the primary and the mass loss of the system, which was thought to be an EB type, while it should be an EA type (semi-detached Algol-type) from our study. The masses, radii, and luminosities of the primary and secondary are 1.60 ± 0.07 M ⊙, 1.64 ± 0.02 R ⊙, and 14.14 ± 0.73 L ⊙ and 0.74 ± 0.02 M ⊙, 1.23 ± 0.02 R ⊙, and 1.65 ± 0.05 L ⊙, respectively.

  19. Spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17nb and CSS170922:172546+342249 by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmanen, J.; Mattila, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Reynolds, T.; Somero, A.; Kangas, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Dong, S.; Pastorello, A.; Pursimo, T.; NUTS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-17nb in MCG+06-17-007 and CSS170922:172546+342249 in an unknown host galaxy.

  20. Spectroscopic observation of AT2016iyw and AT2016jal by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Lundqvist, P.; Ergon, M.; Kangas, T.; Mattila, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Somero, A.; Reynolds, T.; Stritzinger, M.; Dong, S.; Blay, P.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of two transients. The candidates were discovered by the ATLAS survey (Tonry et al., ATel #9685).

  1. Herschel spectroscopic observations of the compact obscured nucleus in Zw 049.057

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falstad, N.; González-Alfonso, E.; Aalto, S.; van der Werf, P. P.; Fischer, J.; Veilleux, S.; Meléndez, M.; Farrah, D.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The luminous infrared galaxy Zw 049.057 contains a compact obscured nucleus where a considerable amount of the galaxy's luminosity is generated. This nucleus contains a dusty environment that is rich in molecular gas. One approach to probing this kind of environment and to revealing what is hidden behind the dust is to study the rotational lines of molecules that couple well with the infrared radiation emitted by the dust. Aims: We probe the physical conditions in the core of Zw 049.057 and establish the nature of its nuclear power source (starburst or active galactic nucleus). Methods: We observed Zw 049.057 with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) onboard the Herschel Space Observatory in rotational lines of H2O, H218O, OH, 18OH, and [O I]. We modeled the unresolved core of the galaxy using a spherically symmetric radiative transfer code. To account for the different excitation requirements of the various molecular transitions, we use multiple components and different physical conditions. Results: We present the full high-resolution SPIRE FTS spectrum of Zw 049.057, along with relevant spectral scans in the PACS range. We find that a minimum of two different components (nuclear and extended) are required in order to account for the rich molecular line spectrum of Zw 049.057. The nuclear component has a radius of 10-30 pc, a very high infrared surface brightness (~1014L⊙kpc-2), warm dust (Td > 100 K), and a very large H2 column density (NH2 = 1024-1025 cm-2). The modeling also indicates high nuclear H2O (~5 × 10-6) and OH (~4 × 10-6) abundances relative to H2 as well as a low 16O/18O-ratio of 50-100. We also find a prominent infall signature in the [O I] line. We tentatively detect a 500 km s-1 outflow in the H2O 313 → 202 line. Conclusions: The high surface brightness of the core indicates the presence of either a buried active galactic nucleus or a very dense nuclear

  2. The Elephant's Trunk: Spectroscopic diagnostics applied to SOHO/CDS observations of the August 1996 equatorial coronal hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Bromage, B. J. I.

    1999-05-01

    A large equatorial coronal hole, named the ``Elephant's Trunk,'' was observed by the coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) during the last week of August 1996. Spatially averaged spectra within the hole and in neighboring quiet sun regions are analyzed and calibrated in intensity. Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques that make use of the CHIANTI atomic database are applied in an attempt to characterize such large-scale features. Line intensity ratios are used to obtain information on the electron density, temperature, and element abundances inside and outside the coronal hole. The transequatorial coronal hole showed, on average, coronal electron densities Ne~=2-3×108cm-3, a factor of 2 higher than the quiet sun areas near the hole. A differential emission measure analysis shows that emission measures in the coronal hole were much lower at temperatures above a million degrees than in the quiet sun regions. In the Elephant's Trunk, the temperature of peak emission is found to be ~=8×105K, compared to about 9.7×105K in the quiet sun. Indications of a first ionization potential (FIP) effect differentiating between cell centers and the network are found, both in coronal hole and quiet sun regions. A small plume was detected inside the Elephant's Trunk coronal hole at low latitude, on the disc.

  3. Spectroscopic observation of Lyα emitters at z ∼ 7.7 and implications on re-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Faisst, A. L.; Carollo, C. M.; Capak, P.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.

    2014-06-10

    We present spectroscopic follow-up observations on two bright Lyα emitter (LAE) candidates originally found by Krug et al. at a redshift of z ∼ 7.7 using the Multi-Object Spectrometer for Infra-Red Exploration at Keck. We rule out any line emission at the >5σ level for both objects, putting on solid ground a previous null result for one of the objects. The limits inferred from the non-detections rule out the previous claim of no or even reversed evolution between 5.7 < z < 7.7 in the Lyα luminosity function (LF) and suggest a drop in the Lyα LF consistent with that seen in Lyman break galaxy (LBG) samples. We model the redshift evolution of the LAE LF using the LBG UV-continuum LF and the observed rest-frame equivalent width distribution. From the comparison of our empirical model with the observed LAE distribution, we estimate lower limits of the neutral hydrogen fraction to be 50%-70% at z ∼ 7.7. Together with this, we find a strong evolution in the Lyα optical depth characterized by (1 + z){sup 2.2} {sup ±} {sup 0.5} beyond z = 6, indicative of a strong evolution of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we extrapolate the LAE LF to z ∼ 9 using our model and show that it is unlikely that large area surveys, like UltraVISTA or Euclid, pick up LAEs at this redshift assuming the current depths and area.

  4. Nitrogen Isotopic Ratio of Cometary Ammonia from High-resolution Optical Spectroscopic Observations of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-11-01

    The icy materials present in comets provide clues to the origin and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems. High-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) were performed on 2015 January 11 (at 1.321 au pre-perihelion) with the High Dispersion Spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Maunakea, Hawaii. We derive the 14N/15N ratio of NH2 (126 ± 25), as well as the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of the H2O+ ion (2.77 ± 0.24) and NH2 (3.38 ± 0.07), which correspond to nuclear spin temperatures of >24 K (3σ lower limit) and 27 ± 2 K, respectively. We also derive the intensity ratio of the green-to-red doublet of forbidden oxygen lines (0.107 ± 0.007). The ammonia in the comet must have formed under low-temperature conditions at ˜10 K or less to reproduce the observed 14N/15N ratio in this molecule if it is assumed that the 15N-fractionation of ammonia occurred via ion-molecule chemical reactions. However, this temperature is inconsistent with the nuclear spin temperatures of water and ammonia estimated from the OPRs. The interpretation of the nuclear spin temperature as the temperature at molecular formation may therefore be incorrect. An isotope-selective photodissociation of molecular nitrogen by protosolar ultraviolet radiation might play an important role in the 15N-fractionation observed in cometary volatiles.

  5. Near-infrared Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) by WINERED: CN Red-system Band Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hamano, Satoshi; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Fukue, Kei; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Yasui, Chikako; Izumi, Natsuko; Mizumoto, Misaki; Otsubo, Shogo; Takenaka, Keiichi; Watase, Ayaka; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya

    2017-08-01

    Although high-resolution spectra of the CN red-system band are considered useful in cometary sciences, e.g., in the study of isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen in cometary volatiles, there have been few reports to date due to the lack of high-resolution (R ≡ λ/Δλ > 20,000) spectrographs in the near-infrared region around ˜1 μm. Here, we present the high-resolution emission spectrum of the CN red-system band in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), acquired by the near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph WINERED mounted on the 1.3 m Araki telescope at the Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto, Japan. We applied our fluorescence excitation models for CN, based on modern spectroscopic studies, to the observed spectrum of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) to search for CN isotopologues (13C14N and 12C15N). We used a CN fluorescence excitation model involving both a “pure” fluorescence excitation model for the outer coma and a “fully collisional” fluorescence excitation model for the inner coma region. Our emission model could reproduce the observed 12C14N red-system band of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy). The derived mixing ratio between the two excitation models was 0.94(+0.02/-0.03):0.06(+0.03/-0.02), corresponding to the radius of the collision-dominant region of ˜800-1600 km from the nucleus. No isotopologues were detected. The observed spectrum is consistent, within error, with previous estimates in comets of 12C/13C (˜90) and 14N/15N (˜150).

  6. Polarimetric and spectroscopic optical observations of the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; Mainetti, D.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Russell, D. M.; Shahbaz, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present a polarimetric and spectroscopic study of the persistent ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 aimed at searching for the emission of a relativistic particle jet and at unveiling the orbital period Porb of the system. Methods: We obtained r-band polarimetric observations with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) equipped with the PAOLO polarimeter and with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with the ALFOSC instrument, covering ~2 h and ~0.5 h observations, respectively. We carried out low resolution spectroscopy of the system using the ESO Very Large Telescope equipped with FORS1 for ~1.5 h (16 spectra covering the range 4300-8000 Å). Results: The polarimetric analysis performed starting from the TNG dataset revealed a polarisation degree in the r-band of 3% ± 1%. From the NOT dataset, due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio, we could obtain only a 3σ upper limit of 3.4%. From the joining of a spectroscopic and photometric analysis, through the study of the equivalent width variations of the CII 7240 Å line and the r-band light curve, we could find a hint of a ~45 min periodicity. Conclusions: A polarisation degree P of ~3% in the r-band is consistent with the emission of a relativistic particle jet, which is supposed to emit intrinsically linearly polarised synchrotron radiation. Since no variations of P with time have been detected, and the accretion disc of the system does not contain ionised hydrogen, scattering by free electrons in the accretion disc has been rejected. The period of ~45 min obtained through the analysis of the system light curve and of the equivalent width variations of the selected spectral line is probably linked to the presence of a hot spot or a superhump in the accretion disc, and lead to an orbital period ≳1 h for the binary system. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto

  7. Culture and Influence in Multisite Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkhart, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of multisite evaluation requires careful consideration of cultural context. The author illustrates dimensions of influence and culture with excerpts from four National Science Foundation evaluation case studies and summarizes what influence teaches everyone about culture and what culture teaches everyone about…

  8. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey - III. An Observed Link Between AGN Eddington Ratio and Narrow-Emission-Line Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Kyuseok; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lamperti, Isabella; Ricci, Claudio; Mushotzky, Richard; Veilleux, Sylvain; Berney, Simon; Crenshaw, D. Michael; hide

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the observed relationship between black hole mass (M(sub BH)), bolometric luminosity (L(sub bol)) and Eddington ratio (lambda(sub Edd)) with optical emission-line ratios ([N II] lambda6583/Halpha, [S II]lambda-lamda6716, 6731/Halpha, [O I] lamda6300/Halpha, [O III] lamda5007/Hbeta, [Ne III] lamda3869/Hbeta and He II lamda4686/Hbeta) of hard X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey. We show that the [N II] lamda6583/Halpha ratio exhibits a significant correlation with lamda(sub Edd) (R(sub Pear) = -0.44, p-value 3 x 10(exp. -13) sigma = 0.28 dex), and the correlation is not solely driven by M(sub BH) or L(sub bol). The observed correlation between [N II] lamda6583/Halpha ratio and M(sub BH) is stronger than the correlation with L(sub bol), but both are weaker than the lamda(sub Edd) correlation. This implies that the large-scale narrow lines of AGN host galaxies carry information about the accretion state of the AGN central engine. We propose that [N II] lamda6583/Halpha is a useful indicator of Eddington ratio with 0.6 dex of rms scatter, and that it can be used to measure lambda(sub Edd) and thus M(sub BH) from the measured L(sub bol), even for high-redshift obscured AGN. We briefly discuss possible physical mechanisms behind this correlation, such as the mass-metallicity relation, X-ray heating, and radiatively driven outflows.

  9. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of the Seyfert 1.5 Galaxy NGC 5548 in a Low State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brotherton, M. S.; Green, R. F.; Kriss, G. A.; Oegerle, W.; Kaiser, M. E.; Zheng, W.; Hutchings, J. B.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present far-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 obtained in 2000 June with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Our data span the observed wavelength range 915-1185 A at a resolution of approximately 20 km s(exp -1). The spectrum shows a weak continuum and emission from O VI (lambda)(lambda)1032, 1038, C III (lambda)977, and He II (lambda)1085. The FUSE data were obtained when the AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) was in a low state, which has revealed strong, narrow O VI emission lines. We also resolve intrinsic, associated absorption lines of O VI and the Lyman series. Several distinct kinematic components are present, spanning a velocity range of approximately 0 to -1300 km s(exp -1) relative to systemic, with kinematic structure similar to that seen in previous observations of longer wavelength ultraviolet (UV) lines. We explore the relationships between the far-UV (ultraviolet) absorbers and those seen previously in the UV and X-rays. We find that the high-velocity UV absorption component is consistent with being low-ionization, contrary to some previous claims, and is consistent with its non-detection in high-resolution X-ray spectra. The intermediate velocity absorbers, at -300 to -400 km s(exp -1), show H I and O VI column densities consistent with having contributions from both a high-ionization X-ray absorber and a low-ionization UV absorber. No single far-UV absorbing component can be solely identified with the X-ray absorber.

  10. Multisite Reliability of Cognitive BOLD Data

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory G.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Stern, Hal; Ford, Judith; Mueller, Bryon; Greve, Douglas N.; McCarthy, Gregory; Voyvodic, Jim; Glover, Gary; Diaz, Michele; Yetter, Elizabeth; Burak Ozyurt, I.; Jorgensen, Kasper W.; Wible, Cynthia G.; Turner, Jessica A.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Potkin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Investigators perform multi-site functional magnetic resonance imaging studies to increase statistical power, to enhance generalizability, and to improve the likelihood of sampling relevant subgroups. Yet undesired site variation in imaging methods could off-set these potential advantages. We used variance components analysis to investigate sources of variation in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal across four 3T magnets in voxelwise and region of interest (ROI) analyses. Eighteen participants traveled to four magnet sites to complete eight runs of a working memory task involving emotional or neutral distraction. Person variance was more than 10 times larger than site variance for five of six ROIs studied. Person-by-site interactions, however, contributed sizable unwanted variance to the total. Averaging over runs increased between-site reliability, with many voxels showing good to excellent between-site reliability when eight runs were averaged and regions of interest showing fair to good reliability. Between-site reliability depended on the specific functional contrast analyzed in addition to the number of runs averaged. Although median effect size was correlated with between-site reliability, dissociations were observed for many voxels. Brain regions where the pooled effect size was large but between-site reliability was poor were associated with reduced individual differences. Brain regions where the pooled effect size was small but between-site reliability was excellent were associated with a balance of participants who displayed consistently positive or consistently negative BOLD responses. Although between-site reliability of BOLD data can be good to excellent, acquiring highly reliable data requires robust activation paradigms, ongoing quality assurance, and careful experimental control. PMID:20932915

  11. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES. V. TNG, KPNO, AND OAN OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR CANDIDATES OF UNCERTAIN TYPE IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez Crespo, N.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; Landoni, M.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; Torrealba, J.; D’Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Latronico, L.; Tosti, G.

    2016-02-15

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by emission from blazars, a peculiar class of active galactic nuclei. Many of the γ-ray sources included in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope Third Source catalog (3FGL) are classified as blazar candidates of uncertain type (BCUs) because there are no optical spectra available in the literature to confirm their nature. In 2013, we started a spectroscopic campaign to look for the optical counterparts of the BCUs and of the unidentified γ-ray sources to confirm their blazar nature. Whenever possible we also determine their redshifts. Here, we present the results of the observations carried out in the northern hemisphere in 2013 and 2014 at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in San Pedro Mártir. In this paper, we describe the optical spectra of 25 sources. We confirmed that all of the 15 BCUs observed in our campaign and included in our sample are blazars and we estimated the redshifts for three of them. In addition, we present the spectra for three sources classified as BL Lacs in the literature but with no optical spectra available to date. We found that one of them is a quasar (QSO) at a redshift of z = 0.208 and the other two are BL Lacs. Moreover, we also present seven new spectra for known blazars listed in the Roma-BZCAT that have an uncertain redshift or are classified as BL Lac candidates. We found that one of them, 5BZB J0724+2621, is a “changing look” blazar. According to the spectrum available in the literature, it was classified as a BL Lac, but in our observation we clearly detected a broad emission line that led us to classify this source as a QSO at z = 1.17.

  12. Bias and Bias Correction in Multisite Instrumental Variables Analysis of Heterogeneous Mediator Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Unlu, Fatih; Zhu, Pei; Bloom, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the use of instrumental variables (IV) analysis with a multisite randomized trial to estimate the effect of a mediating variable on an outcome in cases where it can be assumed that the observed mediator is the only mechanism linking treatment assignment to outcomes, an assumption known in the IV literature as the exclusion restriction.…

  13. Bias and Bias Correction in Multi-Site Instrumental Variables Analysis of Heterogeneous Mediator Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Unlu, Faith; Zhu, Pei; Bloom, Howard

    2013-01-01

    We explore the use of instrumental variables (IV) analysis with a multi-site randomized trial to estimate the effect of a mediating variable on an outcome in cases where it can be assumed that the observed mediator is the only mechanism linking treatment assignment to outcomes, as assumption known in the instrumental variables literature as the…

  14. Bias and Bias Correction in Multisite Instrumental Variables Analysis of Heterogeneous Mediator Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.; Unlu, Fatih; Zhu, Pei; Bloom, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the use of instrumental variables (IV) analysis with a multisite randomized trial to estimate the effect of a mediating variable on an outcome in cases where it can be assumed that the observed mediator is the only mechanism linking treatment assignment to outcomes, an assumption known in the IV literature as the exclusion restriction.…

  15. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Interstellar Gas toward the Large Magellanic Cloud Star SK -67°05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, S. D.; Howk, J. C.; Andersson, B.-G.; Sembach, K. R.; Ake, T. B.; Roth, K.; Sahnow, D. J.; Savage, B. D.; York, D. G.; Sonneborn, G.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Wilkinson, E.

    2000-07-01

    We report on measurements of interstellar O VI, H2, P II, Si II, Ar I, and Fe II absorption along the line of sight to Sk -67°05, a B0 Ia star in a diffuse H II region in the western edge of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We find logN(O VI)=14.40+/-0.04 in the Milky Way component and, using the C IV column density from previous IUE observations, N(C IV)/N(O VI)=1.00+/-0.16, a value similar to other halo measurements made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In the LMC component, logN(O VI)=13.89+/-0.05 and N(C IV)/N(O VI)<0.4 (3 σ), since only an upper limit on N(C IV) is available. Along this sight line, the LMC is rich in molecular hydrogen [logN(H2)=19.50+/-0.08] in the Milky Way, logN(H2)=14.95+/-0.08. A two-component fit for the excitation temperature of the molecular gas in the LMC gives T01=59+/-5 K for J=0, 1 and Tex=800+/-330 K for J=3, 4, 5. For the Milky Way, T01=99+30-20 K; no excitation temperature could be determined for the higher rotational states. The Milky Way and LMC gas-phase [Fe/P] abundances are ~0.6 and ~0.7 dex lower, respectively, than solar system abundances. These values are similar to [Fe/Zn] measurements for the Milky Way and LMC toward SN 1987A.

  16. Dust tail of the active distant Comet C/2003 WT42 (LINEAR) studied with photometric and spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsun, Pavlo P.; Kulyk, Irina V.; Ivanova, Oleksandra V.; Afanasiev, Viktor L.; Kugel, Francois; Rinner, Claudine; Ivashchenko, Yuriy M.

    2010-12-01

    We present the study of dust environment of dynamically new Comet C/2003 WT42 (LINEAR) based on spectroscopic and photometric observations. The comet was observed before and after the perihelion passage at heliocentric distances from 5.2 to 9.5 AU. Although the comet moved beyond the zone where water ice sublimation could be significant, its bright coma and extended dust tail evidenced the high level of physical activity. Afρ values exceeded 3000 cm likely reaching its maximum before the perihelion passage. At the same time, the spectrum of the comet did not reveal molecular emission features above the reflected continuum. Reddening of the continuum derived from the cometary spectrum is nonlinear along the dispersion with the steeper slop in the blue region. The pair of the blue and red continuum images was analyzed to estimate a color of the comet. The mean normalized reflectivity gradient derived from the innermost part of the cometary coma equals to 8% per 1000 Å that is typical for Oort cloud objects. However, the color map shows that the reddening of the cometary dust varies over the coma increasing to 15% per 1000 Å along the tail axis. The photometric images were fitted with a Monte Carlo model to construct the theoretical brightness distribution of the cometary coma and tail and to investigate the development of the cometary activity along the orbit. As the dust particles of distant comets are expected to be icy, we propose here the model, which describes the tail formation taking into account sublimation of grains along their orbits. The chemical composition and structure of these particles are assumed to correspond with Greenberg's interstellar dust model of comet dust. All images were fitted with the close values of the model parameters. According to the results of the modeling, the physical activity of the comet is mainly determined by two active areas with outflows into the wide cones. The obliquity of the rotation axis of the nucleus equals to 20

  17. Stochastic generation of multi-site daily precipitation for applications in risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinl, Korbinian; Turkington, Thea; Stowasser, Markus

    2013-08-01

    Unlike single-site precipitation generators, multi-site precipitation generators make it possible to reproduce the space-time variation of precipitation at several sites. The extension of single-site approaches to multiple sites is a challenging task, and has led to a large variety of different model philosophies for multi-site models. This paper presents an alternative semi-parametric multi-site model for daily precipitation that is straightforward and easy to implement. Multi-site precipitation occurrences are simulated with a univariate Markov process, removing the need for individual Markov models at each site. Precipitation amounts are generated by first resampling observed values, followed by sampling synthetic precipitation amounts from parametric distribution functions. These synthetic precipitation amounts are subsequently reshuffled according to the ranks of the resampled observations in order to maintain important statistical properties of the observation network. The proposed method successfully combines the advantages of non-parametric bootstrapping and parametric modeling techniques. It is applied to two small rain gauge networks in France (Ubaye catchment) and Austria/Germany (Salzach catchment) and is shown to well reproduce the observations. Limitations of the model relate to the bias of the reproduced seasonal standard deviation of precipitation and the underestimation of maximum dry spells. While the lag-1 autocorrelation is well reproduced for precipitation occurrences, it tends to be underestimated for precipitation amounts. The model can generate daily precipitation amounts exceeding the ones in the observations, which can be crucial for risk management related applications. Moreover, the model deals particularly well with the spatial variability of precipitation. Despite its straightforwardness, the new concept makes a good alternative for risk management related studies concerned with producing daily synthetic multi-site precipitation time

  18. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_⊙, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_⊙, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  19. What can We Learn about Solar Coronal Mass Ejections, Coronal Dimmings, and Extreme-ultraviolet Jets through Spectroscopic Observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Xia, Lidong; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-01

    Solar eruptions, particularly coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jets, have rarely been investigated with spectroscopic observations. We analyze several data sets obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode and find various types of flows during CMEs and jet eruptions. CME-induced dimming regions are found to be characterized by significant blueshift and enhanced line width by using a single Gaussian fit, while a red-blue (RB) asymmetry analysis and an RB-guided double Gaussian fit of the coronal line profiles indicate that these are likely caused by the superposition of a strong background emission component and a relatively weak (~10%), high-speed (~100 km s-1) upflow component. This finding suggests that the outflow velocity in the dimming region is probably of the order of 100 km s-1, not ~20 km s-1 as reported previously. These weak, high-speed outflows may provide a significant amount of mass to refill the corona after the eruption of CMEs, and part of them may experience further acceleration and eventually become solar wind streams that can serve as an additional momentum source of the associated CMEs. Density and temperature diagnostics of the dimming region suggest that dimming is primarily an effect of density decrease rather than temperature change. The mass losses in dimming regions as estimated from different methods are roughly consistent with each other, and they are 20%-60% of the masses of the associated CMEs. With the guide of RB asymmetry analysis, we also find several temperature-dependent outflows (speed increases with temperature) immediately outside the (deepest) dimming region. These outflows may be evaporation flows that are caused by the enhanced thermal conduction or nonthermal electron beams along reconnecting field lines, or induced by the interaction between the opened field lines in the dimming region and the closed loops in the surrounding plage region. In an erupted CME loop and an EUV jet

  20. Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) from Mars using ChemCam, OMEGA and SPICAM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, J.; Gondet, B.; Bertaux, J. L.; Barraclough, B. L.; Beck, P.; Bender, S.; Bibring, J. P.; Bridges, N. T.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Gasnault, O.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Langevin, Y.; Le Mouelic, S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Lewin, E.; McConnochie, T. H.; Martín-Torres, J.; Maurice, S.; Meslin, P. Y.; Ming, D. W.; Montmessin, F.; Owen, T. C.; Rapin, W.; Rocard, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Comet Siding Spring will graze Mars on Oct. 19th 2014. Its closest approach from the centre of the planet will be 135,000 km, and its predicted visual magnitude as low as -5.3 (JPL Horizons web site). The observing conditions will be ideal to attempt spectroscopic measurements of the inner coma from the UV to the IR at an unprecedented spectral resolution from the instruments located on and around Mars. ChemCam is a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy instrument operating on-board the Mars Science Laboratory rover to analyse the chemical composition of rocks and can be used for passive spectroscopy. ChemCam is equipped with high resolution spectrometers covering the optical range (240-850 nm) with a pixel resolution of 0.05nm up to 470nm and 0.2nm in the near-IR range. The ChemCam passive spectroscopy field of view is 0.65 mrad wide and covers several 100km projected on the coma. Based on predicted magnitude and inner coma intensity variations, we expect to retrieve spectral signatures around the nucleus. Simultaneously the 7 instruments on board Mars Express will take measurements in nadir and limb modes. We will merge the results obtained with ChemCam with those of the 2 imaging spectrometers SPICAM (110-310 nm resolution of 0.6nm and 1-1.7 μm resolution of 1.5 nm) and OMEGA (457-910 nm resolution of 1.5 nm and 2.5-5.1 μm resolution of 15 nm) to obtain the composition and spatial variation of emitting molecules in the different parts of the coma. The instruments will also monitor the atmosphere before and after the encounter to detect any change. We will report on the preparations for the observations and the spectroscopy results, with emphasis on the detection of complex organic molecules and the spatial distribution of H2O and OH in the inner coma. A decision will be made on the adequacy of risk reduction activities for the spacecraft, and planned science operations may need to be cancelled by ESOC.This work is supported by NASA, ESA and CNES.

  1. OBSERVING THE FINE STRUCTURE OF LOOPS THROUGH HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL RAIN WITH THE CRISP INSTRUMENT AT THE SWEDISH SOLAR TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Antolin, P.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. E-mail: v.d.v.l.rouppe@astro.uio.no

    2012-02-01

    Observed in cool chromospheric lines, such as H{alpha} or Ca II H, coronal rain corresponds to cool and dense plasma falling from coronal heights. Considered as a peculiar sporadic phenomenon of active regions, it has not received much attention since its discovery more than 40 years ago. Yet, it has been shown recently that a close relationship exists between this phenomenon and the coronal heating mechanism. Indeed, numerical simulations have shown that this phenomenon is most likely due to a loss of thermal equilibrium ensuing from a heating mechanism acting mostly toward the footpoints of loops. We present here one of the first high-resolution spectroscopic observations of coronal rain, performed with the CRisp Imaging Spectro Polarimeter (CRISP) instrument at the Swedish Solar Telescope. This work constitutes the first attempt to assess the importance of coronal rain in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field in active regions. With the present resolution, coronal rain is observed to literally invade the entire field of view. A large statistical set is obtained in which dynamics (total velocities and accelerations), shapes (lengths and widths), trajectories (angles of fall of the blobs), and thermodynamic properties (temperatures) of the condensations are derived. Specifically, we find that coronal rain is composed of small and dense chromospheric cores with average widths and lengths of {approx}310 km and {approx}710 km, respectively, average temperatures below 7000 K, displaying a broad distribution of falling speeds with an average of {approx}70 km s{sup -1}, and accelerations largely below the effective gravity along loops. Through estimates of the ion-neutral coupling in the blobs we show that coronal rain acts as a tracer of the coronal magnetic field, thus supporting the multi-strand loop scenario, and acts as a probe of the local thermodynamic conditions in loops. We further elucidate its potential in coronal heating. We find that the cooling

  2. Observing the Fine Structure of Loops through High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of Coronal Rain with the CRISP Instrument at the Swedish Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Rouppe van der Voort, L.

    2012-02-01

    Observed in cool chromospheric lines, such as Hα or Ca II H, coronal rain corresponds to cool and dense plasma falling from coronal heights. Considered as a peculiar sporadic phenomenon of active regions, it has not received much attention since its discovery more than 40 years ago. Yet, it has been shown recently that a close relationship exists between this phenomenon and the coronal heating mechanism. Indeed, numerical simulations have shown that this phenomenon is most likely due to a loss of thermal equilibrium ensuing from a heating mechanism acting mostly toward the footpoints of loops. We present here one of the first high-resolution spectroscopic observations of coronal rain, performed with the CRisp Imaging Spectro Polarimeter (CRISP) instrument at the Swedish Solar Telescope. This work constitutes the first attempt to assess the importance of coronal rain in the understanding of the coronal magnetic field in active regions. With the present resolution, coronal rain is observed to literally invade the entire field of view. A large statistical set is obtained in which dynamics (total velocities and accelerations), shapes (lengths and widths), trajectories (angles of fall of the blobs), and thermodynamic properties (temperatures) of the condensations are derived. Specifically, we find that coronal rain is composed of small and dense chromospheric cores with average widths and lengths of ~310 km and ~710 km, respectively, average temperatures below 7000 K, displaying a broad distribution of falling speeds with an average of ~70 km s-1, and accelerations largely below the effective gravity along loops. Through estimates of the ion-neutral coupling in the blobs we show that coronal rain acts as a tracer of the coronal magnetic field, thus supporting the multi-strand loop scenario, and acts as a probe of the local thermodynamic conditions in loops. We further elucidate its potential in coronal heating. We find that the cooling in neighboring strands occurs

  3. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2016ieq and SN 2016isg by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, T.; Mattila, S.; Stritzinger, M.; Dong, S.; Hsiao, E.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Kankare, E.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Harmanen, J.; Somero, A.; Reynolds, T.; Ergon, M.; Gafton, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of the supernovae SN 2016ieq/Gaia16buy in the host galaxy APMUKS(BJ) B211942.51-120949.1 and SN 2016isg/ASASSN-16oo in the host galaxy 2MASX J01411858-0012382.

  4. Multi-site, multivariate weather generator using maximum entropy bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastav, Roshan K.; Simonovic, Slobodan P.

    2014-05-01

    Weather generators are increasingly becoming viable alternate models to assess the effects of future climate change scenarios on water resources systems. In this study, a new multisite, multivariate maximum entropy bootstrap weather generator (MEBWG) is proposed for generating daily weather variables, which has the ability to mimic both, spatial and temporal dependence structure in addition to other historical statistics. The maximum entropy bootstrap (MEB) involves two main steps: (1) random sampling from the empirical cumulative distribution function with endpoints selected to allow limited extrapolation and (2) reordering of the random series to respect the rank ordering of the original time series (temporal dependence structure). To capture the multi-collinear structure between the weather variables and between the sites, we combine orthogonal linear transformation with MEB. Daily weather data, which include precipitation, maximum temperature and minimum temperature from 27 years of record from the Upper Thames River Basin in Ontario, Canada, are used to analyze the ability of MEBWG based weather generator. Results indicate that the statistics from the synthetic replicates were not significantly different from the observed data and the model is able to preserve the 27 CLIMDEX indices very well. The MEBWG model shows better performance in terms of extrapolation and computational efficiency when compared to multisite, multivariate K-nearest neighbour model.

  5. Evaluation of spectroscopic databases through radiative transfer simulations compared to observations. Application to the validation of GEISA 2015 with IASI and TCCON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armante, Raymond; Scott, Noelle; Crevoisier, Cyril; Capelle, Virginie; Crepeau, Laurent; Jacquinet, Nicole; Chédin, Alain

    2016-09-01

    The quality of spectroscopic parameters that serve as input to forward radiative transfer models are essential to fully exploit remote sensing of Earth atmosphere. However, the process of updating spectroscopic databases in order to provide the users with a database that insures an optimal characterization of spectral properties of molecular absorption for radiative transfer modeling is challenging. The evaluation of the databases content and the underlying choices made by the managing team is thus a crucial step. Here, we introduce an original and powerful approach for evaluating spectroscopic parameters: the Spectroscopic Parameters And Radiative Transfer Evaluation (SPARTE) chain. The SPARTE chain relies on the comparison between forward radiative transfer simulations made by the 4A radiative transfer model and observations of spectra made from various observations collocated over several thousands of well-characterized atmospheric situations. Averaging the resulting 'calculated-observed spectral' residuals minimizes the random errors coming from both the radiometric noise of the instruments and the imperfect description of the atmospheric state. The SPARTE chain can be used to evaluate any spectroscopic databases, from the visible to the microwave, using any type of remote sensing observations (ground-based, airborne or space-borne). We show that the comparison of the shape of the residuals enables: (i) identifying incorrect line parameters (line position, intensity, width, pressure shift, etc.), even for molecules for which interferences between the lines have to be taken into account; (ii) proposing revised values, in cooperation with contributing teams; and (iii) validating the final updated parameters. In particular, we show that the simultaneous availability of two databases such as GEISA and HITRAN helps identifying remaining issues in each database. The SPARTE chain has been here applied to the validation of the update of GEISA-2015 in 2 spectral regions

  6. Analysis Concerning the Inspection Threshold for Multi-Site Damage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    uL 200 words) Periodic inspections, at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft ...at a prescribed interval, for Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in longitudinal fuselage lap-joints start when the aircraft has accumulated a certain number of...viii 1. INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE The cumulative probability of detection of Multi-Site Damage (MSD) in fuselage lap-joints of aging aircraft was assessed

  7. Optical low-dispersion spectroscopic observations of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 at Koyama Astronomical Observatory during the EPOXI flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Naka, Chiharu; Arai, Akira; Arasaki, Takayuki; Kitao, Eiji; Taguchi, Gaku; Ikeda, Yuji

    2013-02-01

    We performed low-dispersion spectroscopic observations of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 in optical wavelengths using the LOSA/F2 mounted on the 1.3 m-Araki telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory on UT 2010 November 4 during the close approach of the Deep Impact spacecraft to the nucleus of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 in the EPOXI mission flyby. Our observations have revealed the chemistry of the coma at optical wavelengths; including CN, C3, C2 and NH2 along with H2O from [OI] emission at 6300 Å. Resultant mixing ratios of these radicals put the comet into the normal group in chemical composition. The mixing ratios with respect to H2O obtained in our observations are basically consistent with the previous optical spectro-photometric observations of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 in 1991 by A'Hearn et al. (A'Hearn, M.F., Millis, R.L., Schleicher, D.G., Osip, D.J., Birch, P.V. [1995]. Icarus 118, 223-270), the optical spectroscopic observations in 1998 by Fink (Fink, U. [2009]. Icarus 201, 311-334) and also consistent with the observations on UT 2010 October 27 and 29 by Lara et al. (Lara, L.M., Lin, Z.-Y., Meech, K. [2011]. Astron. Astrophys. 532, A87) (but only for the ratio relative to CN).

  8. Variations in the D/H Ratio of Extended Sight Lines from Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cristina M.; Hébrard, Guillaume

    2006-12-01

    We use new FUSE data to determine the column densities of interstellar D I, N I, O I, Fe II, and H2 along the HD 41161 and HD 53975 sight lines. Together with N(H I) from the literature, we derive D/H, N/H, and O/H ratios. These sight lines have logN(H I)>21.00 and probe gas up to ~1300 pc, allowing us to determine the gas-phase D/H ratio in a hydrogen column density range, logN(H)>20.70, where the only five measurements available in the literature yield a weighted average of D/H=(0.86+/-0.08)×10-5. We find D/H=(2.14+0.51-0.43)×10-5 along the HD 41161 sight line. This ratio is ~3 σ higher than the weighted mean D/H ratio quoted above, while the D/H ratio for the HD 53975 line of sight, D/H=(1.02+0.23-0.20)×10-5, agrees within the 1 σ uncertainties. Our D/H measurement along the HD 41161 sight line presents the first evidence of variations of D/H at high N(H). Our result seems to indicate either that the long sight lines that, according to the deuterium depletion model, are dominated by cold undisturbed gas where deuterium would be depleted onto carbonaceous grains occur at higher N(H) than previously thought, or that the clumping of low D/H values in the literature for the long sight lines has another explanation. Both of the O/H ratios derived here, (9.12+2.15-1.83)×10-4 and (5.37+1.35-1.14)×10-4 (for HD 41161 and HD 53975, respectively), are higher than what has been found by other authors. Finally, we derive (N/H)×105=8.32+2.09-1.76 and 5.07+1.45-1.21, and (D/O)×102=2.29+0.40-0.35 and 1.91+0.51-0.43, for HD 41161 and HD 53975, respectively. In addition, the relatively high signal-to-noise ratio of the HD 41161 data allows us to place constraints on the f-values of some neutral chlorine transitions present in the FUSE bandpass for which only theoretical values are available. Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. FUSE is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  9. Spectroscopic analyses of subluminous B stars: observational constraints for the theory of stellar evolution, pulsation, and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmann, Heinz

    2003-06-01

    This thesis deals with quantitative spectroscopic analyses of large samples of subluminous B stars in order to find constraints the theory of stellar evolution, pulsation, and diffusion. Subluminous B stars, also known as subdwarf B (sdB) stars, are very important in several respects: They dominate the population of faint blue stars in high galactic latitudes, and are found both in the field and in globular clusters. Therefore, sdB stars are important to understand the structure and evolution of our galaxy. From the cosmological point of view, they are candidate progenitors of supernovae of type Ia due to their membership in close binary systems. In the context of stellar astrophysics, subdwarf B stars play an important role because several of them are discovered to show non-radial pulsations, which allows to probe their interior by asteroseismology. Last but not least, sdB stars show very peculiar element abundance patterns, probably caused by diffusion processes. Subluminous B stars are generally considered to be core helium-burning stars with extremely thin hydrogen envelopes (< 0.02M) and masses around 0.5M. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram they populate a very narrow area which lies on a blue-ward extension of the horizontal branch (HB), the so called "Extreme Horizontal Branch" (EHB). Due to their thin hydrogen-rich envelope, they cannot sustain a hydrogen-burning shell. This means that the sdB stars cannot ascend the asymptotic giant branch after the end of the helium-core burning, but should evolve directly to the white dwarf graveyard. However, according to standard stellar evolution theory, subdwarf B stars should not exist. Their evolution is still unclear and several scenarios are under debate. For all these investigations, knowledge of the stellar parameters (effective temperature, gravity and chemical composition) is very important to verify or discard theoretical models and predictions. Numerous observing runs have been performed mostly by myself

  10. SHRINE: Enabling Nationally Scalable Multi-Site Disease Studies

    PubMed Central

    McMurry, Andrew J.; Murphy, Shawn N.; MacFadden, Douglas; Weber, Griffin; Simons, William W.; Orechia, John; Bickel, Jonathan; Wattanasin, Nich; Gilbert, Clint; Trevvett, Philip; Churchill, Susanne; Kohane, Isaac S.

    2013-01-01

    Results of medical research studies are often contradictory or cannot be reproduced. One reason is that there may not be enough patient subjects available for observation for a long enough time period. Another reason is that patient populations may vary considerably with respect to geographic and demographic boundaries thus limiting how broadly the results apply. Even when similar patient populations are pooled together from multiple locations, differences in medical treatment and record systems can limit which outcome measures can be commonly analyzed. In total, these differences in medical research settings can lead to differing conclusions or can even prevent some studies from starting. We thus sought to create a patient research system that could aggregate as many patient observations as possible from a large number of hospitals in a uniform way. We call this system the ‘Shared Health Research Information Network’, with the following properties: (1) reuse electronic health data from everyday clinical care for research purposes, (2) respect patient privacy and hospital autonomy, (3) aggregate patient populations across many hospitals to achieve statistically significant sample sizes that can be validated independently of a single research setting, (4) harmonize the observation facts recorded at each institution such that queries can be made across many hospitals in parallel, (5) scale to regional and national collaborations. The purpose of this report is to provide open source software for multi-site clinical studies and to report on early uses of this application. At this time SHRINE implementations have been used for multi-site studies of autism co-morbidity, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, colorectal cancer, diabetes, and others. The wide range of study objectives and growing adoption suggest that SHRINE may be applicable beyond the research uses and participating hospitals named in this report. PMID:23533569

  11. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  12. Building a Community of Evaluation Practice within a Multisite Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Leslie K.

    2011-01-01

    New and novel uses of evaluation processes and findings are possible when a community of practice develops as evaluation stakeholders participate in multisite evaluations in multiple ways. Developing such communities takes advantage of what makes multisite evaluations special. This chapter uses the example of the Innovative Technology Experiences…

  13. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  14. Building a Community of Evaluation Practice within a Multisite Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Leslie K.

    2011-01-01

    New and novel uses of evaluation processes and findings are possible when a community of practice develops as evaluation stakeholders participate in multisite evaluations in multiple ways. Developing such communities takes advantage of what makes multisite evaluations special. This chapter uses the example of the Innovative Technology Experiences…

  15. Spectroscopic mode identification of main-sequence non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonneuve, F.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2010-07-01

    We are undertaking an extensive observational campaign of a number of non-radially pulsating stars using the high-resolution HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory. This is part of a large world-wide multi-site campaign to improve mode-identification techniques in non-radially pulsating stars, particularly for g-mode pulsators. This paper outlines our campaign and presents preliminary results for one γ Doradus star, HD 40745, and one β Cephei star, HD 61068. We have used a representative cross-correlation line-profile technique presented by Wright in 2008 to extract line profiles and these have then been analyzed using the FAMIAS package due to Zima published in 2006 to derive a spectroscopic mode identification.

  16. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Carotenoid Deoxyperidinin: Direct Observation of the Forbidden S0 → S1 Transition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Jordan A; LaFountain, Amy M; Kinashi, Naoto; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Katsumura, Shigeo; Magdaong, Nikki Cecil M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2016-03-17

    This paper presents a spectroscopic investigation of deoxyperidinin, a synthetic peridinin analogue in which the carbonyl functional group in peridinin was replaced by a nonconjugated methylene group. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments are carried out on deoxyperidinin in n-hexane and acetonitrile at room temperature and in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran at 77 K. The spectra of deoxyperidinin have higher vibronic resolution compared to those of peridinin. The higher resolution is due to a substantial reduction in both molecular conformational disorder and inhomogeneous broadening of the spectra of deoxyperidinin compared to peridinin. Features in the steady-state absorption spectrum of deoxyperidinin that are not evident in the spectrum of peridinin are unambiguously assigned to the forbidden S0 (1(1)Ag(-)) → S1 (2(1)Ag(-)) absorption transition. The characteristics of both the steady-state and time-resolved spectra are interpreted using EOM-CCSD, SAC-CI, and MNDO-PSDCI quantum computational formalisms that provided a theoretical framework for understanding the photophysical properties of the molecules.

  17. The Wasilewski sample of emission-line galaxies - Follow-up CCD imaging and spectroscopic and IRAS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Schmitz, Mark; Halpern, Jules P.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Impey, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging and spectroscopic follow-up of the objective prism-selected emission line galaxy (ELG) sample of Wasilewski (1982) are presented. Fluxes at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns were also obtained from the coadded IRAS survey data. ELGs found by objective prism surveys are found to be generally small and underluminous galaxies which usually have higher than average optical surface brightness. The Seyfert detection rate in objective prism surveys is roughly 10 percent and the ratio of the space densities of Seyfert 2 to Seyfert 1 galaxies is significantly larger than unity. Most of the galaxies selected by objective prism surveys are star-forming, late-type spirals which often show disturbed morphology. About 25 percent of the galaxies detected by the surveys are faint, high-excitation metal-poor compact H II regions.

  18. Mixed mechanisms of multi-site phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-site phosphorylation is ubiquitous in cell biology and has been widely studied experimentally and theoretically. The underlying chemical modification mechanisms are typically assumed to be distributive or processive. In this paper, we study the behaviour of mixed mechanisms that can arise either because phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involve different mechanisms or because phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation can occur through a combination of mechanisms. We examine a hierarchy of models to assess chemical information processing through different mixed mechanisms, using simulations, bifurcation analysis and analytical work. We demonstrate how mixed mechanisms can show important and unintuitive differences from pure distributive and processive mechanisms, in some cases resulting in monostable behaviour with simple dose–response behaviour, while in other cases generating new behaviour-like oscillations. Our results also suggest patterns of information processing that are relevant as the number of modification sites increases. Overall, our work creates a framework to examine information processing arising from complexities of multi-site modification mechanisms and their impact on signal transduction. PMID:25972433

  19. Mixed mechanisms of multi-site phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Suwanmajo, Thapanar; Krishnan, J

    2015-06-06

    Multi-site phosphorylation is ubiquitous in cell biology and has been widely studied experimentally and theoretically. The underlying chemical modification mechanisms are typically assumed to be distributive or processive. In this paper, we study the behaviour of mixed mechanisms that can arise either because phosphorylation and dephosphorylation involve different mechanisms or because phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation can occur through a combination of mechanisms. We examine a hierarchy of models to assess chemical information processing through different mixed mechanisms, using simulations, bifurcation analysis and analytical work. We demonstrate how mixed mechanisms can show important and unintuitive differences from pure distributive and processive mechanisms, in some cases resulting in monostable behaviour with simple dose-response behaviour, while in other cases generating new behaviour-like oscillations. Our results also suggest patterns of information processing that are relevant as the number of modification sites increases. Overall, our work creates a framework to examine information processing arising from complexities of multi-site modification mechanisms and their impact on signal transduction.

  20. Long-term dynamics of multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Boris Y.; Mattingly, Henry H.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2016-01-01

    Multisite phosphorylation cycles are ubiquitous in cell regulation systems and are studied at multiple levels of complexity, from molecules to organisms, with the ultimate goal of establishing predictive understanding of the effects of genetic and pharmacological perturbations of protein phosphorylation in vivo. Achieving this goal is essentially impossible without mathematical models, which provide a systematic framework for exploring dynamic interactions of multiple network components. Most of the models studied to date do not discriminate between the distinct partially phosphorylated forms and focus on two limiting reaction regimes, distributive and processive, which differ in the number of enzyme–substrate binding events needed for complete phosphorylation or dephosphorylation. Here we use a minimal model of extracellular signal-related kinase regulation to explore the dynamics of a reaction network that includes all essential phosphorylation forms and arbitrary levels of reaction processivity. In addition to bistability, which has been studied extensively in distributive mechanisms, this network can generate periodic oscillations. Both bistability and oscillations can be realized at high levels of reaction processivity. Our work provides a general framework for systematic analysis of dynamics in multisite phosphorylation systems. PMID:27226482

  1. Analysis Of The ATV1 Re-Entry Using Near-UV Spectroscopic Data From The ESA/NASA Multi-Instrument Aircraft Observation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohle, Stefan; Marynowski, Thomas; Knapp, Andreas; Wernitz, Ricarda; Lips, Tobias

    2011-05-01

    The first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV1) named Jules Verne was launched in March 2009 to carry over seven tons of experiments, fuel, water, food and other supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) orbiting at about 350 km. Attached to the ISS, it served as an extension to the space station, giving extra space for the six astronauts and cosmonauts who will ultimately form the permanent ISS Crew. On September 29, 2009, a controlled de-orbit maneuver lead the spacecraft to enter the Earth's atmosphere over the south pacific ocean. The following destructive re-entry was observed by two aircraft equipped with a wide variety of imaging and spectroscopic instruments. In this paper, we present quantitative results from the near-UV spectroscopic measurements acquired aboard an experimental DC-8 aircraft operated by NASA. The wavelength range of observation allows a determination of temperatures from radiation and the investigation of atomic radiation with respect to the identification of the destructive process. Furthermore, the excitation temperatures of chromium give an insight into the explosive events occurring during re-entry. Analysing the continuum of the measured spectra, the Planck radiation temperature is fitted to the data. These temperatures indicate that most of the radiating parts are titanium alloys, i.e. the outer structure of ATV1. All results within this paper are compared to a simulated break-up scenario and related to basic results from other experimenters which allows drawing an overall scenario for this destructive re-entry.

  2. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates in the sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-09-09

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the γ-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  3. Spectroscopic survey of Kepler stars. I. HERMES/Mercator observations of A- and F-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, E.; Murphy, S. J.; Smalley, B.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Pigulski, A.; Lehmann, H.; Bowman, D. M.; Catanzaro, G.; van Aarle, E.; Bloemen, S.; Briquet, M.; De Cat, P.; Drobek, D.; Eyer, L.; Gameiro, J. F. S.; Gorlova, N.; Kamiński, K.; Lampens, P.; Marcos-Arenal, P.; Pápics, P. I.; Vandenbussche, B.; Van Winckel, H.; Stȩślicki, M.; Fagas, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Kepler space mission provided near-continuous and high-precision photometry of about 207 000 stars, which can be used for asteroseismology. However, for successful seismic modeling it is equally important to have accurate stellar physical parameters. Therefore, supplementary ground-based data are needed. We report the results of the analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data of A- and F-type stars from the Kepler field, which were obtained with the HERMES spectrograph on the Mercator telescope. We determined spectral types, atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for a sample of 117 stars. Hydrogen Balmer, Fe I, and Fe II lines were used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and microturbulent velocities. We determined chemical abundances and projected rotational velocities using a spectrum synthesis technique. The atmospheric parameters obtained were compared with those from the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC), confirming that the KIC effective temperatures are underestimated for A stars. Effective temperatures calculated by spectral energy distribution fitting are in good agreement with those determined from the spectral line analysis. The analysed sample comprises stars with approximately solar chemical abundances, as well as chemically peculiar stars of the Am, Ap, and λ Boo types. The distribution of the projected rotational velocity, vsin i, is typical for A and F stars and ranges from 8 to about 280 km s-1, with a mean of 134 km s-1.

  4. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K. Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2014-02-15

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (∼20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-α emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  5. Latent Variable Regression 4-Level Hierarchical Model Using Multisite Multiple-Cohorts Longitudinal Data. CRESST Report 801

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Kilchan

    2011-01-01

    This report explores a new latent variable regression 4-level hierarchical model for monitoring school performance over time using multisite multiple-cohorts longitudinal data. This kind of data set has a 4-level hierarchical structure: time-series observation nested within students who are nested within different cohorts of students. These…

  6. A Hierarchical Modeling Approach to Data Analysis and Study Design in a Multi-Site Experimental fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Bo; Konstorum, Anna; Duong, Thao; Tieu, Kinh H.; Wells, William M.; Brown, Gregory G.; Stern, Hal S.; Shahbaba, Babak

    2013-01-01

    We propose a hierarchical Bayesian model for analyzing multi-site experimental fMRI studies. Our method takes the hierarchical structure of the data (subjects are nested within sites, and there are multiple observations per subject) into account and allows for modeling between-site variation. Using posterior predictive model checking and model…

  7. Multisite Interactions in Lattice-Gas Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, R.

    For detailed applications of lattice-gas models to surface systems, multisite interactions often play at least as significant a role as interactions between pairs of adatoms that are separated by a few lattice spacings. We recall that trio (3-adatom, non-pairwise) interactions do not inevitably create phase boundary asymmetries about half coverage. We discuss a sophisticated application to an experimental system and describe refinements in extracting lattice-gas energies from calculations of total energies of several different ordered overlayers. We describe how lateral relaxations complicate matters when there is direct interaction between the adatoms, an issue that is important when examining the angular dependence of step line tensions. We discuss the connector model as an alternative viewpoint and close with a brief account of recent work on organic molecule overlayers.

  8. Spectroscopic properties of holmium doped ? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Golab, S.; Zawadzka, J.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Lukasiewicz, T.; Swirkowicz, M.

    1998-11-01

    The spectroscopic properties of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions in 0953-8984/10/45/016/img12 crystals have been investigated using optical absorption, luminescence and lifetime measurements in the 5-300 K temperature range. The low temperature, polarized absorption spectra of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 in this matrix have allowed us to identify the Stark levels of the different multiplets up to 30 000 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14. The results are consistent with 0953-8984/10/45/016/img15 symmetry for the rare-earth ions and a singlet A character for the lowest Stark level of the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img16 ground state. Several transitions show additional structure which indicates multi-site occupancy for the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions. The measured oscillator strengths of the transitions between the J manifolds at 300 K are compared with those derived from the Judd-Ofelt theory. The radiative transition rates and radiative lifetimes have been calculated. The luminescence observed at 5 K has been attributed to 0953-8984/10/45/016/img18 (18 100 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14), 0953-8984/10/45/016/img20 (15 060 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14) and 0953-8984/10/45/016/img22 (13 150 0953-8984/10/45/016/img14) transitions. The obtained data are used to discuss the radiative properties for luminescent levels of 0953-8984/10/45/016/img11 ions in the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img25 matrix. The emission cross-section of a potential laser line at 2 0953-8984/10/45/016/img26m connected with the 0953-8984/10/45/016/img27 transition is estimated.

  9. A digital toolkit to implement and manage a multisite study.

    PubMed

    Lasater, Kathie; Johnson, Elizabeth; Hodson-Carlton, Kay; Siktberg, Linda; Sideras, Stephanie

    2012-03-01

    Calls for multisite studies are increasing in nursing education. However, the challenge of implementing consistent protocols and maintaining rigorous standards across sites can be daunting. One purpose of a recent multisite, collaborative, simulation study was to evaluate a digital toolkit's effectiveness for managing a multisite study. We describe the digital toolkit composed of Web-based technologies used to manage a study involving five sites including one United Kingdom site. The digital toolkit included a wiki, a project Web site to coordinate the protocols and study materials, software to organize study materials, and a secure location for sharing data. Most of these are familiar tools; however, combined as a toolkit, they became a useful management system. Web-based communication strategies and coordinated technical support served as key adjuncts to foster collaboration. This article also offers practical implications and recommendations for using a digital toolkit in other multisite studies. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Percival, Will J.; Burden, Angela; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.75 distributed over 9300 deg2, as quantified by their redshift-space correlation function. In order to facilitate these measurements, we define, describe, and motivate the selection function for galaxies in the final data release (DR12) of the SDSS III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This includes the observational footprint, masks for image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on BAO scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overlapping) 0.4 < z < 0.6 redshift bins. In each redshift bin, we obtain a precision that is 2.7 per cent or better on the radial distance and 1.6 per cent or better on the transverse distance. The combination of the redshift bins represents 1.8 per cent precision on the radial distance and 1.1 per cent precision on the transverse distance. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  11. Body composition is associated with multisite lower body musculoskeletal pain in a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Brady, Sharmayne R E; Mamuaya, Bambino B; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hussain, Sultana Monira; Urquhart, Donna M

    2015-08-01

    Population-based studies suggest that pain in the lower body is common and that pain at multiple sites is more prevalent than single-site pain. Obesity is a risk factor for multisite musculoskeletal pain, but there are limited data on the role of body composition. Therefore, we sought to determine whether body composition is associated with multisite musculoskeletal pain involving the low back, knee, and foot. A total of 133 participants were recruited for a study examining the relationship between obesity and musculoskeletal disease. Participants completed validated questionnaires that examined levels of pain at the low back, knee, and foot. Body composition was assessed using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Multisite pain was common, with 26.3% of participants reporting pain at 2 sites and 31.6% at 3 sites, and only 20% were pain free. The low back was the most common site of pain (63%). Greater fat mass and fat mass index, but not fat-free mass, were associated with pain at a greater number of sites, independent of age, gender, and fat-free mass (P < .01). Longitudinal studies exploring the mechanism of action by which increased fat mass is associated with pain may provide important insights into therapeutic strategies for the prevention of multisite pain. Greater fat mass and fat mass index were associated with a greater number of lower body pain sites, with no association observed for fat-free mass. Understanding the mechanism by which increased fat mass is associated with pain may provide important insights into therapeutic strategies for the prevention of pain. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploration of scanning effects in multi-site structural MRI studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiayu; Liu, Jingyu; Calhoun, Vince D.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Gupta, Cota Navin; Franke, Barbara; Turner, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pooling of multi-site MRI data is often necessary when a large cohort is desired. However, different scanning platforms can introduce systematic differences which confound true effects of interest. One may reduce multi-site bias by calibrating pivotal scanning parameters, or include them as covariates to improve the data integrity. New method In the present study we use a source-based morphometry (SBM) model to explore scanning effects in multi-site sMRI studies and develop a data-driven correction. Specifically, independent components are extracted from the data and investigated for associations with scanning parameters to assess the influence. The identified scanning-related components can be eliminated from the original data for correction. Results A small set of SBM components captured most of the variance associated with the scanning differences. In a dataset of 1460 healthy subjects, pronounced and independent scanning effects were observed in brainstem and thalamus, associated with magnetic field strength-inversion time and RF-receiving coil. A second study with 110 schizophrenia patients and 124 healthy controls demonstrated that scanning effects can be effectively corrected with the SBM approach. Comparison with existing method(s) Both SBM and GLM correction appeared to effectively eliminate the scanning effects. Meanwhile, the SBM-corrected data yielded a more significant patient versus control group difference and less questionable findings. Conclusions It is important to calibrate scanning settings and completely examine individual parameters for the control of confounding effects in multi-site sMRI studies. Both GLM and SBM correction can reduce scanning effects, though SBM’s data-driven nature provides additional flexibility and is better able to handle collinear effects. PMID:24785589

  13. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and a hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.

  14. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and amore » hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.« less

  15. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and a hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.

  16. Observed Stellar Spectra As Templates For Gaia. I. The Asiago Red Clump Spectroscopic Survey At 1.22 Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saguner, T.; Munari, U.; Vallenari, A.

    2011-02-01

    We aim to derive accurate, multi-epoch radial velocities and atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g and [M/H]) of a large sample of Red Clump stars. We acquired data of the target stars at high signal-to-noise (S/N) and medium resolution with the Asiago B&C spectrograph. Radial velocities were obtained by applying cross-correlation against observed IAU standard stars and atmospheric parameters via χ2 fit to a synthetic spectral library. Extensive tests were carried out with the multi-epoch observations of the programme stars and re-observations of the Red Clump stars that are taken from different catalogues in the literature. A total of 305 Red Clump stars (60 of them with a second epoch observation) were observed, and presented in an output catalogue that contains accurate radial velocities (σ(RV) = 2.6 km s-1), atmospheric parameters (σ(Teff) = 68 K, σ(log g) = 0.38 dex and σ([M/H]) = 0.17 dex), distances derived from spectrophotometry, space velocities (U,V,W) with additional astrometric and photometric data taken from literature. We aim to use our final catalogue to study the substructure and kinematics of the Galaxy.

  17. Multi-site continuous spectroscopy. 2: Spectrophotometry and energy budget of exceptional white-light flares on HR 1099 from the MUSICOS 89 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Char, S.; Ayres, T.; Catala, C.; Neff, J. E.; Zhai, D. S.; Catalano, S.; Cutispoto, G.; Jankov, S.; Rodono, M.; Simon, T.; Akan, C.; Aslanov, A.; Avellar, P.; Baudrand, J.; Beust, H.; Cao, H.; Chatzichristou, H.; Cuby, J. G.; Czarny, J.; de La Reza, R.; Dreux, M.; Felenbok, P.; Ferlet, R.; Frasca, A.; Floquet, M.; Ghosh, K.; Guo, Z.; Guerin, J.; Hao, J. X.; Houdebine, E. R.; Huang, L.; Hubert, A. M.; Hubert, H.; Huovelin, J.; Hron, J.; Ibanoglu, C.; Jiang, S.; Keskin, V.; Lagrange-Henri, A. M.; Lecontel, J. M.; Li, Q.; Mavridis, L.; Nolthenius, R.; Petrov, P.; Savanov, I.; Scherbakov, A.; Tuominen, I.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.

    1994-12-01

    We report results from the December 89 multi-site continuous observing campaign (MUSICOS (MUlti-SIte COntinuous Spectroscopic) 89) dedicated to the study of surface active structures and flares on the RS CVn-type system HR 1099 (= V711 Tau). This system has been observed by up to 17 telescopes around the globe during this campaign. We obtained complete phase coverage for Doppler imaging of photospheric spots. Quasi-simultaneously, we observed the modulation of Ca II K line profile due to chromospheric plage regions. At least two exceptional white-light flares on 14 Dec. 15:00 UT and 15 Dec. 1:00 UT (the largest such optical flare episode ever reported in a RS CVn system) were detected photometrically with typical rise and decay times of 60-90 min, and with remarkable spectral dynamic signatures in H-alpha with longer decay time scale. Equivalent colors, temperature excesses and projected flare areas (0.55 and 0.89 solar disc areas) were derived for the two optical flares. We estimate the energy budget for these two events, with respective peak intensities of radiative losses of 1.65 and 14 x 1033 erg/s and integrated losses over the white-light event duration of a few hours of 8 x 1036 and 1038 ergs (in the 3100-5900 A range), indicating a total energy balance several times these values. The emission was also measured in the H-alpha and H-Beta lines during these flares with a ratio of flare optical emission over Balmer emission 3-4 times larger compared to other flares on dwarfs. More than one day after the last white-light flare, part of the flare decay phase was also measured with IUE in UV lines of low and high excitation; the extrapolated transition region EUV losses are found similar to the derived Balmer line losses. Both flares were shown to occur near the limb. We derive their physical area, and estimate their densities, column mass, and penetration depth. From Balmer line broadening and flows, we derive a kinetic energy budget comparable to the radiative

  18. A one-year, on-line, multi-site observational study on water-soluble inorganic ions in PM2.5 over the Pearl River Delta region, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shaojia; Mao, Xia; Chen, Huizhong

    2017-12-01

    As the significant components of PM2.5, almost all of previous studies on water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs) have been limited by the use of single sampling station, short sampling times or low temporal resolution. This paper focuses on analysing one-year (2012) observations of WSIIs at a regional central (RCEN) site, a coastal urban (CURB) site and a coastal rural (CRUR) site in the Pearl River Delta region. On average, secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) were the most abundant component and accounted for over 80% of the total WSIIs. The ratio among sulfate, nitrate and ammonium mass concentrations was close to 2:1:1 (5:2:1) at the RCEN and CURB sites (CRUR site). Most components (except Na(+)) showed higher concentrations in the dry season. The diurnal variations of different ions showed obvious differences, which were partially controlled by photochemical reactions and diffusion conditions in the boundary layer. Ionic formation patterns were different among the three sites. Secondary inorganic pollution was much more serious in the northwestern PRD, and it had a significant effect on pollution in the coastal areas. High SO4(2-) concentrations at the CRUR site may be associated with local emissions, such as dimethysulfide (DMS). Long-range transport along the southeastern coastline also played an important role in SO4(2-) pollution over the PRD region. Sea salt aerosols were an important source in coastal regions; they contributed large amounts of Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+) at the CRUR site and large amounts of Na(+), Mg(2+) at the CURB site. The case studies found that sea salt aerosols concentrations increased obviously during the heavy precipitation period of typhoon. The presence of warm-wet air masses before continuous moist weather (CMW) was favourable for the formation of SIA. On the other hand, during CMW periods, SIA concentrations decreased rapidly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A TRANSIENT CORONAL LOOP: EVIDENCE FOR THE NON-MAXWELLIAN κ-DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Mackovjak, Šimon; Dzifčáková, Elena; Karlický, Marian; Kotrč, Pavel; Fárník, František; Zemanová, Alena; Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen E.; Williams, David R.; Lörinčík, Juraj

    2015-07-10

    We report on the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) observations of a transient coronal loop. The loop brightens up in the same location after the disappearance of an arcade formed during a B8.9-class microflare 3 hr earlier. EIS captures this loop during its brightening phase, as observed in most of the AIA filters. We use the AIA data to study the evolution of the loop, as well as to perform the differential emission measure (DEM) diagnostics as a function of κ. The Fe xi–Fe xiii lines observed by EIS are used to perform the diagnostics of electron density and subsequently the diagnostics of κ. Using ratios involving the Fe xi 257.772 Å self-blend, we diagnose κ ≲ 2, i.e., an extremely non-Maxwellian distribution. Using the predicted Fe line intensities derived from the DEMs as a function of κ, we show that, with decreasing κ, all combinations of ratios of line intensities converge to the observed values, confirming the diagnosed κ ≲ 2. These results represent the first positive diagnostics of κ-distributions in the solar corona despite the limitations imposed by calibration uncertainties.

  20. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Mathieu; Goulam Houssen, Yannick; Bradley, Jonathan; de Sars, Vincent; Charpak, Serge

    2013-08-06

    The advent of scanning two-photon microscopy (2PM) has created a fertile new avenue for noninvasive investigation of brain activity in depth. One principal weakness of this method, however, lies with the limit of scanning speed, which makes optical interrogation of action potential-like activity in a neuronal network problematic. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy (eMS2PM), a scanless method that allows simultaneous imaging of multiple targets in depth with high temporal resolution, addresses this drawback. eMS2PM uses a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to split a high-power femto-laser beam into multiple subbeams. To distinguish them, a digital micromirror device encodes each subbeam with a specific binary amplitude modulation sequence. Fluorescence signals from all independently targeted sites are then collected simultaneously onto a single photodetector and site-specifically decoded. We demonstrate that eMS2PM can be used to image spike-like voltage transients in cultured cells and fluorescence transients (calcium signals in neurons and red blood cells in capillaries from the cortex) in depth in vivo. These results establish eMS2PM as a unique method for simultaneous acquisition of neuronal network activity.

  1. Multisite adsorption of cadmium on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1996-11-10

    Recently a new general ion adsorption model has been developed for ion binding to mineral surfaces (Hiemstra and van Riemsdijk, 1996). The model uses the Pauling concept of charge distribution (CD) and is an extension of the multi-site complexation (MUSIC) approach. In the CD-MUSIC model the charge of an adsorbing ion that forms an inner sphere complex is distributed over its ligands, which are present in two different electrostatic planes. In this paper the authors have applied the CD-MUSIC model to the adsorption of metal cations, using an extended data set for cadmium adsorbing on goethite. The adsorption of cadmium and the cadmium-proton exchange ratio were measured as function of metal ion concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data could be described well, taking into account the surface heterogeneity resulting from the presence of two different crystal planes (the dominant 110 face and the minor 021 face). The surface species used in the model are consistent with recent EXAFS data. In accordance with the EXAFS results, high-affinity complexes at the 021 face were used in the model.

  2. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ducros, Mathieu; Houssen, Yannick Goulam; Bradley, Jonathan; de Sars, Vincent; Charpak, Serge

    2013-01-01

    The advent of scanning two-photon microscopy (2PM) has created a fertile new avenue for noninvasive investigation of brain activity in depth. One principal weakness of this method, however, lies with the limit of scanning speed, which makes optical interrogation of action potential-like activity in a neuronal network problematic. Encoded multisite two-photon microscopy (eMS2PM), a scanless method that allows simultaneous imaging of multiple targets in depth with high temporal resolution, addresses this drawback. eMS2PM uses a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to split a high-power femto-laser beam into multiple subbeams. To distinguish them, a digital micromirror device encodes each subbeam with a specific binary amplitude modulation sequence. Fluorescence signals from all independently targeted sites are then collected simultaneously onto a single photodetector and site-specifically decoded. We demonstrate that eMS2PM can be used to image spike-like voltage transients in cultured cells and fluorescence transients (calcium signals in neurons and red blood cells in capillaries from the cortex) in depth in vivo. These results establish eMS2PM as a unique method for simultaneous acquisition of neuronal network activity. PMID:23798397

  3. High-dispersion spectroscopic observations of Venus during 1968 and 1969 II. The carbon-dioxide band at 8689A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorn, R. A. J.; Woszczyk, A.; Young, L. D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty well-exposed photographic plates showing the spectrum of the carbon dioxide band at 8689A in the atmosphere of Venus were obtained during 1968 and 1969. All spectra were obtained at a dispersion of 2 A/mm for Venus phase angles varying from 10 deg. to 126 deg. Rotational temperatures ranging from 236 K to 274 K were found. The average value of the rotational temperature is 246 + or - 1 K (one standard deviation); for 1967 observations, the rotational temperatures ranged from 222 to 248 K, with an average value of 238 + or - 4 K. The variation of the equivalent width of the 8689A band, with Venus phase angle, was very similar for the two sets of observations (53 plates). The temporal variations, of approximately 30 percent, were comparable with the phase variations over this limited range of phase angle.

  4. Thermal infrared spectroscopic observations of Mars from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO): Constraints on past climates and weathering products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Pollack, James B.; Witteborn, Fred C.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Bell, James F., III; Sitton, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    Spectral observations providing evidence for the presence of volatile-bearing minerals on the surface of Mars were obtained in 1988 and 1990 from the KAO. The 1988 data suggest the presence of 1-3 weight percent (wt%) of carbonate/bicarbonate and 10-15 wt% sulfate/bisulfate associated with martian atmospheric dust. Estimates of the optical depths are approximately 0.60 and approximately 0.35 in 1988 and 1990, respectively.

  5. High-cadence, High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of Herbig Stars HD 98922 and V1295 Aquila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia N.; Monnier, John D.; Harries, Tim J.; Kraus, Stefan; Calvet, Nuria; Acreman, David; Che, Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Recent observational work has indicated that mechanisms for accretion and outflow in Herbig Ae/Be star–disk systems may differ from magnetospheric accretion (MA) as it is thought to occur in T Tauri star–disk systems. In this work, we assess the temporal evolution of spectral lines probing accretion and mass loss in Herbig Ae/Be systems and test for consistency with the MA paradigm. For two Herbig Ae/Be stars, HD 98922 (B9e) and V1295 Aql (A2e), we have gathered multi-epoch (∼years) and high-cadence (∼minutes) high-resolution optical spectra to probe a wide range of kinematic processes. Employing a line equivalent width evolution correlation metric introduced here, we identify species co-evolving (indicative of common line origin) via novel visualization. We interferometrically constrain often problematically degenerate parameters, inclination and inner-disk radius, allowing us to focus on the structure of the wind, magnetosphere, and inner gaseous disk in radiative transfer models. Over all timescales sampled, the strongest variability occurs within the blueshifted absorption components of the Balmer series lines; the strength of variability increases with the cadence of the observations. Finally, high-resolution spectra allow us to probe substructure within the Balmer series’ blueshifted absorption components: we observe static, low-velocity features and time-evolving features at higher velocities. Overall, we find the observed line morphologies and variability are inconsistent with a scaled-up T Tauri MA scenario. We suggest that as magnetic field structure and strength change dramatically with increasing stellar mass from T Tauri to Herbig Ae/Be stars, so too may accretion and outflow processes.

  6. The vertical structure of the Uranian atmosphere near equinox as modeled with near-infrared spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, James Walter

    We acquired spectra of Uranus in September 2006 and September 2007, at NASA's infrared Telescope Facility using the spectrograph SpeX. These spectra from 0.8--2.5 mum allow probing the Uranian troposphere due to the low haze opacity and broad range in methane opacity in the near infrared. Our observations occurred close to Uranus' December 2007 equinox, which not only allowed us to simultaneously observe regions of constant latitude due to the near-zero sub-observer latitude, but also provided a rare opportunity to study Uranus in one of the extremes of its 84-year seasonal cycle. We modeled the vertical structure of the Uranian atmosphere with a radiative transfer code designed to generate synthetic spectra based on a given set of atmospheric properties, for comparison with our observations. We employed the band-model methane absorption coefficients of Irwin et al. (2006), determined the effects of collision-induced absorption, and accounted for the large spatial coverage in each observation by calculating the contributions of numerous locations on Uranus to each spectrum. Our models assumed three aerosol layers in the atmosphere of Uranus: a stratospheric haze layer, and two tropospheric cloud layers. We fit optimum values to the optical depth of each aerosol layer in different spectral regions and to the pressure levels of each cloud layer; holding all other parameters constant. Our model results described two overarching regimes on Uranus. In 2006, the spectra from the southern hemisphere were best fit with bright clouds at high altitude, while the northern hemisphere was characterized by a dimmer haze layer, almost nonexistent upper cloud, and a deep lower cloud near 7 bars. However, this changed in the one-year interim between our data sets. In 2007, the high-cloud regions were instead around the equator, and we found the region near 45°S, which in previous years had displayed a bright polar collar, to have taken on the characteristics of the dimmer deeper

  7. {sup 13}C-METHYL FORMATE: OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS INCLUDING ORION-KL AND SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Favre, Cécile; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Neill, Justin L.; Carvajal, Miguel; Field, David; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Brouillet, Nathalie; Despois, Didier; Baudry, Alain; Kleiner, Isabelle; Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Thérèse R.; Demaison, Jean E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and its isotopologues H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4 GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC 6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1 mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 ± 10.1 and 71.4 ± 7.8, respectively) are, for both the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.

  8. CCD system upgrading of the Kyoto3DII and integral field spectroscopic observation with the new system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuda, Kazuma; Hashiba, Yasuhito; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Sugai, Hajime; Shimono, Atsushi; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Hattori, Takashi; Kamata, Yukiko; Ozaki, Shinobu; Doi, Mamoru; Sako, Shigeyuki

    2016-08-01

    The Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII) is an optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Subaru telescope as a PI-type instrument. Used with AO188, Kyoto 3DII provides us unique opportunities of optical Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) with adaptive optics (AO). While AO works better in redder wavelength regions, quantum efficiency of the previous CCD was low there with optimization for a wider wavelength coverage. To optimize Kyoto 3DII to AO observations, we have newly installed the red-sensitive Hamamatsu fully depleted CCD, which enhances the system efficiency by a factor of 2 in the red wavelength range. Fringes are dramatically reduced, and the readout noise drops to 3:2-3:4e- about two times smaller than previous, due to refrigerator and readout system. With these improvements, we carried out engineering and scientific observations in September 2015, February and March 2016. We measured the system efficiency using a standard star, and confirmed the successful improvement of the system efficiency. We observed galactic nuclei of nearby galaxies in the Natural Guide Star (NGS) and the Laser Guide Star (LGS) modes. We found the spatial resolution of 0.1'' FWHM using a 9.5-magnitude NGS, and 0.2 - 0:4'' in LGS mode. Together with the AO resolution, improved efficiency opens a new window for Kyoto 3DII to carry out high resolution optical IFS targeting faint objects such as high-redshift galaxies as well as faint lines such as [OI] λ6300° A and absorption lines of nearby objects.

  9. NEAR-CONTEMPORANEOUS OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIC AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF CANDIDATE HERBIG Ae/Be STARS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, Bradley W.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Wisniewski, John P. E-mail: Karen.Bjorkman@utoledo.edu

    2011-08-15

    We present near-IR (J, H, Ks) photometry for 27 of the 28 candidate Herbig Ae/Be stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC) identified via the EROS1 and EROS2 surveys as well as near-contemporaneous optical (H{alpha}) spectroscopy for 21 of these 28 candidates. Our observations extend previous efforts to determine the evolutionary status of these objects. We compare the IR brightness and colors of a subset of our sample with archival ground-based IR data and find evidence of statistically significant photometric differences for EROS LMC HAeBe candidates (ELHC) 5, 7, 12, 18, and 21 in one or more filters. In all cases, these near-IR photometric variations exhibit a gray color as compared to earlier epoch data. The {approx}1 mag IR brightening and minimal change in the H{alpha} emission strength we observe in ELHC 7 is consistent with previous claims that it is a UX Ori type HAe/Be star, which is occasionally obscured by dust clouds. We also detect a {approx}1 mag IR brightening of ELHC 12, but find little evidence of a similar large-scale change in its H{alpha} line strength, suggesting that its behavior could also be caused by a UX Ori-like event. The {approx}0.5 mag IR variability we observe for ELHC 21, which also exhibited little evidence of a change in its H{alpha} emission strength, could conceivably be caused by a major recent enhancement in the density of the inner disk region of a classical Be star. We also report the first near-IR photometry for two EROS SMC HAeBe Candidates (ESHC) stars and the first H{alpha} spectroscopy for one ELHC and five ESHC stars. Although H{alpha} emission is detected in all of these new observations, they do not exhibit a strong near-IR excess. It is therefore possible that many of these objects may be classical Be stars rather than Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  10. Real-Time Enrollment Dashboard For Multisite Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, William A; Kelley, Robert R; Wiemken, Timothy L; Chariker, Julia H; Peyrani, Paula; Guinn, Brian E; Binford, Laura E; Buckner, Kimberley; Ramirez, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Achieving patient recruitment goals are critical for the successful completion of a clinical trial. We designed and developed a web-based dashboard for assisting in the management of clinical trial screening and enrollment. Materials and Methods We use the dashboard to assist in the management of two observational studies of community-acquired pneumonia. Clinical research associates and managers using the dashboard were surveyed to determine its effectiveness as compared with traditional direct communication. Results The dashboard has been in use since it was first introduced in May of 2014. Of the 23 staff responding to the survey, 77% felt that it was easier or much easier to use the dashboard for communication than to use direct communication. Conclusion We have designed and implemented a visualization dashboard for managing multi-site clinical trial enrollment in two community acquired pneumonia studies. Information dashboards are a useful tool for clinical trial management. They can be used as a standalone trial information tool or included into a larger management system. PMID:26878068

  11. Spectroscopic determinations of surface gravities of giant stars, and ultraviolet observations of RR Lyrae and X Arietis

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The surface gravities of four K giant stars, including the well-known standard stars Arcturus (..cap alpha.. Boo) and Aldebaran (..cap alpha.. Tau) were determined from an analysis of the molecular dissociation equilibrium of OH. High-resolution FTS spectra of the infrared ground-state vibration-rotation lines of the OH ..delta..v = 1 and ..delta.. v = 2 sequences were used in the analysis. The oxygen abundances were derived from the (O I) lines at 6300 and 6363 A. The surface gravities of 5 further G and K giants were determined from an analysis of the molecular equilibrium of MgH, the magnesium abundances being derived from visible and near-infrared high-excitation-potential MgI lines. Ultraviolet observations of RR Lyrae and X Arietis obtained with the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS) and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite are also discussed. These observations are compared with light curves derived using model atmospheres and synthetic spectrum calculations in conjunction with angular diameters determined by Manduca et al. (1981) from photometry at longer wavelengths. A good agreement is found.

  12. Spectroscopic determinations of surface gravities of giant stars, and ultraviolet observations of RR Lyrae and X ARIETIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Jeremiah Tighe

    The surface gravities of four giant K stars, including the well known standard stars Arcturus (alpha Boo) and Aldebaran (alpha Tau) are determined from an analysis of the molecular dissociation equilibrium of OH. High resolution FTS spectra of the infrared ground state vibration-rotation lines of the OH delta v = 1 and delta v = 2 sequences were used in the analysis. The oxygen abundances were derived from the (OI) line at 6300 and 6363 A. Lifetimes for the OH delta v = 2 sequence lines are derived based on the electric dipole moment function and rotationless Einstein A values. Masses for the stars based on the derived gravities, measured parallaxes, and angular diameters are discussed. The surface gravities of 5 more G and K giants were determined from an analysis of the molecular equilibrium of MgH, the magnesium abundances being derived from visible and near infrared high excitation potential MgI lines. The MgH/MgI gravities are compared to surface gravities derived based on an analysis of the ionization equilibrium of iron. It is found that the implied giant star masses are not significantly subsolar. Ultraviolet observations of RR Lyrae and X Arietis obtained with the Astronomical Netherlands Satellite (ANS) and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite are also discussed. These observations are compared with light curves derived using model atmospheres and synthetic spectrum calculations in conjunction with angular diameters determined from photometry at longer wavelengths. A good agreement was found.

  13. Spectroscopic survey of Kepler stars - II. FIES/NOT observations of A- and F-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczura, E.; Polińska, M.; Murphy, S. J.; Smalley, B.; Kołaczkowski, Z.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Lykke, J. M.; Triviño Hage, A.; Michalska, G.

    2017-09-01

    We have analysed high-resolution spectra of 28 A and 22 F stars in the Kepler field, observed using the Fibre-Fed Échelle Spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. We provide spectral types, atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances for 50 stars. Balmer, Fe i and Fe ii lines were used to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities and microturbulent velocities. We determined chemical abundances and projected rotational velocities using a spectrum synthesis technique. Effective temperatures calculated by spectral energy distribution fitting are in good agreement with those determined from the spectral line analysis. The stars analysed include chemically peculiar stars of the Am and λ Boo types, as well as stars with approximately solar chemical abundances. The wide distribution of projected rotational velocity, vsin i, is typical for A and F stars. The microturbulence velocities obtained are typical for stars in the observed temperature and surface gravity ranges. Moreover, we affirm the results of Niemczura et al. that Am stars do not have systematically higher microturbulent velocities than normal stars of the same temperature.

  14. A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty high-energy solar spectroscopic imager.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Iain G; Hurford, Gordon J; Hudson, Hugh S; Lin, Robert P

    2007-02-01

    We present a new method, fan-beam modulation, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This space-based solar x-ray and gamma-ray telescope has much greater sensitivity than previous experiments in the 3-25 keV range, but is normally not well suited to detecting extended sources since their signal is not modulated by RHESSI's rotating grids. When the spacecraft is offpointed from the target source, however, the fan-beam modulation time-modulates the transmission by shadowing resulting from exploiting the finite thickness of the grids. In this article we detail how the technique is implemented and verify its consistency with sources with clear known signals that have occurred during RHESSI offpointing: microflares and the Crab Nebula. In both cases the results are consistent with previous and complementary measurements. Preliminary work indicates that this new technique allows RHESSI to observe the integrated hard x-ray spectrum of weak extended sources on the quiet Sun.

  15. Reduced-complexity multi-site rainfall generation: one million years over night using the model TripleM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinl, Korbinian; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Girons Lopez, Marc

    2017-04-01

    We assess uncertainties of multi-site rainfall generation across spatial scales and different climatic conditions. Many research subjects in earth sciences such as floods, droughts or water balance simulations require the generation of long rainfall time series. In large study areas the simulation at multiple sites becomes indispensable to account for the spatial rainfall variability, but becomes more complex compared to a single site due to the intermittent nature of rainfall. Weather generators can be used for extrapolating rainfall time series, and various models have been presented in the literature. Even though the large majority of multi-site rainfall generators is based on similar methods, such as resampling techniques or Markovian processes, they often become too complex. We think that this complexity has been a limit for the application of such tools. Furthermore, the majority of multi-site rainfall generators found in the literature are either not publicly available or intended for being applied at small geographical scales, often only in temperate climates. Here we present a revised, and now publicly available, version of a multi-site rainfall generation code first applied in 2014 in Austria and France, which we call TripleM (Multisite Markov Model). We test this fast and robust code with daily rainfall observations from the United States, in a subtropical, tropical and temperate climate, using rain gauge networks with a maximum site distance above 1,000km, thereby generating one million years of synthetic time series. The modelling of these one million years takes one night on a recent desktop computer. In this research, we first start the simulations with a small station network of three sites and progressively increase the number of sites and the spatial extent, and analyze the changing uncertainties for multiple statistical metrics such as dry and wet spells, rainfall autocorrelation, lagged cross correlations and the inter-annual rainfall

  16. First spectroscopic observation of gold(i) butadiynylide: Photodetachment velocity map imaging of the AuC4H anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, Bradley R.; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Gascooke, Jason R.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Metha, Gregory F.

    2016-07-01

    The velocity map imaging technique was used in the investigation of gold(i) butadiynylide, AuC4H-, with images recorded at two excitation wavelengths. The resultant photodetachment spectra show a well defined vibrational progression in the neutral with an energy spacing of 343 ± 3 cm-1. The adiabatic electron affinity was determined to be 1.775 ± 0.005 eV and assigned to the X1Σ+←X2Σ+ transition between the anionic and neutral ground states. Franck-Condon simulations performed on density functional theory optimized geometries assisted the assignment of linear geometries to the neutral and anion and the observed vibrational progression to that of the Au-C4H stretch.

  17. First spectroscopic observation of gold(i) butadiynylide: Photodetachment velocity map imaging of the AuC4H anion.

    PubMed

    Visser, Bradley R; Addicoat, Matthew A; Gascooke, Jason R; Lawrance, Warren D; Metha, Gregory F

    2016-07-28

    The velocity map imaging technique was used in the investigation of gold(i) butadiynylide, AuC4H(-), with images recorded at two excitation wavelengths. The resultant photodetachment spectra show a well defined vibrational progression in the neutral with an energy spacing of 343 ± 3 cm(-1). The adiabatic electron affinity was determined to be 1.775 ± 0.005 eV and assigned to the X(1)Σ(+)←X(2)Σ(+) transition between the anionic and neutral ground states. Franck-Condon simulations performed on density functional theory optimized geometries assisted the assignment of linear geometries to the neutral and anion and the observed vibrational progression to that of the Au-C4H stretch.

  18. Compact Solar Spectroscopic Column CO2, CH4, H2O and HOD Observations: Performance Evaluation at TCCON Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, Z.; Lindenmaier, R.; Dubey, M. K.; Hedelius, J.; Wunch, D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Podolske, J. R.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Hase, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of natural sources and sinks and anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) are crucial to predict climate change and develop transparent accounting policies to contain climate forcing. Remote sensing technologies are beginning to monitor CO2 and CH4 from ground and space (OCO-2 and GOSAT) with solar spectroscopy enabling direct MRV. However, current ground based coverage is sparse due to the need for large and expensive high-resolution spectrometers that are part of the Total Column Carbon Observing Network (TCCON, Bruker 125HR). This limits our MRV and satellite validation abilities, both regionally and globally. There are striking monitoring gaps in Asia, South America and Africa where the CO2 emissions are growing and there is a large uncertainty in fluxes from land use change, biomass burning and rainforest vulnerability. To fill this gap we evaluate the precision, accuracy and stability of our new compact, affordable and easy to use low-resolution spectrometer (Bruker EM27SUN) by comparing it with the much larger high-resolution TCCON instruments for column CO2, CH4, H2O and HOD. Results from Four Corners, Los Alamos, Caltech and Dryden-Armstrong sites show that our EM27SUN captures the variability of the aforementioned constituents very well, but has low and high offsets for CO2 and CH4, respectively. These off-the-shelf spectrometers should dramatically expand the coverage of regional column CO2 and CH4 observations, particularly in gap regions that include the rainforest. We will present opportunities that we are exploring to help enable transparent and reliable MRV and measurement of the coupled water-carbon cycle in tropical ecosystems.

  19. Pulsation in the atmosphere of the roAp star HD 24712. I. Spectroscopic observations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Sachkov, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Kallinger, T.; Kochukhov, O.; Bagnulo, S.; Ilyin, I.; Landstreet, J. D.; Leone, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Lüftinger, T.; Lyashko, D.; Magazzù, A.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We have investigated the structure of the pulsating atmosphere of one of the best studied rapidly oscillating Ap stars, HD 24712. Methods: For this purpose we analyzed spectra collected during 2001-2004. An extensive data set was obtained in 2004 simultaneously with the photometry of the Canadian MOST mini-satellite. This allows us to connect directly atmospheric dynamics observed as radial velocity variations with light variations seen in photometry. Results: We directly derived for the first time and for different chemical elements, respectively ions, phase shifts between photometric and radial velocity pulsation maxima indicating, as we suggest, different line formation depths in the atmosphere. This allowed us to estimate for the first time the propagation velocity of a pulsation wave in the outer stellar atmosphere of a roAp star to be slightly lower than the sound speed. We confirm large pulsation amplitudes (150-400 m s-1) for REE lines and the Hα core, while spectral lines of the other elements (Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe-peak elements) have nearly constant velocities. We did not find different pulsation amplitudes and phases for the lines of rare-earth elements before and after the Balmer jump, which supports the hypothesis of REE concentration in the upper atmosphere above the hydrogen line-forming layers. We also discuss radial velocity amplitudes and phases measured for individual spectral lines as tools for a 3D tomography of the atmosphere of HD 24712. Based on observations collected at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, (DDT-274.D-5011), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), and from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with assistance from the University of Vienna. Tables 4, 5 and Fig. 9 are only available in

  20. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Observations of Intervening O VI Absorption Line Systems in the Spectrum of PG 0953+415

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sembach, K. R.; Tripp, T. M.; Richter, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of the intergalactic medium toward the bright QSO PG 0953+415 (zem=0.239). The FUSE spectra extend from 905 to 1187 Å and have a resolution of 25 km s-1, while the STIS spectra cover 1150-1730 Å and have a resolution of 7 km s-1. Additional STIS observations at 30 km s-1 are obtained in selected wavelength ranges. An O VI system at z=0.06807 is detected in H I Lyα, Lyβ, Lyγ, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62, N V λλ1238.82, 1242.80, C IV λλ1548.20, 1550.77, and C III λ977.02. The observed column densities can be modeled as a low-density intervening gas with a metallicity of 0.4+0.6-0.2 times solar in photoionization equilibrium with the ionizing extragalactic background radiation. The best fit is achieved with an ionization parameter, logU=-1.35, which implies nH~10-5 cm-3 and a path length of ~80 kpc through the absorbing gas. H I Lyα absorption at z=0.14232 spans a velocity range of 410 km s-1 with the strongest components near 0 and 80 km s-1 in the z=0.14232 rest frame. In this system, O VI λλ1031.93, 1037.62 absorption is strong near 0 km s-1 and not detected at 80 km s-1. C III λ977.02 absorption is marginally detected at 80 km s-1 but is not detected at 0 km s-1. The observations place constraints on the properties of the z=0.14232 system but do not discriminate between collisional ionization in hot gas versus photoionization in a very low density medium with an ionization parameter logU>-0.74. The z=0.06807 and 0.14232 O VI systems occur at redshifts where there are peaks in the number density of intervening galaxies along the line of sight determined from WIYN redshift measurements of galaxies in the ~1° field centered on PG 0953+415. We combine our observations of PG 0953+415 with those for other QSOs to update the estimate of the low-redshift number density of intervening O VI systems. Over a total unobscured redshift path of Δz=0

  1. VLT/GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations of the metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxy SBS 0335-052E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Schaerer, D.; Blecha, A.; Royer, F.; Guseva, N. G.; North, P.

    2006-11-01

    Aims.We present two-dimensional spectroscopy of the extremely metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy SBS 0335-052E to study physical conditions, element abundances and kinematical properties of the ionised gas in this galaxy. Methods: .Observations were obtained in the spectral range λ3620-9400 Å with the imaging spectrograph GIRAFFE on the UT2 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT). These observations are the first ones carried out so far with GIRAFFE in the ARGUS mode which allows one to simultaneously obtain 308 spectra covering a 11.4 arcsec×7.3 arcsec region. Results: .We produced images of SBS 0335-052E in the continuum and in emission lines of different stages of excitation. While the maximum of emission in the majority of lines, including the strong lines Hβ 4861 Å, Hα 6563 Å, [O iii] 4363,5007 Å, [O ii] 3726,3729 Å, coincides with the youngest south-eastern star clusters 1 and 2, the emission of He II 4686 Å line is offset to the more evolved north-west clusters 4, 5. This suggests that hard ionising radiation responsible for the He II λ4686 Å emission is not related to the most massive youngest stars, but rather is related to fast radiative shocks. This conclusion is supported by the kinematical properties of the ionised gas from the different emission lines as the velocity dispersion in the He II λ4686 Å line is systematically higher, by ~50-100%, than that in other lines. The variations of the emission line profiles suggest the presence of an ionised gas outflow in the direction perpendicular to the galaxy disk. We find a relatively high electron number density Ne of several hundred cm-3 in the brightest part of SBS 0335-052E. There is a small gradient of the electron temperature Te and oxygen abundance from the East to the West with systematically higher Te and lower 12+log O/H in the western part of the galaxy. The oxygen abundances for the whole H II region and its brightest part are 12 + log O/H = 7.29 ± 0.02 and 7.31 ± 0

  2. Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations of Gaia16cfr/AT 2016jbu: A Probable Supernova Impostor in NGC 2442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Monard, L. A. G.; Seidel, M. K.; Dong, S.; Hsiao, E.; Shappee, B. J.; Bond, H. E.; Prieto, J. L.; Morrell, N.; Phillips, M.

    2017-01-01

    Gaia16cfr/AT 2016jbu was discovered by Gaia Alerts at 19.6 mag on UT 2016-12-01 (http://gsaweb.ast.cam.ac.uk/alerts/alert/Gaia16cfr/). This transient in NGC 2442 was also found by Berto Monard at 17.8 +/- 0.2 mag (clear filter) on UT 2016-12-22.85, and the photometric observations by Monard from 2016-12-22 to 2017-01-01 are listed below: Time (UT) Mag (clear filter) -------------------- 2016-12-22.85 17.8 +/- 0.2 2016-12-30.88 17.7 +/- 0.1 2016-12-31.96 17.7 +/- 0.1 2017-01-01.87 17.4 +/- 0.2 The distance NGC 2442 (z = 0.0049) is estimated as 23.9 +/- 0.4 Mpc using SN Ia 2015F (Im et al., 2015), and the absolute magnitude of Gaia16cfr/AT 2016jbu on 2017-01-01.87 is thus about -14.5 mag without taking into account of extinction (the Galactic extinction is about A_R 0.4 mag according to NED).

  3. NGP: a new large format infrared detector for observation, hyperspectral and spectroscopic space missions in VISIR, SWIR and MWIR wavebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delannoy, Anne; Fièque, Bruno; Chorier, Philippe; Riuné, Céline

    2015-10-01

    SOFRADIR is one of the leading companies involved in the development and manufacturing of infrared detectors for space applications. As a matter of fact, SOFRADIR is present in many space programs in visible and SWIR spectral ranges. Most of these programs concern hyperspectral imagery observation of the earth but also some scientific applications. For more than 10 years, the Saturn generation detector (VISIR or SWIR) of Sofradir was the basis of numerous space missions. In order to answer future mission needs which require larger detector for better spatial and spectral resolutions while complying with all specifications reflecting the state of requirements for space detectors, SOFRADIR has developed a new detector in a frame of an ESA R and T program, named Next Generation Panchromatic Detector (NGP). While designed for VISIR and SWIR spectral ranges, this detector is also studied to be extended in MWIR spectral range. In this paper, NGP detector will be described as well as its performances. Space applications using this detector will be presented also showing appropriateness of its use to answer space programs specifications, as for example those of Sentinel-5.

  4. Fast-ion deuterium alpha spectroscopic observations of the effects of fishbones in the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Michael, C. A.; McClements, K. G.; Conway, N. J.; Crowley, B.; Akers, R. J.; Lake, R. J.; Pinches, S. D.; the MAST Team

    2013-08-01

    Using the recently installed fast-ion deuterium alpha (FIDA) spectrometer, the effects of low-frequency (20-50 kHz) chirping energetic particle modes with toroidal mode number n ⩾ 1 on the neutral beam injection-driven fast-ion population in Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasmas are considered. Results from the FIDA diagnostic are presented and discussed in the light of the present theoretical understanding of these modes, known as fishbones, in plasmas with reversed shear. Measurements of the fast-ion population reveal strong redistribution of fast ions in both real and velocity space as a result of the fishbones. Time-resolved measurements throughout the evolution of a fishbone show radial redistribution of fast ions with energies up to 95% of the primary beam injection energy. Correlations between changes in the FIDA signal and the peak time derivative of the magnetic field perturbation are observed in a limited range of operating scenarios. The transient reduction in signal caused by a fishbone may in some cases reach 50% of the signal intensity before mode onset.

  5. Spectroscopic observations of active solar-analog stars with high X-ray luminosity, as a proxy of superflare stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Yuta; Honda, Satoshi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Shota; Namekata, Kosuke; Nogami, Daisaku; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies of solar-type superflare stars have suggested that even old slowly rotating stars similar to the Sun can have large starspots and superflares. We conducted high-dispersion spectroscopy of 49 nearby solar-analog stars (G-type main-sequence stars with Teff ≈ 5600-6000 K) identified as ROSAT soft X-ray sources, which are not binary stars from previous studies. We expected that these stars could be used as a proxy of bright solar-analog superflare stars, since superflare stars are expected to show strong X-ray luminosity. More than half (37) of the 49 target stars show no evidence of binarity, and their atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity) are within the range of ordinary solar-analog stars. We measured the intensity of Ca II 8542 and Hα lines, which are good indicators of the stellar chromospheric activity. The intensity of these lines indicates that all the target stars have large starspots. We also measured v sin i (projected rotational velocity) and lithium abundance for the target stars. Li abundance is a key to understanding the evolution of the stellar convection zone, which reflects the stellar age, mass and rotational history. We confirmed that many of the target stars rapidly rotate and have high Li abundance, compared with the Sun, as suggested by many previous studies. There are, however, also some target stars that rotate slowly (v sin i = 2-3 km s-1) and have low Li abundance like the Sun. These results support that old and slowly rotating stars similar to the Sun could have high activity levels and large starspots. This is consistent with the results of our previous studies of solar-type superflare stars. In the future, it is important to conduct long-term monitoring observations of these active solar-analog stars in order to investigate detailed properties of large starspots from the viewpoint of stellar dynamo theory.

  6. High-dispersion spectroscopic observations of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) with the Subaru Telescope on 2013 November 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Y.; Kawakita, H.; Nagashima, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Decock, A.; Jehin, E.

    2014-07-01

    Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) probably originates from the Oort Cloud. Comet Lovejoy provided us with great opportunities to investigate the chemical composition of the comet thanks to its brightness and elongation angle from October 2013 to March 2014. We observed comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) on 2013 November 15 UT using the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 1.066 and 0.412 au, respectively. The obtained spectra cover the wavelength region from 360 to 830 nm with the resolving power of R = λ/Δλ = 72,000 for the slit size of 0''.5 × 9''.0 (360-520 nm) and 0''.5 × 9''.0 (550-830 nm) on the sky. Exposure time was 130 minutes in total (100 minutes for shorter and 30 minutes for longer wavelength regions). We could identify many species such as the radicals (CN, CH, C_{3}, C_{2}, NH_{2}, etc.), ions (CH^{+}, H_{2}O^{+}), and atoms ([OI] and NaI) in the spectra and many unidentified lines were also detected. Here we discuss the chemical reaction in cometary coma and the origin of icy materials of comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), based on the high-dispersion spectra in the optical wavelength regions. We present (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia inferred from the high-dispersion spectra of H_{2}O^{+} and NH_{2}, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the nitrogen and the carbon isotopic ratios of CN, and (4) spatial distributions of radicals, atoms, and dust continuum in the inner coma.

  7. Coordination and Management of Multisite Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Therapies: Experience from a Multisite Reflexology Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; Victorson, David; Ardjomand-Hessabi, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    Background Multisite randomized clinical trials allow for increased research collaboration among investigators and expedite data collection efforts. As a result, government funding agencies typically look favorably upon this approach. As the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) continues to evolve, so do increased calls for the use of more rigorous study design and trial methodologies, which can present challenges for investigators. Purpose To describe the processes involved in the coordination and management of a multisite randomized clinical trial of a CAM intervention. Methods Key aspects related to the coordination and management of a multisite CAM randomized clinical trial are presented, including organizational and site selection considerations, recruitment concerns and issues related to data collection and randomization to treatment groups. Management and monitoring of data, as well as quality assurance procedures are described. Finally, a real world perspective is shared from a recently conducted multisite randomized clinical trial of reflexology for women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. Results The use of multiple sites in the conduct of CAM-based randomized clinical trials can provide an efficient, collaborative and robust approach to study coordination and data collection that maximizes efficiency and ensures the quality of results. Conclusions Multisite randomized clinical trial designs can offer the field of CAM research a more standardized and efficient approach to examine the effectiveness of novel therapies and treatments. Special attention must be given to intervention fidelity, consistent data collection and ensuring data quality. Assessment and reporting of quantitative indicators of data quality should be required. PMID:21664296

  8. Strategies to Encourage Adoption in Multi-Site Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Guydish, Joseph; Tajima, Barbara; Manser, Sarah; Jessup, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is intended to test promising drug abuse treatment models in multi-site clinical trials, and to support adoption of new interventions into clinical practice. Using qualitative research methods we studied adoption in the context of two multi-site clinical trials, one outside the CTN and one within the CTN. A total of 71 participants, representing 8 organizational levels ranging from clinic staff to clinical trial leaders, were interviewed about their role in the clinical trial, its interactions with clinics, and intervention adoption. Drawing on conceptual themes identified in these interviews, we report strategies that could be applied in planning, development and implementation of multi-site studies to better support adoption of tested interventions in study clinics after the trial has ended. Planning for adoption in the early stages of protocol development will enhance integration of new interventions into practice. PMID:17306726

  9. Study of diatoms/aqueous solution interface. I. Acid-base equilibria and spectroscopic observation of freshwater and marine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélabert, A.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Schott, J.; Boudou, A.; Feurtet-Mazel, A.; Mielczarski, J.; Mielczarski, E.; Mesmer-Dudons, N.; Spalla, O.

    2004-10-01

    This work reports on a concerted study of diatom-water interfaces for two marine planktonic ( Thalassiosira weissflogii= TW, Skeletonema costatum= SC) and two freshwater periphytic species ( Achnanthidium minutissimum= AMIN, Navicula minima= NMIN). Proton surface adsorption was measured at 25°C, pH of 3 to 11 and ionic strength of 0.001 to 1.0 M via potentiometric titration using a limited residence time reactor. Electrophoretic mobility of living cells and their frustules was measured as a function of pH and ionic strength. Information on the chemical composition and molecular structure of diatoms surfaces was obtained using FT-IR (in situ attenuated total reflectance) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The surface area of living cells and their frustules in aqueous solutions was quantified using Small Angle X-ray Scattering Spectroscopy (SAXS). These observations allowed us to identify the nature and to determine the concentration of the major surface functional groups (carboxyl, amine and silanol) responsible for the amphoteric behavior of cell surfaces in aqueous solutions. Taking into account the relative proportion of surface sites inferred from XPS and FT-IR measurements, a surface complexation model of diatom-solution interfaces was generated on the basis of surface titration results. The cell-normalized ratios of the three major surface sites {>COOH}: {>NH 3}: {>SiOH} are 1:1:0.1, 1:10:0, 1:1:0.4 and 1:1:0.3 for TW, SC, AMIN and NMIN, respectively. The total amount of proton/hydroxyl active surface sites for investigated species ranges from 1 (NMIN) to 9 (SC) mmol/g dry weight. Normalization of these site densities to the area of siliceous skeleton yields values between 0.3 (NMIN) and 0.9 mmol/m 2 (SC) which are an order of magnitude higher than corresponding values for organic-free frustules or amorphous silica. This suggests that the amphoteric properties and possibly the affinity for metal adsorption of diatom cultures are essentially

  10. Observational and laboratory studies of optical properties of black and brown carbon particles in the atmosphere using spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoki; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    Light absorption and scattering by aerosols are as an important contributor to radiation balance in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) is considered to be the most potent light absorbing material in the visible region of the spectrum, although light absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon or BrC) and mineral dust may also act as sources of significant absorption, especially in the ultraviolet (UV) and shorter visible wavelength regions. The optical properties of such particles depend on wavelength, particle size and shape, morphology, coating, and complex refractive index (or chemical composition), and therefore accurate in situ measurements of the wavelength dependence of the optical properties of particles are needed. Recently, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) have been used for the direct measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients of particles suspended in air. We have applied these techniques to the observational studies of optical properties of BC and BrC in an urban site in Japan and to the laboratory studies of optical properties of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds and those of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). In the presentation, the basic principles of these techniques and the results obtained in our studies and in the recent literatures will be overviewed. References Guo, X. et al., Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer, Atmos. Environ., 94, 428-437 (2014). Nakayama, T. et al., Measurements of aerosol optical properties in central Tokyo during summertime using cavity ring-down spectroscopy: Comparison with conventional techniques, Atmos. Environ., 44, 3034-3042 (2010). Nakayama, T. et al., Laboratory studies on optical properties of secondary organic aerosols generated during the photooxidation of toluene and the ozonolysis of alpha

  11. A comparison of single- and multi-site calibration and validation: a case study of SWAT in the Miyun Reservoir watershed, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jianwen; Shen, Zhenyao; Yan, Tiezhu

    2017-09-01

    An essential task in evaluating global water resource and pollution problems is to obtain the optimum set of parameters in hydrological models through calibration and validation. For a large-scale watershed, single-site calibration and validation may ignore spatial heterogeneity and may not meet the needs of the entire watershed. The goal of this study is to apply a multi-site calibration and validation of the Soil andWater Assessment Tool (SWAT), using the observed flow data at three monitoring sites within the Baihe watershed of the Miyun Reservoir watershed, China. Our results indicate that the multi-site calibration parameter values are more reasonable than those obtained from single-site calibrations. These results are mainly due to significant differences in the topographic factors over the large-scale area, human activities and climate variability. The multi-site method involves the division of the large watershed into smaller watersheds, and applying the calibrated parameters of the multi-site calibration to the entire watershed. It was anticipated that this case study could provide experience of multi-site calibration in a large-scale basin, and provide a good foundation for the simulation of other pollutants in followup work in the Miyun Reservoir watershed and other similar large areas.

  12. Analysis of CO, CH4 and AOD distributions over Eurasia and estimates of their long-term tendencies based on spectroscopic ground-based and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitin, Vadim; Elansky, Nikolai; Shtabkin, Yury; Dzhola, Anatoly; Pankratova, Natalia; Shilkin, Arseny

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of the CO and CH4 total column (TC) measurements and AOD data in urban and background regions of Eurasia for period from 1998 to 2016 years is presented. The trends estimates based on spectroscopic ground-based datasets of OIAP, SPSU, IAP CAC, NPO "Typhoon" and NDACC were compared with similar ones obtained with use of orbital data (MOPITT v6J and AIRS v6). Total decrease of CO TC in both urban (Moscow and Beijing) and background regions (ZSS, Peterhof, Obninsk, European NDACC sites) in 1998-2016 years changed to increase of CO in summer and autumn months in almost all background regions of Northern Eurasia after 2007. Negative trends of AOD were obtained for Europe, West Siberia and China for different seasons (including summer and autumn months) for time periods 2000-2016 and 2007-2016 with using both AERONET and MODIS Terra/Aqua datasets; AOD trends over East Siberia were positive that dui to influence of strong wild fires in 2010-2016 years in Siberia. Rate of CO TC decrease obtained with orbital data using are less than the same for ground based data with factor 1.5-2.0 for both urban and background regions. Rate of CH4 TC increased after 2007 in North-West Eurasian regions and didn't change in most of North-East regions. The negative AOD trends over Europe and West Siberia indirectly point to non-increase of wild-fires emissions over this region in latest years. Therefore the positive CO TC trends cannot be explained only by increase of wild-fires impact and anthropogenic emissions; possible reasons of such CO tendencies could be the changes in all atmospheric photochemistry system. This work was supported by the Russian Scientific Foundation under grant №14-47-00049 (in part of NDACC, AERONET and satellite trends estimates), under grant №16-17-10275 (in part of analysis of ground-based observations over Moscow and Obninsk) and partially by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant № 16-05-00287 in part of provide of ground

  13. In Situ Raman Spectroscopic Observations of Gas-Saturated Rising Oil droplets: Simulation with Decane as an Oil-Equivalent Substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Brewer, P. G.

    2016-02-01

    Oil droplets rising from the sea floor, whether from seeps or well leakage, contain very large quantities of dissolved gas that profoundly affects their density and critical oil-water interfacial characteristics. The primary dissolved gas is methane which may be up to 30% of the molar volume. This can create a hydrate skin as the methane gas is shed from the oil as it rises through the water column, thus decreasing in pressure and increasing in temperature, and steadily changing the rising droplet buoyancy. We have explored this phenomenon by executing controlled ROV based experiments with a "bubble cup" technique in which a small volume of gas saturated decane (saturated with pure methane, a mix of methane and nitrogen , or a mix of methane and CO2) is interrogated by laser Raman spectroscopy. The use of decane as an oil "substitute" is required since natural oil samples are highly fluorescent due to the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We have devised Matlab techniques for extracting the spectroscopic dissolved methane signal from the thicket of decane peaks that surround it. We have directly observed the rate at which gases are lost from the "oil" per unit area at depths in the water column that are both within and outside the hydrate forming phase boundary. We have compared the behavior of both a non-hydrate forming dissolved gas (nitrogen) with CO2 where the hydrate phase boundary is at significantly shallower depth. The results indicate complex interfacial behavior and physical chemistry. We did not observe direct gas bubble formation on the decane outer surface but did observe gas bubble formation within the oil droplets as they rose through the water column. Because there are significant energy barriers for homogeneous bubble formation within the decane phase, we took this as evidence of significant gas super-saturation within the oil droplet. The gas loss rates increased significantly in all cases when the hydrate phase boundary was crossed.

  14. The Growth of Multi-Site Fatigue Damage in Fuselage Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    Destructive examinations were performed to document the progression of multi-site damage (MSD) in three lap joint panels that were removed from a full scale fuselage test article that was tested to 60,000 full pressurization cycles. Similar fatigue crack growth characteristics were observed for small cracks (50 microns to 10 mm) emanating from counter bore rivets, straight shank rivets, and 100 deg counter sink rivets. Good correlation of the fatigue crack growth data base obtained in this study and FASTRAN Code predictions show that the growth of MSD in the fuselage lap joint structure can be predicted by fracture mechanics based methods.

  15. Spectroscopic Observations of the Planets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1997). "The Surfaces of Pluto and Charon" D. P. Cruikshank, T. L. Roush, J. M. Moore, M. V. Sykes, T. Owen, M. J. Bartholomew, R. H. Brown, K. A...Tryka. In Pluto and Charon, ed. D. J. Tholen and S. A. Stern (Tucson, Univ. of Arizona Press) p. 221-268 (1997) . "From Planetesimals to Planets

  16. Spectroscopic Observations of the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias

    1998-01-01

    During the period under review, the main effort of the research supported by this grant was concentrated on Titan, Iapetus, and two comets, Comet Hyakutake and Comet Hale-Bopp. Significant discoveries were made in each case as summarized in the report.

  17. Candidate Water Vapor Lines to Locate the H2O Snowline through High-dispersion Spectroscopic Observations. I. The Case of a T Tauri Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Shota; Nomura, Hideko; Ishimoto, Daiki; Walsh, Catherine; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Hirota, Tomoya; Millar, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Inside the H2O snowline of protoplanetary disks, water evaporates from the dust-grain surface into the gas phase, whereas it is frozen out onto the dust in the cold region beyond the snowline. H2O ice enhances the solid material in the cold outer part of a disk, which promotes the formation of gas-giant planet cores. We can regard the H2O snowline as the surface that divides the regions between rocky and gaseous giant planet formation. Thus observationally measuring the location of the H2O snowline is crucial for understanding the planetesimal and planet formation processes, and the origin of water on Earth. In this paper, we find candidate water lines to locate the H2O snowline through future high-dispersion spectroscopic observations. First, we calculate the chemical composition of the disk and investigate the abundance distributions of H2O gas and ice, and the position of the H2O snowline. We confirm that the abundance of H2O gas is high not only in the hot midplane region inside the H2O snowline but also in the hot surface layer of the outer disk. Second, we calculate the H2O line profiles and identify those H2O lines that are promising for locating the H2O snowline: the identified lines are those that have small Einstein A coefficients and high upper state energies. The wavelengths of the candidate H2O lines range from mid-infrared to sub-millimeter, and they overlap with the regions accessible to the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array and future mid-infrared high-dispersion spectrographs (e.g., TMT/MICHI, SPICA).

  18. First High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of an Erupting Prominence Within a Coronal Mass Ejection by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; De Pontieu, Bart; Vial, Jean-Claude; Title, Alan M.; Carlsson, Mats; Uitenbroek, Han; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Berger, Thomas E.; Antolin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Spectroscopic observations of prominence eruptions associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), although relatively rare, can provide valuable plasma and three-dimensional geometry diagnostics. We report the first observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph mission of a spectacular fast CME/prominence eruption associated with an equivalent X1.6 flare on 2014 May 9. The maximum plane-of-sky and Doppler velocities of the eruption are 1200 and 460 km s-1, respectively. There are two eruption components separated by ˜200 km s-1 in Doppler velocity: a primary, bright component and a secondary, faint component, suggesting a hollow, rather than solid, cone-shaped distribution of material. The eruption involves a left-handed helical structure undergoing counterclockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion. There is a temporal evolution from upward eruption to downward fallback with less-than-free-fall speeds and decreasing nonthermal line widths. We find a wide range of Mg ii k/h line intensity ratios (less than ˜2 expected for optically-thin thermal emission): the lowest ever reported median value of 1.17 found in the fallback material, a comparably high value of 1.63 in nearby coronal rain, and intermediate values of 1.53 and 1.41 in the two eruption components. The fallback material exhibits a strong (\\gt 5σ ) linear correlation between the k/h ratio and the Doppler velocity as well as the line intensity. We demonstrate that Doppler dimming of scattered chromospheric emission by the erupted material can potentially explain such characteristics.

  19. Hard X-ray Spectroscopic, Microwave and H-alpha Linear Polarization Studies with Hard X-Ray Observations from HESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    2005-01-01

    The Principal Investigator (P.I.) has been pursuing a three year grant under NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Guest Investigator Program in support of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). An objective of these efforts is to combine X-ray and other data on solar flares, coronal mass ejections and interplanetary particle events in order to obtain a more comprehensive recognition of signatures, and understanding of interplanetary proton events. Thus, part of these efforts are to investigate if signatures seen in hard X-rays and microwaves can lead to better predictions of interplanetary proton events that can be dangerous to astronauts and spacecraft. The original proposal was written in May, 2000 and it discusses a three-pronged approach for data comparisons with three new types of instrumentation observing at X-ray, microwave and optical wavelengths. The major impetus behind this work and the proposal is that the P.I. discovered a strong correlation between a particular type of hard X-ray signature seen in spectral evolutions and interplanetary proton events (Kiplinger, 1995). The basic signature is that hard X-ray flux peaks either exhibit spectra that soften on their decays (Le. show fewer and fewer high energy X-rays with time) or they harden during decays (i.e. high energy X-rays decay significantly slower that lower energy X-rays). This signature is called progressive hardening. Studies were conducted over an eight-year period of data from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) of the Solar maximum mission. Out of the 750 well observed flares studied, 41 flares had major associated proton events. Of these, 29 events were predicted on the basis of progressive hardening for a hit rate of 71%. The 152 largest flares had a hit rate of 82%.

  20. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  1. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, R. J.; Hounsell, R. A.; Downing, S.; Pan, Y.-C.; Scolnic, D.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-07-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph (wavelength range 3100 - 7100) on the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope.

  2. Single-site vs. multi-site rainfall generation and the role of parametric rainfall distributions in lumped hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breinl, Korbinian

    2017-04-01

    It was examined whether a lumped hydrological model driven with lumped daily precipitation time series from a single-site rainfall generator can produce equally good simulation results compared to using a multi-site rainfall generator, where synthetic precipitation is first generated at multiple sites and subsequently lumped. Driving a lumped hydrological model with synthetic rainfall time series from stochastic rainfall generation is a fast methodology in hydrological impact assessment, for example for the assessment of low frequent extreme flows when long synthetic discharge time series are required. The use of a lumped hydrological model appears to justify the application of a straightforward single-site "Richardson type" rainfall generator, where rainfall observations from several sites in the catchment are first lumped and then used for parametric distribution fitting. An alternative approach is the application of a multi-site rainfall generator, where rainfall is first generated at all available rainfall sites and subsequently lumped to feed the hydrological model. The higher complexity of multi-site rainfall generators makes the application of a single-site approach attractive as the latter can be set up fairly easily. This study revealed, however, that well-established parametric rainfall distributions for single-site rainfall observations are not suitable for lumped rainfall time series in the Alpine catchments examined, and can lead to bias in the simulation of extreme flows when using a single-site rainfall generator. The issue can be avoided by either using a multi-site rainfall generator, which is considerably less sensitive to the choice of the parametric rainfall distribution or by a careful choice of the parametric rainfall distribution fitted to lumped rainfall time series when using a single-site rainfall generator. In this study three different rainfall generators were tested: two different single-site "Richardson type" models (one with and one

  3. How Does a Multi-Site Institution Plan Effectively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson, Curtis F.

    A multi-site college plans effectively by having in place planning and evaluation systems that enhance its capability to respond effectively to changes in the environment in order to continue to provide high quality educational programs and services for the people in its service area. The effectiveness of these systems is dependent on clearly…

  4. Hydrological modeling using a multi-site stochastic weather generator

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weather data is usually required at several locations over a large watershed, especially when using distributed models for hydrological simulations. In many applications, spatially correlated weather data can be provided by a multi-site stochastic weather generator which considers the spatial correl...

  5. A Multisite Cluster Randomized Field Trial of Open Court Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Schneck, Carrie

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors report achievement outcomes of a multisite cluster randomized field trial of Open Court Reading 2005 (OCR), a K-6 literacy curriculum published by SRA/McGraw-Hill. The participants are 49 first-grade through fifth-grade classrooms from predominantly minority and poor contexts across the nation. Blocking by grade level…

  6. A Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lena K.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org). PMID:21931740

  7. A Multisite Evaluation of Reading Is Fundamental: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Ronald K.; And Others

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national program that seeks to motivate children to read. Implemented by local sponsors and aimed at disadvantaged groups, it offers participating children a wide selection of attractive paperback books about interesting people, places, and events. The multisite evaluation summarized in this report studied…

  8. A Multisite Evaluation of Reading Is Fundamental: Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Ronald K.; And Others

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national program that seeks to motivate children to read. Implemented by local sponsors and aimed at disadvantaged groups, it offers participating children a wide selection of attractive paperbound books about interesting people, places, and events. The multisite evaluation discussed in this technical report…

  9. Strengthening Multisite Educational Interventions: An Illustration with Multilevel Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Miller, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Uses data from an evaluation of an alternative teacher certification program to illustrate the value and use of multilevel models to examine site-to-site outcome differences data from multisite evaluations, showing how a traditional analysis approach can overlook effective interventions and miss important links between program implementation and…

  10. Multi-site precipitation downscaling using a stochastic weather generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Chen, Hua; Guo, Shenglian

    2017-05-01

    Statistical downscaling is an efficient way to solve the spatiotemporal mismatch between climate model outputs and the data requirements of hydrological models. However, the most commonly-used downscaling method only produces climate change scenarios for a specific site or watershed average, which is unable to drive distributed hydrological models to study the spatial variability of climate change impacts. By coupling a single-site downscaling method and a multi-site weather generator, this study proposes a multi-site downscaling approach for hydrological climate change impact studies. Multi-site downscaling is done in two stages. The first stage involves spatially downscaling climate model-simulated monthly precipitation from grid scale to a specific site using a quantile mapping method, and the second stage involves the temporal disaggregating of monthly precipitation to daily values by adjusting the parameters of a multi-site weather generator. The inter-station correlation is specifically considered using a distribution-free approach along with an iterative algorithm. The performance of the downscaling approach is illustrated using a 10-station watershed as an example. The precipitation time series derived from the National Centers for Environment Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis dataset is used as the climate model simulation. The precipitation time series of each station is divided into 30 odd years for calibration and 29 even years for validation. Several metrics, including the frequencies of wet and dry spells and statistics of the daily, monthly and annual precipitation are used as criteria to evaluate the multi-site downscaling approach. The results show that the frequencies of wet and dry spells are well reproduced for all stations. In addition, the multi-site downscaling approach performs well with respect to reproducing precipitation statistics, especially at monthly and annual timescales. The remaining biases mainly result from the non-stationarity of

  11. A comparison of three stochastic multi-site precipitation occurrence generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, R.; Srikanthan, R.; Sharma, Ashish

    2006-11-01

    SummaryThis paper presents a comparison of three multi-site stochastic weather generators for simulation of point rainfall occurrences at a network of 30 raingauge stations around Sydney, Australia. The approaches considered include a parametric hidden Markov model (HMM), a multi-site stochastic precipitation generation model (proposed by [Wilks, D.S., 1998. Multi-site generalization of a daily stochastic precipitation model, J. Hydrol. 210, 178-191.]) and a non-parametric K-nearest neighbour (KNN) model. The HMM generates the precipitation distribution conditional on a discrete weather state representing certain identified spatial rainfall distribution patterns. The spatial dependence is maintained by assumption of a common weather state across all stations while the temporal dependence is simulated by assuming the weather state to be Markovian in nature. The Wilks model preserves serial dependence through the assumption of an order one Markov dependence at each location. The spatial dependence is simulated by prescribing a dependence pattern on the uniform random variates used to generate the rainfall occurrence at each location from the associated conditional probability distribution. The K-nearest neighbour approach simulates spatial dependence by simultaneously generating precipitation occurrence at all locations. Temporal persistence is simulated through Markovian assumptions on the rainfall occurrence process. The three methods are evaluated for their ability to model spatial and temporal dependence in the rainfall occurrence field and also the relative ease with which the assumptions of spatial and temporal dependence can be accommodated. Our results indicate that all the approaches are successful in reproducing spatial dependence in the multi-site rainfall occurrence field. However, the different orders of assumed Markovian dependence in the observed data limit their ability in representing temporal dependence at time scales longer than a few days. While

  12. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  13. Spectroscopic Observations of SN 2012fr: A Luminous, Normal Type Ia Supernova with Early High-velocity Features and a Late Velocity Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Jha, S. W.; McCully, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Anderson, J. P.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Forster, F.; Gal-Yam, A.; Le Guillou, L.; Maguire, K.; Maund, J.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pignata, G.; Smartt, S.; Spyromilio, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taddia, F.; Valenti, S.; Bayliss, D. D. R.; Bessell, M.; Blanc, G. A.; Carson, D. J.; Clubb, K. I.; de Burgh-Day, C.; Desjardins, T. D.; Fang, J. J.; Fox, O. D.; Gates, E. L.; Ho, I.-T.; Keller, S.; Kelly, P. L.; Lidman, C.; Loaring, N. S.; Mould, J. R.; Owers, M.; Ozbilgen, S.; Pei, L.; Pickering, T.; Pracy, M. B.; Rich, J. A.; Schaefer, B. E.; Scott, N.; Stritzinger, M.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Zhou, G.

    2013-06-01

    We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II λ6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity "photospheric" component. This Si II λ6355 HVF fades by phase -5 subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of ~12,000 km s-1 until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v ≈ 12,000 km s-1 with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v ≈ 31,000 km s-1 two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the "shallow silicon" and "core-normal" subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the "low velocity gradient" group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

  14. Establishment of multi-site infection model in zebrafish larvae for studying Staphylococcus aureus infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-juan; Hu, Bing

    2012-09-20

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal model for studying the mechanism of infectious disease and the interaction between host and pathogen. As a teleost, zebrafish has developed a complete immune system which is similar to mammals. Moreover, the easy acquirement of large amounts of transparent embryos makes it a good candidate for gene manipulation and drug screening. In a zebrafish infection model, all of the site, timing, and dose of the bacteria microinjection into the embryo are important factors that determine the bacterial infection of host. Here, we established a multi-site infection model in zebrafish larvae of 36 hours post-fertilization (hpf) by microinjecting wild-type or GFP-expressing Staphylococcus aereus (S. aureus) with gradient burdens into different embryo sites including the pericardial cavity (PC), eye, the fourth hindbrain ventricle (4V), yolk circulation valley (YCV), caudal vein (CV), yolk body (YB), and Duct of Cuvier (DC) to resemble human infectious disease. With the combination of GFP-expressing S. aureus and transgenic zebrafish Tg (coro1a: eGFP; lyz: Dsred) and Tg (lyz: Dsred) lines whose macrophages or neutrophils are fluorescent labeled, we observed the dynamic process of bacterial infection by in vivo multicolored confocal fluorescence imaging. Analyses of zebrafish embryo survival, bacterial proliferation and myeloid cells phagocytosis show that the site- and dose-dependent differences exist in infection of different bacterial entry routes. This work provides a consideration for the future study of pathogenesis and host resistance through selection of multi-site infection model. More interaction mechanisms between pathogenic bacteria virulence factors and the immune responses of zebrafish could be determined through zebrafish multi-site infection model.

  15. Replication and Comparison of the Newly Proposed ADOS-2, Module 4 Algorithm in ASD without ID: A Multi-Site Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Wallace, Gregory L.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.; Popal, Haroon; Armour, Anna Chelsea; Miller, Judith; Herrington, John D.; Schultz, Robert T.; Martin, Alex; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth

    2015-01-01

    Recent updates have been proposed to the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2 Module 4 diagnostic algorithm. This new algorithm, however, has not yet been validated in an independent sample without intellectual disability (ID). This multi-site study compared the original and revised algorithms in individuals with ASD without ID. The revised…

  16. Replication and Comparison of the Newly Proposed ADOS-2, Module 4 Algorithm in ASD without ID: A Multi-Site Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Kenworthy, Lauren; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Wallace, Gregory L.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.; Popal, Haroon; Armour, Anna Chelsea; Miller, Judith; Herrington, John D.; Schultz, Robert T.; Martin, Alex; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth

    2015-01-01

    Recent updates have been proposed to the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2 Module 4 diagnostic algorithm. This new algorithm, however, has not yet been validated in an independent sample without intellectual disability (ID). This multi-site study compared the original and revised algorithms in individuals with ASD without ID. The revised…

  17. High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of Binary Stars and Yellow Stragglers in Three Open Clusters : NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales Silva, J. V.; Peña Suárez, V. J.; Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F.

    2014-11-01

    Binary stars in open clusters are very useful targets in constraining the nucleosynthesis process. The luminosities of the stars are known because the distances of the clusters are also known, so chemical peculiarities can be linked directly to the evolutionary status of a star. In addition, binary stars offer the opportunity to verify a relationship between them and the straggler population in both globular and open clusters. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the atmospheric parameters for 16 red giants in binary systems and the chemical composition of 11 of them in the open clusters NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employ the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that the stars NGC 2360-92 and 96, NGC 3680-34, and NGC 5822-4 and 312 are yellow straggler stars. We show that the spectra of NGC 5822-4 and 312 present evidence of contamination by an A-type star as a secondary star. For the other yellow stragglers, evidence of contamination is given by the broad wings of the Hα. Detection of yellow straggler stars is important because the observed number can be compared with the number predicted by simulations of binary stellar evolution in open clusters. We also found that the other binary stars are not s-process enriched, which may suggest that in these binaries the secondary star is probably a faint main-sequence object. The lack of any s-process enrichment is very useful in setting constraints for the number of white dwarfs in the open cluster, a subject that is related to the birthrate of these kinds of stars in open clusters and also to the age of a

  18. Spectroscopic observations of ATLAS17lcs (SN 2017guv) and ASASSN-17mq (AT 2017gvo) by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Subo; Bose, Subhash; Stritzinger, M.; Holmbo, S.; Fraser, M.; Fedorets, G.

    2017-10-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of ATLAS17lcs (SN 2017guv) and ASASSN-17mq (AT 2017gvo) in host galaxies 2MASX J19132225-1648031 and CGCG 225-050, respectively.

  19. The s-process in low-metallicity stars - II. Interpretation of high-resolution spectroscopic observations with asymptotic giant branch models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Gallino, R.; Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Käppeler, F.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations of 100 metal-poor carbon and s-rich stars (CEMP-s) collected from the literature are compared with the theoretical nucleosynthesis models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) presented in Paper I (MAGBini= 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 2 M⊙, - 3.6 ≲ [ Fe/H ] ≲- 1.5). The s-process enhancement detected in these objects is associated with binary systems: the more massive companion evolved faster through the thermally pulsing AGB phase (TP-AGB), synthesizing s-elements in the inner He intershell, which are partly dredged up to the surface during the third dredge-up (TDU) episode. The secondary observed low-mass companion became CEMP-s by the mass transfer of C- and s-rich material from the primary AGB. We analyse the light elements C, N, O, Na and Mg, as well as the two s-process indicators, [hs/ls] (where ls = is the the light-s peak at N = 50 and hs = the heavy-s peak at N = 82) and [Pb/hs]. We distinguish between CEMP-s with high s-process enhancement, [hs/Fe] >rsim 1.5 (CEMP-sII), and mild s-process enhanced stars, [hs/Fe] < 1.5 (CEMP-sI). To interpret the observations, a range of s-process efficiencies at any given metallicity is necessary. This is confirmed by the high spread observed in [Pb/hs] (˜2 dex). A degeneration of solutions is found with some exceptions: most main-sequence CEMP-sII stars with low [Na/Fe] can only be interpreted with MAGBini= 1.3-1.4 M⊙. Giants having suffered the first dredge-up (FDU) need a dilution >rsim1 dex (dil is defined as the mass of the convective envelope of the observed star, Mobs★, over the material transferred from the AGB to the companion, MtransAGB). Then AGB models with higher AGB initial masses (MAGBini= 1.5-2 M⊙) are adopted to interpret CEMP-sII giants. In general, solutions with AGB models in the mass range MAGBini= 1.3-2 M⊙ and different dilution factors are found for CEMP-sI stars. About half of the CEMP-s stars with europium measurements show a high r

  20. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of binary stars and yellow stragglers in three open clusters: NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822

    SciTech Connect

    Sales Silva, J. V.; Peña Suárez, V. J.; Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F. E-mail: jearim@on.br E-mail: claudio@on.br E-mail: froig@on.br

    2014-11-01

    Binary stars in open clusters are very useful targets in constraining the nucleosynthesis process. The luminosities of the stars are known because the distances of the clusters are also known, so chemical peculiarities can be linked directly to the evolutionary status of a star. In addition, binary stars offer the opportunity to verify a relationship between them and the straggler population in both globular and open clusters. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the atmospheric parameters for 16 red giants in binary systems and the chemical composition of 11 of them in the open clusters NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employ the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that the stars NGC 2360-92 and 96, NGC 3680-34, and NGC 5822-4 and 312 are yellow straggler stars. We show that the spectra of NGC 5822-4 and 312 present evidence of contamination by an A-type star as a secondary star. For the other yellow stragglers, evidence of contamination is given by the broad wings of the Hα. Detection of yellow straggler stars is important because the observed number can be compared with the number predicted by simulations of binary stellar evolution in open clusters. We also found that the other binary stars are not s-process enriched, which may suggest that in these binaries the secondary star is probably a faint main-sequence object. The lack of any s-process enrichment is very useful in setting constraints for the number of white dwarfs in the open cluster, a subject that is related to the birthrate of these kinds of stars in open clusters and also to the age of a

  1. Direct spectroscopic observation of singlet oxygen quenching and kinetic studies of physical and chemical singlet oxygen quenching rate constants of synthetic antioxidants (BHA, BHT, and TBHQ) in methanol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hyun; Jung, Mun Yhung

    2010-08-01

    Singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic antioxidants (BHA, BHT, and TBHQ) was directly observed by spectroscopic monitoring of luminescence at 1268 nm. The luminescence data showed unambiguous evidence of singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic phenolic antioxidants with the highest activity for TBHQ, followed by BHA and BHT. The protective activities of these synthetic antioxidants on alpha-terpinene oxidation with chemically-induced singlet oxygen under dark further confirmed their singlet oxygen quenching abilities. Total singlet oxygen quenching rate constants (k(r) + k(q)) of BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were determined in a system containing alpha-terpinene (as a singlet oxygen trap) and methylene blue (as a sensitizer) during light irradiation, and the values were 5.14 x 10(7), 3.41 x 10(6), and 1.99 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1), respectively. After the k(r) value of alpha-terpinene was first determined, the k(r) values of the synthetic antioxidants were calculated by measuring their relative reaction rates with singlet oxygen to that of alpha-terpinene under the identical conditions. The k(r) values of the BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were 3.90 x 10(5), 1.23 x 10(5), and 2.93 x 10(6), M(-1)s(-1). The percent partition of chemical quenching over total singlet oxygen quenching (k(r) x 100)/(k(r) + k(q)) for BHA, BHT, and TBHQ were 0.76%, 3.61%, and 1.47%, respectively. The results showed that the synthetic antioxidants quench singlet oxygen almost exclusively through the mechanism of physical quenching. This represents the first report on the singlet oxygen quenching mechanism of these synthetic antioxidants. Practical Application: The synthetic antioxidants, especially TBHQ, have been found to have a strong singlet oxygen quenching ability. This article also clearly showed that singlet oxygen quenching by synthetic antioxidants was mainly by the physical quenching mechanism. The results suggested that these synthetic antioxidants, especially TBHQ, could be used practically for the protection

  2. Quantification of source impact to PM using three-dimensional weighted factor model analysis on multi-site data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guoliang; Peng, Xing; Huangfu, Yanqi; Wang, Wei; Xu, Jiao; Tian, Yingze; Feng, Yinchang; Ivey, Cesunica E.; Russell, Armistead G.

    2017-07-01

    Source apportionment technologies are used to understand the impacts of important sources of particulate matter (PM) air quality, and are widely used for both scientific studies and air quality management. Generally, receptor models apportion speciated PM data from a single sampling site. With the development of large scale monitoring networks, PM speciation are observed at multiple sites in an urban area. For these situations, the models should account for three factors, or dimensions, of the PM, including the chemical species concentrations, sampling periods and sampling site information, suggesting the potential power of a three-dimensional source apportionment approach. However, the principle of three-dimensional Parallel Factor Analysis (Ordinary PARAFAC) model does not always work well in real environmental situations for multi-site receptor datasets. In this work, a new three-way receptor model, called ;multi-site three way factor analysis; model is proposed to deal with the multi-site receptor datasets. Synthetic datasets were developed and introduced into the new model to test its performance. Average absolute error (AAE, between estimated and true contributions) for extracted sources were all less than 50%. Additionally, three-dimensional ambient datasets from a Chinese mega-city, Chengdu, were analyzed using this new model to assess the application. Four factors are extracted by the multi-site WFA3 model: secondary source have the highest contributions (64.73 and 56.24 μg/m3), followed by vehicular exhaust (30.13 and 33.60 μg/m3), crustal dust (26.12 and 29.99 μg/m3) and coal combustion (10.73 and 14.83 μg/m3). The model was also compared to PMF, with general agreement, though PMF suggested a lower crustal contribution.

  3. Security architecture for multi-site patient records research.

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, F. M.; Johnson, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    A security system was developed as part of a patient records research database project intended for both local and multi-site studies. A comprehensive review of ethical foundations and legal environment was undertaken, and a security system comprising both administrative policies and computer tools was developed. For multi-site studies, Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval is required for each study, at each participating site. A sponsoring Principal Investigator (PI) is required at each site, and each PI needs automated enforcement tools. Systems fitting this model were implemented at two academic medical centers. Security features of commercial database systems were found to be adequate for basic enforcement of approved research protocols. PMID:10566404

  4. Independent positioning of microelectrodes for multisite recordings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albus, Klaus; Sinske, Kurt; Heinemann, Uwe

    2009-01-30

    A robust and easy to handle, inexpensive multisite recording system is described which allows independent positioning of several microelectrodes with high precision axial movement of each electrode. The basic units of the system are a manually operated manipulator for left-right and up-down movement and a micrometer for positioning in the direction of the micrometer axis. The micrometer is actuated with a DC-motor operated by a stand-alone controller module allowing for remote control of the motor in either step mode or continuous mode. The multisite recording system has been proven to allow stable simultaneous recordings of single unit and population activities, extracellular ion concentrations and intracellular potentials in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) of rat.

  5. Predicting multisite protein subcellular locations: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Du, Pufeng; Xu, Chao

    2013-06-01

    In the last two decades, predicting protein subcellular locations has become a hot topic in bioinformatics. A number of algorithms and online services have been developed to computationally assign a subcellular location to a given protein sequence. With the progress of many proteome projects, more and more proteins are annotated with more than one subcellular location. However, multisite prediction has only been considered in a handful of recent studies, in which there are several common challenges. In this special report, the authors discuss what these challenges are, why these challenges are important and how the existing studies gave their solutions. Finally, a vision of the future of predicting multisite protein subcellular locations is given.

  6. Spectroscopic parallaxes of MAP region stars from UBVRI, DDO, and uvbyH-beta photometry. [Multichannel Astrometric Photometer for astronomical observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Persinger, Tim; Castelaz, Michael W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of spectral type and luminosity classification of reference stars in the Allegheny Observatory MAP parallax program, using broadband and intermediate-band photometry. In addition to the use of UBVRI and DDO photometric systems, the uvbyH-beta photometric system was included for classification of blue (B - V less than 0.6) reference stars. The stellar classifications made from the photometry are used to determine spectroscopic parallaxes. The spectroscopic parallaxes are used in turn to adjust the relative parallaxes measured with the MAP to absolute parallaxes. A new method for dereddening stars using more than one photometric system is presented. In the process of dereddening, visual extinctions, spectral types, and luminosity classes are determined, as well as a measure of the goodness of fit. The measure of goodness of fit quantifies confidence in the stellar classifications. It is found that the spectral types are reliable to within 2.5 spectral subclasses.

  7. In-Situ Measurements of HCN and CH3CN in the Pacific Troposphere: Sources, Sinks, and Comparisons with Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Czech, E.; Viezee, W.; Li, Q.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Sachse, G.; Harward, C. N.; hide

    2002-01-01

    We report the first in-situ measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) from the Pacific troposphere (0-12 km) obtained during the NASA/Trace-P mission (Feb.-April, 2001). Mean HCN and CH3CN mixing ratios of 243 (+/-118) ppt and 149 (+/-56) ppt respectively, were measured. The in-situ observations correspond to a total HCN column of 4.4-4.9 x 10(exp 15) molec. cm(exp -2) and a CH3CN column of 2.8-3.0 x 10(exp 15) molec. cm(exp -2). This HCN column is in good agreement with available spectroscopic observations. The atmospheric concentrations of HCN and CH3CN were greatly influenced by outflow of pollution from Asia. There is a linear relationship between the mixing ratios of HCN and CH3CN, and in turn these are well correlated with tracers of biomass combustion (e.g. CH3Cl, CO). Relative enhancements with respect to known tracers of biomass combustion within selected plumes in the free troposphere, and pollution episodes in the boundary layer allow an estimation of a global biomass burning source of 0.8+/-0.4 Tg (N)/y for HCN and 0.4+/-0.1 Tg (N)/y for CH3CN. In comparison, emissions from automobiles and industry are quite small (<0.05 Tg (N)/y). The vertical structure of HCN and CH3CN indicated reduced mixing ratios in the MBL (Marine Boundary Layer). Using, a simple box model, the observed gradients across the top of the MBL are used to derive an oceanic flux of 6.7 x 10(exp -15) g (N) cm(exp -2)/s for HCN and 4.8 x 10(exp -15) g (N) cm(exp -2)/s for CH3CN. An air-sea exchange model is used to conclude that this flux can be maintained if the oceans are under-saturated in HCN and CH3CN by 23% and 17%, respectively. It is inferred that oceanic loss is a dominant sink for these nitrites, and they deposit some 1.3 Tg (N) of nitrogen annually to the oceans. Assuming reaction with OH radicals and loss to the oceans as the major removal processes, a mean atmospheric residence time of 4.7 months for HCN and 5.1 months for CH3CN is calculated. A global

  8. Multisite accelerometry for sleep and wake classification in children.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Marnie L; Bradley, Andrew P; Tran, Tommy; Boynton, Alison; Terrill, Philip I

    2015-01-01

    Actigraphy is a useful alternative to the gold standard polysomnogram for non-invasively measuring sleep and wakefulness. However, it is unable to accurately assess sleep fragmentation due to its inability to differentiate restless sleep from wakefulness and quiet wake from sleep. This presents significant limitations in the assessment of sleep-related breathing disorders where sleep fragmentation is a common symptom. We propose that this limitation may be caused by hardware constraints and movement representation techniques. Our objective was to determine if multisite tri-axial accelerometry improves sleep and wake classification. Twenty-four patients aged 6-15 years (median: 8 years, 16 male) underwent a diagnostic polysomnogram while simultaneously recording motion from the left wrist and index fingertip, upper thorax and left ankle and great toe using a custom accelerometry system. Movement was quantified using several features and two feature selection techniques were employed to select optimal features for restricted feature set sizes. A heuristic was also applied to identify movements during restless sleep. The sleep and wake classification performance was then assessed and validated against the manually scored polysomnogram using discriminant analysis. Tri-axial accelerometry measured at the wrist significantly improved the wake detection when compared to uni-axial accelerometry (specificity at 85% sensitivity: 71.3(14.2)% versus 55.2(24.7)%, p < 0.01). Multisite accelerometry significantly improved the performance when compared to the single wrist placement (specificity at 85% sensitivity: 82.1(12.5)% versus 71.3(14.2)%, p < 0.05). Our results indicate that multisite accelerometry offers a significant performance benefit which could be further improved by analysing movement in raw multisite accelerometry data.

  9. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  10. Expansion of the Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Shearin, Harold K.; Dvarishkis, Alisa R.; Kozeluh, Craig D.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Precise manipulation of transgene expression in genetic model organisms has led to advances in understanding fundamental mechanisms of development, physiology, and genetic disease. Transgene construction is, however, a precondition of transgene expression, and often limits the rate of experimental progress. Here we report an expansion of the modular Gateway MultiSite recombination-cloning platform for high efficiency transgene assembly. The expansion includes two additional destination vectors and entry clones for the LexA binary transcription system, among others. These new tools enhance the expression levels possible with Gateway MultiSite generated transgenes and make possible the generation of LexA drivers and reporters with Gateway MultiSite cloning. In vivo data from transgenic Drosophila functionally validating each novel component are presented and include neuronal LexA drivers, LexAop2 red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle reporters, TDC2 and TRH LexA, GAL4, and QF drivers, and LexAop2, UAS, and QUAS channelrhodopsin2 T159C reporters. PMID:24204935

  11. Expansion of the gateway multisite recombination cloning toolkit.

    PubMed

    Shearin, Harold K; Dvarishkis, Alisa R; Kozeluh, Craig D; Stowers, R Steven

    2013-01-01

    Precise manipulation of transgene expression in genetic model organisms has led to advances in understanding fundamental mechanisms of development, physiology, and genetic disease. Transgene construction is, however, a precondition of transgene expression, and often limits the rate of experimental progress. Here we report an expansion of the modular Gateway MultiSite recombination-cloning platform for high efficiency transgene assembly. The expansion includes two additional destination vectors and entry clones for the LexA binary transcription system, among others. These new tools enhance the expression levels possible with Gateway MultiSite generated transgenes and make possible the generation of LexA drivers and reporters with Gateway MultiSite cloning. In vivo data from transgenic Drosophila functionally validating each novel component are presented and include neuronal LexA drivers, LexAop2 red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle reporters, TDC2 and TRH LexA, GAL4, and QF drivers, and LexAop2, UAS, and QUAS channelrhodopsin2 T159C reporters.

  12. Multisite artery disease: a common and challenging clinical condition calling for specific management.

    PubMed

    Di Noi, Paola; Brancati, Marta Francesca; Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    'Multisite' artery disease is defined as the simultaneous presence of clinically significant atherosclerotic lesions in at least two major vascular territories. The management of patients with multisite artery disease represents a common challenge in clinical practice, since they are at increased risk for both vascular and coronary surgery. Preliminary experiences suggest that percutaneous treatment may represent a promising strategy for patients with multisite artery disease. In this review, the prevalence and management of multisite artery disease are discussed with particular attention to coronary and peripheral revascularization related issues.

  13. Multisite ion model in concentrated solutions of divalent cations (MgCl2 and CaCl2): osmotic pressure calculations.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Akansha; García, Angel E

    2015-01-08

    Accurate force field parameters for ions are essential for meaningful simulation studies of proteins and nucleic acids. Currently accepted models of ions, especially for divalent ions, do not necessarily reproduce the right physiological behavior of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Saxena and Sept (J. Chem. Theor. Comput. 2013, 9, 3538-3542) described a model, called the multisite-ion model, where instead of treating the ions as an isolated sphere, the charge was split into multiple sites with partial charge. This model provided accurate inner shell coordination of the ion with biomolecules and predicted better free energies for proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we expand and refine the multisite model to describe the behavior of divalent ions in concentrated MgCl2 and CaCl2 electrolyte solutions, eliminating the unusual ion-ion pairing and clustering of ions which occurred in the original model. We calibrate and improve the parameters of the multisite model by matching the osmotic pressure of concentrated solutions of MgCl2 to the experimental values and then use these parameters to test the behavior of CaCl2 solutions. We find that the concentrated solutions of both divalent ions exhibit the experimentally observed behavior with correct osmotic pressure, the presence of solvent separated ion pairs instead of direct ion pairs, and no aggregation of ions. The improved multisite model for (Mg(2+) and Ca(2+)) can be used in classical simulations of biomolecules at physiologically relevant salt concentrations.

  14. Multisite Ion Model in Concentrated Solutions of Divalent Cations (MgCl2 and CaCl2): Osmotic Pressure Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Accurate force field parameters for ions are essential for meaningful simulation studies of proteins and nucleic acids. Currently accepted models of ions, especially for divalent ions, do not necessarily reproduce the right physiological behavior of Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions. Saxena and Sept (J. Chem. Theor. Comput.2013, 9, 3538–3542) described a model, called the multisite-ion model, where instead of treating the ions as an isolated sphere, the charge was split into multiple sites with partial charge. This model provided accurate inner shell coordination of the ion with biomolecules and predicted better free energies for proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we expand and refine the multisite model to describe the behavior of divalent ions in concentrated MgCl2 and CaCl2 electrolyte solutions, eliminating the unusual ion–ion pairing and clustering of ions which occurred in the original model. We calibrate and improve the parameters of the multisite model by matching the osmotic pressure of concentrated solutions of MgCl2 to the experimental values and then use these parameters to test the behavior of CaCl2 solutions. We find that the concentrated solutions of both divalent ions exhibit the experimentally observed behavior with correct osmotic pressure, the presence of solvent separated ion pairs instead of direct ion pairs, and no aggregation of ions. The improved multisite model for (Mg2+ and Ca2+) can be used in classical simulations of biomolecules at physiologically relevant salt concentrations. PMID:25482831

  15. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017mf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-01-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of SN2017mf. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.22-m Galileo Telescope (+ Boller & Chivens spectrograph).

  16. High-Accuracy Quartic Force Field Calculations for the Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies of 1(exp 1)A' l-C3H(-): A Possible Link to Lines Observed in the Horsehead Nebula PDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photon-dominated-region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C3H+, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D-eff for C3H(-) is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C3H(+). As a result, 1 (sup 1)A' C3H(-). is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions and would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C(sub n)H(-) molecular anion with an odd n.

  17. A DVD Spectroscope: A Simple, High-Resolution Classroom Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka; Hamada, Kiyohito

    2006-01-01

    Digital versatile disks (DVDs) have successfully made up an inexpensive but high-resolution spectroscope suitable for classroom experiments that can easily be made with common material and gives clear and fine spectra of various light sources and colored material. The observed spectra can be photographed with a digital camera, and such images can…

  18. Spectroscopic pulsational frequency identification and mode determination of γ Doradus star HD 12901

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, E.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2012-12-01

    Using multisite spectroscopic data collected from three sites, the frequencies and pulsational modes of the γ Doradus star HD 12901 were identified. A total of six frequencies in the range 1-2 d-1 were observed, their identifications supported by multiple line-profile measurement techniques and previously published photometry. Five frequencies were of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for mode identification, and all five displayed similar three-bump standard deviation profiles which were fitted well with (l,m) = (1,1) modes. These fits had reduced χ2 values of less than 18. We propose that this star is an excellent candidate to test models of non-radially pulsating γ Doradus stars as a result of the presence of multiple (1,1) modes. This paper includes data taken at the Mount John University Observatory of the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), the McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin (Texas, USA) and the European Southern Observatory at La Silla (Chile).

  19. Multi-Sited Global Ethnography and Travel: Gendered Journeys in Three Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Debbie; Fahey, Johannah; Kenway, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This paper joins a barely begun conversation about multi-sited and global ethnography in educational research; a conversation that is likely to intensify along with growing interest in the links between education, globalisation, internationalisation and transnationalism. Drawing on an ongoing multi-sited global ethnography of elite schools and…

  20. Multi-Sited Global Ethnography and Travel: Gendered Journeys in Three Registers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Debbie; Fahey, Johannah; Kenway, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This paper joins a barely begun conversation about multi-sited and global ethnography in educational research; a conversation that is likely to intensify along with growing interest in the links between education, globalisation, internationalisation and transnationalism. Drawing on an ongoing multi-sited global ethnography of elite schools and…

  1. Efficient multi-site two-photon functional imaging of neuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Castanares, Michael Lawrence; Gautam, Vini; Drury, Jack; Bachor, Hans; Daria, Vincent R.

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon imaging using high-speed multi-channel detectors is a promising approach for optical recording of cellular membrane dynamics at multiple sites. A main bottleneck of this technique is the limited number of photons captured within a short exposure time (~1ms). Here, we implement temporal gating to improve the two-photon fluorescence yield from holographically projected multiple foci whilst maintaining a biologically safe incident average power. We observed up to 6x improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Fluorescein and cultured hippocampal neurons showing evoked calcium transients. With improved SNR, we could pave the way to achieving multi-site optical recording of fluorogenic probes with response times in the order of ~1ms. PMID:28018745

  2. Control of spatially patterned synchrony with multisite delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Omel‘Chenko, O.; Popovych, O. V.; Maistrenko, Y.; Tass, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present an analytical study describing a method for the control of spatiotemporal patterns of synchrony in networks of coupled oscillators. Delayed feedback applied through a small number of electrodes effectively induces spatiotemporal dynamics at minimal stimulation intensities. Different arrangements of the delays cause different spatial patterns of synchrony, comparable to central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e., interacting clusters of oscillatory neurons producing patterned output, e.g., for motor control. Multisite delayed feedback stimulation might be used to restore CPG activity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury or gait ignition disorders.

  3. Adsorption of a multicomponent mixture of gases with multisite occupancy.

    PubMed

    Manzi, S; Mas, W; Belardinelli, R; Pereyra, V D

    2004-01-20

    In this paper, we present a study of the adsorption of multicomponent mixtures with multisite occupancy. The transfer-matrix technique is used to analyze the one-dimensional binary mixtures for interacting systems. A general expression for the characteristic polynomial is derived. Extension of the treatment to a higher dimension is also presented by using the mean-field Bragg-Williams approximation, transfer-matrix calculations, and Monte Carlo simulation. Partial and total isotherms are obtained for the dimer-trimer mixture where a different order appears.

  4. Lessons Learned From an International, Multisite Simulation Research Study.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Cynthia; Alhusen, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process and lessons learned in conducting an international, multisite simulation research study. Key lessons include asking site leaders to complete human subjects training early, applying for a deferral agreement for multiple sites, standardization, seeking consultation, considering differences in simulation centers, and having a back-up plan if committed team members are unable to progress. Although challenging, this process yields many rewards and raises the state of the science to improve pedagogy and student learning outcomes.

  5. THE HYPERFINE STRUCTURE OF THE ROTATIONAL SPECTRUM OF HDO AND ITS EXTENSION TO THE THz REGION: ACCURATE REST FREQUENCIES AND SPECTROSCOPIC PARAMETERS FOR ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Puzzarini, Cristina; Alonso, José Luis; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-06-10

    The rotational spectrum of the mono-deuterated isotopologue of water, HD{sup 16}O, has been investigated in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave frequency regions, up to 1.6 THz. The Lamb-dip technique has been exploited to obtain sub-Doppler resolution and to resolve the hyperfine (hf) structure due to the deuterium and hydrogen nuclei, thus enabling the accurate determination of the corresponding hf parameters. Their experimental determination has been supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations. The Lamb-dip measurements have been supplemented by Doppler-limited measurements (weak high-J and high-frequency transitions) in order to extend the predictive capability of the available spectroscopic constants. The possibility of resolving hf splittings in astronomical spectra has been discussed.

  6. Multisite multivariate modeling of daily precipitation and temperature in the Canadian Prairie Provinces using generalized linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asong, Zilefac E.; Khaliq, M. N.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) framework, a multisite stochastic modelling approach is developed using daily observations of precipitation and minimum and maximum temperatures from 120 sites located across the Canadian Prairie Provinces: Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Temperature is modeled using a two-stage normal-heteroscedastic model by fitting mean and variance components separately. Likewise, precipitation occurrence and conditional precipitation intensity processes are modeled separately. The relationship between precipitation and temperature is accounted for by using transformations of precipitation as covariates to predict temperature fields. Large scale atmospheric covariates from the National Center for Environmental Prediction Reanalysis-I, teleconnection indices, geographical site attributes, and observed precipitation and temperature records are used to calibrate these models for the 1971-2000 period. Validation of the developed models is performed on both pre- and post-calibration period data. Results of the study indicate that the developed models are able to capture spatiotemporal characteristics of observed precipitation and temperature fields, such as inter-site and inter-variable correlation structure, and systematic regional variations present in observed sequences. A number of simulated weather statistics ranging from seasonal means to characteristics of temperature and precipitation extremes and some of the commonly used climate indices are also found to be in close agreement with those derived from observed data. This GLM-based modelling approach will be developed further for multisite statistical downscaling of Global Climate Model outputs to explore climate variability and change in this region of Canada.

  7. Multi-site, multi-colour and space photometry of a southern δ Scuti star, 38 Eri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparó, Margit; Benkö, József

    2017-09-01

    38 Eri is a δ Scuti star in the shell hydrogen burning stage of evolution, with a 0.04 mag peak-to-peak amplitude and a very complex light variation. It was discovered in 1971. In the subsequent investigation the star always showed a different frequency content. A ground-based multi-site campaign and a MOST observation were devoted to resolve the contradicting pulsational behaviour. We present the preliminary result of our investigation obtained on Stromgren b and MOST data. The complexity of the pulsation is confirmed, but the comprehensive analysis helps to resolve the frequencies of the fast rotating star.

  8. Child Passenger Restraint System Misuse in Rural Versus Urban Children: A Multisite Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hafner, John W; Kok, Stephanie J; Wang, Huaping; Wren, Dale L; Aitken, Mary E; Miller, Beverly K; Anderson, Byron L; Monroe, Kathy W

    2017-10-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of childhood fatality, making use of properly installed child passenger restraint system (CRS) a public health priority. Motor vehicle crashes in rural environments are associated with increased injuries and fatalities, and overall CRS use tends to be lower compared with urban populations. However, it remains unclear if proper installation of car seats is lower in a rural population compared with a similar matched urban population. A multisite (Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois), observational, case-control study was performed using data from community child passenger safety checkup events in rural (economically and population-controlled) and urban locations. Data were matched to the primary child assessed in a vehicle, and stratified by age, site, and year with urban unscheduled CRS check data. All CRS checks were performed using nationally certified CRS technicians who used the best practice standards of the American Academy of Pediatrics and collected subject demographics, car seat misuse patterns, and interventions using identical definitions. Four hundred eighty-four CRS checks (242 rural and 242 urban) involving 603 total children from 3 states (Alabama, 43 [7%]; Arkansas, 442 [73%]; Illinois, 118 [20%]) were examined; of which, 86% had at least 1 documented CRS misuse. Child passenger restraint system misuse was more common in rural than urban locations (90.5% vs 82.6%; P = 0.01). Child passenger restraint system misuse was more common in rural children aged 4 to 8 years (90.3% vs 80.6%; P = 0.02). In this multisite study, rural location was associated with higher CRS misuse. Child passenger restraint system education and resources that target rural populations specifically appear to be justified.

  9. Spectroscopic Classifications of Optical Transients with SOAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hounsell, R. A.; Miller, J. A.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Jha, S. W.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the following classifications of optical transients from spectroscopic observations with the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR 4-m telescope. Targets were supplied by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST).

  10. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN2017awk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner; Pastorello, P.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G

    2017-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17co The target was supplied by All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN).

  11. HIGH-ACCURACY QUARTIC FORCE FIELD CALCULATIONS FOR THE SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS AND VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES OF 1{sup 1} A' l-C{sub 3}H{sup -}: A POSSIBLE LINK TO LINES OBSERVED IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA PHOTODISSOCIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel

    2013-07-20

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photodissociation region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 {sup 1} A' C{sub 3}H{sup -}. The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D{sub eff} for C{sub 3}H{sup -} is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}. As a result, 1 {sup 1} A' C{sub 3}H{sup -} is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions. It has been previously proposed that at least C{sub 6}H{sup -} may be present in the Horsehead nebular PDR formed by way of radiative attachment through its dipole-bound excited state. C{sub 3}H{sup -} could form in a similar way through its dipole-bound state, but its valence excited state increases the number of relaxation pathways possible to reach the ground electronic state. In turn, the rate of formation for C{sub 3}H{sup -} could be greater than the rate of its destruction. C{sub 3}H{sup -} would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C{sub n}H{sup -} molecular anion with an odd n.

  12. High-accuracy Quartic Force Field Calculations for the Spectroscopic Constants and Vibrational Frequencies of 11 A' l-C3H-: A Possible Link to Lines Observed in the Horsehead Nebula Photodissociation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Crawford, T. Daniel; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-07-01

    It has been shown that rotational lines observed in the Horsehead nebula photodissociation region (PDR) are probably not caused by l-C3H+, as was originally suggested. In the search for viable alternative candidate carriers, quartic force fields are employed here to provide highly accurate rotational constants, as well as fundamental vibrational frequencies, for another candidate carrier: 1 1 A' C3H-. The ab initio computed spectroscopic constants provided in this work are, compared to those necessary to define the observed lines, as accurate as the computed spectroscopic constants for many of the known interstellar anions. Additionally, the computed D eff for C3H- is three times closer to the D deduced from the observed Horsehead nebula lines relative to l-C3H+. As a result, 1 1 A' C3H- is a more viable candidate for these observed rotational transitions. It has been previously proposed that at least C6H- may be present in the Horsehead nebular PDR formed by way of radiative attachment through its dipole-bound excited state. C3H- could form in a similar way through its dipole-bound state, but its valence excited state increases the number of relaxation pathways possible to reach the ground electronic state. In turn, the rate of formation for C3H- could be greater than the rate of its destruction. C3H- would be the seventh confirmed interstellar anion detected within the past decade and the first C n H- molecular anion with an odd n.

  13. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. X. A COMPLETE SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG OF DENSE MOLECULAR GAS OBSERVED TOWARD 1.1 mm DUST CONTINUUM SOURCES WITH 7.°5 ≤ l ≤ 194°

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian; Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Schlingman, Wayne M.; Ginsburg, Adam; Battersby, Cara; Stringfellow, Guy; Glenn, Jason; Bally, John; Rosolowsky, Erik; Gerner, Thomas; Mairs, Steven; Dunham, Miranda K.

    2013-11-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 mm continuum survey of dense clumps of dust throughout the Galaxy covering 170 deg{sup 2}. We present spectroscopic observations using the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope of the dense gas tracers, HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2, for all 6194 sources in the BGPS v1.0.1 catalog between 7.°5 ≤ l ≤ 194°. This is the largest targeted spectroscopic survey of dense molecular gas in the Milky Way to date. We find unique velocities for 3126 (50.5%) of the BGPS v1.0.1 sources observed. Strong N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2 emission (T {sub mb} > 0.5 K) without HCO{sup +} 3-2 emission does not occur in this catalog. We characterize the properties of the dense molecular gas emission toward the entire sample. HCO{sup +} is very sub-thermally populated and the 3-2 transitions are optically thick toward most BGPS clumps. The median observed line width is 3.3 km s{sup –1} consistent with supersonic turbulence within BGPS clumps. We find strong correlations between dense molecular gas integrated intensities and 1.1 mm peak flux and the gas kinetic temperature derived from previously published NH{sub 3} observations. These intensity correlations are driven by the sensitivity of the 3-2 transitions to excitation conditions rather than by variations in molecular column density or abundance. We identify a subset of 113 sources with stronger N{sub 2}H{sup +} than HCO{sup +} integrated intensity, but we find no correlations between the N{sub 2}H{sup +}/HCO{sup +} ratio and 1.1 mm continuum flux density, gas kinetic temperature, or line width. Self-absorbed profiles are rare (1.3%)

  14. Observation of the origin of d0 magnetism in ZnO nanostructures using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi B; Wang, Yu-Fu; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Lai, Hsuan-Yu; Hsieh, Shang-Hsien; Limaye, Mukta V; Chuang, Chen-Hao; Hsueh, Hung-Chung; Wang, Hsaiotsu; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Hung-Ming; Pao, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Wu, Chun-Te; Wu, Jih-Jen; Pong, Way-Faung; Ohigashi, Takuji; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jigang; Regier, Tom; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-08-07

    Efforts have been made to elucidate the origin of d(0) magnetism in ZnO nanocactuses (NCs) and nanowires (NWs) using X-ray-based microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The photoluminescence and O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray-excited optical luminescence spectra showed that ZnO NCs contain more defects than NWs do and that in ZnO NCs, more defects are present at the O sites than at the Zn sites. Specifically, the results of O K-edge scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and the corresponding X-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy demonstrated that the impurity (non-stoichiometric) region in ZnO NCs contains a greater defect population than the thick region. The intensity of O K-edge STXM-XANES in the impurity region is more predominant in ZnO NCs than in NWs. The increase in the unoccupied (occupied) density of states at/above (at/below) the conduction-band minimum (valence-band maximum) or the Fermi level is related to the population of defects at the O sites, as revealed by comparing the ZnO NCs to the NWs. The results of O K-edge and Zn L3,2-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism demonstrated that the origin of magnetization is attributable to the O 2p orbitals rather than the Zn d orbitals. Further, the local density approximation (LDA) + U verified that vacancies in the form of dangling or unpaired 2p states (due to Zn vacancies) induced a significant local spin moment in the nearest-neighboring O atoms to the defect center, which was determined from the uneven local spin density by analyzing the partial density of states of O 2p in ZnO.

  15. Multisite reliability of MR-based functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Noble, Stephanie; Scheinost, Dustin; Finn, Emily S; Shen, Xilin; Papademetris, Xenophon; McEwen, Sarah C; Bearden, Carrie E; Addington, Jean; Goodyear, Bradley; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Olvet, Doreen M; Mathalon, Daniel H; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Belger, Aysenil; Seidman, Larry J; Thermenos, Heidi; Tsuang, Ming T; van Erp, Theo G M; Walker, Elaine F; Hamann, Stephan; Woods, Scott W; Cannon, Tyrone D; Constable, R Todd

    2017-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing number of multisite MRI functional connectivity (fcMRI) studies. While multisite studies provide an efficient way to accelerate data collection and increase sample sizes, especially for rare clinical populations, any effects of site or MRI scanner could ultimately limit power and weaken results. Little data exists on the stability of functional connectivity measurements across sites and sessions. In this study, we assess the influence of site and session on resting state functional connectivity measurements in a healthy cohort of traveling subjects (8 subjects scanned twice at each of 8 sites) scanned as part of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). Reliability was investigated in three types of connectivity analyses: (1) seed-based connectivity with posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), right motor cortex (RMC), and left thalamus (LT) as seeds; (2) the intrinsic connectivity distribution (ICD), a voxel-wise connectivity measure; and (3) matrix connectivity, a whole-brain, atlas-based approach to assessing connectivity between nodes. Contributions to variability in connectivity due to subject, site, and day-of-scan were quantified and used to assess between-session (test-retest) reliability in accordance with Generalizability Theory. Overall, no major site, scanner manufacturer, or day-of-scan effects were found for the univariate connectivity analyses; instead, subject effects dominated relative to the other measured factors. However, summaries of voxel-wise connectivity were found to be sensitive to site and scanner manufacturer effects. For all connectivity measures, although subject variance was three times the site variance, the residual represented 60-80% of the variance, indicating that connectivity differed greatly from scan to scan independent of any of the measured factors (i.e., subject, site, and day-of-scan). Thus, for a single 5min scan, reliability across connectivity measures was poor (ICC=0

  16. Multi-site identification of a distributed hydrological nitrogen model using Bayesian uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sanyuan; Jomaa, Seifeddine; Büttner, Olaf; Meon, Günter; Rode, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For capturing spatial variations of runoff and nutrient fluxes attributed to catchment heterogeneity, multi-site hydrological water quality monitoring strategies are increasingly put into practice. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of spatially distributed streamflow and streamwater Inorganic Nitrogen (IN) concentration observations on the identification of a continuous time, spatially semi-distributed and process-based hydrological water quality model HYPE (HYdrological Predictions for the Environment). A Bayesian inference based approach DREAM(ZS) (DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metrololis algorithm) was combined with HYPE to implement model optimisation and uncertainty analysis on streamflow and streamwater IN concentration simulations at a nested meso scale catchment in central Germany. To this end, a 10-year period (1994-1999 for calibration and 1999-2004 for validation) was utilised. We compared the parameters' posterior distributions, modelling performance using the best estimated parameter set and 95% prediction confidence intervals at catchment outlet for the calibration period that were derived from single-site calibration (SSC) and multi-site calibration (MSC) modes. For SSC, streamflow and streamwater IN concentration observations at only the catchment outlet were used. While, for MSC, streamflow and streamwater IN concentration observations from both catchment outlet and two internal sites were considered. Results showed that the uncertainty intervals of hydrological water quality parameters' posterior distributions estimated from MSC, were narrower than those obtained from SSC. In addition, it was found that the MSC outperformed SSC on streamwater IN concentration simulations at internal sites for both calibration and validation periods, while the influence on streamflow modelling performance was small. This can be explained by the ;nested; nature of the catchment and high correlation between discharge observations from different sites

  17. Multisite phosphorylation networks as signal processors for Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Ord, Mihkel; Iofik, Anna; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Faustova, Ilona; Kivi, Rait; Balog, Eva Rose M; Rubin, Seth M; Loog, Mart

    2013-12-01

    The order and timing of cell-cycle events is controlled by changing substrate specificity and different activity thresholds of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). However, it is not understood how a single protein kinase can trigger hundreds of switches in a sufficiently time-resolved fashion. We show that cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1-dependent phosphorylation of multisite targets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by key substrate parameters including distances between phosphorylation sites, distribution of serines and threonines as phosphoacceptors and positioning of cyclin-docking motifs. The component mediating the key interactions in this process is Cks1, the phosphoadaptor subunit of the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1 complex. We propose that variation of these parameters within networks of phosphorylation sites in different targets provides a wide range of possibilities for differential amplification of Cdk1 signals, thus providing a mechanism to generate a wide range of thresholds in the cell cycle.

  18. Statistical multi-site fatigue damage analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G. S.

    1995-02-01

    A statistical model has been developed to evaluate fatigue damage at multi-sites in complex joints based on coupon test data and fracture mechanics methods. The model is similar to the USAF model, but modified by introducing a failure criterion and a probability of fatal crack occurrence to account for the multiple site damage phenomenon. The involvement of NDI techniques has been included in the model which can be used to evaluate the structural reliability, the detectability of fatigue damage (cracks), and the risk of failure based on NDI results taken from samples. A practical example is provided for rivet fasteners and bolted fasteners. It is shown that the model can be used even if it is based on conventional S-N coupon experiments should further fractographic inspections be made for cracks on the broken surfaces of specimens.

  19. Studying multisite binary and ternary protein interactions by global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data in SEDPHAT: application to adaptor protein complexes in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Jon C D; Brown, Patrick H; Bowden, Brent; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Appella, Ettore; Samelson, Lawrence E; Schuck, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Multisite interactions and the formation of ternary or higher-order protein complexes are ubiquitous features of protein interactions. Cooperativity between different ligands is a hallmark for information transfer, and is frequently critical for the biological function. We describe a new computational platform for the global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data for the study of binary and ternary multisite interactions, implemented as part of the public domain multimethod analysis software SEDPHAT. The global analysis of titrations performed in different orientations was explored, and the potential for unraveling cooperativity parameters in multisite interactions was assessed in theory and experiment. To demonstrate the practical potential and limitations of global analyses of ITC titrations for the study of cooperative multiprotein interactions, we have examined the interactions of three proteins that are critical for signal transduction after T-cell activation, LAT, Grb2, and Sos1. We have shown previously that multivalent interactions between these three molecules promote the assembly of large multiprotein complexes important for T-cell receptor activation. By global analysis of the heats of binding observed in sets of ITC injections in different orientations, which allowed us to follow the formation of binary and ternary complexes, we observed negative and positive cooperativity that may be important to control the pathway of assembly and disassembly of adaptor protein particles.

  20. Raman Spectroscopic Observations of the Ion Association between Mg(2+) and SO4(2-) in MgSO4-Saturated Droplets at Temperatures of ≤380 °C.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ye; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Wenxuan; Chou, I-Ming

    2015-08-27

    Liquid–liquid phase separation was observed in aqueous MgSO4 solutions with excess H2SO4 at elevated temperatures; the aqueous MgSO4/H2SO4 solutions separated into MgSO4-rich droplets (fluid F1) and a MgSO4-poor phase (fluid F2) during heating. The phase separation temperature increases with SO4(2–)/Mg2+ ratio at a constant MgSO4 concentration. At a MgSO4/H2SO4 ratio of 5, the liquid–liquid phase separation temperature decreases with an increase in MgSO4 concentration up to ∼1.0 mol/kg and then increases at higher concentrations, showing a typical macroscale property of polymer solutions with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of ∼271.4 °C. In situ Raman spectroscopic analyses show that the MgSO4 concentration in fluid F1 increases with an increase in temperature, whereas that in fluid F2 decreases with an increase in temperature. In addition, HSO4(–), which does not readily form complexes with Mg(2+), tends to accumulate in fluid F2. Analyses of the v1(SO4(2–)) bands confirmed the presence of four-sulfate species of unassociated SO4(2–) (∼980 cm(–1)), contact ion pairs (CIPs; ∼995 cm(–1)), and triple ion pairs (TIPs; ∼1005 cm(–1)) in aqueous solution, and more complex ion pair chain structure (∼1020 cm(–1)) in fluid F1. Comparison of the sulfate species in fluids F1 and F2 at 280 °C suggests that SO4(2–) in fluid F2 is less associated with Mg(2+). On the basis of in situ visual and Raman spectroscopic observations, we suggest that the formation of the complex Mg(2+)–SO4(2–) ion association might be responsible for the liquid–liquid phase separation. In addition, Raman spectroscopic analyses of the OH stretching bands indicate that the hydrogen bonding in fluid F1 is stronger than that in fluid F2, which might be ascribed to the increasing probability of collision of H2O with Mg(2+) and SO4(2–) in fluid F1.

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of the isolated SF6- and C4F8- anions: observation of very long harmonic progressions in symmetric deformation modes upon photodetachment.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Joseph C; Roscioli, Joseph R; Johnson, Mark A; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A; Villano, Stephanie M; Wren, Scott W; Lineberger, W Carl

    2007-02-22

    Spectroscopic studies of the SF6- and c-C4F8- anions are reported to provide experimental benchmarks for theoretical predictions of their structures and electron binding energies. The photoelectron spectrum of SF6- is dominated by a long progression in the S-F stretching mode, with an envelope consistent with theoretical predictions that the anion preserves the Oh symmetry of the neutral, but has a longer S-F bond length. This main progression occurs with an unexpectedly strong contribution from a second mode, however, whose characteristic energy does not correspond to any of the neutral SF6 fundamental vibrations in its ground electronic state. The resulting doublet pattern is evident when the bare ion is prepared with low internal energy content (i.e., using N2 carrier gas in a free jet or liquid nitrogen-cooling in a flowing afterglow) but is much better resolved in the spectrum of the SF6-.Ar complex. The infrared predissociation spectrum of SF6-.Ar consists of a strong band at 683(5) cm(-1), which we assign to the nu3 (t1u) fundamental, the same mode that yields the strong 948 cm(-1) infrared transition in neutral SF6. One qualitatively interesting aspect of the SF6- behavior is the simple structure of its photoelectron spectrum, which displays uncluttered, harmonic bands in an energy region where the neutral molecule contains about 2 eV of vibrational excitation. We explore this effect further in the c-C4F8- anion, which also presents a system that is calculated to undergo large, symmetrical distortion upon electron attachment to the neutral. The photoelectron spectrum of this species is dominated by a long, single vibrational progression, this time involving the symmetric ring-breathing mode. Like the SF6- case, the c-C4F8- spectrum is remarkably isolated and harmonic in spite of the significant internal excitation of a relatively complex molecular framework. Both these perfluorinated anions thus share the property that the symmetrical deformation of the

  2. Ultrasensitivity and sharp threshold theorems for multisite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougoud, M.; Mazza, C.; Vinckenbosch, L.

    2017-02-01

    This work studies the ultrasensitivity of multisite binding processes where ligand molecules can bind to several binding sites. It considers more particularly recent models involving complex chemical reactions in allosteric phosphorylation processes and for transcription factors and nucleosomes competing for binding on DNA. New statistics-based formulas for the Hill coefficient and the effective Hill coefficient are provided and necessary conditions for a system to be ultrasensitive are exhibited. It is first shown that the ultrasensitivity of binding processes can be approached using sharp-threshold theorems which have been developed in applied probability theory and statistical mechanics for studying sharp threshold phenomena in reliability theory, random graph theory and percolation theory. Special classes of binding process are then introduced and are described as density dependent birth and death process. New precise large deviation results for the steady state distribution of the process are obtained, which permits to show that switch-like ultrasensitive responses are strongly related to the multi-modality of the steady state distribution. Ultrasensitivity occurs if and only if the entropy of the dynamical system has more than one global minimum for some critical ligand concentration. In this case, the Hill coefficient is proportional to the number of binding sites, and the system is highly ultrasensitive. The classical effective Hill coefficient I is extended to a new cooperativity index I q , for which we recommend the computation of a broad range of values of q instead of just the standard one I  =  I 0.9 corresponding to the 10%-90% variation in the dose-response. It is shown that this single choice can sometimes mislead the conclusion by not detecting ultrasensitivity. This new approach allows a better understanding of multisite ultrasensitive systems and provides new tools for the design of such systems.

  3. Power estimation for non-standardized multisite studies.

    PubMed

    Keshavan, Anisha; Paul, Friedemann; Beyer, Mona K; Zhu, Alyssa H; Papinutto, Nico; Shinohara, Russell T; Stern, William; Amann, Michael; Bakshi, Rohit; Bischof, Antje; Carriero, Alessandro; Comabella, Manuel; Crane, Jason C; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Demaerel, Philippe; Dubois, Benedicte; Filippi, Massimo; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gaetano, Laura; Goris, An; Graetz, Christiane; Gröger, Adriane; Groppa, Sergiu; Hafler, David A; Harbo, Hanne F; Hemmer, Bernhard; Jordan, Kesshi; Kappos, Ludwig; Kirkish, Gina; Llufriu, Sara; Magon, Stefano; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; McCauley, Jacob L; Montalban, Xavier; Mühlau, Mark; Pelletier, Daniel; Pattany, Pradip M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Schlaeger, Regina; Saiz, Albert; Sprenger, Till; Stecco, Alessandro; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Villoslada, Pablo; Wattjes, Mike P; Weiner, Howard; Wuerfel, Jens; Zimmer, Claus; Zipp, Frauke; Hauser, Stephen L; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Henry, Roland G

    2016-07-01

    A concern for researchers planning multisite studies is that scanner and T1-weighted sequence-related biases on regional volumes could overshadow true effects, especially for studies with a heterogeneous set of scanners and sequences. Current approaches attempt to harmonize data by standardizing hardware, pulse sequences, and protocols, or by calibrating across sites using phantom-based corrections to ensure the same raw image intensities. We propose to avoid harmonization and phantom-based correction entirely. We hypothesized that the bias of estimated regional volumes is scaled between sites due to the contrast and gradient distortion differences between scanners and sequences. Given this assumption, we provide a new statistical framework and derive a power equation to define inclusion criteria for a set of sites based on the variability of their scaling factors. We estimated the scaling factors of 20 scanners with heterogeneous hardware and sequence parameters by scanning a single set of 12 subjects at sites across the United States and Europe. Regional volumes and their scaling factors were estimated for each site using Freesurfer's segmentation algorithm and ordinary least squares, respectively. The scaling factors were validated by comparing the theoretical and simulated power curves, performing a leave-one-out calibration of regional volumes, and evaluating the absolute agreement of all regional volumes between sites before and after calibration. Using our derived power equation, we were able to define the conditions under which harmonization is not necessary to achieve 80% power. This approach can inform choice of processing pipelines and outcome metrics for multisite studies based on scaling factor variability across sites, enabling collaboration between clinical and research institutions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficient Calculations with Multisite Local Orbitals in a Large-Scale DFT Code CONQUEST.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Ayako; Bowler, David R; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi

    2014-11-11

    Multisite local orbitals, which are formed from linear combinations of pseudoatomic orbitals from a target atom and its neighbor atoms, have been introduced in the large-scale density functional theory calculation code CONQUEST. Multisite local orbitals correspond to local molecular orbitals so that the number of required local orbitals can be minimal. The multisite support functions are determined by using the localized filter diagonalization (LFD) method [ Phys. Rev. B 2009 , 80 , 205104 ]. Two new methods, the double cutoff method and the smoothing method, are introduced to the LFD method to improve efficiency and stability. The Hamiltonian and overlap matrices with multisite local orbitals are constructed by efficient sparse-matrix multiplications in CONQUEST. The investigation of the calculated energetic and geometrical properties and band structures of bulk Si, Al, and DNA systems demonstrate the accuracy and the computational efficiency of the present method. The representability of both occupied and unoccupied band structures with the present method has been also confirmed.

  5. The relationship between involvement in and use of evaluation in multi-site evaluations.

    PubMed

    Roseland, Denise; Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao

    2015-02-01

    This research explores the relationship between participation in evaluation and the use of evaluation findings and processes within three large-scale multi-site evaluations. Using canonical correlation analysis and a collection of 20 interviews, this study describes and tests the relationship between these two critical conceptual powerhouses in evaluation. Using data that were collected as a part of the NSF-funded research Beyond Evaluation Use (Lawrenz & King, 2009), this study found that some theories and beliefs about participatory evaluation contribute to use and influence in similar ways as in single-site evaluations. The differences identified in this research highlight potential planning and implementation considerations that might allow multi-site evaluators and funders of multi-site evaluation to enhance use and influence of multi-site evaluations.

  6. Spectroscopic measurements of solar wind generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Zapata, C. A.; Noci, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopically observable quantities are described which are sensitive to the primary plasma parameters of the solar wind's source region. The method is discussed in which those observable quantities are used as constraints in the construction of empirical models of various coronal structures. Simulated observations are used to examine the fractional contributions to observed spectral intensities from coronal structures of interest which co-exist with other coronal structures along simulated lines-of-sight. The sensitivity of spectroscopic observables to the physical parameters within each of those structures is discussed.

  7. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    DOEpatents

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  9. PS2-06: Best Practices for Advancing Multi-site Chart Abstraction Research

    PubMed Central

    Blick, Noelle; Cole, Deanna; King, Colleen; Riordan, Rick; Von Worley, Ann; Yarbro, Patty

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Multi-site chart abstraction studies are becoming increasingly common within the HMORN. Differences in systems among HMORN sites can pose significant obstacles to the success of these studies. It is therefore crucial to standardize abstraction activities by following best practices for multi-site chart abstraction, as consistency of processes across sites will increase efficiencies and enhance data quality. Methods Over the past few months the authors have been meeting to identify obstacles to multi-site chart abstraction and to address ways in which multi-site chart abstraction processes can be systemized and standardized. The aim of this workgroup is to create a best practice guide for multi-site chart abstraction studies. Focus areas include: abstractor training, format for chart abstraction (database, paper, etc), data quality, redaction, mechanism for transferring data, site specific access to medical records, IRB/HIPAA concerns, and budgetary issues. Results The results of the workgroup’s efforts (the best practice guide) will be presented by a panel of experts at the 2012 HMORN conference. The presentation format will also focus on discussion among attendees to elicit further input and to identify areas that need to be further addressed. Subsequently, the best practice guide will be posted on the HMORN website. Discussion The best practice guide for multi-site chart abstraction studies will establish sound guidelines and serve as an aid to researchers embarking on multi-site chart abstraction studies. Efficiencies and data quality will be further enhanced with standardized multi-site chart abstraction practices.

  10. Basal inflammation and innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Macfarlane, Gary J; Geenen, Rinie; Smit, Johannes H; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-08-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in chronic pain, although study findings are inconsistent. This cross-sectional study examined whether basal inflammatory markers and the innate immune response are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Data were used on 1632 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. The Chronic Pain Grade questionnaire was used to determine the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Subjects were categorized in a chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain group (n=754) and a control group (n=878). Blood levels of the basal inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined. To obtain a measure of the innate immune response, 13 inflammatory markers were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in a subsample (n=707). Subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain showed elevated levels of basal inflammatory markers compared with controls, but statistical significance was lost after adjustment for lifestyle and disease variables. For some LPS-stimulated inflammatory markers, we did find elevated levels in subjects with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain both before and after adjustment for covariates. Pain severity was not associated with inflammation within chronic pain subjects. An enhanced innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain may be examined as a potential biomarker for the onset or perpetuation of chronic pain.

  11. Increasing the ranks of academic researchers in mental health: a multisite approach to postdoctoral fellowship training.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ruth; Cassidy-Eagle, Erin L; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Eyler, Lisa T; Gray, Heather L; Giese-Davis, Janine; Hubbard, Jeffrey; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights the use of multisite training for psychiatry and psychology postdoctoral fellows developing careers in academic clinical research in the field of mental health. The objective is to describe a model of training for young investigators to establish independent academic clinical research careers, including (1) program structure and eligibility, (2) program goals and development of a multisite curriculum, (3) use of technology for implementing the program across multiple sites, and (4) advantages and challenges of this multisite approach. In 2000, in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECCs), the VA Office of Academic Affiliations launched the Special Fellowship Program in Advanced Psychiatry and Psychology. Each of the 10 currently participating VA sites across the United States is affiliated with a MIRECC and an academic medical institution. In the first five years of this fellowship program, 83 fellows (34 psychiatrists and 49 psychologists) have participated. The success of this multisite approach is evidenced by the 58 fellows who have already graduated from the program: 70% have entered academic clinical research positions, and over 25 have obtained independent extramural grant support from the VA or the National Institutes of Health. Multisite training results in a greater transfer of knowledge and capitalizes on the nationwide availability of experts, creating unique networking and learning opportunities for trainees. The VA's multisite fellowship program plays a valuable role in preparing substantial numbers of psychiatry and psychology trainees for a range of academic clinical research and leadership positions in the field of mental health.

  12. Three-year of observations of Jupiter’s aurora and Io plasma torus variabilities by earth orbiting extreme-ultraviolet spectroscope HISAKI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Tao, C.; Kita, H.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yamazaki, A.; Kasaba, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet spectrograph, EXCEED, on-board the HISAKI satellite is designed for observing tenuous gas and plasma around planets in the solar system. It enables us to obtain continuous and long-term data set and find time variability in the planetary magnetosphere and ionosphere with time scales of several hours to months. Here, we introduce new findings of Jupiter’s UV aurora and plasma emissions from the Io plasma torus obtained from the HISAKI observation.

  13. Spectroscopic Orbits of Three Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfe, C. D.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents new spectroscopic orbits of three binaries with evolved primaries and periods of the order of a few years, two of them very eccentric. All the orbits were determined primarily from observations made with the DAO 1.2-m telescope and coudé spectrograph. Observations were obtained using the radial velocity spectrometer until it was decommissioned in 2004, and since then using a CCD detector, and cross-correlating the spectra with those of standard stars. It will be evident that the latter procedure leads to smaller observational scatter than the former did.

  14. The value and potential of multisited ethnography for science education research: a review of Jrène Rahm's Science in the Making at the Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeman-Cadwallader, Nicole

    2012-03-01

    Rahm sought to illuminate how children and youth make meaning of science in three out-of-school time programs, and the identity work that is done through the trajectory of their youth toward their young adulthood. Through using multisited ethnography, she asserts that we can learn more about what the youth say about their science learning and science literacy development in these programs. She has revealed through her rich data the potential value of multisited ethnography for science education research. A similar theme of insider/outsider status to science emerged in each of the three sites. The nature of the data collected in Rahm's multisited ethnography allowed for the unveiling of the similarities in this theme, but also made evident the nuanced ways that this theme presented itself differently across the three sites. The additional potential came through in the varied data Rahm could have delved into and did not. A unique characteristic of ethnographic research, that is not necessarily present in other research methods, is that a wide array of varied data is collected. An analysis of documents, images, and observational field notes, which go beyond interview data, may provide deeper understandings previously untouched in science education.

  15. Ground state dissociation pathways for 3,4,-dichloro-1,2,5-thiadiazole: Spectroscopic observation and fate of NCsbnd C(Cl2)sbnd Ndbnd S isomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, D.; Upadhyaya, Hari P.

    2016-09-01

    Photodissociation pathways for 3,4-dichloro-1,2,5-thiadiazole was investigated in its ground state at various wavelengths in the UV region. The photolysis products were identified by the UV absorption and emission spectroscopy. Molecular chlorine (Cl2) elimination was observed using absorption methods in the UV region. UV absorption and quantum calculation confirms the migration of chlorine atom and subsequent ring opening to form NCsbnd C(Cl2)sbnd Ndbnd S isomer. Multiphotonic excitation leading to the UV emission in the vicinity of 389 nm was observed due to the formation of CN(B2Σ+) moiety. New UV absorption bands observed at ∼255 and ∼290 nm were assigned to the its isomer NCsbnd C(Cl2)sbnd Ndbnd S.

  16. Simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric CO2 and light path modification from space-based spectroscopic observations of greenhouse gases: methodology and application to GOSAT measurements over TCCON sites.

    PubMed

    Oshchepkov, Sergey; Bril, Andrey; Yokota, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Yukio; Blumenstock, Thomas; Deutscher, Nicholas M; Dohe, Susanne; Macatangay, Ronald; Morino, Isamu; Notholt, Justus; Rettinger, Markus; Petri, Christof; Schneider, Matthias; Sussman, Ralf; Uchino, Osamu; Velazco, Voltaire; Wunch, Debra; Belikov, Dmitry

    2013-02-20

    This paper presents an improved photon path length probability density function method that permits simultaneous retrievals of column-average greenhouse gas mole fractions and light path modifications through the atmosphere when processing high-resolution radiance spectra acquired from space. We primarily describe the methodology and retrieval setup and then apply them to the processing of spectra measured by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). We have demonstrated substantial improvements of the data processing with simultaneous carbon dioxide and light path retrievals and reasonable agreement of the satellite-based retrievals against ground-based Fourier transform spectrometer measurements provided by the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON).

  17. The Aliso Canyon Super-Emitter: Initial Results of observations by AVIRIS-C and the Hyperion spacecraft, with Implications for Global Spectroscopic CH4 Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.; Thorpe, A. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Green, R. O.; Duren, R. M.; Aubrey, A. D.; Guanter, L.; Hollstein, A.; Middleton, E.; Ong, L.; Ungar, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Aliso Canyon gas storage facility was involved in a large accidental release of methane into the atmosphere from October 2015 - February 2016. A range of in-situ instrumentation provided observations of CH4 concentrations, showing enhancements consistent with its designation as a "super-emitter:" one of a handful of emitters contributing a disproportionately large fraction of the regional and sectoral CH4 emissions budget. The event was also observed by multiple overpasses of the Hyperion and AVIRIS-C spectrometers, which measured the CH4 plume concentrations from orbit and the air respectively. This experiment demonstrates what is to our knowledge the first orbital detection of a super-emitter plume, suggesting the utility for future imaging spectrometers to monitor and measure this important class of sources. This presentation describes quantitative results from these observations that permit meaningful comparisons across the two platforms. In addition, we present possible observing architectures and spectrometer designs for future monitoring missions. These include instruments designed specifically for the monitoring trace greenhouse emissions (CH4 and CO2), which promise enhanced sensitivity to measure a larger fraction of emitters. Finally, we also describe possible detection strategies for improving sensitivity and interference suppression. Copyright 2016 California Institute of Technology. All Rights Reserved. We acknowledge support of the US Government, NASA, the Earth Science Division and Terrestrial Ecology program.

  18. Knockout, Transfer and Spectroscopic Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Kirby; Keeley, Nicholas; Rusek, Krzysztof

    2011-10-01

    As derived quantities rather than observables, spectroscopic factors extracted from fits to data are model dependent. The main source of uncertainty is the choice of binding potential, but other factors such as adequate modeling of the reaction mechanism, the Perey effect, choice of distorting nuclear potentials etc. can also play a significant role. Recently, there has been some discussion of apparent discrepancies in spectroscopic factors derived from knockout reactions compared to those obtained from low-energy direct reactions. It should be possible to reconcile these discrepancies and we explore this prospect by attempting to describe the 10Be(d,t)9Be data of Nucl. Phys. A157, 305 (1970) using the 10Be/9Be form factors from a recent knockout study, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 162502 (2011). The influence of such factors as choice of distorting potentials and multi-step reactions paths will be explored.

  19. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Helfrich addresses two perspectives from which to think about observation in the classroom: that of the teacher observing her classroom, her group, and its needs, and that of the outside observer coming into the classroom. Offering advice from her own experience, she encourages and defends both. Do not be afraid of the disruption of outside…

  20. Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosten, Albert Max

    2016-01-01

    Joosten begins his article by telling us that love and knowledge together are the foundation for our work with children. This combination is at the heart of our observation. With this as the foundation, he goes on to offer practical advice to aid our practice of observation. He offers a "List of Objects of Observation" to help guide our…

  1. Direct spectroscopic observation of a brewer's yeast pyruvate decarboxylase-bound enamine intermediate produced from a suicide substrate. Evidence for nonconcerted decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-11-25

    The conjugated alpha-keto acid (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid, a suicide substrate (Kuo, D. J., and Jordan, F. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 3735-3740), when reacted with brewer's yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), was found to produce a new absorption band centered at 440 nm. The band was attributed to the formation of a thiamindiphosphate-bound intermediate produced upon decarboxylation and was not observed in the absence of either thiamindiphosphate or apoprotein. Simultaneously, with the appearance of the spectral band, the enzyme was inactivated irreversibly. The combined evidence suggested that the spectral band pertains to an enzyme-bound conjugated enamine and the results constitute the first direct observation of such an intermediate in any thiamindiphosphate requiring enzymatic reaction. It could be concluded that for the alpha-keto acid employed, CO2 loss and C-protonation of the enamine take place in a stepwise, rather than concerted, manner and that the steps culminating in CO2 loss are faster overall than the subsequent steps that lead to the release of the product. The observation of stoichiometric concentration of enzyme-bound enamine intermediate supports the previous suggestion that alpha-hydroxyethyl thiamindiphosphate is not the true intermediate, but rather the enamine is (Ullrich, J., and Mannshreck, A. (1967) Eur. J. Biochem 1, 110-116).

  2. Multisite musculoskeletal pain predicts medically certified disability retirement among Finns.

    PubMed

    Haukka, E; Kaila-Kangas, L; Ojajärvi, A; Saastamoinen, P; Holtermann, A; Jørgensen, M B; Karppinen, J; Heliövaara, M; Leino-Arjas, P

    2015-09-01

    Musculoskeletal pain at several sites (multisite pain) is more common than single-site pain. Little is known on its effects on disability pension (DP) retirement. A nationally representative sample comprised 4071 Finns in the workforce aged 30 to 63. Data (questionnaire, interview, clinical examination) were gathered in 2000-2001 and linked with national DP registers for 2000-2011. Pain during the preceding month in 18 locations was combined into four sites (neck, upper limbs, low back, lower limbs). Hazard ratios (HR) of DP were estimated by Cox regression. The HR of any DP (n = 477) was 1.6 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.1) for one, 2.5 (1.9-3.3) for two, 3.1 (2.3-4.3) for three and 5.6 (4.0-7.8) for four pain sites, when adjusted for age and gender. When additionally adjusted for clinically assessed chronic diseases, the HRs varied from 1.4 (1.0-1.8) to 3.5 (2.5-4.9), respectively. When further adjusted for physical and psychosocial workload, education, body mass index, smoking, exercise and sleep disorders, the HRs were 1.3 (0.9-1.7), 1.6 (1.2-2.2), 1.8 (1.3-2.5) and 2.5 (1.8-3.6). The number of pain sites was especially strong in predicting DPs due to musculoskeletal diseases (HRs in the full model; 3.1 to 4.3), but it also predicted DPs due to other somatic diseases (respective HRs 1.3 to 2.3); pain in all four sites was also predictive of DPs due to mental disorders (full model HR 2.2). The number of pain sites independently predicted DP retirement. Employees with multisite pain may need specific support to maintain their work ability. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  4. Resolving Spectral Lines with a Periscope-Type DVD Spectroscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakabayashi, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    A new type of DVD spectroscope, the periscope type, is described and the numerical analysis of the observed emission and absorption spectra is demonstrated. A small and thin mirror is put inside and an eighth part of a DVD is used as a grating. Using this improved DVD spectroscope, one can observe and photograph visible spectra more easily and…

  5. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  6. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  7. Investigating the nitrogen dioxide concentrations in the boundary layer by using multi-axis spectroscopic measurements and comparison with satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Muhammad Fahim; Nisar, Munazza; Noreen, Asma; Khan, Waseem Razzaq; Hakeem, Khalid Rehman

    2017-01-01

    This study emphasizes on near surface observation of chemically active trace gases such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) over Islamabad on a regular basis. Absorption spectroscopy using backscattered extraterrestrial light source technique was used to retrieve NO2 differential slant column densities (dSCDs). Mini multi-axis-differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrument was used to perform ground-based measurements at Institute of Environmental Sciences and Engineering (IESE), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST) Islamabad, Pakistan. Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2 were derived from measured dSCDs by using geometric air mass factor approach. A case study was conducted to identify the impact of different materials (glass, tinted glass, and acrylic sheet of various thicknesses used to cover the instrument) on the retrieval of dSCDs. Acrylic sheet of thickness 5 mm was found most viable option for casing material as it exhibited negligible impact in the visible wavelength range. Tropospheric NO2 VCD derived from ground-based mini MAX-DOAS measurements exceeded two times the Pak-NEQS levels and showed a reasonable comparison (r (2) = 0.65, r = 0.81) with satellite observations (root mean square bias of 39 %) over Islamabad, Pakistan.

  8. Candidate Water Vapor Lines to Locate the H2O Snowline through High-dispersion Spectroscopic Observations. II. The Case of a Herbig Ae Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, Shota; Nomura, Hideko; Ishimoto, Daiki; Walsh, Catherine; Honda, Mitsuhiko; Hirota, Tomoya; Millar, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    Observationally measuring the location of the {{{H}}}2{{O}} snowline is crucial for understanding planetesimal and planet formation processes, and the origin of water on Earth. In disks around Herbig Ae stars (T * ∼ 10,000 K, M * ≳ 2.5M ⊙), the position of the {{{H}}}2{{O}} snowline is farther from the central star compared with that around cooler and less massive T Tauri stars. Thus, the {{{H}}}2{{O}} emission line fluxes from the region within the {{{H}}}2{{O}} snowline are expected to be stronger. In this paper, we calculate the chemical composition of a Herbig Ae disk using chemical kinetics. Next, we calculate the {{{H}}}2{{O}} emission line profiles and investigate the properties of candidate water lines across a wide range of wavelengths (from mid-infrared to submillimeter) that can locate the position of the {{{H}}}2{{O}} snowline. Those lines identified have small Einstein A coefficients (∼ {10}-6{--}{10}-3 s‑1) and relatively high upper-state energies (∼1000 K). The total fluxes tend to increase with decreasing wavelengths. We investigate the possibility of future observations (e.g., ALMA, SPICA/SMI-HRS) locating the position of the {{{H}}}2{{O}} snowline. Since the fluxes of those identified lines from Herbig Ae disks are stronger than those from T Tauri disks, the possibility of a successful detection is expected to increase for a Herbig Ae disk.

  9. Multisite Phosphorylation Provides an Effective and Flexible Mechanism for Switch-Like Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Varedi K., S. Marjan; Ventura, Alejandra C.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation-triggered degradation is a common strategy for elimination of regulatory proteins in many important cell signaling processes. Interesting examples include cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors such as p27 in human and Sic1 in yeast, which play crucial roles during the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. In this work, we have modeled and analyzed the dynamics of multisite-phosphorylation-triggered protein degradation systematically. Inspired by experimental observations on the Sic1 protein and a previous intriguing theoretical conjecture, we develop a model to examine in detail the degradation dynamics of a protein featuring multiple phosphorylation sites and a threshold site number for elimination in response to a kinase signal. Our model explains the role of multiple phosphorylation sites, compared to a single site, in the regulation of protein degradation. A single-site protein cannot convert a graded input of kinase increase to much sharper output, whereas multisite phosphorylation is capable of generating a highly switch-like temporal profile of the substrate protein with two characteristics: a temporal threshold and rapid decrease beyond the threshold. We introduce a measure termed temporal response coefficient to quantify the extent to which a response in the time domain is switch-like and further investigate how this property is determined by various factors including the kinase input, the total number of sites, the threshold site number for elimination, the order of phosphorylation, the kinetic parameters, and site preference. Some interesting and experimentally verifiable predictions include that the non-degradable fraction of the substrate protein exhibits a more switch-like temporal profile; a sequential system is more switch-like, while a random system has the advantage of increased robustness; all the parameters, including the total number of sites, the threshold site number for elimination and the kinetic parameters synergistically

  10. Multisite phosphorylation provides an effective and flexible mechanism for switch-like protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Varedi K, S Marjan; Ventura, Alejandra C; Merajver, Sofia D; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina

    2010-12-13

    Phosphorylation-triggered degradation is a common strategy for elimination of regulatory proteins in many important cell signaling processes. Interesting examples include cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors such as p27 in human and Sic1 in yeast, which play crucial roles during the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. In this work, we have modeled and analyzed the dynamics of multisite-phosphorylation-triggered protein degradation systematically. Inspired by experimental observations on the Sic1 protein and a previous intriguing theoretical conjecture, we develop a model to examine in detail the degradation dynamics of a protein featuring multiple phosphorylation sites and a threshold site number for elimination in response to a kinase signal. Our model explains the role of multiple phosphorylation sites, compared to a single site, in the regulation of protein degradation. A single-site protein cannot convert a graded input of kinase increase to much sharper output, whereas multisite phosphorylation is capable of generating a highly switch-like temporal profile of the substrate protein with two characteristics: a temporal threshold and rapid decrease beyond the threshold. We introduce a measure termed temporal response coefficient to quantify the extent to which a response in the time domain is switch-like and further investigate how this property is determined by various factors including the kinase input, the total number of sites, the threshold site number for elimination, the order of phosphorylation, the kinetic parameters, and site preference. Some interesting and experimentally verifiable predictions include that the non-degradable fraction of the substrate protein exhibits a more switch-like temporal profile; a sequential system is more switch-like, while a random system has the advantage of increased robustness; all the parameters, including the total number of sites, the threshold site number for elimination and the kinetic parameters synergistically

  11. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Adie, Steven G; Liang, Xing; Kennedy, Brendan F; John, Renu; Sampson, David D; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-12-06

    We present an optical technique to image the frequency-dependent complex mechanical response of a viscoelastic sample. Three-dimensional hyperspectral data, comprising two-dimensional B-mode images and a third dimension corresponding to vibration frequency, were acquired from samples undergoing external mechanical excitation in the audio-frequency range. We describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal when vibration is applied to a sample and detail the processing and acquisition techniques used to extract the local complex mechanical response from three-dimensional data that, due to a wide range of vibration frequencies, possess a wide range of sample velocities. We demonstrate frequency-dependent contrast of the displacement amplitude and phase of a silicone phantom containing inclusions of higher stiffness. Measurements of an ex vivo tumor margin demonstrate distinct spectra between adipose and tumor regions, and images of displacement amplitude and phase demonstrated spatially-resolved contrast. Contrast was also observed in displacement amplitude and phase images of a rat muscle sample. These results represent the first demonstration of mechanical spectroscopy based on B-mode OCT imaging. Spectroscopic optical coherence elastography (S-OCE) provides a high-resolution imaging capability for the detection of tissue pathologies that are characterized by a frequency-dependent viscoelastic response.

  12. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  13. Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  14. Spectroscopic far ultraviolet observations of transition zone instabilities and their possible role in a pre-flare energy build-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Patterson, N. P.; Scherrer, V. E.

    1976-01-01

    Highly flare-productive newly emerging active regions are characterized by numerous small low-lying loops which frequently show a chaotic pattern. Flare activity in such a region subsides as the chaotic loop structures relax and expand into a bipolar configuration. The transition zone in such an active region is highly unstable, as shown by broadened and shifted nonthermal line profiles of medium-ionized elements like Si III, Si IV, and C IV. These transition-zone instabilities, which occur as isolated events in active regions of low flare productivity, are often observed prior to flares. Transition-zone instabilities can be traced to the footpoints of active loops and seem to be accompanied by heating of the loop. The loops vary in size and show differing degrees of activity, with the brightest and most compact ones seemingly being in a pre-flare state which results in the catastrophic energy release along the loop during a flare.

  15. Multisite flooding hazard assessment in the Upper Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzoni, Tatiana; Roth, Giorgio; Rudari, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThis contribution presents an assessment of the joint probability distribution able to describe multi-site multi-basin flood scenarios in a high dimensionality framework. This goal will be pursued through two different approaches: the multivariate skew- t distribution and the Student copula with arbitrary margins. While copulas have been widely used in the modeling of hydrological processes, the use of the skew- t distribution in hydrology has been only recently proposed with reference to a trivariate application (Ghizzoni et al., 2010, Adv. Water Resour., 33, 1243-1255). Both methods are here applied and discussed in a context of considerably higher dimensionality: the Upper Mississippi River floods. In fact, to enhance the characteristics of the correlation structure, eighteen nested and non-nested gauging stations were selected, with significantly different contributing areas. Such conditions represent a challenge for both the skew- t and the copula approach. In perspective, the ability of such approaches in explaining the multivariate aspects of the relevant processes is needed to specify flood hazard scenarios in terms of their intensity, extension and frequency. When this is associated to the knowledge of location, value and vulnerability of exposed elements, comprehensive flood risk scenarios can be produced, and risk cumuli quantified, for given portfolios, composed of wherever located risks.

  16. Multisite clickable modification of proteins using lipoic acid ligase.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Joseph G; Falatach, Rebecca; Kastantin, Mark; Berberich, Jason A; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-06-17

    Approaches that allow bioorthogonal and, in turn, site-specific chemical modification of proteins present considerable opportunities for modulating protein activity and stability. However, the development of such approaches that enable site-selective modification of proteins at multiple positions, including internal sites within a protein, has remained elusive. To overcome this void, we have developed an enzymatic approach for multisite clickable modification based on the incorporation of azide moieties in proteins using lipoic acid ligase (LplA). The ligation of azide moieties to the model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), at the N-terminus and two internal sites using lipoic acid ligase was shown to proceed efficiently with near-complete conversion. Modification of the ligated azide groups with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), α-d-mannopyranoside, and palmitic acid resulted in highly homogeneous populations of protein-polymer, protein-sugar, and protein-fatty acid conjugates. The homogeneity of the conjugates was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. In the case of PEG attachment, which involved the use of strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry, the conjugation reaction resulted in highly homogeneous PEG-GFP conjugates in less than 30 min. As further demonstration of the utility of this approach, ligated GFP was also covalently immobilized on alkyne-terminated self-assembled monolayers. These results underscore the potential of this approach for, among other applications, site-specific multipoint protein PEGylation, glycosylation, fatty acid modification, and protein immobilization.

  17. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Go, Mary Ann; To, Minh-Son; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Stephen; Bachor, Hans-A.; Stuart, Greg J.; Daria, Vincent R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions. PMID:24348330

  18. Multisite phosphorylation networks as signal processors for Cdk1

    PubMed Central

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Örd, Mihkel; Iofik, Anna; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Faustova, Ilona; Kivi, Rait; Balog, Eva Rose M.; Rubin, Seth M.; Loog, Mart

    2013-01-01

    The order and timing of cell cycle events is controlled by changing substrate specificity and different activity thresholds of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). However, it is not understood how a single protein kinase can trigger hundreds of switches in a sufficiently time-resolved fashion. We show that the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1-dependent phosphorylation of multisite targets in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is controlled by key substrate parameters including distances between phosphorylation sites, the distribution of serines and threonines as phospho-acceptors, and the positioning of cyclin-docking motifs. The component mediating the key interactions in this process is Cks1, the phospho-adaptor subunit of the cyclin-Cdk1-Cks1 complex. We propose that variation of these parameters within the networks of phosphorylation sites in different targets provides a wide range of possibilities for the differential amplification of Cdk1 signals, providing a mechanism to generate a wide range of thresholds in the cell cycle. PMID:24186061

  19. Structural integrity of fuselage panels with multisite damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai H.; Singh, Ripudaman; Pyo, Chang R.; Atluris, Satya N.

    1995-05-01

    Structural integrity assessment of aging flight vehicles is extremely important to ensure their economic and safe operation. A two-step analytical approach, developed to estimate the residual strength of pressurized fuselage stiffened shell panels with multi-bay fatigue cracking is presented in this article. Conventional finite element analysis of the damaged multibay panel is first carried out to obtain the load flow pattern through it. The Schwartz-Neumann alternating method is then applied to the fuselage skin with multiple site damage, to obtain stresses and the relevant crack tip parameters that govern the onset of fracture. Fracture mechanics as well as net section yield criteria are used to evaluate the static residual strength. The presence of holes with or without multisite damage ahead of a dominant crack is found to significantly degrade the capacity of the fuselage shell panels to sustain static internal pressure. An elastic-plastic alternating method is newly developed and applied to evaluate the residual strength of flat panels with multiple cracks. The computational methodologies presented herein are marked improvements to the present state-of-the-art, and are extremely efficient, both from engineering manpower as well as computational costs point of view. Once verified, they can very well complement the experimental requirements, reducing the cost of structural integrity assessment programs.

  20. Multisite comparison of wheelchair propulsion kinetics in persons with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Alicia M; Yang, Yusheng; Price, Robert; Tolerico, Michelle L; DiGiovine, Carmen P; Sisto, Sue Ann; Cooper, Rory A; Boninger, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    A multisite collaborative study is being conducted on the association between propulsion biomechanics and upper-limb injuries. This substudy compared subject characteristics and pushrim kinetics across three sites and identified early on in the main study any differences that could affect interpretation of the findings or data pooling. A total of 42 manual wheelchair users with paraplegia (14 from each site) performed 0.9 m/s and 1.8 m/s steady state propulsion trials and an acceleration-brake-coastdown trial on a wheelchair dynamometer while propulsion forces and moment about the hub were measured with a SmartWheel. Significant differences between two sites were found in peak and average resultant force (p < 0.05), peak and average moment at the slower steady state speed (p < 0.005), and peak and average torque at the faster steady state speed (p = 0.06). Subjects at the site with significantly lower forces and torques had a slower deceleration rate during coastdown compared with the subjects at the other two sites (p < 0.001). These results imply that rolling resistance is lower at one of the sites and likely due to differences in dynamometer properties. A mechanical method was used to site-normalize the data and enable data pooling for future analyses.

  1. Intra-operative multi-site stimulation: Expanding methodology for cortical brain mapping of language functions

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Akiva; Kirschner, Adi; Perry, Daniella; Hendler, Talma; Ram, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Direct cortical stimulation (DCS) is considered the gold-standard for functional cortical mapping during awake surgery for brain tumor resection. DCS is performed by stimulating one local cortical area at a time. We present a feasibility study using an intra-operative technique aimed at improving our ability to map brain functions which rely on activity in distributed cortical regions. Following standard DCS, Multi-Site Stimulation (MSS) was performed in 15 patients by applying simultaneous cortical stimulations at multiple locations. Language functioning was chosen as a case-cognitive domain due to its relatively well-known cortical organization. MSS, performed at sites that did not produce disruption when applied in a single stimulation point, revealed additional language dysfunction in 73% of the patients. Functional regions identified by this technique were presumed to be significant to language circuitry and were spared during surgery. No new neurological deficits were observed in any of the patients following surgery. Though the neuro-electrical effects of MSS need further investigation, this feasibility study may provide a first step towards sophistication of intra-operative cortical mapping. PMID:28700619

  2. Intra-operative multi-site stimulation: Expanding methodology for cortical brain mapping of language functions.

    PubMed

    Gonen, Tal; Gazit, Tomer; Korn, Akiva; Kirschner, Adi; Perry, Daniella; Hendler, Talma; Ram, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Direct cortical stimulation (DCS) is considered the gold-standard for functional cortical mapping during awake surgery for brain tumor resection. DCS is performed by stimulating one local cortical area at a time. We present a feasibility study using an intra-operative technique aimed at improving our ability to map brain functions which rely on activity in distributed cortical regions. Following standard DCS, Multi-Site Stimulation (MSS) was performed in 15 patients by applying simultaneous cortical stimulations at multiple locations. Language functioning was chosen as a case-cognitive domain due to its relatively well-known cortical organization. MSS, performed at sites that did not produce disruption when applied in a single stimulation point, revealed additional language dysfunction in 73% of the patients. Functional regions identified by this technique were presumed to be significant to language circuitry and were spared during surgery. No new neurological deficits were observed in any of the patients following surgery. Though the neuro-electrical effects of MSS need further investigation, this feasibility study may provide a first step towards sophistication of intra-operative cortical mapping.

  3. Coping Skills Among Adolescent Suicide Attempters: Results of a Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, Bojan; Labelle, Réal; Guilé, Jean-Marc; Belloncle, Vincent; Bodeau, Nicolas; Knafo, Alexandra; Condat, Agnès; Bapt-Cazalets, Nathalie; Marguet, Christophe; Breton, Jean-Jacques; Cohen, David; Gérardin, Priscille

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: A multisite study was undertaken to advance our understanding of how coping skills, depression, and suicidal ideation are related among adolescents who attempt suicide. Two hypotheses were postulated: productive coping and nonproductive coping would be associated, respectively, with lower and higher depression scores when age, sex, and stressful life events (SLEs) were controlled; and productive coping and nonproductive coping would be associated, respectively, with the presence and absence of suicidal ideation when age, sex, and SLEs were controlled. Methods: Participants were 167 adolescents (13 to 17 years of age) hospitalized for attempting suicide in 5 pediatric departments across France. Four instruments were administered: the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia—Present and Lifetime Version, the Adolescent Coping Scale, the Life Events Questionnaire, and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Descriptive analyses and univariate and multiple regression models were completed. Results: Both hypotheses were confirmed. Focus on the positive emerged as a significant variable in both models; depression emerged as a significant variable in the suicidal ideation model. The only sex difference observed was that girls made greater use of wishful thinking and seek social support. Conclusions: These findings suggest that coping skills are important mechanisms through which depression and suicidal ideation are maintained after attempting suicide. In intervening with adolescents who have attempted suicide, it may be useful to emphasize cognitive work geared to looking on the bright side, positive thinking, and fighting depression. PMID:25886670

  4. Multisite parent-centered risk assessment to reduce pediatric oral chemotherapy errors.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Mazor, Kathleen M; Roblin, Douglas; Biggins, Colleen; Wagner, Joann L; Houlahan, Kathleen; Li, Justin W; Keuker, Christopher; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Donovan, Jennifer; Kanaan, Abir; Weingart, Saul N

    2013-01-01

    Observational studies describe high rates of errors in home oral chemotherapy use in children. In hospitals, proactive risk assessment methods help front-line health care workers develop error prevention strategies. Our objective was to engage parents of children with cancer in a multisite study using proactive risk assessment methods to identify how errors occur at home and propose risk reduction strategies. We recruited parents from three outpatient pediatric oncology clinics in the northeast and southeast United States to participate in failure mode and effects analyses (FMEA). An FMEA is a systematic team-based proactive risk assessment approach in understanding ways a process can fail and develop prevention strategies. Steps included diagram the process, brainstorm and prioritize failure modes (places where things go wrong), and propose risk reduction strategies. We focused on home oral chemotherapy administration after a change in dose because prior studies identified this area as high risk. Parent teams consisted of four parents at two of the sites and 10 at the third. Parents developed a 13-step process map, with two to 19 failure modes per step. The highest priority failure modes included miscommunication when receiving instructions from the clinician (caused by conflicting instructions or parent lapses) and unsafe chemotherapy handling at home. Recommended risk assessment strategies included novel uses of technology to improve parent access to information, clinicians, and other parents while at home. Parents of pediatric oncology patients readily participated in a proactive risk assessment method, identifying processes that pose a risk for medication errors involving home oral chemotherapy.

  5. A model of yeast cell-cycle regulation based on multisite phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Debashis; Baumann, William T; Paul, Mark R; Novak, Bela; Tyson, John J

    2010-01-01

    In order for the cell's genome to be passed intact from one generation to the next, the events of the cell cycle (DNA replication, mitosis, cell division) must be executed in the correct order, despite the considerable molecular noise inherent in any protein-based regulatory system residing in the small confines of a eukaryotic cell. To assess the effects of molecular fluctuations on cell-cycle progression in budding yeast cells, we have constructed a new model of the regulation of Cln- and Clb-dependent kinases, based on multisite phosphorylation of their target proteins and on positive and negative feedback loops involving the kinases themselves. To account for the significant role of noise in the transcription and translation steps of gene expression, the model includes mRNAs as well as proteins. The model equations are simulated deterministically and stochastically to reveal the bistable switching behavior on which proper cell-cycle progression depends and to show that this behavior is robust to the level of molecular noise expected in yeast-sized cells (∼50 fL volume). The model gives a quantitatively accurate account of the variability observed in the G1-S transition in budding yeast, which is governed by an underlying sizer+timer control system. PMID:20739927

  6. Complementary Therapies for Children Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant: Report of A Multisite Trial

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Sean; Barrera, Maru; Vannatta, Kathryn; Xiong, Xiaoping; Doyle, John J; Alderfer, Melissa A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Children undergoing stem cell transplant (SCT) experience high levels of somatic distress and mood disturbance. This trial evaluated the efficacy of complementary therapies (massage, humor therapy, relaxation/imagery) for reducing distress associated with pediatric SCT. Methods Across 4 sites, 178 pediatric patients scheduled to undergo SCT were randomized to a child-targeted intervention involving massage and humor therapy (HPI-C), the identical child intervention plus a parent intervention involving massage and relaxation/imagery (HPI-CP) or standard care (SC). Randomization was stratified by site, age, and type of transplant. The interventions began at admission and continued through SCT week +3. Primary outcomes included patient and parent reports of somatic distress and mood disturbance obtained weekly from admission through week +6 using the BASES scales. Secondary outcomes included length of hospitalization, time to engraftment, and usage of narcotic analgesic and antiemetic medications. Results A mixed model approach was used to assess longitudinal trends of patient and parent-report outcomes and test differences between groups on these measures. Significant changes across time were observed on all patient and parent-report outcomes. However, no significant differences between treatment arms were found on the primary outcomes. Similarly, no signficant between group differences were noted on any of the medical variables as secondary outcomes. Conclusions Results of this multi-site trial failed to document significant benefits of complementary interventions in the pediatric SCT setting. PMID:20626016

  7. Multisite, multimodal neuroimaging of chronic urological pelvic pain: Methodology of the MAPP Research Network.

    PubMed

    Alger, Jeffry R; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Woodworth, Davis C; Labus, Jennifer S; Farmer, Melissa; Huang, Lejian; Apkarian, A Vania; Johnson, Kevin A; Mackey, Sean C; Ness, Timothy J; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Glover, Gary H; Parrish, Todd B; Hollander, Jan den; Kusek, John W; Mullins, Chris; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (MAPP) Research Network is an ongoing multi-center collaborative research group established to conduct integrated studies in participants with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS). The goal of these investigations is to provide new insights into the etiology, natural history, clinical, demographic and behavioral characteristics, search for new and evaluate candidate biomarkers, systematically test for contributions of infectious agents to symptoms, and conduct animal studies to understand underlying mechanisms for UCPPS. Study participants were enrolled in a one-year observational study and evaluated through a multisite, collaborative neuroimaging study to evaluate the association between UCPPS and brain structure and function. 3D T1-weighted structural images, resting-state fMRI, and high angular resolution diffusion MRI were acquired in five participating MAPP Network sites using 8 separate MRI hardware and software configurations. We describe the neuroimaging methods and procedures used to scan participants, the challenges encountered in obtaining data from multiple sites with different equipment/software, and our efforts to minimize site-to-site variation.

  8. [Preanalytical phase and accreditation: acceptance criteria for samples of multisite laboratory].

    PubMed

    Dialma, Pascale; Piaulenne, Stéphane; Baty, Sonia; Zeitoun, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Performing high quality analyses in order to help physicians in their diagnoses and to ensure better patient care: this represents our routine mission for clinical lab. To achieve this goal, all steps from sampling to the final data transfer must be controlled. The preanalytical phase is one of the most crucial, but also one of the most complicated, especially in the context of a consolidated laboratory network. Transport conditions, delays, temperature, regulatory constraints are all criteria that we need to take into consideration in order to comply to ISO 15189, section 5.4. In this context, our laboratory would like to address the following issues: to control the transport conditions in order to guarantee optimal preservation of the samples, and to define an internal process and identify non-conforming situations linked to delay in sample delivery. An original study dealing with the stability in whole blood of common clinical chemistry and immunochemistry tests in defined transport conditions (delays, temperature, tube position) was performed on a panel of 100 patients' samples. This panel is intended to be a good reflection of the patients usually seen in multi-site laboratory. We observed that most of the analytes (35 of 41) were stable in whole blood; however, some of them demonstrated instability over time. All these results were integrated into our collection manual.

  9. Streamflow prediction using multi-site rainfall obtained from hydroclimatic teleconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashid, S. S.; Ghosh, Subimal; Maity, Rajib

    2010-12-01

    SummarySimultaneous variations in weather and climate over widely separated regions are commonly known as "hydroclimatic teleconnections". Rainfall and runoff patterns, over continents, are found to be significantly teleconnected, with large-scale circulation patterns, through such hydroclimatic teleconnections. Though such teleconnections exist in nature, it is very difficult to model them, due to their inherent complexity. Statistical techniques and Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools gain popularity in modeling hydroclimatic teleconnection, based on their ability, in capturing the complicated relationship between the predictors (e.g. sea surface temperatures) and predictand (e.g., rainfall). Genetic Programming is such an AI tool, which is capable of capturing nonlinear relationship, between predictor and predictand, due to its flexible functional structure. In the present study, gridded multi-site weekly rainfall is predicted from El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) indices, Equatorial Indian Ocean Oscillation (EQUINOO) indices, Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) and lag rainfall at grid points, over the catchment, using Genetic Programming. The predicted rainfall is further used in a Genetic Programming model to predict streamflows. The model is applied for weekly forecasting of streamflow in Mahanadi River, India, and satisfactory performance is observed.

  10. Asiago spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-15db

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Turatto, M.

    2015-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-15db in NGC 5996. The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), equipped with the CCD Andor IKON L936.

  11. Asiago spectroscopic classification of SN 2017ati.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, S.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Terreran, G.

    2017-02-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic observation of Gaia17aiq. The target was supplied by Gaia Photometric Science Alerts programme . The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey name | IAU name | Host galaxy | Disc.

  12. Spectroscopic Observation of the Stardust Re-Entry in the Near UV with SLIT: Deduction of Surface Temperatures and Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Trumble, Kerry A.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal radiation of the heat-shield and the emission of the post-shock layer around the Stardust capsule, during its re-entry, were detected by a NASA-led observation campaign aboard NASA's DC-8 airborne observatory involving teams from several nations. The German SLIT experiment used a conventional spectrometer, in a Czerny-Turner configuration (300 mm focal length and a 600 lines/mm grating), fed by fiber optics, to cover a wavelength range from 324 nm to 456 nm with a pixel resolution of 0.08 nm. The reentering spacecraft was tracked m uansuinaglly a camera with a view angle of 20 degrees, and light from the capsule was collected using a small mirror telescope with a view angle of only 0.45 degrees. Data were gathered with a measurement frequency of 5 Hz in a 30-second time interval around the point of maximum heating until the capsule left the field of view. The emission of CN (as a major ablation product), N2(+) and different atoms were monitored successfully during that time. Due to the nature of the experimental set up, spatial resolution of the radiation field was not possible. Therefore, all measured values represent an integration of radiation from the visible part of the glowing heat shield, and from the plasma in the post-shock region. Further, due to challenges in tracking not every spectrum gathered contained data. The measured spectra can be split up into two parts: (i) continuum spectra which represent a superposition of the heat shield radiation and the continuum radiation of potential dust particles in the plasma, and (ii) line spectra from the plasma in the shock layer. Planck temperatures (interpreted as the surface temperatures of the Stardust heat shield) were determined assuming either a constant surface temperature, or a temperature distribution deduced from numerical simulation. The constant surface temperatures are in good agreement with numerical simulations, but the peak values at the stagnation point are significantly lower than those

  13. High-resolution Optical Spectroscopic Observations of Four Symbiotic Stars: AS 255, MWC 960, RW Hya, and StHα 32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Baella, N. O.; Drake, N. A.; Miranda, L. F.; Roig, F.

    2017-05-01

    follow that of the thick disk population for RW Hya and of the halo population for AS 255, MWC 960, and StHα32. We also determined the rotational velocities of these four symbiotic stars and compare our results with those of single field stars. Based on the observations made with the 2.2 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile) under agreement between ESO and Observatório Nacional/MCTI.

  14. Spectroscopic observations of 14N/15N ratios in both NH2 and CN in comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-10-01

    Comet is one of the primordial small bodies in the solar system and probably it has kept the information about the evolution of materials from the pre-solar molecular cloud to the solar nebula.Isotopic ratio in volatiles is one of the primordial properties of comets. A heavier isotopes trend to be captured into a molecule by chemical reactions under very low-temperature conditions (called as fractionation). For instance, D/H ratio of water (HDO/H2O) in comet is enriched in D atom than the elemental abundance ratios of D/H in entire solar system [1]. Based on the observed D/H ratios in cometary water, a presumed temperature is ~20-50 K as the formation temperature of water (most abundant volatiles in cometary nucleus), by assuming water formed in gas-phase chemistry [2].Besides, the nitrogen isotopic ratios (14N/15N) have been determined from CN and HCN (which is believed a dominant "parent" species of CN in the coma) in >20 comets [3,4]. They demonstrated cometary HCN and CN show high 15N-fractionation with respect to the proto-solar value by a factor of ~3 and with a small diversity. Moreover, 14N/15N ratios in NH3 in comets has been determined from intensity ratios of NH2 isotopologues [5,6,7], and both 15N-fractionation as much as HCN in comets and a small diversity are seen in those 14N/15N ratios in NH3. However, there is a few reports about 14N/15N ratios in both HCN and NH3 in the same comets, and discussions about the relationship between these 14N/15N ratios have not been yet.We present 14N/15N ratios in both NH2 and CN in comet C/2013 US10 (Catalina). High-resolution optical spectra of the comet were taken with the HDS spectrograph mounted on the Subaru Telescope (Hawaii) on UT 2016 January 2-3. We will discuss about the origins of these volatiles based on the 14N/15N ratios.This work was supported by Graint-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows, 15J10864 (YS).References:[1] Lis et al., 2013, ApJ 774, L3[2] Millar et al., 1989, ApJ 340, 906[3] Bockelée-Morvan et al

  15. Millimeter wave spectroscopic measurements over the South Pole: 2. An 11-month cycle of stratospheric ozone observations during 1993-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongjie; de Zafra, Robert L.; Trimble, Curtis

    1996-03-01

    A quasi-continuous record of ozone profiles throughout the stratosphere over the South Pole has been obtained over an 11-month cycle, from February 1993 to January 1994. This record includes the first winter measurements of ozone profiles in the altitude region above ˜30 km. Observations were made approximately every 3 days, using a high-sensitivity millimeter wave spectrometer to quantitatively measure the pressure-broadened ozone rotational emission line at 276.923 GHz. Vertical mixing ratio profiles have been derived from pressure-broadened lineshapes by a deconvolution technique. A number of interesting features are present. We find a persistent double-peaked structure in the mixing ratio profiles, lasting through most of the winter period until the remains of the lower peak are destroyed by spring "ozone hole" chemistry. A new low-altitude peak is reformed in December as the vortex breaks up. With the aid of circumpolar UARS/MLS ozone maps, we interpret the lower peak as due to transport from ozone-rich regions near the edge of the continent, while the profile from ˜30 km upward, composing the "trough" region and upper peak, appears to be the result of normal polar summer photochemistry. This double-peaked structure then becomes "fossilized" within the strong, isolated, fall-winter vortex. The mixing ratio of the upper peak increases after polar sunset, which we interpret as due to poleward mixing causing an erasure of the negative poleward gradient maintained by photochemistry before sunset. Mixing ratio isopleths show a relatively steady downward trend for a 3-month period after the winter vortex pattern is established, preceded by rapid variations in ozone mixing ratios over the 20- to 40-km range. Downward transport rates derived from isopleth slopes in the upper stratosphere are significantly smaller than vertical transport derived from theoretical studies, and we propose an explanation for this discrepancy based on ozone flow from the mesosphere

  16. Synchrotron-based far-infrared spectroscopic investigation and ab initio calculations of 3-oxetanone: observation and analysis of the ν7 band and the Coriolis coupled ν16 and ν20 bands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqiu; van Wijngaarden, Jennifer

    2012-09-27

    Rotationally resolved vibrational spectra of the four-membered heterocycle 3-oxetanone (c-C(3)H(4)O(2)) have been investigated in the 360-720 cm(-1) region with a resolution of 0.000 959 cm(-1) using synchrotron radiation from the Canadian Light Source. The observed bands correspond to motions best described as C═O deformation out-of-plane (ν(20)) at 399.6 cm(-1), C═O deformation in-plane (ν(16)) at 448.2 cm(-1), and the ring deformation (ν(7)) at 685.0 cm(-1). Infrared ground state combination differences along with previously reported pure rotational transitions were used to obtain the ground state spectroscopic parameters. Band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for the ν(7), ν(16), and ν(20) vibrational excited states were accurately determined by fitting a total of 10,319 assigned rovibrational transitions in a global analysis. The two adjacent carbonyl deformation bands, ν(16) and ν(20), were found to be mutually perturbed through a first-order a-type Coriolis interaction which was accounted for in the multiband analysis. The band centers agree within 3% of the ab initio estimates using DFT theory.

  17. How Institutional and University Counselor Policies Effectively Respond to Victims of Cyber Violent Acts: A Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Gretchen M.

    2012-01-01

    This multisite case study examined how institutional and university counselor policies effectively respond to cyber violent acts. Stake's (2006) multisite case study methodology was used to identify seven themes from current literature. Two sites with four participants were selected. The participants included two counseling directors and the…

  18. How Institutional and University Counselor Policies Effectively Respond to Victims of Cyber Violent Acts: A Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Gretchen M.

    2012-01-01

    This multisite case study examined how institutional and university counselor policies effectively respond to cyber violent acts. Stake's (2006) multisite case study methodology was used to identify seven themes from current literature. Two sites with four participants were selected. The participants included two counseling directors and the…

  19. High-energy spectroscopic astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güdel, Manuel; Walter, Roland

    After three decades of intense research in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, the time was ripe to summarize basic knowledge on X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy for interested students and researchers ready to become involved in new high-energy missions. This volume exposes both the scientific basics and modern methods of high-energy spectroscopic astrophysics. The emphasis is on physical principles and observing methods rather than a discussion of particular classes of high-energy objects, but many examples and new results are included in the three chapters as well.

  20. Middle-Eastern plant communities tolerate 9 years of drought in a multi-site climate manipulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Tielbörger, Katja; Bilton, Mark C; Metz, Johannes; Kigel, Jaime; Holzapfel, Claus; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin; Konsens, Irit; Parag, Hadas A; Sternberg, Marcelo

    2014-10-06

    For evaluating climate change impacts on biodiversity, extensive experiments are urgently needed to complement popular non-mechanistic models which map future ecosystem properties onto their current climatic niche. Here, we experimentally test the main prediction of these models by means of a novel multi-site approach. We implement rainfall manipulations--irrigation and drought--to dryland plant communities situated along a steep climatic gradient in a global biodiversity hotspot containing many wild progenitors of crops. Despite the large extent of our study, spanning nine plant generations and many species, very few differences between treatments were observed in the vegetation response variables: biomass, species composition, species richness and density. The lack of a clear drought effect challenges studies classifying dryland ecosystems as most vulnerable to global change. We attribute this resistance to the tremendous temporal and spatial heterogeneity under which the plants have evolved, concluding that this should be accounted for when predicting future biodiversity change.

  1. Middle-Eastern plant communities tolerate 9 years of drought in a multi-site climate manipulation experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tielbörger, Katja; Bilton, Mark C.; Metz, Johannes; Kigel, Jaime; Holzapfel, Claus; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin; Konsens, Irit; Parag, Hadas A.; Sternberg, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    For evaluating climate change impacts on biodiversity, extensive experiments are urgently needed to complement popular non-mechanistic models which map future ecosystem properties onto their current climatic niche. Here, we experimentally test the main prediction of these models by means of a novel multi-site approach. We implement rainfall manipulations—irrigation and drought—to dryland plant communities situated along a steep climatic gradient in a global biodiversity hotspot containing many wild progenitors of crops. Despite the large extent of our study, spanning nine plant generations and many species, very few differences between treatments were observed in the vegetation response variables: biomass, species composition, species richness and density. The lack of a clear drought effect challenges studies classifying dryland ecosystems as most vulnerable to global change. We attribute this resistance to the tremendous temporal and spatial heterogeneity under which the plants have evolved, concluding that this should be accounted for when predicting future biodiversity change. PMID:25283495

  2. A Comparison of Commonly Used Processes for Multi-Site Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avritzer, Alberto; Paulish, Daniel J.

    This chapter describes some commonly used multi-site software development processes and compares them with respect to the amount of coordination that they support across locations. Specifically, two common processes, called the "Extended Workbench Modelextended workbench model " and "System of Systems Modelsystem of systems model " will be compared based on our experience. The processes have each been experimentally applied over several years to a global development project, called the "Global Studio Project" (GSP) in which university students around the world have simulated the processes used for an industrial multi-site development project. Lessons learned will be discussed and guidance given for multi-site development projects based on our experience from experimental and real projects.

  3. Ethics review for a multi-site project involving Tribal Nations in the Northern Plains

    PubMed Central

    Angal, Jyoti; Petersen, Julie M.; Tobacco, Deborah; Elliott, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, Tribal Nations are forming ethics review panels, which function separately from institutional research review boards (IRBs). The emergence of strong community representation coincides with a widespread effort supported by the Department of Health and Human Services and other federal agencies to establish a single IRB for all multi-site research. This article underscores the value of a tribal ethics review board and describes the tribal oversight for the Safe Passage Study - a multi-site, community-based project in the Northern Plains. Our experience demonstrates the benefits of tribal ethics review and makes a strong argument for including tribal oversight in future regulatory guidance for multi-site, community based research. PMID:26928897

  4. Multisite comparison of high-sensitivity multiplex cytokine assays.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Reynolds, Sandra M; Cox, Christopher; Jacobson, Lisa P; Magpantay, Larry; Mulder, Candice B; Dibben, Oliver; Margolick, Joseph B; Bream, Jay H; Sambrano, Elise; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Borrow, Persephone; Landay, Alan L; Rinaldo, Charles R; Norris, Philip J

    2011-08-01

    The concentrations of cytokines in human serum and plasma can provide valuable information about in vivo immune status, but low concentrations often require high-sensitivity assays to permit detection. The recent development of multiplex assays, which can measure multiple cytokines in one small sample, holds great promise, especially for studies in which limited volumes of stored serum or plasma are available. Four high-sensitivity cytokine multiplex assays on a Luminex (Bio-Rad, BioSource, Linco) or electrochemiluminescence (Meso Scale Discovery) platform were evaluated for their ability to detect circulating concentrations of 13 cytokines, as well as for laboratory and lot variability. Assays were performed in six different laboratories utilizing archived serum from HIV-uninfected and -infected subjects from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) and commercial plasma samples spanning initial HIV viremia. In a majority of serum samples, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were detectable with at least three kits, while IL-1β was clearly detected with only one kit. No single multiplex panel detected all cytokines, and there were highly significant differences (P < 0.001) between laboratories and/or lots with all kits. Nevertheless, the kits generally detected similar patterns of cytokine perturbation during primary HIV viremia. This multisite comparison suggests that current multiplex assays vary in their ability to measure serum and/or plasma concentrations of cytokines and may not be sufficiently reproducible for repeated determinations over a long-term study or in multiple laboratories but may be useful for longitudinal studies in which relative, rather than absolute, changes in cytokines are important.

  5. Patterns of multisite pain and associations with risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T.; Felli, Vanda E.; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H.; Felknor, Sarah A.; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R.; Sadeghian, Farideh; Masood Kadir, M.; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S.P.; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R.; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H.; Sarquis, Leila M.; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V.; Quintana, Leonardo A.; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J.; Harris, E. Clare; Serra, Consol; Martinez, J. Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G.; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J.; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A. Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kelsall, Helen L.; Hoe, Victor C.W; Urquhart, Donna M.; Derrett, Sarah; McBride, David; Herbison, Peter; Gray, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To explore definitions for multisite pain, and compare associations with risk factors for different patterns of musculoskeletal pain, we analysed cross-sectional data from the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID) study. The study sample comprised 12,410 adults aged 20–59 years from 47 occupational groups in 18 countries. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect information about pain in the past month at each of 10 anatomical sites, and about potential risk factors. Associations with pain outcomes were assessed by Poisson regression, and characterised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs). Extensive pain, affecting 6–10 anatomical sites, was reported much more frequently than would be expected if the occurrence of pain at each site were independent (674 participants vs 41.9 expected). In comparison with pain involving only 1–3 sites, it showed much stronger associations (relative to no pain) with risk factors such as female sex (PRR 1.6 vs 1.1), older age (PRR 2.6 vs 1.1), somatising tendency (PRR 4.6 vs 1.3), and exposure to multiple physically stressing occupational activities (PRR 5.0 vs 1.4). After adjustment for number of sites with pain, these risk factors showed no additional association with a distribution of pain that was widespread according to the frequently used American College of Rheumatology criteria. Our analysis supports the classification of pain at multiple anatomical sites simply by the number of sites affected, and suggests that extensive pain differs importantly in its associations with risk factors from pain that is limited to only a small number of anatomical sites. PMID:23727463

  6. Mediators of antiretroviral adherence: a multisite international study

    PubMed Central

    Corless, I. B.; Guarino, A.J.; Nicholas, P.K.; Tyer-Viola, L; Kirksey, K.; Brion, J.; Rose, Dawson; Eller, L.S.; Rivero-Mendez, M.; Kemppainen, J.; Nokes, K.; Sefcik, E.; Voss, J.; Wantland, D.; Johnson, M.O.; Phillips, C.J.; Webel, A.; Iipinge, S.; Portillo, C.; Wei-Ti-Chen; Maryland, M.; Hamilton, M. J; Reid, P.; Hickey, D.; Holzemer, W.L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of stressful life events (SLE on medication adherence (3 day, 30 day) as mediated by sense of coherence (SOC), self-compassion (SCS), and engagement with the health care provider (eHCP) and whether this differed by international site. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional sample of 2082 HIV positive adults between September 2009 and January 2011 from sites in Canada, China, Namibia, Puerto Rico, Thailand and the U.S. Statistical tests to explore the effects of stressful life events on antiretroviral medication adherence included descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, and path analysis. An examination by international site of the relationships between SLE, SCS, SOC and eHCP with adherence (3 day, 30 day) indicated these combined variables were related to adherence whether 3 day or 30 day to different degrees at the various sites. SLE, SCS, SOC, and eHCP were significant predictors of adherence past 3 days for the U.S (p= <.001), Canada (p= .006), and Namibia (p= .019). The combined independent variables were significant predictors of adherence past 30 days only in the U.S. and Canada. Engagement with the provider was a significant correlate for antiretroviral adherence in most, but not all, of these countries. Thus the importance of eHCP cannot be overstated. Nonetheless, our findings need to be accompanied by the caveat that research on variables of interest while enriched by a sample obtained from international sites, may not have the same relationships in each country. Mediators of antiretroviral adherence: a multisite international study PMID:22774796

  7. Patterns of multisite pain and associations with risk factors.

    PubMed

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T; Felli, Vanda E; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H; Felknor, Sarah A; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R; Sadeghian, Farideh; Masood Kadir, M; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S P; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H; Sarquis, Leila M; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V; Quintana, Leonardo A; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J; Harris, E Clare; Serra, Consol; Martinez, J Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M; Pesatori, Angela C; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kelsall, Helen L; Hoe, Victor C W; Urquhart, Donna M; Derrett, Sarah; McBride, David; Herbison, Peter; Gray, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    To explore definitions for multisite pain, and compare associations with risk factors for different patterns of musculoskeletal pain, we analysed cross-sectional data from the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID) study. The study sample comprised 12,410 adults aged 20-59 years from 47 occupational groups in 18 countries. A standardised questionnaire was used to collect information about pain in the past month at each of 10 anatomical sites, and about potential risk factors. Associations with pain outcomes were assessed by Poisson regression, and characterised by prevalence rate ratios (PRRs). Extensive pain, affecting 6-10 anatomical sites, was reported much more frequently than would be expected if the occurrence of pain at each site were independent (674 participants vs 41.9 expected). In comparison with pain involving only 1-3 sites, it showed much stronger associations (relative to no pain) with risk factors such as female sex (PRR 1.6 vs 1.1), older age (PRR 2.6 vs 1.1), somatising tendency (PRR 4.6 vs 1.3), and exposure to multiple physically stressing occupational activities (PRR 5.0 vs 1.4). After adjustment for number of sites with pain, these risk factors showed no additional association with a distribution of pain that was widespread according to the frequently used American College of Rheumatology criteria. Our analysis supports the classification of pain at multiple anatomical sites simply by the number of sites affected, and suggests that extensive pain differs importantly in its associations with risk factors from pain that is limited to only a small number of anatomical sites. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term adolescent multi-site musculoskeletal pain is associated with psychological distress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Juha; Eskola, Pasi J; Ohtonen, Hanni-Rosa; Paananen, Markus; Jokelainen, Jari; Timonen, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Karppinen, Jaro

    2017-02-01

    Although several studies have shown that adolescent musculoskeletal pain is associated with psychological problems in a cross-sectional setting, the associations of long-term musculoskeletal pain with psychological distress and anxiety are not known. The study included 1773 adolescents belonging to the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. They received a postal questionnaire at the age of 16years and a follow-up questionnaire two years later. The first inquiry contained questions about the sites of musculoskeletal pain; the second had the same pain questions, along with measures of distress and anxiety. Risk ratios (RR) were assessed by log-linear regression analysis. Multi-site musculoskeletal pain (in ≥2 body locations) at both 16 and 18years was common, reported by 53% of girls and 30% of boys. Multi-site pain at both ages, compared to those with multi-site pain neither at 16 nor 18years, was associated with psychological distress at the age of 18 among both girls (RR 1.8 95% CI 1.2-2.7) and boys (RR 3.5 95% CI 2.1-5.9). For anxiety, the corresponding relative risks were 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.2) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.4-2.3), respectively. For short-term multi-site pain (prevalent only at the age of 16 or 18), these relative risks were between 0.8 and 2.3. Adolescents with long-term multi-site pain have higher levels of distress and anxiety than those without or with only short-term multi-site pain. Associations were found in both genders, but the relationship between pain and distress was more pronounced among boys. The associations had modest effect strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation and validation of a Wilks-type multi-site daily precipitation generator over a typical Alpine river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, D. E.; Fischer, A. M.; Frei, C.; Liniger, M. A.; Appenzeller, C.; Knutti, R.

    2015-05-01

    Many climate impact assessments require high-resolution precipitation time series that have a spatio-temporal correlation structure consistent with observations, for simulating either current or future climate conditions. In this respect, weather generators (WGs) designed and calibrated for multiple sites are an appealing statistical downscaling technique to stochastically simulate multiple realisations of possible future time series consistent with the local precipitation characteristics and their expected future changes. In this study, we present the implementation and validation of a multi-site daily precipitation generator re-built after the methodology described in Wilks (1998). The generator consists of several Richardson-type WGs run with spatially correlated random number streams. This study aims at investigating the capabilities, the added value and the limitations of the precipitation generator for a typical Alpine river catchment in the Swiss Alpine region under current climate. The calibrated multi-site WG is skilful at individual sites in representing the annual cycle of the precipitation statistics, such as mean wet day frequency and intensity as well as monthly precipitation sums. It reproduces realistically the multi-day statistics such as the frequencies of dry and wet spell lengths and precipitation sums over consecutive wet days. Substantial added value is demonstrated in simulating daily areal precipitation sums in comparison to multiple WGs that lack the spatial dependency in the stochastic process. Limitations are seen in reproducing daily and multi-day extreme precipitation sums, observed variability from year to year and in reproducing long dry spell lengths. Given the performance of the presented generator, we conclude that it is a useful tool to generate precipitation series consistent with the mean climatic aspects and likely helpful to be used as a downscaling technique for climate change scenarios.

  10. Spectroscopic observations of selected stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, P. S.; Garmany, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra of very luminous, high temperature stars, the o-type stars with the largest masses among stars, and the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars are studied. These stars are characterized by strong stellar winds which produce signiicant mass loss. The nature and evolution of these winds are studied to learn the densities, velocity structue, ionization balance, and composition. The IUE satellite provides the best way to study these phenomena because many of the most important ground state and excited state lines of common highly ionized species are found in the spectral range.

  11. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P.

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  12. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 21 electronic states of AsF are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) and multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. The computed spectroscopic constants agree with the experimental values for the observed states.

  13. Tools and Methods for Risk Management in Multi-Site Engineering Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mingwei; Nemes, Laszlo; Reidsema, Carl; Ahmed, Ammar; Kayis, Berman

    In today's highly global business environment, engineering and manufacturing projects often involve two or more geographically dispersed units or departments, research centers or companies. This paper attempts to identify the requirements for risk management in a multi-site engineering project environment, and presents a review of the state-of-the-art tools and methods that can be used to manage risks in multi-site engineering projects. This leads to the development of a risk management roadmap, which will underpin the design and implementation of an intelligent risk mapping system.

  14. A Multi-Site Study of the Clinical Diagnosis of Different Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Catherine; Petkova, Eva; Hus, Vanessa; Gan, Weijin; Lu, Feihan; Martin, Donna M.; Ousley, Opal; Guy, Lisa; Bernier, Raphael; Gerdts, Jennifer; Algermissen, Molly; Whitaker, Agnes; Sutcliffe, James S.; Warren, Zachary; Klin, Ami; Saulnier, Celine; Hanson, Ellen; Hundley, Rachel; Piggot, Judith; Fombonne, Eric; Steiman, Mandy; Miles, Judith; Kanne, Stephen M.; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Peters, Sarika U.; Cook, Edwin H.; Guter, Stephen; Tjernagel, Jennifer; Green-Snyder, Lee Anne; Bishop, Somer; Esler, Amy; Gotham, Katherine; Luyster, Rhiannon; Miller, Fiona; Olson, Jennifer; Richler, Jennifer; Risi, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Context Clinical best estimate diagnoses of specific autism spectrum disorders (autistic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified, Asperger’s disorder) have been used as the diagnostic gold standard, even when information from standardized instruments is available. Objective To determine if the relationships between behavioral phenotypes and clinical diagnoses of different autism spectrum disorders vary across 12 university-based sites. Design Multi-site observational study collecting clinical phenotype data (diagnostic, developmental and demographic) for genetic research. Classification trees were employed to identify characteristics that predicted diagnosis across and within sites. Setting Participants were recruited through 12 university-based autism service providers into a genetic study of autism. Participants 2102 probands (1814 males) between 4 and 18 years of age (M age=8.93, SD=3.5 years) who met autism spectrum criteria on the Autism Diagnostic Interview–Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and had a clinical diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder. Main Outcome Measures Best estimate clinical diagnoses predicted by standardized scores from diagnostic, cognitive, and behavioral measures. Results Though distributions of scores on standardized measures were similar across sites, significant site differences emerged in best estimate clinical diagnoses of specific autism spectrum disorders. Relationships between clinical diagnoses and standardized scores, particularly verbal IQ, language level and core diagnostic features, varied across sites in weighting of information and cut-offs. Conclusions Clinical distinctions among categorical diagnostic subtypes of autism spectrum disorders were not reliable even across sites with well-documented fidelity using standardized diagnostic instruments. Results support the move from existing sub-groupings of autism spectrum disorders to dimensional descriptions of core features

  15. A multisite study of the clinical diagnosis of different autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lord, Catherine; Petkova, Eva; Hus, Vanessa; Gan, Weijin; Lu, Feihan; Martin, Donna M; Ousley, Opal; Guy, Lisa; Bernier, Raphael; Gerdts, Jennifer; Algermissen, Molly; Whitaker, Agnes; Sutcliffe, James S; Warren, Zachary; Klin, Ami; Saulnier, Celine; Hanson, Ellen; Hundley, Rachel; Piggot, Judith; Fombonne, Eric; Steiman, Mandy; Miles, Judith; Kanne, Stephen M; Goin-Kochel, Robin P; Peters, Sarika U; Cook, Edwin H; Guter, Stephen; Tjernagel, Jennifer; Green-Snyder, Lee Anne; Bishop, Somer; Esler, Amy; Gotham, Katherine; Luyster, Rhiannon; Miller, Fiona; Olson, Jennifer; Richler, Jennifer; Risi, Susan

    2012-03-01

    Best-estimate clinical diagnoses of specific autism spectrum disorders (autistic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified, and Asperger syndrome) have been used as the diagnostic gold standard, even when information from standardized instruments is available. To determine whether the relationships between behavioral phenotypes and clinical diagnoses of different autism spectrum disorders vary across 12 university-based sites. Multisite observational study collecting clinical phenotype data (diagnostic, developmental, and demographic) for genetic research. Classification trees were used to identify characteristics that predicted diagnosis across and within sites. Participants were recruited through 12 university-based autism service providers into a genetic study of autism. A total of 2102 probands (1814 male probands) between 4 and 18 years of age (mean [SD] age, 8.93 [3.5] years) who met autism spectrum criteria on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and who had a clinical diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder. Best-estimate clinical diagnoses predicted by standardized scores from diagnostic, cognitive, and behavioral measures. Although distributions of scores on standardized measures were similar across sites, significant site differences emerged in best-estimate clinical diagnoses of specific autism spectrum disorders. Relationships between clinical diagnoses and standardized scores, particularly verbal IQ, language level, and core diagnostic features, varied across sites in weighting of information and cutoffs. Clinical distinctions among categorical diagnostic subtypes of autism spectrum disorders were not reliable even across sites with well-documented fidelity using standardized diagnostic instruments. Results support the move from existing subgroupings of autism spectrum disorders to dimensional descriptions of core features of social affect and fixated, repetitive behaviors

  16. Development of a THz spectroscopic imaging system.

    PubMed

    Usami, M; Iwamoto, T; Fukasawa, R; Tani, M; Watanabe, M; Sakai, K

    2002-11-07

    We have developed a real-time THz imaging system based on the two-dimensional (2D) electro-optic (EO) sampling technique. Employing the 2D EO-sampling technique, we can obtain THz images using a CCD camera at a video rate of up to 30 frames per second. A spatial resolution of 1.4 mm was achieved. This resolution was reasonably close to the theoretical limit determined by diffraction. We observed not only static objects but also moving ones. To acquire spectroscopic information, time-domain images were collected. By processing these images on a computer, we can obtain spectroscopic images. Spectroscopy for silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  17. Asiago spectroscopic classification of AT 2016cvm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Turatto, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of AT 2016cvm (also known as PTSS-16hxs), discovered 20160613.771 by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS) The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm).

  18. Spectroscopic classification of three supernovae candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Dong, Subo; Sun, Fengwu; Prieto, Jose L.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2017-08-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observation of supernova candidates ASASSN-17kr (2017gas), ASASSN-17kz (2017gea) and Gaia17bzv (2017fzy) done on UT 2017-08-18, with DBSP mounted on the Hale 5m telescope at Palomar Observatory.

  19. Spectroscopic mode identification in gamma Doradus stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylvia Pollard, Karen

    2015-08-01

    The MUSICIAN programme at the University of Canterbury has been successfully identifying frequencies and pulsation modes in many gamma Doradus stars using hundreds of precise, high resolution spectroscopic observations. This paper describes some of these frequency and mode identifications and the emerging patterns of the programme.

  20. Brief Treatments for Cannabis Dependence: Findings From a Randomized Multisite Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babor, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 brief interventions for cannabis-dependent adults. A multisite randomized controlled trial compared cannabis use outcomes across 3 study conditions: (a) 2 sessions of motivational enhancement therapy (MET); (b) 9 sessions of multicomponent therapy that included MET, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and case…

  1. Multi-site Management Plan Ecoregional Conservation for the Ouachita Ecoregion Arkansas and Oklahoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    MOUNTAINS ......................................12 HUMAN USES AND CURRECT AND HISTORICAL IMPACTS .......................................20...Conserving Biodiversity on Military Lands: A Handbook for Natural Resources Managers in cooperation with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) that provided the...foundation for multi-site adaptive conservation management. The handbook recognized managing for biodiversity contributes to military readiness and

  2. A Qualitative Multi-Site Case Study: Examining Principals' Leadership Styles and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyear, Loukisha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multi-site case study was to explore the impact of principals' leadership styles on student academic achievement in a high-poverty low-performing school district in Louisiana. A total of 17 participants, principals and teachers, from this school district were used in this study. Data source triangulation of…

  3. Power Calculations for Moderators in Multi-Site Cluster Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben; Dong, Nianbo

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), or studies in which intact groups of individuals are randomly assigned to a condition, are becoming more common in evaluation studies of educational programs. A specific type of CRT in which clusters are randomly assigned to treatment within blocks or sites, known as multisite cluster randomized trials (MSCRTs),…

  4. A Multisite Psychotherapy and Medication Trial for Depressed Adolescents: Background and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Simons, Anne; Vitiello, Benedetto; Walkup, John; Emslie, Graham; Rosenberg, David; March, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) is an NIMH-supported multisite clinical trial that compares the effectiveness of a depression-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication management with fluoxetine (FLX), the combination of CBT and FLX (COMB), and medical management with pill placebo (PBO). TADS was…

  5. Multi-Site Ethnography, Hypermedia and the Productive Hazards of Digital Methods: A Struggle for Liveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen; Freeman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities and frustrations of using digital methods in a multi-sited ethnographic research project. The project, "Urban School Performances: The interplay, through live and digital drama, of local-global knowledge about student engagement", is a study of youth and teachers in drama classrooms in contexts of…

  6. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M.; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, Jose; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and are often excluded from clinical trials in the United States. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. The authors conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 3…

  7. A Qualitative Multi-Site Case Study: Examining Principals' Leadership Styles and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preyear, Loukisha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multi-site case study was to explore the impact of principals' leadership styles on student academic achievement in a high-poverty low-performing school district in Louisiana. A total of 17 participants, principals and teachers, from this school district were used in this study. Data source triangulation of…

  8. Multisite Employment and Training Program Evaluations: A Tale of Three Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, David; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using a multilevel statistics framework, a study examined the role of multiple sites in evaluation of three programs: Greater Avenues to Independence (GAIN), Job Training Partnership Act, and Food Stamp Employment and Training. Although multisite evaluations have great potential, they are more difficult and expensive and have limited success in…

  9. A Multisite Randomized Effectiveness Trial of Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Spanish-Speaking Substance Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Martino, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Nich, Charla; Frankforter, Tami; Anez, Luis M.; Paris, Manuel; Suarez-Morales, Lourdes; Szapocznik, Jose; Miller, William R.; Rosa, Carmen; Matthews, Julie; Farentinos, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Hispanic individuals are underrepresented in clinical and research populations and are often excluded from clinical trials in the United States. Hence, there are few data on the effectiveness of most empirically validated therapies for Hispanic substance users. The authors conducted a multisite randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of 3…

  10. The Original Ten: A Multisite Case Study of Florida's Millennium High School Reform Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the New Millennium High School Model in Florida in a multisite case study of the original 10 sites involving interviews with 15 school leaders and 530 school personnel. Findings show the essentially grassroots nature of the model and the functioning of school leadership in this context. (SLD)

  11. Testing the Feasibility of Fidelity Evaluation in a Multisite, Multiprogram Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Disa Lubker; Losch, Mary E.; Avery, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring fidelity of implementation is a critical task when initiating evidence-based programs. This pilot study sought to identify best practices in a fidelity monitoring process and determine the feasibility of continuing a fidelity monitoring process with a multisite, multiprogram initiative. A fidelity log was created for each of 11…

  12. Learning about and from a Distribution of Program Impacts Using Multisite Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Bloom, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    The present article provides a synthesis of the conceptual and statistical issues involved in using multisite randomized trials to learn about and from a distribution of heterogeneous program impacts across individuals and/or program sites. Learning "about" such a distribution involves estimating its mean value, detecting and quantifying…

  13. Positive Family Intervention for Severe Challenging Behavior I: A Multisite Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, V. Mark; Hieneman, Meme; Clarke, Shelley; Wang, Mo; Rinaldi, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was a multisite randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of adding a cognitive-behavioral intervention to positive behavior support (PBS). Fifty-four families who met the criteria of (a) having a child with a developmental disability, (b) whose child displayed serious challenging behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury,…

  14. Toward Better Research on--and Thinking about--Evaluation Influence, Especially in Multisite Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Melvin M.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation is typically carried out with the intention of making a difference in the understandings and actions of stakeholders and decision makers. The author provides a general review of the concepts of evaluation "use," evaluation "influence," and "influence pathways," with connections to multisite evaluations. The study of evaluation influence…

  15. Multi-Site Ethnography, Hypermedia and the Productive Hazards of Digital Methods: A Struggle for Liveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen; Freeman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities and frustrations of using digital methods in a multi-sited ethnographic research project. The project, "Urban School Performances: The interplay, through live and digital drama, of local-global knowledge about student engagement", is a study of youth and teachers in drama classrooms in contexts of…

  16. A Multi-Site Study on Medical School Selection, Performance, Motivation and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wouters, A.; Croiset, G.; Schripsema, N. R.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Spaai, G. W.; Hulsman, R. L.; Kusurkar, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Medical schools seek ways to improve their admissions strategies, since the available methods prove to be suboptimal for selecting the best and most motivated students. In this multi-site cross-sectional questionnaire study, we examined the value of (different) selection procedures compared to a weighted lottery procedure, which includes direct…

  17. Finding Efficiency in the Design of Large Multisite Evaluations: Estimating Variances for Science Achievement Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westine, Carl D.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known empirically about intraclass correlations (ICCs) for multisite cluster randomized trial (MSCRT) designs, particularly in science education. In this study, ICCs suitable for science achievement studies using a three-level (students in schools in districts) MSCRT design that block on district are estimated and examined. Estimates of…

  18. Positive Family Intervention for Severe Challenging Behavior I: A Multisite Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, V. Mark; Hieneman, Meme; Clarke, Shelley; Wang, Mo; Rinaldi, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was a multisite randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of adding a cognitive-behavioral intervention to positive behavior support (PBS). Fifty-four families who met the criteria of (a) having a child with a developmental disability, (b) whose child displayed serious challenging behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury,…

  19. Documenting the Impact of Multisite Evaluations on the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseland, Denise; Greenseid, Lija O.; Volkov, Boris B.; Lawrenz, Frances

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the impact that four multisite National Science Foundation (NSF) evaluations had on the broader field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and evaluation. Three approaches were used to investigate the broader impact of these evaluations on the field: (a) a citation analysis, (b) an on-line survey,…

  20. Documenting the Impact of Multisite Evaluations on the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseland, Denise; Greenseid, Lija O.; Volkov, Boris B.; Lawrenz, Frances

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the impact that four multisite National Science Foundation (NSF) evaluations had on the broader field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and evaluation. Three approaches were used to investigate the broader impact of these evaluations on the field: (a) a citation analysis, (b) an on-line survey,…

  1. Finding Efficiency in the Design of Large Multisite Evaluations: Estimating Variances for Science Achievement Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westine, Carl D.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known empirically about intraclass correlations (ICCs) for multisite cluster randomized trial (MSCRT) designs, particularly in science education. In this study, ICCs suitable for science achievement studies using a three-level (students in schools in districts) MSCRT design that block on district are estimated and examined. Estimates of…

  2. Statistical Analysis for Multisite Trials Using Instrumental Variables with Random Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Reardon, Sean F.; Nomi, Takako

    2012-01-01

    Multisite trials can clarify the average impact of a new program and the heterogeneity of impacts across sites. Unfortunately, in many applications, compliance with treatment assignment is imperfect. For these applications, we propose an instrumental variable (IV) model with person-specific and site-specific random coefficients. Site-specific IV…

  3. Predicting changes in protein thermostability brought about by single- or multi-site mutations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important aspect of protein design is the ability to predict changes in protein thermostability arising from single- or multi-site mutations. Protein thermostability is reflected in the change in free energy (ΔΔG) of thermal denaturation. Results We have developed predictive software, Prethermut, based on machine learning methods, to predict the effect of single- or multi-site mutations on protein thermostability. The input vector of Prethermut is based on known structural changes and empirical measurements of changes in potential energy due to protein mutations. Using a 10-fold cross validation test on the M-dataset, consisting of 3366 mutants proteins from ProTherm, the classification accuracy of random forests and the regression accuracy of random forest regression were slightly better than support vector machines and support vector regression, whereas the overall accuracy of classification and the Pearson correlation coefficient of regression were 79.2% and 0.72, respectively. Prethermut performs better on proteins containing multi-site mutations than those with single mutations. Conclusions The performance of Prethermut indicates that it is a useful tool for predicting changes in protein thermostability brought about by single- or multi-site mutations and will be valuable in the rational design of proteins. PMID:20598148

  4. A Multisite Psychotherapy and Medication Trial for Depressed Adolescents: Background and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Simons, Anne; Vitiello, Benedetto; Walkup, John; Emslie, Graham; Rosenberg, David; March, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) is an NIMH-supported multisite clinical trial that compares the effectiveness of a depression-specific cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication management with fluoxetine (FLX), the combination of CBT and FLX (COMB), and medical management with pill placebo (PBO). TADS was…

  5. Intraclass Correlations for Three-Level Multi-Site Cluster-Randomized Trials of Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westine, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster-randomized trial (CRT) relies on random assignment of intact clusters to treatment conditions, such as classrooms or schools (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2002). One specific type of CRT, a multi-site CRT (MSCRT), is commonly employed in educational research and evaluation studies (Spybrook & Raudenbush, 2009; Spybrook, 2014; Bloom,…

  6. Testing the Feasibility of Fidelity Evaluation in a Multisite, Multiprogram Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornish, Disa Lubker; Losch, Mary E.; Avery, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring fidelity of implementation is a critical task when initiating evidence-based programs. This pilot study sought to identify best practices in a fidelity monitoring process and determine the feasibility of continuing a fidelity monitoring process with a multisite, multiprogram initiative. A fidelity log was created for each of 11…

  7. Brief Treatments for Cannabis Dependence: Findings From a Randomized Multisite Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babor, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of 2 brief interventions for cannabis-dependent adults. A multisite randomized controlled trial compared cannabis use outcomes across 3 study conditions: (a) 2 sessions of motivational enhancement therapy (MET); (b) 9 sessions of multicomponent therapy that included MET, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and case…

  8. Statistical Analysis for Multisite Trials Using Instrumental Variables with Random Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Reardon, Sean F.; Nomi, Takako

    2012-01-01

    Multisite trials can clarify the average impact of a new program and the heterogeneity of impacts across sites. Unfortunately, in many applications, compliance with treatment assignment is imperfect. For these applications, we propose an instrumental variable (IV) model with person-specific and site-specific random coefficients. Site-specific IV…

  9. Multisite Parent-Centered Risk Assessment to Reduce Pediatric Oral Chemotherapy Errors

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kathleen E.; Mazor, Kathleen M.; Roblin, Douglas; Biggins, Colleen; Wagner, Joann L.; Houlahan, Kathleen; Li, Justin W.; Keuker, Christopher; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Donovan, Jennifer; Kanaan, Abir; Weingart, Saul N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Observational studies describe high rates of errors in home oral chemotherapy use in children. In hospitals, proactive risk assessment methods help front-line health care workers develop error prevention strategies. Our objective was to engage parents of children with cancer in a multisite study using proactive risk assessment methods to identify how errors occur at home and propose risk reduction strategies. Methods: We recruited parents from three outpatient pediatric oncology clinics in the northeast and southeast United States to participate in failure mode and effects analyses (FMEA). An FMEA is a systematic team-based proactive risk assessment approach in understanding ways a process can fail and develop prevention strategies. Steps included diagram the process, brainstorm and prioritize failure modes (places where things go wrong), and propose risk reduction strategies. We focused on home oral chemotherapy administration after a change in dose because prior studies identified this area as high risk. Results: Parent teams consisted of four parents at two of the sites and 10 at the third. Parents developed a 13-step process map, with two to 19 failure modes per step. The highest priority failure modes included miscommunication when receiving instructions from the clinician (caused by conflicting instructions or parent lapses) and unsafe chemotherapy handling at home. Recommended risk assessment strategies included novel uses of technology to improve parent access to information, clinicians, and other parents while at home. Conclusion: Parents of pediatric oncology patients readily participated in a proactive risk assessment method, identifying processes that pose a risk for medication errors involving home oral chemotherapy. PMID:23633976

  10. Predicting diffuse light-enhancement of GPP from plant functional traits: A multi-site synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Barr, J. G.; Cook, B.; Goeckede, M.; Law, B. E.; Kueppers, L. M.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse light enhances canopy-scale photosynthesis because isotropic diffuse light penetrates deeper into the canopy, involves more leaf area in photosynthesis, and prevents the top of the canopy from becoming light saturated. However, the observational and modeling communities still have little understanding of how the 'Diffuse light Enhancement Effect' (DEE) varies across plant functional types or is constrained by factors such as nitrogen availability and plant structure. So far, variability in the strength of DEE across plant functional types (PFTs) remains poorly constrained, but canopy models indicate leaf area index (LAI) is a primary controller. While the very few existing multi-site, measurement-based syntheses of the DEE have provided valuable information on the variability of the DEE across a few plant functional types, no study has correlated measured metrics of DEE magnitude with direct measurements of canopy physical traits across a wide range of plant functional types. Here we report a new metric that is suitable for quantifying the DEE in both flux measurements and land surface models. We also present, for the first time, an examination of the relationship between the DEE metric and plant functional traits. Results from our 70+ site AmeriFlux and FLUXNET synthesis indicate that LAI is the strongest controller of the DEE across sites and PFTs, with less significant influences from foliar nitrogen, canopy height, and mean annual precipitation. Our results will enable direct evaluation and improvement of remote sensing algorithms and light use efficiency models (e.g. MODIS GPP), which to this point regard diffuse light fraction as a source of noise. Additionally, improving resolution of the DEE in prognostic land surface models, such as the Community Land Model (CLM), will greatly improve our ability to forecast future feedbacks to terrestrial carbon sequestration from changes in cloudiness and aerosol amount.

  11. ULK1 inhibits mTORC1 signaling, promotes multisite Raptor phosphorylation and hinders substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Elaine A; Hunt, David K; Acosta-Jaquez, Hugo A; Fingar, Diane C

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis and autophagy work as two opposing processes to control cell growth in response to nutrient supply. The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which acts as a master regulator to control protein synthesis, has recently been shown to inhibit autophagy by phosphorylating and inactivating ULK1, an autophagy regulatory protein. ULK1 also inhibits phosphorylation of a mTORC1 substrate, S6K1, indicating that a complex signaling interplay exists between mTORC1 and ULK1. Here, we demonstrate that ULK1 induces multisite phosphorylation of Raptor in vivo and in vitro. Using phospho-specific antibodies we identify Ser855 and Ser859 as being strongly phosphorylated by ULK1, with moderate phosphorylation of Ser792 also observed. Interestingly, ULK1 overexpression also increases phosphorylation of Raptor Ser863 and the mTOR autophosphorylation site, Ser2481 in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Despite this evidence for heightened mTORC1 kinase activity following ULK1 overexpresssion, mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1 is significantly inhibited. ULK1 expression has no effect on protein-protein interactions between the components of mTORC1, but does reduce the ability of Raptor to bind to the substrate 4E-BP1. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of ULK1 leads to increased phosphorylation of mTORC1 substrates and decreased phosphorylation of Raptor at Ser859 and Ser792. We propose a new mechanism whereby ULK1 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition through hindrance of substrate docking to Raptor. This is a novel negative feedback loop that occurs upon activation of autophagy to maintain mTORC1 inhibition when nutrient supplies are limiting. PMID:21460630

  12. RMAWGEN: A software project for a daily Multi-Site Weather Generator with R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordano, E.; Eccel, E.

    2012-04-01

    The modeling in in climate change applications for agricultural or hydrological purposes often requires daily time-series of precipitation and temperature. This is the case of downscaled series from monthly or seasonal predictions of Global Climate Models (GCMs). This poster presents a software project, the R package RMAWGEN (R Multi-Sites Auto-regressive Weather GENerator), to generate daily temperature and precipitation time series in several sites by using the theory of vectorial auto-regressive models (VAR). The VAR model is used because it is able to maintain the temporal and spatial correlations among the several series. In particular, observed time series of daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation are used to calibrate the parameters of a VAR model (saved as "GPCAvarest2" or "varest2" classes, which inherit the "varest" S3 class defined in the package vars [Pfaff, 2008]). Therefore the VAR model, coupled with monthly mean weather variables downscaled by GCM predictions, allows to generate several stochastic daily scenarios. The structure of the package consists in functions that transform precipitation and temperature time series into Gaussian-distributed random variables through deseasonalization and Principal Component Analysis. Then a VAR model is calibrated on transformed time series. The time series generated by VAR are then inversely re-transformed into precipitation and/or temperature series. An application is included in the software package as an example; it is presented by using a dataset with daily weather time series recorded in 59 different sites of Trentino (Italy) and its neighborhoods for the period 1958-2007. The software is distributed as a Free Software with General Public License (GPL) and is available on CRAN website (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/RMAWGEN/index.html)

  13. A comparative analysis of sextant and an extended 11-core multisite directed biopsy strategy.

    PubMed

    Babaian, R J; Toi, A; Kamoi, K; Troncoso, P; Sweet, J; Evans, R; Johnston, D; Chen, M

    2000-01-01

    The 3 tumor locations unsampled by conventional sextant biopsies that have been identified on composite 3-dimensional reconstruction of 180 radical prostatectomy specimens are the anterior transition zone, midline peripheral zone and inferior portions of the anterior horn in the peripheral zone. We evaluated an 11-core multisite directed biopsy scheme incorporating these alternate areas and conventional sextant biopsies in 362 patients from 2 institutions. Patients without a prior diagnosis of cancer underwent ultrasound guided 11-core biopsies which included conventional sextant and 3 alternate sites. All specimens were separated for specific location identification. Biopsy was performed in 183 patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center (group 1) and in 179 at Toronto General Hospital (group 2). All group 2 and 54% of group 1 patients (98 of 183) had a prior biopsy negative for cancer. Median prostate specific antigen was higher in group 2 than in group 1 patients (11.5 versus 9.5 ng./ml., p = 0.016). Overall a 33% increase (36 of 110 patients) in cancer detection was observed when biopsy technique included the alternate areas (p = 0.0021). The anterior horn was the most frequently positive biopsy site followed by the transition zone and midline sites. The 11-core technique had significantly better cancer detection rates when digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound were normal, and in men with serum prostate specific antigen between 4.1 and 10 ng./ml. Biopsies of the alternate sites suggested by our simulation studies are feasible and reproducible. This new strategy significantly enhanced (p = 0.0075) prostate cancer detection compared to conventional sextant biopsies in men undergoing a repeat procedure.

  14. Increased mortality among Indigenous persons in a multisite cohort of people living with HIV in Canada.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Anita C; Younger, Jaime; Beaver, Kerrigan; Jackson, Randy; Loutfy, Mona; Masching, Renée; Nobis, Tony; Nowgesic, Earl; O'Brien-Teengs, Doe; Whitebird, Wanda; Zoccole, Art; Hull, Mark; Jaworsky, Denise; Benson, Elizabeth; Rachlis, Anita; Rourke, Sean B; Burchell, Ann N; Cooper, Curtis; Hogg, Robert S; Klein, Marina B; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio S G; Tsoukas, Chris; Raboud, Janet

    2017-06-16

    Compare all-cause mortality between Indigenous participants and participants of other ethnicities living with HIV initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in an interprovincial multi-site cohort. The Canadian Observational Cohort is a collaboration of 8 cohorts of treatment-naïve persons with HIV initiating cART after January 1, 2000. Participants were followed from the cART initiation date until death or last viral load (VL) test date on or before December 31, 2012. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the effect of ethnicity on time until death after adjusting for age, gender, injection drug use, being a man who has sex with men, hepatitis C, province of origin, baseline VL and CD4 count, year of cART initiation and class of antiretroviral medication. The study sample consisted of 7080 participants (497 Indigenous, 2471 Caucasian, 787 African/Caribbean/Black (ACB), 629 other, and 2696 unknown ethnicity). Most Indigenous persons were from British Columbia (BC) (83%), with smaller numbers from Ontario (13%) and Québec (4%). During the study period, 714 (10%) participants died. The five-year survival probability was lower for Indigenous persons (0.77) than for Caucasian (0.94), ACB (0.98), other ethnicities (0.96) and unknown ethnicities (0.85) (p < 0.0001). In an adjusted proportional hazard model for which missing data were imputed, Indigenous persons were more likely to die than Caucasian participants (hazard ratio = 2.69, p < 0.0001). The mortality rate for Indigenous persons was higher than for other ethnicities and is largely reflective of the BC population. Addressing treatment challenges and identifying HIV- and non-HIV-related causes for mortality among Indigenous persons is required to optimize their clinical management.

  15. Evaluating multisite multiprofessional simulation training for a hyperacute stroke service using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    PubMed

    Ross, A J; Reedy, G B; Roots, A; Jaye, P; Birns, J

    2015-09-02

    Stroke is a clinical priority requiring early specialist assessment and treatment. A London (UK) stroke strategy was introduced in 2010, with Hyper Acute Stroke Units (HASUs) providing specialist and high dependency care. To support increased numbers of specialist staff, innovative multisite multiprofessional simulation training under a standard protocol-based curriculum took place across London. This paper reports on an independent evaluation of the HASU training programme. The main aim was to evaluate mechanisms for behaviour change within the training design and delivery, and impact upon learners including potential transferability to the clinical environment. The evaluation utilised the Behaviour Change Wheel framework. Procedures included: mapping training via the framework; examination of course material; direct and video-recorded observations of courses; pre-post course survey sheet; and follow up in-depth interviews with candidates and faculty. Patient management skills and trainee confidence were reportedly increased post-course (post-course median 6 [IQ range 5-6.33]; pre-course median 5 [IQ range 4.67-5.83]; z = 6.42, P < .001). Thematic analysis showed that facilitated 'debrief' was the key agent in supporting both clinical and non-clinical skills. Follow up interviews in practice showed some sustained effects such as enthusiasm for role, and a focus on situational awareness, prioritization and verbalising thoughts. Challenges in standardising a multi-centre course included provision for local context/identity. Pan-London simulation training under the London Stroke Model had positive outcomes in terms of self-reported skills and motivation. These effects persisted to an extent in practice, where staff could recount applications of learning. The evaluation demonstrated that a multiple centre simulation programme congruent with clinical practice can provide valuable standard training opportunities that support patient care.

  16. In situ optical and Raman spectroscopic observations of the effects of pressure and fluid composition on liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous cadmium sulfate solutions (≤400 °C, 50 MPa) with geological and geochemical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ye; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Wenxuan; Chou, I.-Ming; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Ying; Xu, Zhimin

    2017-08-01

    This study presents the first description of liquid-liquid phase separation in a vapor-saturated CdSO4 solution at temperatures above 222.2 °C in fused silica capillary tubing, in which a sulfate-rich liquid (Srich) phase separates from an initially homogeneous aqueous solution and coexists with the remaining sulfate-poor liquid (Spoor) phase and a vapor phase. This phase behavior is characterized by a lower critical solution temperature (∼222.2 °C), which is a macroscale property of polymer mixtures. In situ Raman spectroscopy shows an increase in Cd2+-SO42- associations with increasing temperature, especially in the immiscible Srich phase. Phase behavior observations and in situ Raman spectroscopic analyses confirm our previous conclusion that strong ion associations are responsible for the liquid-liquid phase separation in inorganic solutions. The effects of pressure and the fluid composition on liquid-liquid phase separation are also investigated. The temperature of liquid-liquid phase separation increases almost linearly with pressure at a rate of ∼0.5 °C/MPa and decreases with the addition of methanol. Both decreases in pressure and increases in the methanol concentration decrease the dielectric constant of the solutions, favoring the Cd2+-SO42- interaction and thus liquid-liquid phase separation. The capillary size also exerts a strong influence on liquid-liquid phase separation because the immiscible Srich phase is more stable in fused silica capillary tubing with an inner diameter of ≤300 μm. Therefore, liquid-liquid phase separation can occur in hydrothermal fluids hosted in porous rocks/sediments, especially those that are rich in low-dielectric-constant components and/or at low pressures. Liquid-liquid phase separation may play an important role in the formation of Mississippi-valley-type ore deposits because the ore-forming fluids are enriched in low-dielectric-constant components. The occurrence of liquid-liquid phase separation can promote

  17. Spectroscopic Low Coherence Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Aalders, Maurice C.; Hermann, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Faber, Dirk J.

    Low-coherence interferometry (LCI) allows high-resolution volumetric imaging of tissue morphology and provides localized optical properties that can be related to the physiological status of tissue. This chapter discusses the combination of spatial and spectroscopic information by means of spectroscopic OCT (sOCT) and low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS). We describe the theory behind these modalities for the assessment of spatially resolved optical absorption and (back)scattering coefficient spectra. These spectra can be used for the highly localized quantification of chromophore concentrations and assessment of tissue organization on (sub)cellular scales. This leads to a wealth of potential clinical applications, ranging from neonatology for the determination of billibrubin concentrations, to oncology for the optical assessment of the aggressiveness of a cancerous lesion.

  18. Spectroscopic madness - A golden age for amateurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Today, professional instrumentation is dominated by heavily oversubscribed telescopes which focus mainly on a limited number of ``fashionable'' research topics. As a result, time acquisition for massive star research including extended observation campaigns, becomes more difficult. On the other hand, massive star investigations by amateur astronomers performing spectroscopic measurements are on a level which can fulfil professional needs. I describe the instrumentation available to the amateurs, their observational skills and the potential contribution they can make to the professional community.

  19. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of GeF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 27 electronic states of GeF + are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that included up to 1.6 million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of the 1Σ+ electronic state fit well with the experimentally observed X ground state. Other yet to be observed properties of several excited electronic states are reported.

  20. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of SnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dingguo; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 20 electronic states of SnF arising from valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to one million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of five electronic states fit well with the experimentally observed X, A, a, and C states. The dipole moments and other yet to be observed properties of several electronic states are reported.

  1. Multifunction Imaging and Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2004-01-01

    A proposed optoelectronic instrument would perform several different spectroscopic and imaging functions that, heretofore, have been performed by separate instruments. The functions would be reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies; variable-color confocal imaging at two different resolutions; and wide-field color imaging. The instrument was conceived for use in examination of minerals on remote planets. It could also be used on Earth to characterize material specimens. The conceptual design of the instrument emphasizes compactness and economy, to be achieved largely through sharing of components among subsystems that perform different imaging and spectrometric functions. The input optics for the various functions would be mounted in a single optical head. With the exception of a targeting lens, the input optics would all be aimed at the same spot on a specimen, thereby both (1) eliminating the need to reposition the specimen to perform different imaging and/or spectroscopic observations and (2) ensuring that data from such observations can be correlated with respect to known positions on the specimen. The figure schematically depicts the principal components and subsystems of the instrument. The targeting lens would collect light into a multimode optical fiber, which would guide the light through a fiber-selection switch to a reflection/ fluorescence spectrometer. The switch would have four positions, enabling selection of spectrometer input from the targeting lens, from either of one or two multimode optical fibers coming from a reflectance/fluorescence- microspectrometer optical head, or from a dark calibration position (no fiber). The switch would be the only moving part within the instrument.

  2. A comparison of multi-site daily rainfall downscaling techniques under Australian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Andrew J.; Charles, Stephen P.; Timbal, Bertrand; Chiew, Francis H. S.; Mehrotra, R.; Nguyen, Kim C.; Chandler, Richard E.; McGregor, John L.; Fu, Guobin; Kirono, Dewi G. C.; Fernandez, Elodie; Kent, David M.

    2011-09-01

    SummarySix methods of downscaling GCM simulations to multi-site daily precipitation were applied to a set of 30 rain gauges located within South-Eastern Australia. The methods were tested at reproducing a range of statistics important within hydrological studies including inter-annual variability and spatial coherency using both NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and GCM predictors, thus testing the validity of GCM downscaled predictions. The methods evaluated, all having found application in Australia previously, are: (1) the dynamical downscaling Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) of McGregor (2005); the historical data based (2) Scaling method applied by Chiew et al. (2009) and (3) Analogue method of Timbal (2004); and three stochastic methods, (4) the GLIMCLIM (Generalised Linear Model for daily Climate time series) software package ( Chandler, 2002), (5) the Non-homogeneous Hidden Markov Model (NHMM) of Charles et al. (1999), and (6) the modified Markov model-kernel probability density estimation (MMM-KDE) downscaling technique of Mehrotra and Sharma (2007). The results showed that the simple Scaling approach provided relatively robust results for a range of statistics when GCM forcing data was used, and was therefore recommended for regional water availability and planning studies (subject to certain limitations as mentioned in conclusion section). The stochastic methods better capture changes to a fuller range of rainfall statistics and are recommended for detailed catchment modelling studies. In particular, the stochastic methods show better results for daily extreme rainfall (e.g. flooding/low flow) as the simulations are not based purely on temporal/spatial rainfall patterns observed in the past, and a hybrid GLIMCLIM occurrence-KDE amounts model is recommended based on performance for individual statistics. For GCM downscaled simulations, biases in annual mean and standard deviation of ±5% and -30% were observed typically, and no single model performed well

  3. Work-related determinants of multi-site musculoskeletal pain among employees in the health care sector.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Subas; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Oakman, Jodi

    2016-06-16

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain is a major occupational problem. Those with pain in multiple sites usually report worse health outcomes than those with pain in one site. This study explored prevalence and associated predictors of multi-site pain in health care sector employees. Survey responses from 1348 health care sector employees across three organisations (37% response rate) collected data on job satisfaction, work life balance, psychosocial and physical hazards, general health and work ability. Musculoskeletal discomfort was measured across 5 body regions with pain in ≥ 2 sites defined as multi-site pain. Generalized linear models were used to identify relationships between work-related factors and multi-site pain. Over 52% of the employees reported pain in multiple body sites and 19% reported pain in one site. Poor work life balance (PRR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.06-5.14). physical (PRR = 7.58, 95% CI = 4.89-11.77) and psychosocial (PRR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.00-2.57) hazard variables were related to multi-site pain (after controlling for age, gender, health and work ability. Older employees and females were more likely to report multi-site pain. Effective risk management of work related multi-site pain must include identification and control of psychosocial and physical hazards.

  4. Mauna Kea Observatory infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Galactic and solar system infrared observations are reported using a broad variety of radiometric and spectroscopic instrumentation. Infrared programs and papers published during this period are listed.

  5. Sonication effect on the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene with sodium sulfide in liquid-liquid multi-site phase-transfer catalysis condition - kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Abimannan, Pachaiyappan; Selvaraj, Varathan; Rajendran, Venugopal

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of di-p-tolylsulfane from the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene (BMB) with sodium sulfide was carried out using a multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) viz., 1,4-dihexyl-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octanium dibromide and ultrasonic irradiation in a liquid-liquid reaction condition. The overall reaction rate is greatly enhanced when catalyzed by multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) combined with sonication (40 kHz, 300 W) in a batch reactor than catalyzed by MPTC without sonication. Effects on the reaction due to various operating conditions, such as agitation speed, different ultrasound frequencies, different phase-transfer catalysts, different organic solvents, the amount of MPTC, temperature, amount of sodium sulfide, effect of sodium hydroxide, volume of n-hexane and the concentration of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene. The reaction obeys a pseudo first-order rate law and a suitable mechanism was proposed based on the experimental observation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. T Tauri Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudorov, A. E.; Eretnova, O. V.

    2017-06-01

    The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the excess radius-age, and the eccentricity-period relations are constructed for double-lined spectroscopic T Tauri binaries. The masses and the ages of the classical T Tauri and the weak-line T Tauri stars are compared. All components of T Tauri stars have the excess radius in comparison with initial Main Sequence stars of corresponding mass. The younger the star the more excess radius it has. The overwhelming majority of close binaries (P<10d) have eccentricity near to zero. The fraction of quadruple systems in our sample are higher than for Main Sequence stars.

  7. Pulsating variable stars and large spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cat, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In the past decade, the research of pulsating variable stars has taken a giant leap forward thanks to the photometric measurements provided by space missions like Most, CoRoT, Kepler/K2, and Brite. These missions have provided quasi uninterrupted photometric time-series with an ultra-high quality and a total length that is not achievable from Earth. However, many of the success stories could not have been told without ground-based spectroscopic follow-up observations. Indeed, spectroscopy has some important assets as it can provide (more) accurate information about stellar parameters (like the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and abundances that are mandatory parameters for an in-depth asteroseismic study), the radial velocity (that is important for the detection of binaries and for the confirmation of cluster membership, if applicable), and the projected rotational velocity (that allows the study of the effects of rotation on pulsations). Fortunately, several large spectroscopic surveys are (becoming) available that can be used for these purposes. For some of these surveys, sub-projects have been initiated with the specific goal to complement space-based photometry. In this review, several spectroscopic surveys are introduced and compared with each other. We show that a large amount of spectroscopic data is (becoming) available for a large variety of objects.

  8. Solution of the antiferromagnetic Ising model with multisite interaction on a zigzag ladder.

    PubMed

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M

    2014-09-01

    We consider the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising model with multisite interaction in an external magnetic field on an infinite zigzag ladder. The model is solved exactly by using the transfer matrix method. Using the exact expression for the total magnetization per site, the magnetic properties of the model are investigated in detail. The model exhibits the formation of magnetization plateaus for low temperatures, and it is shown that their properties depend strongly on the strength of the multisite interaction. All possible ground states of the model are found and discussed. The existence of nontrivial singular ground states is proven and exact explicit expressions for them are found. The macroscopic degeneracy of the ground states is investigated and discussed.

  9. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves for GeF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D. W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic constants of the electronic states of GeF lying below the 60000 cm -1 region are obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI. SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states are also computed. The computed spectroscopic constants confirm the assignments of the X, A, a, C, C', and D' states of GeF. In addition the spectroscopic constants of several electronic states of GeF are predicted which are yet to be observed.

  10. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves for GeBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D. W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of several low-lying electronic states of the GeBr radical are computed using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent filed (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants confirm the assignments of X, A, A‧, B, and C states. Spectroscopic properties of several other electronic states below 30 000 cm-1 are predicted, which are yet to be observed.

  11. MASCARA: the multi-site all-sky CAameRA: concept and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesage, A.-L.; Spronck, J. F. P.; Stuik, R.; Bettonvil, F.; Pollaco, D.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2014-07-01

    MASCARA, the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA, will consist of several fully-automated stations distributed across the globe. Its goal is to find exoplanets transiting the brightest stars, in the mV = 4 to 8 magnitude range, currently probed neither by space- nor by ground-based surveys. The nearby transiting planet systems that MASCARA is expected to discover will be key targets for future detailed planet atmosphere observations. The target population for MASCARA consists mostly of hot Jupiters. The main requirement set on MASCARA to detect these planets around stars down to magnitude 8 is to reach a minimum Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 100 within one hour of observation. Each MASCARA station consists of five low-noise off-the-shelf full-frame CCD cameras, fitted with standard Canon 24 mm , f/1.4 lenses, monitoring the near-entire sky down to magnitude 8 at that location. Measurements have demonstrated that the required Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 100, can be achieved in less than thirty minutes. MASCARA aims at deploying several stations world-wide to provide a nearly continuous coverage of the dark sky, at sub-minute cadence. While at the faint end MASCARA is limited mainly by photon noise, at the bright end scintillation and red noise become the limiting factors. Instrumental noise sources are reduced by placing the cameras in a fixed orientation and in a temperature controlled environment. By defocusing and allowing stars to drift over the detector, the impact of pixel-to-pixel variations on the photometry are minimized, while taking exposures at fixed sidereal times allows accurate cross-calibration of consecutive nights. The exposure time of 6.4 seconds gives rise to a high data acquisition rate of a MASCARA station, around 500GB per night. In order to minimize data transport and data storage requirements, the raw images are reduced to produce accurate light curves in nearly real time. The first MASCARA station will be integrated on La Palma during the summer of 2014

  12. Multisite organic-inorganic hybrid catalysts for the direct sustainable synthesis of GABAergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, Antonio; García-García, Pilar; Corma, Avelino

    2014-08-11

    Multisite organic-inorganic hybrid catalysts have been prepared and applied in a new general, practical, and sustainable synthetic procedure toward industrially relevant GABA derivatives. The domino sequence is composed of seven chemical transformations which are performed in two one-pot reactions. The method produces both enantiomeric forms of the product in high enantiopurity as well as the racemate in good yields after a single column purification step. This protocol highlights major process intensification, catalyst recyclability, and low waste generation.

  13. Multi-Site Fatigue Testing and Characterization of Fuselage Panels from Aging Aircraft Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-07

    Multi-site fatigue damage is a common problem in the riveted lap joint structure of aging aircraft. Modeling and characterization of such damage is...an especially daunting task. In this effort we present the results from fatigue tests which were performed on fuselage lap joints extracted from...in the lap joint . Some spot welded lap joint panels were also tested during the larger program; however, only the results from mechanically fastened

  14. Spectroscopic investigation of highly transient pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, K.; Engel, A.; Lebert, R.; Rosmej, O.N.; Rosmej, F.B.; Gavrilescu, C.; Neff, W.

    1997-11-01

    The temporal evolution of neon pinch plasmas, generated in a 2 kJ plasma focus device, has been investigated by x-ray spectroscopic methods for two sets of device parameters. These two sets lead to characteristic differences of the K-shell emission. Stationary models are shown to fail to explain the experimental observations even qualitatively. Transient spectra analysis shows that the characteristic differences observed can be referred to different transient modes of plasma dynamics. The spectra analysis includes beside resonance lines also dielectronic satellites and recombination continua. The results concerning the development of the plasma parameters achieved by the spectra modeling are supported by independent measurements of the time resolved K-shell emission and by optical streak images of the pinch plasma dynamics, which confirms the reliability of the transient spectroscopic analysis presented. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Spectroscopic Sensitivity Workout: First-order modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2003-07-01

    We will observe the primary flux standards G191B2B, GD71 and GD153, obtaining first-order spectra in all L-modes {G191B2B only in the CCD modes due to its high brightness in the UV}. By comparing observed and model spectra, we will update calibration reference files describing spectroscopic sensitivity {and CTE loss} as a function of time. On visit of GD71 will be spent on verifying the recently derived CTE formula for STIS Spectroscopic modes with the CCD, by stepping the target along the slit {7 positions} with two {short} exposure times. This will verify the results using the two-amplifier readout method, and provide high-S/N data at low intensity levels and low background level.

  16. Progress in centralised ethics review processes: Implications for multi-site health evaluations.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Brenton; Davey, Rachel; Gibson, Diane

    2015-04-01

    Increasingly, public sector programmes respond to complex social problems that intersect specific fields and individual disciplines. Such responses result in multi-site initiatives that can span nations, jurisdictions, sectors and organisations. The rigorous evaluation of public sector programmes is now a baseline expectation. For evaluations of large and complex multi-site programme initiatives, the processes of ethics review can present a significant challenge. However in recent years, there have been new developments in centralised ethics review processes in many nations. This paper provides the case study of an evaluation of a national, inter-jurisdictional, cross-sector, aged care health initiative and its encounters with Australian centralised ethics review processes. Specifically, the paper considers progress against the key themes of a previous five-year, five nation study (Fitzgerald and Phillips, 2006), which found that centralised ethics review processes would save time, money and effort, as well as contribute to more equitable workloads for researchers and evaluators. The paper concludes with insights for those charged with refining centralised ethics review processes, as well as recommendations for future evaluators of complex multi-site programme initiatives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The unique character of involvement in multi-site evaluation settings.

    PubMed

    Toal, Stacie A; King, Jean A; Johnson, Kelli; Lawrenz, Frances

    2009-05-01

    As the number of large federal programs increases, so, too, does the need for a more complete understanding of how to conduct evaluations of such complex programs. The research literature has documented the benefits of stakeholder participation in smaller-scale program evaluations. However, given the scope and diversity of projects in multi-site program evaluations, traditional notions of participatory evaluation do not apply. The purpose of this research is to determine the ways in which stakeholders are involved in large-scale, multi-site STEM evaluations. This article describes the findings from a survey of 313 program leaders and evaluators and from follow-up interviews with 12 of these individuals. Findings from this study indicate that attendance at meetings and conferences, planning discussions within the project related to use of the program evaluation, and participation in data collection should be added to the list of activities that foster feelings of evaluation involvement among stakeholders. In addition, perceptions of involvement may vary according to breadth or depth of evaluation activities, but not always both. Overall, this study suggests that despite the contextual challenges of large, multi-site evaluations, it is feasible to build feelings of involvement among stakeholders.

  18. Expanding Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Residency Education Through a Multisite University-Affiliated Model.

    PubMed

    Schweiss, Sarah K; Westberg, Sarah M; Moon, Jean Y; Sorensen, Todd D

    2017-01-01

    As the health-care system evolves and shifts to value-based payment systems, there is a recognized need to increase the number of ambulatory care trained pharmacists. The objective of this article is to describe the administrative structure of the University of Minnesota Postgraduate Year 1 (PGY1) Pharmacy Residency program and to encourage adoption of similar models nationally in order to expand ambulatory care residency training opportunities and meet the demand for pharmacist practitioners. Program Structure: The University of Minnesota PGY1 Pharmacy Residency program is a multisite program centered on the practice of pharmaceutical care and provision of comprehensive medication management (CMM) services in ambulatory care settings. The centralized administration of a multisite academic-affiliated training model creates efficiency in the administration process, while allowing sites to focus on clinical training. This model also offers many innovative and unique opportunities to residents. A multisite university-affiliated ambulatory care residency training model provides efficiency in program administration, while successfully accelerating the growth of quality ambulatory care residency training and supporting innovative delivery of shared core learning experiences. Consequently, practice sites grow in their service delivery capacity and quality of care.

  19. Cascades of multisite phosphorylation control Sic1 destruction at the onset of S phase.

    PubMed

    Kõivomägi, Mardo; Valk, Ervin; Venta, Rainis; Iofik, Anna; Lepiku, Martin; Balog, Eva Rose M; Rubin, Seth M; Morgan, David O; Loog, Mart

    2011-10-12

    Multisite phosphorylation of proteins has been proposed to transform a graded protein kinase signal into an ultrasensitive switch-like response. Although many multiphosphorylated targets have been identified, the dynamics and sequence of individual phosphorylation events within the multisite phosphorylation process have never been thoroughly studied. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the initiation of S phase is thought to be governed by complexes of Cdk1 and Cln cyclins that phosphorylate six or more sites on the Clb5-Cdk1 inhibitor Sic1, directing it to SCF-mediated destruction. The resulting Sic1-free Clb5-Cdk1 complex triggers S phase. Here, we demonstrate that Sic1 destruction depends on a more complex process in which both Cln2-Cdk1 and Clb5-Cdk1 act in processive multiphosphorylation cascades leading to the phosphorylation of a small number of specific phosphodegrons. The routes of these phosphorylation cascades are shaped by precisely oriented docking interactions mediated by cyclin-specific docking motifs in Sic1 and by Cks1, the phospho-adaptor subunit of Cdk1. Our results indicate that Clb5-Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation generates positive feedback that is required for switch-like Sic1 destruction. Our evidence for a docking network within clusters of phosphorylation sites uncovers a new level of complexity in Cdk1-dependent regulation of cell cycle transitions, and has general implications for the regulation of cellular processes by multisite phosphorylation.

  20. Multi-level assessment protocol (MAP) for adoption in multi-site clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Guydish, J.; Manser, S.T.; Jessup, M.; Tajima, B.; Sears, C.; Montini, T.

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) is intended to test promising drug abuse treatment models in multi-site clinical trials, and to support adoption of new interventions into clinical practice. Using qualitative research methods we asked: How might the technology of multi-site clinical trials be modified to better support adoption of tested interventions? A total of 42 participants, representing 8 organizational levels ranging from clinic staff to clinical trial leaders, were interviewed about their role in the clinical trial, its interactions with clinics, and intervention adoption. Among eight clinics participating in the clinical trial, we found adoption of the tested intervention in one clinic only. In analysis of interview data we identified four conceptual themes which are likely to affect adoption and may be informative in future multi-site clinical trials. We offer the conclusion that planning for adoption in the early stages of protocol development will better serve the aim of integrating new interventions into practice. PMID:20890376

  1. Spectroscopic Gradients in Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzoni, A.; Battistini, C.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.

    2009-11-01

    We review some relevant properties of the observed changes of Hβ, Mg_2, and FeI Lick indices across the surface of 25 bright elliptical galaxies. The impact of these spectroscopic gradients is briefly discussed, in the framework of the leading physical mechanisms that led to galaxy formation. In particular, three relevant evolutionary scenarios are sketched, each one able, in principle, to consistently match galaxy spectral properties and effectively constrain the composing stellar populations in these systems.

  2. Asiago spectroscopic classification of transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-08-01

    The Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017giq, discovered by Zhijian Xu et al. in SDSS J235754.69+283007.1, and the observations of AT 2017ghp and AT 2017gio discovered by Torny et al (ATLAS) The observation was performed with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope equipped with AFOSC (range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm). Survey Name | IAU Name | Discovery date (UT) | Discovery mag | Observation (UT) | Type | z | Notes| PTSS-17vkg | SN 2017giq | 2017-08-27 15:15:18 | 18.8 |2017-08-29 22:09:09 | SN Ic | 0.029813| (1) | ATLAS17juy | AT 2017ghp | 2017-08-23 14:00:57 | 17.53 |2017-08-29 23:49:52 | ? | ? | (2) | (1) The spectrum is consistent with that of Type Ic SN events around maximum light, at a redshift 0.0298, according to the redshift of the host galaxy SDSS J235754.69+283007.1 (Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 13 as obtained Jan. 31, 2017 from http://www.sdss.org/dr13/data_access/bulk/); (2) Featureless, blue continuum.

  3. MultiSite Gateway-Compatible Cell Type-Specific Gene-Inducible System for Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siligato, Riccardo; Wang, Xin; Yadav, Shri Ram; Lehesranta, Satu; Ma, Guojie; Ursache, Robertas; Sevilem, Iris; Zhang, Jing; Gorte, Maartje; Prasad, Kalika; Heidstra, Renze

    2016-01-01

    A powerful method to study gene function is expression or overexpression in an inducible, cell type-specific system followed by observation of consequent phenotypic changes and visualization of linked reporters in the target tissue. Multiple inducible gene overexpression systems have been developed for plants, but very few of these combine plant selection markers, control of expression domains, access to multiple promoters and protein fusion reporters, chemical induction, and high-throughput cloning capabilities. Here, we introduce a MultiSite Gateway-compatible inducible system for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants that provides the capability to generate such constructs in a single cloning step. The system is based on the tightly controlled, estrogen-inducible XVE system. We demonstrate that the transformants generated with this system exhibit the expected cell type-specific expression, similar to what is observed with constitutively expressed native promoters. With this new system, cloning of inducible constructs is no longer limited to a few special cases but can be used as a standard approach when gene function is studied. In addition, we present a set of entry clones consisting of histochemical and fluorescent reporter variants designed for gene and promoter expression studies. PMID:26644504

  4. Desirable evolutions of stellar spectroscopic services in the light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançan, A.; Prugniel, P.; Powalka, M.; Vauglin, I.

    2016-12-01

    Recent and future surveys have improved the precision and the accuracy of photometric and spectroscopic observations of remote galaxies. By examining the difficulties encountered in the modelling of these stellar populations, we identify a few key requests to future libraries of stellar spectra and to the related spectroscopic services. Beside providing data access, future services should increasingly focus on the associated on-line and off-line tools required to model and analyse galaxy spectra.

  5. Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Curves of SnF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Xu, H.

    1995-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties and potential energy curves of several electronic states of SnF+ are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that include up to 1.6 million configurations. Spin-orbit effects were incorporated using the relativistic configuration interaction (RCI) method. Spectroscopic properties of several excited electronic states of SnF+ are reported, none of which is observed at present.

  6. Spectroscopic Follow Up of Kepler Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, David W.; Cochran, W. D.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L.; Endl, M.; Isaacson, H.; Gautier, T. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Kepler Team

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations play a crucial role in the confirmation and characterization of transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. The most challenging part of this work is the determination of radial velocities with a precision approaching 1 m/s in order to derive masses from spectroscopic orbits. The most precious resource for this work is HIRES on Keck I, to be joined by HARPS-North on the William Herschel Telescope when that new spectrometer comes on line in two years. Because a large fraction of the planet candidates are in fact stellar systems involving eclipsing stars and not planets, our strategy is to start with reconnaissance spectroscopy using smaller telescopes, to sort out and reject as many of the false positives as possible before going to Keck. During the first Kepler observing season in 2009, more than 100 nights of telescope time were allocated for this work, using high-resolution spectrometers on the Lick 3.0-m Shane Telescope, the McDonald 2.7-m Reflector, the 2.5-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Whipple observatory. In this paper we will summarize the scope and organization of the spectroscopic follow-up observations, showing examples of the types of false positives found and ending with a presentation of the characteristics of a confirmed planet.

  7. Introduction of shared electronic records: multi-site case study using diffusion of innovation theory.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Stramer, Katja; Bratan, Tanja; Byrne, Emma; Mohammad, Yara; Russell, Jill

    2008-10-23

    To explore the introduction of a centrally stored, shared electronic patient record (the summary care record (SCR)) in England and draw wider lessons about the implementation of large scale information technology projects in health care. Multi-site, mixed method case study applying utilisation focused evaluation. Four early adopter sites for the SCR in England-three in urban areas of relative socioeconomic deprivation and the fourth in a relatively affluent rural area. Data sources and analysis Data included 250 staff interviews, 1500 hours of ethnographic observation, interviews and focus groups with 170 patients and carers, 2500 pages of correspondence and documentary evidence, and incorporation of relevant surveys and statistics produced by others. These were analysed by using a thematic approach drawing on (and extending) a theoretical model of complex change developed in a previous systematic review. Main findings The mixed fortunes of the SCR programme in its first year were largely explained by eight interacting influences. The first was the SCR's material properties (especially technical immaturity and lack of interoperability) and attributes (especially the extent to which potential adopters believed the benefits outweighed the risks). The second was adopters' concerns (especially about workload and the ethicality of sharing "confidential" information on an implied consent model). The third influence was interpersonal influence (for example, opinion leaders, champions, facilitators), and the fourth was organisational antecedents for innovation (for example past experience with information technology projects, leadership and management capacity, effective data capture systems, slack resources). The fifth was organisational readiness for the SCR (for example, innovation-system fit, tension for change, power balances between supporters and opponents, baseline data quality). The sixth was the implementation process (including the nature of the change model and

  8. Multisite HPV16/18 Vaccine Efficacy Against Cervical, Anal, and Oral HPV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Lowy, Douglas R.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Quint, Wim; Jimenez, Silvia; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Struijk, Linda; Schussler, John; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) reports separately demonstrated vaccine efficacy against HPV16 and HPV18 (HPV16/18) infections at the cervical, anal, and oral regions; however, the combined overall multisite efficacy (protection at all three sites) and vaccine efficacy among women infected with HPV16 or HPV18 prior to vaccination are less known. Methods: Women age 18 to 25 years from the CVT were randomly assigned to the HPV16/18 vaccine (Cervarix) or a hepatitis A vaccine. Cervical, oral, and anal specimens were collected at the four-year follow-up visit from 4186 women. Multisite and single-site vaccine efficacies (VEs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for one-time detection of point prevalent HPV16/18 in the cervical, anal, and oral regions four years after vaccination. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: The multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was highest among “naïve” women (HPV16/18 seronegative and cervical HPV high-risk DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 83.5%, 95% CI = 72.1% to 90.8%). Multisite woman-level vaccine efficacy was also demonstrated among women with evidence of a pre-enrollment HPV16 or HPV18 infection (seropositive for HPV16 and/or HPV18 but cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative at vaccination) (vaccine efficacy = 57.8%, 95% CI = 34.4% to 73.4%), but not in those with cervical HPV16 and/or HPV18 DNA at vaccination (anal/oral HPV16/18 VE = 25.3%, 95% CI = -40.4% to 61.1%). Concordant HPV16/18 infections at two or three sites were also less common in HPV16/18-infected women in the HPV vaccine vs control arm (7.4% vs 30.4%, P < .001). Conclusions: This study found high multisite vaccine efficacy among “naïve” women and also suggests the vaccine may provide protection against HPV16/18 infections at one or more anatomic sites among some women infected with these types prior to HPV16/18 vaccination. PMID:26467666

  9. The mass ratio in spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, J. R.; Penteado, E. M.; Turcati, R.

    2003-08-01

    The process of formation of binary and multiple stars is not yet fully understood. Possibilities range from simultaneous processes of condensation from the primeval nebula, to isolated star formation and eventual capture to form a double system. Models exist that predict success probabilities for each theoretical process, and comparison with observational data is crucial. Spectroscopic binaries are specially suited to be used as observational data, since several biases that can arise from general catalogues of binary stars can be avoided, including dominance of systems with large separations between components. A very important parameter in these studies is the mass ratio, the quocient of the masses of primary and secundary members. The histogram of mass ratios provides crucial information to models of binary formation, linked to condensation processes and evolutionaty rates.In this case, spectroscopic binaries can be chosen as the observational sample, provided that the spectrum of the primary is from a non-evolved, main-sequence star,whose mass can be derived reliably from its spectral type. Defining an adequate limiting magnitude (6.5), one avoids bias from eclipsing systems with high inclinations, since nearly all systems up to 6.5 mag were detected. In this paper, a critical review is presented of the existing methods for deriving the distribution of the mass ratios from spectroscopic binary orbital data. After showing the incorrectness of some results published in the litterature, the available data (Batten's 8th Catalogue, 1989) is discussed. Simulations for several distributions of mass ratios (constant, quadratic, etc) are performed. It is shown that the existing data permits only to assert that the spectroscopic binaries with small mass ratios (q < 0.4) are more frequent that those with large mass ratios (q = 0.9 to 1.0).

  10. Spectroscopic Survey of Circumstellar Disks in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Olguin, Lorenzo; Briceno, Cesar

    2013-07-01

    As a second stage of a project focused on characterizing candidate stars bearing a circumstellar disk in Orion, we present a spectroscopic follow-up of a set of about 170 bright stars. The present set of stars was selected by their optical (UBVRI) and infrared behavior in different color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. Observations were carried out at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional located at the Sierra San Pedro Martir in B.C., Mexico and at the Observatorio Guillermo Haro in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. Low-resolution spectra were obtained for all candidates in the sample. Using the SPTCLASS code, we have obtained spectral types and equivalent widths of the Li I 6707 and Halpha lines for each one of the stars. This project is a cornerstone of a large scale survey aimed to obtain stellar parameters in a homogeneous way using spectroscopic data. This work was partially supported by UNAM-PAPIIT grant IN-109311.

  11. Socioeconomic Status and Improvements in Lifestyle, Coronary Risk Factors, and Quality of Life: The Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program

    PubMed Central

    Govil, Sarah R.; Merritt-Worden, Terri; Ornish, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to clarify whether patients of low socioeconomic status (SES) can make lifestyle changes and show improved outcomes in coronary heart disease (CHD), similar to patients with higher SES. Methods. We examined lifestyle, risk factors, and quality of life over 3 months, by SES and gender, in 869 predominantly White, nonsmoking CHD patients (34% female) in the insurance-sponsored Multisite Cardiac Lifestyle Intervention Program. SES was defined primarily by education. Results. At baseline, less-educated participants were more likely to be disadvantaged (e.g., past smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high fat diet, overweight, depression) than were higher-SES participants. By 3 months, participants at all SES levels reported consuming 10% or less dietary fat, exercising 3.5 hours per week or more, and practicing stress management 5.5 hours per week or more. These self-reports were substantiated by improvements in risk factors (e.g., 5-kg weight loss, and improved blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and exercise capacity; P < .001), and accompanied by improvements in well-being (e.g., depression, hostility, quality of life; P < .001). Conclusions. The observed benefits for CHD patients with low SES indicate that broadening accessibility of lifestyle programs through health insurance should be strongly encouraged. PMID:18923113

  12. Process evaluation in a multisite, primary obesity-prevention trial in American Indian schoolchildren1–3

    PubMed Central

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Davis, Sally M; Gittelsohn, Joel; Going, Scott B; Murray, David M; Snyder, Patricia; Steckler, Allan B

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development, implementation, and use of the process evaluation component of a multisite, primary obesity prevention trial for American Indian schoolchildren. We describe the development and pilot testing of the instruments, provide some examples of the criteria for instrument selection, and provide examples of how process evaluation results were used to document and refine intervention components. The theoretical and applied framework of the process evaluation was based on diffusion theory, social learning theory, and the desire for triangulation of multiple modes of data collection. The primary objectives of the process evaluation were to systematically document the training process, content, and implementation of 4 components of the intervention. The process evaluation was developed and implemented collaboratively so that it met the needs of both the evaluators and those who would be implementing the intervention components. Process evaluation results revealed that observation and structured interviews provided the most informative data; however, these methods were the most expensive and time consuming and required the highest level of skill to undertake. Although the literature is full of idealism regarding the uses of process evaluation for formative and summative purposes, in reality, many persons are sensitive to having their work evaluated in such an in-depth, context-based manner as is described. For this reason, use of structured, quantitative, highly objective tools may be more effective than qualitative methods, which appear to be more dependent on the skills and biases of the researcher and the context in which they are used. PMID:10195608

  13. THE zCOSMOS 10k-BRIGHT SPECTROSCOPIC SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Lilly, Simon J.; Maier, Christian; Carollo, Marcella; Caputi, Karina; Le Brun, Vincent; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fevre, Olivier; De la Torre, Sylvain; De Ravel, Loic; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Mignoli, Marco; Zamorani, Gianni; Bardelli, Sandro; Bolzonella, Micol; Coppa, Graziano; Scodeggio, Marco; Contini, Thierry; Bongiorno, Angela; Cucciati, Olga

    2009-10-01

    We present spectroscopic redshifts of a large sample of galaxies with I {sub AB} < 22.5 in the COSMOS field, measured from spectra of 10,644 objects that have been obtained in the first two years of observations in the zCOSMOS-bright redshift survey. These include a statistically complete subset of 10,109 objects. The average accuracy of individual redshifts is 110 km s{sup -1}, independent of redshift. The reliability of individual redshifts is described by a Confidence Class that has been empirically calibrated through repeat spectroscopic observations of over 600 galaxies. There is very good agreement between spectroscopic and photometric redshifts for the most secure Confidence Classes. For the less secure Confidence Classes, there is a good correspondence between the fraction of objects with a consistent photometric redshift and the spectroscopic repeatability, suggesting that the photometric redshifts can be used to indicate which of the less secure spectroscopic redshifts are likely right and which are probably wrong, and to give an indication of the nature of objects for which we failed to determine a redshift. Using this approach, we can construct a spectroscopic sample that is 99% reliable and which is 88% complete in the sample as a whole, and 95% complete in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 0.8. The luminosity and mass completeness levels of the zCOSMOS-bright sample of galaxies is also discussed.

  14. Chronic multisite pain in major depression and bipolar disorder: cross-sectional study of 149,611 participants in UK Biobank.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Barbara I; Mackay, Daniel; Cullen, Breda; Martin, Daniel J; Ul-Haq, Zia; Mair, Frances S; Evans, Jonathan; McIntosh, Andrew M; Gallagher, John; Roberts, Beverly; Deary, Ian J; Pell, Jill P; Smith, Daniel J

    2014-12-10

    Chronic pain has a strong association with major depressive disorder (MDD), but there is a relative paucity of studies on the association between chronic multisite pain and bipolar disorder (BD). Such studies are required to help elucidate the complex biological and psychological overlap between pain and mood disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between chronic multisite pain and mood disorder across the unipolar-bipolar spectrum. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 149,611 UK Biobank participants. Self-reported depressive and bipolar features were used to categorise participants into MDD and BD groups and a non-mood disordered comparison group. Multinomial logistic regression was used to establish whether there was an association between extent of chronic pain (independent variable) and mood disorder category (dependent variable), using no pain as the referent category, and adjusting for a wide range of potential sociodemographic, lifestyle and comorbidity confounders. Multisite pain was significantly more prevalent in participants with BD and MDD, for example, 4-7 pain sites: BD 5.8%, MDD 4.5%, and comparison group 1.8% (p < 0.001). A relationship was observed between extent of chronic pain and risk of BD and persisted after adjusting for confounders (relative to individuals with no chronic pain): 2-3 sites RRR of BD 1.84 (95% CI 1.61, 2.11); 4-7 sites RRR of BD 2.39 (95% CI 1.88, 3.03) and widespread pain RRR of BD 2.37 (95% CI 1.73, 3.23). A similar relationship was observed between chronic pain and MDD: 2-3 sites RRR of MDD 1.59 (95% CI 1.54, 1.65); 4-7 sites RRR of MDD 2.13 (95% CI 1.98, 2.30); widespread pain RRR of MDD 1.86 (95% CI 1.66, 2.08). Individuals who report chronic pain and multiple sites of pain are more likely to have MDD and are at higher risk of BD. These findings highlight an important aspect of comorbidity in MDD and BD and may have implications for understanding the shared neurobiology of chronic pain and

  15. The pulsating hot subdwarf Balloon 090100001: results of the 2005 multisite campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A.; Oreiro, R.; Pigulski, A.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Ulla, A.; Reed, M. D.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Moskalik, P.; Kim, S.-L.; Chen, W.-P.; Crowe, R.; Siwak, M.; Armendarez, L.; Binder, P. M.; Choo, K.-J.; Dye, A.; Eggen, J. R.; Garrido, R.; González Pérez, J. M.; Harms, S. L.; Huang, F.-Y.; Kozieł, D.; Lee, H.-T.; MacDonald, J.; Fox Machado, L.; Monserrat, T.; Stevick, J.; Stewart, S.; Terry, D.; Zhou, A.-Y.; Zoła, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a multisite photometric campaign on the pulsating B-type hot subdwarf star Balloon090100001 (Bal09). The star is one of the two known hybrid hot subdwarfs with both long- and short-period oscillations, theoretically attributed to g and p modes. The campaign involved eight telescopes with three obtaining UBVR data, four B-band data and one Strömgren uvby photometry. The campaign covered 48 nights, providing a temporal resolution of 0.36μHz with a detection threshold of about 0.2mmag in B-filter data. Bal09 has the richest pulsation spectrum of any known pulsating subdwarf B star, and our analysis detected 114 frequencies including 97 independent and 17 combination ones. Most of the 24 g-mode frequencies are between 0.1 and 0.4mHz. Of the remaining 73, presumably p modes, 72 group into four distinct regions near 2.8, 3.8, 4.7 and 5.5mHz. The density of frequencies requires that some modes must have degrees l larger than 2. The modes in the 2.8 mHz region have the largest amplitudes. The strongest mode (f1) is most likely radial, while the remaining ones in this region form two nearly symmetric multiplets: a triplet and quintuplet, attributed to rotationally split l = 1 and 2 modes, respectively. We find clear increases of splitting in both multiplets between the 2004 and 2005 observing campaigns, amounting to ~15 per cent on average. The observed splittings imply that the rotational rate in Bal09 depends on stellar latitude and is the fastest on the equator. We also speculate on the possible reasons for the changes of splitting. The only plausible explanation we find is torsional oscillation. This hypothesis, however, needs to be verified in the future by detailed modelling. In this context, it is very important to monitor the splittings on a longer time-scale as their behaviour may help to explain this interesting phenomenon. The amplitudes of almost all terms detected in both 2004 and 2005 were found to vary. This is evident even during

  16. Exploring the Feasibility of Multi-Site Flow Cytometric Processing of Gut Associated Lymphoid Tissue with Centralized Data Analysis for Multi-Site Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Ian; Anton, Peter A.; Elliott, Julie; Cranston, Ross D.; Duffill, Kathryn; Althouse, Andrew D.; Hawkins, Kevin L.; De Rosa, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the development of a standardized approach to the collection of intestinal tissue from healthy volunteers, isolation of gut associated lymphoid tissue mucosal mononuclear cells (MMC), and characterization of mucosal T cell phenotypes by flow cytometry was sufficient to minimize differences in the normative ranges of flow parameters generated at two trial sites. Forty healthy male study participants were enrolled in Pittsburgh and Los Angeles. MMC were isolated from rectal biopsies using the same biopsy acquisition and enzymatic digestion protocols. As an additional comparator, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were collected from the study participants. For quality control, cryopreserved PBMC from a single donor were supplied to both sites from a central repository (qPBMC). Using a jointly optimized standard operating procedure, cells were isolated from tissue and blood and stained with monoclonal antibodies targeted to T cell phenotypic markers. Site-specific flow data were analyzed by an independent center which analyzed all data from both sites. Ranges for frequencies for overall CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, derived from the qPBMC samples, were equivalent at both UCLA and MWRI. However, there were significant differences across sites for the majority of T cell activation and memory subsets in qPBMC as well as PBMC and MMC. Standardized protocols to collect, stain, and analyze MMC and PBMC, including centralized analysis, can reduce but not exclude variability in reporting flow data within multi-site studies. Based on these data, centralized processing, flow cytometry, and analysis of samples may provide more robust data across multi-site studies. Centralized processing requires either shipping of fresh samples or cryopreservation and the decision to perform centralized versus site processing needs to take into account the drawbacks and restrictions associated with each method. PMID:26010577

  17. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  18. Spectroscopic Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    ALAM,M. KATHLEEN; TIMLIN,JERILYN A.; MARTIN,LAURA E.; HJELLE,DRIAN; LYONS,RICK; GARRISON,KRISTIN

    2000-11-01

    The goal of this LDRD Research project was to provide a preliminary examination of the use of infrared spectroscopy as a tool to detect the changes in cell cultures upon activation by an infectious agent. Due to a late arrival of funding, only 5 months were available to transfer and setup equipment at UTTM,develop cell culture lines, test methods of in-situ activation and collect kinetic data from activated cells. Using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling method, live cell cultures were examined prior to and after activation. Spectroscopic data were collected from cells immediately after activation in situ and, in many cases for five successive hours. Additional data were collected from cells activated within a test tube (pre-activated), in both transmission mode as well as in ATR mode. Changes in the infrared data were apparent in the transmission data collected from the pre-activated cells as well in some of the pre-activated ATR data. Changes in the in-situ activated spectral data were only occasionally present due to (1) the limited time cells were studied and (2) incomplete activation. Comparison of preliminary data to infrared bands reported in the literature suggests the primary changes seen are due an increase in ribonucleic acid (RNA) production. This work will be continued as part of a 3 year DARPA grant.

  19. Congenital Anomalies in Contaminated Sites: A Multisite Study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Michele; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Pierini, Anna; Astolfi, Gianni; Bisceglia, Lucia; Carbone, Pietro; Conti, Susanna; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Iavarone, Ivano; Ricci, Paolo; Scarano, Gioacchino; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The health impact on populations residing in industrially contaminated sites (CSs) is recognized as a public health concern especially in relation to more vulnerable population subgroups. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of congenital anomalies (CAs) in Italian CSs. Thirteen CSs covered by regional CA registries were investigated in an ecological study. The observed/expected ratios (O/E) with 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the total and specific subgroups of CAs were calculated using the regional areas as references. For the CSs with waste landfills, petrochemicals, and refineries, pooled estimates were calculated. The total number of observed cases of CAs was 7085 out of 288,184 births (prevalence 245.8 per 10,000). For some CSs, excesses for several CA subgroups were observed, in particular for genital and heart defects. The excess of genital CAs observed in Gela (O/E 2.36; 90% CI 1.73–3.15) is consistent with findings from other studies. For CSs including petrochemical and landfills, the pooled risk estimates were 1.10 (90% CI 1.01–1.19) and 1.07 (90% CI 1.02–1.13), respectively. The results are useful in identifying priority areas for analytical investigations and in supporting the promotion of policies for the primary prevention of CAs. The use of short-latency effect indicators is recommended for the health surveillance of the populations residing in CSs. PMID:28287452

  20. Congenital Anomalies in Contaminated Sites: A Multisite Study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Michele; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Pierini, Anna; Astolfi, Gianni; Bisceglia, Lucia; Carbone, Pietro; Conti, Susanna; Dardanoni, Gabriella; Iavarone, Ivano; Ricci, Paolo; Scarano, Gioacchino; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Group, RiscRipro Sentieri Working

    2017-03-10

    The health impact on populations residing in industrially contaminated sites (CSs) is recognized as a public health concern especially in relation to more vulnerable population subgroups. The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of congenital anomalies (CAs) in Italian CSs. Thirteen CSs covered by regional CA registries were investigated in an ecological study. The observed/expected ratios (O/E) with 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the total and specific subgroups of CAs were calculated using the regional areas as references. For the CSs with waste landfills, petrochemicals, and refineries, pooled estimates were calculated. The total number of observed cases of CAs was 7085 out of 288,184 births (prevalence 245.8 per 10,000). For some CSs, excesses for several CA subgroups were observed, in particular for genital and heart defects. The excess of genital CAs observed in Gela (O/E 2.36; 90% CI 1.73-3.15) is consistent with findings from other studies. For CSs including petrochemical and landfills, the pooled risk estimates were 1.10 (90% CI 1.01-1.19) and 1.07 (90% CI 1.02-1.13), respectively. The results are useful in identifying priority areas for analytical investigations and in supporting the promotion of policies for the primary prevention of CAs. The use of short-latency effect indicators is recommended for the health surveillance of the populations residing in CSs.