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Sample records for multistage fluid bed

  1. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Taulbee, D.; Robl, T.; Hower, J.; Mahboub, K.; Robertson, R.; Hornsberger, P.; Oduroh, P.; Simpson, A.

    1992-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis (shale oil production), gasification (synthesis gas production), and combustion of the spent oil shale for process heat. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work completed this year involved several different areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors were carried out in fluidized and fixed bed reactors using both freshly generated shale oil vapors and model compounds. The design and fabrication of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II reactor was completed and installation of the process components was initiated. The raw oil shale sample (Cleveland Member from Montgomery County, Kentucky) for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored. A preliminary study of KENTORT II-derived oil for possible paving applications was completed, and it was concluded that the shale exhibits acceptable properties as an asphalt recycling agent.

  2. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, September 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.; Stehn, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II). The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zone for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work performed during this year involved projects that will contribute physical and chemical data for the final design of the 50-lb/hr retort. A cold-flow model of the 50-lb/hr retort was built and tested. The unit demonstrated stable operation and proper fluidization of all beds. Good control of solid recirculation up to the maximum design rate for each loop (200 and 500 lb/hr, respectively) was achieved simultaneously. Basically, the cold-flow model is completely operational and translation of the cold-flow design parameters to the design of the retort is ready to begin. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors passed over processed shales was initiated. The addition of a mass spectrometer to the system to monitor total carbon, nitrogen and sulfur evolution in real-time was successful. Coking activities of processed shales were ranked as follows: combusted shale > gasified shale > pyrolyzed shale. Arrangements for conducting an evaluation of KENTORT-derived oil for asphalt applications were finalized and testing was initiated.

  3. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. Quarterly technical report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Stehn, J.; Vego, A.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993 under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27286 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, U.S. Department of Energy. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The major activities for this quarter included: system leak proofing, cold flow testing, shake down of the data acquisition system, instrumentation verification, and preparation for hot operation. Once the tasks necessary for heat up are completed, shake down and operation of the Process Demonstration Unit will begin.

  4. The development of an integrated multistage fluid bed retorting process. [KENTORT II process--50-lb/hr

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Taulbee, D.; Stehn, J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II). The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zone for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of the oil shale. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work performed during this year involved projects that will contribute physical and chemical data for the final design of the 50-lb/hr retort. A cold-flow model of the 50-lb/hr retort was built and tested. The unit demonstrated stable operation and proper fluidization of all beds. Good control of solid recirculation up to the maximum design rate for each loop (200 and 500 lb/hr, respectively) was achieved simultaneously. Basically, the cold-flow model is completely operational and translation of the cold-flow design parameters to the design of the retort is ready to begin. In another aspect of the program, a study of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors passed over processed shales was initiated. The addition of a mass spectrometer to the system to monitor total carbon, nitrogen and sulfur evolution in real-time was successful. Coking activities of processed shales were ranked as follows: combusted shale > gasified shale > pyrolyzed shale. Arrangements for conducting an evaluation of KENTORT-derived oil for asphalt applications were finalized and testing was initiated.

  5. Multi-stage circulating fluidized bed syngas cooling

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Guan, Xiaofeng; Peng, WanWang

    2016-10-11

    A method and apparatus for cooling hot gas streams in the temperature range 800.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. using multi-stage circulating fluid bed (CFB) coolers is disclosed. The invention relates to cooling the hot syngas from coal gasifiers in which the hot syngas entrains substances that foul, erode and corrode heat transfer surfaces upon contact in conventional coolers. The hot syngas is cooled by extracting and indirectly transferring heat to heat transfer surfaces with circulating inert solid particles in CFB syngas coolers. The CFB syngas coolers are staged to facilitate generation of steam at multiple conditions and hot boiler feed water that are necessary for power generation in an IGCC process. The multi-stage syngas cooler can include internally circulating fluid bed coolers, externally circulating fluid bed coolers and hybrid coolers that incorporate features of both internally and externally circulating fluid bed coolers. Higher process efficiencies can be realized as the invention can handle hot syngas from various types of gasifiers without the need for a less efficient precooling step.

  6. The development of an integrated multistaged fluid-bed retorting process. Final report, September 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, S.D.; Taulbee, D.N.; Stehn, J.L.; Vego, A.; Robl, T.L.

    1995-02-01

    This summarizes the development of the KENTORT II retorting process, which includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of oil shale. Purpose was to design and test the process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The program included bench- scale studies of coking and cracking reactions of shale oil vapors over processed shale particles to address issues of scaleup associated with solid-recycle retorting. The bench-scale studies showed that higher amounts of carbon coverage reduce the rate of subsequent carbon deposition by shale oil vapors onto processed shale particles; however carbon-covered materials were also active in terms of cracking and coking. Main focus was the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II PDU. Cold-flow modeling and shakedown were done before the PDU was made ready for operation. Seven mass-balanced, steady-state runs were completed within the window of design operating conditions. Goals were achieved: shale feedrate, run duration (10 hr), shale recirculation rates (4:1 to pyrolyzer and 10:1 to combustor), bed temperatures (pyrolyzer 530{degree}C, gasifier 750{degree}C, combustor 830{degree}C), and general operating stability. Highest oil yields (up to 109% of Fischer assay) were achieved for runs lasting {ge} 10 hours. High C content of the solids used for heat transfer to the pyrolysis zone contributed to the enhanced oil yield achieved.

  7. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E.

    1994-01-01

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  8. Apparatus for fluid-bed catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.; Owen, H.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes an apparatus for the conversion of hydrocarbons. It comprises a reactor vessel for containing a fluid bed reaction zone including finely divided catalyst, the reactor vessel further comprising a feed distributor positioned in a lower portion of the reactor vessel, a heat exchange conduit within the reactor vessel in direct contact with the fluid bed reaction zone for transferring heat from a hot circulating fluid to the fluid bed reaction zone, and a catalyst separator positioned in an upper section of the reactor vessel for segregating reaction products from entrained spent catalyst; a first conduit for withdrawing spent catalyst from the fluid bed reaction zone; a feed preheater vessel operatively connected to the first conduit for contacting an aliphatic feedstream with a fluidized bed of the spent catalyst, the feed preheater vessel being sized to provide spent catalyst circulation through the preheater vessel of from about 0.1 to about 100 volumes of spent catalyst per hour.

  9. Multistage fluidized bed reactor performance characterization for adsorption of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Mohanty, C.R.; Meikap, B.C.

    2009-12-15

    Carbon dioxide and its different compounds are generated as primary greenhouse gases from the flue gases of coal-fired thermal power plants, boilers, and other stationary combustion processes. This greenhouse gas causes global warming after being emitted to the environment. To deal with this problem, a new dry scrubbing process was tested in this study. A three-stage countercurrent fluidized bed adsorber was developed, designed, and fabricated. It was used as a removal apparatus and operated in a continuous regime for the two-phase system. The height of each stage was 0.30 m, and the inner diameter was 0.10 m. The paper presents the removal of CO{sub 2} from gas mixtures by chemical sorption on porous granular calcium oxide particles in the reactor at ambient temperature. The advantages of a multistage fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of the gas when using a dry method. The effects of the operating parameters such as sorbent, superficial gas velocity, and the Weir height on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency in the multistage fluidized bed were investigated. The results indicate that the removal efficiency of the carbon dioxide was around 71% at a high solid flow rate corresponding to lower gas velocity at room temperature. In comparison with wet scrubbers, this dry process appears to have lower cost, less complicated configuration, and simpler disposal of used sorbent. The results in this study assume importance from the perspective of use of a multistage fluidized bed adsorber for control of gaseous pollutants at high temperature.

  10. Fluid bed oligomerization of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owens, H.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a continuous process for upgrading lower olefins to increase gasoline yield and ease of LPG recovery. It comprises separating a C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} cracked olefinic gas into a primary overhead stream containing C{sub 2} hydrocarbons having at least about 10% ethene and a secondary stream comprising a major amount of C{sub 3}-c{sub 4} olefinic hydrocarbons; adding the primary stream containing C{sub 2} hydrocarbons to a primary fluidized reaction zone comprising solid crystalline zeolite catalyst particles in a reactor bed operating under high severity conditions; adding the secondary stream comprising C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} olefinic hydrocarbons to a secondary fluidized bed reaction zone comprising solid crystalline zeolite catalyst particles in a reactor bed operating under turbulent regime low severity conditions; and withdrawing a portion of partially deactivated catalyst particles from the primary high severity fluidized bed reaction zone.

  11. SYNROC production using a fluid bed calciner

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, F.J.; Grens, J.Z.; Ryerson, F.J.; Hoenig, C.L.; Bazan, F.; Campbell, J.H.

    1982-09-27

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic developed for immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes in solid form. Fluid-bed SYNROC production permits slurry drying, calcining and redox to be carried out in a single unit. We present results of studies from two fluid beds; the Idaho Exxon internally-heated unit and the externally-heated unit constructed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Bed operation over a range of temperature, feed rate, fluidizing rate and redox conditions indicate that high density, uniform particle-size SYNROC powders are produced which facilitate the densification step and give HUP parts with dense, well-developed phases and good leaching characteristics. 3 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Countercurrent multistage fluidized bed reactor for immobilized biocatalysts: II. Operation of a laboratory-scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Vos, H J; Zomerdijk, M; Groen, D J; Luyben, K C

    1990-08-01

    In Part I of this series,(1) we derived a model and made simulations for a multistage fluidized bed reactor (MFBR). It was concluded that the MFBR can be an attractive alternative for a fixed bed reactor when operated with a deactivating biocatalyst. In Part II of this series, the design of a laboratory-scale MFBR and its evaluation to investigate the practical feasibility of this reactor type, will be described. Experiments with a duration as long as 10 days were carried out successfully using immobilized glucose isomerase as a model reaction system. The results predicted by the model are in good agreement with the measured glucose concentration and biocatalyst activity gradients, indicating perfect mixing of the particles in the reactor compartments.The diameters of the biocatalyst particles used in the experiments showed a large spread, with the largest being 1.7 times the smallest. Therefore, an additional check was carried out, to make sure that the particles were not segregating according to size. Particles withdrawn from the reactor compartments were investigated using an image analyzer. Histograms of particle size distribution do not indicate segregation and it is concluded that the particles used have been mixed completely within the compartments. As a result, transport of biocatalyst is nearly plug flow. PMID:18595091

  13. Removal of CO2 in a multistage fluidized bed reactor by diethanol amine impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipa; Samal, Debi Prasad; Meikap, Bhim C

    2016-07-28

    To mitigate the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), we have developed and designed a four-stage fluidized bed reactor. There is a counter current exchange between solid adsorbent and gas flow. In this present investigation diethanol amine (DEA) impregnated activated carbon made from green coconut shell was used as adsorbent. This type of adsorbent not only adsorbs CO2 due to the presence of pore but also chemically reacts with CO2 and form secondary zwitterions. Sampling and analysis of CO2 was performed using Orsat apparatus. The effect of initial CO2 concentration, gas velocity, solid rate, weir height etc. on removal efficiency of CO2 have been investigated and presented. The percentage removal of CO2 has been found close to 80% under low gas flow rate (0.188 m/s), high solid flow rate (4.12 kg/h) and weir height of 50 mm. From this result it has been found out that multistage fluidized bed reactor may be a suitable equipment for removal of CO2 from flue gas. PMID:27163861

  14. Rigging Test Bed Development for Validation of Multi-Stage Decelerator Extractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenig, Sivan J.; Gallon, John C.; Adams, Douglas S.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project is developing new decelerator systems for Mars entry which would include testing with a Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test Vehicle. One of the decelerator systems being developed is a large supersonic ringsail parachute. Due to the configuration of the vehicle it is not possible to deploy the parachute with a mortar which would be the preferred method for a spacecraft in a supersonic flow. Alternatively, a multi-stage extraction process using a ballute as a pilot is being developed for the test vehicle. The Rigging Test Bed is a test venue being constructed to perform verification and validation of this extraction process. The test bed consists of a long pneumatic piston device capable of providing a constant force simulating the ballute drag force during the extraction events. The extraction tests will take place both inside a high-bay for frequent tests of individual extraction stages and outdoors using a mobile hydraulic crane for complete deployment tests from initial pack pull out to canopy extraction. These tests will measure line tensions and use photogrammetry to track motion of the elements involved. The resulting data will be used to verify packing and rigging as well, as validate models and identify potential failure modes in order to finalize the design of the extraction system.

  15. Removal of CO2 in a multistage fluidized bed reactor by diethanol amine impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipa; Samal, Debi Prasad; Meikap, Bhim C

    2016-07-28

    To mitigate the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), we have developed and designed a four-stage fluidized bed reactor. There is a counter current exchange between solid adsorbent and gas flow. In this present investigation diethanol amine (DEA) impregnated activated carbon made from green coconut shell was used as adsorbent. This type of adsorbent not only adsorbs CO2 due to the presence of pore but also chemically reacts with CO2 and form secondary zwitterions. Sampling and analysis of CO2 was performed using Orsat apparatus. The effect of initial CO2 concentration, gas velocity, solid rate, weir height etc. on removal efficiency of CO2 have been investigated and presented. The percentage removal of CO2 has been found close to 80% under low gas flow rate (0.188 m/s), high solid flow rate (4.12 kg/h) and weir height of 50 mm. From this result it has been found out that multistage fluidized bed reactor may be a suitable equipment for removal of CO2 from flue gas.

  16. A catalytic multistage fixed-bed tower bioreactor in an industrial-scale pilot plant for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Bakoyianis, V.; Koutinas, A.A.

    1996-01-20

    This article describes the development of an industrial-scale, multistage fixed-bed tower (MFBT) bioreactor using the promoter mineral kissiris for industrial alcohol producing using free cells. Specifically, the authors examined the parameters needed to maintain operational stability from batch to batch for long periods. Pilot plant operations used one- and two-stage fixed-bed, 7,000-L bioreactors. Likewise a 100,000-L, multistage fixed-bed tower system containing layered kissiris confirmed the laboratory results. Compared with a continuous stirred tank fermentor (CSTF) with recycle, a 30% reduction of energy demand and 10%--20% of the production costs are obtained. The latter are attributed to the increased ethanol concentration and alcohol productivity.

  17. Reducing mode circulating fluid bed combustion

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Yung-Yi; Sadhukhan, Pasupati; Fraley, Lowell D.; Hsiao, Keh-Hsien

    1986-01-01

    A method for combustion of sulfur-containing fuel in a circulating fluid bed combustion system wherein the fuel is burned in a primary combustion zone under reducing conditions and sulfur captured as alkaline sulfide. The reducing gas formed is oxidized to combustion gas which is then separated from solids containing alkaline sulfide. The separated solids are then oxidized and recycled to the primary combustion zone.

  18. Aerobic biodegradation of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye by a bacterial community immobilized in a multistage packed-bed BAC reactor.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arias, Alfredo; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; de los Cobos-Vasconcelos, Daniel; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Salmerón-Alcocer, Angélica; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio

    2010-11-01

    A microbial community able to aerobically degrade the azo dye Acid Orange 7 was selected from riparian or lacustrine sediments collected at sites receiving textile wastewaters. Three bacterial strains, pertaining to the genera Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Rhizobium, constitute the selected community. The biodegradation of AO7 was carried out in batch-suspended cell culture and in a continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor. The rapid decolorization observed in batch culture, joined to a delay of about 24 h in COD removal and cell growth, suggests that enzymes involved in biodegradation of the aromatic amines generated after AO7 azo-bond cleavage (1-amino-2-naphthol [1-A2N] and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid [4-ABS]), are inducible in this microbial consortium. After this presumptive induction period, the accumulated byproducts, measured through COD, were partially metabolized and transformed in cell mass. At all azo dye loading rates used, complete removal of AO7 and 1-A2N was obtained in the multistage packed-bed BAC reactor (PBR).; however, the overall COD (eta ( COD )) and 4-ABS (eta ( ABS )) removal efficiencies obtained in steady state continuous culture were about 90%. Considering the toxicity of 1-A2N, its complete removal has particular relevance. In the first stages of the packed-bed BAC reactor (Fig. 4a-c), major removal was observed. In the last stage, only a slight removal of COD and 4-ABS was obtained. Comparing to several reported studies, the continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor showed similar or superior results. In addition, the operation of large-packed-bed BAC reactors could be improved by using several shallow BAC bed stages, because the pressure drop caused by bed compaction of a support material constituted by small and fragile particles can be reduced.

  19. Multi-Bed Multi-Stage Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle-Reducing Driving Heat Source Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K. C. Amanul; Akahira, Akira; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Koyama, Shigeru; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, Hui Tong

    The study aims at designing a multi-bed multi-stage adsorption chiller that can be driven by waste heat at near ambient temperature. The chiller is designed such a way that it can be switched into different modes depending on the driving heat source temperature. Stage regeneration techniques have been applied to operate the chiller by relatively low temperature heat source. Driving heat source temperature is validated by simulated data and the performances obtained from different modes are compared. In terms of COP (Coefficient of performance),the chiller shows best performance in conventional single-stage mode for driving heat source temperature greater than 60°C, two stage mode for driving source temperature between 42 and 60°C,in three-stage mode for driving source temperature less than 42°C. In terms of cooling capacity, it shows the best performance in single-stage mode for heat source temperature greater than 70°C. The mass recovery process in single-stage mode is also examined. It is seen that the mass recovery process improve cooling capacity significantly, specially for the low regenerating temperature region.

  20. Removal of hazardous gaseous pollutants from industrial flue gases by a novel multi-stage fluidized bed desulfurizer.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, C R; Adapala, Sivaji; Meikap, B C

    2009-06-15

    Sulfur dioxide and other sulfur compounds are generated as primary pollutants from the major industries such as sulfuric acid plants, cupper smelters, catalytic cracking units, etc. and cause acid rain. To remove the SO(2) from waste flue gas a three-stage counter-current multi-stage fluidized bed adsorber was developed as desulfurization equipment and operated in continuous bubbling fluidization regime for the two-phase system. This paper represents the desulfurization of gas mixtures by chemical sorption of sulfur dioxide on porous granular calcium oxide particles in the reactor at ambient temperature. The advantages of the multi-stage fluidized bed reactor are of high mass transfer and high gas-solid residence time that can enhance the removal of acid gas at low temperature by dry method. Experiments were carried out in the bubbling fluidization regime supported by visual observation. The effects of the operating parameters such as sorbent (lime) flow rate, superficial gas velocity, and the weir height on SO(2) removal efficiency in the multistage fluidized bed are reported. The results have indicated that the removal efficiency of the sulfur dioxide was found to be 65% at high solid flow rate (2.0 kg/h) corresponding to lower gas velocity (0.265 m/s), wier height of 70 mm and SO(2) concentration of 500 ppm at room temperature.

  1. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.; Shou, J. K.

    1983-07-01

    The fluid dynamics occurring in a coal liquefaction reactor is measured and compared with cold flow fluidization results. Catalyst bed expansions and gas holdups are higher in the Process Development Unit (PDU) than those observed in the cold flow tests for slurries having the same nominal viscosity. Comparison of PDU results with cold flow results shows that the bulk of the operating reactor gas flow lies in the ideal bubbly regime. Existence of churn turbulent behavior during these two experiments is consistent with trends observed in earlier cold flow experiments. Two and three phase fluidization experiments are carried out. Bed expansion is primarily a function of slurry velocity, with gas velocity having only a weak effect. A viscometer is adapted for measurement of the viscosity of coal slurries at high temperature and pressure. A significant degree of backmixing occurs in the H-Coal system.

  2. Countercurrent multistage fluidized bed reactor for immobilized biocatalysts: III. Hydrodynamic aspects.

    PubMed

    Vos, H J; van Houwelingen, C; Zomerdijk, M; Luyben, K C

    1990-08-01

    In Parts I and II of this series we described the modelling, design, and operation of a multistage fluidized bed reactor (MFBR) for immobilized biocatalysts. This article deals with those aspects of the MFBR which are different from single-stage fluidized beds which are operated in batch mode with respect to the solids. The semicontinuous transport of the particles requires perfect mixing of the particles in the reactor compartments, because particles are mainly transported from the bottom of these compartments. A large spread in the physical properties of the biocatalyst particles, especially of both size and density, may cause the particles to segregate into layers with different diameter and/or density. This affects the efficient use of the biocatalyst. The properties of the particles are dependent on the immobilization method. The suitability of different methods for possible future application in the MFBR is therefore compared. Because of segregation, successful use of a biofilm catalyst with a nonuniform thickness of the biofilm is doubtful. Experiments in a small scale reactor (+/- 0.1 m diameter) demonstrated that perfect particle mixing is possible using commercially available biocatalyst particles of uniform density. Co-immobilization of the biocatalyst with glass powder in a gel is a simple and effective method of increasing gel density. High density particles allow high liquid flow rates, and thus an improved external mass transfer can be achieved.The distributor plates, which separate the reactor compartments, must allow unhindered transport of particles. Therefore, the holes in these plates must have a diameter of at least 4.5 times that of the largest particles which are present in the particle mixture used. Furthermore, the plates must be designed such that, when scaling-up the reactor, a uniform liquid distribution over the cross-sectional area of the reactor occurs. Large-scale experiments were not carried out, but published correlations, indicate

  3. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  4. Fluid bed solids heater. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Preuit, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    A solids heater which operates at up to 2000 F was designed, fabricated, installed and operated through checkout at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center at Morgantown, West Virginia. The system, designated the 2000 F Fluid Bed Solids Heater (FBSH) uses a fluidized bed to heat limestone to 600 F and aluminium oxide or silicon carbide to 2000 F and discharges heated solids upon demand. The FBSH with added valve handling and pressurization equipment is known as the Valve Hot Solids Test Unit and is intended for use by the US Department of Energy for testing of valves for severe service applications in coal conversion and utilization processes. The FBSH as designed and supplied by Combustion Power Company includes process equipment, controls, the enclosing building and other associated equipment. In the 600 F range of operation it can circulate limestone through two valve test trains simultaneously on a continuous basis. Only one valve test train is used for 2000 F solids and operation in that range is also continuous. Limestone, crushed to minus 5/16 size, is heated, discharged, and recycled at a maximum average rate of 250 lb/min while aluminum oxide or silicon carbide, No. 8 grit, is circulated at rates up to 167 lb/min. The FBSH control system is designed for automatic operation, and capability is included for external computerized data acquisition and/or supervisory control. An operating and maintenance manual and as-built drawings have been submitted. This report describes the FBSH equipment, its design basis, and its operation. It has been prepared and submitted in fulfillment of Contract Number DIAC05-77ET10499.

  5. Regulation of electrolyte and fluid metabolism in multi-stage ultra-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Knechtle, P; Rüst, C A; Gnädinger, M; Imoberdorf, R; Kohler, G; Rosemann, T; Ballmer, P

    2012-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in multi-stage ultra-marathoners and (ii) to gain more insight into fluid and electrolyte regulation during a multi-stage race. Body mass, sodium concentration ([Na⁺]), potassium concentration ([K⁺]), creatinine, urea, specific gravity, and osmolality in urine were measured in 25 male ultra-marathoners in the 'Swiss Jura Marathon' 2008 with 11,000 m gain of altitude over 7 stages covering 350 km, before and after each stage. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, creatinine, urea, [Na⁺], [K⁺], and osmolality were measured in plasma before stage 1 and after stages 1, 3, 5, and 7. Two athletes (8%) showed plasma [Na⁺] <135 mmol/l. Body mass, plasma [Na⁺], and plasma [K⁺] remained unchanged (p>0.05). Urine specific gravity (p<0.001) and osmolality in both plasma (p<0.01) and urine (p<0.001) were increased and haematocrit (p<0.0001), haemoglobin (p<0.0001) and plasma albumin were decreased (p<0.001). Plasma volume (p<0.01) and plasma urea (p<0.001) were increased. The K⁺/Na⁺ ratio in urine increased >1.0 after each stage and returned to <1.0 the morning of the next stage (p<0.001). To summarize, more sodium than potassium was excreted during rest. The increased urinary sodium losses during rest are compatible with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or the cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS). Further studies are needed to determine the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and both the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) during multi-stage races.

  6. Regulation of electrolyte and fluid metabolism in multi-stage ultra-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Knechtle, P; Rüst, C A; Gnädinger, M; Imoberdorf, R; Kohler, G; Rosemann, T; Ballmer, P

    2012-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (i) to determine the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in multi-stage ultra-marathoners and (ii) to gain more insight into fluid and electrolyte regulation during a multi-stage race. Body mass, sodium concentration ([Na⁺]), potassium concentration ([K⁺]), creatinine, urea, specific gravity, and osmolality in urine were measured in 25 male ultra-marathoners in the 'Swiss Jura Marathon' 2008 with 11,000 m gain of altitude over 7 stages covering 350 km, before and after each stage. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, creatinine, urea, [Na⁺], [K⁺], and osmolality were measured in plasma before stage 1 and after stages 1, 3, 5, and 7. Two athletes (8%) showed plasma [Na⁺] <135 mmol/l. Body mass, plasma [Na⁺], and plasma [K⁺] remained unchanged (p>0.05). Urine specific gravity (p<0.001) and osmolality in both plasma (p<0.01) and urine (p<0.001) were increased and haematocrit (p<0.0001), haemoglobin (p<0.0001) and plasma albumin were decreased (p<0.001). Plasma volume (p<0.01) and plasma urea (p<0.001) were increased. The K⁺/Na⁺ ratio in urine increased >1.0 after each stage and returned to <1.0 the morning of the next stage (p<0.001). To summarize, more sodium than potassium was excreted during rest. The increased urinary sodium losses during rest are compatible with the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or the cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS). Further studies are needed to determine the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and both the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) during multi-stage races. PMID:22638835

  7. Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

  8. Fluid-bed air-supply system

    DOEpatents

    Atabay, Keramettin

    1979-01-01

    The air-supply system for a fluidized-bed furnace includes two air conduits for the same combustion zone. The conduits feed separate sets of holes in a distributor plate through which fluidizing air flows to reach the bed. During normal operation, only one conduit and set of holes is used, but the second conduit and set of holes is employed during start-up.

  9. Shielded fluid stream injector for particle bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Notestein, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A shielded fluid-stream injector assembly is provided for particle bed reactors. The assembly includes a perforated pipe injector disposed across the particle bed region of the reactor and an inverted V-shaped shield placed over the pipe, overlapping it to prevent descending particles from coming into direct contact with the pipe. The pipe and shield are fixedly secured at one end to the reactor wall and slidably secured at the other end to compensate for thermal expansion. An axially extending housing aligned with the pipe and outside the reactor and an in-line reamer are provided for removing deposits from the inside of the pipe. The assembly enables fluid streams to be injected and distributed uniformly into the particle bed with minimized clogging of injector ports. The same design may also be used for extraction of fluid streams from particle bed reactors.

  10. Pressurized fluid bed demonstration units operate successfully

    SciTech Connect

    Smock, R.

    1993-03-01

    This article reviews the successful demonstration of 75 MW pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plants and the planning for 350 MW commercial scale plants. The topics of the article include progress in development, a review of operating units, the need for better sulfur capture, and large scale circulating PFBC design. A buyer's guide to PFBC system suppliers is provided.

  11. Bed inventory overturn in a circulating fluid bed riser with pant-leg structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jinjing Li; Wei Wang; Hairui Yang; Junfu Lv; Guangxi Yue

    2009-05-15

    The special phenomenon, nominated as bed inventory overturn, in circulating fluid bed (CFB) riser with pant-leg structure was studied with model calculation and experimental work. A compounded pressure drop mathematic model was developed and validated with the experimental data in a cold experimental test rig. The model calculation results agree well with the measured data. In addition, the intensity of bed inventory overturn is directly proportional to the fluidizing velocity and is inversely proportional to the branch point height. The results in the present study provide significant information for the design and operation of a CFB boiler with pant-leg structure. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Selecting fines recycle methods to optimize fluid bed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rickman, W.S.; Fields, D.E.; Brimhall, W.L.; Callahan, S.F.

    1980-05-01

    Testing and analysis of a number of different fines recycle methods for fluid bed combustors has led to a generalized modeling technique. This model accounts for the effect of pertinent variables in determining overall combustion efficiencies. Computer application of this model has allowed trade-off studies to be performed that show the overall process effects of changes in individual operating parameters. Verification of the model has been accomplished in processing campaigns while combusting fuels such as graphite and bituminous coal. A 0.4 MW test unit was used for the graphite experimental work. Solid fuel was typically crushed to 5 mm maximum screen size. Bed temperatures were normally controlled at 900/sup 0/C; the combustor was an atmospheric unit with maximum in-bed pressures of 0.2 atm. Expanded bed depths ranged from 1.5 to 3 meters. Additional data was taken from recycle tests sponsored by EPRI on the B and W 6 ft x 6 ft fluid bed combustor. These tests used high sulfur coal in a 1.2 meter deep, 850/sup 0/C atmospheric fluidized bed of limestone, with low recycle rates and temperatures. Close agreement between the model and test data has been noted, with combustion efficiency predictions matching experimental results within 1%.

  13. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  14. Coal fired fluid bed module for a single elevation style fluid bed power plant

    DOEpatents

    Waryasz, Richard E.

    1979-01-01

    A fluidized bed for the burning of pulverized fuel having a specific waterwall arrangement that comprises a structurally reinforced framework of wall tubes. The wall tubes are reversely bent from opposite sides and then bonded together to form tie rods that extend across the bed to support the lateral walls thereof.

  15. Method for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Grindley, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600.degree. to 1800.degree. F. and are partially quenched with water to 1000.degree. to 1200.degree. F. before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime/limestone.

  16. Improved fluid bed combustor efficiencies through fines recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Rickman, W.S.

    1980-04-01

    Carbon burnup efficiencies of 99.9% and higher have been attained on a 0.4-MW(t) atmospheric fluid bed combustor with fines recycle. A cyclone and sintered metal filter system separated the fines from the off-gas stream, returning them at 600/sup 0/C (1150/sup 0/F) to the fluid bed. The fines were metered through a unique rotary valve that also served as a pressure boundary between the fluid bed and the fines recycle hopper. Combustor operation was fully automated with a 100-channel process controller and supervisory computer. This high combustion efficiency is especially significant, since the fuel was graphite sized to less than 5 mm (1.3 in.) maximum size. More than 30% of the feed was fine enough to be quickly entrained, placing a substantial burden on the fines recycle system. Detailed modeling techniques were successfully developed to allow prediction of recycle rates and temperatures needed to maintain high combustion efficiency. This model has now been used to analyze coal combustion tests sponsored by Electric Power Research Institute. Surface reaction rate constants were first determined using combustor data taken during cold, low-flow fines recycle tests. These were then used to predict the effect of higher rates of recycle at various temperatures.

  17. Erosion of a granular bed by laminar fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orpe, Ashish; Lobovsky, Alex; Molloy, Ryan; Kudrolli, Arshad; Rothman, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by examples of erosive incision of channels in sand, we investigate the motion of individual grains in a granular bed as a function of fluid flow rate to give us new insight concerning the relationship between hydrodynamic stress and surficial granular flow. A closed channel of rectangular cross section is partially filled with glass beads and a fluid and a constant flux Q is circulated through the channel. The fluid has same refractive index as the glass beads and is illuminated with a laser sheet away from the sidewalls. The bed erodes quadratically in time to a height hc which depends on Q. The Shields criterion, which is proportional to the ratio of the viscous shear stress and gravitational normal stress, describes the observed hc√Q when a height offset of approximately half a grain diameter is introduced. The offset can be interpreted as arising due to differences between the flow near a porous boundary and a smooth wall. Introducing this offset in the estimation of the shear stress yields a grain flux qx in the bed load regime proportional to (τ- τc)^2, where τ is the non-dimensional shear stress, and τc corresponds to the Shields criteria.

  18. Bed-rest studies: Fluid and electrolyte responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Confinement in the horizontal position for 2 to 3 weeks results in a chronic decrease in plasma volume, increased interstitial fluid volume, and unchanged or slightly increased extracellular fluid volume. Concentrations of blood electrolytes, glucose, and nitrogenous constituents remain within normal limits of variability when maintenance levels of isometric or isotonic exercise are performed for 1 hr/day. Hematocrit and plasma osmolality can be elevated significantly throughout bed rest (BR). Significant diuresis occurs on the first day, and increases in urine Na and Ca continue throughout BR, although voluntary fluid intake is unchanged. Urine Na and K are evaluated during the second week of BR in spite of stabilization of PV and extracellular volume. The initial diuresis probably arises from the extracellular fluid while subsequent urine loss above control levels must come from the intracellular fluid. Preservation of the extracellular volume takes precedance over maintenance of the intracellular fluid volume. The functioning of a natriuretic factor (hormone) to account for the continued increased loss of Na in the urine is suggested.

  19. METC Fluid-bed Test Rigs/Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Walczak, S.C.; Rockey, J.M.; Rutten, J.

    1993-09-01

    Since its last runs in December 1989, the 6-inch gasifier has been modified to enlarge the reactor inside diameter to 10 inches. Recent runs have shown stable operation and increased carbon conversion with the new gasifier size. As a 10-inch reactor, the METC FBG has logged over 150 hours online with Montana Rosebud coal. Table 2 shows typical solids analyses for an April 1993 run. A series of hot gas desulfurization tests using a batch-mode, fluidized bed to contact the coal gas with sulfur capturing sorbent marked the last integrated runs with the 6-inch, fluid-bed gasifier [2]. Table 3 shows typical coal gas composition before and after the fluid-bed, hot gas desulfurization reactor. Shakedown tests of the MGCR were performed in April and May 1993. These tests were performed primarily to obtain the characteristics of a candle filter created by the Shell Development Company as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The April run was a 4-day test using a 30-lb batch of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. A plot of the sulfur removal in this run compared with one in 1989 [3] is shown in Figure 5. It is obvious from this figure that the MGCR has performed consistently despite a 4-year hiatus.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Rong

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  1. Relationship between fluid bed aerosol generator operation and the aerosol produced

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.L.; Yerkes, K.

    1980-12-01

    The relationships between bed operation in a fluid bed aerosol generator and aerosol output were studied. A two-inch diameter fluid bed aerosol generator (FBG) was constructed using stainless steel powder as a fluidizing medium. Fly ash from coal combustion was aerosolized and the influence of FBG operating parameters on aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), geometric standard deviation (sigma/sub g/) and concentration was examined. In an effort to extend observations on large fluid beds to small beds using fine bed particles, minimum fluidizing velocities and elutriation constant were computed. Although FBG minimum fluidizing velocity agreed well with calculations, FBG elutriation constant did not. The results of this study show that the properties of aerosols produced by a FBG depend on fluid bed height and air flow through the bed after the minimum fluidizing velocity is exceeded.

  2. Fluid bed dryer efficient with abrasive copper concentrate

    SciTech Connect

    Marczeski, C.D.; Hodel, A.E.

    1985-11-01

    Thermally efficient dryers were needed to remove 11-12% moisture from very fine (70%, -325 mesh), copper concentrate at Asarco, Inc., in Hayden, AZ. More than 128 t/hr of the wet, dust-like material produced by the copper mine's grinders had to be made bone dry (0.1% moisture) before being fed to a flash smelting furnace. Two 12 ft diam fluidized bed dryers, each with a capacity of 64 wet t/hr, were installed to dry the copper concentrate. Each dryer's push/pull air system employs a 1250 hp fluidizing air fan to provide air at 80 in (wc) static pressure. A natural gas fired heater raises the air temperature to 600/sup 0/F to dry the dense (100 lb/cu ft bulk density) ore. The dense, wet copper concentrate is fed to the dryer from the top, countercurrent to the flow of the light, dry product. Drying begins when the wet feed reaches the fluidized bed of gravel rock. Lighter, dried material is conveyed by the air back to the top of the dryer and out through a duct to the baghouse. The throughput of the dryer is determined by the wetness of the concentrate and the temperature of the fluidizing air. Asarco, Inc. has found the fluid bed drying system simple and efficient to operate. Fuel gas consumption of the dryer is on the order of 1000 cu ft/ton of wet feed. The abrasion resistant lining provided in the dryer (a hard brick lining in the rock bed zone; castable refractory in the top and in the ducting) and ceramic tiles at the inlet of the dust collector have been effective in long term operation with the highly abrasive product.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li

    2008-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Northwest Africa 5738: Multistage fluid-driven secondary alteration in an extraordinarily evolved eucrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Paul H.; Rubin, Alan E.; Isa, Junko; Gessler, Nicholas; Ahn, Insu; Choi, Byeon-Gak

    2014-09-01

    The Northwest Africa 5738 eucrite contains a record of unprecedented geochemical complexity for a sample from the HED asteroid. It originated with a uniquely evolved (Stannern Trend) primary igneous composition, combining ultra-high bulk incompatible element and Na2O concentrations with a relatively low mg. Its bulk oxygen-isotopic composition (Δ‧17O = -0.27‰), as well as its trace element composition (e.g., Ga/Al), confirm other evidence for classification as a eucrite. Pyroxene mg equilibration, exsolution and “cloudy” inclusions, all reflect a typical eucritic degree of thermal metamorphism. The rock contains an unprecedented array of microscopic fluid-metasomatic vein deposits. Most common are curvy microveins within pyroxene, which consist dominantly of Ca-plagioclase (typically An95, in stark contrast with the rock’s An68-78 primary-igneous plagioclase), with Fe-olivine (Fo14) and Cr-spinel as additional major constituents. Likely related to these microveins are small masses of intergrown Ca-plagioclase (again roughly An95) and silica (or high-Si glass). Analyses of the microvein Cr-spinels show stoichiometry implying a significant Fe3+ content (Fe2O3 0.7-2.3 wt.%), and fO2 up to roughly IW+3; clearly elevated in comparison to the normal HED fO2 of about IW-1. The fO2 results show an anticorrelation with equilibration T (and with Mg/Fe), which suggests the parent fluid system became more oxidizing as it cooled. NWA 5738 also contains apparent secondary iron metal. The Fe-metals are very pure, with Ni consistently below an EPMA detection limit of ∼0.01 wt.%. The vein-like shapes of roughly 1/3 of the largest Fe-metals suggest origin by deposition from a fluid. The role of pyroxene exsolution as template for a denticular (sawtooth) Fe-metal edge shape, and the survival of Fo14 olivine in a rock with abundant silica and a far higher bulk mg, suggest that the most intense thermal metamorphism occurred no later than the secondary alteration. Near

  5. Method and apparatus for enhancing the desulfurization of hot coal gas in a fluid-bed coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Grindley, T.

    1988-04-05

    A process and apparatus for providing additional desulfurization of the hot gas produced in a fluid-bed coal gasifier, within the gasifier is described. A fluid-bed of iron oxide is located inside the gasifier above the gasification bed in a fluid-bed coal gasifier in which in-bed desulfurization by lime/limestone takes place. The product gases leave the gasification bed typically at 1600 to 1800 F and are partially quenched with water to 1000 to 1200 F before entering the iron oxide bed. The iron oxide bed provides additional desulfurization beyond that provided by the lime /limestone. 1 fig.

  6. Biodenitrification of gaseous diffusion plant aqueous wastes: fluid bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalchuk, M.

    1982-01-04

    Decontamination and uranium recovery operations at Portsmouth generate raffinates which contain nitrate. Nitrate discharges are now within EPA limits. However, more stringent limits go into effect on October 2, 1982. These limits cannot be met by present operating methods without seriously restricting decontamination and recovery operations. A biodentrification process will therefore be used at Portsmouth to reduce the nitrate concentration to acceptable levels. Pilot plant studies using a fluid bed reactor were carried out at ORNL. Process operating parameters were characterized and design criteria for the full-scale facility which is to be built at Portsmouth were devised. When operations were completed, the pilot plant, equipped with a 20-inch bioreactor, was shipped to Portsmouth. It will be installed during FY-1982, and will be operated until the full-scale facility is built. It will allow GAT to meet EPA limts and will accommodate 9000 liters of raffinate per month. The projected post CIP/CUP raffinate generation rate is 15,000 liters per month. Recovery operations will be limited to some extent until the fullscale biodenitrification facility is built.

  7. Fluid dynamics of the freeboard in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verloop, Willem Cornelis

    1994-05-01

    The present study focuses on the fluid dynamics of the gas-particle freeboard flow, whereas a subsequent study will cover the chemistry. The objective of the present thesis is to increase the insight in the physical processes that govern the freeboard particle flow. Special attention has to be paid to the lateral transport of particles and the often observed phenomenon of a downflowing wall layer of solids, which has not been explained satisfactorily up to now. In order to achieve this, detailed experiments have to be performed which provide data on the local flow structure. In addition, the freeboard flow has to be modeled at least two-dimensionally, incorporating the essential physical processes. The resulting model of the freeboard flow should firstly be capable of predicting the local properties of both the gas flow and the particle flow. This prediction has to serve as a basis for the subsequent modeling of the freeboard chemistry. Secondly, the model should serve as a basis for studying the consequences of the scaling up a fluidized bed installation from lab scale to industrial size.

  8. Scale-up of a fluid-bed process for production of light olefins from methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.M.; Avidan, A.A.; Soto, J.L.; Chang, C.D.; Socha, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mobil Research and Development Corporation has developed a fluid-bed process for the production of olefins from methanol. The olefins can be converted to gasoline, distillate, and/or aviation fuels by commercially available technologies. The process is based on the ZSM-5 family of shape selective zeolite catalysts. Initial development in fixed and fluid-bed micro-units gave total olefins selectivities exceeding 75 wt% of hydrocarbons with complete methanol conversion. Scale-up to a 4 BPD fluid-bed pilot plant was successful in maintaining high olefin yield. The process has recently been scaled up in a 100 BPD demonstration plant in Germany.

  9. Effluent characterization from a conical pressurized fluid bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, R. J.; Rollbuhler, R. J.; Patch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain useable corrosion and erosion results it was necessary to have data with several levels of particulate matter in the hot gases. One level of particulate loading was as low as possible so that ideally no erosion and only corrosion occurred. A conical fluidized bed was used to obtain some degree of filtration through the top of the bed which would not be highly fluidized. This would minimize the filtration required for the hot gases or conversely the amount of particulate matter in the hot gases after a given level of filtration by cyclones and/or filters. The data obtained during testing characterized the effluent from the bed at different test conditions. A range of bed heights, coal flows, air flows, limestone flows, and pressure are represented. These tests were made to determine the best operating conditions prior to using the bed to determine erosion and corrosion rates of typical turbine blade materials.

  10. Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from spent uranium alloy fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghusen, J. J.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gunderson, G. E.; Holmes, J. T.; Jonke, A. A.; Kincinas, J. E.; Levitz, N. M.; Potts, G. L.; Ramaswami, D.; Stethers, H.; Turner, K. S.

    1967-01-01

    Fluid-bed fluoride volatility process recovers uranium from uranium fuels containing either zirconium or aluminum. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. The process requires few operations in simple, compact equipment, and eliminates aqueous radioactive wastes.

  11. Armoring, stability, and transport driven by fluid flow over a granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Benjamin; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-03-01

    We discuss experiments investigating the evolution of a granular bed by a fluid flow as a function of shear rate at the fluid-bed interface. This is a model system to investigate a variety of physical examples including wind blowing over sand, sediment transport in rivers, tidal flows interacting with beaches, flows in slurry pipelines, and sand proppants in hydraulic fracturing. In order to examine the onset and entrainment of the granular bed under steady state conditions, we have constructed a novel conical rheometer system which allows a variable amount of shear to be applied to the granular bed. The grain-fluid system is index matched so that we can visualize the grains away from the sides as well as visualize the fluid flow above and below the interface by using fluorescent tracer particles. We demonstrate that the onset of erosion arises as particles rotate out of their stable position highlighting the importance of torque balance to onset. We find significant armoring of the bed, as the bed is sheared by the fluid flow. Above onset, at least three distinct regions of bed mobility can be found. We will discuss the measured integrated granular flux as a function of shear rate and compare them with empirical laws found in the geophysical literature. Supported by NSF Grant Number CBET 1335928.

  12. Use fluid bed reactor for maleic anhydride from butane

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.C.; Neri, A.; Suciu, G.D.; Verde, L.

    1985-09-01

    A new process is described that incorporates three major improvements over the conventional air oxidation of benzene in a fixed-bed reactor system. The new ALMA Process was developed jointly by Alusuisse Italia and Lummus Crest. It includes the following process improvements: n-Butane feedstock, fluidized-bed reactor system, and a continuous maleic anhydride recovery system using an organic solvent. A summary of the process is given, as well as the steps in its development and its economic advantages.

  13. Synchronous droplets as a test bed for pulsatory active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2014-11-01

    Collective behavior in many-body systems has been studied extensively focusing on a wide range of interacting entities including: flocking animals, sedimenting particles and microfluidic droplets among others. Here, we propose an experimental platform to explore an oscillatory active fluid with synchronous ferrofluid droplets immersed in an immiscible carrier fluid in a Hele-Shaw configuration. The droplets are organized and actuated on a 2-D uniform grid through application of a precessive magnetic field. The state of our system is dependent on three parameters: the grid occupancy with fluid droplets, the grid geometry and the magnetic field. We study the long range orientational order of our system over a range of those parameters by tracking the motion of the droplets and analyzing the PIV data of the carrier fluid flow. Numerical simulations are juxtaposed with experimental data for prediction of the system's behavior.

  14. Physiology of Fluid and Electrolyte Responses During Inactivity: Water Immersion and Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    This manuscript emphasizes the physiology of fluid-electrolyte-hormonal responses during the prolonged inactivity of bed rest and water immersion. An understanding of the total mechanism of adaptation (deconditioning) should provide more insight into the conditioning process. Findings that need to be confirmed during bed rest and immersion are: (1) the volume and tissues of origin of fluid shifted to the thorax and head; (2) interstitial fluid pressure changes in muscle and subcutaneous tissue, particularly during immersion; and (3) the composition of the incoming presumably interstitial fluid that contributes to the early hypervolemia. Better resolution of the time course and source of the diuretic fluid is needed. Important data will be forthcoming when hypotheses are tested involving the probable action of the emerging diuretic and natriuretic hormones, between themselves and among vasopressin and aldosterone, on diuresis and blood pressure control.

  15. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  16. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest and fluid immersion in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    For many centuries, physicians have used prolonged rest in bed and immersion in water in the treatment of ailments and disease. Both treatments have positive remedial effects. However, adverse physiological responses become evident when patients return to their normal daily activities. The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the physiological changes during bed rest and the effects produced by water immersion. It is found that abrupt changes in body position related to bed rest cause acute changes in fluid compartment volumes. Attention is given to fluid shifts and body composition, renal function and diuresis, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, and orthostatic tolerance. In a discussion of water immersion, fluid shifts are considered along with cardiovascular-respiratory responses, renal function, and natriuretic and diuretic factors.

  17. In situ Sr isotopic analyses of epidote: tracing the sources of multi-stage fluids in ultrahigh-pressure eclogite (Ganghe, Dabie terrane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Ye, Kai; Yang, Yueheng; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Lingmin; Liu, Jingbo; Mao, Qian; Ma, Yuguang

    2014-02-01

    This study presents in situ strontium (Sr) isotope and Sr content data on multi-stage epidote crystals from ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) eclogites and omphacite-epidote veins therein at Ganghe (Dabie terrane, China), determined using LA-MC-ICP-MS. The Ganghe eclogites occur as lenses in mainly leucocratic UHP gneisses, and therefore, our data provide insights into the origin, composition, and transport scale of the discrete multi-stage fluids in UHP eclogites during the subduction and exhumation of a continental crust. Four textural types of epidote that record compositional and isotopic signatures of fluid at various metamorphic P- T conditions have been distinguished based on petrographic observations and compositional analyses. They are (1) fine-grained high-pressure (HP) epidote inclusions (Ep-In) in omphacite that define the earliest stage of epidote formation in the eclogite; (2) coarse-grained UHP epidote porphyroblasts (Ep-P) that contain omphacite with Ep-In inclusions in the eclogite; (3) fine-grained HP epidote in omphacite-epidote veins (Ep-V) as well as (4) the latest-stage epidote in disseminated amphibolite-facies veinlets (Ep-A), which crosscut the Ep-P or matrix minerals in the eclogite and HP vein. Both Ep-P and Ep-V crystals exhibit significant and complex chemical zonations with respect to the XFe (= Fe/(Fe + Al)) ratio and Sr content. In contrast to the varying Sr contents, Ep-In, Ep-P, and Ep-V have similar and narrow ranges of initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (from 0.70692 to 0.70720 for Ep-In, from 0.70698 to 0.70721 for Ep-P, and from 0.70668 to 0.70723 for Ep-V), which are significantly different from those in Ep-A (from 0.70894 to 0.71172). The initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio of Ep-A is closer in value to the initial Sr isotopic composition of the gneisses (from 0.710790 to 0.712069) which enclose the UHP eclogite. These data indicate different sources of the eclogite-facies fluids and retrograde amphibolite-facies fluid in the Ganghe eclogites. The HP

  18. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  19. METAL FILTERS FOR PRESSURIZED FLUID BED COMBUSTION (PFBC) APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-01-02

    Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. As part of the demonstration effort, SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field-tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous commercial metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions.

  20. Onset and cessation of grain motion in fluid-sheared beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abe; Salevan, Julia; Shattuck, Mark; Ouellette, Nick; O'Hern, Corey

    2015-11-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of granular beds driven by a model hydrodynamic shear flow to elucidate general grain-scale mechanisms that determine the onset and cessation of sediment transport. By varying the Shields number (the nondimensional shear stress at the top of the bed) and particle Reynolds number (the ratio of particle inertia to viscous damping), we explore how variations of the fluid flow rate, particle inertia, and fluid viscosity affect the onset and cessation of bed motion. For low to moderate particle Reynolds numbers, a critical boundary separates mobile and static states. Transition times between these states diverge as this boundary is approached both from above and below. At high particle Reynolds number, inertial effects become dominant, and particle motion can be sustained well below flow rates at which mobilization of a static bed occurs. We also find that the onset of bed motion (for both low and high particle Reynolds numbers) is described by Weibullian weakest-link statistics, and thus is crucially dependent on the packing structure of the granular bed, even deep beneath the surface. This work was supported by the US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-14-1-0005.

  1. The Hydrodynamic Stability of a Fluid-Particle Flow: Instabilities in Gas-Fluidized Beds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xue; Howley, Maureen A.; Johri, Jayati; Glasser, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    A simplified model of an industrially relevant fluid-particle flow system is analyzed using linear stability theory. Instabilities of the uniform state of a fluidized bed are investigated in response to small flow perturbations. Students are expected to perform each step of the computational analysis, and physical insight into key mechanistic…

  2. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 4/1/95 to 7/31/95 on contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384 (Work accomplished during the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/94 was summarized in the previous technical progress report included in the appendix of this report). In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) Completion of a literature survey on Fluid Bed Gasifier control, (2) Observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21, and (3) Suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure.

  3. Centaur Test Bed (CTB) for Cryogenic Fluid Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakla, Steven; Kutter, Bernard; Wall, John

    2006-01-01

    Future missions such as NASA s space exploration vision and DOD satellite servicing will require significant increases in the understanding and knowledge of space based cryogenic fluid management (CFM), including the transfer and storage of cryogenic fluids. Existing CFM capabilities are based on flight of upper stage cryogenic vehicles, scientific dewars, a few dedicated flight demonstrations and ground testing. This current capability is inadequate to support development of the CEV cryogenic propulsion system, other aspects of robust space exploration or the refueling of satellite cryo propulsion systems with reasonable risk. In addition, these technologies can provide significant performance increases for missions beyond low-earth orbit to enable manned missions to the Moon and beyond. The Centaur upper-stage vehicle can provide a low cost test platform for performing numerous flight demonstrations of the full breadth of required CFM technologies to support CEV development. These flight demonstrations can be performed as secondary mission objectives using excess LH2 and/or LO2 from the main vehicle propellant tanks following primary spacecraft separation at minimal cost and risk.

  4. Axial dispersion in packed bed reactors involving viscoinelastic and viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Renu; Bansal, Ajay

    2013-08-01

    Axial dispersion is an important parameter in the performance of packed bed reactors. A lot of fluids exhibit non-Newtonian behaviour but the effect of rheological parameters on axial dispersion is not available in literature. The effect of rheology on axial dispersion has been analysed for viscoinelastic and viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluids. Aqueous solutions of carboxymethyl cellulose and polyacrylamide have been chosen to represent viscoinelastic and viscoelastic liquid-phases. Axial dispersion has been measured in terms of BoL number. The single parameter axial dispersion model has been applied to analyse RTD response curve. The BoL numbers were observed to increase with increase in liquid flow rate and consistency index 'K' for viscoinelastic as well as viscoelastic fluids. Bodenstein correlation for Newtonian fluids proposed has been modified to account for the effect of fluid rheology. Further, Weissenberg number is introduced to quantify the effect of viscoelasticity.

  5. Fluid and salt supplementation effect on body hydration and electrolyte homeostasis during bed rest and ambulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Kakurin, Vassily J.; Kuznetsov, Nikolai A.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.

    2002-06-01

    Bed rest (BR) induces significant urinary and blood electrolyte changes, but little is known about the effect of fluid and salt supplements (FSS) on catabolism, hydration and electrolytes. The aim was to measure the effect of FSS on catabolism, body hydration and electrolytes during BR. Studies were done during 7 days of a pre-bed rest period and during 30 days of a rigorous bed rest period. Thirty male athletes aged, 24.6±7.6 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS groups were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS daily took 30 ml water per kg body weight and 0.1 sodium chloride per kg body weight. Plasma sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) levels, urinary Na, K, Ca and Mg excretion, plasma osmolality, plasma protein level, whole blood hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct) level increased significantly ( p≤0.05), while plasma volume (PV), body weight, body fat, peak oxygen uptake, food and fluid intake decreased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. In contrast, plasma and urinary electrolytes, osmolality, protein level, whole blood Hct and Hb level decreased significantly ( p≤0.05), while PV, fluid intake, body weight and peak oxygen uptake increased significantly ( p≤0.05) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with their baseline control values. The data indicate that FSS stabilizes electrolytes and body hydration during BR, while BR alone induces significant changes in electrolytes and body hydration. We conclude that FSS may be used to prevent catabolism and normalize body hydration status and electrolyte values during BR.

  6. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 10/1/94 to 3/31/95. In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data, (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control, and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Below we summarize work accomplished to data in each of these areas.

  7. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    In this work, three components will form the basis for design of a control scheme for the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG) at METC: (1) a control systems analysis based on simple linear models derived from process data; (2) review of the literature on fluid bed gasifier operation and control; and (3) understanding of present FBG operation and real world considerations. Tasks accomplished during the present reporting period include: (1) observation of the FBG during the week of July 17 to July 21; (2) suggested improvements to the control of FBG backpressure and MGCR pressure; and (3) data collection from FBG run No. 11 and transfer of data to USC.

  8. Chemical and textural characteristics of multistage fluid inclusions with high Li/B ratio found from the Sanbagawa belt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Hirajima, T.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies invoked that the variation of peculiar fluid soluble light elements, such as Li, B and Cl, are capable of suggesting generation depths of fluid released in subduction zones (e.g., Scambelluri et al., 2004; Bebout et al., 2007; Marschall et al., 2009). Crush-leached fluids extracted from quartz veins intercalated with metabasites of the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt show high Li and B concentrations, whose Li/B ratios show a positive correlation with metamorphic grade of the host rocks, i.e., from 0.02 for pumpellyite-actinolite facies to 0.27 for eclogite facies (Sengen et al., 2009). Furthermore, crush-leached fluids extracted from quartz veins intercalated with metasediments in proximal to the eclogite unit in the Besshi district show much higher Li/B ratio (ca. 0.36-1.99). Yoshida et al. (2011) pointed out that Li/B ratio of dehydrated fluids was controlled by the rock types of the host rocks, i.e., Li/B ratio of dehydrated fluids derived from tourmaline-free metasediments show much higher values than those expected from metabasites. Those obtained data suggest that the Li/B ratio of the deep fluid has a potential as a depth indicator but there remain many unknown factors for establishing it. The Li/B ratio of extracted fluid obtained by the crush-leached method integrates the whole fluid activities which the host rocks were taken place. To investigate the fluid activity history for the sample showing the highest Li/B ratio (1.99), detailed petrographical and microthemometric studies were performed. The studied sample IR04 is a foliation-parallel quartz vein intercalated with a Grt-Hbl-Ph schist probably derived from clay, whose peak P-T conditions are estimated as 600 °C and 1.3 GPa using pseudosection analysis. The quartz vein shows a foam microstructure, suggesting that low differential stress and high-T conditions were attained during its texture formation. Three types of fluid inclusions have been identified: the earliest one, FIA-I, is

  9. Composition of fluid inclusions in Permian salt beds, Palo Duro Basin, Texas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; d'Angelo, W. M.; Dorrzapf, A.F.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Several methods have been developed and used to extract and chemically analyze the two major types of fluid inclusions in bedded salt from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. Data on the ratio K: Ca: Mg were obtained on a few of the clouds of tiny inclusions in "chevron" salt, representing the brines from which the salt originally crystallized. Much more complete quantitative data (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Cl, SO4 and Br) were obtained on ??? 120 individual "large" (mostly ???500 ??m on an edge, i.e., ??? ??? 1.6 ?? 10-4 g) inclusions in recrystallized salt. These latter fluids have a wide range of compositions, even in a given piece of core, indicating that fluids of grossly different composition were present in these salt beds during the several (?) stages of recrystallization. The analytical results indicating very large inter-and intra-sample chemical variation verify the conclusion reached earlier, from petrography and microthermometry, that the inclusion fluids in salt and their solutes are generally polygenetic. The diversity in composition stems from the combination of a variety of sources for the fluids (Permian sea, meteoric, and groundwater, as well as later migrating ground-, formation, or meteoric waters of unknown age), and a variety of subsequent geochemical processes of dissolution, precipitation and rock-water interaction. The compositional data are frequently ambiguous but do provide constraints and may eventually yield a coherent history of the events that produced these beds. Such an understanding of the past history of the evaporite sequence of the Palo Duro Basin should help in predicting the future role of the fluids in the salt if a nuclear waste repository is sited there. ?? 1987.

  10. Catalytic converter with fluid injector for catalyst-free enclosure of catalyst bed

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.P.S.

    1984-09-25

    A fluid injection lozenge comprises two tubes supporting a perforate member forming a cage enclosing the space between the tubes. Each tube has a series of perforations along its length so that a fluid can be injected, through the tube, into the enclosed space. The lozenges are of use in catalytic converters of either the axial or radial flow design. In the case of a radial flow converter, a plurality of tubes are provided, preferably connected in pairs by the perforate members, to form a squirrel cage structure, disposed in the catalyst bed.

  11. Multi-stage barites in partially melted UHP eclogite: implications for fluid/melt activities during deep continental subduction in the Sulu orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songjie; Wang, Lu

    2015-04-01

    . Zr-in-rutile thermometry shows their formation temperature to be 586-664 oC at 1.5-2.5 GPa. Barite-bearing MS inclusions with Ba-bearing K-feldspar (type-II) connected by Kfs+Pl+Bt veinlets of in-situ phengite breakdown and thin barite veinlets along grain boundaries (type-III) are products of phengite breakdown and induced fluid flow during exhumation. These barites have witnessed the gradational separation process of melt/ fluid from miscibility on/above the second critical endpoint during UHP metamorphism, to immiscibility along the exhumation path of the subducted slab. Associated reactions from pyrite to hematite and goethite with the type-III barite ring surrounding the pyrite provide evidence for a local high oxygen fugacity environment during eclogite partial melting and subsequent melt/fluid crystallization processes. Moreover, large grain barite aggregations (type-IV) modified by amphibole+albite symplectite are most likely formed by release of molecular and hydroxyl water from anhydrous minerals of eclogite during high-grade amphibolite-facies retrogression. The growth of multi-stage barites in UHP eclogite further advances our understanding of fluid/melt transfer, crystallization processes along the subduction-exhumation path of the partially melted eclogite, broadening our knowledge of melt/fluid evolution within subduction-collision zones worldwide. REFERENCES Chen Y.X., et al., 2014, Lithos, 200, 1-21. Liu J.B., et al., 2000, Acta Petrologica Sinica 16(4), 482-484. Zeng L.S., et al., 2007, Chinese Science Bulletin, 52(21), 2995-3001. Gao X.Y., et al., 2012, Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 30(2), 193-212.

  12. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  13. Fluid-particle interaction and generation of coherent structures over permeable beds: an experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvaro, Sara; Miozzi, Massimo; Postacchini, Matteo; Mancinelli, Alessandro; Brocchini, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    process, while the former occurs before flow inversion and close to the porous bed. This result reveals that nearbed small-scale phenomena are weakly influenced by the wave mean flow. A detailed description of fluid suction and injection is proposed in terms of the mean flow dynamics (at wave scale), while the actual inflow/outflow of particles at the bed is seen to depend on local, small-scale flow properties. Suction and injection are generated during positive and negative water surface elevations and either squeeze or expand the flow downward/upward. The suction/injection perturbations contribute to the triggering of sweep and ejection events. Suction is mainly concentrated very close to the bed, injection is rapidly transported above the BBL, but the highest turbulence occurs in correspondence of suction events.

  14. Fluid modelling of a packed bed dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laer, Koen; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-02-01

    A packed bed dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor is computationally studied with a fluid model. Two different complementary axisymmetric 2D geometries are used to mimic the intrinsic 3D problem. It is found that a packing enhances the electric field strength and electron temperature at the contact points of the dielectric material due to polarization of the beads by the applied potential. As a result, these contact points prove to be of direct importance to initiate the plasma. At low applied potential, the discharge stays at the contact points, and shows the properties of a Townsend discharge. When a high enough potential is applied, the plasma will be able to travel through the gaps in between the beads from wall to wall, forming a kind of glow discharge. Therefore, the inclusion of a so-called ‘channel of voids’ is indispensable in any type of packed bed modelling.

  15. Effect of dietary sodium on fluid/electrolyte regulation during bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Gretebeck, Randall J.; Lane, Helen W.; Stuart, Charles A.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A negative fluid balance during bed rest (BR) is accompanied by decreased plasma volume (PV) which contributes to cardiovascular deconditioning. HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake would increase plasma osmolality (POSM), stimulate fluid conserving hormones, and reduce fluid/electrolyte (F/E) losses during BR; conversely, decreasing dietary sodium would decrease POSM, suppress fluid conserving hormones, and increase F/E losses. METHODS: We controlled fluid intake (30 ml x kg(-1) x d(-1)) in 17 men who consumed either a 4.0 +/- 0.06 g x d(-1) (174 mmol x d(-1)) (CONT; n = 6), 1.0 +/- 0.02 g x d(-1) (43 mmol x d(-1)) (LS; n = 6), or 10.0 +/- 0.04 g x d(-1) (430 mmol x d(-1)) (HS; n = 5) sodium diet before, during, and after 21 d of 6 degrees head-down BR. PV, total body water, urine volume and osmolality, POSM, and F/E controlling hormone concentrations were measured. RESULTS: In HS subjects, plasma renin activity (-92%), plasma/urinary aldosterone (-59%; -64%), and PV (-15.0%; 6.0 ml x kg(-1); p < 0.05) decreased while plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (+34%) and urine antidiuretic hormone (+24%) increased during BR (p < 0.05) compared with CONT. In LS, plasma renin activity (+166%), plasma aldosterone (+167%), plasma antidiuretic hormone (+19%), and urinary aldosterone (+335%) increased with no change in PV compared with CONT (p < 0.05). Total body water did not change in any of the subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Contrary to our hypothesis, increasing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake during BR resulted in a greater loss of PV compared with the CONT subjects. Reducing dietary sodium while controlling fluid intake did not alter the PV response during BR compared with CONT subjects.

  16. CFD study on local fluid-to-wall heat transfer in packed beds and field synergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenping; Xu, Min; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    To reach the target of smaller pressure drop and better heat transfer performance, packed beds with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio ( D/d p<10) have now been considered in many areas. Fluid-to-wall heat transfer coefficient is an important factor determining the performance of this type of beds. In this work, local fluid- to-wall heat transfer characteristic in packed beds was studied by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at different Reynolds number for D/d p=1.5, 3.0 and 5.6. The results show that the fluid-to-wall heat transfer coefficient is oscillating along the bed with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio. Moreover, this phenomenon was explained by field synergy principle in detail. Two arrangement structures of particles in packed beds were recommended based on the synergy characteristic between flow and temperature fields. This study provides a new local understanding of fluid-to-wall heat transfer in packed beds with small tube-to-particle diameter ratio.

  17. Bile salt/phospholipid mixed micelle precursor pellets prepared by fluid-bed coating

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fuxia; Xie, Yunchang; Qi, Jianping; Hu, Fuqiang; Lu, Yi; Li, Sanming; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Bile salt/phospholipid mixed micelles (MMs) are potent carriers used for oral absorption of drugs that are poorly soluble in water; however, there are many limitations associated with liquid formulations. In the current study, the feasibility of preparing bile salt/phospholipid MM precursor (preMM) pellets with high oral bioavailability, using fluid-bed coating technology, was examined. In this study, fenofibrate (FB) and sodium deoxycholate (SDC) were used as the model drug and the bile salt, respectively. To prepare the MMs and to serve as the micellular carrier, a weight ratio of 4:6 was selected for the sodium deoxycholate/phospholipids based on the ternary phase diagram. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 was selected as the dispersion matrix for precipitation of the MMs onto pellets, since it can enhance the solubilizing ability of the MMs. Coating of the MMs onto the pellets using the fluid-bed coating technology was efficient and the pellets were spherical and intact. MMs could be easily reconstituted from preMM pellets in water. Although they existed in a crystalline state in the preMM pellets, FB could be encapsulated into the reconstituted MMs, and the MMs were redispersed better than solid dispersion pellets (FB:PEG = 1:3) and Lipanthyl®. The redispersibility of the preMM pellets increased with the increase of the FB/PEG/micellar carrier. PreMM pellets with a FB:PEG:micellar carrier ratio of 1:1.5:1.5 showed 284% and 145% bioavailability relative to Lipanthyl® and solid dispersion pellets (FB:PEG = 1:3), respectively. Fluid-bed coating technology has considerable potential for use in preparing sodium deoxycholate/phospholipid preMM pellets, with enhanced oral bioavailability for poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:23641154

  18. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    PubMed

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  19. Multistage Electrophoretic Separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nathan; Doyle, John F.; Kurk, Andy; Vellinger, John C.; Todd, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A multistage electrophoresis apparatus has been invented for use in the separation of cells, protein molecules, and other particles and solutes in concentrated aqueous solutions and suspensions. The design exploits free electrophoresis but overcomes the deficiencies of prior free-electrophoretic separators by incorporating a combination of published advances in mathematical modeling of convection, sedimentation, electro-osmotic flow, and the sedimentation and aggregation of droplets. In comparison with other electrophoretic separators, these apparatuses are easier to use and are better suited to separation in relatively large quantities characterized in the art as preparative (in contradistinction to smaller quantities characterized in the art as analytical). In a multistage electrophoretic separator according to the invention, an applied vertical steady electric field draws the electrically charged particles of interest from within a cuvette to within a collection cavity that has been moved into position of the cuvette. There are multiple collection cavities arranged in a circle; each is aligned with the cuvette for a prescribed short time. The multistage, short-migration-path character of the invention solves, possibly for the first time, the fluid-instability problems associated with free electrophoresis. The figure shows a prototype multistage electrophoretic separator that includes four sample stations and five collection stages per sample. At each sample station, an aqueous solution or suspension containing charged species to be separated is loaded into a cuvette, which is machined into a top plate. The apparatus includes a lower plate, into which 20 collection cavities have been milled. Each cavity is filled with an electrophoresis buffer solution. For the collection of an electrophoretic fraction, the lower plate is rotated to move a designated collection cavity into alignment with the opening of the cuvette. An electric field is then applied between a non

  20. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A CFD two-scale model is formulated to simulate heavy metal vaporization from waste incineration in fluidized beds. • MSW particle is modelled with the macroscopic particle model. • Influence of bed dynamics on HM vaporization is included. • CFD predicted results agree well with experimental data reported in literature. • This approach may be helpful for fluidized bed reactor modelling purposes. - Abstract: Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073 K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator.

  1. Fluid bed drying of guarana (Paullinia cupana HBK) extract: effect of process factors on caffeine content.

    PubMed

    Pagliarussi, Renata S; Bastos, Jairo K; Freitas, Luis A P

    2006-06-16

    The aim of this study was to study the convective drying of the hydroalcoholic extracts obtained from powdered guarana seeds in a spouted bed dryer. The influence of process variables, such as the convective airflow rate, extract feed rate, and air inlet temperature, on the quality of the dry extract was determined using the caffeine and moisture content for the process evaluation. The caffeine content in the alcoholic and dried extracts was determined by capillary gas chromatography. The experiments were performed following a 3(3) factorial design and the data analyzed by response surface. The analysis of dry extract showed that the air and extract feed rates did not significantly affect (25% level) the caffeine content, but that drying temperature is a major factor to consider when the extract is submitted to fluid bed drying. Caffeine losses were significant (1% level) for drying temperatures above 120 degrees C, while moisture content was lower than 3% for temperatures above 120 degrees C. The data showed that there is an optimum temperature for the drying of guarana extracts in spouted beds, and under the conditions used in this study it was 120 degrees C.

  2. Effects of process parameters on solid self-microemulsifying particles in a laboratory scale fluid bed.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Tusharmouli; Plakogiannis, Fotios M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to select the critical process parameters of the fluid bed processes impacting the quality attribute of a solid self-microemulsifying (SME) system of albendazole (ABZ). A fractional factorial design (2(4-1)) with four parameters (spray rate, inlet air temperature, inlet air flow, and atomization air pressure) was created by MINITAB software. Batches were manufactured in a laboratory top-spray fluid bed at 625-g scale. Loss on drying (LOD) samples were taken throughout each batch to build the entire moisture profiles. All dried granulation were sieved using mesh 20 and analyzed for particle size distribution (PSD), morphology, density, and flow. It was found that as spray rate increased, sauter-mean diameter (D(s)) also increased. The effect of inlet air temperature on the peak moisture which is directly related to the mean particle size was found to be significant. There were two-way interactions between studied process parameters. The main effects of inlet air flow rate and atomization air pressure could not be found as the data were inconclusive. The partial least square (PLS) regression model was found significant (P < 0.01) and predictive for optimization. This study established a design space for the parameters for solid SME manufacturing process.

  3. Effects of Daily Centrifugation on Segmental Fluid Distribution in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diedrich, Andre; Moore, S. T.; Stenger, M.; Arya, T. M.; Newby, N.; Tucker, J. M.; Milstead, L.; Acock, K.; Knapp, C.; Jevans, J.; Paloski, W.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of daily centrifugation on segmental fluid distribution have been studied during 21 days of 6 degree head down bedrest. One group (N=7) underwent no countermeasure while the other (N=8) received a daily, one hour, dose (2.5 gz at the foot, decreasing to 1.0 gz at the heart) of artificial gravity (AG) training on the Johnson Space Center short radius centrifuge. Fluid shifts of thoracic(VTO), abdominal (VAB), thigh (VTH), and calf (VCA) regions were measured by the tetrapolar segmental body impedance technique. Untrained subjects reduced their total volume from 18.9 plus or minus 0.5L to 17.9 plus or minus 0.9L (MN plus or minus SE, P less than 0.05) while trained subjects maintained their total volume. In untrained, control, subjects after bed rest, there was a trend toward reduced volume in all segments, with significant reductions in thigh and calf (fig, P less than 0.05). Trained subjects maintained volume in all segments. Our data indicate that artificial gravity treatment counteracts bed rest-induced hypovolemia.

  4. Rapid formulation screening with a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor.

    PubMed

    Kivikero, Niina; Murtomaa, Matti; Antikainen, Osmo; Hatara, Juha; Juppo, Anne-Mari; Sandler, Niklas

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate early formulation screening in small scale with a miniaturized fluid bed device. Altogether eight different batches were granulated in a Multipart Microscale Fluid bed Powder processor (MMFP) with constant process conditions using electrostatic atomization. Atomization voltage and granulation liquid flow rate were kept constant. Acid acetylsalicylic was used as model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose and polyvinylpyrrolidone were used as excipients. Granule size distributions were measured with spatial filtering technique. Friability test was performed by spinning granules in the mixer with glass beads. Compressibility of the granules was evaluated by tableting and the breaking force of the tablets was measured. Multivariate analysis, namely partial least squares regression and multilinear regression were applied to the data. It was possible to generate granules of different compositions rapidly employing MMFP with electrostatic atomization fast and acquire reliable and logical results with only small amount of material. However, a major challenge was to find suitable analytical methods for such small batches. PMID:20387990

  5. Influence of in line monitored fluid bed granulation process parameters on the stability of Ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2015-12-30

    Ethinylestradiol (EE) as a highly active and low dosed compound is prone to oxidative degradation. The stability of the drug substance is therefore a critical parameter that has to be considered during drug formulation. Beside the stability of the drug substance, granule particle size and moisture are critical quality attributes (CQA) of the fluid bed granulation process which influence the tableting ability of the resulting granules. Both CQA should therefore be monitored during the production process by process analytic technology (PAT) according to ICH Q8. This work focusses on the effects of drying conditions on the stability of EE in a fluid-bed granulation process. We quantified EE degradation products 6-alpha-hydroxy-EE, 6-beta-hydroxy-EE, 9(11)-dehydro-EE and 6-oxo-EE during long time storage and accelerated conditions. PAT-tools that monitor granule particle size (Spatial filtering technology) and granule moisture (Microwave resonance technology) were applied and compared with off-line methods. We found a relevant influence of residual granule moisture and thermic stress applied during granulation on the storage stability of EE, whereas no degradation was found immediately after processing. Hence we conclude that drying parameters have a relevant influence on long term EE stability.

  6. Fluid Flow through a High Cell Density Fluidized-Bed during Centrifugal Bioreactor Culture

    PubMed Central

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing demand for products such as tissues, proteins, and antibodies from mammalian cell suspension cultures is driving interest in increasing production through high-cell density bioreactors. The centrifugal bioreactor (CCBR) retains cells by balancing settling forces with surface drag forces due to medium throughput and is capable of maintaining cell densities above 108 cells/mL. This article builds on a previous study where the fluid mechanics of an empty CCBR were investigated showing fluid flow is nonuniform and dominated by Coriolis forces, raising concerns about nutrient and cell distribution. In this article, we demonstrate that the previously reported Coriolis forces are still present in the CCBR, but masked by the presence of cells. Experimental dye injection observations during culture of 15 μm hybridoma cells show a continual uniform darkening of the cell bed, indicating the region of the reactor containing cells is well mixed. Simulation results also indicate the cell bed is well mixed during culture of mammalian cells ranging in size from 10 to 20 μm. However, simulations also allow for a slight concentration gradient to be identified and attributed to Coriolis forces. Experimental results show cell density increases from 0.16 to 0.26 when centrifugal force is doubled by increasing RPM from 650 to 920 at a constant inlet velocity of 6.5 cm/s; an effect also observed in the simulation. Results presented in this article indicate cells maintained in the CCBR behave as a high-density fluidized bed of cells providing a homogeneous environment to ensure optimal growth conditions. PMID:20205172

  7. Comparison between finite volume and lattice-Boltzmann method simulations of gas-fluidised beds: bed expansion and particle-fluid interaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Third, J. R.; Chen, Y.; Müller, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) simulations of a gas-fluidised bed have been performed. In contrast to the current state-of-the-art coupled computational fluid dynamics-discrete element method (CFD-DEM) simulations, the LBM does not require a closure relationship for the particle-fluid interaction force. Instead, the particle-fluid interaction can be calculated directly from the detailed flow profile around the particles. Here a comparison is performed between CFD-DEM and LBM simulations of a small fluidised bed. Simulations are performed for two different values of the superficial gas velocity and it is found that the LBM predicts a larger bed expansion for both flowrates. Furthermore the particle-fluid interaction force obtained for LBM simulations is compared to the force which would be predicted by a CFD-DEM model under the same conditions. On average the force predicted by the CFD-DEM closure relationship is found to be significantly smaller than the force obtained from the LBM.

  8. Body fluid alterations during head-down bed rest in men at moderate altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Luft, F. C.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on fluid balance responses to simulated zero-gravity, measurements were made in six subjects before and during -5 deg continuous head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft. The same subjects were studied again at this altitude without HDBR as a control (CON) using a cross-over design. During this time, they maintained normal upright day-time activities, sleeping in the horizontal position at night. Fluid balance changes during HDBR in hypoxia were more pronounced than similar measurements previously reported from HDBR studies at sea level. Plasma volume loss was slightly greater and the diuresis and natriuresis were doubled in magnitude as compared to previous studies in normoxia and sustained for 4 d during hypoxia. These changes were associated with an immediate but transient rise in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to day 4 of 140 percent in HDBR and 41 percent in CON (p less than 0.005), followed by a decline towards baseline. Differences were less striking between HDBR and CON for plasma antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone, which were transiently reduced by HDBR. Plasma catecholamines showed a similar pattern to ANP in both HDBR and CON, suggesting that elevated ANP and catecholamines together accounted for the enhanced fluid shifts with HDBR during hypoxia.

  9. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    SciTech Connect

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish; Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  10. High temperature fluid-bed heat recovery for aluminum melting furnace

    SciTech Connect

    1982-12-01

    The objective of the study was to establish whether technical problems would be encountered in increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid bed heat exchanger unit at Alcoa above the 1100/sup 0/F target of the current contract. Specifically, the temperature range of up to, and potentially above, 1600/sup 0/F were investigated to establish the benefits of higher temperature, trade offs required, and plans to achieve that technology goal. The benefits are tabulated and are very significant, particularly at the temperature range of 1600 to 1800/sup 0/F. Relative to 1100/sup 0/F the heat recovery is increased by 24 to 29% at 1600 and 1800/sup 0/F respectively.

  11. Coupling scales for modelling heavy metal vaporization from municipal solid waste incineration in a fluid bed by CFD.

    PubMed

    Soria, José; Gauthier, Daniel; Flamant, Gilles; Rodriguez, Rosa; Mazza, Germán

    2015-09-01

    Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) in fluidized bed is a very interesting technology mainly due to high combustion efficiency, great flexibility for treating several types of waste fuels and reduction in pollutants emitted with the flue gas. However, there is a great concern with respect to the fate of heavy metals (HM) contained in MSW and their environmental impact. In this study, a coupled two-scale CFD model was developed for MSWI in a bubbling fluidized bed. It presents an original scheme that combines a single particle model and a global fluidized bed model in order to represent the HM vaporization during MSW combustion. Two of the most representative HM (Cd and Pb) with bed temperatures ranging between 923 and 1073K have been considered. This new approach uses ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 as the modelling platform for the simulations along with a complete set of self-developed user-defined functions (UDFs). The simulation results are compared to the experimental data obtained previously by the research group in a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator. The comparison indicates that the proposed CFD model predicts well the evolution of the HM release for the bed temperatures analyzed. It shows that both bed temperature and bed dynamics have influence on the HM vaporization rate. It can be concluded that CFD is a rigorous tool that provides valuable information about HM vaporization and that the original two-scale simulation scheme adopted allows to better represent the actual particle behavior in a fluid bed incinerator. PMID:26050934

  12. Coupled dynamics of interfacial waves and bed forms in fluid muds over erodible seabeds in oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, J. H.; Traykovski, P.

    2015-08-01

    Recent field investigations of the damping of ocean surface waves over fluid muds have revealed waves on the interface between the thin layer of fluid mud and the overlying much thicker column of clear water, accompanied by bed forms on the erodible seabed beneath the fluid mud. The frequencies and wavelengths of the observed interfacial waves are qualitatively consistent with the linear dispersion relationship for long interfacial waves, but the forcing mechanism is not known. To understand the forcing, a linear model is proposed, based on the layer-averaged hydrostatic equations for the fluid mud, together with the Meyer-Peter-Mueller equation for the sediment transport within the underlying seabed, both subject to oscillatory forcing by the surface waves. If the underlying seabed is nonerodible and flat, the model indicates parametric instability to interfacial waves, but the threshold for instability is not met by the observations. If the underlying seabed is erodible, the model indicates that perturbations to the seabed elevation in the presence of the oscillatory forcing create interfacial waves, which in turn produce stresses within the fluid mud that force a net transport of sediment within the seabed toward the bed form crests, thus causing growth of both bed forms and interfacial waves. The frequencies, wavelengths, and growth rates are in qualitative agreement with the observations. A competition between mixing created by the interfacial waves and gravitational settling might control the thickness, density, and viscosity of the fluid muds during periods of strong forcing.

  13. The origin of fluids in the salt beds of the Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Johnson, C.M.; White, L.D.; Roedder, E.

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses have been made of (1) brines from several wells in the salt deposits of the Delaware Basin, (2) inclusion fluids in halite crystals from the ERDA No. 9 site, and (3) local ground waters of meteoric origin. The isotopic compositions indicate that the brines are genetically related and that they probably originated from the evaporation of paleo-ocean waters. Although highly variable in solute contents, the brines have rather uniform isotopic compositions. The stable isotope compositions of brine from the ERDA No. 6 site (826.3 m depth) and fluid inclusions from the ERDA No. 9 site are variable but remarkably regular and show that (1) mixing with old or modern meteoric waters has occurred, the extent of mixing apparently decreasing with depth, and (2) water in the ERDA No. 6 brine may have originated from the dehydration of gypsum. Alternatively, the data may reflect simple evaporation of meteoric water on a previously dry marine flat. Stable isotope compositions of all the waters analyzed indicate that there has been fairly extensive mixing with ground water throughout the area, but that no significant circulation has occurred. The conclusions bear importantly on the suitability of these salt beds and others as repositories for nuclear waste. ?? 1986.

  14. Preparative chromatography with supercritical fluids. Comparison of simulated moving bed and batch processes.

    PubMed

    Peper, Stephanie; Johannsen, Monika; Brunner, Gerd

    2007-12-28

    Preparative chromatography is a key technology for the separation of fine chemicals in production scale. Most of the published studies are carried out using liquid solvents as mobile phase. However, the used organic solvents can often be replaced by supercritical fluids. A reduction or renouncement of organic solvents does not only correspond to the trend of the so-called green chemistry--a sustainable, environmentally friendly production of chemical products. But a changeover to chromatography with supercritical fluids can also be reasonable under economic criteria. In this contribution a comparison between the Batch-supercritical fluid chromatography (Batch-SFC) process and the simulated moving bed (SMB)-SFC process is presented. Because of the minor importance of solvent consumption and solvent recovery in SFC, the separation systems were optimized primarily in terms of their specific productivity. For three of the four investigated model systems, the specific productivity of the SMB process is significantly higher than the productivity of the Batch process. Due to the fact, that the process with the higher specific productivity is not inevitably the more economical process, supplementary the costs of the process were considered. Therefore the comparison of the two processes was done from an economic point of view considering the minimum product price that has to be realized to fulfill the defined economic aim. It was found that although the optimized specific productivities of the SMB process were significantly higher than the productivities of the Batch process, the Batch process is the more profitable process for the investigated production rate range between 0.4 and 5t/a.

  15. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  16. Development and evaluation of diltiazem hydrochloride controlled-release pellets by fluid bed coating process

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mikkilineni Bhanu; Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvalam Lankapalli C.; Balakrishna, Talamanchi; Trilochani, Pavuluri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop controlled-release pellets of diltiazem HCl with ethyl cellulose and hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose phthalate as the release rate retarding polymers by fluid bed coating technique. The prepared pellets were evaluated for drug content, particle size, subjected to Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Differential Scanning Calori metry (DSC), and evaluated for in vitro release. Stability studies were carried out on the optimized formulations for a period of 3 months. The drug content was in the range of 97%-101%. The mean particle size of the drug-loaded pellets was in the range 700-785 μm. The drug release rate decreased as the concentration of ethyl cellulose increased in the pellet formulations. Among the prepared formulations, FDL10 and FDL11 showed 80% drug release in 16 h, matching with USP dissolution test 6 for diltiazem HCl extended-release capsules. SEM photographs confirmed that the prepared formulations were spherical in nature with a smooth surface. The compatibility between drug and polymers in the drug-loaded pellets was confirmed by DSC studies. Stability studies indicated that the pellets were stable. PMID:23833750

  17. Cardiovascular and Body Fluid Adjustments During Bed Rest and Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Although a few scientific bed rest (BR) studies were conducted soon after World War II, advent of the space program provided impetus for utilizing prolonged (days-months) BR, which employed the horizontal or 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) body positions, to simulate responses of healthy people to microgravity. Shorter (hours) HDT protocols were used to study initial mechanisms of the acclimation-deconditioning (reduction of physical fitness) syndromes. Of the major physiological factors modified during BR, reduced force on bones, ligaments, and muscles, and greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, the latter: which involves shifts of blood from the lower extremities into the upper body, increase in central venous pressure, and diuresis, appears to be the initial stimulus for acclimation. Increase in central venous pressure occurs in subjects during weightless parabolic flight, but not in astronauts early during orbital flight. But significant reduction in total body water (hypohydration) and plasma volume (hypovolemia) occurs in subjects during both BR and microgravity. Response of interstitial fluid volume is not as clear, It has been reported to increase during BR, and it may have increased in Skylab II and IV astronauts. Reduction of total body water, and greater proportional reduction of extracellular volume, indicates increased cellular volume which may contribute to inflight cephalic edema. Cerebral pressure abates after a few days of HDT, but not during flight. accompanied by normal (eugravity) blood constituent concentrations suggesting some degree of acclimation had occurred. But during reentry, with moderately increased +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration and gravitational force, the microgravity "euhydration" becomes functional progressive dehydration contributing to the general reentry syndrome (GRS) which, upon landing the Shuttle, can and often results in gastrointestinal distress, disorientation, vertigo, fatigue, and

  18. Fluid bed gasification – Plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: Experimental assessment of sulphur species

    SciTech Connect

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • We investigate gaseous sulphur species whilst gasifying sulphur-enriched wood pellets. • Experiments performed using a two stage fluid bed gasifier – plasma converter process. • Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels were identified. • Oxygen-rich regions of the bed are believed to facilitate SO{sub 2}, with a delayed release. • Gas phase reducing regions above the bed would facilitate more prompt COS generation. - Abstract: Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO{sub 2}’s generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO{sub 2} was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO{sub 2} generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS – hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling.

  19. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics for H-Coal. Quarterly progress report No. 1, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.

    1980-12-01

    Cold flow experiments were completed with kerosene, nitrogen, and HDS-2A (3/16'' length) catalyst. Percent bed expansion, gas/liquid/catalyst holdups, and drift fluxes were determined for each test. Fluid dynamics data were obtained at HRI during Run PDU-10 (Wyodak coal and Amocat-1A catalyst). Reactor liquid samples were taken for later viscosity determination. A 6'' diameter test stand for bubble coalescence experiments was constructed and delivered to Northwestern University. A search was initiated to select suitable model fluids.

  20. Improving design and operation of multiple-hearth and fluid bed sludge incinerators. Final report, June 1984-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to document improvements in design, operation, and maintenance of multiple-hearth and fluid-bed furnace incineration for combustion of sludge in municipal wastewater-treatment plants. The information contained in the report is intended to supplement and qualify information available from incinerator manufacturers and published literature. The report addresses incinerator and support systems design deficiencies and solutions, operation and maintenance problems and solutions, fuel efficient operation, upgrading of existing incinerators, administration, and personnel training.

  1. In-line monitoring of particle size in a fluid bed granulator: investigations concerning positioning and configuration of the sensor.

    PubMed

    Roßteuscher-Carl, Katrin; Fricke, Sabine; Hacker, Michael C; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela

    2014-05-15

    According to the ICH Q8 guideline, analytic technologies (PAT) are important tools for characterization and optimization of pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Particle size as a critical quality attribute for granules is therefore an important parameter that should be monitored during the fluid bed granulation process. This work focusses on optimizing position and configuration of an SFT-sensor for the in-line measurement of particle size distribution in a Glatt GPCG 3 fluid bed granulator. As model-substances, different grades of microcrystalline cellulose were used. The in-line measured particle size and particle rate in the sensor were evaluated. A sensor position in the deceleration zone of the granulator was found to be promising for in-line particle size measurement. Most reliable data were generated in this position when the probe was placed in a distance of 11cm from the chamber wall to avoid bias by the inlet air stream. No major influence of rotation angle of the probe was found in this position. Furthermore, an entire fluid bed granulation process was successfully monitored with the sensor installed in the optimized setting.

  2. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Yu; Harrington, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard areas to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard. 2 figs.

  3. Combustor with multistage internal vortices

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.; Harrington, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor is provided with a multistage arrangement of vortex generators in the freeboard area. The vortex generators are provided by nozzle means which extend into the interior of the freeboard for forming vortices within the freeboard area to enhance the combustion of particulate material entrained in product gases ascending into the freeboard from the fluidized bed. Each of the nozzles are radially inwardly spaced from the combustor walls defining the freeboard to provide for the formation of an essentially vortex-free, vertically extending annulus about the vortices whereby the particulate material centrifuged from the vortices against the inner walls of the combustor is returned through the annulus to the fluidized bed. By adjusting the vortex pattern within the freeboard, a significant portion of the full cross-sectional area of the freeboard except for the peripheral annulus can be contacted with the turbulent vortical flow for removing the particulate material from the gaseous products and also for enhancing the combustion thereof within the freeboard.

  4. Quantifying fluid and bed dynamics for characterizing benthic physical habitat in large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Sturgeon use benthic habitats in and adjacent to main channels where environmental conditions can include bedload sediment transport and high near-bed flow velocities. Bed velocity measurements obtained with acoustic Doppler instruments provide a means to assess the concentration and velocity of sediment moving near the streambed, and are thus indicative of the bedload sediment transport rate, the near-bed flow velocity, and the stability of the substrate. Acoustic assessments of benthic conditions in the Missouri River were conducted at scales ranging from the stream reach to individual bedforms. Reach-scale results show that spatially-averaged bed velocities in excess of 0.5 m s-1 frequently occur in the navigation channel. At the local scale, bed velocities are highest near bedform crests, and lowest in the troughs. Low-velocity zones can persist in areas with extremely high mean bed velocities. Use of these low-velocity zones may allow sturgeon to make use of portions of the channel where the average conditions near the bed are severe. To obtain bed velocity measurements of the highest possible quality, it is necessary to extract bottom-track and GPS velocity information from the raw ADCP data files on a ping-by-ping basis. However, bed velocity measured from a point can also be estimated using a simplified method that is more easily implemented in the context of routine monitoring. The method requires only the transect distance and direction data displayed in standard ADCP data-logging software. Bed velocity estimates obtained using this method are usually within 5-10% of estimates obtained from ping-by-ping processing. ?? 2007 Blackwell Verlag.

  5. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Soria, J; Gauthier, D; Falcoz, Q; Flamant, G; Mazza, G

    2013-03-15

    The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles' combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature.

  6. Local CFD kinetic model of cadmium vaporization during fluid bed incineration of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Soria, J; Gauthier, D; Falcoz, Q; Flamant, G; Mazza, G

    2013-03-15

    The emissions of heavy metals during incineration of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) are a major issue to health and the environment. It is then necessary to well quantify these emissions in order to accomplish an adequate control and prevent the heavy metals from leaving the stacks. In this study the kinetic behavior of Cadmium during Fluidized Bed Incineration (FBI) of artificial MSW pellets, for bed temperatures ranging from 923 to 1073 K, was modeled. FLUENT 12.1.4 was used as the modeling framework for the simulations and implemented together with a complete set of user-defined functions (UDFs). The CFD model combines the combustion of a single solid waste particle with heavy metal (HM) vaporization from the burning particle, and it takes also into account both pyrolysis and volatiles' combustion. A kinetic rate law for the Cd release, derived from the CFD thermal analysis of the combusting particle, is proposed. The simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained in a lab-scale fluidized bed incinerator reported in literature, and with the predicted values from a particulate non-isothermal model, formerly developed by the authors. The comparison shows that the proposed CFD model represents very well the evolution of the HM release for the considered range of bed temperature. PMID:23410804

  7. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately.

  8. Fluid bed gasification--plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: experimental assessment of sulphur species.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO2 and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO2's generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO2 was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO2 generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS--hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling. PMID:24176239

  9. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. PMID:25181553

  10. Fluid bed gasification--plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: experimental assessment of sulphur species.

    PubMed

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Taylor, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO2 and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO2's generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO2 was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO2 generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS--hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling.

  11. Development of a visiometric process analyzer for real-time monitoring of bottom spray fluid-bed coating.

    PubMed

    Liew, Celine Valeria; Wang, Li Kun; Wan Sia Heng, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Particle recirculation within the partition column is a major source of process variability in the bottom spray fluid-bed coating process. However, its locality and complex nature make it hidden from the operator. The aim of this study was to take snapshots of the process by employing a visiometric process analyzer based on high-speed imaging and ensemble correlation particle image velocimetry (PIV) to quantify particle recirculation. High-speed images of particles within the partition column of a bottom spray fluid-bed coater were captured and studied by morphological image processing and ensemble correlation PIV. Particle displacement probability density function (PDF) obtained from ensemble correlation PIV was consistent with validation experiments using an image tracking method. Particle displacement PDF was further resolved into particle velocity magnitude and particle velocity orientation histograms, which gave information about particle recirculation probability, thus quantifying the main source of process variability. Deeper insights into particle coating process were obtained and better control of coat uniformity can thus be achieved with use of the proposed visiometric process analyzer. The concept of visiometric process analyzers was proposed and their potential applications in pharmaceutical processes were further discussed. PMID:19504576

  12. A multi-scale investigation of interfacial transport, pore fluid flow, and fine particle deposition in a sediment bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Packman, Aaron I.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Gaillard, Jean-FrançOis

    2010-11-01

    We used X-ray difference microtomography (XDMT) and multi-scale lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulations to investigate the deposition of colloidal particles in a streambed from the micron scale to the bedform scale. Flume experiments were performed to deposit zirconia colloids from suspension into a sediment bed composed of glass beads and covered with dune-shaped bedforms. Following deposition, we extracted a series of cores over a single bedform, and analyzed the microstructure of colloid deposition patterns within these cores by XDMT. Colloids deposited primarily on the upstream sides of glass beads located at the upstream face of the bedform. Colloid deposits were also found in narrow pores and grain contacts, resulting from physical straining. We used the pore structure measured by XDMT as internal solid boundaries in pore-scale LB simulations of pore water flow in order to define a constitutive porosity-permeability relationship at the scale of the representative elementary volume (REV) for the porous medium. We then incorporated this information in a continuum-scale LB model to simulate hyporheic exchange flow at the bedform scale. The bedform-scale flow model was discretized at the REV scale, with the porosity-permeability relationship obtained from the pore-scale analysis used to represent the effects of micro-scale feedbacks between particle deposition, bed structure, and pore fluid flow. Colloids deposited rapidly in the subsurface, leading to a decrease in permeability and a modification of hyporheic flow paths near the bed surface. Colloid deposition reduced the mean stream-subsurface exchange flux, but increased the spatial variability in pore water flow, leading to higher exchange flux in some locations. Similarly, the mean hyporheic residence time increased after deposition, but the development of preferential flow paths led to more rapid exchange through some regions of the bedform. These results reveal how flow-boundary interactions, colloid influx to

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  14. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube

  15. Combine waste-to-energy, recycling with fluid-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a plant that will be the first to incorporate a fluidized-bed boiler to burn refuse-derived fuel exclusively. An effective long-term solid-waste management program will soon be a reality for Bladen, Cumberland, and Hoke counties, North Carolina. The key element of the program is a 600-ton/day waste-to-energy (WTE) facility, scheduled to begin commercial operation later this year. The BCH Energy project, which gets its name from the initials of the three counties it serves, will become the first fluidized-bed boiler in the US designed to be fueled solely by refuse-derived fuel (RDF). As such, it provides an innovative and efficient approach to solid-waste management in several ways: (1) Maximizes community participation in a recovery and recycling effort. (2) Maximizes additional waste handling and hauling efforts. (3) Significantly reducing waste flow into landfill. (4) Eliminating use of fossil fuel for a nearby chemical plant`s energy load. (5) Substantially improves air quality through use of the latest combustion and emissions control technology.

  16. Combine waste-to-energy, recycling with fluid-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    An effective long-term solid-waste management program will soon be a reality for Bladen, Cumberland, and Hoke counties, North Carolina. The key element of the program is a 600-ton/day waste-to-energy (WTE) facility, scheduled to begin commercial operation later this year. The BCH Energy project, which gets its name from the initials of the three counties it serves, will become the first fluidized-bed boiler in the US designed to be fueled solely by refuse-derived fuel (RDF). As such, it provides an innovative and efficient approach to solid-waste management in several ways: (1) maximimizes community participation in a recovery and recycling effort; (2) maximizes additional waste handling and hauling efforts; (3) significantly reducing waste flow into landfill; (4) eliminating use of fossil fuel for a nearby chemical plant`s energy load; and (5) substantially improves air quality through use of the latest combustoin and emissions control technology.

  17. Analysis and control of the METC fluid-bed gasifier. Quarterly report, October 1994--January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Farell, A.E.; Reddy, S.

    1995-03-01

    This document summarizes work performed for the period 10/1/94 to 2/1/95. The initial phase of the work focuses on developing a simple transfer function model of the Fluidized Bed Gasifier (FBG). This transfer function model will be developed based purely on the gasifier responses to step changes in gasifier inputs (including reactor air, convey air, cone nitrogen, FBG pressure, and coal feedrate). This transfer function model will represent a linear, dynamic model that is valid near the operating point at which the data was taken. In addition, a similar transfer function model will be developed using MGAS in order to assess MGAS for use as a model of the FBG for control systems analysis.

  18. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  19. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid.

  20. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Steven J.; Evans, Paul N.; Parks, Donovan H.; Golding, Suzanne D.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  1. Two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process for solid waste valorisation: Technical review and preliminary thermodynamic modelling of sulphur emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Morrin, Shane; Lettieri, Paola; Chapman, Chris; Mazzei, Luca

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate sulphur during MSW gasification within a fluid bed-plasma process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the literature on the feed, sulphur and process principles therein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The need for research in this area was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We perform thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial findings indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur. - Abstract: Gasification of solid waste for energy has significant potential given an abundant feed supply and strong policy drivers. Nonetheless, significant ambiguities in the knowledge base are apparent. Consequently this study investigates sulphur mechanisms within a novel two stage fluid bed-plasma gasification process. This paper includes a detailed review of gasification and plasma fundamentals in relation to the specific process, along with insight on MSW based feedstock properties and sulphur pollutant therein. As a first step to understanding sulphur partitioning and speciation within the process, thermodynamic modelling of the fluid bed stage has been performed. Preliminary findings, supported by plant experience, indicate the prominence of solid phase sulphur species (as opposed to H{sub 2}S) - Na and K based species in particular. Work is underway to further investigate and validate this.

  2. Stable isotope composition of fluid inclusions preserved in halite derived from Wieliczka and Bochnia Salt Beds (Southern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulinski, Marek; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Bukowski, Krzysztof

    2010-05-01

    Halite deposits located in the southern Poland, near Krakow, are famous mostly due to the medieval salt mine located in Wieliczka. Contrary to most salt deposits in Europe forming large domes, the halite deposits near Krakow form distinct beds, extending from west to east on the area of ca. 10 km2, with several types of salt identified. The deposits were formed in shallow environment, ca. 15 mln years ago and represent initial stages of Miocene sea water evaporation. Stable isotope composition of fluid inclusions trapped in the halite crystals originating from Wieliczka and Bochnia salt mines was investigated. Three distinct groups of samples were analysed: (i) samples derived from so-called 'green salt' beds forming extensive horizontal structures, (ii) samples derived from so-called zuber-type salt, and (iii) large monocrystals of halite collected in two crystal caves existing in the mine. The samples belonging to the first and second group were heated under vacuum to extract the fluid inclusions, according to the procedure used previously to extract inclusions from speleothem samples. The macro-inclusions present in some monocrystals of halite collected in crystal caves were removed for analysis without any thermal treatment. The concentration of bivalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+) was measured in the bulk material (green salt). K+, Mg2+ and SO4-2 content was measured in the fluid inclusions derived from macro-crystals. The stable isotope data points form two clusters in the δ2H-δ18O space, representing crystal caves and green- and zuber-type salts, respectively. The cluster representing green- and zuber-type salt deposit is shifted to the right-hand side of the Local Meteoric Water Line (LMWL), towards more positive δ2H and δ18O values, pointing to evaporative conditions during formation of these deposits. Although the evaporation trajectories for the sea water in the δ2H - δ18O space suggest that fluid inclusions might represent remnants of the original

  3. Online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in bottom spray fluid bed coating--development and application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2010-08-16

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop a visiometric process analyzer for online monitoring of particle mass flow rate in the bottom spray fluid bed coating process. The secondary purpose is to investigate the influences of partition gap and air accelerator insert size on particle mass flow rate using the developed visiometric process analyzer. Particle movement in the region between the product chamber and partition column was captured using a high speed camera. Mean particle velocity and number of particles in the images were determined by particle image velocimetry and morphological image processing method respectively. Mass flow rate was calculated using particle velocity, number of particles in the images, particle density and size information. Particle velocity and number findings were validated using image tracking and manual particle counting techniques respectively. Validation experiments showed that the proposed method was accurate. Partition gap was found to influence particle mass flow rate by limiting the rate of solids flux into the partition column; the air accelerator insert was found to influence particle mass flow rate by a Venturi effect. Partition gap and air accelerator insert diameter needed to be adjusted accordingly in relation to the other variability sources and diameter of coating cores respectively. The potential, challenges and possible solutions of the proposed visiometric process analyzer were further discussed.

  4. Improved bioavailability and antiasthmatic efficacy of poorly soluble curcumin-solid dispersion granules obtained using fluid bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Jin; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Kooyeon; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal absorption and antiasthmatic efficacy of poorly water-soluble curcumin (CUR), which has low solubility and permeability, was increased by fabricating solid dispersion granules (SDGs). The SDG containing CUR (SDG-CUR) was prepared by dispersing CUR in excess Cremophor RH40 as a solubilizer and Ryoto sugar ester L-1695 as an absorption enhancer using fluid bed granulation. We evaluated the physicochemical properties such as crystallinity and dissolution, pharmacokinetics, and antiasthmatic efficacy of SDG-CUR. Our results showed that CUR was molecularly dispersed, and the dissolution of SDG-CUR was significantly higher than that of native CUR. In addition, the blood concentration of SDG-CUR in rats was much higher than that of native CUR. Compared to CUR, SDG-CUR showed a 9.1- and 13.1-fold increase in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), respectively. Further, SDG-CUR effectively alleviated airway hyperresponsiveness and levels of T-helper 2 cytokines (interleukin-4, interleukin-5, and interleukin-13) in a murine model of asthma. In conclusion, our results suggest that the SDGs could be considered as a potential oral formulation to enhance the absorption and efficacy of CUR.

  5. Hydrodynamics and energy consumption studies in a three-phase liquid circulating three-phase fluid bed contactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rusumdar, Ahmad J; Abuthalib, A.; Mohan, Vaka Murali; Srinivasa Kumar, C.; Sujatha, V.; Rajendra Prasad, P.

    2009-07-15

    The hydrodynamics and energy consumption have been studied in a cold flow, bubbling and turbulent, pressurized gas-liquid-solid three-phase fluidized bed (0.15 m ID x 1 m height) with concurrent gas-liquid up flow is proposed with the intention of increasing the gas hold up. The hydrodynamic behaviour is described and characterised by some specific gas and liquid velocities. Particles are easily fluidized and can be uniformly distributed over the whole height of the column. The effect of parameters like liquid flow rate, gas flow rate, particle loading, particle size, and solid density on gas hold up and effect of gas flow rate, solid density and particle size on solid hold up, energy consumption and minimum fluidization velocity has been studied. At the elevated pressures a superior method for better prediction of minimum fluidization velocity and terminal settling velocities has been adopted. The results have been interpreted with Bernoulli's theorem and Richardson-Zaki equation. Based on the assumption of the gas and liquid as a pretend fluid, a simplification has been made to predict the particle terminal settling velocities. The Richardson-Zaki parameter n' was compared with Renzo's results. A correlation has been proposed with the experimental results for the three-phase fluidization. (author)

  6. Simulation of multistage turbine flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Mulac, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A flow model has been developed for analyzing multistage turbomachinery flows. This model, referred to as the average passage flow model, describes the time-averaged flow field with a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. Computer resource requirements, supporting empirical modeling, formulation code development, and multitasking and storage are discussed. Illustrations from simulations of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) fuel turbine performed to date are given.

  7. Multistage Zeeman deceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Andrist, M.; Schmutz, H.; Lambilotte, B.; Merkt, F.

    2009-05-01

    In recent years multistage Zeeman deceleration of open shell atoms and molecules has been developed as a possible method to produce cold (< 1 K) samples for applications in precision spectroscopy and studies of cold reactive collisions [1-7]. This contribution will present the strategy followed at ETH Zurich which relies on (i) the generation of strong magnetic field pulses (> 2 T) with rise and fall times of only a few microseconds, (ii) the deceleration and loading of samples into quadrupole magnetic traps, (iii) 3D particle trajectory simulations of the complete deceleration and trapping processes, and (iv) comparison of the simulations with measurements of the velocity and spatial distributions of the decelerated and trapped samples. The four generations of Zeeman deceleration and trapping devices developed in our group will be presented and compared using results obtained with different samples. [0pt] [1] N. Vanhaecke et al., Phys. Rev. A 75, 031402(R)(2007).[0pt] [2] S. D. Hogan et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 023412 (2007).[0pt] [3] E. Narevicius et al., New. J. Phys. 9, 358 (2007).[0pt] [4] E. Narevicius et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 093003 (2008).[0pt] [5] E. Narevicius et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 051401(R) (2008).[0pt] [6] S. D. Hogan et al., J. Phys. B 41, 081005 (2008).[0pt] [7] S. D. Hogan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 143001 (2008).

  8. Multistage integrated process for upgrading olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.

    1991-03-19

    This patent describes a continuous multi-stage process for increasing octane quality and yield of liquid hydrocarbons from an integrated fluidized catalytic cracking unit and olefins oligomerization reaction zone. It comprises: contacting heavy hydrocarbon feedstock in a primary fluidized bed reaction stage with cracking catalyst comprising particulate solid large pore acid aluminosilicate zeolite catalyst at conversion conditions to produce a hydrocarbon effluent comprising gas containing C{sub 2}-C{sub 6} olefins intermediate hydrocarbons in the gasoline and distillate range, and cracked bottoms; regenerating the primary stage zeolite cracking catalyst in a primary stage regeneration zone and returning at least a portion of the resulting regenerated zeolite cracking catalyst to the primary reaction stage; withdrawing another portion of the catalyst from the regeneration zone and adding fresh makeup catalyst thereto separating primary stage effluent to recover olefinic gas containing C{sub 2}-C{sub 6} olefins; reacting at least a portion of the olefinic gas in a secondary fluidized bed reactor stage in contact with a closed fluidized bed of acid zeolite catalyst particles.

  9. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest and fluid immersion in man: A compendium of research (1974 - 1980)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Silverstein, L.; Bliss, J.; Langenheim, V.; Rosson, H.; Chao, C.

    1982-01-01

    Water immersion and prolonged bed rest reproduce nearly all the physiological responses observed in astronauts in the weightless state. Related to actual weightlessness, given responses tend to occur sooner in immersion and later in bed rest. Much research was conducted on humans using these two techniques, especially by Russian scientists. Abstracts and annotations of reports that appeared in the literature from January 1974 through December 1980 are compiled and discussed.

  10. Analysis and control of the METC fluid bed gasifier. Final report (includes technical progress report for October 1994--January 1995), September 1994--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This document presents a modeling and control study of the Fluid Bed Gasification (FBG) unit at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The work is performed under contract no. DE-FG21-94MC31384. The purpose of this study is to generate a simple FBG model from process data, and then use the model to suggest an improved control scheme which will improve operation of the gasifier. The work first developes a simple linear model of the gasifier, then suggests an improved gasifier pressure and MGCR control configuration, and finally suggests the use of a multivariable control strategy for the gasifier.

  11. Enhanced dissolution, stability and physicochemical characterization of ATRA/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex pellets prepared by fluid-bed coating technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongjian; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare stable all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)/2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) inclusion complex pellets with industrial feasible technology, the fluid-bed coating technique, using PVP K30 simultaneously as binder and reprecipitation retarder. The coating process was fluent with high coating efficiency. In vitro dissolution of the inclusion complex pellets in 5% w/v Cremopher EL solution was dramatically enhanced with no reprecipitation observed, and significantly improved stability against humidity (92.5% and 75% RH) and illumination (4500 lx ± 500 lx) was achieved by HPCD inclusion. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffractometry confirmed the absence of crystallinity of ATRA. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry revealed interaction between ATRA and HPCD adding evidence on inclusion of ATRA moieties into HPCD cavities. Solid-state (13)C NMR spectrometry indicated possible inclusion of ATRA through the polyene chain, which was the main reason for the enhanced photostability. It is concluded that the fluid-bed coating technique has the potential use in the industrial preparation of ATRA/HPCD inclusion complex pellets. PMID:22304703

  12. Multistage Turbomachinery Flows Simulated Numerically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Adamczyk, John J.; Shabbir, Aamir; Wellborn, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    At the NASA Lewis Research Center, a comprehensive assessment was made of the predictive capability of the average passage flow model as applied to multistage axial-flow compressors. This model, which describes the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded in a multistage configuration, is being widely used throughout U.S. aircraft industry as an integral part of their design systems. Rotor flow-angle deviation. In this work, detailed data taken within a four and one-half stage large low-speed compressor were used to assess the weaknesses and strengths of the predictive capabilities of the average passage flow model. The low-speed compressor blading is of modern design and employs stator end-bends. Measurements were made with slow- and high response instrumentation. The high-response measurements revealed the velocity components of both the rotor and stator wakes. From the measured wake profiles, we found that the flow exiting the rotors deviated from the rotor exit metal angle to a lesser degree than was predicted by the average passage flow model. This was found to be due to blade boundary layer transition, which recently has been shown to exist on multistage axial compressor rotor and stator blades, but was not accounted for in the average passage model. Consequently, a model that mimics the effects of blade boundary layer transition, Shih k-epsilon model, was incorporated into the average passage model. Simulations that incorporated this transition model showed a dramatic improvement in agreement with data. The altered model thus improved predictive capability for multistage axial-flow compressors, and this was verified by detailed experimental measurement.

  13. Fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Sowards, N.K.; Murphy, M.L.

    1991-10-29

    This patent describes a vessel. It comprises a fluid bed for continuously incinerating fuel comprising tire segments and the like which comprise metallic wire tramp and for concurrently removing tramp and bed materials at a bottom effluent exit means of the vessel, the vessel further comprising static air distributor means at the periphery of the bed comprising a substantially centrally unobstructed relatively large central region in which the fluid bed and fuel only are disposed and through which bed material and tramp migrate without obstruction to and through the effluent exit means, downwardly and inwardly stepped lower vessel wall means and a plurality of peripherally located centrally directed vertically and horizontally offset spaced air influent means surrounding the central region and associated with the stepped lower vessel wall means by which the bed is supported and fluidized.

  14. Development of advanced fluid-bed agglomeration and cyclonic incineration for simultaneous waste disposal and energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is currently developing a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incineration system for waste disposal that is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion techologies. Both technologies have been developed individually at IGT over many years. This combination has resulted in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes including municipal sludges. The system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes are incinerated with ease and great efficiency (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)), while solid inorganic contaminants contained within a glassy matrix are rendered benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. The heat generated within the incinerator can be recovered using the state-of-the-art boilers. The development of the two-stage incinerator is a culmination of extensive research and development efforts on each stage of the incinerator. The variety of data obtained with solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes for both stages includes agglomeration of ash, incineration and reclamation of used blast grit and foundry sand, partial combustion of carbonaceous fuels, in-situ desulfurization, combustion of low-Btu gases, incineration of industrial wastewater, and incineration of carbon tetrachloride. 5 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Process for combining the regeneratorless operation of tandem super-dense riser and fluid-bed oligomerization reactors containing a zeolite oligomerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-05-15

    This patent describes a catalytic process for upgrading a C{sub 2}{sup +} olefin feedstream to a heavier product stream rich in C{sub 10}{sup +} aliphatic hydrocarbons in first and second oligomerization zones. It comprises: contacting the olefin feedstream in the first zone with a finely divided medium pore size zeolite metallosilicate catalyst having a silica:alumina ratio grater than 12, and a constraint index in the range from about 1 to about 12, at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) sufficient to maintain a transport zone, and, then with essentially the same catalyst maintained as a fluid bed, the first zone containing riser catalyst having a higher coke content than that of catalyst in the second zone maintained in a turbulent regime.

  16. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of cryogenic molecular sieve bed absorber of hydrogen isotopes recovery system for Indian LLCB-TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri Devi, V.; Sircar, A.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-03-15

    One of the most challenging tasks in the design of the fuel cycle system lies in the effective design of Tritium Extraction System (TES) which involves proper extraction and purification of tritium in the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor. Indian Lead Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (LLCB-TBM) would extract hydrogen isotopes through Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) adsorber system. A prototype Hydrogen Isotopes Recovery System (HIRS) is being developed to validate the concepts for tritium extraction by adsorption mass transfer mechanism. In this study, a design model has been developed and analyzed to simulate the adsorption mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed adsorption column. The simulation leads primarily to effective design of HIRS, which is a state-of-the-art technology. The paper describes the process simulation approach and the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The effects of different operating conditions are studied to investigate their influence on the hydrogen isotopes adsorption capacity. The results of the present simulation study would be used to understand the best optimized transport phenomenon before realizing the TES as a system for LLCB-TBM. (authors)

  17. Feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance triathlete: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies investigating ultraendurance athletes showed an association between excessive fluid intake and swelling of the lower limbs such as the feet. To date, this association has been investigated in single-stage ultraendurance races, but not in multistage ultraendurance races. In this case study, we investigated a potential association between fluid intake and feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance race such as a Deca Iron ultratriathlon with ten Ironman triathlons within 10 consecutive days. A 49-year-old well-experienced ultratriathlete competed in autumn 2013 in the Deca Iron ultratriathlon held in Lonata del Garda, Italy, and finished the race as winner within 129:33 hours:minutes. Changes in body mass (including body fat and lean body mass), foot volume, total body water, and laboratory measurements were assessed. Food and fluid intake during rest and competing were recorded, and energy and fluid turnovers were estimated. During the ten stages, the volume of the feet increased, percentage body fat decreased, creatinine and urea levels increased, hematocrit and hemoglobin values decreased, and plasma [Na+] remained unchanged. The increase in foot volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. The poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. This case report shows that the volume of the foot increased during the ten stages, and the increase in volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. Furthermore, the poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. The continuous feet swelling during the race was most probably due to a combination of a high fluid intake and a progressive decline in renal function (ie, continuous increase in creatinine and urea), leading to body fluid retention (ie, increase in total body water). PMID:26508884

  18. Feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance triathlete: a case study.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies investigating ultraendurance athletes showed an association between excessive fluid intake and swelling of the lower limbs such as the feet. To date, this association has been investigated in single-stage ultraendurance races, but not in multistage ultraendurance races. In this case study, we investigated a potential association between fluid intake and feet swelling in a multistage ultraendurance race such as a Deca Iron ultratriathlon with ten Ironman triathlons within 10 consecutive days. A 49-year-old well-experienced ultratriathlete competed in autumn 2013 in the Deca Iron ultratriathlon held in Lonata del Garda, Italy, and finished the race as winner within 129:33 hours:minutes. Changes in body mass (including body fat and lean body mass), foot volume, total body water, and laboratory measurements were assessed. Food and fluid intake during rest and competing were recorded, and energy and fluid turnovers were estimated. During the ten stages, the volume of the feet increased, percentage body fat decreased, creatinine and urea levels increased, hematocrit and hemoglobin values decreased, and plasma [Na(+)] remained unchanged. The increase in foot volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. The poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. This case report shows that the volume of the foot increased during the ten stages, and the increase in volume was significantly and positively related to fluid intake during the stages. Furthermore, the poststage volume of the foot was related to poststage total body water, poststage creatinine, and poststage urea. The continuous feet swelling during the race was most probably due to a combination of a high fluid intake and a progressive decline in renal function (ie, continuous increase in creatinine and urea), leading to body fluid retention (ie, increase in total body water). PMID:26508884

  19. Simulation of Multistage Turbine Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of turbine flows serves to enhance the understanding of the flow phenomena within multistage turbomachinery components. The direct benefit of this activity is improved modeling capability, which can be used to improve component efficiency and durability. A hierarchy of equations was formulated to assess the difficulty in analyzing the flow field within multistage turbomachinery components. The Navier-Stokes equations provides the most complete description. The simplest description is given by a set of equations that govern the quasi-one-dimensional flow. The number of unknowns to be solved for increases monotonically above the number of equations. The development of the additional set of equations needed to mathematically close the system of equations forms the closure problem associated with that level of description. For the Navier-Stokes equation there is no closure problem. For the quasi-one-dimensional equation set random flow fluctuations, unsteady fluctuations, nonaxisymmetric flow variations, and hub-to-shroud variations on the quasi-one-dimensional flow must be accounted for.

  20. Cluster formation and drag reduction-proposed mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the bottom spray fluid-bed coater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Bottom spray fluid-bed coating is a common technique for coating multiparticulates. Under the quality-by-design framework, particle recirculation within the partition column is one of the main variability sources affecting particle coating and coat uniformity. However, the occurrence and mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the coater are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to visualize and define particle recirculation within the partition column. Based on different combinations of partition gap setting, air accelerator insert diameter, and particle size fraction, particle movements within the partition column were captured using a high-speed video camera. The particle recirculation probability and voidage information were mapped using a visiometric process analyzer. High-speed images showed that particles contributing to the recirculation phenomenon were behaving as clustered colonies. Fluid dynamics analysis indicated that particle recirculation within the partition column may be attributed to the combined effect of cluster formation and drag reduction. Both visiometric process analysis and particle coating experiments showed that smaller particles had greater propensity toward cluster formation than larger particles. The influence of cluster formation on coating performance and possible solutions to cluster formation were further discussed.

  1. Influence of operational parameters on the fluid-side mass transfer resistance observed in a packed bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Amir; Kangwa, Martin; Abo-Elwafa, Ahmed Gad; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The influence of mass transfer on productivity as well as the performance of packed bed bioreactor was determined by varying a number of parameters; flow rate, glucose concentration and polymers (chitosan). Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were immobilized in chitosan and non-chitosan coated alginate beads to demonstrate the effect on external mass transfer by substrate consumption time, lag phase and ethanol production. The results indicate that coating has a significant effect on the lag phase duration, being 30-40 min higher than non-coated beads. After lag phase, no significant change was observed in both types of beads on consumption of glucose with the same flow rate. It was observed that by increasing flow rates; lag phase and glucose consumption time decreased. The reason is due to the reduction of external mass transfer as a result of increase in flow rate as glucose is easily transported to and from the beads surface by diffusion. It is observed that chitosan acts as barrier for transfer of substrate and products, in and out of beads, at initial time of fermentation as it shows longer lag phase for chitosan coated beads than non-coated. Glucose consumption at low flow rate was lower as compared to higher flow rates. The optimum combination of parameters consisting of higher flow rates 30-90 ml/min and between 10 and 20 g/l of glucose was found for maximum production of ethanol.

  2. Wadeite (K2ZrSi3O9), an alkali-zirconosilicate from the Saima agpaitic rocks in northeastern China: Its origin and response to multi-stage activities of alkaline fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Yang, Jin-Hui; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lan; Gu, Xiang-Ping; Zhang, Ai-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    The Triassic Saima alkaline complex in the Liaodong Peninsula of northeastern China covers an area of about 20 km2 and is dominated by nepheline syenite, with phonolite at its center, and a concealed body of eudialyte-bearing nepheline syenite in the northwest of the complex. The phonolite has similar features to miaskite, while the nepheline syenites are classified in the agpaitic group according to their mineral assemblage, and the alkalinity and aluminum saturation indexes. Zircon is the dominant Zr-bearing mineral in the phonolite, whereas wadeite occurs as the only primary Zr-bearing mineral in the nepheline syenites. The transitional crystallization from zircon to wadeite reveals an increase in alkalis and a high K/Na ratio as the magmas evolved from the volcanic to the intrusive stage. The primary wadeite grains underwent varying degrees of hydrothermal alteration. Overall, the areas of weak, medium, and strong alteration are characterized by the following respective associations: (1) wadeite + secondary catapleiite/gaidonnayite, (2) wadeite + secondary catapleiite/gaidonnayite + zircon, and (3) pseudomorphs after wadeite. The pseudomorphs are widespread and mainly consist of residual wadeite, secondary zircon, catapleiite/gaidonnayite, K-feldspar, calcite, and some Zr-bearing titanite and vesuvianite. All of the secondary zircon grains in the three associations are typically enriched in Ca and Al compared with the primary Ca-free zircons of the phonolite. The progressive alteration of wadeite suggests that the Saima complex underwent multiple episodes of fluid activity during a hydrothermal stage, including an initial Na-metasomatism via alkaline fluids, then stages most likely involving progressively CO2-rich fluids, and an intensive episode involving a mixture of these fluids with externally derived Ca-rich fluids.

  3. Thermal energy storage systems using fluidized bed heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weast, T.; Shannon, L.

    1980-01-01

    A rotary cement kiln and an electric arc furnace were chosen for evaluation to determine the applicability of a fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHX) for thermal energy storage (TES). Multistage shallow bed FBHX's operating with high temperature differences were identified as the most suitable for TES applications. Analysis of the two selected conceptual systems included establishing a plant process flow configuration, an operational scenario, a preliminary FBHX/TES design, and parametric analysis. A computer model was developed to determine the effects of the number of stages, gas temperatures, gas flows, bed materials, charge and discharge time, and parasitic power required for operation. The maximum national energy conservation potential of the cement plant application with TES is 15.4 million barrels of oil or 3.9 million tons of coal per year. For the electric arc furnance application the maximum national conservation potential with TES is 4.5 million barrels of oil or 1.1 million tons of coal per year. Present time of day utility rates are near the breakeven point required for the TES system. Escalation of on-peak energy due to critical fuel shortages could make the FBHX/TES applications economically attractive in the future.

  4. Investigations into the coupled fluid flow and mechanical creep closure behavior of waste disposal rooms in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, F.T.; Butcher, B.M.; Davies, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room. In particular the results show: (1) that an initially empty disposal room will consolidate in 195 years to less than 10% of is initial volume, (2) that if waste, backfill, and gas generation are allowed to generate backstress, room consolidation ceases at about 9--10 MPa backstress and room expansion can occur with backstress slightly higher than 9--10 MPa, (3) that reducing the gas generation potentials and rates by a factor of five, drops the maximum room pressure from about 22 MPa to about 18 MPa and decreases the minimum room porosity from about 0.30 to 0.09, (4) that for two-phase fluid flow, brine and gas are driven out of the disposal room into the nonhalite interbeds and that pressures build in these interbeds near the disposal room, and (5) that the interbed pressurization shown in the two-phase flow can exceed lithostatic pressure of 14.8 MPa, which has the potential of opening preexisting fractures between disposal rooms in about 270 years. This work demonstrates the complex interdependent interactions of creep closure affecting void volume, gas pressurization, brine flow, gas generation, and interbed fracture dilation. Finally, work aiming at achieving greater coupling in the simulations of WIPP disposal rooms is discussed.

  5. Multistage Simulations of the GE90 Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Mark G.; Vitt, Paul H.; Topp, David A.; Saeidi, Sohrab; Hunter, Scott D.; Dailey, Lyle D.; Beach, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    The average passage approach has been used to analyze three multistage configurations of the GE90 turbine. These are a high pressure turbine rig, a low pressure turbine rig and a full turbine configuration comprising 18 blade rows of the GE90 engine at takeoff conditions. Cooling flows in the high pressure turbine have been simulated using source terms. This is the first time a dual-spool cooled turbine has been analyzed in 3D using a multistage approach. There is good agreement between the simulations and experimental results. Multistage and component interaction effects are also presented. The parallel efficiency of the code is excellent at 87.3% using 121 processors on an SGI Origin for the 18 blade row configuration. The accuracy and efficiency of the calculation now allow it to be effectively used in a design environment so that multistage effects can be accounted for in turbine design.

  6. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  7. Consider nonfouling fluidized bed exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Klaren, D.G.; Baiiie, R.E. )

    1989-07-01

    Applications for fluidized bed heat exchangers in various industries, their operating principles and a detailed analysis of their suitability for replacing double-pipe scraped-surface heat exchangers in lube oil plants are discussed. Development of the fluidized bed heat exchanger started in the early 70s and was totally dedicated to improvement of the multistage flash evaporator for sea water desalination. This resulted in a demonstration plant with a fluidized bed heat exchanger with a total heat transfer surface of over 1,000 m/sup 2/. Over an operating period of more than 15,000 hours untreated sea water was heated to more than 120{sup 0}C without any fouling in the tubes due to scale deposits.

  8. Fluid-bed reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1990-05-29

    This patent describes a process for the conversion of hydrocarbons. It comprises: fluidizing a finely divided dehydrogenation catalyst in a dehydrogenation reaction zone; withdrawing spent dehydrogenation catalyst from the dehydrogenation reaction zone; contacting an aliphatic feedstream with the spent dehydrogenation catalyst in a preheat zone to preheat the aliphatic feedstream and to convert at least a portion of the coke precursors in the aliphatic feedstream to coke; and depositing the coke on the spent dehydrogenation catalyst in the preheat zone.

  9. Fast fluidized bed steam generator

    DOEpatents

    Bryers, Richard W.; Taylor, Thomas E.

    1980-01-01

    A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

  10. Matching multistage schemes to viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleb, William Leonard

    A method to accelerate convergence to steady state by explicit time-marching schemes for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The combination of cell-Reynolds-number-based multistage time stepping and local preconditioning makes solving steady-state viscous flow problems competitive with the convergence rates typically associated with implicit methods, without the associated memory penalty. Initially, various methods are investigated to extend the range of multistage schemes to diffusion-dominated cases. It is determined that the Chebyshev polynomials are well suited to serve as amplification factors for these schemes; however, creating a method that can bridge the continuum from convection-dominated to diffusion-dominated regimes proves troublesome, until the Manteuffel family of polynomials is uncovered. This transformation provides a smooth transition between the two extremes; and armed with this information, sets of multistage coefficients are created for a given spatial discretization as a function of cell Reynolds number according to various design criteria. As part of this process, a precise definition for the numerical time step is hammered out, something which up to this time, has been set via algebraic arguments only. Next are numerical tests of these sets of variable multistage coefficients. To isolate the effects of the variable multistage coefficients, the test case chosen is very simple: circular advection-diffusion. The numerical results support the analytical analysis by demonstrating an order of magnitude improvement in convergence rate for single-grid relaxation and a factor of three for multigrid relaxation. Building upon the success of the scalar case, preconditioning is applied to make the Navier-Stokes system of equations behave more nearly as a single scalar equation. Then, by applying the variable multistage coefficient scheme to a typical boundary-layer flow problem, the results affirm the benefits of local preconditioning

  11. Separation Control in a Multistage Compressor Using Impulsive Surface Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    Control of flow separation using impulsive surface injection is investigated within the multistage environment of a low speed axial-flow compressor. Measured wake profiles behind a set of embedded stator vanes treated with suction-surface injection indicate significant reduction in flow separation at a variety of injection-pulse repetition rates and durations. The corresponding total pressure losses across the vanes reveal a bank of repetition rates at each pulse duration where the separation control remains nearly complete. This persistence allows for demands on the injected-mass delivery system to be economized while still achieving effective flow control. The response of the stator-vane boundary layers to infrequently applied short injection pulses is described in terms of the periodic excitation of turbulent strips whose growth and propagation characteristics dictate the lower bound on the band of optimal pulse repetition rates. The eventual falloff in separation control at higher repetition rates is linked to a competition between the benefits of pulse-induced mixing and the aggravation caused by the periodic introduction of low-momentum fluid. Use of these observations for impulsive actuator design is discussed and their impact on modeling the time-average effect of impulsive surface injection for multistage steady-flow simulation is considered.

  12. Multi-megavolt low jitter multistage switch

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.R.; Penn, K.J. Jr.

    1985-06-19

    It is one object of the present invention to provide a multistage switch capable of holding off numerous megavolts, until triggered, from a particle beam accelerator of the type used for inertial confinement fusion. The invention provides a multistage switch having low timing jitter and capable of producing multiple spark channels for spreading current over a wider area to reduce electrode damage and increase switch lifetime. The switch has fairly uniform electric fields and a short spark gap for laser triggering and is engineered to prevent insulator breakdowns.

  13. Mars integrated transportation system multistage Mars mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In accordance with the objective of the Mars Integrated Transport System (MITS) program, the Multistage Mars Mission (MSMM) design team developed a profile for a manned mission to Mars. The purpose of the multistage mission is to send a crew of five astronauts to the martian surface by the year 2019. The mission continues man's eternal quest for exploration of new frontiers. This mission has a scheduled duration of 426 days that includes experimentation en route as well as surface exploration and experimentation. The MSMM is also designed as a foundation for a continuing program leading to the colonization of the planet Mars.

  14. The fluids in salt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of fluid inclusions in salt, the geological processes through which these fluids evolve, and the possible problems such inclusions pose for nuclear waste disposal in salt beds or domes are reviewed.-J.A.Z.

  15. Technology test bed review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnaughey, H. V.

    1992-07-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) technology test bed (TTB) history; (2) TTB objectives; (3) TTB major accomplishments; (4) TTB contributions to SSME; (5) major impacts of 3001 testing; (6) some challenges to computational fluid dynamics (CFD); (7) the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP); and (8) 3001 lessons learned in design and operations.

  16. Technology test bed review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, H. V.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) technology test bed (TTB) history; (2) TTB objectives; (3) TTB major accomplishments; (4) TTB contributions to SSME; (5) major impacts of 3001 testing; (6) some challenges to computational fluid dynamics (CFD); (7) the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP); and (8) 3001 lessons learned in design and operations.

  17. Multistage Magnetic Separator of Cells and Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Ken; Ainsworth, Mark; Daily, Bruce; Dunn, Scott; Metz, Bill; Vellinger, John; Taylor, Brock; Meador, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    The multistage electromagnetic separator for purifying cells and magnetic particles (MAGSEP) is a laboratory apparatus for separating and/or purifying particles (especially biological cells) on the basis of their magnetic susceptibility and magnetophoretic mobility. Whereas a typical prior apparatus based on similar principles offers only a single stage of separation, the MAGSEP, as its full name indicates, offers multiple stages of separation; this makes it possible to refine a sample population of particles to a higher level of purity or to categorize multiple portions of the sample on the basis of magnetic susceptibility and/or magnetophoretic mobility. The MAGSEP includes a processing unit and an electronic unit coupled to a personal computer. The processing unit includes upper and lower plates, a plate-rotation system, an electromagnet, an electromagnet-translation system, and a capture-magnet assembly. The plates are bolted together through a roller bearing that allows the plates to rotate with respect to each other. An interface between the plates acts as a seal for separating fluids. A lower cuvette can be aligned with as many as 15 upper cuvette stations for fraction collection during processing. A two-phase stepping motor drives the rotation system, causing the upper plate to rotate for the collection of each fraction of the sample material. The electromagnet generates a magnetic field across the lower cuvette, while the translation system translates the electromagnet upward along the lower cuvette. The current supplied to the electromagnet, and thus the magnetic flux density at the pole face of the electromagnet, can be set at a programmed value between 0 and 1,400 gauss (0.14 T). The rate of translation can be programmed between 5 and 2,000 m/s so as to align all sample particles in the same position in the cuvette. The capture magnet can be a permanent magnet. It is mounted on an arm connected to a stepping motor. The stepping motor rotates the arm to

  18. Bed bugs.

    PubMed

    Foulke, Galen T; Anderson, Bryan E

    2014-09-01

    The term bed bug is applied to 2 species of genus Cimex: lectularius describes the common or temperate bed bug, and hemipterus its tropical cousin. Cimex lectularius is aptly named; its genus and species derive from the Latin words for bug and bed, respectively. Though the tiny pest is receiving increased public attention and scrutiny, the bed bug is hardly a new problem. PMID:25577850

  19. The design and development of transonic multistage compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, C. L.; Steinke, R. J.; Newman, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the transonic multistage compressor is reviewed. Changing trends in design and performance parameters are noted. These changes are related to advances in compressor aerodynamics, computational fluid mechanics and other enabling technologies. The parameters normally given to the designer and those that need to be established during the design process are identified. Criteria and procedures used in the selection of these parameters are presented. The selection of tip speed, aerodynamic loading, flowpath geometry, incidence and deviation angles, blade/vane geometry, blade/vane solidity, stage reaction, aerodynamic blockage, inlet flow per unit annulus area, stage/overall velocity ratio, and aerodynamic losses are considered. Trends in these parameters both spanwise and axially through the machine are highlighted. The effects of flow mixing and methods for accounting for the mixing in the design process are discussed.

  20. "MSTGen": Simulated Data Generator for Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    Multistage testing, or MST, was developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for applications in which it is preferable to administer a test at the level of item sets (i.e., modules). As with CAT, the simulation technique in MST plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of tests. "MSTGen," a new MST…

  1. Multi-stage separations based on dielectrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-07-13

    A system utilizing multi-stage traps based on dielectrophoresis. Traps with electrodes arranged transverse to the flow and traps with electrodes arranged parallel to the flow with combinations of direct current and alternating voltage are used to trap, concentrate, separate, and/or purify target particles.

  2. Phase stability in a multistage Zeeman decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Merkt, F.

    2010-10-15

    The phase stability of a multistage Zeeman decelerator is analyzed by numerical particle-trajectory simulations and experimental measurements. A one-dimensional model of the phase stability in multistage Stark deceleration [Bethlem et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5744 (2000)] has been adapted to multistage Zeeman deceleration and compared with one- and three-dimensional particle-trajectory simulations, including the analysis of the effect of finite switch-on and -off times of the deceleration pulses. The comparison reveals that transverse effects in the decelerator lead to a considerable reduction of the phase-space acceptance at low values of the phase angle and an enhancement at high values. The optimal combinations of phase angles and currents with which a preset amount of kinetic energy can be removed from atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam using a multistage decelerator are determined by simulation. Quantitative analysis of the phase-space acceptance within a given volume reveals that for our decelerator (8 {mu}s switch-off time) optimal conditions are achieved for values of the phase angle between 45 deg. and 55 deg. This conclusion is examined and confirmed by experimental measurements using deuterium atoms. Alternative approaches to generate optimal deceleration pulse sequences, such as the implementation of evolutionary algorithms or the use of higher-order modes of the decelerator, are discussed.

  3. Automated Simultaneous Assembly for Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breithaupt, Krista; Ariel, Adelaide; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2005-01-01

    This article offers some solutions used in the assembly of the computerized Uniform Certified Public Accountancy (CPA) licensing examination as practical alternatives for operational programs producing large numbers of forms. The Uniform CPA examination was offered as an adaptive multistage test (MST) beginning in April of 2004. Examples of…

  4. [Variance estimation considering multistage sampling design in multistage complex sample analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yichong; Zhao, Yinjun; Wang, Limin; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-03-01

    Multistage sampling is a frequently-used method in random sampling survey in public health. Clustering or independence between observations often exists in the sampling, often called complex sample, generated by multistage sampling. Sampling error may be underestimated and the probability of type I error may be increased if the multistage sample design was not taken into consideration in analysis. As variance (error) estimator in complex sample is often complicated, statistical software usually adopt ultimate cluster variance estimate (UCVE) to approximate the estimation, which simply assume that the sample comes from one-stage sampling. However, with increased sampling fraction of primary sampling unit, contribution from subsequent sampling stages is no more trivial, and the ultimate cluster variance estimate may, therefore, lead to invalid variance estimation. This paper summarize a method of variance estimation considering multistage sampling design. The performances are compared with UCVE and the method considering multistage sampling design by simulating random sampling under different sampling schemes using real world data. Simulation showed that as primary sampling unit (PSU) sampling fraction increased, UCVE tended to generate increasingly biased estimation, whereas accurate estimates were obtained by using the method considering multistage sampling design.

  5. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Bonk, D.L.; Dowdy, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    Polluting NO{sub x} gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO{sub x} gases are removed is directed to introducing NO{sub x}-free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor.

  6. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, Darren J.; Bonk, Donald L.; Dowdy, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Polluting NO.sub.x gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO.sub.x gases are removed is directed to introducing NO.sub.x -free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor.

  7. Removal of oxides of nitrogen from gases in multi-stage coal combustion

    DOEpatents

    Mollot, D.J.; Bonk, D.L.; Dowdy, T.E.

    1998-01-13

    Polluting NO{sub x} gas values are removed from off-gas of a multi-stage coal combustion process which includes an initial carbonizing reaction, firing of char from this reaction in a fluidized bed reactor, and burning of gases from the carbonizing and fluidized bed reactions in a topping combustor having a first, fuel-rich zone and a second, fuel-lean zone. The improvement by means of which NO{sub x} gases are removed is directed to introducing NO{sub x}-free oxidizing gas such as compressor air into the second, fuel-lean zone and completing combustion with this source of oxidizing gas. Excess air fed to the fluidized bed reactor is also controlled to obtain desired stoichiometry in the first, fuel-rich zone of the topping combustor. 2 figs.

  8. Numerical Study of Usage Efficiency of Multistage Filters on Mineral Leaching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkarbekov, Medet; Kuljabekov, Alibek; Alibayeva, Karlygash; Kaltayev, Aidarkhan

    2013-11-01

    The numerical study of the usage efficiency of the multistage filters setting technology is carried out on the basis of mathematical simulation. And its application on in-situ mineral leaching process is considered. So long as mineral bearing sandstone in deposit mostly is separated by interbedded layers of sands and clays, it's expedient to use multistage filters setting technology at the mineral extraction. A comparison of the extraction degree at single and multistage filters is implemented. The results of calculations show that the distribution of flow (inflow) on well height is not uniform. In the calculations the well accepted as high-permeability channel, depending on the construction of the filter. Obtained results for a multistage filters setting qualitatively conform to the experimental findings. Wellbore is considered as a surface with a constant reduced pressure in the bottomhole formation zone. But such assumption does not show a qualitative picture of the fluid flow in the bottomhole zone [Brovin K.G., Grabovnikov V.A., 1997]. To construct an accurate mathematical model it's necessary to use Navier-Stokes equation for the interior of a vertical wellbore, and the filtration law for modeling the filtration in the reservoir. Strictly speaking, it would have had to sew two laws on the contact surface of a rock and filter. Such review requires enormous computing, as far as computational grid must be sufficiently thick to cover the interior of the wellbore.

  9. A Multistage Method for Multiobjective Route Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Gen, Mitsuo

    The multiobjective route selection problem (m-RSP) is a key research topic in the car navigation system (CNS) for ITS (Intelligent Transportation System). In this paper, we propose an interactive multistage weight-based Dijkstra genetic algorithm (mwD-GA) to solve it. The purpose of the proposed approach is to create enough Pareto-optimal routes with good distribution for the car driver depending on his/her preference. At the same time, the routes can be recalculated according to the driver's preferences by the multistage framework proposed. In the solution approach proposed, the accurate route searching ability of the Dijkstra algorithm and the exploration ability of the Genetic algorithm (GA) are effectively combined together for solving the m-RSP problems. Solutions provided by the proposed approach are compared with the current research to show the effectiveness and practicability of the solution approach proposed.

  10. Impedance characteristics of multistage ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, M.

    1994-09-01

    We further develop a theory of multistage diodes that includes the possibility of emission of ions in the final stage. The exact solutions are extremely cumbersome and are not practical for most applications. We have developed approximate solutions that are very accurate, require no integrations, and may be rapidly calculated using a simple iterative scheme. These solutions for the total current as a function of voltage are used in time-dependent modeling of a two-stage diode.

  11. Handling Imbalanced Data Sets in Multistage Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M.

    Multistage classification is a logical approach, based on a divide-and-conquer solution, for dealing with problems with a high number of classes. The classification problem is divided into several sequential steps, each one associated to a single classifier that works with subgroups of the original classes. In each level, the current set of classes is split into smaller subgroups of classes until they (the subgroups) are composed of only one class. The resulting chain of classifiers can be represented as a tree, which (1) simplifies the classification process by using fewer categories in each classifier and (2) makes it possible to combine several algorithms or use different attributes in each stage. Most of the classification algorithms can be biased in the sense of selecting the most populated class in overlapping areas of the input space. This can degrade a multistage classifier performance if the training set sample frequencies do not reflect the real prevalence in the population. Several techniques such as applying prior probabilities, assigning weights to the classes, or replicating instances have been developed to overcome this handicap. Most of them are designed for two-class (accept-reject) problems. In this article, we evaluate several of these techniques as applied to multistage classification and analyze how they can be useful for astronomy. We compare the results obtained by classifying a data set based on Hipparcos with and without these methods.

  12. Paragenesis and chemistry of multistage tourmaline formation in the sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Palmer, M.R.; Slack, J.F.; Shaw, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed petrographic study, scanning electron microscope imaging, and electron microprobe analyses of tourmalines from the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag massive sulfide deposit (British Columbia, Canada) document multiple paragenetic stages and large compositional variations. The tourmalines mainly belong to two common solid-solution series: dravite-schorl and dravite-uvite. Ca- and Fe-rich feruvite and alkali-deficient tourmalines are present locally. Products of tourmaline-forming stages include (from oldest to youngest): (1) rare Fe-rich dravite-schorl within black tourmalinite clasts in footwall fragmental rocks; (2) widespread Mg-rich, very fine grained, felted dravite in the footwall (the main type of tourmaline in the footwall tourmalinite pipe); (3) recrystallized, Fe-rich dravite-schorl (locally Ca-Fe feruvite) in the tourmalinite pipe, which preferentially occurs near postore gabbroic intrusions; (4) Mg-rich dravite or uvite associated with chlorite-pyrrhotite and chlorite-albite-pyrite-altered rocks in the shallow footwall and hanging wall; (5) discrete Mg-rich tourmaline grains associated with chlorite and discordant Mg-rich tourmaline rims which occur on disseminated Fe-rich schorl in the bedded Pb-Zn-Ag ores. The timing of rare Fe-rich schorl in the bedded ores is uncertain, but it most likely occurred during or between stages 2 and 3. The different paragenetic stages and their respective tourmaline compositions are interpreted in terms of a multistage evolution involving contributions from: (1) variable mixtures of synsedimentary, Fe-rich hydrothermal fluids and entrained seawater; (2) postore, Fe-rich, gabbro-related hydrothermal fluids; and (3) postore metamorphic reactions. Early synsedimentary, Fe-rich hydrothermal fluids which contained little or no entrained seawater formed Fe-rich black tourmalinite clasts locally in the footwall. The major type of tourmaline in the footwall tourmalinite pipe is Mg rich, recording seawater entrainment under high water

  13. Aerodynamic Design Study of Advanced Multistage Axial Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, Louis M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Medd, Adam J.; Dang, Thong Q.

    2002-01-01

    As a direct response to the need for further performance gains from current multistage axial compressors, an investigation of advanced aerodynamic design concepts that will lead to compact, high-efficiency, and wide-operability configurations is being pursued. Part I of this report describes the projected level of technical advancement relative to the state of the art and quantifies it in terms of basic aerodynamic technology elements of current design systems. A rational enhancement of these elements is shown to lead to a substantial expansion of the design and operability space. Aerodynamic design considerations for a four-stage core compressor intended to serve as a vehicle to develop, integrate, and demonstrate aerotechnology advancements are discussed. This design is biased toward high efficiency at high loading. Three-dimensional blading and spanwise tailoring of vector diagrams guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to manage the aerodynamics of the high-loaded endwall regions. Certain deleterious flow features, such as leakage-vortex-dominated endwall flow and strong shock-boundary-layer interactions, were identified and targeted for improvement. However, the preliminary results were encouraging and the front two stages were extracted for further aerodynamic trimming using a three-dimensional inverse design method described in part II of this report. The benefits of the inverse design method are illustrated by developing an appropriate pressure-loading strategy for transonic blading and applying it to reblade the rotors in the front two stages of the four-stage configuration. Multistage CFD simulations based on the average passage formulation indicated an overall efficiency potential far exceeding current practice for the front two stages. Results of the CFD simulation at the aerodynamic design point are interrogated to identify areas requiring additional development. In spite of the significantly higher aerodynamic loadings, advanced CFD

  14. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-12-31

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows. Again, to verify and or direct the development of these advanced codes, complete three-dimensional unsteady flow field data are needed.

  15. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  16. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1996-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  17. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.

    1993-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  18. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Marasco, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

  19. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1993-12-14

    A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

  20. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1996-02-27

    A fluidized bed reactor system is described which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  1. Biparticle fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.; Marasco, J.A.

    1995-04-25

    A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figs.

  2. Multistage Schemes with Multigrid for Euler and Navier-Strokes Equations: Components and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, Eli

    1997-01-01

    A class of explicit multistage time-stepping schemes with centered spatial differencing and multigrids are considered for the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. These schemes are the basis for a family of computer programs (flow codes with multigrid (FLOMG) series) currently used to solve a wide range of fluid dynamics problems, including internal and external flows. In this paper, the components of these multistage time-stepping schemes are defined, discussed, and in many cases analyzed to provide additional insight into their behavior. Special emphasis is given to numerical dissipation, stability of Runge-Kutta schemes, and the convergence acceleration techniques of multigrid and implicit residual smoothing. Both the Baldwin and Lomax algebraic equilibrium model and the Johnson and King one-half equation nonequilibrium model are used to establish turbulence closure. Implementation of these models is described.

  3. The numerical simulation of multistage turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.; Beach, T. A.; Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; To, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The need to account for momentum and energy transport by the unsteady deterministic flow field in modeling the time-averaged flow state within a blade row passage embedded in a multistage compressor is assessed. It was found that, within the endwall regions, large-scale three-dimensional unsteady structures existed which caused significant transport of momentum and energy across the time-averaged stream surface of a stator flow field. These experiments confirmed that the tranport process is dominated by turbulent diffusion in the midspan region. A model was then proposed for simulating this transport process, and a limited study was undertaken to assess its validity.

  4. Bed-parallel calcite veins in the core of Wills Mountain anticline: Implications for deformation conditions and fluid flow during the Alleghanian orogeny

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A.; Battles, D.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1994-03-01

    Thick, bed-parallel to sub-bed-parallel calcite veins are found in Upper Ordovician Trenton and Black River Group limestones exposed in the core of Wills Mountain anticline, Pendleton County, West Virginia. The veins range in thickness from less than 5 centimeters to over 2 meters, and contain individual crystals up to 20 centimeters across. The veins have a 1 to 3 mete spacing, and are planar to lensoid. They are also subhorizontal, and can be traced for tens of meters along the outcrop. The calcite is opaque to translucent white, and occasionally colorless and transparent. Tectonic slickenlines are found at the top and bottom margins of the veins, as well as within the veins. These slickenlines indicate transport directed toward 280[degree]--315[degree]. When crushed the calcite emits a strong odor of H[sub 2]S. The calcite contains abundant two-phase aqueous inclusions that have ice melting temperatures (T[sub m]) of [minus]9.0 to [minus]14.1 C. This corresponds to a salinity of 13 to 17 wt.% NaCl equiv. Inclusion homogenization (T[sub b]) values range from 91.8 to 135.1 C, with a medium value of 124 C. Since the calcite veins are bed-parallel and subhorizontal, they must have formed under lithostatic conditions. The calcite veins occur along a fault that is proposed to be a splay from the Ordovician Martinsburg Fm. decollement. This major decollement separates two Cambro-Ordovician carbonate flats east of the Wills Mountain anticline. The splay served as a conduit for the release of massive amounts of H[sub 2]S-saturated brine from the decollement.

  5. Study of ebullated-bed fluid dynamics for h-coal. Quarterly progress report No. 2, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of data from the fluid dynamics tests performed at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., during Run PDU-10 was started. Data in the computer files were cross-checked with the original notebooks to verify accuracy. Gamma-ray mass absorption coefficients for material in the PDU reactor were calculated using characterization of selected oil and catalyst samples. Battelle Institute began viscosity measurement of PDU reactor liquid samples. Northwestern University began shakedown of the 6'' diameter test stand. Model fluids were selected and charged to the unit. Optical components were designed and assembly was started.

  6. Multistage Zeeman deceleration of metastable neon

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, Alex W.; Motsch, Michael; Hogan, Stephen D.; Andrist, Markus; Schmutz, Hansjuerg; Lambillotte, Bruno; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic

    2011-12-07

    A supersonic beam of metastable neon atoms has been decelerated by exploiting the interaction between the magnetic moment of the atoms and time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a multistage Zeeman decelerator. Using 91 deceleration solenoids, the atoms were decelerated from an initial velocity of 580 m/s to final velocities as low as 105 m/s, corresponding to a removal of more than 95% of their initial kinetic energy. The phase-space distribution of the cold, decelerated atoms was characterized by time-of-flight and imaging measurements, from which a temperature of 10 mK was obtained in the moving frame of the decelerated sample. In combination with particle-trajectory simulations, these measurements allowed the phase-space acceptance of the decelerator to be quantified. The degree of isotope separation that can be achieved by multistage Zeeman deceleration was also studied by performing experiments with pulse sequences generated for {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne.

  7. Multistage adsorption of diffusing macromolecules and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2007-09-01

    We derive the equations that describe adsorption of diffusing particles onto a surface followed by additional surface kinetic steps before being transported across the interface. Multistage surface kinetics occurs during membrane protein insertion, cell signaling, and the infection of cells by virus particles. For example, viral entry into healthy cells is possible only after a series of receptor and coreceptor binding events occurs at the cellular surface. We couple the diffusion of particles in the bulk phase with the multistage surface kinetics and derive an effective, integrodifferential boundary condition that contains a memory kernel embodying the delay induced by the surface reactions. This boundary condition takes the form of a singular perturbation problem in the limit where particle-surface interactions are short ranged. Moreover, depending on the surface kinetics, the delay kernel induces a nonmonotonic, transient replenishment of the bulk particle concentration near the interface. The approach generalizes that of Ward and Tordai [J. Chem. Phys. 14, 453 (1946)] and Diamant and Andelman [Colloids Surf. A 183-185, 259 (2001)] to include surface kinetics, giving rise to qualitatively new behaviors. Our analysis also suggests a simple scheme by which stochastic surface reactions may be coupled to deterministic bulk diffusion.

  8. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

    2003-11-09

    The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

  9. A Testlet Assembly Design for Adaptive Multistage Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard; Brumfield, Terry; Breithaupt, Krista

    2006-01-01

    This article describes multistage tests and some practical test development considerations related to the design and implementation of a multistage test, using the Uniform CPA (certified public accountant) Examination as a case study. The article further discusses the use of automated test assembly procedures in an operational context to produce…

  10. Exposure Control Using Adaptive Multi-Stage Item Bundles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.

    This paper presents a multistage adaptive testing test development paradigm that promises to handle content balancing and other test development needs, psychometric reliability concerns, and item exposure. The bundled multistage adaptive testing (BMAT) framework is a modification of the computer-adaptive sequential testing framework introduced by…

  11. 40 CFR 600.316-78 - Multistage manufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.316-78 Multistage manufacture. Where more than one person is the manufacturer of a vehicle, the final stage vehicle manufacturer (as defined in 49 CFR 549.3... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Multistage manufacture....

  12. 40 CFR 600.316-78 - Multistage manufacture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Later Model Year Automobiles-Labeling § 600.316-78 Multistage manufacture. Where more than one person is the manufacturer of a vehicle, the final stage vehicle manufacturer (as defined in 49 CFR 549.3... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Multistage manufacture....

  13. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  14. Solar heated fluidized bed gasification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar-powered fluidized bed gasification system for gasifying carbonaceous material is presented. The system includes a solar gasifier which is heated by fluidizing gas and steam. Energy to heat the gas and steam is supplied by a high heat capacity refractory honeycomb which surrounds the fluid bed reactor zone. The high heat capacity refractory honeycomb is heated by solar energy focused on the honeycomb by solar concentrator through solar window. The fluid bed reaction zone is also heated directly and uniformly by thermal contact of the high heat capacity ceramic honeycomb with the walls of the fluidized bed reactor. Provisions are also made for recovering and recycling catalysts used in the gasification process. Back-up furnace is provided for start-up procedures and for supplying heat to the fluid bed reaction zone when adequate supplies of solar energy are not available.

  15. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  16. Modern multistage depressed collectors - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmahl, H. G.

    1982-11-01

    The design and performance of the Lewis Research Center (LeRC) electrostatic collector and the associated passive permanent magnetic beam reconditioning (refocusing) are discussed and compared with numerous experimental results on wide- and narrow-band TWT and two klystron cases. Universal designs for efficient collectors for TV klystrons are presented. Collectors other than those based on the symmetric LeRC concept are reviewed only briefly, either because they have not been treated analytically or because only sporadic or incomplete experimental evaluation results are available. It is concluded that significant, a priori predictable performance improvements for TWTs have been demonstrated and that a substantial reduction in the dc power input to TV klystron transmitters could be effected by using well-designed multistage depressed collectors.

  17. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  18. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  19. The numerical simulation of multistage turbomachinery flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Beach, T. A.; Celestina, M. L.; Mulac, R. A.; To, W. M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the unsteady flow field in a multistage compressor on the time-averaged performance was assessed. The energy transport by the unsteady deterministic flow field was taken into account. The magnitude of the body force resulting from the aerodynamic loading on a blade row was compared to the gradient of the stress tensor associated with the unsteady time-resolved flow field generated by the blade row. The magnitude of the work performed by these forces was compared to the divergence of the energy correlations produced by the unsteady time-resolved flow field. The stress tensor and the energy correlations are non-negligible in the end wall regions. The results suggest that the turbulence is the primary source of flow mixing in the midspan region.

  20. Production of heavier hydrocarbons from light olefins in multistage catalytic reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Tabak, S.A.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a continuous multistage catalytic process for conversion of light olefins to distillate range of hydrocarbons rich in C/sub 10/ + aliphatics, comprising the steps of: maintaining a fluidized bed of medium pore acid zeolite catalyst particles in a primary reaction stage in a turbulent reactor bed maintained under reaction severity conditions effective to convert a primary ethene-containing olefinic feedstream by passing hot feedstock vapor upwardly through the fluidized catalyst bed at reaction severity conditions sufficient to convert ethene substantially to intermediate range olefins and aromatics in the C/sub 5/-C/sub 9/ range; recovering primary stage effluent, including a liquid stream containing a major amount of aromatics-rich C/sub 5/ + hydrocarbons; contacting a secondary olefinic feedstream comprising C/sub 3/-C-/sub 4/ olefins in a secondary catalytic reactor stage with a series of fixed catalyst bed reactors containing shape selective medium pore acid zeolite oligomerization catalyst at high pressure under distillate mode oligomerization conditions; mixing at least a portion of liquid primary stage effluent containing aromatic hydrocarbon with at least one hot inter-reactor stream containing partially upgraded olefins in the secondary stage, thereby quenching the inter-reactor stream.

  1. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  2. Multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump

    DOEpatents

    Maier, Eugen; Raney, Michael Raymond

    2004-07-06

    A multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump for a vehicle includes a housing having an inlet and an outlet and a motor disposed in the housing. The multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump also includes a shaft extending axially and disposed in the housing. The multi-stage internal gear/turbine fuel pump further includes a plurality of pumping modules disposed axially along the shaft. One of the pumping modules is a turbine pumping module and another of the pumping modules is a gerotor pumping module for rotation by the motor to pump fuel from the inlet to the outlet.

  3. Model equation for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional average-passage equation system is derived for use in simulating multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. From this system of equations, various reduced forms can be derived for use in simulating the three-dimensional flow field within multistage machinery. It is suggested that a properly scaled form of the average-passage equation system would provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in multistage machines at design and, in particular, at off-design conditions.

  4. Model equation for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional average-passage equation system is derived for use in simulating multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. From this system of equations, various reduced forms can be derived for use in simulating the three-dimensional flow field within multistage machinery. It is suggested that a properly scaled form of the averaged-passage equation system would provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in multistage machines at design and, in particular, at off-design conditions.

  5. Dynamic bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Stormo, K.E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix. 27 figs.

  6. Dynamic bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Stormo, Keith E.

    1996-07-02

    A dynamic bed reactor is disclosed in which a compressible open cell foam matrix is periodically compressed and expanded to move a liquid or fluid through the matrix. In preferred embodiments, the matrix contains an active material such as an enzyme, biological cell, chelating agent, oligonucleotide, adsorbent or other material that acts upon the liquid or fluid passing through the matrix. The active material may be physically immobilized in the matrix, or attached by covalent or ionic bonds. Microbeads, substantially all of which have diameters less than 50 microns, can be used to immobilize the active material in the matrix and further improve reactor efficiency. A particularly preferred matrix is made of open cell polyurethane foam, which adsorbs pollutants such as polychlorophenol or o-nitrophenol. The reactors of the present invention allow unidirectional non-laminar flow through the matrix, and promote intimate exposure of liquid reactants to active agents such as microorganisms immobilized in the matrix.

  7. Bed Bugs FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Bed Bugs FAQs Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... are bed bugs treated and prevented? What are bed bugs? Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic ...

  8. Automatic variance analysis of multistage care pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Haifeng; Zhang, Shilei; Mei, Jing; Xie, Guotong; Yu, Yiqin; Li, Jing; Lakshmanan, Geetika T

    2014-01-01

    A care pathway (CP) is a standardized process that consists of multiple care stages, clinical activities and their relations, aimed at ensuring and enhancing the quality of care. However, actual care may deviate from the planned CP, and analysis of these deviations can help clinicians refine the CP and reduce medical errors. In this paper, we propose a CP variance analysis method to automatically identify the deviations between actual patient traces in electronic medical records (EMR) and a multistage CP. As the care stage information is usually unavailable in EMR, we first align every trace with the CP using a hidden Markov model. From the aligned traces, we report three types of deviations for every care stage: additional activities, absent activities and violated constraints, which are identified by using the techniques of temporal logic and binomial tests. The method has been applied to a CP for the management of congestive heart failure and real world EMR, providing meaningful evidence for the further improvement of care quality. PMID:25160280

  9. Multistage integration model for human egomotion perception.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, G L; Miao, A X; Warren, R

    1995-01-01

    Human computational vision models that attempt to account for the dynamic perception of egomotion and relative depth typically assume a common three-stage process: first, compute the optical flow field based on the dynamically changing image; second, estimate the egomotion states based on the flow; and third, estimate the relative depth/shape based on the egomotion states and possibly on a model of the viewed surface. We propose a model more in line with recent work in human vision, employing multistage integration. Here the dynamic image is first processed to generate spatial and temporal image gradients that drive a mutually interconnected state estimator and depth/shape estimator. The state estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with a depth/shape estimate of the viewed surface and an assumed model of the viewer's dynamics to generate current state estimates; in tandem, the depth/shape estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with the viewer's state estimate and assumed shape model to generate current depth/shape estimates. In this paper, we describe the model and compare model predictions with empirical data.

  10. A novel multistage estimation of signal parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Rajendra

    1990-01-01

    A multistage estimation scheme is presented for estimating the parameters of a received carrier signal possibly phase-modulated by unknown data and experiencing very high Doppler, Doppler rate, etc. Such a situation arises, for example, in the case of the Global Positioning Systems (GPS). In the proposed scheme, the first-stage estimator operates as a coarse estimator of the frequency and its derivatives, resulting in higher rms estimation errors but with a relatively small probability of the frequency estimation error exceeding one-half of the sampling frequency (an event termed cycle slip). The second stage of the estimator operates on the error signal available from the first stage, refining the overall estimates, and in the process also reduces the number of cycle slips. The first-stage algorithm is a modified least-squares algorithm operating on the differential signal model and referred to as differential least squares (DLS). The second-stage algorithm is an extended Kalman filter, which yields the estimate of the phase as well as refining the frequency estimate. A major advantage of the is a reduction in the threshold for the received carrier power-to-noise power spectral density ratio (CNR) as compared with the threshold achievable by either of the algorithms alone.

  11. Multistage sampling for latent variable models.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Duncan C

    2007-12-01

    I consider the design of multistage sampling schemes for epidemiologic studies involving latent variable models, with surrogate measurements of the latent variables on a subset of subjects. Such models arise in various situations: when detailed exposure measurements are combined with variables that can be used to assign exposures to unmeasured subjects; when biomarkers are obtained to assess an unobserved pathophysiologic process; or when additional information is to be obtained on confounding or modifying variables. In such situations, it may be possible to stratify the subsample on data available for all subjects in the main study, such as outcomes, exposure predictors, or geographic locations. Three circumstances where analytic calculations of the optimal design are possible are considered: (i) when all variables are binary; (ii) when all are normally distributed; and (iii) when the latent variable and its measurement are normally distributed, but the outcome is binary. In each of these cases, it is often possible to considerably improve the cost efficiency of the design by appropriate selection of the sampling fractions. More complex situations arise when the data are spatially distributed: the spatial correlation can be exploited to improve exposure assignment for unmeasured locations using available measurements on neighboring locations; some approaches for informative selection of the measurement sample using location and/or exposure predictor data are considered.

  12. Combined fluidized bed retort and combustor

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Notestein, John E.; Mei, Joseph S.; Zeng, Li-Wen

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combined fluidized bed retorting and combustion system particularly useful for extracting energy values from oil shale. The oil-shale retort and combustor are disposed side-by-side and in registry with one another through passageways in a partition therebetween. The passageways in the partition are submerged below the top of the respective fluid beds to preclude admixing or the product gases from the two chambers. The solid oil shale or bed material is transported through the chambers by inclining or slanting the fluidizing medium distributor so that the solid bed material, when fluidized, moves in the direction of the downward slope of the distributor.

  13. Catalytic multi-stage process for hydroconversion and refining hydrocarbon feeds

    DOEpatents

    Comolli, Alfred G.; Lee, Lap-Keung

    2001-01-01

    A multi-stage catalytic hydrogenation and hydroconversion process for heavy hydrocarbon feed materials such as coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and plastic waste materials. In the process, the feedstock is reacted in a first-stage, back-mixed catalytic reactor with a highly dispersed iron-based catalyst having a powder, gel or liquid form. The reactor effluent is pressure-reduced, vapors and light distillate fractions are removed overhead, and the heavier liquid fraction is fed to a second stage back-mixed catalytic reactor. The first and second stage catalytic reactors are operated at 700-850.degree. F. temperature, 1000-3500 psig hydrogen partial pressure and 20-80 lb./hr per ft.sup.3 reactor space velocity. The vapor and light distillates liquid fractions removed from both the first and second stage reactor effluent streams are combined and passed to an in-line, fixed-bed catalytic hydrotreater for heteroatom removal and for producing high quality naphtha and mid-distillate or a full-range distillate product. The remaining separator bottoms liquid fractions are distilled at successive atmospheric and vacuum pressures, low and intermediate-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products are withdrawn, and heavier distillate fractions are recycled and further upgraded to provide additional low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products. This catalytic multistage hydrogenation process provides improved flexibility for hydroprocessing the various carbonaceous feedstocks and adjusting to desired product structures and for improved economy of operations.

  14. Staged cascade fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Cannon, Joseph N.; De Lucia, David E.; Jackson, William M.; Porter, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A fluid bed combustor comprising a plurality of fluidized bed stages interconnected by downcomers providing controlled solids transfer from stage to stage. Each stage is formed from a number of heat transfer tubes carried by a multiapertured web which passes fluidizing air to upper stages. The combustor cross section is tapered inwardly from the middle towards the top and bottom ends. Sorbent materials, as well as non-volatile solid fuels, are added to the top stages of the combustor, and volatile solid fuels are added at an intermediate stage.

  15. Separation characteristics of multistage water/hydrogen exchange column for water detritiation in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanishi, T.; Okuno, K.

    1995-10-01

    A simulation code of multistage chemical exchange columns has been developed. The sieve trays for liquid-vapor scrubbing and the catalyst beds for vapor-hydrogen exchange reactions are alternately piled within the column. The code deals with all the twelve molecular species of hydrogen gas and water; and is based on the Newton-Raphson method. The characteristics of the column were discussed from the calculated results by this code such as effects of temperature and pressure. Similar to the distillation columns, the phase flow rates within the column (hydrogen gas and water vapor) and product flow rates have large effects on the separation performance of the column. A control method of the column was also proposed from these calculated results. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method. PMID:25124155

  17. NIR spectroscopic method for the in-line moisture assessment during drying in a six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous tablet production line: Validation of quantifying abilities and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Arruabarrena, Julen; de Beer, Jacques; Hellings, Mario; Van Den Kerkhof, Tom; Burggraeve, Anneleen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    This study focuses on the thorough validation of an in-line NIR based moisture quantification method in the six-segmented fluid bed dryer of a continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line (ConsiGma™ 25, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium). The moisture assessment ability of an FT-NIR spectrometer (Matrix™-F Duplex, Bruker Optics Ltd, UK) equipped with a fiber-optic Lighthouse Probe™ (LHP, GEA Pharma Systems nv, Wommelgem, Belgium) was investigated. Although NIR spectroscopy is a widely used technique for in-process moisture determination, a minority of NIR spectroscopy methods is thoroughly validated. A moisture quantification PLS model was developed. Twenty calibration experiments were conducted, during which spectra were collected at-line and then regressed versus the corresponding residual moisture values obtained via Karl Fischer measurements. The developed NIR moisture quantification model was then validated by calculating the accuracy profiles on the basis of the analysis results of independent in-line validation experiments. Furthermore, as the aim of the NIR method is to replace the destructive, time-consuming Karl Fischer titration, it was statistically demonstrated that the new NIR method performs at least as good as the Karl Fischer reference method.

  18. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  19. Deciphering Multistage Crystal Histories in Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, R.; Turner, S.; Berlo, K.; Pearson, N.

    2005-12-01

    Discrepancy between crystal ages derived by short-lived chronometers with vastly differing half-lives is one manifestation of the potential for complex, multistage evolution of phenocrysts in arc magmatic systems. Deciphering these processes is critical for estimating realistic crystal histories and, ultimately, the physical mechanisms of differentiation. Some of the biggest chronological discrepancies are evident in the andesitic compositional range, the most ubiquitous material erupted at arcs. In some systems, such as Sangeang Api in the Sunda arc, U-Th and Ra-Th systematics of bulk plagioclase separates are not in conflict and indicate that differentiation occurred over several 1000 years via crystallization due to cooling in the lower crust. Here, 210Pb data indicate significant degassing occurred in the decade prior to eruption but post-dated phenocryst growth and magma differentiation. Combined textural and U-Th-Ra isotope approaches often, however, provide compelling evidence that plagioclase phenocrysts contain old cores and thus are zoned in both age and composition. One of the best examples of apparently conflicting time-scale information comes from Soufriere volcano on St. Vincent in the Lesser Antilles. U-Th isotopes analyses of bulk plagioclase separates conflict with whole-rock and mineral Ra-Th disequilibria and attest to non-linear growth histories, and involvement of recycled cumulates upon which renewed crystal growth has taken place. We augment this well-constrained case study with new in situ Sr isotope analyses for one of the Soufriere lavas and a cumulate xenolith erupted in 1979. Significant isotope heterogeneity is observed, and complimentary isotope variations exist between cumulate xenolith and lava plagioclase phenocryst cores, lending further support to the model of heterogeneous core-rim evolution in the Soufriere system. We conclude that mineral time scales should always be cross-examined with other textural and/or isotope techniques

  20. Quantitation of multistage carcinogenesis in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Pitot, H C; Dragan, Y P; Teeguarden, J; Hsia, S; Campbell, H

    1996-01-01

    A well characterized model of multistage carcinogenesis is that of hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat. The histopathology as well as the cell and molecular biology of the stages of initiation, promotion, and progression have been elucidated to varying degrees in this system. Putatively single initiated hepatocytes are identified by their expression of the ubiquitous marker of hepatocarcinogenesis, glutathione-S-transferase pi (GSTP). 0.5-1.0 x 10(6) GSTP-positive "initiated" hepatocytes developed within 14 days after initiation with a subcarcinogenic dose of diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Approximately 1% of these cells develop clonally into altered hepatic foci (AHF) in animals administered promoting agents, such as phenobarbital, chronically for 4-8 mo. Hepatocytes within AHF during the stage of promotion exhibit normal diploid karyotypes but various phenotypes depending on the chemical nature of the promoting agent. Continued administration of the promoting agent results in the infrequent development of hepatocellular carcinomas; however, administration of a complete carcinogen or a progressor agent during the stage of promotion results in substantial numbers of hepatic neoplasms. In order to quantitate the development of the stage of progression more accurately, markers selective for this stage have been sought. Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) appears to be such a marker of progression. About 500 TGF-alpha-positive lesions develop spontaneously following initiation and continued promotion, usually within GSTP-positive AHF, but administration of a single dose of a progressor agent such as ethylnitrosourea may increase this number 3-fold or more. Some agents such as gamma radiation and hydroxyurea, when administered as single or a few closely spaced multiple doses, result in no increased number in TGF-alpha-positive lesions but a markedly enhanced increase in their growth rate. By monitoring gene expression using quantitative stereology, the stages of

  1. Modeling of Unsteady Three-dimensional Flows in Multistage Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Kenneth C.; Pratt, Edmund T., Jr.; Kurkov, Anatole (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Despite many years of development, the accurate and reliable prediction of unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on turbomachinery blades remains less than satisfactory, especially when viewed next to the great success investigators have had in predicting steady flows. Hall and Silkowski (1997) have proposed that one of the main reasons for the discrepancy between theory and experiment and/or industrial experience is that many of the current unsteady aerodynamic theories model a single blade row in an infinitely long duct, ignoring potentially important multistage effects. However, unsteady flows are made up of acoustic, vortical, and entropic waves. These waves provide a mechanism for the rotors and stators of multistage machines to communicate with one another. In other words, wave behavior makes unsteady flows fundamentally a multistage (and three-dimensional) phenomenon. In this research program, we have has as goals (1) the development of computationally efficient computer models of the unsteady aerodynamic response of blade rows embedded in a multistage machine (these models will ultimately be capable of analyzing three-dimensional viscous transonic flows), and (2) the use of these computer codes to study a number of important multistage phenomena.

  2. Simple method for performance evaluation of multistage rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontani, Mauro; Teofilatto, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Multistage rockets are commonly employed to place spacecraft and satellites in their operational orbits. Performance evaluation of multistage rockets is aimed at defining the maximum payload mass at orbit injection, for specified structural, propulsive, and aerodynamic data of the launch vehicle. This work proposes a simple method for a fast performance evaluation of multistage rockets. The technique at hand is based on three steps: (i) the flight-path angle at each stage separation is guessed, (ii) the spacecraft velocity is maximized at the first and second stage separation, and (iii) for the last stage the thrust direction is obtained through the particle swarm optimization technique, in conjunction with the use of the Euler-Lagrange equations and the Pontryagin minimum principle. The coast duration at the second stage separation is optimized as well. The method at hand is extremely simple and easy-to-implement, but nevertheless it proves to be capable of yielding near-optimal ascending trajectories for a multistage launch vehicle with realistic structural, propulsive, and aerodynamic characteristics. The solutions found with the technique under consideration can be employed either for a rapid evaluation of the multistage rocket performance or as guesses for more refined optimization algorithms.

  3. Packed Bed Reactor Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The purpose of the Packed Bed Reactor Experiment in low gravity is to determine how a mixture of gas and liquid flows through a packed bed in reduced gravity. A packed bed consists of a metal pipe ...

  4. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  5. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  6. Model equations for simulating flows in multistage turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A steady, three dimensional average-passage equation system was derived. The purpose was to simulate multistage turbomachinery flows. These equations describe a steady, viscous flow that is periodic from blade passage to blade passage. Moreover, these equations have a closure problem that is similar to that of the Reynolds-average Navier-Stokes equations. A scaled form of the average-passage equation system could provide an improved mathematical model for simulating the flow in the design and in the off-design conditions of a multistage machine.

  7. Multi-Stage Bunch Compressors for the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wolski, A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2005-05-27

    We present bunch compressor designs for the International Linear Collider (ILC) which achieve a reduction in RMS bunch length from 6 mm to 0.3 mm via multiple stages of compression, with stages of acceleration inserted between the stages of compression. The key advantage of multi-stage compression is that the maximum RMS energy spread is reduced to approximately 1%, compared to over 3% for a single-stage design. Analytic and simulation studies of the multi-stage bunch compressors are presented, along with performance comparisons to a single-stage system. Parameters for extending the systems to a larger total compression factor are discussed.

  8. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid imbalance; Hypernatremia - fluid imbalance; Hypokalemia - fluid imbalance; Hyperkalemia - fluid imbalance ... of sodium or potassium is present as well. Medicines can also affect fluid balance. The most common ...

  9. Solids feed nozzle for fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Zielinski, Edward A.

    1982-01-01

    The vertical fuel pipe of a fluidized bed extends up through the perforated support structure of the bed to discharge granulated solid fuel into the expanded bed. A cap, as a deflecting structure, is supported above the discharge of the fuel pipe and is shaped and arranged to divert the carrier fluid and granulated fuel into the combusting bed. The diverter structure is spaced above the end of the fuel pipe and provided with a configuration on its underside to form a venturi section which generates a low pressure in the stream into which the granules of solid fuel are drawn to lengthen their residence time in the combustion zone of the bed adjacent the fuel pipe.

  10. Improving adsorption cryocoolers by multi-stage compression and reducing void volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the performance of gas adsorption cryocoolers is greatly improved by using adsorbents with low void volume within and between individual adsorbent particles (reducing void volumes in plumbing lines), and by compressing the working fluid in more than one stage. Refrigerator specific power requirements and compressor volumetric efficiencies are obtained in terms of adsorbent and plumbing line void volumes and operating pressures for various charcoal adsorbents using an analytical model. Performance optimization curves for 117.5 and 80 K charcoal/nitrogen adsorption cryocoolers are given for both single stage and multistage compressor systems, and compressing the nitrogen in two stages is shown to lower the specific power requirements by 18 percent for the 117.5 K system.

  11. Two-fluid Hydrodynamic Model for Fluid-Flow Simulation in Fluid-Solids Systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-20

    FLUFIX is a two-dimensional , transient, Eulerian, and finite-difference program, based on a two-fluid hydrodynamic model, for fluid flow simulation in fluid-solids systems. The software is written in a modular form using the Implicit Multi-Field (IMF) numerical technique. Quantities computed are the spatial distribution of solids loading, gas and solids velocities, pressure, and temperatures. Predicted are bubble formation, bed frequencies, and solids recirculation. Applications include bubbling and circulating atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed reactors, combustors, gasifiers, and FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) reactors.

  12. Two-fluid Hydrodynamic Model for Fluid-Flow Simulation in Fluid-Solids Systems

    1994-06-20

    FLUFIX is a two-dimensional , transient, Eulerian, and finite-difference program, based on a two-fluid hydrodynamic model, for fluid flow simulation in fluid-solids systems. The software is written in a modular form using the Implicit Multi-Field (IMF) numerical technique. Quantities computed are the spatial distribution of solids loading, gas and solids velocities, pressure, and temperatures. Predicted are bubble formation, bed frequencies, and solids recirculation. Applications include bubbling and circulating atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed reactors, combustors,more » gasifiers, and FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) reactors.« less

  13. Test Information Targeting Strategies for Adaptive Multistage Testing Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.; Burgin, William

    Adaptive multistage testlet (MST) designs appear to be gaining popularity for many large-scale computer-based testing programs. These adaptive MST designs use a modularized configuration of preconstructed testlets and embedded score-routing schemes to prepackage different forms of an adaptive test. The conditional information targeting (CIT)…

  14. Optimal Testlet Pool Assembly for Multistage Testing Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Breithaupt, Krista

    2006-01-01

    Computerized multistage testing (MST) designs require sets of test questions (testlets) to be assembled to meet strict, often competing criteria. Rules that govern testlet assembly may dictate the number of questions on a particular subject or may describe desirable statistical properties for the test, such as measurement precision. In an MST…

  15. Low-dose-rate extrapolation using the multistage model

    SciTech Connect

    Portier, C.; Hoel, D.

    1983-12-01

    The distribution of the maximum likelihood estimates of virtually safe levels of exposure to environmental chemicals is derived by using large-sample theory and Monte Carlo simulation according to the Armitage-Doll multistage model. Using historical dose-response we develop a set of 33 two-stage models upon which we base our conclusions. The large-sample distributions of the virtually safe dose are normal for cases in which the multistage-model parameters have nonzero expectation, and are skewed in other cases. The large-sample theory does not provide a good approximation of the distribution observed for small bioassays when Monte Carlo simulation is used. The constrained nature of the multistage-model parameters leads to bimodal distributions for small bioassays. The two modes are the direct result of estimating the linear parameter in the multistage model; the lower mode results from estimating this parameter to be nonzero, and the upper mode from estimating it to be zero. The results of this research emphasize the need for incorporation of the biological theory in the model-selection process.

  16. Automatic Multi-Stage Clock Gating Optimization Using ILP Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Xin; Horiyama, Takashi; Kimura, Shinji

    Clock gating is supported by commercial tools as a power optimization feature based on the guard signal described in HDL (structural method). However, the identification of control signals for gated registers is hard and designer-intensive work. Besides, since the clock gating cells also consume power, it is imperative to minimize the number of inserted clock gating cells and their switching activities for power optimization. In this paper, we propose an automatic multi-stage clock gating algorithm with ILP (Integer Linear Programming) formulation, including clock gating control candidate extraction, constraints construction and optimum control signal selection. By multi-stage clock gating, unnecessary clock pulses to clock gating cells can be avoided by other clock gating cells, so that the switching activity of clock gating cells can be reduced. We find that any multi-stage control signals are also single-stage control signals, and any combination of signals can be selected from single-stage candidates. The proposed method can be applied to 3 or more cascaded stages. The multi-stage clock gating optimization problem is formulated as constraints in LP format for the selection of cascaded clock-gating order of multi-stage candidate combinations, and a commercial ILP solver (IBM CPLEX) is applied to obtain the control signals for each register with minimum switching activity. Those signals are used to generate a gate level description with guarded registers from original design, and a commercial synthesis and layout tools are applied to obtain the circuit with multi-stage clock gating. For a set of benchmark circuits and a Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) Decoder (6.6k gates, 212 F.F.s), the proposed method is applied and actual power consumption is estimated using Synopsys NanoSim after layout. On average, 31% actual power reduction has been obtained compared with original designs with structural clock gating, and more than 10% improvement has been achieved for some

  17. Fluidized bed heat treating system

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B; Pfennigwerth, Glenn L

    2014-05-06

    Systems for heat treating materials are presented. The systems typically involve a fluidized bed that contains granulated heat treating material. In some embodiments a fluid, such as an inert gas, is flowed through the granulated heat treating medium, which homogenizes the temperature of the heat treating medium. In some embodiments the fluid may be heated in a heating vessel and flowed into the process chamber where the fluid is then flowed through the granulated heat treating medium. In some embodiments the heat treating material may be liquid or granulated heat treating material and the heat treating material may be circulated through a heating vessel into a process chamber where the heat treating material contacts the material to be heat treated. Microwave energy may be used to provide the source of heat for heat treating systems.

  18. Rivesville multicell fluidized bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    One objective of the experimental MFB at Rivesville, WV, was the evaluation of alternate feed systems for injecting coal and limestone into a fluidized bed. A continuous, uniform feed flow to the fluid bed is essential in order to maintain stable operations. The feed system originally installed on the MFB was a gravity feed system with an air assist to help overcome the back pressure created by the fluid bed. The system contained belt, vibrating, and rotary feeders which have been proven adequate in other material handling applications. This system, while usable, had several operational and feeding problems during the MFB testing. A major portion of these problems occurred because the coal and limestone feed control points - a belt feeder and rotary feeder, respectively - were pressurized in the air assist system. These control points were not designed for pressurized service. An alternate feed system which could accept feed from the two control points, split the feed into six equal parts and eliminate the problems of the pressurized system was sought. An alternate feed system designed and built by the Fuller Company was installed and tested at the Rivesville facility. Fuller feed systems were installed on the north and south side of C cell at the Rivesville facility. The systems were designed to handle 10,000 lb/hr of coal and limestone apiece. The systems were installed in late 1979 and evaluated from December 1979 to December 1980. During this time period, nearly 1000 h of operating time was accumulated on each system.

  19. 7 CFR 2902.15 - Bedding, bed linens, and towels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bedding, bed linens, and towels. 2902.15 Section 2902... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 2902.15 Bedding, bed linens, and towels. (a) Definition. (1) Bedding is that group of woven cloth products used as coverings on a bed. Bedding includes products such as...

  20. Lifting a large object from an anisotropic porous bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Timir; Raja Sekhar, G. P.

    2016-09-01

    An analytical study of two dimensional problem of lifting an object from the top of a fully saturated rigid porous bed is discussed. It is assumed that the porous bed is anisotropic in nature. The flow within the gap region between the object and the porous bed is assumed to be governed by Stokes equation while the flow within the porous bed is governed by Brinkman equation. The breakout phenomenon for different kinds of soil is reported. The effect of mechanical properties like anisotropic permeability, grain diameter size, and porosity on streamlines, velocity, and force is analyzed. Relevant comparison with C. C. Mei, R. W. Yeung, and K. F. Liu ["Lifting a large object from a porous bed," J. Fluid. Mech. 152, 203-215 (1985)] and Y. Chang, L. H. Huang and F. P. Y. Yang ["Two-dimensional lift-up problem for a rigid porous bed," Phys. Fluids, 27, 053101 (2015)] is done.

  1. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOEpatents

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P.; Matthews, Francis T.

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  2. A fluidized-bed reactor for silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, S.

    1984-01-01

    The silane decomposition in a fluidized bed reactor was studied. The process feasibility and operating windows were determined. Long duration tests were conducted and silicon purity was demonstrated. A high purity linear was installed in the fluid bed reactor; the FBR product was melted and single crystallized. Product purity improvements are noted.

  3. Reentry trajectory optimization based on a multistage pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization.

  4. Reentry trajectory optimization based on a multistage pseudospectral method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization. PMID:24574929

  5. Reentry Trajectory Optimization Based on a Multistage Pseudospectral Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Jin, Xuelian

    2014-01-01

    Of the many direct numerical methods, the pseudospectral method serves as an effective tool to solve the reentry trajectory optimization for hypersonic vehicles. However, the traditional pseudospectral method is time-consuming due to large number of discretization points. For the purpose of autonomous and adaptive reentry guidance, the research herein presents a multistage trajectory control strategy based on the pseudospectral method, capable of dealing with the unexpected situations in reentry flight. The strategy typically includes two subproblems: the trajectory estimation and trajectory refining. In each processing stage, the proposed method generates a specified range of trajectory with the transition of the flight state. The full glide trajectory consists of several optimal trajectory sequences. The newly focused geographic constraints in actual flight are discussed thereafter. Numerical examples of free-space flight, target transition flight, and threat avoidance flight are used to show the feasible application of multistage pseudospectral method in reentry trajectory optimization. PMID:24574929

  6. Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Various types of multi-stage decoding for multi-level modulation codes are investigated. It is shown that if the component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. Particularly, it is shown that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft-decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single-stage optimum soft-decision decoding of the code is very small, only a fraction of dB loss in signal to noise ratio at a bit error rate (BER) of 10(exp -6).

  7. Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S.; Berry, P; Cohen, M.; Danelis, J.; Deroshia, C.; Greenleaf, J.; Harris, B.; Keil, L.; Bernauer, E.; Bond, M.; Ellis, S.; Lee, P.; Selzer, R.; Wade, C.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiment to investigate effects of isotonic and isokinetic leg exercises in counteracting effects of bed rest upon physical and mental conditions of subjects. Data taken on capacity for work, endurance and strength, tolerance to sitting up, equilibrium, posture, gait, atrophy, mineralization and density of bones, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid and electrolyte balances, intermediary metabolism of muscles, mood, and performance.

  8. Multi-stage, isothermal CO preferential oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Brundage, Mark A.; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Pettit, William Henry; Stukey, Kevin; Hart-Predmore, David James; Fairchok, Joel

    2000-01-01

    A multi-stage, isothermal, carbon monoxide preferential oxidation (PrOx) reactor comprising a plurality of serially arranged, catalyzed heat exchangers, each separated from the next by a mixing chamber for homogenizing the gases exiting one heat exchanger and entering the next. In a preferred embodiment, at least some of the air used in the PrOx reaction is injected directly into the mixing chamber between the catalyzed heat exchangers.

  9. Multi-stage depressed collector for small orbit gyrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Amarjit; Ives, R. Lawrence; Schumacher, Richard V.; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-stage depressed collector for receiving energy from a small orbit gyrating electron beam employs a plurality of electrodes at different potentials for sorting the individual electrons on the basis of their total energy level. Magnetic field generating coils, for producing magnetic fields and magnetic iron for magnetic field shaping produce adiabatic and controlled non-adiabatic transitions of the incident electron beam to further facilitate the sorting.

  10. Multi-stage depressed collector for small orbit gyrotrons

    DOEpatents

    Singh, A.; Ives, R.L.; Schumacher, R.V.; Mizuhara, Y.M.

    1998-07-14

    A multi-stage depressed collector for receiving energy from a small orbit gyrating electron beam employs a plurality of electrodes at different potentials for sorting the individual electrons on the basis of their total energy level. Magnetic field generating coils, for producing magnetic fields and magnetic iron for magnetic field shaping produce adiabatic and controlled non-adiabatic transitions of the incident electron beam to further facilitate the sorting. 9 figs.

  11. Multistage aerospace craft. [perspective drawings of conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A conceptual design of a multi-stage aerospace craft is presented. Two perspective views of the vehicle are developed to show the two component configuration with delta wing, four vertical tail surfaces, tricycle landing gear, and two rocket exhaust nozzles at the rear of the fuselage. Engines for propulsion in the atmosphere are mounted on the fuselage in front of the wing root attachment.

  12. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  13. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    MedlinePlus

    ... their development. Bed-wetting is more common among boys than girls. What causes bed-wetting? A number of things ... valves in boys or in the ureter in girls or boys Abnormalities in the spinal cord A small bladder ...

  14. Development of a three-dimensional multistage inverse design method for aerodynamic matching of axial compressor blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rooij, Michael P. C.

    Current turbomachinery design systems increasingly rely on multistage Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a means to assess performance of designs. However, design weaknesses attributed to improper stage matching are addressed using often ineffective strategies involving a costly iterative loop between blading modification, revision of design intent, and evaluation of aerodynamic performance. A design methodology is presented which greatly improves the process of achieving design-point aerodynamic matching. It is based on a three-dimensional viscous inverse design method which generates the blade camber surface based on prescribed pressure loading, thickness distribution and stacking line. This inverse design method has been extended to allow blading analysis and design in a multi-blade row environment. Blade row coupling was achieved through a mixing plane approximation. Parallel computing capability in the form of MPI has been implemented to reduce the computational time for multistage calculations. Improvements have been made to the flow solver to reach the level of accuracy required for multistage calculations. These include inclusion of heat flux, temperature-dependent treatment of viscosity, and improved calculation of stress components and artificial dissipation near solid walls. A validation study confirmed that the obtained accuracy is satisfactory at design point conditions. Improvements have also been made to the inverse method to increase robustness and design fidelity. These include the possibility to exclude spanwise sections of the blade near the endwalls from the design process, and a scheme that adjusts the specified loading area for changes resulting from the leading and trailing edge treatment. Furthermore, a pressure loading manager has been developed. Its function is to automatically adjust the pressure loading area distribution during the design calculation in order to achieve a specified design objective. Possible objectives are overall

  15. Optimal software multicast in wormhole-routed multistage networks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.; Gui, Y.D.; Ni, L.M.

    1994-12-31

    Multistage interconnection networks are a popular class of interconnection architecture for constructing scalable parallel computers (SPCs). The focus of this paper is on wormhole routed multistage networks supporting turnaround routing. Existing machines characterized by such a system model include the IBM SP-1, TMC CM-5, and Meiko CS-2. Efficient collective communication among processor nodes is critical to the performance of SPCS. A system-level multicast service, in which the same message is delivered from a source node to an arbitrary number of destination nodes, is fundamental in supporting collective communication primitives including the application-level broadcast, reduction, and barrier synchronization. This paper addresses how to efficiently implement multicast services in wormhole routed multistage networks, in the absence of hardware multicast support, by exploiting the properties of the switching technology. An optimal multicast algorithm is proposed. The results of implementations on a 64-node SP-1 show that the proposed algorithm significantly out performs the application-level broadcast primitives provided by currently existing collective communication libraries including the public domain MPI.

  16. Simulating the multistage environment for single-stage compressor experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Place, J.M.M.; Howard, M.A.; Cumpsty, N.A.

    1996-10-01

    The performance of a single-stage low-speed compressor has been measured both before and after the introduction of certain features of the multistage flow environment. The aim is to make the single-stage rig more appropriate for developing design rules for multistage compressors. End-wall blockage was generated by teeth on the hub and casing upstream of the rotor. A grid fitted upstream produced free-stream turbulence at rotor inlet typical of multistage machines and raised stage efficiency by 1.8 percent at the design point. The potential field that would be generated by blade rows downstream of an embedded stage was replicated by introducing a pressure loss screen at stage exit. This reduced the stator hub corner separation and increased the rotor pressure rise at flow rates below design, changing the shape of the pressure-rise characteristic markedly. These results highlight the importance of features of the flow environment that are often omitted from single-stage experiments and offer improved understanding of stage aerodynamics.

  17. Making a Bed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Anthony; Stein, Sherman

    2005-01-01

    The origins of this paper lay in making beds by putting pieces of plywood on a frame: If beds need to be 4 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 3 inches, and plywood comes in 4-foot by 8-foot sheets, how should one cut the plywood to minimize waste (and have stable beds)? The problem is of course generalized.

  18. Fluidized bed combustor and tube construction therefor

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  19. Tube construction for fluidized bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1984-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  20. Getting Rid of Bed Bugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed Bugs — Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control — Pesticides to Control Bed Bugs Bed Bug Information Clearinghouse ... Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems ...

  1. Impact of influent wastewater quality on nitrogen removal rates in multistage treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Magdalena; Jóźwiakowski, Krzysztof; Ghrabi, Ahmed; Masi, Fabio

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen removal in treatment wetlands is influenced by many factors, and the presence of electron donors (biodegradable organic matter) and electron acceptors (nitrate ions) is the main limiting one; for obtaining these conditions, multistage treatment wetlands (MTWs) are required, where an extensive nitrification can be obtained in the first stages under aerobic conditions leaving then to the following anoxic/anaerobic stages the duty of the denitrification. Most of the biodegradable organic matter is however oxidised in the first stages, and therefore, the inlet to the denitrification beds is usually poor of easily degradable carbon sources. This study is comparing the long-term performances obtained at several MTWs operating in Europe (North and South) and North Africa in order to understand if there is a significant avail in making use of the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N ratio during the design phase for ensuring proper performances in terms of N overall removal. The statistic analysis performed in this study have shown that MTWs are capable to ensure sufficient removal of both organic and nutrients even in unfavourable proportions of macronutrients (C and N). The usual assumptions for conventional biological treatment systems concerning adequate C/N ratios seem to be dubious in case of wastewater treatment in MTWs.

  2. Physiology of prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Bed rest has been a normal procedure used by physicians for centuries in the treatment of injury and disease. Exposure of patients to prolonged bed rest in the horizontal position induces adaptive deconditioning responses. While deconditioning responses are appropriate for patients or test subjects in the horizontal position, they usually result in adverse physiological responses (fainting, muscular weakness) when the patient assume the upright posture. These deconditioning responses result from reduction in hydrostatic pressure within the cardiovascular system, virtual elimination of longitudinal pressure on the long bones, some decrease in total body metabolism, changes in diet, and perhaps psychological impact from the different environment. Almost every system in the body is affected. An early stimulus is the cephalic shift of fluid from the legs which increases atrial pressure and induces compensatory responses for fluid and electrolyte redistribution. Without countermeasures, deterioration in strength and muscle function occurs within 1 wk while increased calcium loss may continue for months. Research should also focus on drug and carbohydrate metabolism.

  3. Study report on modification of the long term circulatory model for the simulation of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.; Grounds, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications were made of the circulatory, fluid, and electrolyte control model which was based on the model of Guyton. The modifications included separate leg compartments and the addition of gravity dependency. It was found that these modifications allowed for more accurate bed rest simulation by simulating changes in the orthostatic gradient and simulating the response to the fluid shifts associated with bed rest.

  4. Multistage optical system for broadcasting and switching information.

    PubMed

    Mendlovic, D; Leibner, B; Cohen, N

    1999-10-10

    Conventional switching systems connect each input channel to one output channel. Broadcasting systems permit the connection of each input channel to more than a single output. A broadcast 2 x 2 switch is presented. This switch is an extension of the standard bypass-exchange switch. It allows for the broadcasting of the inputs in addition to the conventional modes. Multistage interconnection networks can be constructed with this switch as the basic building block. Such networks will extend their capabilities, allowing for broadcasting features. Three implementations of this type are described, and experimental results for the 2 x 2 switch are also presented.

  5. Thermochemical production of hydrogen via multistage water splitting processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents and reviews the fundamental thermodynamic principles underlying thermochemical water splitting processes. The overall system is considered first and the temperature limitation in process thermal efficiency is developed. The relationship to an ideal water electrolysis cell is described and the nature of efficient multistage reaction processes is discussed. The importance of the reaction entropy change and the relation of the reaction free energy change to the work of separation is described. A procedure for analyzing thermochemical water splitting processes is presented and its use to calculate individual stage efficiency is demonstrated. A number of processes are used to illustrate the concepts and procedures.

  6. The evolution of the cancer niche during multistage carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Lyden, David; Wang, Timothy C

    2013-07-01

    The concept of the tumour microenvironment recognizes that the interplay between cancer cells and stromal cells is a crucial determinant of cancer growth. In this Perspectives article, we propose the novel concept that the tumour microenvironment is built through rate-limiting steps during multistage carcinogenesis. Construction of a 'precancer niche' is a necessary and early step that is required for initiated cells to survive and evolve; subsequent niche expansion and maturation accompany tumour promotion and progression, respectively. As such, cancer niches represent an emergent property of a tumour that could be a robust target for cancer prevention and therapy.

  7. Multistage Spectral Relaxation Method for Solving the Hyperchaotic Complex Systems

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Nik, Hassan; Rebelo, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method application for solving the hyperchaotic complex systems. The proposed method, called the multistage spectral relaxation method (MSRM) is based on a technique of extending Gauss-Seidel type relaxation ideas to systems of nonlinear differential equations and using the Chebyshev pseudospectral methods to solve the resulting system on a sequence of multiple intervals. In this new application, the MSRM is used to solve famous hyperchaotic complex systems such as hyperchaotic complex Lorenz system and the complex permanent magnet synchronous motor. We compare this approach to the Runge-Kutta based ode45 solver to show that the MSRM gives accurate results. PMID:25386624

  8. An integral equation solution for multistage turbomachinery design calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to calculate flows in multistage turbomachinery. The method is an extension of quasi-three-dimensional blade-to-blade solution methods. Governing equations for steady compressible inviscid flow are linearized by introducing approximations. The linearized flow equations are solved using integral equation techniques. The flows through both stationary and rotating blade rows are determined in a single calculation. Multiple bodies can be modelled for each blade row, so that arbitrary blade counts can be analyzed. The method's benefits are its speed and versatility.

  9. Fluidized bed combustor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Rengarajan, P.; Krishnan, R.; Wen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    A general mathematical model for the prediction of performance of a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBC) is developed. The basic elements of the model consist of: (1) hydrodynamics of gas and solids in the combustor; (2) description of gas and solids contacting pattern; (3) kinetics of combustion; and (4) absorption of SO2 by limestone in the bed. The model is capable of calculating the combustion efficiency, axial bed temperature profile, carbon hold-up in the bed, oxygen and SO2 concentrations in the bubble and emulsion phases, sulfur retention efficiency and particulate carry over by elutriation. The effects of bed geometry, excess air, location of heat transfer coils in the bed, calcium to sulfur ratio in the feeds, etc. are examined. The calculated results are compared with experimental data. Agreement between the calculated results and the observed data are satisfactory in most cases. Recommendations to enhance the accuracy of prediction of the model are suggested.

  10. High-Flux, High Performance H2O2 Catalyst Bed for ISTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponzo, J.

    2005-01-01

    On NASA's ISTAR RBCC program packaging and performance requirements exceeded traditional H2O2 catalyst bed capabilities. Aerojet refined a high performance, monolithic 90% H202 catalyst bed previously developed and demonstrated. This approach to catalyst bed design and fabrication was an enabling technology to the ISTAR tri-fluid engine. The catalyst bed demonstrated 55 starts at throughputs greater than 0.60 lbm/s/sq in for a duration of over 900 seconds in a physical envelope approximately 114 of traditional designs. The catalyst bed uses photoetched plates of metal bonded into a single piece monolithic structure. The precise control of the geometry and complete mixing results in repeatable, quick starting, high performing catalyst bed. Three different beds were designed and tested, with the best performing bed used for tri-fluid engine testing.

  11. The influence of shrouded stator cavity flows on multistage compressor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wellborn, S.R.; Okiishi, T.H.

    1999-07-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved systematic changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Rig data indicate increasing seal-tooth leakage substantially degraded compressor performance. For every 1 percent increase in seal-tooth clearance-to-span ratio, the decrease in pressure rise was 3 percent and the reduction in efficiency was 1 point. These observed performance penalties are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. The performance degradation observed with increased leakage was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near-hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit flow conditions, caused by increased leakage, impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the stator. These trends caused the performance of downstream stages to deteriorate progressively. Numerical simulations of the test rig stator flow field were also conducted to help resolve important fluid mechanic details associated with the interaction between the primary and cavity flows. Simulation results show that fluid originating in the upstream cavity collected on the stator suction surface when the cavity tangential momentum was low and on the pressure side when it was high. The convection of cavity fluid to the suction surface was a mechanism that reduced stator performance when leakage increased.

  12. Bed rest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Catherine; Stone, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    The use of bed rest in medicine dates back to Hippocrates, who first recommended bed rest as a restorative measure for pain. With the formalization of prenatal care in the early 1900s, maternal bed rest became a standard of care, especially toward the end of pregnancy. Antepartum bed rest is a common obstetric management tool, with up to 95% of obstetricians utilizing maternal activity restriction in some way in their practice. Bed rest is prescribed for a variety of complications of pregnancy, from threatened abortion and multiple gestations to preeclampsia and preterm labor. Although the use of bed rest is pervasive, there is a paucity of data to support its use. Additionally, many well-documented adverse physical, psychological, familial, societal, and financial effects have been discussed in the literature. There have been no complications of pregnancy for which the literature consistently demonstrates a benefit to antepartum bed rest. Given the well-documented adverse effects of bed rest, disruption of social relationships, and financial implications of this intervention, there is a real need for scientific investigation to establish whether this is an appropriate therapeutic modality. Well-designed randomized, controlled trials of bed rest versus normal activity for various complications of pregnancy are required to lay this debate to rest once and for all. PMID:21425272

  13. FLUFIXMOD2. Two-fluid Hydrodynamic Model for Fluid-Flow Simulation in Fluid-Solids Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Folga, S.M.

    1992-04-01

    FLUFIX is a two-dimensional , transient, Eulerian, and finite-difference program, based on a two-fluid hydrodynamic model, for fluid flow simulation in fluid-solids systems. The software is written in a modular form using the Implicit Multi-Field (IMF) numerical technique. Quantities computed are the spatial distribution of solids loading, gas and solids velocities, pressure, and temperatures. Predicted are bubble formation, bed frequencies, and solids recirculation. Applications include bubbling and circulating atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed reactors, combustors, gasifiers, and FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) reactors.

  14. A multistaged automatic restoration of noisy microscopy cell images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinwei; Hu, Jiankun; Jia, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    Automated cell segmentation for microscopy cell images has recently become an initial step for further image analysis in cell biology. However, microscopy cell images are easily degraded by noise during the readout procedure via optical-electronic imaging systems. Such noise degradations result in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and poor image quality for cell identification. In order to improve SNR for subsequent segmentation and image-based quantitative analysis, the commonly used state-of-art restoration techniques are applied but few of them are suitable for corrupted microscopy cell images. In this paper, we propose a multistaged method based on a novel integration of trend surface analysis, quantile-quantile plot, bootstrapping, and the Gaussian spatial kernel for the restoration of noisy microscopy cell images. We show this multistaged approach achieves higher performance compared with other state-of-art restoration techniques in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity in synthetic noise experiments. This paper also reports an experiment on real noisy microscopy data which demonstrated the advantages of the proposed restoration method for improving segmentation performance. PMID:25291801

  15. Multistage Nanoparticles for Improved Delivery into Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Wong, Cliff; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect has been a key rationale for the development of nanoscale carriers to solid tumors. As a consequence of EPR, nanotherapeutics are expected to improve drug and detection probe delivery, have less adverse effects than conventional chemotherapy, and thus result in improved detection and treatment of tumors. Physiological barriers posed by the abnormal tumor microenvironment, however, can hinder the homogeneous delivery of nanomedicine in amounts sufficient to eradicate cancer. To effectively enhance the therapeutic outcome of cancer patients by nanotherapeutics, we have to find ways to overcome these barriers. One possibility is to exploit the abnormal tumor microenvironment for selective and improved delivery of therapeutic agents to tumors. Recently, we proposed a multistage nanoparticle delivery system as a potential means to enable uniform delivery throughout the tumor and improve the efficacy of anticancer therapy. Here, we describe the synthesis of a novel multistage nanoparticle formulation that shrinks in size once it enters the tumor interstitial space to optimize the delivery to tumors as well as within tumors. Finally, we provide detailed experimental methods for the characterization of such nanoparticles. PMID:22449923

  16. Numerical Simulation of Multi-Stage Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Shabbir, Aamir; Wellborn, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment is made of the predictive capability of the average passage flow model as applied to multi-stage axial flow compressors. The average passage flow model describes the time average flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded in a multi-stage configuration. In this work data taken within a four and one-half stage large low speed compressor will be used to assess the weakness and strengths of the predictive capabilities of the average passage flow model. The low speed compressor blading is of modern design and employs stators with end-bends. Measurements were made with slow and high response instrumentation. The high response measurements revealed the velocity components of both the rotor and stator wakes. Based on the measured wake profiles it will be argued that blade boundary layer transition is playing an important role in setting compressor performance. A model which mimics the effects of blade boundary layer transition within the frame work of the average passage model will be presented. Simulations which incorporated this model showed a dramatic improvement in agreement with data.

  17. A multistaged automatic restoration of noisy microscopy cell images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinwei; Hu, Jiankun; Jia, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    Automated cell segmentation for microscopy cell images has recently become an initial step for further image analysis in cell biology. However, microscopy cell images are easily degraded by noise during the readout procedure via optical-electronic imaging systems. Such noise degradations result in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and poor image quality for cell identification. In order to improve SNR for subsequent segmentation and image-based quantitative analysis, the commonly used state-of-art restoration techniques are applied but few of them are suitable for corrupted microscopy cell images. In this paper, we propose a multistaged method based on a novel integration of trend surface analysis, quantile-quantile plot, bootstrapping, and the Gaussian spatial kernel for the restoration of noisy microscopy cell images. We show this multistaged approach achieves higher performance compared with other state-of-art restoration techniques in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio and structure similarity in synthetic noise experiments. This paper also reports an experiment on real noisy microscopy data which demonstrated the advantages of the proposed restoration method for improving segmentation performance.

  18. Multi-stage apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, L.; Venet, M.; Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    2008-07-01

    Prolate (Pupil) Apodized Lyot Coronagraphs (PPALC) are known to offer optimal performances for a Lyot-type Coronagraph configuration, i.e. with an opaque occulting focal mask. One additional benefit of PPALC is its possible use in a multi-stage configuration. In theory, the coronagraphic performance can be QN, where Q is the energy rejection factor of one stage (the first one), and N the number of stages. Several ground-based telescopes are considering PPALC as an option for their high-contrast instrumentation (e.g. Gemini/GPI, EELT/EPICS, Subaru HiCIAO). Although the PPALC suffers from several limitations, several works are currently focused on fabricating entrance pupil apodizers and trying to find ways to overcome chromatism issues. In this work, we present the first experimental results from Multi-Stage PPALC (MS-PPALC) that was done in the context of the Japanese space telescope SPICA coronagraph project. Our entrance pupil apodizers use small diameter High Energy Beam Sensitive glass (HEBS-glass) from Canyon Materials Inc. The current results show modest coronagraphic performance due to uncompensated phase aberrations inherent to HEBS-glass material. In addition, and due to these uncompensated phase aberrations, the present optical configuration is an altered version of the originally planned set-up. However, we can demonstrate the validity the MS-PPALC concept and compare it to numerical simulations.

  19. Numerical simulation of turbulence and sand-bed morphodynamics in natural waterways under live bed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, Ali; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-11-01

    We develop and validate a 3D numerical model for coupled simulations of turbulence and sand-bed morphodynamics in natural waterways under live bed conditions. We employ the Fluid-Structure Interaction Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (FSI-CURVIB) method of Khosronejad et al. (Adv. in Water Res., 2011). The mobile channel bed is discretized with an unstructured triangular grid and treated as the sharp-interface immersed boundary embedded in a background curvilinear mesh. Transport of bed load and suspended load sediments are combined in the non-equilibrium from of the Exner-Poyla for the bed surface elevation, which evolves due to the spatio-temporally varying bed shear stress and velocity vector induced by the turbulent flow field. Both URANS and LES models are implemented to simulate the effects of turbulence. Simulations are carried out for a wide range of waterways, from small scale streams to large-scale rivers, and the simulated sand-waves are quantitatively compared to available measurements. It is shown that the model can accurately capture sand-wave formation, growth, and migration processes observed in nature. The simulated bed-forms are found to have amplitude and wave length scales ranging from the order of centimeters up to several meters. This work was supported by NSF Grants EAR-0120914 and EAR-0738726, and National Cooperative Highway Research Program Grant NCHRP-HR 24-33. Computational resources were provided by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  20. Interaction of frequency-modulated light beams in multistage parametric amplifiers at the maximum gain bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, Sergei N; Koposova, E V; Freidman, Gennadii I

    2009-05-31

    Conditions of the applicability of equations in the quasi-static approximation for studying the parametric interaction of frequency-modulated light beams in multistage amplifiers are considered. This approximation is used to simulate numerically processes in a multistage DKDP crystal amplifier with the output power exceeding 10 PW and suppressed luminescence. (lasers and amplifiers)

  1. Long-duration bed rest as an analog to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hargens, Alan R; Vico, Laurence

    2016-04-15

    Long-duration bed rest is widely employed to simulate the effects of microgravity on various physiological systems, especially for studies of bone, muscle, and the cardiovascular system. This microgravity analog is also extensively used to develop and test countermeasures to microgravity-altered adaptations to Earth gravity. Initial investigations of bone loss used horizontal bed rest with the view that this model represented the closest approximation to inactivity and minimization of hydrostatic effects, but all Earth-based analogs must contend with the constant force of gravity by adjustment of the G vector. Later concerns about the lack of similarity between headward fluid shifts in space and those with horizontal bed rest encouraged the use of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest as pioneered by Russian investigators. Headward fluid shifts in space may redistribute bone from the legs to the head. At present, HDT bed rest with normal volunteers is the most common analog for microgravity simulation and to test countermeasures for bone loss, muscle and cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, and reduced muscle strength/exercise capacity. Also, current physiologic countermeasures are focused on long-duration missions such as Mars, so in this review we emphasize HDT bed rest studies with durations of 30 days and longer. However, recent results suggest that the HDT bed rest analog is less representative as an analog for other important physiological problems of long-duration space flight such as fluid shifts, spinal dysfunction and radiation hazards. PMID:26893033

  2. Fluidized bed calciner apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas J.; Klem, Jr., Michael J.; Cash, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

  3. Occurrence of sub-synchronous vibration in a multistage turbine pump and its prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanai, Yanosuke; Saito, Shinobu

    1994-01-01

    It is because of the critical importance the prevention of vibration for high-load rotary machinery assumes in ensuring reliability of a plant as a whole that so many investigations and studies have been performed. A peculiar vibration encountered in a multistage turbine pump is presented and discussed. The pump was serving an active power plant in a part that was a veritable 'heart' of the entire plant, and the major vibration component was about 80 percent frequency of revolution. At first, the propagating stall was thought to be responsible, but the absence of higher harmonics made this presumption untenable. Or else, even though previous reports dealt with seemingly similar mechanical vibration troubles, they offer no clear diagnosis nor suggest simple remedial measures. It is for these reasons that the problem was investigated. Through fundamental tests and experiments, several insights into the nature of this anomalous vibration were gained, the fluid force that caused such a vibration was determined, and effective countermeasures were devised.

  4. Multi-Stage System for Automatic Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas T.; Ye, David; Edens, Weston; Johnson, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage automated target recognition (ATR) system has been designed to perform computer vision tasks with adequate proficiency in mimicking human vision. The system is able to detect, identify, and track targets of interest. Potential regions of interest (ROIs) are first identified by the detection stage using an Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter combined with a wavelet transform. False positives are then eliminated by the verification stage using feature extraction methods in conjunction with neural networks. Feature extraction transforms the ROIs using filtering and binning algorithms to create feature vectors. A feedforward back-propagation neural network (NN) is then trained to classify each feature vector and to remove false positives. The system parameter optimizations process has been developed to adapt to various targets and datasets. The objective was to design an efficient computer vision system that can learn to detect multiple targets in large images with unknown backgrounds. Because the target size is small relative to the image size in this problem, there are many regions of the image that could potentially contain the target. A cursory analysis of every region can be computationally efficient, but may yield too many false positives. On the other hand, a detailed analysis of every region can yield better results, but may be computationally inefficient. The multi-stage ATR system was designed to achieve an optimal balance between accuracy and computational efficiency by incorporating both models. The detection stage first identifies potential ROIs where the target may be present by performing a fast Fourier domain OT-MACH filter-based correlation. Because threshold for this stage is chosen with the goal of detecting all true positives, a number of false positives are also detected as ROIs. The verification stage then transforms the regions of interest into feature space, and eliminates false positives using an

  5. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Bed bath; Sponge bath ... Some patients cannot safely leave their beds to bathe. For these people, daily bed baths can help keep their skin healthy, control odor, and increase comfort. If moving the ...

  6. Isotropic graphite multistage depressed collectors - A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramins, Peter; Ebihara, Ben T.

    1989-04-01

    A small isotropic-graphite-electrode multistage depressed collector (MDC) was designed, fabricated, and evaluated in conjunction with a 500-W CW 4.8-9.6-GHz TWT. The carbon electrode surfaces were used to improve the TWT overall efficiency by minimizing the secondary-electron emission losses in the MDC. The design and fabrication of the brazed graphite MDC assembly are described. The TWT and graphite-electrode MDC bakeout and processing (outgassing) characteristics were evaluated and found to be comparable to those for TWTs equipped with copper-electrode MDCs. The TWT and MDC performance was optimized for broadband CW operation at saturation. The average RF, overall, and MDC efficiencies were 14.9, 46.4, and 83.6 percent, respectively, across the octave operating band. A 1500-h CW test showed no gas buildup and excellent stability of the electrode surfaces.

  7. Multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Smith, William C.

    2000-01-01

    A high efficiency, multi-stage fuel cell system method and apparatus is provided. The fuel cell system is comprised of multiple fuel cell stages, whereby the temperatures of the fuel and oxidant gas streams and the percentage of fuel consumed in each stage are controlled to optimize fuel cell system efficiency. The stages are connected in a serial, flow-through arrangement such that the oxidant gas and fuel gas flowing through an upstream stage is conducted directly into the next adjacent downstream stage. The fuel cell stages are further arranged such that unspent fuel and oxidant laden gases too hot to continue within an upstream stage because of material constraints are conducted into a subsequent downstream stage which comprises a similar cell configuration, however, which is constructed from materials having a higher heat tolerance and designed to meet higher thermal demands. In addition, fuel is underutilized in each stage, resulting in a higher overall fuel cell system efficiency.

  8. Extracting multistage screening rules from online dating activity data.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Elizabeth; Feinberg, Fred; Lee, Kee Yeun

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a statistical framework for harnessing online activity data to better understand how people make decisions. Building on insights from cognitive science and decision theory, we develop a discrete choice model that allows for exploratory behavior and multiple stages of decision making, with different rules enacted at each stage. Critically, the approach can identify if and when people invoke noncompensatory screeners that eliminate large swaths of alternatives from detailed consideration. The model is estimated using deidentified activity data on 1.1 million browsing and writing decisions observed on an online dating site. We find that mate seekers enact screeners ("deal breakers") that encode acceptability cutoffs. A nonparametric account of heterogeneity reveals that, even after controlling for a host of observable attributes, mate evaluation differs across decision stages as well as across identified groupings of men and women. Our statistical framework can be widely applied in analyzing large-scale data on multistage choices, which typify searches for "big ticket" items.

  9. Multistep and Multistage Boundary Integral Methods for the Wave Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjai, Lehel

    2009-09-01

    We describe how time-discretized wave equation in a homogeneous medium can be solved by boundary integral methods. The time discretization can be a multistep, Runge-Kutta, or a more general multistep-multistage method. The resulting convolutional system of boundary integral equations falls in the family of convolution quadratures of Ch. Lubich. In this work our aim is to discuss a new technique for efficiently solving the discrete convolutional system and to present large scale 3D numerical experiments with a wide range of time-discretizations that have up to now not appeared in print. One of the conclusions is that Runge-Kutta methods are often the method of choice even at low accuracy; yet, in connection with hyperbolic problems BDF (backward difference formulas) have been predominant in the literature on convolution quadrature.

  10. Subsychronous vibration of multistage centrifugal compressors forced by rotating stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A multistage centrifugal compressor, in natural gas re-injection service on an offshore petroleum production platform, experienced subsynchronous vibrations which caused excessive bearing wear. Field performance testing correlated the subsynchronous amplitude with the discharge flow coefficient, demonstrating the excitation to be aerodynamic. Adding two impellers allowed an increase in the diffuser flow angle (with respect to tangential) to meet the diffuser stability criteria based on factory and field tests correlated using the theory of Senoo (for rotating stall in a vaneless diffuser). This modification eliminated all significant subsynchronous vibrations in field service, thus confirming the correctness of the solution. Other possible sources of aerodynamically induced vibrations were considered, but the judgment that those are unlikely has been confirmed by subsequent experience with other similar compressors.

  11. Multi-stage methodology to detect health insurance claim fraud.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marina Evrim; Nagarur, Nagen

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare costs in the US, as well as in other countries, increase rapidly due to demographic, economic, social, and legal changes. This increase in healthcare costs impacts both government and private health insurance systems. Fraudulent behaviors of healthcare providers and patients have become a serious burden to insurance systems by bringing unnecessary costs. Insurance companies thus develop methods to identify fraud. This paper proposes a new multistage methodology for insurance companies to detect fraud committed by providers and patients. The first three stages aim at detecting abnormalities among providers, services, and claim amounts. Stage four then integrates the information obtained in the previous three stages into an overall risk measure. Subsequently, a decision tree based method in stage five computes risk threshold values. The final decision stating whether the claim is fraudulent is made by comparing the risk value obtained in stage four with the risk threshold value from stage five. The research methodology performs well on real-world insurance data.

  12. 'Bootstrap' Configuration for Multistage Pulse-Tube Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Bich; Nguyen, Lauren

    2008-01-01

    A bootstrap configuration has been proposed for multistage pulse-tube coolers that, for instance, provide final-stage cooling to temperatures as low as 20 K. The bootstrap configuration supplants the conventional configuration, in which customarily the warm heat exchangers of all stages reject heat at ambient temperature. In the bootstrap configuration, the warm heat exchanger, the inertance tube, and the reservoir of each stage would be thermally anchored to the cold heat exchanger of the next warmer stage. The bootstrapped configuration is superior to the conventional setup, in some cases increasing the 20 K cooler's coefficient of performance two-fold over that of an otherwise equivalent conventional layout. The increased efficiency could translate into less power consumption, less cooler mass, and/or lower cost for a given amount of cooling.

  13. Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, S. K.; Flagella, R. N.; Dipaolo, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fluidized bed offers an attractive route for the low-cost production of silicon for photovoltaic application. To obtain design data for a fluid bed silane pyrolysis reactor, deposition experiments were conducted in a small-scale fixed bed apparatus. Data on the decomposition mode, plating rate, and deposition morphology were obtained in the temperature range 600-900 C. Conditions favorable for heterogeneous decomposition with good deposition morphology were identified. The kinetic rate data showed the reaction to be first order with an activation energy of 38.8 kcal/mol, which agrees well with work done by others. The results are promising for the development of an economically attractive fluid bed process.

  14. Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fixed bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iya, S. K.; Flagella, R. N.; Dipaolo, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Heterogeneous decomposition of silane in a fluidized bed offers an attractive route for the low-cost production of silicon for photovoltaic application. To obtain design data for a fluid bed silane pyrolysis reactor, deposition experiments were conducted in a small-scale fixed bed apparatus. Data on the decomposition mode, plating rate, and deposition morphology were obtained in the temperature range 600 900 C. Conditions favorable for heterogenous decomposition with good deposition morphology were identified. The kinetic rate data showed the reaction to be first order with an activation energy of 38.8 kcal/mole, which agrees well with work done by others. The results are promising for the development of an economically attractive fluid bed process.

  15. Performance of a magnetically stabilized bed reactor with immobilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, V; Hristov, J; Dobreva, E; al-Hassan, Z; Penchev, I

    1996-05-01

    This paper is focused on the possibility to apply the magnetic stabilization technique in bioprocessing. The feasibility of a continuous ethanol fermentation process with immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a magnetically stabilized bed (MSB) was demonstrated. The fermentation processes were carried out in an external magnetic field, transverse to the fluid flow. The flexibility to change the bed expansion owing to the independent change of the fluid flow and the field intensity (the "magnetization FIRST" mode) permitted the creation of fixed beds with different particle arrangements, which affected the bed porosity, the effective fluid-particle contact area, and the mass transfer processes on the particle-fluid interface. As a result, higher ethanol concentration, ethanol production, and glucose uptake rates than in conventional packed bed reactor were reached.

  16. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, W.O.; Virden, J.W. Jr.; Richardson, R.L.; Bergsman, T.M.

    1993-10-19

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation. 4 figures.

  17. Method and apparatus for chemically altering fluids in continuous flow

    DOEpatents

    Heath, William O.; Virden, Jr., Judson W.; Richardson, R. L.; Bergsman, Theresa M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a continuous flow fluid reactor for chemically altering fluids. The reactor operates on standard frequency (50 to 60 Hz) electricity. The fluid reactor contains particles that are energized by the electricity to form a corona throughout the volume of the reactor and subsequently a non-equilibrium plasma that interacts with the fluid. Particles may form a fixed bed or a fluid bed. Electricity may be provided through electrodes or through an inductive coil. Fluids include gases containing exhaust products and organic fuels requiring oxidation.

  18. Multistage amphiboles from the Galinge iron skarn deposit in Qiman Tagh, western China: evidence of igneous rocks replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, M.; Feng, C.-Y.; Zhu, Y.-F.; Mao, J.-W.; Zhao, Y.-M.; Li, D.-X.

    2016-08-01

    Amphiboles from the Galinge skarn deposit, the largest iron (Fe) polymetallic skarn deposit in the Qiman Tagh metallogenic belt (western China), were formed by multistage fluid-rock interactions. Mineral analysis of the various amphiboles suggest that they were formed by the replacement of mafic to intermediate igneous rocks. The two alteration phases have formed three generations of compositionally distinct amphiboles: Amp-I: Ferro-edenitic hornblende (FE); Amp-II: Deep bluish-green magnesian-hastingsite (MH); Amp-III: Light greenish-beige ferro-actinolite (FA). The Amp-I preserves the primary igneous amphibole composition, and was subsequently replaced by Amp-II. The amphibole Cl content markedly increases from the FE (0.176 - 0.582 wt.%) to the MH (0.894 - 3.161 wt.%), and abruptly drops in the FA (0.017 - 0.039 wt.%). The Cl-rich MH contains the lowest concentration of Si [5.64 - 6.28 atoms per formula unit (apfu)], and the highest (K + Na) values (0.72 - 1.06 apfu) in the amphibole A-site with a high K/(K + Na) of 0.491 to 0.429. Both Mg and Fe contents of the MH and FA vary widely, possibly due to the interactions of magma-derived hydrothermal fluids with the basaltic / andesitic host rocks. Formation of the Cl-rich MH may have been associated with the early high-temperature and high-saline hydrothermal fluids, meanwhile the Cl-poor FA may have formed from later low-temperature and low-saline hydrothermal fluids. The MH plays an important role for consuming Cl carried by hydrothermal fluids. The Cl-rich fluids may have mobilized some elements, such as Fe, Al, Mg, Ca and Ti from the host rocks. Considerable amounts of Ti, Al, Mg and Fe were incorporated into the sphene and Fe-Ti oxides that coexist with the MH.

  19. Fluid fertilizers. [Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    The use of fertilizer in the United States has increased spectacularly in the past 20 years. In 1981 plant nutrient use (N + P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ + K/sub 2/O) totaled 23.5 million short tons - compared with only 7.5 million tons in 1960 (table 2). Nutrient use doubled from 1960 to 1970 and tripled from 1960 to 1981. In 1981 fluid nutrient use (mixtures plus nitrogen solutions) totaled 4.1 million tons, more than doubling since 1970 and increasing from 6.3% to 17.5% of the total nutrient use since 1960. Fluid mixtures (NPK) use in 1981 totaled 1.8 million tons of nutrients - about 17% of total mixed fertilizers or 7.5% of total nutrients used. The proportion of total fertilizer nutrients applied in fluid from increases greatly if anhydrous ammonia is included. The 4.6 million tons of nitrogen applied as anhydrous ammonia in 1981 increases total fluid nutrients to 8.1 million tons - 34.5% of the total nutrients applied in the United States. Fluid fertilizer use has grown nearly twice as fast as total fertilizer use, averaging more than 15% per year increase between 1960 and 1970, and an 11% increase between 1960 and 1980. A large part of this increase occurred during the introductory stages of the new product form and was aided by rapid advances in technology.

  20. In-bed tube bank for a fluidized-bed combustor

    DOEpatents

    Hemenway, Jr., Lloyd F.

    1990-01-01

    An in-bed tube bank (10) for a fluidized bed combustor. The tube bank (10) of the present invention comprises one or more fluid communicating boiler tubes (30) which define a plurality of selectively spaced boiler tube sections (32). The tube sections (32) are substantially parallel to one another and aligned in a common plane. The tube bank (10) further comprises support members (34) for joining adjacent tube sections (32), the support members (34) engaging and extending along a selected length of the tube sections (32) and spanning the preselected space therebetween.

  1. Are there any factors influencing the course of multistage treatment in Hirschsprung's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Błaszczyński, Michał; Moryciński, Sebastian; Porzucek, Witold; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of Hirschsprung's disease may be performed in a single step, or in stages with a temporary stoma. The therapy depends on the clinical condition of the patient and the severity of symptoms. Planned multistage treatment is carried out in two or three steps. Aim To analyse our 15 years of experience with multistage surgery for the treatment of Hirschsprung's disease, to identify multistage-related factors influencing the course of surgery and hospitalisation, and to evaluate the probability of complications during multistage treatment. Material and methods The study material was collected on the basis of documentation of patients treated during the years 2000 to 2014. The parameters concerning surgery and hospitalisation were statistically analysed. Results Twenty nine patients were treated with multistage surgery using the following methods: Duhamel-Martin and Transanal Endorectal Pull-Through (TEPT). There were significant correlations (p < 0.05) between length of resected intestine and operative time. Classification and Regression Tree (CRT) was used to classify the operated children depending on the presentence of complications after surgery. Conclusions The incidence of complications during multistage treatment for both methods was comparable. It is difficult to objectively compare the Duhamel-Martin and TEPT techniques because of the different indicators for their use in multistage surgery. Intestinal adhesions were the most common complication after definitive surgery. Younger age of the operated patients was associated with greater risk of adhesion formation. PMID:27350842

  2. Tapered bed bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Charles D.; Hancher, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    A vertically oriented conically shaped column is used as a fluidized bed bioreactor wherein biologically catalyzed reactions are conducted in a continuous manner. The column utilizes a packing material a support having attached thereto a biologically active catalytic material.

  3. Test Bed For Telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, Jacob R.; Zimmerman, Wayne F.; Dolinsky, Shlomo

    1990-01-01

    Assembly of electromechanical and electronic equipment (including computers) constitutes test bed for development of advanced robotic systems for remote manipulation. Combines features not found in commercial systems. Its architecture allows easy growth in complexity and level of automation. System national resource for validation of new telerobotic technology. Intended primarily for robots used in outer space, test bed adapted to development of advanced terrestrial telerobotic systems for handling radioactive materials, dangerous chemicals, and explosives.

  4. Bed exit alarms.

    PubMed

    2004-09-01

    Bed-exit alarms alert caregivers that a patient who should not get out of bed unassisted is doing so. These alarms can help reduce the likelihood of falls and can promote speedy assistance to patients who have already fallen. But as we described in our May 2004 Guidance Article on bed-exit alarms, they don't themselves prevent falls. They are only effective if used as part of an overall fall-prevention program and with a clear understanding of their limitations. This Evaluation examines the effectiveness of 16 bed-exit alarms from seven suppliers. Our ratings focus primarily on each product's reliability in detecting bed-exit events and alerting caregivers, its ability to minimize nuisance alarms (alarms that sound even though the patient isn't leaving the bed or that sound while a caregiver is helping the patient to leave the bed), and its resistance to deliberate or inadvertent tampering. Twelve of the products use pressure-sensor-activated alarms (mainly sensor pads placed on or under the mattress); three use a cord that can attach to the patient's garment, alarming if the cord is pulled loose from the control unit; and one is a position-sensitive alarm attached to a leg cuff. All the products reliably detect attempted or successful bed exits. But they vary greatly in how effectively they alert staff, minimize nuisance alarms, and resist tampering. Ease of use and battery performance also vary for many units. Of the pressure-sensor units, three are rated Preferred. Those units meet most of our criteria and have no significant disadvantages. Five of the other pressure-sensor products are Acceptable, and the remaining four are Not Recommended. All three cord-activated alarms are rated Acceptable, as is the patient-worn alarm.

  5. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  6. Bed rest and immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Aviles, Hernan; Butel, Janet S.; Shearer, William T.; Niesel, David; Pandya, Utpal; Allen, Christopher; Ochs, Hans D.; Blancher, Antoine; Abbal, Michel

    2007-02-01

    Space flight has been shown to result in altered immune responses. The current study was designed to investigate this possibility by using the bed rest model of some space flight conditions. A large number of women are included as subjects in the study. The hypothesis being tested is: 60 days head-down tilt bed rest of humans will affect the immune system and resistance to infection. Blood, urine and saliva samples will be obtained from bed rest subjects prior to, at intervals during, and after completion of 60 days of head-down tilt bed rest. Leukocyte blastogenesis, cytokine production and virus reactivation will be assessed. The ability of the subjects to respond appropriately to immunization with the neoantigen bacteriophage φX-174 will also be determined. Bed rest is being carried out at MEDES, Toulouse France, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX. The studies to be carried out in France will also allow assessment of the effects of muscle/bone exercise and nutritional countermeasures on the immune system in addition to the effects of bed rest.

  7. A STUDY OF MULTISTAGE/MULTIFUNCTION COLUMN FOR FINE PARTICLE SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Shiao-Hung Chiang

    1999-10-01

    A non-agitated multi-stage column was constructed and applied to wastewater treatment. Preliminary oil/water separation tests were performed. Excellent separation results verifies the multi-function feature of the multi-stage column. Hydrodynamic behavior is considered as the underlying cause for the separation performance. Therefore, a series of experiments were carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic parameters, including gas holdups and liquid circulating velocities. The experimental data will be used to create a mathematical model to simulate the multi-stage column process. The model will further shed light on the future scale-up of the MSTLFLO process.

  8. A Study of Multistage/Multifunction Column for Fine Particle Separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.

    1997-09-15

    A non-agitated multi-stage column was constructed and applied to wastewater treatment. Preliminary oil/water separation tests were performed. Excellent separation results verifies the multi-function feature of the multi-stage column. Hydrodynamic behavior is considered as the underlying cause for the separation performance. Therefore, a series of experiments were carried out to investigate the hydrodynamic parameters, including gas holdups and liquid circulating velocities. The experimental data will be used to create a mathematical model to simulate the multi-stage column process. The model will further shed light on the future scale-up of the MSTLFLO process.

  9. Simulation of Anomalous Oil Filtration in a Porous Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbaliev, G. I.; Rzaev, Ab. G.; Rasulov, S. R.; Guseinova, L. V.

    2015-03-01

    The problems of modeling the processes of filtration of anomalous structurized oils with coagulation structures present in a porous bed are considered. An equation for the filtration of Bingham fluids in a carrier bed that accounts for the dependence of the filtration rate on the pressure gradient and shear stress has been derived. Models for calculating the effective viscosity and mobility of oil depending on the change of the pressure gradient in the bed and of the concentration of particles in it have been developed. A comparison of these models with the experimental data available in the literature for various wells yielded satisfactory results.

  10. Control of bed height in a fluidized bed gasification system

    DOEpatents

    Mehta, Gautam I.; Rogers, Lynn M.

    1983-12-20

    In a fluidized bed apparatus a method for controlling the height of the fdized bed, taking into account variations in the density of the bed. The method comprises taking simultaneous differential pressure measurements at different vertical elevations within the vessel, averaging the differential pressures, determining an average fluidized bed density, then periodically calculating a weighting factor. The weighting factor is used in the determination of the actual bed height which is used in controlling the fluidizing means.

  11. Role of near-bed turbulence in bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Jonathan M.; Shreve, Ronald L.; McLean, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    Bedload transport by a turbulent fluid moving over an erodible sediment bed results from complex interactions between flow field of the overlying fluid and the grains making up the bed. To develop a better view of these interactions, a method that combines high-speed photography with laser-Doppler velocimetry was devised. The methodology permits correlation of bedload transport with local turbulence structure at a frequency resolution of 10 hz. By making a suite of measurements at varying distances from a backward step, data were obtained for a variety of flows with different turbulence characteristics ranging from steady, uniform boundary layers to highly intermittent, nonuniform wake-like flows.

  12. AERODYNAMIC AND BLADING DESIGN OF MULTISTAGE AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The axial-flow compressor is used for aircraft engines because it has distinct configuration and performance advantages over other compressor types. However, good potential performance is not easily obtained. The designer must be able to model the actual flows well enough to adequately predict aerodynamic performance. This computer program has been developed for computing the aerodynamic design of a multistage axial-flow compressor and, if desired, the associated blading geometry input for internal flow analysis. The aerodynamic solution gives velocity diagrams on selected streamlines of revolution at the blade row edges. The program yields aerodynamic and blading design results that can be directly used by flow and mechanical analysis codes. Two such codes are TSONIC, a blade-to-blade channel flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-10977), and MERIDL, a more detailed hub-to-shroud flow analysis code (COSMIC program LEW-12966). The aerodynamic and blading design program can reduce the time and effort required to obtain acceptable multistage axial-flow compressor configurations by generating good initial solutions and by being compatible with available analysis codes. The aerodynamic solution assumes steady, axisymmetric flow so that the problem is reduced to solving the two-dimensional flow field in the meridional plane. The streamline curvature method is used for the iterative aerodynamic solution at stations outside of the blade rows. If a blade design is desired, the blade elements are defined and stacked within the aerodynamic solution iteration. The blade element inlet and outlet angles are established by empirical incidence and deviation angles to the relative flow angles of the velocity diagrams. The blade element centerline is composed of two segments tangentially joined at a transition point. The local blade angle variation of each element can be specified as a fourth-degree polynomial function of path distance. Blade element thickness can also be specified

  13. Particle swarm optimization of ascent trajectories of multistage launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontani, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    Multistage launch vehicles are commonly employed to place spacecraft and satellites in their operational orbits. If the rocket characteristics are specified, the optimization of its ascending trajectory consists of determining the optimal control law that leads to maximizing the final mass at orbit injection. The numerical solution of a similar problem is not trivial and has been pursued with different methods, for decades. This paper is concerned with an original approach based on the joint use of swarming theory and the necessary conditions for optimality. The particle swarm optimization technique represents a heuristic population-based optimization method inspired by the natural motion of bird flocks. Each individual (or particle) that composes the swarm corresponds to a solution of the problem and is associated with a position and a velocity vector. The formula for velocity updating is the core of the method and is composed of three terms with stochastic weights. As a result, the population migrates toward different regions of the search space taking advantage of the mechanism of information sharing that affects the overall swarm dynamics. At the end of the process the best particle is selected and corresponds to the optimal solution to the problem of interest. In this work the three-dimensional trajectory of the multistage rocket is assumed to be composed of four arcs: (i) first stage propulsion, (ii) second stage propulsion, (iii) coast arc (after release of the second stage), and (iv) third stage propulsion. The Euler-Lagrange equations and the Pontryagin minimum principle, in conjunction with the Weierstrass-Erdmann corner conditions, are employed to express the thrust angles as functions of the adjoint variables conjugate to the dynamics equations. The use of these analytical conditions coming from the calculus of variations leads to obtaining the overall rocket dynamics as a function of seven parameters only, namely the unknown values of the initial state

  14. Unsteady Flow Field in a Multistage Axial Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suryavamshi, N.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Prato, J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow field in a multistage compressor is three-dimensional, unsteady, and turbulent with substantial viscous effects. Some of the specific phenomena that has eluded designers include the effects of rotor-stator and rotor-rotor interactions and the physics of mixing of velocity, pressure, temperature and velocity fields. An attempt was made, to resolve experimentally, the unsteady pressure and temperature fields downstream of the second stator of a multistage axial flow compressor which will provide information on rotor-stator interaction effects and the nature of the unsteadiness in an embedded stator of a three stage axial flow compressor. Detailed area traverse measurements using pneumatic five hole probe, thermocouple probe, semi-conductor total pressure probe (Kulite) and an aspirating probe downstream of the second stator were conducted at the peak efficiency operating condition. The unsteady data was then reduced through an ensemble averaging technique which splits the signal into deterministic and unresolved components. Auto and cross correlation techniques were used to correlate the deterministic total temperature and velocity components (acquired using a slanted hot-film probe at the same measurement locations) and the gradients, distributions and relative weights of each of the terms of the average passage equation were then determined. Based on these measurements it was observed that the stator wakes, hub leakage flow region, casing endwall suction surface corner region, and the casing endwall region away from the blade surfaces were the regions of highest losses in total pressure, lowest efficiency and highest levels of unresolved unsteadiness. The deterministic unsteadiness was found to be high in the hub and casing endwall regions as well as on the pressure side of the stator wake. The spectral distribution of hot-wire and kulite voltages shows that at least eight harmonics of all three rotor blade passing frequencies are present at this

  15. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  16. Effects of Shrouded Stator Cavity Flows on Multistage Axial Compressor Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wellborn, Steven R.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a low-speed multistage axial-flow compressor to assess the effects of shrouded stator cavity flows on aerodynamic performance. Five configurations, which involved changes in seal-tooth leakage rates and/or elimination of the shrouded stator cavities, were tested. Data collected enabled differences in overall individual stage and the third stage blade element performance parameters to be compared. The results show conclusively that seal-tooth leakage ran have a large impact on compressor aerodynamic performance while the presence of the shrouded stator cavities alone seemed to have little influence. Overall performance data revealed that for every 1% increase in the seal-tooth clearance to blade-height ratio the pressure rise dropped up to 3% while efficiency was reduced by 1 to 1.5 points. These observed efficiency penalty slopes are comparable to those commonly reported for rotor and cantilevered stator tip clearance variations. Therefore, it appears that in order to correctly predict overall performance it is equally important to account for the effects of seal-tooth leakage as it is to include the influence of tip clearance flows. Third stage blade element performance data suggested that the performance degradation observed when leakage was increased was brought about in two distinct ways. First, increasing seal-tooth leakage directly spoiled the near hub performance of the stator row in which leakage occurred. Second, the altered stator exit now conditions caused by increased leakage impaired the performance of the next downstream stage by decreasing the work input of the downstream rotor and increasing total pressure loss of the downstream stator. These trends caused downstream stages to progressively perform worse. Other measurements were acquired to determine spatial and temporal flow field variations within the up-and-downstream shrouded stator cavities. Flow within the cavities involved low momentum fluid traveling primarily

  17. Design of a multistage depressed collector for the F-16 radar dual mode transmitter tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a multistage depressed collector (MDC) for use with the F-16 radar dual mode transmitter tube is described. The methods employed and the rationale on which the design is based are presented.

  18. Process analytical tools for monitoring, understanding, and control of pharmaceutical fluidized bed granulation: A review.

    PubMed

    Burggraeve, Anneleen; Monteyne, Tinne; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Fluidized bed granulation is a widely applied wet granulation technique in the pharmaceutical industry to produce solid dosage forms. The process involves the spraying of a binder liquid onto fluidizing powder particles. As a result, the (wetted) particles collide with each other and form larger permanent aggregates (granules). After spraying the required amount of granulation liquid, the wet granules are rapidly dried in the fluid bed granulator. Since the FDA launched its Process Analytical Technology initiative (and even before), a wide range of analytical process sensors has been used for real-time monitoring and control of fluid bed granulation processes. By applying various data analysis techniques to the multitude of data collected from the process analyzers implemented in fluid bed granulators, a deeper understanding of the process has been achieved. This review gives an overview of the process analytical technologies used during fluid bed granulation to monitor and control the process. The fundamentals of the mechanisms contributing to wet granule growth and the characteristics of fluid bed granulation processing are briefly discussed. This is followed by a detailed overview of the in-line applied process analyzers, contributing to improved fluid bed granulation understanding, modeling, control, and endpoint detection. Analysis and modeling tools enabling the extraction of the relevant information from the complex data collected during granulation and the control of the process are highlighted.

  19. A study of multistage/multifunction column for fine particle seperation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.

    1997-09-07

    The objective if this program is to explore the potential application of a multistage column equipped with concentric draft- tubes (multistage column) for fine coal cleaning. The aim is to identify design parameters of the separation process. In the last quarter we conducted the gas holdup measurement which is an essential part of the hydrodynamic experiments for establishing a process model for engineering design and scale-up.

  20. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  1. Cooling of debris beds

    SciTech Connect

    Barleon, L.; Thomauske, K.; Werie, H.

    1984-04-01

    The dependence of the dryout heat flux for volume-heated particulate beds on bed height (less than or equal to40 cm), particle diameter (0.06 to 16 mm), stratification and boundary conditions (saturated and subcooled liquid, adiabatic and cooled bottom and sidewalls) has been determined for water and Freon-113. Channel penetration through subcooled layers and ''downward boiling'' due to capillarity effects have been observed. Different types of bed disturbances have been identified, and their effect on dryout has been studied. Using existing theoretical models, which have been verified by the experiments, the upper limit of the thermal load on support structures has been calculated as a function of the particle size and bottom temperature for reactor accident conditions (Pu/U-oxide particles in sodium).

  2. Treatment bed microbiological control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, Gilbert E.; Fitzpatrick, Timothy W.; Kril, Michael B.; Wilber, Georgia A.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of microbial fouling on treatment bed (TB) performance are being studied. Fouling of activated carbon (AC) and ion exchange resins (IEX) by live and devitalized bacteria can cause decreased capacity for selected sorbates with AC and IEX TB. More data are needed on organic species removal in the trace region of solute sorption isotherms. TB colonization was prevented by nonclassical chemical disinfectant compositions (quaternary ammonium resins) applied in suitable configurations. Recently, the protection of carbon beds via direct disinfectant impregnation has shown promise. Effects (of impregnation) upon bed sorption/removal characteristics are to be studied with representative contaminants. The potential need to remove solutes added or produced during water disinfection and/or TB microbiological control must be investigated.

  3. Multi-stage methodology to detect health insurance claim fraud.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marina Evrim; Nagarur, Nagen

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare costs in the US, as well as in other countries, increase rapidly due to demographic, economic, social, and legal changes. This increase in healthcare costs impacts both government and private health insurance systems. Fraudulent behaviors of healthcare providers and patients have become a serious burden to insurance systems by bringing unnecessary costs. Insurance companies thus develop methods to identify fraud. This paper proposes a new multistage methodology for insurance companies to detect fraud committed by providers and patients. The first three stages aim at detecting abnormalities among providers, services, and claim amounts. Stage four then integrates the information obtained in the previous three stages into an overall risk measure. Subsequently, a decision tree based method in stage five computes risk threshold values. The final decision stating whether the claim is fraudulent is made by comparing the risk value obtained in stage four with the risk threshold value from stage five. The research methodology performs well on real-world insurance data. PMID:25600704

  4. Multistage DFTB-DFT Strategy for Energy Surface Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai; Polovina, Dusan; Horchidan, Bogdan; Jackson, Koblar A.

    2002-03-01

    Recently we proposed a multistage DFTB-DFT strategy to find the absolute minimum energy configuration of a cluster of atoms: (i) in a first stage we use the Density Functional Tight Binding (DFTB) method to generate a collection of candidate optimal structures; (ii) subsequently, we relax the DFTB structures using full Density Functional Theory (DFT). This approach was successfully used to identify new lowest energy configurations of several Sin clusters with n<20 (I. Rata, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 546(2000)). In the present contribution we report an improvement to this algorithm based on the observation that there is a strong correlation between the unrelaxed DFT energies of the DFTB clusters and the final energies of the relaxed DFT structures. The modification increases the efficiency of the search algorithm by a factor of 50, allowing the analysis of more DFTB candidate structures. We use the new strategy to analyze the oblate-compact shape transition, from Si_25 to Si_27, observed in the experiment (R.R. Hudgins et al, J.Chem.Phys. 111, 7865 (1999)).

  5. AEROELASTIC DIVERGENCE CHARACTERISTICS OF UNGUIDED, SLENDER BODY, MULTISTAGE LAUNCH VEHICLES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P.

    1994-01-01

    The primary function of this computer program is the calculation of the divergence dynamic pressure and associated divergence modal characteristics of unguided, slender-body, multistage launch vehicles. The divergence dynamic pressure is obtained as the non-trivial solution to a homogenous stability equation using matrix recurrence techniques. Provision is made for modulating the distributed lift curve coefficient slope function and the stiffness function. The program also includes an option for calculating a generalized static margin which approximates the degeneration in rigid-body static margin due to aeroelasticity effects. Evaluated equations are also programmed to allow for the exclusion of the effect of aerodynamic crossflow resulting from vehicle angular velocities if desired. Other physical and aerodynamic properties calculated include total mass, center of mass, moments of inertia in pitch about the reference station, total aerodynamic lift curve slope, static aerodynamic center of pressure, rigid body static margin, and short period frequency. Input to the program is via the Fortran NAMELIST option with output printed. The program is written in CDC Fortran IV (Version 2.3) and has been implemented on a CDC 6600 computer under the SCOPE 3.2 monitor in central memory field lengths less than 57K octal 60 bit words.

  6. Calculation of Multistage Turbomachinery Using Steady Characteristic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    1998-01-01

    A multiblock Navier-Stokes analysis code for turbomachinery has been modified to allow analysis of multistage turbomachines. A steady averaging-plane approach was used to pass information between blade rows. Characteristic boundary conditions written in terms of perturbations about the mean flow from the neighboring blade row were used to allow close spacing between the blade rows without forcing the flow to be axisymmetric. In this report the multiblock code is described briefly and the characteristic boundary conditions and the averaging-plane implementation are described in detail. Two approaches for averaging the flow properties are also described. A two-dimensional turbine stator case was used to compare the characteristic boundary conditions with standard axisymmetric boundary conditions. Differences were apparent but small in this low-speed case. The two-stage fuel turbine used on the space shuttle main engines was then analyzed using a three-dimensional averaging-plane approach. Computed surface pressure distributions on the stator blades and endwalls and computed distributions of blade surface heat transfer coefficient on three blades showed very good agreement with experimental data from two tests.

  7. Multistage carcinogenesis modeling including cell cycle and DNA damage states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, W.; Moolgavkar, S.

    The multistage clonal expansion model of carcinogenesis is generalized to include cell cycle states and corresponding DNA damage states with imperfect repair for normal and initiated stem cells. Initiated cells may undergo transformation to a malignant state, eventually leading to cancer incidence or death. The model allows oxidative or radiation induced DNA damage, checkpoint delay, DNA repair, apoptosis, and transformation rates to depend on the cell cycle state or DNA damage state of normal and initiated cells. A probability generating function approach is used to represent the time dependent probability distribution for cells in all states. The continuous time coupled Markov system representing this joint distribution satisfies a partial differential equation (pde). Time dependent survival and hazard functions are found through numerical solution of the characteristic equations for the pde. Although the hazard and survival can be calculated numerically, number and size distributions of pre-malignant lesions from models that are developed will be approximated through simulation. We use the model to explore predictions for hazard and survival as parameters representing cell cycle regulation and arrest are modified. Modification of these parameters may influence rates for cell division, apoptosis and malignant transformation that are important in carcinogenesis. We also explore enhanced repair that may be important for low-dose hypersensitivity and adaptive response, and degradation of repair processes or loss of checkpoint control that may drive genetic instability.

  8. Multi-stage combustion using nitrogen-enriched air

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.

    2004-09-14

    Multi-stage combustion technology combined with nitrogen-enriched air technology for controlling the combustion temperature and products to extend the maintenance and lifetime cycles of materials in contact with combustion products and to reduce pollutants while maintaining relatively high combustion and thermal cycle efficiencies. The first stage of combustion operates fuel rich where most of the heat of combustion is released by burning it with nitrogen-enriched air. Part of the energy in the combustion gases is used to perform work or to provide heat. The cooled combustion gases are reheated by additional stages of combustion until the last stage is at or near stoichiometric conditions. Additional energy is extracted from each stage to result in relatively high thermal cycle efficiency. The air is enriched with nitrogen using air separation technologies such as diffusion, permeable membrane, absorption, and cryogenics. The combustion method is applicable to many types of combustion equipment, including: boilers, burners, turbines, internal combustion engines, and many types of fuel including hydrogen and carbon-based fuels including methane and coal.

  9. Controllability in Multi-Stage Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Barada, D.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.

    2015-11-01

    The present paper shows a concept for a future laser ion accelerator, which should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers and ion post acceleration devices. Based on the laser ion accelerator components, the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled, and a future compact laser ion accelerator would be designed for ion cancer therapy or for ion material treatment. In this study each component is designed to control the ion beam quality. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser-target interaction. A combination of each component provides a high controllability of the ion beam quality to meet variable requirements in various purposes in the laser ion accelerator. The work was partly supported by MEXT, JSPS, ASHULA project/ ILE, Osaka University, CORE (Center for Optical Research and Education, Utsunomiya University, Japan), Fudan University and CDI (Creative Dept. for Innovation) in CCRD, Utsunomiya University.

  10. A cascaded three-phase symmetrical multistage voltage multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Singh, G. K.; Besar, R.; Muhammad, G.

    2006-10-01

    A cascaded three-phase symmetrical multistage Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier (CW-VM) is proposed in this report. It consists of three single-phase symmetrical voltage multipliers, which are connected in series at their smoothing columns like string of batteries and are driven by three-phase ac power source. The smoothing column of each voltage multiplier is charged twice every cycle independently by respective oscillating columns and discharged in series through load. The charging discharging process completes six times a cycle and therefore the output voltage ripple's frequency is of sixth order of the drive signal frequency. Thus the proposed approach eliminates the first five harmonic components of load generated voltage ripples and sixth harmonic is the major ripple component. The proposed cascaded three-phase symmetrical voltage multiplier has less than half the voltage ripple, and three times larger output voltage and output power than the conventional single-phase symmetrical CW-VM. Experimental and simulation results of the laboratory prototype are given to show the feasibility of proposed cascaded three-phase symmetrical CW-VM.

  11. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  12. Multistage optical smoke detection approach for smoke alarm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Truc Kim Thi; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel multistage smoke detection algorithm based on inherent optical characteristics such as diffusion, color, and texture of smoke. Moving regions in a video frame are detected by an approximate median background subtraction method using the diffusion behavior of smoke. These moving regions are segmented by a fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm that uses the hue and saturation components of moving pixels in the hue-saturation-intensity color space. A decision rule is used to select candidate smoke regions from smoke-colored FCM clusters. An object tracking approach is employed in the candidate smoke region to detect candidate smoke objects in the video frame, and image texture parameters are extracted from these objects using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The thirteen GLCM features are selected to constitute the feature vector by applying principal components analysis, resulting in high-accuracy smoke detection. Finally, a back propagation neural network is utilized as a classifier to discriminate smoke and nonsmoke using the selected feature vector. Experimental results using a standard experimental dataset of video clips demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms state-of-the-art smoke detection approaches in terms of accuracy, making real-life implementation feasible.

  13. Extracting multistage screening rules from online dating activity data.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Elizabeth; Feinberg, Fred; Lee, Kee Yeun

    2016-09-20

    This paper presents a statistical framework for harnessing online activity data to better understand how people make decisions. Building on insights from cognitive science and decision theory, we develop a discrete choice model that allows for exploratory behavior and multiple stages of decision making, with different rules enacted at each stage. Critically, the approach can identify if and when people invoke noncompensatory screeners that eliminate large swaths of alternatives from detailed consideration. The model is estimated using deidentified activity data on 1.1 million browsing and writing decisions observed on an online dating site. We find that mate seekers enact screeners ("deal breakers") that encode acceptability cutoffs. A nonparametric account of heterogeneity reveals that, even after controlling for a host of observable attributes, mate evaluation differs across decision stages as well as across identified groupings of men and women. Our statistical framework can be widely applied in analyzing large-scale data on multistage choices, which typify searches for "big ticket" items. PMID:27578870

  14. Multipurpose image watermarking algorithm based on multistage vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe-Ming; Xu, Dian-Guo; Sun, Sheng-He

    2005-06-01

    The rapid growth of digital multimedia and Internet technologies has made copyright protection, copy protection, and integrity verification three important issues in the digital world. To solve these problems, the digital watermarking technique has been presented and widely researched. Traditional watermarking algorithms are mostly based on discrete transform domains, such as the discrete cosine transform, discrete Fourier transform (DFT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Most of these algorithms are good for only one purpose. Recently, some multipurpose digital watermarking methods have been presented, which can achieve the goal of content authentication and copyright protection simultaneously. However, they are based on DWT or DFT. Lately, several robust watermarking schemes based on vector quantization (VQ) have been presented, but they can only be used for copyright protection. In this paper, we present a novel multipurpose digital image watermarking method based on the multistage vector quantizer structure, which can be applied to image authentication and copyright protection. In the proposed method, the semi-fragile watermark and the robust watermark are embedded in different VQ stages using different techniques, and both of them can be extracted without the original image. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in terms of robustness and fragility. PMID:15971780

  15. Dynamics of Multistage Gear Transmission with Effects of Gearbox Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive approach is presented in analyzing the dynamic behavior of multistage gear transmission systems with the effects of gearbox induced vibrations and mass imbalances of the rotor. The modal method, with undamped frequencies and planar mode shapes, is used to reduce the degrees of freedom of the gear system for time-transient dynamic analysis. Both the lateral and torsional vibration modes of each rotor-bearing-gear stage as well as the interstage vibrational characteristics are coupled together through localized gear mesh tooth interactions. In addition, gearbox vibrations are also coupled to the rotor-bearing-gear system dynamics through bearing support forces between the rotor and the gearbox. Transient and steady state dynamics of lateral and torsional vibrations of the geared system are examined in both time and frequency domains to develop interpretations of the overall modal dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. A typical three-stage geared system is used as an example. Effects of mass imbalance and gearbox vibrations on the system dynamic behavior are presented in terms of modal excitation functions for both lateral and torsional vibrations. Operational characteristics and conclusions are drawn from the results presented.

  16. Ether production with multi-stage reaction of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.

    1993-07-13

    A multistage process is described for etherifying a mixed C[sub 4] + olefinic hydrocarbon feedstock containing diene, isoalkene and nalkene, comprising: contacting the olefinic feedstock and aliphatic alcohol in a first reaction stage reaction zone under etherification conditions with acid etherification catalyst to convert a major amount of the isoalkene to C[sub 5] + tertiary-alkyl ether; recovering a reactant effluent from the first stage containing tertiary-alkyl ether product, unreacted alcohol and unreacted olefin comprising n-alkene and diene; separating an ether-rich C[sub 5] + liquid product stream from the first stage effluent in a first product recovery section; reacting at least a fraction of the first stage effluent unconverted olefins and alcohol fraction under low severity oligomerization conditions comprising moderate temperature between 70 C and 280 C and space velocity of 0.5-50 WHSV based on total olefin in the feed in a secondary stage catalytic reaction zone containing porous solid acid oligomerization catalyst particles to oligomerize a major portion of diene; recovering a C[sub 5]+ liquid product stream from secondary stage effluent; and recovering n-alkene substantially free of diene from secondary stage effluent.

  17. Fluidized bed coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindram, M.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments were conducted on two high volatile bituminous coals in a bench scale batch fluidized bed reactor. Chemical pretreatment and posttreatment of coals were tried as a means of enhancing desulfurization. Sequential chlorination and dechlorination cum hydrodesulfurization under modest conditions relative to the water slurry process were found to result in substantial sulfur reductions of about 80%. Sulfur forms as well as proximate and ultimate analyses of the processed coals are included. These studies indicate that a fluidized bed reactor process has considerable potential for being developed into a simple and economic process for coal desulfurization.

  18. Staged fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.

    1983-05-13

    The invention relates to oil shale retorting and more particularly to staged fluidized bed oil shale retorting. Method and apparatus are disclosed for narrowing the distribution of residence times of any size particle and equalizing the residence times of large and small particles in fluidized beds. Particles are moved up one fluidized column and down a second fluidized column with the relative heights selected to equalize residence times of large and small particles. Additional pairs of columns are staged to narrow the distribution of residence times and provide complete processing of the material.

  19. Simulated microgravity [bed rest] has little influence on taste, odor or trigeminal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Z. M.; Rice, B. L.; Rose, M. S.; Lane, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that astronauts' perceptions of foods in space flight may differ from their perceptions of the same foods on Earth. Fluid shifts toward the head experienced in space may alter the astronauts' sensitivity to odors and tastes, producing altered perceptions. Our objective was to determine whether head-down bed rest, which produces similar fluid shifts, would produce changes in sensitivity to taste, odor or trigeminal sensations. Six subjects were rested three times prior to bed rest, three times during bed rest and two times after bed rest to determine their threshold sensitivity to the odors isoamylbutyrate and menthone, the tastants sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid, quinine and monosodium glutamate, and to capsaicin. Thresholds were measured using a modified staircase procedure. Self-reported congestion was also recorded at each test time. Thresholds for monosodium glutamate where slightly higher during bed rest. None of the other thresholds were altered by bed rest.

  20. Acoustic bed velocity and bed load dynamics in a large sand bed river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaeuman, D.; Jacobson, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Development of a practical technology for rapid quantification of bed load transport in large rivers would represent a revolutionary advance for sediment monitoring and the investigation of fluvial dynamics. Measurement of bed load motion with acoustic Doppler current profiles (ADCPs) has emerged as a promising approach for evaluating bed load transport. However, a better understanding of how ADCP data relate to conditions near the stream bed is necessary to make the method practical for quantitative applications. In this paper, we discuss the response of ADCP bed velocity measurements, defined as the near-bed sediment velocity detected by the instrument's bottom-tracking feature, to changing sediment-transporting conditions in the lower Missouri River. Bed velocity represents a weighted average of backscatter from moving bed load particles and spectral reflections from the immobile bed. The ratio of bed velocity to mean bed load particle velocity depends on the concentration of the particles moving in the bed load layer, the bed load layer thickness, and the backscatter strength from a unit area of moving particles relative to the echo strength from a unit area of unobstructed bed. A model based on existing bed load transport theory predicted measured bed velocities from hydraulic and grain size measurements with reasonable success. Bed velocities become more variable and increase more rapidly with shear stress when the transport stage, defined as the ratio of skin friction to the critical shear stress for particle entrainment, exceeds a threshold of about 17. This transition in bed velocity response appears to be associated with the appearance of longer, flatter bed forms at high transport stages.

  1. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

  2. Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds

    DOEpatents

    Rehmat, Amirali G.; Patel, Jitendra G.

    1987-05-12

    An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

  3. Bed rest during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for support groups, bulletin boards, and chat rooms online for moms-to-be who are also on bed rest. Expect emotional ups and downs. Share your hopes and worries with your partner. Let each other vent if needed. If sex is not allowed, look for other ways to ...

  4. Onset and cessation of motion in hydrodynamically sheared granular beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abram H.; Shattuck, Mark D.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2015-10-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of granular beds driven by a model hydrodynamic shear flow to elucidate general grain-scale mechanisms that determine the onset and cessation of sediment transport. By varying the Shields number (the nondimensional shear stress at the top of the bed) and particle Reynolds number (the ratio of particle inertia to viscous damping), we explore how variations of the fluid flow rate, particle inertia, and fluid viscosity affect the onset and cessation of bed motion. For low to moderate particle Reynolds numbers, a critical boundary separates mobile and static states. Transition times between these states diverge as this boundary is approached both from above and below. At high particle Reynolds number, inertial effects become dominant, and particle motion can be sustained well below flow rates at which mobilization of a static bed occurs. We also find that the onset of bed motion (for both low and high particle Reynolds numbers) is described by Weibullian weakest-link statistics and thus is crucially dependent on the packing structure of the granular bed, even deep beneath the surface.

  5. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  6. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Mariela; Vinicio Sánchez, René; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-09-18

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The Sensors 2015, 15 23904 approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%.

  7. Multi-Stage Feature Selection by Using Genetic Algorithms for Fault Diagnosis in Gearboxes Based on Vibration Signal

    PubMed Central

    Cerrada, Mariela; Sánchez, René Vinicio; Cabrera, Diego; Zurita, Grover; Li, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    There are growing demands for condition-based monitoring of gearboxes, and techniques to improve the reliability, effectiveness and accuracy for fault diagnosis are considered valuable contributions. Feature selection is still an important aspect in machine learning-based diagnosis in order to reach good performance in the diagnosis system. The main aim of this research is to propose a multi-stage feature selection mechanism for selecting the best set of condition parameters on the time, frequency and time-frequency domains, which are extracted from vibration signals for fault diagnosis purposes in gearboxes. The selection is based on genetic algorithms, proposing in each stage a new subset of the best features regarding the classifier performance in a supervised environment. The selected features are augmented at each stage and used as input for a neural network classifier in the next step, while a new subset of feature candidates is treated by the selection process. As a result, the inherent exploration and exploitation of the genetic algorithms for finding the best solutions of the selection problem are locally focused. The approach is tested on a dataset from a real test bed with several fault classes under different running conditions of load and velocity. The model performance for diagnosis is over 98%. PMID:26393603

  8. Bodypart Recognition Using Multi-stage Deep Learning.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhan, Yiqiang; Peng, Zhigang; Liao, Shu; Shinagawa, Yoshihisa; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2015-01-01

    Automatic medical image analysis systems often start from identifying the human body part contained in the image; Specifically, given a transversal slice, it is important to know which body part it comes from, namely "slice-based bodypart recognition". This problem has its unique characteristic--the body part of a slice is usually identified by local discriminative regions instead of global image context, e.g., a cardiac slice is differentiated from an aorta arch slice by the mediastinum region. To leverage this characteristic, we design a multi-stage deep learning framework that aims at: (1) discover the local regions that are discriminative to the bodypart recognition, and (2) learn a bodypart identifier based on these local regions. These two tasks are achieved by the two stages of our learning scheme, respectively. In the pre-train stage, a convolutional neural network (CNN) is learned in a multi-instance learning fashion to extract the most discriminative local patches from the training slices. In the boosting stage, the learned CNN is further boosted by these local patches for bodypart recognition. By exploiting the discriminative local appearances, the learned CNN becomes more accurate than global image context-based approaches. As a key hallmark, our method does not require manual annotations of the discriminative local patches. Instead, it automatically discovers them through multi-instance deep learning. We validate our method on a synthetic dataset and a large scale CT dataset (7000+ slices from wholebody CT scans). Our method achieves better performances than state-of-the-art approaches, including the standard CNN. PMID:26221694

  9. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Kevin C.; Comi, Troy J.; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM n -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM n -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM 1 -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment.

  10. The multistage 20 metre shuttle run test for aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    Léger, L A; Mercier, D; Gadoury, C; Lambert, J

    1988-01-01

    A maximal multistage 20 m shuttle run test was designed to determine the maximal aerobic power of schoolchildren, healthy adults attending fitness class and athletes performing in sports with frequent stops and starts (e.g. basketball, fencing and so on). Subjects run back and forth on a 20 m course and must touch the 20 m line; at the same time a sound signal is emitted from a prerecorded tape. Frequency of the sound signals is increased 0.5 km h-1 each minute from a starting speed of 8.5 km h-1. When the subject can no longer follow the pace, the last stage number announced is used to predict maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) (Y, ml kg-1 min-1) from the speed (X, km h-1) corresponding to that stage (speed = 8 + 0.5 stage no.) and age (A, year): Y = 31.025 + 3.238 X - 3.248A + 0.1536AX, r = 0.71 with 188 boys and girls aged 8-19 years. To obtain this regression, the test was performed individually. Right upon termination VO2 was measured with four 20 s samples and VO2max was estimated by retroextrapolating the O2 recovery curve at time zero of recovery. For adults, similar measurements indicated that the same equation could be used keeping age constant at 18 (r = 0.90, n = 77 men and women 18-50 years old). Test-retest reliability coefficients were 0.89 for children (139 boys and girls 6-16 years old) and 0.95 for adults (81 men and women, 20-45 years old).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Application of sedimentation model to uniform and segregated fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Shippy, J.L. III; Watson, J.S.

    1990-10-24

    This paper incorporates concepts of unimodal and bimodal sedimentation to develop a model that accurately predicts bed expansion during particulate fluidization. During bed expansion a particle is considered to be fluidized not by the pure fluid, but by a slurry consisting of the pure fluid and other surrounding particles. The contributions of the other surrounding particles to the additional buoyant and drag forces are accounted for with the use of effective fluid or slurry properties, density and viscosity. As bed expansion proceeds, influences of the surrounding particles decrease; therefore, these effective properties are functions of the changing void fraction of the suspension. Furthermore, the expansion index, which empirically represents the degree to which viscous and inertial forces are present, is traditionally a function of a constant terminal Reynold's number. Because the effective fluid properties are considered to be changing as fluidization proceeds, the degree to which viscous and inertial forces also changes; therefore, the expansion index is written as a function of a local or intermediate Reynold's number. These concepts are further extended to bimodal fluidization in which small or light particles aid in the fluidization of the large or heavy particles. The results indicate that the proposed model more accurately predicts particulate bed expansion for a wider range of systems (gas -- liquid, low Reynold's number -- high Reynold's number) than other analytical or empirical models.

  12. Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Hu, X.; Jin, C.

    1994-03-01

    Campbell and Wang (1991) showed that the particle pressures in gas-fluidized beds were largely generated by the passage of bubbles. In particular, they showed that the average particle pressure exerted on the side walls scaled with the average size of the bubble. This immediately brings to mind two questions: (1) what is it about bubbles that leads to particle pressure generation and (2) would there be measurable particle pressures in liquid-fluidized beds which, while unstable, do not bubble? This project is largely aimed at answering these two questions. To attack the first problem, the authors have built a two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed into which bubbles may be injected and the distribution of particle-pressure measured. For the latter, other experiments are being performed in liquid fluidized beds. However, it soon became apparent that the particle pressures generated in the liquid beds are extremely small. This has pointed that phase of the research in two directions. The first is the design and construction of a third, and more sensitive, from of the particle pressure transducer. The second approach arose from reflection on what ultimately was the utility of the current research. This led to the development of a generic stability model, in which all modeled terms are left unspecified. From analyzing this model, they have developed an experimental plan that, by measuring the characteristics of voidage disturbances and comparing with the theory, will allow them to back out appropriate values for the modeled terms. The results will not only yield insight into the particle pressure, but also of the fluid drag. The latter results may be used to evaluate common models for these terms.

  13. Electrode assembly for a fluidized bed apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Schora, Jr., Frank C.; Matthews, Charles W.; Knowlton, Ted M.

    1976-11-23

    An electrode assembly comprising a high voltage electrode having a generally cylindrical shape and being electrically connected to a high voltage source, where the cylinder walls may be open to flow of fluids and solids; an electrically grounded support electrode supporting said high voltage electrode by an electrically insulating support where both of the electrically grounded and electrically insulating support may be hollow; and an electrically grounded liner electrode arranged concentrically around both the high voltage and support electrodes. This assembly is specifically adapted for use in a fluidized bed chemical reactor as an improved heating means therefor.

  14. Production of MHD fluid

    DOEpatents

    Lacey, James J.; Kurtzrock, Roy C.; Bienstock, Daniel

    1976-08-24

    A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

  15. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  16. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  17. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  18. Novel simulated moving-bed adsorber for the fractionation of gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rao, D P; Sivakumar, S V; Mandal, Susmita; Kota, Sridevi; Ramaprasad, B S G

    2005-03-25

    The separation of propylene-propane mixture is an energy intensive operation commercially practiced using cryogenic distillation. The separation by pressure swing adsorption has been studied as an alternative. A fixed-bed pressure swing adsorption yields the heavy component as a pure product. The product recovery and the productivity are not high. In a moving-bed process, because of the counter-current solid-gas contact, the separation achieved is similar to that of the fractionation by distillation. Although the moving-bed operation offers the upper limit for the performance of a cyclic adsorptive process, due to mechanical complexities in the handling of solids the 'simulated' moving-bed is preferred. By moving the inlet and outlet ports of streams located along the length of the bed, a moving-bed process can be realized in a fixed bed. We describe here a 'moving-port' system which permits injection or withdrawal of the fluid along the axial direction in a fixed bed. A fixed bed embedded with the moving-port systems emulates a simulated moving-bed adsorber. The proposed adsorber can fractionate a binary gas mixture into two product streams with high purities. It is similar to the Sorbex process of UOP but does not have the eluent as an additional separating agent. A parametric study indicates that high purity products and a higher productivity by an order of magnitude can be achieved with simulated moving-beds compared to the fixed beds.

  19. Continuum Statistics of the Bed Topography in a Sandy River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B.; Jerolmack, D.; Mohrig, D.

    2005-12-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities in the bed geometry of sandy rivers contain information about processes of sediment transport that has not been fully appreciated. This is primarily due to a disparity between the dynamic nature of the sediment-fluid interface and the relatively static methods of surveying bed elevation, e.g. single profiles or point measurements. High resolution topographic data is paramount to understanding the dynamic behavior of sandy beds. We present and analyze a data set collected on a 2cm x 2cm grid at 1 minute intervals and with a vertical precision of ~1mm. This was accomplished by using Lambert-Beer's Law for attenuation of light to transform low-altitude aerial photographs into digital elevation models. Forty successive models were generated for a 20 m by 30 m section of channel bottom of the N. Loup River, Nebraska. To calculate the average, whole bed translation rate, or celerity, cross-correlations between a reference bed topography and its proceeding configurations were determined. Time differences between models were related to the shift lengths that produced correlation maxima for each model pair. The result is a celerity of ~3.8cm/s with a correlation coefficient of 0.992. Bed topography also deforms while it translates, and this can be seen as a secular decrease of correlation maxima. The form of this decrease in correlation is exponential, and from it an interface half-life is defined. In this case, the bed had become extensively reorganized within ~40 minutes, the time necessary to translate the bed one wavelength of the dominant roughness element. Although the bed is continuously deforming, its roughness is statistically stationary. Essentially, a mean roughness is maintained as the bed creates new realizations of itself. The dynamic nature of the whole bed and similarly transient behavior of individual elements suggests the utility of a holistic approach to studying the feedback between bed topography, fluid flow, and

  20. Fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Botros, P E

    1990-04-01

    This report describes the activities of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center's research and development program in fluidized-bed combustion from October 1, 1987, to September 30, 1989. The Department of Energy program involves atmospheric and pressurized systems. Demonstrations of industrial-scale atmospheric systems are being completed, and smaller boilers are being explored. These systems include vortex, multi-solid, spouted, dual-sided, air-cooled, pulsed, and waste-fired fluidized-beds. Combustion of low-rank coal, components, and erosion are being studied. In pressurized combustion, first-generation, combined-cycle power plants are being tested, and second-generation, advanced-cycle systems are being designed and cost evaluated. Research in coal devolatilization, metal wastage, tube corrosion, and fluidization also supports this area. 52 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. The Influence of Relative Submergence on the Near-bed Flow Field: Implications for Bed-load Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Tait, S.; Marion, A.

    2005-12-01

    the above tests. The overlap between this distribution and the measured velocities are used to estimate entrainment rates. Predicted entrainment rates increase with relative submergence, even for similar bed shear stress. Assuming bed-load rate is the product of entrainment rate and hop length, and that hop lengths are sensibly stable, suggests that transport rate has a dependence on relative submergence. This demonstrates that transport rate is not a direct function of average bed shear stress. The results describe a mechanism that will cause river channels with contrasting morphologies (and different relative submergence) but similar levels of average bed stress to experience different levels of sediment mobility. Chegini A. Tait S. Heald J. McEwan I. 2002 The development of an automated system for the measurement of near bed turbulence and grain motion. Proc. ASCE Conf. on Hydraulic Measurements and Experimental Methods, ISBN 0-7844-0655-3. Drake T.G. Shreve R.L. Dietrich W.E. Whiting P.J. Leopold L.B. 1988 Bedload transport of fine gravel observed by motion-picture photography, J. Fluid Mech., 192, 193-217. Heald J. McEwan I. Tait, S. 2004 Sediment transport over a flat bed in a unidirectional flow: simulations and validation, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. of London A, 362, 1973-1986. Nelson J.M. Shreve R.L. McLean S.R. Drake T.G. 1995 Role of near-bed turbulence structure in bed-load transport and bed form mechanics, Water. Res. Res., 31, 8, 2071-2086.

  2. Grain-size considerations for optoelectronic multistage interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, A V; Marchand, P J; Kiamilev, F E; Esener, S C

    1992-09-10

    This paper investigates, at the system level, the performance-cost trade-off between optical and electronic interconnects in an optoelectronic interconnection network. The specific system considered is a packet-switched, free-space optoelectronic shuffle-exchange multistage interconnection network (MIN). System bandwidth is used as the performance measure, while system area, system power, and system volume constitute the cost measures. A detailed design and analysis of a two-dimensional (2-D) optoelectronic shuffle-exchange routing network with variable grain size K is presented. The architecture permits the conventional 2 x 2 switches or grains to be generalized to larger K x K grain sizes by replacing optical interconnects with electronic wires without affecting the functionality of the system. Thus the system consists of log(k) N optoelectronic stages interconnected with free-space K-shuffles. When K = N, the MIN consists of a single electronic stage with optical input-output. The system design use an effi ient 2-D VLSI layout and a single diffractive optical element between stages to provide the 2-D K-shuffle interconnection. Results indicate that there is an optimum range of grain sizes that provides the best performance per cost. For the specific VLSI/GaAs multiple quantum well technology and system architecture considered, grain sizes larger than 256 x 256 result in a reduced performance, while grain sizes smaller than 16 x 16 have a high cost. For a network with 4096 channels, the useful range of grain sizes corresponds to approximately 250-400 electronic transistors per optical input-output channel. The effect of varying certain technology parameters such as the number of hologram phase levels, the modulator driving voltage, the minimum detectable power, and VLSI minimum feature size on the optimum grain-size system is studied. For instance, results show that using four phase levels for the interconnection hologram is a good compromise for the cost

  3. Fluidized bed combustor and removable windbox and tube assembly therefor

    DOEpatents

    DeFeo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1983-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a housing having a chamber therein with a top having a discharge for the gases which are generated in the chamber and a bottom with a discharge for heated fluid. An assembly is arranged in the lower portion of the chamber and the assembly includes a lower plate which is mounted on a support flange of the housing so that it is spaced from the bottom of the chamber and defines a fluid plenum between it and the bottom of the chamber for the discharge of heated fluid. The assembly includes a heat exchanger inlet plenum having tubes therethrough for the passage of fluidizer air and a windbox above the heat exchanger plenum which has a distributor plate top wall. A portion of the chamber above the top wall defines a fluidized bed.

  4. Fluidized bed combustor and removable windbox and tube assembly therefor

    DOEpatents

    DeFeo, Angelo; Hosek, William S.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a housing having a chamber therein with a top having a discharge for the gases which are generated in the chamber and a bottom with a discharge for heated fluid. An assembly is arranged in the lower portion of the chamber and the assembly includes a lower plate which is mounted on a support flange of the housing so that it is spaced from the bottom of the chamber and defines a fluid plenum between it and the bottom of the chamber for the discharge of heated fluid. The assembly includes a heat exchanger inlet plenum having tubes therethrough for the passage of fluidizer air and a windbox above the heat exchanger plenum which has a distributor plate top wall. A portion of the chamber above the top wall defines a fluidized bed.

  5. Discrete Element Modeling of the Mobilization of Coarse Gravel Beds by Finer Gravel Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Tan, D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown that the addition of fine gravel particles to a coarse bed will mobilize the coarser bed, and that the effect is sufficiently strong that a pulse of fine gravel particles can mobilize an impacted coarser bed. Recent flume experiments have demonstrated that the degree of bed mobilization by finer particles is primarily dependent on the particle size ratio of the coarse and fine particles, rather than absolute size of either particle, provided both particles are sufficiently large. However, the mechanism behind the mobilization is not understood. It has previously been proposed that the mechanism is driven by a combination of geometric effects and hydraulic effects. For example, it has been argued that smaller particles fill in gaps along the bed, resulting in a smoother bed over which the larger particles are less likely to be disentrained and a reduced near-bed flow velocity and subsequent increased drag on protruding particles. Altered near-bed turbulence has also been cited as playing an important role. We perform simulations using the discrete element method with one-way fluid-solid coupling to conduct simulations of mobilization of a gravel bed by fine gravel particles. By independently and artificially controlling average and fluctuating velocity profiles, we systematically investigate the relative role that may be played by particle-particle interactions, average near-bed velocity profiles, and near-bed turbulence statistics. The simulations indicate that the relative importance of these mechanisms changes with the degree of mobilization of the bed. For higher bed mobility similar to bed sheets, particle-particle interactions, plays a significant role in an apparent rheology in the bed sheets, not unlike that observed in a dense granular flow of particles of different sizes. For conditions closer to a critical shear stress for bedload transport, the near-bed velocity profiles and turbulence statistics become increasingly important.

  6. Adaptation of Decoy Fusion Strategy for Existing Multi-Stage Search Workflows.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mark V; Levitsky, Lev I; Gorshkov, Mikhail V

    2016-09-01

    A number of proteomic database search engines implement multi-stage strategies aiming at increasing the sensitivity of proteome analysis. These approaches often employ a subset of the original database for the secondary stage of analysis. However, if target-decoy approach (TDA) is used for false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, the multi-stage strategies may violate the underlying assumption of TDA that false matches are distributed uniformly across the target and decoy databases. This violation occurs if the numbers of target and decoy proteins selected for the second search are not equal. Here, we propose a method of decoy database generation based on the previously reported decoy fusion strategy. This method allows unbiased TDA-based FDR estimation in multi-stage searches and can be easily integrated into existing workflows utilizing popular search engines and post-search algorithms. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27349255

  7. Development of novel general equation for multistage epicyclic gearset with corrected teeth: non-constrained approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Jablonski, Adam; Dziedziech, Kajetan; Dworakowski, Ziemowit; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-04-01

    A large number of commercial systems for condition monitoring of most common planetary gearboxes used in wind turbines and mining machinery have been developed for years. However nowadays, multistage constructions are encountered in industries. These are not necessarily planetary, but generally epicyclic. Current state of the art, according to the authors knowledge, does not give general equations for a case where multistage systems are considered, where some of the gears consist all moving parts. Hence, currently available CMS systems are not suitable for condition monitoring of these kinds of systems. The paper presents a new general equation, which allows calculating the characteristic frequencies of any kind of multistage gear sets, as a result of theoretical investigation. Illustrated solution does not assume a fixed speed of any element. Moreover, presented equation takes into account corrected teeth, making developed equations most general from all available in tribology science. Presented scientific development is currently implemented in a modern European CMS.

  8. Adaptation of Decoy Fusion Strategy for Existing Multi-Stage Search Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mark V.; Levitsky, Lev I.; Gorshkov, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    A number of proteomic database search engines implement multi-stage strategies aiming at increasing the sensitivity of proteome analysis. These approaches often employ a subset of the original database for the secondary stage of analysis. However, if target-decoy approach (TDA) is used for false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, the multi-stage strategies may violate the underlying assumption of TDA that false matches are distributed uniformly across the target and decoy databases. This violation occurs if the numbers of target and decoy proteins selected for the second search are not equal. Here, we propose a method of decoy database generation based on the previously reported decoy fusion strategy. This method allows unbiased TDA-based FDR estimation in multi-stage searches and can be easily integrated into existing workflows utilizing popular search engines and post-search algorithms.

  9. Dynamic analysis for solid waste management systems: an inexact multistage integer programming approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe

    2009-03-01

    In this study, a dynamic analysis approach based on an inexact multistage integer programming (IMIP) model is developed for supporting municipal solid waste (MSW) management under uncertainty. Techniques of interval-parameter programming and multistage stochastic programming are incorporated within an integer-programming framework. The developed IMIP can deal with uncertainties expressed as probability distributions and interval numbers, and can reflect the dynamics in terms of decisions for waste-flow allocation and facility-capacity expansion over a multistage context. Moreover, the IMIP can be used for analyzing various policy scenarios that are associated with different levels of economic consequences. The developed method is applied to a case study of long-term waste-management planning. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated for binary and continuous variables. They can help generate desired decisions of system-capacity expansion and waste-flow allocation with a minimized system cost and maximized system reliability. PMID:19320267

  10. Adaptation of Decoy Fusion Strategy for Existing Multi-Stage Search Workflows.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mark V; Levitsky, Lev I; Gorshkov, Mikhail V

    2016-09-01

    A number of proteomic database search engines implement multi-stage strategies aiming at increasing the sensitivity of proteome analysis. These approaches often employ a subset of the original database for the secondary stage of analysis. However, if target-decoy approach (TDA) is used for false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, the multi-stage strategies may violate the underlying assumption of TDA that false matches are distributed uniformly across the target and decoy databases. This violation occurs if the numbers of target and decoy proteins selected for the second search are not equal. Here, we propose a method of decoy database generation based on the previously reported decoy fusion strategy. This method allows unbiased TDA-based FDR estimation in multi-stage searches and can be easily integrated into existing workflows utilizing popular search engines and post-search algorithms. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Multi-stage conversion of alkanes to gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes improvement in a facility for converting alkanes into gasoline, the facility including a fluid catalytic cracking system and an olefin oligomerization reactor. The improvement comprises: a first valved conduit means for withdrawing a controlled stream of the regenerated catalyst from the first regenerator means; a dehydrogenation reactor in valved communication with the first regenerator means, through the first valved conduit means the dehydrogenation reactor having a dehydrogenation zone at a temperature below those prevailing in the first regeneration zone, the dehydrogenation reactor being located externally relative to the fluid catalytic cracker reactor and first regenerator; means for introducing a lower alkane feedstream into the dehydrogenation zone in an amount sufficient to maintain hot withdrawn catalyst in a state of fluidization in the dehydrogenation reactor while the catalyst is being cooled therein; a second valved conduit means for transporting cooled catalyst from the dehydrogenation zone to the first regeneration zone.

  12. Bed and flow dynamics leading to sediment-wave initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, S. E.; Nikora, V. I.

    2009-04-01

    New PIV-based experiments show that the nascent seed waves from which both ripples and dunes develop are generated on planar mobile sediment beds in a two-stage process. The first stage comprises the motion of random sediment patches that reflect the passage of sediment-transport events caused by attached eddies. These eddy-transport events propagate at speeds that are proportional to their size and less than overhead eddy convection velocities, but potentially larger than local average fluid and sediment velocities. In the second stage, interactions of the moving patches result in a bed disturbance that exceeds a critical height and interrupts the bed-load layer. Quasi-regular seed waves are then generated successively downstream of this stabilised growing disturbance via a scour-deposition wave that arises from the requirement of sediment mass conservation and the sediment-transport and bed-stress distributions downstream of a bed perturbation. Seed waves are thereby of preferred lengths that scale with the grain size, i.e. length = O(130) grain diameters, agreeing with compiled measurements. This two-stage generation mechanism is valid for fully-turbulent hydraulically-smooth and rough-bed flows of small to large sediment transport rates. It is furthermore valid for laminar flows, although the critical disturbances leading to seed-wave generation arise through bed discontinuities, and not eddy-based sediment-transport events. The identified generation mechanism, which accounts for turbulence effects, explains the observed similar scaling of alluvial, closed-conduit and lightweight-sediment seed waves. The present measurements highlight further aspects of the flow dynamics preceding seed-wave generation, including: decreases in von Kármán's constant due to bed mobility, near-bed eddy convection speeds in excess of local double-averaged (in time and space) streamwise velocities, and the validity of the four-range spectral scaling model for open-channel flows

  13. Hydraulic fracturing and methane recovery in coal beds

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    One method for increasing the production rate of coal bed methane is hydraulic fracturing. Typically, a mixture of fine sand and a special fracturing fluid is forced down a well that is drilled into a gas-bearing coal bed. The fluid usually is either water treated with an organic gel or water with nitrogen added to yield a foam. Injection of the fluid under high pressure causes the coal bed to crack until it forms a highly conductive fracture that is held open by the sand. Gas can then flow through the fracture and into the well. The hydraulic fracture follows the path of least resistance, determined primarily by the closing stresses across the crack and by natural surfaces of weakness. Whereas conventional coal bed wells produce only 140 to 170 cu m of methane per day, successful hydraulic fracturing techniques have increased production levels 2 to 30 times, up to 1,700 cu m. Such increased rates of production are significant since the production average of conventional gas wells in the Appalachian region for example, is 980 cu m/day. 11 references.

  14. Beds of reconfigurable angled hairs rectify Stokes flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Jose; Comtet, Jean; Hosoi, Anette Peko

    2015-11-01

    Biological tissues such as intestines, blood vessels, kidneys, and tongues are coated with beds of passive, elongated, hair-like protrusions such as microvilli, hyaluronans, primary cilia, and papillae. Stresses from fluid flows can bend deformable hairs, but this reconfiguration can in turn affect confined fluid flows. We investigate this elastoviscous coupling by developing a biomimetic model system of elastomer hair beds subject to shear-driven Stokes flows in a Taylor-Couette geometry. We characterize this system with a theoretical model which shows that reconfiguration of hair beds is controlled by a single elastoviscous number. Hair bending results in an apparent shear thinning because the hair tip lowers toward the base and thus widens the gap through which fluid flows. When hairs are cantilevered at an angle subnormal to the surface, flow against the grain bends hairs away from the base and thus narrows the gap. Beds of reconfigurable angled hairs can thus give rise to an asymmetric flow impedance at arbitrarily low Reynolds number and could therefore function as a microfluidic rectifier.

  15. Optimal planning of a cascade-type multistage refrigeration system for a beverage plant

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Takashi; Ito, Koichi; Yokoyama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Shigeru; Himura, Yoshiaki

    1999-07-01

    An optimal planning method is presented for a cascade-type multistage refrigeration system. Heat exchange areas of evaporator, condenser, and beverage cooler are determined optimally so as to minimize the annual total cost and input energy consumption subject to constraints concerning annual equipment operation. This problem is considered as a multiobjective optimization one, and a discrete set of Pareto optimal solutions is derived numerically by a weighting method. Through a numerical study, it is investigated how the heat exchange areas influence the long-term economics and energy conservation. Cascade-type multistage refrigeration systems are compared with single stage systems.

  16. Simulation of three-dimensional viscous flow within a multistage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    This work outlines a procedure for simulating the flow field within multistage turbomachinery which includes the effects of unsteadiness, compressibility, and viscosity. The associated modeling equations are the average passage equation system which governs the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. The results from a simulation of a low aspect ratio stage and a one-half turbine will be presented and compared with experimental measurements. It will be shown that the secondary flow field generated by the rotor causes the aerodynamic performance of the downstream vane to be significantly different from that of an isolated blade row.

  17. Simulation of 3-D viscous flow within a multi-stage turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    This work outlines a procedure for simulating the flow field within multistage turbomachinery which includes the effects of unsteadiness, compressibility, and viscosity. The associated modeling equations are the average passage equation system which governs the time-averaged flow field within a typical passage of a blade row embedded within a multistage configuration. The results from a simulation of a low aspect ratio stage and a one-half turbine will be presented and compared with experimental measurements. It will be shown that the secondary flow field generated by the rotor causes the aerodynamic performance of the downstream vane to be significantly different from that of an isolated blade row.

  18. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  19. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  20. Method and apparatus for improving heat transfer in a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Lessor, Delbert L.; Robertus, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus contains a fluidized bed that includes particles of different triboelectrical types, each particle type acquiring an opposite polarity upon contact. The contact may occur between particles of the two types or between particles of etiher type and structure or fluid present in the apparatus. A fluidizing gas flow is passed through the particles to produce the fluidized bed. Immersed within the bed are electrodes. An alternating EMF source connected to the electrodes applies an alternating electric field across the fluidized bed to cause particles of the first type to move relative to particles of the second type and relative to the gas flow. In a heat exchanger incorporating the apparatus, the electrodes are conduits conveying a fluid to be heated. The two particle types alternately contact each conduit to transfer heat from a hot gas flow to the second fluid within the conduit.

  1. Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Comparato, Joseph R.; Jacobs, Martin

    1982-01-01

    A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

  2. Fluidized-bed sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to identify and demonstrate methods for enhancing long-term chemical reactivity and attrition resistance of zinc oxide-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents for desulfurization of hot coal-derived gases in a high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) fluidized-bed reactor. In this program, regenerable ZnO-based mixed metal-oxide sorbents are being developed and tested. These include zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-SORB sorbents. The Z-SORB sorbent is a proprietary sorbent developed by Phillips Petroleum Company (PPCo).

  3. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  4. Cardiovascular Adaptations to Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Martin, David S.; Perez, Sondar A.; Ribeiro, Christine; Stenger, Michael B.; Summers, Richard; Meck, Janice V.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Orthostatic hypotension is a serious risk for crewmembers returning from spaceflight. Numerous cardiovascular mechanisms have been proposed to account for this problem, including vascular and cardiac dysfunction, which we studied during bed rest. METHODS: Thirteen subjects were studied before and during bed rest. Statistical analysis was limited to the first 49-60 days of bed rest, and compared to pre-bed rest data. Ultrasound data were collected on vascular and cardiac structure and function. Tilt testing was conducted for 30 minutes or until presyncopal symptoms intervened. RESULTS: Plasma volume was significantly reduced by day 7 of bed rest. Flow-mediated dilation in the leg was significantly increased at bed rest day 49. Arterial responses to nitroglycerin differed in the arm and leg, but did not change as a result of bed rest. Intimal-medial thickness markedly decreased at bed rest days 21, 35 and 49. Several cardiac functional parameters including isovolumic relaxation time, ejection time and myocardial performance index were significantly increased (indicating a decrease in cardiac function) during bed rest. There was a trend for decreased orthostatic tolerance following 60 days of bed rest. DISCUSSION: These data suggest that 6 head-down tilt bed rest alters cardiovascular structure and function in a pattern similar to short duration spaceflight. Additionally, the vascular alterations are primarily seen in the lower body, while vessels of the upper body are unaffected. KEY WORDS: spaceflight, orthostatic intolerance, hypotension, fluid-shift, plasma volume

  5. An Experimental Study of Ice-Bed Separation during Sliding over a Hard Bed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, N. R.; Petersen, B. B.

    2010-12-01

    Separation of sliding ice from hard beds plays a central role in theories of subglacial hydrology, sliding and surging, and erosion of subglacial bedrock. Despite a half-century of interest in cavities at glacier beds, there are no data that establish relationships between steady cavity size, bed geometry, sliding speed, and effective pressure. Field studies are complicated by unsteady behavior and various factors that are poorly known, including the local drag on the bed, bedrock geometry, and cavity size. Cavity growth and shrinkage have been commonly estimated from glacier surface velocities but usually by making the uncertain assumption that vertical ice strain is uniform with depth. These problems are avoided by studying sliding and ice-bed separation experimentally with a recently constructed laboratory device. The device rotates a large confined ring (0.9 m O.D., 0.2 m wide , 0.2 m thick) of synthetic ice across a rigid or soft horizontal bed at a constant speed or shear stress, while applying a downward stress. A bath with circulating fluid, regulated to ~0.01 °C., surrounds the ice chamber. This bath keeps the ice at its pressure-melting temperature and the melt rate low. Initial experiments have been with a rigid bed, consisting of steps 0.18 m long and 0.035 m high at the ice-ring centerline, with stoss surfaces inclined uniformly at 11° and vertical lee surfaces. The steps are plastic of low thermal conductivity, so that regelation can be neglected. Imposed steady slip rates have, to date, ranged from ~20 to 200 m/a, under an effective pressure of ~1000 kPa. Cavities of steady size develop over periods of ~10-60 hours, depending upon the sliding speed and initial cavity size. Cavities do not change their size monotonically after a change in slip velocity but oscillate slowly one or more times about their steady size before attaining it. Cavities initiate at step edges and have weakly sigmoidal roofs. Measured drag on the bed is independent of slip

  6. On the dynamics of shallow gravel bed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohajeri, Seyed Hossein; Righetti, Maurizio; Wharton, Geraldene; Gurnell, Angela

    2013-04-01

    crest and above and through the gravel, and ejection is dominant and reaches a maximum in the middle of the water column. The calculated integral length scale profile tends to a constant value far from the gravel bed, similar to past research. However, it shows a linear behavior in a region near the gravel crest. Interestingly, the integral length scale at the bed tends to assume values close to the value of the bed elevation standard deviation, which was suggested as representative of bed roughness (Nikora and et.al, 1998). This work has been carried out within the SMART Joint Doctorate (Science for the MAnagement of Rivers and their Tidal systems) funded with the support of the Erasmus Mundus programme of the European Union. Lu S., Willmarth W., (1973), "Measurements of the structure of the Reynolds stress in a turbulent boundary layer", Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Volume60, Issue03, pp 481-511. Nezu I., Nakagawa H., (1993), "Turbulence in open-channel flows", Monograph series A.A. Balkema, Rotterdam. Nikora V., Goring D., Biggs B., (1998),"On gravel-bed roughness characterization", Journal of Water Resources Research, Vol. 34, No. 3, pp. 517-527.

  7. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds.

  8. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds. PMID:21216098

  9. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  10. Debris-bed friction of hard-bedded glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Jackson, M.; Moore, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Field measurements of debris-bed friction on a smooth rock tablet at the bed of Engabreen, a hard-bedded, temperate glacier in northern Norway, indicated that basal ice containing 10% debris by volume exerted local shear traction of up to 500 kPa. The corresponding bulk friction coefficient between the dirty basal ice and the tablet was between 0.05 and 0.08. A model of friction in which nonrotating spherical rock particles are held in frictional contact with the bed by bed-normal ice flow can account for these measurements if the power law exponent for ice flowing past large clasts is 1. A small exponent (n < 2) is likely because stresses in ice are small and flow is transient. Numerical calculations of the bed-normal drag force on a sphere in contact with a flat bed using n = 1 show that this force can reach values several hundred times that on a sphere isolated from the bed, thus drastically increasing frictional resistance. Various estimates of basal friction are obtained from this model. For example, the shear traction at the bed of a glacier sliding at 20 m a-1 with a geothermally induced melt rate of 0.006 m a-1 and an effective pressure of 300 kPa can exceed 100 kPa. Debris-bed friction can therefore be a major component of sliding resistance, contradicting the common assumption that debris-bed friction is negligible. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Method for packing chromatographic beds

    DOEpatents

    Freeman, David H.; Angeles, Rosalie M.; Keller, Suzanne

    1991-01-01

    Column chromatography beds are packed through the application of static force. A slurry of the chromatography bed material and a non-viscous liquid is filled into the column plugged at one end, and allowed to settle. The column is transferred to a centrifuge, and centrifuged for a brief period of time to achieve a predetermined packing level, at a range generally of 100-5,000 gravities. Thereafter, the plug is removed, other fixtures may be secured, and the liquid is allowed to flow out through the bed. This results in an evenly packed bed, with no channeling or preferential flow characteristics.

  12. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  13. Slow Granular Dynamics in River Beds: Toward a Continuous Definition of Bed Load Transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houssais, M.; Ortiz, C. P.; Durian, D. J.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Field records and experimental studies show that the fluvial geophysical processes that shape the landscape, such as debris flows and river sediment transport, are extremely unpredictable in large part due to the nonlinear dependence of the transport rates on the structural properties of the sediment. There is a need for a more fundamental understanding of the physical processes that control sediment transfer rates, particularly the magnitude and frequency of the bed load transport flux. We present experiments in a simple geometry, an annular couette cell, that allows us to study the free-surface dynamics at the interface between a flowing viscous fluid and a submerged particle bed made of plastic spheres, a highly idealized river. This geometry presents an opportunity to study details of the bed structure and particle transport with a well-controlled steady shear stress during long-time experiments. We use the refractive-index-matched laser scanning technique [Dijksman et al. 2012], to detect the particle positions on a two-dimensional vertical slice at the middle of the 15 particle wide bed, and characterize their dynamics over a range of timescales of six-orders of magnitude. We find that the particle dynamics are spatiotemporally heterogeneous, but that the overall flow field reaches a well-developed steady-state. Below the fluid flow depth, we find a wide flowing layer characterized by a fast, approximately exponential decay of the particle velocity versus depth. This layer can be associated with the active layer commonly mentioned in the literature. We find that the thickness of the flow layer increases with the applied shear stress. However, deep in the bed, the velocity profile does not indefinitely follow a exponential decay. Instead, the rate of decay of the velocity profile slows drastically, transitioning continuously to a quasistatic flow regime, with a very different exponential decay. This study provides a new framework for understanding the

  14. A Study of Multistage/Multifunction Column for Fine Particle Separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.

    1997-09-15

    Hydrodynamic tests were continued in this quarter. Liquid circulation velocities are the characteristic parameters in the multistage column. Conductivity tracer response method has been set up for liquid circulation velocities measurement. The period of dampened sinusoidal conductivity signals can be clearly identified and then converted into linear and superficial liquid velocities.

  15. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  16. Effective Teachers as Viewed by Students at a 2 Year College: A Multistage Mixed Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jinhao; Gibson, Angela M.; Slate, John R.

    2007-01-01

    A multi-stage mixed analysis was used to examine stories from 423, primarily Hispanic, undergraduate students in the United States regarding their best and poorest K-12 teachers, along with responses to 10 Likert format survey items. In the quantitative analysis phase, participants expressed strong agreement with items derived from the literature…

  17. Hispanic College Students' Views of Effective Middle-School Teachers: A Multi-Stage Mixed Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Don P.; Slate, John R.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    In this multi-stage mixed-analysis study, the views of 437 Hispanic college students enrolled at two Hispanic-Serving Institutions in the Southwest of the USA were obtained concerning characteristics of effective middle-school teachers. Through the method of constant comparison (qualitative phase), 38 themes were determined to be present in…

  18. Panel Design Variations in the Multistage Test Using the Mixed-Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Dodd, Barbara G.; Park, Ryoungsun

    2012-01-01

    This study compared various panel designs of the multistage test (MST) using mixed-format tests in the context of classification testing. Simulations varied the design of the first-stage module. The first stage was constructed according to three levels of test information functions (TIFs) with three different TIF centers. Additional computerized…

  19. A Monte Carlo Approach to the Design, Assembly, and Evaluation of Multistage Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.; Armstrong, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an application of Monte Carlo methods for developing and assembling multistage adaptive tests (MSTs). A major advantage of the Monte Carlo assembly over other approaches (e.g., integer programming or enumerative heuristics) is that it provides a uniform sampling from all MSTs (or MST paths) available from a given item pool.…

  20. A Comparison of IRT Proficiency Estimation Methods under Adaptive Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyeon; Moses, Tim; Yoo, Hanwook

    2015-01-01

    This inquiry is an investigation of item response theory (IRT) proficiency estimators' accuracy under multistage testing (MST). We chose a two-stage MST design that includes four modules (one at Stage 1, three at Stage 2) and three difficulty paths (low, middle, high). We assembled various two-stage MST panels (i.e., forms) by manipulating two…

  1. A survey and comparison of fault-tolerant multistage interconnection networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, George B., III; Agrawal, Dharma P.; Siegel, Howard Jay

    1987-01-01

    Intrinsically fault-tolerant multistage interconnection networks (MINs) are surveyed, categorizing the MINs by the amount of hardware modifications they use to provide redundancy. The diversity of such MINs and the scope of fault-tolerance techniques are examined. A hypothetical MIN with ideal engineering characteristics is defined, and the surveyed MINs are compared to this standard.

  2. An Investigation on Computer-Adaptive Multistage Testing Panels for Multidimensional Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xinrui

    2013-01-01

    The computer-adaptive multistage testing (ca-MST) has been developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT), and been increasingly adopted in large-scale assessments. Current research and practice only focus on ca-MST panels for credentialing purposes. The ca-MST test mode, therefore, is designed to gauge a single scale. The…

  3. Multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate various types of multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes, in which the decoding of a component code at each stage can be either soft-decision or hard-decision, maximum likelihood or bounded-distance. Error performance of codes is analyzed for a memoryless additive channel based on various types of multi-stage decoding, and upper bounds on the probability of an incorrect decoding are derived. Based on our study and computation results, we find that, if component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. In particular, we find that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft-decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single-stage optimum decoding of the overall code is very small: only a fraction of dB loss in SNR at the probability of an incorrect decoding for a block of 10(exp -6). Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes really offers a way to achieve the best of three worlds, bandwidth efficiency, coding gain, and decoding complexity.

  4. Multi-stage decoding for multi-level block modulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao

    1991-01-01

    Various types of multistage decoding for multilevel block modulation codes, in which the decoding of a component code at each stage can be either soft decision or hard decision, maximum likelihood or bounded distance are discussed. Error performance for codes is analyzed for a memoryless additive channel based on various types of multi-stage decoding, and upper bounds on the probability of an incorrect decoding are derived. It was found that, if component codes of a multi-level modulation code and types of decoding at various stages are chosen properly, high spectral efficiency and large coding gain can be achieved with reduced decoding complexity. It was found that the difference in performance between the suboptimum multi-stage soft decision maximum likelihood decoding of a modulation code and the single stage optimum decoding of the overall code is very small, only a fraction of dB loss in SNR at the probability of an incorrect decoding for a block of 10(exp -6). Multi-stage decoding of multi-level modulation codes really offers a way to achieve the best of three worlds, bandwidth efficiency, coding gain, and decoding complexity.

  5. Variability of bed drag on cohesive beds under wave action

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Ilgar

    2016-01-01

    Drag force at the bed acting on water flow is a major control on water circulation and sediment transport. Bed drag has been thoroughly studied in sandy waters, but less so in muddy coastal waters. The variation of bed drag on a muddy shelf is investigated here using field observations of currents, waves, and sediment concentration collected during moderate wind and wave events. To estimate bottom shear stress and the bed drag coefficient, an indirect empirical method of logarithmic fitting to current velocity profiles (log-law), a bottom boundary layer model for combined wave-current flow, and a direct method that uses turbulent fluctuations of velocity are used. The overestimation by the log-law is significantly reduced by taking turbulence suppression due to sediment-induced stratification into account. The best agreement between the model and the direct estimates is obtained by using a hydraulic roughness of 10  m in the model. Direct estimate of bed drag on the muddy bed is found to have a decreasing trend with increasing current speed, and is estimated to be around 0.0025 in conditions where wave-induced flow is relatively weak. Bed drag shows an increase (up to fourfold) with increasing wave energy. These findings can be used to test the bed drag parameterizations in hydrodynamic and sediment transport models and the skills of these models in predicting flows in muddy environments.

  6. Concentration and Velocity Gradients in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClymer, James P.

    2003-01-01

    sufficiently large that Brownian motion of the particles can be ignored and the Reynolds number sufficiently small that particle inertia is negligible. A packed particle bed is used to randomize and disperse the flowing fluid introduced by a peristaltic pump. The bed itself is a rectangular glass cell 8 cm wide (x), 0.8 cm deep and a height of 30.5 cm (z). The depth of field of the camera is approximately 0.5 cm so depth information is averaged. Over flow fluid is returned to the reservoir making a closed loop system. In these experiments the particles form a sediment approximately 5.7 cm high with the pump off and expand to 22 cm with the pump on. For the smaller particles the pump velocity is .5 millimeters per second and 1.1 millimeters per second for the large particles. At this concentration the bed has a very well defined top where particle concentration rapidly drops to zero.

  7. Granular controls on the dispersion of bed load tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.; Phillips, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse particles are transported in a river as bed load, i.e., they move in frequent contact with and are supported by the granular bed. This movement is typically intermittent and may be described by a series of steps are rests, the distributions of which determine particle dispersion. Laboratory and field studies of bed load tracer dispersion have reported sub- and super-diffusive behavior, both of which have been successfully reproduced with stochastic transport models. Although researchers have invoked heavy-tailed step lengths as the cause of anomalous dispersion, most observations report thin-tailed distributions. Little attention has been paid to rest periods, and stochastic transport models have not been connected to the underlying mechanics of particle motion. Based on theoretical and experimental evidence, we argue that step lengths are thin-tailed and do not control the longterm dispersion of bed load tracers; they are determined by momentum balance between the fluid and solid. Using laboratory experiments with both marbles and natural sediments, we demonstrate that the rest time distribution is power law, and argue that this distribution controls asymptotic dispersion. Observed rest times far exceed any hydrodynamic timescale. Experiments reveal that rest times of deposited particles are governed by fluctuations in river bed elevation; in particular, the return time for the bed to scour to the base of a deposited particle. Stochastic fluctuations in bed elevation are describable by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (mean-reverting random walk) model that contains two parameters, which we show are directly related to the granular shear rate and range of bed elevation fluctuations, respectively. Combining these results with the theory of asymmetric random walks (particles only move downstream), we predict superdiffusive behavior that is in quantitative agreement with our observations of tracer dispersion in a natural river.

  8. What can cross-bedding tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are a common transport mechanism associated with explosive eruptions. They behave as particulate density current (flows of particles and fluid, whose driving force is the excess density compared to the ambient fluid). The particles thus are the defining part of the flow acting as the agent of momentum and the resultant deposits, making PDC sedimentology fundamental. We combine wind tunnel measurements with nontraditional field techniques to consider cross-bedding from dilute PDCs from the mm to the km scale. Each deposited particle requires 1) momentum to reach its final location, but 2) sufficiently low shearing to halt at this place. A range of shearing is constrained from wind tunnel measurements. The results are combined with field data from lacquer peel sampling (an outcrop is impregnated with a solidifying glue, preserving the primary organization of the grains). This enables quantification of the grain size of mm-scale laminae, giving an order of magnitude of turbulence during deposition. The lacquer peel technique also imaged cm-scale, soft sediment deformation patterns producing overturned beds. These are interpreted as related to Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instabilities between a granular-based flow and the bed. Dune bedform (DBs) cross-stratification at the m scale generally have an overall stoss-aggrading stacking pattern. Often interpreted as indicating supercritical flows, the wind-tunnel results and DBs' geometry rather suggest they are a specificity of particulate density currents with high deposition rates. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) reveals the 3D stability in location of a DB over several m depth, although stacking patterns vary with time and laterally. This emphasizes the primary influence of the basal boundary layer in the depositional dynamics. At the 100 m scale, DBs' shape evolves in dimensions and form, calling for 3D datasets. Terrestrial laser scanner and photogrammetry enable quantification of the

  9. Computational Flow Modeling of Hydrodynamics in Multiphase Trickle-Bed Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rodrigo J. G.; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M.

    2008-05-01

    This study aims to incorporate most recent multiphase models in order to investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of a TBR in terms of pressure drop and liquid holdup. Taking into account transport phenomena such as mass and heat transfer, an Eulerian k-fluid model was developed resulting from the volume averaging of the continuity and momentum equations and solved for a 3D representation of the catalytic bed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model predicts hydrodynamic parameters quite well if good closures for fluid/fluid and fluid/particle interactions are incorporated in the multiphase model. Moreover, catalytic performance is investigated with the catalytic wet oxidation of a phenolic pollutant.

  10. Analysis of Multistage and Other Creep Data for Domal Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.

    1998-10-01

    There have existed for some time relatively sparse creep databases for a number of domal salts. Although all of these data were analyzed at the time they were reported, to date there has not been a comprehensive, overall evaluation within the same analysis framework. Such an evaluation may prove of value. The analysis methodology is based on the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) description of salt creep and the corresponding model parameters determined from conventional creep tests. The constitutive model of creep wss formulated through application of principles involved in micromechanical modeling. It was possible, at minimum, to obtain the steady state parameters of the creep model from the data on the domal salts. When this was done, the creep of the domal salts, as compared to the well-defined Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) bedded clean salt, was either essentially identical to, or significantly harder (more creep resistant) than WIPP salt. Interestingly, the domal salts form two distinct groups, either sofl or hard, where the difference is roughly a factor often in creep rate between the twcl groups. As might be expected, this classification corresponds quite well to the differences in magnitude of effective creep volume losses of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns as determined by the CAVEMAN cavern pressure history analysis, depending upon the specific dome or region within the dome. Creep response shoulcl also correlate to interior cavern conditions that produce salt falls. WMle, in general, the caverns in hard sah have a noticeably greater propensity for salt falls, a smaller number of similar events are exhibited even in the caverns in soft salt.

  11. Multi-stage supra-subduction metasomatism in the Cabo Ortegal Complex, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilhac, Romain; O'Reilly, Suzanne; Griffin, William; Pearson, Norman; Ceuleneer, Georges; Grégoire, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Three harzburgitic massifs are exposed in the Cabo Ortegal Complex as part of the Variscan suture in Spain. Among these, the Herbeira massif has an unusually high volume of massive and layered pyroxenites whose formation has never comprehensively understood due to a particularly complex tectonothermal history (Ábalos et al., 2003). We use a detailed structural and geochemical approach to reveal a multi-stage metasomatic scenario unraveling the intricacy of magmatic and metamorphic features. Our new mapping of the Herbeira massif suggests that it consists of a single exposure of heterogeneous mantle cross-cut by different generations of mafic veins, outlining a potential metasomatic conduit developed in a subduction zone. The recognition of an overprinting sheath-fold deformation confirms that the whole massif has been deformed in a deep-subduction setting. However, thickness variations in pyroxenites may not only result from various degrees of shear deformation as previously suggested (Girardeau and Gil Ibarguchi, 1991), thus more than a single magmatic event potentially occurred. Structural and textural observations are consistent with the massive pyroxenites intruding the package of harzburgite and layered pyroxenites prior to its intrusion into the subduction zone. The massive pyroxenites display homogeneous enrichments of light rare earth elements (LREE) whereas layered pyroxenites are variously enriched, resulting in spoon-shaped to strongly LREE-fractionated patterns, characteristic of varying degrees of chromatographic re-equilibration. We suggest that an initial metasomatic episode occurred when the parental melt of the massive pyroxenites percolated through the massif, forming dunitic aureoles via additional melt extraction from harzburgites. After intrusion into the subduction zone, shear deformation was accompanied by fluid percolation controlled by inherited lithological heterogeneities and specifically the existence of dunitic channels, as evidenced

  12. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The general specifications for a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor Design Report (PAFBC) plant are presented. The design tasks for the PAFBC are described in the following areas: Coal/Limestone preparation and feed system; pulse combustor; fluidized bed; boiler parts; and ash handling system.

  13. LSP Composite Test Bed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Arthur C.; Griess, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides standalone information for the Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) Composite Substrate Test Bed Design. A six-sheet drawing set is reproduced for reference, as is some additional descriptive information on suitable sensors and use of the test bed.

  14. Scattering from elastic sea beds: first-order theory.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D R; Ivakin, A N

    1998-01-01

    A perturbation model for high-frequency sound scattering from an irregular elastic sea bed is considered. The sea bed is assumed homogeneous on the average and two kinds of irregularities are assumed to cause scattering: roughness of the water-sea bed interface and volume inhomogeneities of the sediment mass density and the speeds of compressional and shear waves. The first-order small perturbation approximation is used to obtain expressions for the scattering amplitude and bistatic scattering strength. The angular dependence of the scattering strength is calculated for sedimentary rock and the influence of shear elasticity is examined by comparison with the case of a fluid bottom. Shear effects are shown to be strong and complicated.

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  16. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  17. Reverse buoyancy in a vibrated granular bed: Computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Idler, Vladimir; Sánchez, Iván; Paredes, Ricardo; Botet, Robert

    2012-10-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of an intruder in a vibrated granular bed including interstitial fluid effects to account for the phenomenon of reverse buoyancy. We show that our model is able to reproduce the overall behaviour observed by previous experimental works and is the first finite-elements simulation to show the sinking of intruders lighter than the granular bed. To further advance our comprehension of this phenomenon, we studied the motion of the intruders in a single vibration cycle with respect to the bottom of the granular column, finding a substantial qualitative difference for heavy and light intruders and we compare these results with experiments using fine-sized glass beads. We show that, though heavy intruders seem unaffected by the force due to the fluid, the effect on light intruders is remarkable.

  18. Forces on stationary particles in near-bed turbulent flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmeeckle, M.W.; Nelson, J.M.; Shreve, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    In natural flows, bed sediment particles are entrained and moved by the fluctuating forces, such as lift and drag, exerted by the overlying flow on the particles. To develop a better understanding of these forces and the relation of the forces to the local flow, the downstream and vertical components of force on near-bed fixed particles and of fluid velocity above or in front of them were measured synchronously at turbulence-resolving frequencies (200 or 500 Hz) in a laboratory flume. Measurements were made for a spherical test particle fixed at various heights above a smooth bed, above a smooth bed downstream of a downstream-facing step, and in a gravel bed of similarly sized particles as well as for a cubical test particle and 7 natural particles above a smooth bed. Horizontal force was well correlated with downstream velocity and not correlated with vertical velocity or vertical momentum flux. The standard drag formula worked well to predict the horizontal force, but the required value of the drag coefficient was significantly higher than generally used to model bed load motion. For the spheres, cubes, and natural particles, average drag coefficients were found to be 0.76, 1.36, and 0.91, respectively. For comparison, the drag coefficient for a sphere settling in still water at similar particle Reynolds numbers is only about 0.4. The variability of the horizontal force relative to its mean was strongly increased by the presence of the step and the gravel bed. Peak deviations were about 30% of the mean force for the sphere over the smooth bed, about twice the mean with the step, and 4 times it for the sphere protruding roughly half its diameter above the gravel bed. Vertical force correlated poorly with downstream velocity, vertical velocity, and vertical momentum flux whether measured over or ahead of the test particle. Typical formulas for shear-induced lift based on Bernoulli's principle poorly predict the vertical forces on near-bed particles. The

  19. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  20. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby is born), or gestational diabetes . Too little amniotic fluid is known as oligohydramnios. This condition may occur with late pregnancies, ruptured membranes, placental dysfunction , or fetal abnormalities. Abnormal amounts of ...

  1. Drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-01-10

    Polyethylene glycols in combination with at least one water-dispersible polymeric viscosifier comprising cellulose ethers, cellulose sulfate esters, polyacrylamides, guar gum, or heteropolysaccharides improve the water loss properties of water-based drilling fluids, particularly in hard brine environments.

  2. Amniotic Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heather C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Morrow, Ardythe L.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to review the use of high-dimensional biology techniques, specifically transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, in amniotic fluid to elucidate the mechanisms behind preterm birth or assessment of fetal development. We performed a comprehensive MEDLINE literature search on the use of transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic technologies for amniotic fluid analysis. All abstracts were reviewed for pertinence to preterm birth or fetal maturation in human subjects. Nineteen articles qualified for inclusion. Most articles described the discovery of biomarker candidates, but few larger, multicenter replication or validation studies have been done. We conclude that the use of high-dimensional systems biology techniques to analyze amniotic fluid has significant potential to elucidate the mechanisms of preterm birth and fetal maturation. However, further multicenter collaborative efforts are needed to replicate and validate candidate biomarkers before they can become useful tools for clinical practice. Ideally, amniotic fluid biomarkers should be translated to a noninvasive test performed in maternal serum or urine. PMID:23599373

  3. MULTIFLUID EULERIAN MODELLING OF DENSE GAS-SOLID FLUIDIZED BED HYDRODYNAMICS: INFLUENCE OF THE DISSIPATION PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Reuge, N; Cadoret, L.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; Coufort, C; Caussat, B

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models must be thoroughly validated before they can be used with confidence for designing fluidized bed reactors. In this study, validation data were collected from a fluidized bed of (Geldart's group B) alumina particles operated at different gas velocities involving two fluidization hydrodynamic regimes (bubbling and slugging). The bed expansion, height of bed fluctuations, and frequency of fluctuations were measured from a videos of the fluidized bed. The Eulerian-Eulerian two fluid model MFIX was then used to simulate the experiments. Two different models for the particle stresses - Schaeffer (Syamlal et al., (1993), Schaeffer (1987)) and Princeton (Srivastava and Sundaresan (2003)) models - and different values of the restitution coefficient and internal angle of friction were evaluated. 3-D simulations are required for getting quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data. The results from the Princeton model are in better agreement with data than from the Schaeffer model. Both free-slip and Johnson-Jackson boundary conditions give nearly identical results. An increase in e from 0.8 to 1 leads to larger bed expansions and lower heights of fluctuations in the bubbling regime whereas it leads to unchanged bed expansion and to a massive reduction in the height of fluctuations in the slugging regime. The angle of internal friction (φ) in the range 10 -40 does not affect the bed expansion, but its reduction significantly reduces the height of fluctuations.

  4. Capillary movement of liquid in granular beds in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yendler, B. S.; Webbon, B.; Podolski, I.; Bula, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for the development of an effective water and nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants in space. An experiment was conducted on the Mir Space Station that used an experimental cuvette called "Capillary Test Bed" to compare fluid migration under terrestrial laboratory conditions by positioning the cuvette such that the hydrostatic force is negated and on Mir under microgravity conditions. Differences in fluid migration in the cuvette were observed with migration being slower in microgravity compared with some ground control experiments.

  5. Capillary movement of liquid in granular beds in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Yendler, B S; Webbon, B; Podolski, I; Bula, R J

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for the development of an effective water and nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants in space. An experiment was conducted on the Mir Space Station that used an experimental cuvette called "Capillary Test Bed" to compare fluid migration under terrestrial laboratory conditions by positioning the cuvette such that the hydrostatic force is negated and on Mir under microgravity conditions. Differences in fluid migration in the cuvette were observed with migration being slower in microgravity compared with some ground control experiments. PMID:11538803

  6. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  7. Conceptual design and assessment of a pressurized circulating fluidized-bed boiler. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.T.; Payne, H.M.; Wechsler, A.T.; Saunders, W.H.; Berman, P.A.; Dille, J.C.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents a technical feasibility study of a turbocharged boiler employing a Lurgi circulating fluid bed combustion system operating at 10 atmospheres pressure. The study is based on a 250 MW(e) plant firing a high sulfur Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The basic design objective was to develop a plant with components that can be shop-assembled and transported to the plant site by barge on the nation's inland waterways. The study was jointly undertaken by Combustion Engineering, Inc., Lurgi Corporation, and Westinghouse Electric Corporation and included development of design parameters, a conceptual design and general arrangement, a control philosophy, and identification of areas where further development is needed. The methods utilized to determine the feasibility of the pressurized circulating fluid bed system and to develop system concepts were based on Lurgi's extensive experience in atmospheric circulating fluid bed technology. The system consists of the same components as used in an atmospheric circulating fluid bed system, but designed for operation at 10 atmospheres. The principal conclusions of the study are that the concept of burning coal in a circulating fluid bed can be applied to a system operating at 10 atmospheres, that shop fabrication can be maximized, and the system components can be barge shipped. The conclusions also indicate that this concept is a viable method for providing incremental steam generating capacity either in existing plants or in first generation steam plants.

  8. The effect of bed defects on bedform generation - A new approach using the SPH simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Podszun, Lina; Huhn, Katrin

    2014-05-01

    Various researchers investigated the initiation of bed forms from a flat sediment bed in aquatic environments using analogue techniques, such as wave tanks or in situ field investigations. Nevertheless, this process particularly the role of major controlling factors is still not fully understood. Prior work has highlighted that the existence of bed defects has the potential to influence the erosion pattern at the surface of sediment beds. In such cases, artificial defects were manufactured in a flat bed and tested under various flow speeds, which resulted in the generation of various bed forms. As bed defects impinge on the in the interior of sediment beds, their effects on fluid flow conditions are difficult to quantify with analogue techniques. To investigate the fluid flow conditions occurring at the direct vicinity and in the interior of a sediment bed, a new 3D-SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) numerical 'wave tank', as an alternative to the difficult task of in situ measurement, was used. The model geometry was chosen to mimic typical wave tank dimensions, i.e., X = 2.5 m, Y = 0.35 m, Z = 0.8 m. In order to generate a sediment bed 0.2 m in height, each grain (D50 = 4000 µm) was generated as a fixed particle. Afterwards, the numerical wave tank was flooded with fluid particles. A wave was generated using a vertical paddle accelerated to 0.8 m/s perpendicular to the bed. Six sets of experiments were undertaken with an increasing depth range of bed defects (0.04 - 0.2 m). High resolution flow conditions inside the bed defects as a function of the wave activity were constantly monitored. For estimation of sediment erosion, all measured flow speeds were compared to the Yalin (1972) curve describing transport initiation. The results showed that the fluid velocities in the bed defect increased with increasing bed defect size depth, which was accompanied by an increase of the flow velocities into the pore spaces along the flanks of the defect. With increasing wave

  9. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  10. Gasification of Biomass in Fluidised Bed: Review of Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Barea, A.; Leckner, B.

    Modelling of biomass gasification in bubbling and circulating fluidised bed (FB) is reviewed. The focus is on comprehensive fluidisation models, where semi-empirical correlations are employed to simplify the fluid-dynamics of the FB. The conversion of single fuel particles, char and gas reaction kinetics are dealt with, outlining the key phenomena that should be included in gasification models. An assessment of published models is presented and the need of further investigation is identified.

  11. Pulling a patient up in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Moving a patient in bed ... You must move or pull someone up in bed the right way to avoid injuring the patient's ... people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can scrape or tear the ...

  12. Enhanced Productivity of Chemical Processes Using Dense Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Sibashis Banerjee; Alvin Chen; Rutton Patel; Dale Snider; Ken Williams; Timothy O'Hern; Paul Tortora

    2008-02-29

    The work detailed in this report addresses Enabling Technologies within Computational Technology by integrating a “breakthrough” particle-fluid computational technology into traditional Process Science and Engineering Technology. The work completed under this DOE project addresses five major development areas 1) gas chemistry in dense fluidized beds 2) thermal cracking of liquid film on solids producing gas products 3) liquid injection in a fluidized bed with particle-to-particle liquid film transport 4) solid-gas chemistry and 5) first level validation of models. Because of the nature of the research using tightly coupled solids and fluid phases with a Lagrangian description of the solids and continuum description of fluid, the work provides ground-breaking advances in reactor prediction capability. This capability has been tested against experimental data where available. The commercial product arising out of this work is called Barracuda and is suitable for a wide (dense-to-dilute) range of industrial scale gas-solid flows with and without reactions. Commercial applications include dense gas-solid beds, gasifiers, riser reactors and cyclones.

  13. Numerical simulation of particle bed scour by vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Dan; Dubief, Yves; Dewoolkar, Mandar

    2014-11-01

    The repeated impacts of a vortex dipole on a particle bed are simulated using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) code. The resulting scour characteristics and flow dynamics are investigated as a function of the Shields number. The fluid phase is treated as a continuum and the discretized Navier-Stokes equations are solved down to the smallest scales of the flow, on an Eulerian grid. The particles comprising the bed are represented by the Discrete Particle Model (DPM), whereby each individual particle is tracked in a Lagrangian framework. Particle-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere model. The fluid phase and the solid phase are coupled through a forcing term in the fluid conservation of momentum equation, and a drag force in the particle equation of motion, governed by Newton's Second Law. Above the critical Shields number, the scour hole topography is not fundamentally altered with subsequent impacts until the scale of the scour hole reaches a critical value. At which point, the shape and scale of the scour hole significantly alters the behavior of the vortex dipole and results in strongly asymmetric scour topographies. The two-way coupling between the bed scour and the vortex dipole dynamics are analyzed. Support from UVM Transportation Research Center and NSF CBET-0967224.

  14. Particle pressures in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Hu, X.; Jin, C.; Potapov, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This is an experimental project to make detailed measurements of the particle pressures generated in fluidized beds. The focus lies in two principle areas: (1) the particle pressure distribution around single bubbles rising in a two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed and (2) the particle pressures measured in liquid-fluidized beds. This first year has largely been to constructing the experiments The design of the particle pressure probe has been improved and tested. A two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed has been constructed in order to measure the particle pressure generated around injected bubbles. The probe is also being adapted to work in a liquid fluidized bed. Finally, a two-dimensional liquid fluidized bed is also under construction. Preliminary measurements show that the majority of the particle pressures are generated in the wake of a bubble. However, the particle pressures generated in the liquid bed appear to be extremely small. Finally, while not directly associated with the particle pressure studies, some NERSC supercomputer time was granted alongside this project. This is being used to make large scale computer simulation of the flow of granular materials in hoppers.

  15. Rock bed thermal storage: Concepts and costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kenneth; von Backström, Theodor; Joubert, Eugene; Gauché, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Thermal storage enables concentrating solar power (CSP) plants to provide baseload or dispatchable power. Currently CSP plants use two-tank molten salt thermal storage, with estimated capital costs of about 22-30 /kWhth. In the interests of reducing CSP costs, alternative storage concepts have been proposed. In particular, packed rock beds with air as the heat transfer fluid offer the potential of lower cost storage because of the low cost and abundance of rock. Two rock bed storage concepts which have been formulated for use at temperatures up to at least 600 °C are presented and a brief analysis and cost estimate is given. The cost estimate shows that both concepts are capable of capital costs less than 15 /kWhth at scales larger than 1000 MWhth. Depending on the design and the costs of scaling containment, capital costs as low as 5-8 /kWhth may be possible. These costs are between a half and a third of current molten salt costs.

  16. Biofilm detachment mechanisms in a liquid-fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Chang, H T; Rittmann, B E; Amar, D; Heim, R; Ehlinger, O; Lesty, Y

    1991-08-20

    Bed fluidization offers the possibility of gaining the advantages of fixed-film biological processes without the disadvantage of pore clogging. However, the biofilm detachment rate, due to hydrodynamics and particle-to-particle attrition, is very poorly understood for fluidized-bed biofilm processes. In this work, a two-phase fluidized-bed biofilm was operated under a constant surface loading (0.09 mg total organic carbon/cm(2) day) and with a range of bed height (H), fluid velocities (U), and support-particle concentrations (C(p)). Direct measurements were made for the specific biofilm loss rate coefficient (b(s))and the total biofilm accumulation (X(f)L(f)). A hydrodynamic model allowed independent determination of the biofilm density (X(f)), biofilm thickness (L(f)), liquid shear stress (tau), and Reynolds number (Re). Multiple regression analysis of the results showed that increased particle-to-particle attrition, proportional to C(p) and increased turbulence, described by Re, caused the biofilms to be denser and thinner. The specific detachment rate coefficient (b(s)) increased as C(p) and Re increased. Almost all of the 6, values were larger than predicted by a previous model derived for smooth biofilms on a nonfluidized surface. Therefore, the turbulence and attrition of bed fluidization appear to be dominant detachment mechanisms.

  17. Performance comparison of suspended bed and batch contactor chromatography.

    PubMed

    Quiñones-García, I; Rayner, I; Levison, P R; Dickson, N; Purdom, G

    2001-01-26

    In some applications, the purification and recovery of biomolecules is performed via a cascade of batch adsorption and desorption stages using agitated contactors and related filtration devices. Suspended bed chromatography is a recent process-scale innovation that is applicable to these separations. This hybrid technique exploits the benefits of combining batch adsorption in an agitated contactor with elution in an enclosed column system. To some extent, the process is similar to batch contactor chromatography but can be fully contained and significantly quicker. The process has two steps; first the fluid containing the sample is mixed with the adsorbent in a stirred tank. Second, the slurry suspension is transferred directly into a specialized column, such as an IsoPak column. The media with the adsorbed product is formed as a packed bed, whilst the suspension liquid is passed out of the column. The product is then eluted from the packed bed utilizing standard column-chromatography techniques. The performance of the suspended bed and the agitated contactor operations are demonstrated both by full-scale experimental results and process simulations. The purification of ovalbumin from a hen-egg white feedstock by anion-exchange chromatography was used as a case study in order to prove the concept. With the availability of both pump-packed systems and shear-resistant media, suspended bed chromatography is a better alternative for a range of applications than the traditional batch separations using agitated contactors. PMID:11218119

  18. Feasibility Study of a Lunar Analog Bed Rest Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Platts, Steven H.; Yarbough, Patrice; Buccello-Stout, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a 9.5deg head-up tilt bed rest model to simulate the effects of the 1/6 g load to the human body that exists on the lunar surface. The lunar analog bed rest model utilized a modified hospital bed. The modifications included mounting the mattress on a sled that rolled on bearings to provide freedom of movement. The weight of the sled was off-loaded using a counterweight system to insure that 1/6 body weight was applied along the long axis (z-axis) of the body. Force was verified through use of a force plate mounted at the foot of the bed. A seating assembly was added to the bed to permit periods of sitting. Subjects alternated between standing and sitting positions throughout the day. A total of 35% of the day was spent in the standing position and 65% was spent sitting. In an effort to achieve physiologic fluid shifts expected for a 1/6 G environment, subjects wore compression stockings and performed unloaded foot and ankle exercises. Eight subjects (3 females and 5 males) participated in this study. Subjects spent 13 days in the pre-bed rest phase, 6 days in bed rest and 3 days post bed rest. Subjects consumed a standardized diet throughout the study. To determine feasibility, measures of subject comfort, force and plasma volume were collected. Subject comfort was assessed using a Likert scale. Subjects were asked to assess level of comfort (0-100) for 11 body regions and provide an overall rating. Results indicated minimal to no discomfort as most subjects reported scores of zero. Force measures were performed for each standing position and were validated against subject s calculated 1/6 body weight (r(sup 2) = 0.993). The carbon monoxide rebreathing technique was used to assess plasma volume during pre-bed rest and on the last day of bed rest. Plasma volume results indicated a significant decrease (p = 0.001) from pre to post bed rest values. Subjects lost on average 8.3% (sd = 6.1%) during the

  19. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  20. The Multi-Stage History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Dapremont, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5-km high central mound. We are investigating the history of alteration and erosion of Mt. Sharp using orbital imagery, spectroscopy and rover observations. Our results suggest a significant time gap between emplacement of the upper and lower sections of the mound. Crater counts show that the lower mound was formed soon after Gale itself, and that it contains distinct units ranging in altitude from approximately -4,500 to -1,800 m. Spectral data suggest that many units contain phyllosilicates. We found that these clay-bearing rocks occur in distinct layers concentrated below -2,900 m. Parts of the lower mound exhibit a transition from clays to sulfates with increasing altitude. The lower mound shows evidence of flowing water, including canyons and inverted channels. Wind erosion produced km-scale yardangs and scalloped cliffs. Our mapping shows that many yardangs in the lower mound are clay-bearing, with a predominant orientation of around N-S. Curiosity's ground-level images show myriad fine-scale, mainly horizontal layers in the lower mound. The rover has found stream beds and conglomerates, indicating that water once flowed on the crater floor. Drilling near the deepest point in Gale produced abundant clay, providing additional evidence of aqueous alteration. Upper mound units range in altitude from -2,100 m to +500 m, and mantle the lower mound above an angular unconformity. Most upper mound units are composed of layers. The formation age of the upper mound is unknown, since few craters are preserved. Clay-bearing layers are detectable in several locations, mainly at altitudes near -2,000 m. There is no evidence of water flow, but wind erosion has scalloped the surfaces and edges of layers, and fine-scale yardangs are common. Correlations between yardangs and clay spectra are apparent only in the lowermost units of the upper mound. Yardang orientations vary, and include N-S, NW-SE, and NE

  1. The Multi-Stage History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C.; Dapremont, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5-km high central mound. We are investigating the history of alteration and erosion of Mt. Sharp using orbital imagery, spectroscopy and rover observations. Our results suggest a significant time gap between emplacement of the upper and lower sections of the mound. Crater counts show that the lower mound was formed soon after Gale itself, and that it contains distinct units ranging in altitude from approximately -4,500 to -1,800 m. Spectral data suggest that many units contain phyllosilicates. We found that these clay-bearing rocks occur in distinct layers concentrated below -2,900 m. Parts of the lower mound exhibit a transition from clays to sulfates with increasing altitude. The lower mound shows evidence of flowing water, including canyons and inverted channels. Wind erosion produced km-scale yardangs and scalloped cliffs. Our mapping shows that many yardangs in the lower mound are clay-bearing, with a predominant orientation of around N-S. Curiosity's ground-level images show myriad fine-scale, mainly horizontal layers in the lower mound. The rover has found stream beds and conglomerates, indicating that water once flowed on the crater floor. Drilling near the deepest point in Gale produced abundant clay, providing additional evidence of aqueous alteration. Upper mound units range in altitude from -2,100 m to +500 m, and mantle the lower mound above an angular unconformity. Most upper mound units are composed of layers. The formation age of the upper mound is unknown, since few craters are preserved. Clay-bearing layers are detectable in several locations, mainly at altitudes near -2,000 m. There is no evidence of water flow, but wind erosion has scalloped the surfaces and edges of layers, and fine-scale yardangs are common. Correlations between yardangs and clay spectra are apparent only in the lowermost units of the upper mound. Yardang orientations vary, and include N-S, NW-SE, and NE

  2. Efficient Multi-Stage Time Marching for Viscous Flows via Local Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Wood, William A.; vanLeer, Bram

    1999-01-01

    A new method has been developed to accelerate the convergence of explicit time-marching, laminar, Navier-Stokes codes through the combination of local preconditioning and multi-stage time marching optimization. Local preconditioning is a technique to modify the time-dependent equations so that all information moves or decays at nearly the same rate, thus relieving the stiffness for a system of equations. Multi-stage time marching can be optimized by modifying its coefficients to account for the presence of viscous terms, allowing larger time steps. We show it is possible to optimize the time marching scheme for a wide range of cell Reynolds numbers for the scalar advection-diffusion equation, and local preconditioning allows this optimization to be applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Convergence acceleration of the new method is demonstrated through numerical experiments with circular advection and laminar boundary-layer flow over a flat plate.

  3. General theory of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants. I. Kinetic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Kipriyanov, Alexey A.

    2014-05-14

    General matrix approach to the consideration of multistage geminate reactions of isolated pairs of reactants depending on reactant mobility is formulated on the basis of the concept of “effective” particles. Various elementary reactions (stages of multistage reaction including physicochemical processes of internal quantum state changes) proceeding with the participation of isolated pairs of reactants (or isolated reactants) are taken into account. Investigation has been made in terms of kinetic approach implying the derivation of general (matrix) kinetic equations for local and mean probabilities of finding any of the reaction species in the sample under study (or for local and mean concentrations). The recipes for the calculation of kinetic coefficients of the equations for mean quantities in terms of relative coordinates of reactants have been formulated in the general case of inhomogeneous reacting systems. Important specific case of homogeneous reacting systems is considered.

  4. [Effects of multi-stage strengthening inoculation on bacterial community diversity during composting].

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiu-Ling; Li, Ming-Xiao; Xi, Bei-Dou; Wei, Zi-Min; Liu, Chi; Xia, Xun-Feng; Yang, Tian-Xue; Li, Ye

    2011-09-01

    Effects of multi-stage strengthening inoculation on bacterial community diversity were analyzed using PCR-DGGE method in municipal solid waste composting combined with Cluster analysis and changes of Shannon-Weaver index, and the changes of lignocellulose's degradation rate were also detected during the process. The results showed that Multi-stage inoculation of composting can improve the temperature of cooling and the secondary fermentation period. And the hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin degradation rate increased by 7.19%, 10.89% and 8.98% compared to general inoculation composting. The analysis of bacterial community diversity indicated that the diversity index of the two inoculation showed significant differences, the microbial inoculation could live well in the pile. It could avoid competition between different inoculated agents and competition between inoculated and indigenous microorganisms, and could improve bacterial community diversity during composting especially for maturity stage. It could speed up the composting process of stabilization.

  5. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  6. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Stephen L; Orton, Christopher J; Lilly, David G; Russell, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard 'A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia' that defines and promotes 'best practice' in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in 'best practice' while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia.

  7. Flight Analogs (Bed Rest Research)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flight Analogs / Bed Rest Research Projects provide NASA with a ground based research platform to complement space research. By mimicking the conditions of weightlessness in the human body here on ...

  8. Bed Bugs: The Australian Response

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, Stephen L.; Orton, Christopher J.; Lilly, David G.; Russell, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Australia has experienced a sudden and unexpected resurgence in bed bug infestations from both Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus F. A survey in 2006 revealed that infestations had increased across the nation by an average of 4,500% since the start of the decade. In response, a multi-disciplinary approach to combat the rise of this public health pest was implemented and involved the coordinated efforts of several organizations. The key components of the strategy included the introduction of a pest management standard ‘A Code of Practice for the Control of Bed Bug Infestations in Australia’ that defines and promotes ‘best practice’ in bed bug eradication, the development of a policy and procedural guide for accommodation providers, education of stakeholders in best management practices, and research. These strategies continue to evolve with developments that lead to improvements in ‘best practice’ while bed bugs remain problematic in Australia. PMID:26467616

  9. A Comparison of Tandem Walk Performance Between Bed Rest Subjects and Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Kofman, Igor; Philips, Tiffany; Batson, Crystal; Cerisano, Jody; Fisher, Elizabeth; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Feiveson, Alan; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience a microgravity environment during spaceflight, which results in a central reinterpretation of both vestibular and body axial-loading information by the sensorimotor system. Subjects in bed rest studies lie at 6deg head-down in strict bed rest to simulate the fluid shift and gravity-unloading of the microgravity environment. However, bed rest subjects still sense gravity in the vestibular organs. Therefore, bed rest isolates the axial-unloading component, thus allowing for the direct study of its effects. The Tandem Walk is a standard sensorimotor test of dynamic postural stability. In a previous abstract, we compared performance on a Tandem Walk test between bed rest control subjects, and short- and long-duration astronauts both before and after flight/bed rest using a composite index of performance, called the Tandem Walk Parameter (TWP), that takes into account speed, accuracy, and balance control. This new study extends the previous data set to include bed rest subjects who performed exercise countermeasures. The purpose of this study was to compare performance during the Tandem Walk test between bed rest subjects (with and without exercise), short-duration (Space Shuttle) crewmembers, and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers at various time points during their recovery from bed rest or spaceflight.

  10. Study of the combustion of low rank coal in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, R.; Grimes, R.W.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the results of preliminary combustion tests performed with Eagle Butte Coal in a bubbling, fluidized-bed combustion system. The system was designed for the combustion of low-rank coals and industrial wastes. The work, as proposed, was aimed at not only the evaluation of co-firing of waste material with coal, but also at developing modifications to first generation bubbling bed designs to improve the combustion performance during co-firing. However, the funding for the work was redirected and the combustion tests were suspended soon after the shakedown testing was completed. Consequently, this report describes the results of the tests completed prior to the redirection of the effort and funding. A total of 33 combustion tests were performed in a 6-inch diameter fluidized-bed combustor. Oxygen concentrations were measured at two points in the system; the vent line and at the interface between the fluid bed and the freeboard. These measurements provided a measure of the amount of conversion of coal within the fluidized bed compared to the conversion in the freeboard region. Typically, 75 to 80% of the conversion occurred within the bed. Several experiments were performed in which special bed internals were placed in the bed. The internals were designed to reduce bubble size in the bed thus increasing the surface area of the bubbles and hence promoting oxygen diffusion into the emulsion phase.

  11. Three-Dimensional Aerodynamic Instabilities In Multi-Stage Axial Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Gong, Yifang; Suder, Kenneth L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents the conceptualization and development of a computational model for describing three-dimensional non-linear disturbances associated with instability and inlet distortion in multistage compressors. Specifically, the model is aimed at simulating the non-linear aspects of short wavelength stall inception, part span stall cells, and compressor response to three-dimensional inlet distortions. The computed results demonstrated the first-of-a-kind capability for simulating short wavelength stall inception in multistage compressors. The adequacy of the model is demonstrated by its application to reproduce the following phenomena: (1) response of a compressor to a square-wave total pressure inlet distortion; (2) behavior of long wavelength small amplitude disturbances in compressors; (3) short wavelength stall inception in a multistage compressor and the occurrence of rotating stall inception on the negatively sloped portion of the compressor characteristic; (4) progressive stalling behavior in the first stage in a mismatched multistage compressor; (5) change of stall inception type (from modal to spike and vice versa) due to IGV stagger angle variation, and "unique rotor tip incidence" at these points where the compressor stalls through short wavelength disturbances. The model has been applied to determine the parametric dependence of instability inception behavior in terms of amplitude and spatial distribution of initial disturbance, and intra-blade-row gaps. It is found that reducing the inter-blade row gaps suppresses the growth of short wavelength disturbances. It is also concluded from these parametric investigations that each local component group (rotor and its two adjacent stators) has its own instability point (i.e. conditions at which disturbances are sustained) for short wavelength disturbances, with the instability point for the compressor set by the most unstable component group. For completeness, the methodology has been extended to

  12. A Simulated Annealing Algorithm for the Optimization of Multistage Depressed Collector Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaden, Karl R.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Bulson, Brian A.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave traveling wave tube amplifier (TWTA) is widely used as a high-power transmitting source for space and airborne communications. One critical factor in designing a TWTA is the overall efficiency. However, overall efficiency is highly dependent upon collector efficiency; so collector design is critical to the performance of a TWTA. Therefore, NASA Glenn Research Center has developed an optimization algorithm based on Simulated Annealing to quickly design highly efficient multi-stage depressed collectors (MDC).

  13. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  14. Multistage processing for automatic minefield detection using low-frequency SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Sandra C.; Ayasli, Serpil; Grosch, Theodore O.

    1995-06-01

    An automatic, multistage algorithm for detecting minefields is introduced. This algorithm was tested, with encouraging results, against buried metal mines. The measurement data for this test were obtained using a low-frequency airborne SAR, collected during an extensive ground penetration experiment in Yuma, Arizona, in June 1993. Although verified using SAR data, the automatic minefield detection technique may prove applicable to other remote sensors as well.

  15. A multistage differential transformation method for approximate solution of Hantavirus infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökdoğan, Ahmet; Merdan, Mehmet; Yildirim, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is presented a reliable algorithm based on the standard differential transformation method (DTM), which is called the multi-stage differential transformation method (MsDTM) for solving Hantavirus infection model. The results obtanied by using MsDTM are compared to those obtained by using the Runge-Kutta method (R-K-method). The proposed technique is a hopeful tool to solving for a long time intervals in this kind of systems.

  16. Long Duration Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest Studies: Safety Considerations Regarding Vision Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Taibbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Visual symptoms reported in astronauts returning from long duration missions in low Earth orbit, including hyperopic shift, choroidal folds, globe flattening and papilledema, are thought to be related to fluid shifts within the body due to microgravity exposure. Because of this possible relation to fluid shifts, safety considerations have been raised regarding the ocular health of head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest subjects. HDT is a widely used ground ]based analog that simulates physiological changes of spaceflight, including fluid shifts. Thus, vision monitoring has been performed in bed rest subjects in order to evaluate the safety of HDT with respect to vision health. Here we report ocular outcomes in 9 healthy subjects (age range: 27-48 years; Male/Female ratio: 8/1) completing bed rest Campaign 11, an integrated, multidisciplinary 70-day 6 degrees HDT bed rest study. Vision examinations were performed on a weekly basis, and consisted of office-based (2 pre- and 2 post-bed rest) and in-bed testing. The experimental design was a repeated measures design, with measurements for both eyes taken for each subject at each planned time point. Findings for the following tests were all reported as normal in each testing session for every subject: modified Amsler grid, red dot test, confrontational visual fields, color vision and fundus photography. Overall, no statistically significant differences were observed for any of the measures, except for both near and far visual acuity, which increased during the course of the study. This difference is not considered clinically relevant as may result from the effect of learning. Intraocular pressure results suggest a small increase at the beginning of the bed rest phase (p=0.059) and lesser increase at post-bed rest with respect to baseline (p=0.046). These preliminary results provide the basis for further analyses that will include correlations between intraocular pressure change pre- and post-bed rest, and optical coherence

  17. Operating characteristics of rotating beds

    SciTech Connect

    Keyvani, M.; Gardner, N.C.

    1988-01-01

    Vapor-liquid contacting in high gravitational fields offers prospects for significant reductions in the physical size, capital, and operating costs of packed towers. Pressure drops, power requirements, mass transfer coefficients and liquid residence time distributions are reported for a rotating bed separator. The beds studied were rigid, foamed aluminum, with specific surface areas ranging from 650 to 3000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 2}. Gravitational fields were varied from 50 to 300g.

  18. MULTI-STAGE DELIVERY NANO-PARTICLE SYSTEMS FOR THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Serda, Rita E.; Godin, Biana; Blanco, Elvin; Chiappini, Ciro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Background The daunting task for drug molecules to reach pathological lesions has fueled rapid advances in Nanomedicine. The progressive evolution of nanovectors has led to the development of multi-stage delivery systems aimed at overcoming the numerous obstacles encountered by nanovectors on their journey to the target site. Scope of Review This review summarizes major findings with respect to silicon-based drug delivery vectors for cancer therapeutics and imaging. Based on rational design, well established silicon technologies have been adapted for the fabrication of nanovectors with specific shapes, sizes, and porosities. These vectors are part of a multi-stage delivery system that contains multiple nano-components, each designed to achieve a specific task with the common goal of site-directed delivery of therapeutics. Major Conclusions Quasi-hemispherical and discoidal silicon microparticles are superior to spherical particles with respect to margination in the blood, with particles of different shapes and sizes having unique distributions in vivo. Cellular adhesion and internalization of silicon microparticles is influenced by microparticle shape and surface charge, with the latter dictating binding of serum opsonins. Based on in vitro cell studies, the internalization of porous silicon microparticles by endothelial cells and macrophages is compatible with cellular morphology, intracellular trafficking, mitosis, cell cycle progression, cytokine release, and cell viability. In vivo studies support superior therapeutic efficacy of liposomal encapsulated siRNA when delivered in multi-stage systems compared to free nanoparticles. PMID:20493927

  19. Health condition identification of multi-stage planetary gearboxes using a mRVM-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yaguo; Liu, Zongyao; Wu, Xionghui; Li, Naipeng; Chen, Wu; Lin, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Multi-stage planetary gearboxes are widely applied in aerospace, automotive and heavy industries. Their key components, such as gears and bearings, can easily suffer from damage due to tough working environment. Health condition identification of planetary gearboxes aims to prevent accidents and save costs. This paper proposes a method based on multiclass relevance vector machine (mRVM) to identify health condition of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. In this method, a mRVM algorithm is adopted as a classifier, and two features, i.e. accumulative amplitudes of carrier orders (AACO) and energy ratio based on difference spectra (ERDS), are used as the input of the classifier to classify different health conditions of multi-stage planetary gearboxes. To test the proposed method, seven health conditions of a two-stage planetary gearbox are considered and vibration data is acquired from the planetary gearbox under different motor speeds and loading conditions. The results of three tests based on different data show that the proposed method obtains an improved identification performance and robustness compared with the existing method.

  20. Aerodynamic Analysis of Multistage Turbomachinery Flows in Support of Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of 3D CFD based models of the time average flow field within axial flow multistage turbomachines. Emphasis is placed on models which are compatible with the industrial design environment and those models which offer the potential of providing credible results at both design and off-design operating conditions. The need to develop models which are free of aerodynamic input from semi-empirical design systems is stressed. The accuracy of such models is shown to be dependent upon their ability to account for the unsteady flow environment in multistage turbomachinery. The relevant flow physics associated with some of the unsteady flow processes present in axial flow multistage machinery are presented along with procedures which can be used to account for them in 3D CFD simulations. Sample results are presented for both axial flow compressors and axial flow turbines which help to illustrate the enhanced predictive capabilities afforded by including these procedures in 3D CFD simulations. Finally, suggestions are given for future work on the development of time average flow models.

  1. Multistage slow relaxation in a Hamiltonian system: The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Hironori J.; Konishi, Tetsuro

    2015-08-01

    The relaxation process toward equipartition of energy among normal modes in a Hamiltonian system with many degrees of freedom, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) model is investigated numerically. We introduce a general indicator of relaxation σ which denotes the distance from equipartition state. In the time evolution of σ , some long-time interferences with relaxation, named "plateaus," are observed. In order to examine the details of the plateaus, relaxation time of σ and excitation time for each normal mode are measured as a function of the energy density ɛ0=E0/N . As a result, multistage relaxation is detected in the finite-size system. Moreover, by an analysis of the Lyapunov spectrum, the spectrum of mode energy occupancy, and the power spectrum of mode energy, we characterize the multistage slow relaxation, and some dynamical phases are extracted: quasiperiodic motion, stagnant motion (escaping from quasiperiodic motion), local chaos, and stronger chaos with nonthermal noise. We emphasize that the plateaus are robust against the arranging microscopic state. In other words, we can often observe plateaus and multistage slow relaxation in the FPU phase space. Slow relaxation is expected to remain or vanish in the thermodynamic limit depending on indicators.

  2. Multistage slow relaxation in a Hamiltonian system: The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Hironori J; Konishi, Tetsuro

    2015-08-01

    The relaxation process toward equipartition of energy among normal modes in a Hamiltonian system with many degrees of freedom, the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) model is investigated numerically. We introduce a general indicator of relaxation σ which denotes the distance from equipartition state. In the time evolution of σ, some long-time interferences with relaxation, named "plateaus," are observed. In order to examine the details of the plateaus, relaxation time of σ and excitation time for each normal mode are measured as a function of the energy density ε0=E0/N. As a result, multistage relaxation is detected in the finite-size system. Moreover, by an analysis of the Lyapunov spectrum, the spectrum of mode energy occupancy, and the power spectrum of mode energy, we characterize the multistage slow relaxation, and some dynamical phases are extracted: quasiperiodic motion, stagnant motion (escaping from quasiperiodic motion), local chaos, and stronger chaos with nonthermal noise. We emphasize that the plateaus are robust against the arranging microscopic state. In other words, we can often observe plateaus and multistage slow relaxation in the FPU phase space. Slow relaxation is expected to remain or vanish in the thermodynamic limit depending on indicators. PMID:26382486

  3. Inexact multistage stochastic integer programming for water resources management under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Li, Y P; Huang, G H; Nie, S L; Liu, L

    2008-07-01

    In this study, an inexact multistage stochastic integer programming (IMSIP) method is developed for water resources management under uncertainty. This method incorporates techniques of inexact optimization and multistage stochastic programming within an integer programming framework. It can deal with uncertainties expressed as both probabilities and discrete intervals, and reflect the dynamics in terms of decisions for water allocation through transactions at discrete points of a complete scenario set over a multistage context. Moreover, the IMSIP can facilitate analyses of the multiple policy scenarios that are associated with economic penalties when the promised targets are violated as well as the economies-of-scale in the costs for surplus water diversion. A case study is provided for demonstrating the applicability of the developed methodology. The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated for both binary and continuous variables. For all scenarios under consideration, corrective actions can be undertaken dynamically under various pre-regulated policies and can thus help minimize the penalties and costs. The IMSIP can help water resources managers to identify desired system designs against water shortage and for flood control with maximized economic benefit and minimized system-failure risk. PMID:17532113

  4. Efficient design and inference for multistage randomized trials of individualized treatment policies.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ree; Lavori, Philip W

    2012-01-01

    Clinical demand for individualized "adaptive" treatment policies in diverse fields has spawned development of clinical trial methodology for their experimental evaluation via multistage designs, building upon methods intended for the analysis of naturalistically observed strategies. Because often there is no need to parametrically smooth multistage trial data (in contrast to observational data for adaptive strategies), it is possible to establish direct connections among different methodological approaches. We show by algebraic proof that the maximum likelihood (ML) and optimal semiparametric (SP) estimators of the population mean of the outcome of a treatment policy and its standard error are equal under certain experimental conditions. This result is used to develop a unified and efficient approach to design and inference for multistage trials of policies that adapt treatment according to discrete responses. We derive a sample size formula expressed in terms of a parametric version of the optimal SP population variance. Nonparametric (sample-based) ML estimation performed well in simulation studies, in terms of achieved power, for scenarios most likely to occur in real studies, even though sample sizes were based on the parametric formula. ML outperformed the SP estimator; differences in achieved power predominately reflected differences in their estimates of the population mean (rather than estimated standard errors). Neither methodology could mitigate the potential for overestimated sample sizes when strong nonlinearity was purposely simulated for certain discrete outcomes; however, such departures from linearity may not be an issue for many clinical contexts that make evaluation of competitive treatment policies meaningful. PMID:21765180

  5. Bed-exit alarm effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Capezuti, Elizabeth; Brush, Barbara L.; Lane, Stephen; Rabinowitz, Hannah U.; Secic, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the accuracy of two types of bed-exit alarms to detect bed-exiting body movements: pressure-sensitive and a pressure sensitive combined with infrared beam detectors (dual sensor system). We also evaluated the occurrence of nuisance alarms, or alarms that are activated when a participant does not attempt to get out of bed. Fourteen nursing home residents were directly observed for a total of 256 nights or 1,636.5 hours; an average of 18.3 ± 22.3 (± S.D.) nights/participant for an average of 6.4 ± 1.2 hours/night. After adjusting for body movements via repeated measures, Poisson regression modeling, the least squares adjusted means show a marginally significant difference between the type of alarm groups on the number of true positives (mean/S.E.M. = 0.086/1.617) for pressure-sensitive vs. dual sensor alarm (0.593/1.238; p = 0.0599) indicating that the dual sensor alarm may have a higher number of true positives. While the dual sensor bed-exit alarm was more accurate than the pressure sensitive alarm in identifying bed-exiting body movements and reducing the incidence of false alarms, false alarms were not eliminated altogether. Alarms are not a substitute for staff; adequate staff availability is still necessary when residents need or wish to exit bed. PMID:18508138

  6. Bed-exit alarm effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Capezuti, Elizabeth; Brush, Barbara L; Lane, Stephen; Rabinowitz, Hannah U; Secic, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the accuracy of two types of bed-exit alarms to detect bed-exiting body movements: pressure-sensitive and a pressure-sensitive combined with infrared (IR) beam detectors (dual sensor system). We also evaluated the occurrence of nuisance alarms, or alarms that are activated when a participant does not attempt to get out of bed. Fourteen nursing home residents were directly observed for a total of 256 nights or 1636.5h; an average of 18.3+/-22.3 (+/-S.D.) nights/participant for an average of 6.4+/-1.2 h/night. After adjusting for body movements via repeated measures, Poisson regression modeling, the least squares adjusted means (LSM) show a marginally significant difference between the type of alarm groups on the number of true positives (NTP) (mean/S.E.M.=0.086/1.617) for pressure-sensitive versus dual sensor alarm (0.593/1.238; p=0.0599) indicating that the dual sensor alarm may have a higher NTP. While the dual sensor bed-exit alarm was more accurate than the pressure-sensitive alarm in identifying bed-exiting body movements and reducing the incidence of false alarms, false alarms were not eliminated altogether. Alarms are not a substitute for staff; adequate staff availability is still necessary when residents need or wish to exit bed.

  7. Northern European Satellite Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster-Bruce, Alan; Lawson, James; Quinlan, Michael; McGregor, Andrew

    Satellite Based Augmentation Systems are being developed in Europe (EGNOS), the USA (WAAS), and in Japan (MSAS). As part of their support to EGNOS, NATS and Racal have developed and deployed a prototype SBAS system called the Northern European Satellite Test Bed (NEST Bed). NEST Bed uses GPS L1/L2 reference stations at: Aberdeen, Rotterdam, Ankara, Cadiz, Keflavik, and Bronnoysund. Data is sent to the Master Control Centre at NATS Gatwick Services Management Centre for processing. The resulting 250 bits-per-second message is sent to Goonhilly for up-linking by BT to the Navigation Payload of either the Inmarsat AOR-E or F5 spare satellite. NEST Bed was deployed and commissioned during summer 1998, and flight tests were successfully demonstrated at the September 1998 Farnborough Air Show where approaches were flown to Boscombe Down on the DERA BAC1-11 aircraft. In October 1998, a NATS/FAA flight trial was held in Iceland involving NEST Bed and the FAA NSTB. NEST Bed is also being used for SARPS validation.

  8. Lab-testing, predicting, and modeling multi-stage activated carbon adsorption of organic micro-pollutants from treated wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zietzschmann, F; Altmann, J; Hannemann, C; Jekel, M

    2015-10-15

    Multi-stage reuse of powdered activated carbon (PAC) is often applied in practice for a more efficient exploitation of the PAC capacity to remove organic micro-pollutants (OMP). However, the adsorption mechanisms in multi-stage PAC reuse are rarely investigated, as large-scale experiments do not allow for systematic tests. In this study, a laboratory method for the separation of PAC/water suspensions and the subsequent reuse of the PAC and the water was developed. The method was tested on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent in a setup with up to 7 PAC reuse stages. The tests show that the overall OMP removal from WWTP effluent can be increased when reusing PAC. The reason is that a repeated adsorption in multi-stage PAC reuse results in similar equilibrium concentrations as a single-stage adsorption. Thus, a single relationship between solid and liquid phase OMP concentrations appears valid throughout all stages. This also means that the adsorption efficiency of multi-stage PAC reuse setups can be estimated from the data of a single-stage setup. Furthermore, the overall OMP removals in multi-stage setups coincide with the overall UV254 removals, and for each respective OMP one relationship to UV254 removal is valid throughout all stages. The results were modeled by a simple modification of the equivalent background compound model (EBCM) which was also used to simulate the additional OMP removals in multi-stage setups with up to 50 reuse stages. PMID:26117373

  9. Comparison of Ocular Outcomes in Two 14-Day Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Zanello, S. B.; Yarbough, P. O.; Tabbi, G.; Vizzeri, G.

    2012-01-01

    Reports of astronauts' visual changes have raised concern about ocular health during long-duration spaceflight. Some of these findings include globe flattening with hyperopic shifts, choroidal folds, optic disc edema, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickening, and cotton wool spots. While the etiology remains unknown, it is hypothesized that, in predisposed individuals, hypertension in the brain may follow cephalad fluid shifts during spaceflight. This possible mechanism of ocular changes may also apply to analogous cases of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) or pseudotumor cerebri on Earth patients. Head-down t ilt (HDT) bed rest is a spaceflight analog that induces cephalad fluid shifts. Previous studies of the HDT position demonstrated body fluid shifts associated with changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) but the conditions of bed rest varied among experiments, making it difficult to compare data and draw conclusions. For these reasons, vision evaluation of bed rest subjects was implemented for NASA bed rest studies since 2010, in an attempt to monitor vision health in subjects subjected to bed rest. Vision monitoring is thus currently performed in all NASA-conducted bed rest campaigns

  10. Measurement of interstage fluid-annulus dynamical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Makay, E.; Diaz-Tous, I. A.

    1982-01-01

    The work described in this paper is part of an Electric Power Research Institute sponsored effort to improve rotor vibrational performance on power plant feed water pumps. A major objective of this effort is to reduce vibration levels by devising inter-stage sealing configurations with optimized damping capacity, realizing that the typical multi-stage centrifugal pump has several ore inter-stage fluid annuli than it has journal bearings. Also, the fluid annuli are distributed between the journal bearings where vibration levels are highest and can therefore be 'exercised' more as dampers than can the bearings. Described in this paper is a test apparatus which has been built to experimentally determine fluid-annulus dynamical coefficients for various configurations of inter-stage sealing geometry.

  11. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  12. Stabilizing Fluid-Fluid Displacements in Porous Media Through Wettability Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, Mathias; Szulczewski, Michael L.; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-05-01

    We study experimentally how wettability impacts fluid-fluid-displacement patterns in granular media. We inject a low-viscosity fluid (air) into a thin bed of glass beads initially saturated with a more-viscous fluid (a water-glycerol mixture). Chemical treatment of glass surfaces allows us to control the wetting properties of the medium and modify the contact angle θ from 5° (drainage) to 120° (imbibition). We demonstrate that wettability exerts a powerful influence on the invasion morphology of unfavorable mobility displacements: increasing θ stabilizes fluid invasion into the granular pack at all capillary numbers. In particular, we report the striking observation of a stable radial displacement at low capillary numbers, whose origin lies on the cooperative nature of fluid invasion at the pore scale.

  13. Some developments in the feeding of coal to fluidized bed combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    Research is being done in the development of fluid bed combustors for high sulphur coal, using limestone or dolomite in the bed for removal of the sulphur. Operating units to date have proven the inadequacies of available material handling techniques for introduction and control of the coal and adsorbent to the beds. Larger units now being contemplated will pose formidable problems in this area. Some of the techniques which were developed for the existing pilot units and novel ideas under consideration for future, large production units are illustrated and described.

  14. Exprimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency for large gas turbine engines. Under ERA, the highly loaded core compressor technology program attempts to realize the fuel burn reduction goal by increasing overall pressure ratio of the compressor to increase thermal efficiency of the engine. Study engines with overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70 are now being investigated. This means that the high pressure compressor would have to almost double in pressure ratio while keeping a high level of efficiency. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by testing the first two stages of an advanced GE compressor designed to meet the requirements of a very high pressure ratio core compressor. Previous test experience of a compressor which included these front two stages indicated a performance deficit relative to design intent. Therefore, the current rig was designed to run in 1-stage and 2-stage configurations in two separate tests to assess whether the bow shock of the second rotor interacting with the upstream stage contributed to the unpredicted performance deficit, or if the culprit was due to interaction of rotor 1 and stator 1. Thus, the goal was to fully understand the stage 1 performance under isolated and multi-stage conditions, and additionally to provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to understand fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to rotor shock interaction and endwall losses. This paper will present the description of the compressor test article and its measured performance and operability, for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the paper on measurements at 97% corrected speed with design intent vane setting angles.

  15. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  16. CFD Analysis of Bubbling Fluidized Bed Using Rice Husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ravi Inder; Mohapatra, S. K.; Gangacharyulu, D.

    Rice is Cultivated in all the main regions of world. The worldwide annual rice production could be 666million tons (www.monstersandcritics.com,2008) for year 2008. The annual production of rice husk is 133.2 million tons considering rice husk being 20% of total paddy production. The average annual energy potential is 1.998 *1012 MJ of rice husk considering 15MJ/kg of rice husk. India has vast resource of rice husk; a renewable source of fuel, which if used effectively would reduce the rate of depletion of fossil energy resources. As a result a new thrust on research and development in boilers bases on rice husk is given to commercialize the concept. CFD is the analysis of systems involving fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena such as chemical reactions by means of computer-based simulation. High quality Computational Fluid dynamics (CFD) is an effective engineering tool for Power Engineering Industry. It can determine detailed flow distributions, temperatures, and pollutant concentrations with excellent accuracy, and without excessive effort by the software user. In the other words it is the science of predicting fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, chemical reactions and related phenomena; and an innovate strategy to conform to regulations and yet stay ahead in today's competitive power market. This paper is divided into two parts; in first part review of CFD applied to the various types of boilers based on biomass fuels/alternative fuels is presented. In second part CFD analysis of fluidized bed boilers based on rice husk considering the rice husk based furnace has been discussed. The eulerian multiphase model has used for fluidized bed. Fluidized bed has been modeled using Fluent 6.2 commercial code. The effect of numerical influence of bed superheater tubes has also been discussed.

  17. 49 CFR 236.336 - Locking bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking bed. 236.336 Section 236.336 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Instructions § 236.336 Locking bed. The various parts of the locking bed, locking bed supports, and tappet...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6070 - Bed board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bed board. 880.6070 Section 880.6070 Food and....6070 Bed board. (a) Identification. A bed board is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of a stiff board used to increase the firmness of a bed. (b) Classification. Class I...

  19. A simple and feasible process for using multi-stage high-precision DTMs, field surveys and rainfall data to study debris flow occurrence factors of Shenmu area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, W.-C.; Lin, B.-S.; Ho, H.-C.; Keck, J.; Yin, H.-Y.; Shan, H.-Y.

    2012-11-01

    The occurrence of typhoon Herb in 1996 caused massive landslides in the Shenmu area of Taiwan. Many people died and stream and river beds were covered by meters of debris. Debris flows almost always take place in the Shenmu area during the flood season, especially in the catchment areas around Tsushui river and Aiyuzih river. Anthropogenic and natural factors that cause debris flow occurrences are complex and numerous. The precise conditions of initiation are difficult to be identified, but three factors are generally considered to be the most important ones, i.e. rainfall characteristics, geologic conditions and topography. This study proposes a simple and feasible process that combines remote sensing technology and multi-stage high-precision DTMs from aerial orthoimages and airborne LiDAR with field surveys to establish a connection between three major occurrence factors that trigger debris flows in the Shenmu area.

  20. Fine-grid simulations of gas-solids flow in a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Benyahia, S.

    2012-01-01

    This research note demonstrates that more accurate predictions of a two-fluid model for the riser section of a circulating fluidized bed are obtained as the grid size is equally refined along all the directions of the gas-particle flow. However, two-fluid simulations of large-scale fluidized beds with such a fine mesh are currently computationally prohibitive. Alternatively,subgrid models can significantly reduce the simulation time of multiphase flow by using coarse mesh, whereas maintaining a high level of accuracy.

  1. Rapid ignition of fluidized bed boiler

    DOEpatents

    Osborn, Liman D.

    1976-12-14

    A fluidized bed boiler is started up by directing into the static bed of inert and carbonaceous granules a downwardly angled burner so that the hot gases cause spouting. Air is introduced into the bed at a rate insufficient to fluidize the entire bed. Three regions are now formed in the bed, a region of lowest gas resistance, a fluidized region and a static region with a mobile region at the interface of the fluidized and static regions. Particles are transferred by the spouting action to form a conical heap with the carbonaceous granules concentrated at the top. The hot burner gases ignite the carbonaceous matter on the top of the bed which becomes distributed in the bed by the spouting action and bed movement. Thereafter the rate of air introduction is increased to fluidize the entire bed, the spouter/burner is shut off, and the entire fluidized bed is ignited.

  2. Flow instability in particle-bed nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerrebrock, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    The particle-bed core offers mitigation of some of the problems of solid-core nuclear rocket reactors. Dividing the fuel elements into small spherical particles contained in a cylindrical bed through which the propellant flows radially, may reduce the thermal stress in the fuel elements, allowing higher propellant temperatures to be reached. The high temperature regions of the reactor are confined to the interior of cylindrical fuel assemblies, so most of the reactor can be relatively cool. This enables the use of structural and moderating materials which reduce the minimum critical size and mass of the reactor. One of the unresolved questions about this concept is whether the flow through the particle-bed will be well behaved, or will be subject to destructive flow instabilities. Most of the recent analyses of the stability of the particle-bed reactor have been extensions of the approach of Bussard and Delauer, where the bed is essentially treated as an array of parallel passages, so that the mass flow is continuous from inlet to outlet through any one passage. A more general three dimensional model of the bed is adopted, in which the fluid has mobility in three dimensions. Comparison of results of the earlier approach to the present one shows that the former does not accurately represent the stability at low Re. The more complete model presented should be capable of meeting this deficiency while accurately representing the effects of the cold and hot frits, and of heat conduction and radiation in the particle-bed. It can be extended to apply to the cylindrical geometry of particle-bed reactors without difficulty. From the exemplary calculations which were carried out, it can be concluded that a particle-bed without a cold frit would be subject to instability if operated at the high temperatures desired for nuclear rockets, and at power densities below about 4 megawatts per liter. Since the desired power density is about 40 megawatts per liter, it can be concluded

  3. Turbulence Locality and Granularlike Fluid Shear Viscosity in Collisional Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2015-11-01

    We reanalyze previous experimental measurements of solid volume fraction, mean velocity, and velocity fluctuations in collisional suspensions of plastic cylinders and water flowing over inclined, erodible beds. We show that the particle pressure scales with the granular temperature, as predicted by kinetic theory of granular gases. The assumption that the particle shear stress is also well predicted by kinetic theory permits us to determine the fluid shear stress and the effective fluid viscosity from the experiments. The fluid viscosity can be decomposed into turbulent and granularlike components: the turbulent viscosity can be modeled using a mixing length, which is a decreasing function of the local volume fraction and does not depend upon the distance from the bed; the granularlike viscosity, associated with the transfer of momentum due to the conjugate motion of the fluid mass added to the particles, can be modeled by replacing the particle density with the density of the added fluid mass in the viscosity of kinetic theory. PMID:26588387

  4. A laboratory apparatus to measure clast-bed contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D.

    2007-12-01

    Glacier dynamics, sediment transport, and erosion are controlled in part by processes occurring at the interface between basal ice and bedrock. One critical parameter is the contact force between a clast and the bedrock. This force affects many processes such as basal friction which regulates sliding speed, slip resistance which influences basal shear stress and may cause micro-seismic events associated with slip instabilities, abrasion which controls rates of erosion, landscape evolution, and production of sediments. Despite field and laboratory evidences indicating that contact forces may be up to one order of magnitude higher than estimated from leading theories, no studies have yet measured with precision the magnitude of contact forces and how contact forces vary as a function of key glaciological variables such as basal melt rate and effective pressure. An apparatus was designed to make two independent measurements: (1) the contact force between a clast and a hard bed as a function of melt rate and effective pressure; (2) the drag force on an identical clast away from the bed as a function of the ice speed. The contact force differs from the drag force because of the presence of the bed which modifies the ice flow field. Measurement (2) is necessary to estimate the rheological properties of the ice and to quantify wall- (bed) effects on the drag force. The apparatus consists of a hydraulic press that pressurizes an ice cylinder, 24~cm high and 20~cm in diameter, to 1.0 - 1.5~MPa. The ice cylinder is contained inside a polycarbonate vessel. Above and below the ice cylinder are three disks: an aluminum disk sandwiched between two Delrin disks. The aluminum disks are hollow and used to circulate a fluid at a controlled temperature. The Delrin disks are used to isolate the ice from the cold room and to control the flow of heat to the ice block. The ice is kept at the melting temperature by circulating a fluid in channels inside the polycarbonate vessel and in the

  5. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  6. Space station propulsion test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briley, G. L.; Evans, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    A test bed was fabricated to demonstrate hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the intital operating configuration (IOC) space station application. The test bed propulsion module and computer control system were delivered in December 1985, but activation was delayed until mid-1986 while the propulsion system baseline for the station was reexamined. A new baseline was selected with hydrogen/oxygen thruster modules supplied with gas produced by electrolysis of waste water from the space shuttle and space station. As a result, an electrolysis module was designed, fabricated, and added to the test bed to provide an end-to-end simulation of the baseline system. Subsequent testing of the test bed propulsion and electrolysis modules provided an end-to-end demonstration of the complete space station propulsion system, including thruster hot firings using the oxygen and hydrogen generated from electrolysis of water. Complete autonomous control and operation of all test bed components by the microprocessor control system designed and delivered during the program was demonstrated. The technical readiness of the system is now firmly established.

  7. Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  8. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  9. Novel description of a design space for fluidised bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Lipsanen, Tanja; Antikainen, Osmo; Räikkönen, Heikki; Airaksinen, Sari; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2007-12-10

    The physical measurements of a fluid bed granulator can be exploited in construction of an operating window, a design space, for process performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of inlet air humidity changes on temperature in different parts of a granulator system, on fluidisation behaviour and on the particle size of the final granules. A humidifying setup was constructed on a bench-scale fluid bed granulator that enabled elevated humidity levels and sharp humidity changes of the inlet air. Ibuprofen granules were produced at the various inlet air humidity levels classified as low, intermediate and high. A novel fluidisation parameter was developed. The more improperly the particles were fluidising the smaller was the relationship of airflow rate and fan speed. Four different failure modes were identified and classified, based on the fluidisation parameter: over-fluidisation, risk of improper fluidisation, improper fluidisation and collapsed bed. It was possible to construct process trajectories for smooth fluidisation, which the optimal granulation process should follow.

  10. Flow and fracture in water-saturated, unconstrained granular beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varas, Germán; Ramos, Gabriel; Géminard, Jean-Christophe; Vidal, Valérie

    2015-06-01

    The injection of gas in a liquid-saturated granular bed gives rise to a wide variety of invasion patterns. Many studies have focused on constrained porous media, in which the grains are fixed in the bed and only the interstitial fluid flows when the gas invades the system. With a free upper boundary, however, the grains can be entrained by the ascending gas or fluid motion, and the competition between the upward motion of grains and sedimentation leads to new patterns. We propose a brief review of the experimental investigation of the dynamics of air rising through a water-saturated, unconstrained granular bed, in both two and three dimensions. After describing the invasion pattern at short and long time, a tentative regime-diagram is proposed. We report original results showing a dependence of the fluidized zone shape, at long times, on the injection flow rate and grain size. A method based on image analysis makes it possible to detect not only the fluidized zone profile in the stationary regime, but also to follow the transient dynamics of its formation. Finally, we describe the degassing dynamics inside the fluidized zone, in the stationary regime. Depending on the experimental conditions, regular bubbling, continuous degassing, intermittent regime or even spontaneous flow-to-fracture transition are observed.

  11. Exercise Effects on the Course of Gray Matter Changes Over 70 Days of Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight affects posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes through direct effects on peripheral changes that result from reduced vestibular stimulation and body unloading. Effects of microgravity on sensorimotor function have been investigated on earth using bed rest studies. Long duration bed rest serves as a space-flight analogue because it mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. It has been hypothesized that the cephalad fluid shift that has been observed in microgravity could potentially affect central nervous system function and structure, and thereby indirectly affect sensorimotor or cognitive functioning. Preliminary results of one of our ongoing studies indeed showed that 70 days of long duration head down-tilt bed rest results in focal changes in gray matter volume from pre-bed rest to various time points during bed rest. These gray matter changes that could reflect fluid shifts as well as neuroplasticity were related to decrements in motor skills such as maintenance of equilibrium. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both inand post-flight we are currently conducting a study that investigates the potential preventive effects of exercise on gray matter and motor performance changes that we observed over the course of bed rest. Numerous studies have shown beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on brain structure and cognitive performance in healthy and demented subjects over a large age range. We therefore hypothesized that an exercise intervention in bed rest could potentially mitigate or prevent the effects of bed rest on the central nervous system. Here we present preliminary outcomes of our study.

  12. Dietary Support of Extended-Duration Bed Rest Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inniss, A. M.; Rice, B. L.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary control and nutrient intake are critical aspects of any metabolic study, but this is especially true in the case of bed rest studies. We sought to define nutrient requirements, develop menus, and implement them in a series of three long-duration bed rest studies. With regard to energy intake, the goal was to maintain subject body weight to within 3% of their body weight on day 3 of bed rest (after fluid shift had occurred). For other nutrients, intakes were based on the NASA space flight nutritional requirements (with some adaptations based on the ground-based model used here). A secondary goal was to develop menus with foods similar to those expected to be approved for space flight (however, this was relaxed to attain desired nutrient intakes). This paper also describes the role of the research dietitian as part of the multi-disciplinary team and the importance of the metabolic kitchen staff. It also provides insight into some of the dietary challenges that arise during extended-duration bed rest studies. Regardless of the overall objective of the study, nutrition must be carefully planned, implemented, and monitored for results to be uncompromised.

  13. Flow instability in particle-bed nuclear reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerrebrock, J. L.; Kalamas, J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the stability of the particle-bed reactor is presented, in which the fluid has mobility in three dimensions. The model accurately represents the stability at low Re numbers as well as the effects of the cold and hot frits and of the heat conduction and radiation in the particle bed. The model can be easily extended to apply to the cylindrical geometry of particle-bed reactors. Exemplary calculations are carried out, showing that a particle bed without a cold frit would be subject to instability if operated at the high-temperature ratios used for nuclear rockets and at power densities below about 4 MW/l; since the desired power density for such a reactor is about 40 MW/l, the operation at design exit temperature but at reduced power could be hazardous. Calculations show however that it might be possible to remove the instability problem by appropriate combinations of cold and hot frits.

  14. Focal Gray Matter Plasticity as a Function of Long Duration Head-down Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koppelmans, V.; DeDios, Y. E.; Wood, S. J.; Reuter-Lorenz, P. A.; Kofman, I.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight (i.e., > or = 22 days) has been associated with changes in sensorimotor systems, resulting in difficulties that astronauts experience with posture control, locomotion, and manual control. The microgravity environment is an important causal factor for spaceflight induced sensorimotor changes. Whether these sensorimotor changes may be related to structural and functional brain changes is yet unknown. However, experimental studies revealed changes in the gray matter (GM) of the brain after simulated microgravity. Thus, it is possible that spaceflight may affect brain structure and thereby cognitive functioning and motor behavior. Long duration head-down tilt bed rest has been suggested as an exclusionary analog to study microgravity effects on the sensorimotor system. Bed rest mimics microgravity in body unloading and bodily fluid shifts. In consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers both in- and post-flight, we are conducting a prospective longitudinal 70-day bed rest study as an analog to investigate the effects of microgravity on the brain. VBM analysis revealed a progressive decrease from pre- to in- bed rest in GM volume in bilateral areas including the frontal medial cortex, the insular cortex and the caudate. Over the same time period, there was a progressive increase in GM volume in the cerebellum, occipital-, and parietal cortex, including the precuneus. The majority of these changes did not fully recover during the post-bed rest period. Analysis of lobular GM volumes obtained with BRAINS showed significantly increased volume from pre-bed rest to in-bed rest in GM of the parietal lobe and the third ventricle. Temporal GM volume at 70 days in bed rest was smaller than that at the first pre-bed rest measurement. Trend analysis showed significant positive linear and negative quadratic relationships between parietal GM and time, a positive linear relationship between third ventricle volume and time, and a negative linear

  15. Multiscale Analysis of Pebble Bed Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Gougar; Woo Yoon; Abderrafi Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    – The PEBBED code was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for design and analysis of pebble-bed high temperature reactors. The diffusion-depletion-pebble-mixing algorithm of the original PEBBED code was enhanced through coupling with the THERMIX-KONVEK code for thermal fluid analysis and by the COMBINE code for online cross section generation. The COMBINE code solves the B-1 or B-3 approximations to the transport equation for neutron slowing down and resonance interactions in a homogeneous medium with simple corrections for shadowing and thermal self-shielding. The number densities of materials within specified regions of the core are averaged and transferred to COMBINE from PEBBED for updating during the burnup iteration. The simple treatment of self-shielding in previous versions of COMBINE led to inaccurate results for cross sections and unsatisfactory core performance calculations. A new version of COMBINE has been developed that treats all levels of heterogeneity using the 1D transport code ANISN. In a 3-stage calculation, slowing down is performed in 167 groups for each homogeneous subregion (kernel, particle layers, graphite shell, control rod absorber annulus, etc.) Particles in a local average pebble are homogenized using ANISN then passed to the next (pebble) stage. A 1D transport solution is again performed over the pebble geometry and the homogenized pebble cross sections are passed to a 1-d radial model of a wedge of the pebble bed core. This wedge may also include homogeneous reflector regions and a control rod region composed of annuli of different absorbing regions. Radial leakage effects are therefore captured with discrete ordinates transport while axial and azimuthal effects are captured with a transverse buckling term. In this paper, results of various PBR models will be compared with comparable models from literature. Performance of the code will be assessed.

  16. Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Smeenk, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion of coal and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with deposits most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Three general types of mineralogic reactions were observed to occur in the agglomerates and deposits. Although alkalies may play a role with some {open_quotes}high alkali{close_quotes} lignites, we found agglomeration was initiated due to fluxing reactions between iron (II) from pyrites and aluminosilicates from clays. This is indicated by the high amounts of iron, silica, and alumina in the agglomerates and the mineralogy of the agglomerates. Agglomeration likely originated in the dense phase of the FBC bed within the volatile plume which forms when coal is introduced to the boiler. Secondary mineral reactions appear to occur after the agglomerates have formed and tend to strengthen the agglomerates. When calcium is present in high amounts, most of the minerals in the resulting deposits are in the melilite group (gehlenite, melilite, and akermanite) and pyroxene group (diopside and augite). During these solid-phase reactions, the temperature of formation of the melilite minerals can be lowered by a reduction of the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (Diopside + Calcite {r_arrow}Akermanite).

  17. Reconstruction of multistage massive rock slope failure: Polymethodical approach in Lake Oeschinen (CH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Sibylle; Gilli, Adrian; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Hajdas, Irka

    2016-04-01

    Lateglacial and Holocene rock-slope failures occur often as multistage failures where paraglacial adjustment and stress adaptation are hypothesised to control stages of detachment. However, we have only limited datasets to reconstruct detailed stages of large multistage rock-slope failures, and still aim at improving our models in terms of geohazard assessment. Here we use lake sediments, well-established for paleoclimate and paleoseismological reconstruction, with a focus on the reconstruction of rock-slope failures. We present a unique inventory from Lake Oeschinen (Bernese Alps, Switzerland) covering about 2.4 kyrs of rock-slope failure history. The lake sediments have been analysed using sediment-core analysis, radiocarbon dating and seismic-to-core and core-to-core correlations, and these were linked to historical and meteorological records. The results imply that the lake is significantly younger than the ~9 kyrs old Kandersteg rock avalanche (Tinner et al., 2005) and shows multiple rock-slope failures, two of which could be C14-dated. Several events detached from the same area potentially initiated by prehistoric earthquakes (Monecke et al., 2006) and later from stress relaxation processes. The data imply unexpected short recurrence rates that can be related to certain detachment scarps and also help to understand the generation of a historical lake-outburst flood. Here we show how polymethodical analysis of lake sediments can help to decipher massive multistage rock-slope failure. References Monecke, K., Anselmetti, F.S., Becker, A., Schnellmann, M., Sturm, M., Giardini, D., 2006. Earthquake-induced deformation structures in lake deposits: A Late Pleistocene to Holocene paleoseismic record for Central Switzerland. Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae, 99(3), 343-362. Tinner, W., Kaltenrieder, P., Soom, M., Zwahlen, P., Schmidhalter, M., Boschetti, A., Schlüchter, C., 2005. Der nacheiszeitliche Bergsturz im Kandertal (Schweiz): Alter und Auswirkungen auf die

  18. European dominance in multistage ultramarathons: an analysis of finisher rate and performance trends from 1992 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Shoak, Mohannad Abou; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Participation and performance trends regarding the nationality of ultraendurance athletes have been investigated in the triathlon, but not in running. The present study aimed to identify the countries in which multistage ultramarathons were held around the world and the nationalities of successful finishers. Methods Finisher rates and performance trends of finishers in multistage ultramarathons held worldwide between 1992 and 2010 were investigated. Results Between 1992 and 2010, the bulk of multistage ultramarathons were held in Germany and France, with more than 30 races organized in each country. Completion rates for men and women increased exponentially, with women representing on average 16.4% of the total field. Since 1992, 6480 athletes have competed in Morocco, 2538 in Germany, and 1842 in France. A total of 81.9% of athletes originated from Europe, and more specifically from France (22.9%), Great Britain (18.0%), and Germany (13.4%). Conclusion European ultramarathoners dominated the athletes who completed multistage ultramarathons worldwide, with specific dominance of French, British, and German athletes. Future studies should investigate social aspects, such as sport tourism, among European athletes to understand why European athletes are so interested in participating in multistage ultramarathons. PMID:24379704

  19. Cross-bedding Related Anisotropy and its Role in the Orientation of Joints in an Aeolian Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, S.; Cilona, A.; Mapeli, C.; Panfilau, A.; Aydin, A.; Prasad, M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research revealed that the cross-bedding related anisotropy in aeolian sandstones affects the orientation of compaction bands, also known as anticracks. We hypothesize that cross-bedding should a have similar influence on the orientation of the joints within the same rock at the same location. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between the cross-beds and the cross-bed package confined joints in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone cropping out in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. The field data demonstrates that the cross-bed package confined joints occur at high-angle to bedding and trend roughly parallel to the dip direction of the cross-beds. This shows that the cross-bed orientation and the associated anisotropy also exert a strong control on the formation and orientation of the joints. In order to characterize the anisotropy due to cross-bedding in the Aztec Sandstone, we measured the P-wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from 11 samples in the laboratory using a bench-top ultrasonic assembly. The measured P-wave anisotropy is about 13% on average. Based on these results, a numerical model based on the generalized Hooke's law for anisotropic materials is analyzed assuming the cross-bedded sandstone to be transversely isotropic. Using this model, we tested various cross-bed orientations as well as different strain boundary conditions (uniaxial, axisymmetric and triaxial). It is possible to define a boundary condition under which the modeled results roughly match with the observed relationship between cross-bed package confined joints and cross-beds. These results have important implications for fluid flow through aeolian sandstones in reservoirs and aquifers.

  20. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...