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Sample records for multiwavelength blazar analysis

  1. Long-term Optical Polarization Variability and Multiwavelength Analysis of Blazar Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.; Benítez, E.; Hiriart, D.; Sorcia, M.; López, J. M.; Mújica, R.; Cabrera, J. I.; de Diego, J. A.; Rojas-Luis, M.; Salazar-Vázquez, F. A.; Galván-Gámez, A.

    2017-09-01

    The results of 8 yr R-band photopolarimetric data of blazar Mrk 421 collected from 2008 February to 2016 May are presented, along with extensive multiwavelength observations covering radio to TeV γ-rays around the flares observed in 2008 May, 2010 March, and 2013 April. The most important results are found in 2013, when the source displayed in the R band a very high brightness state of 11.29 ± 0.03 mag (93.60 ± 1.53 mJy) on April 10 and a polarization degree of 11.00% ± 0.44% on May 13. The analysis of the optical data shows that the polarization variability is due to the superposition of two polarized components that might be produced in two distinct emitting regions. An intranight photopolarimetric variability study carried out over seven nights after the 2013 April maximum found flux and polarization variations on the nights of April 14, 15, 16, and 19. In addition, the flux shows a minimum variability timescale of Δt = 2.34 ± 0.12 hr, and the polarization degree presents variations of ∼1%–2% on a timescale of Δ t ∼ minutes. Also, a detailed analysis of the intranight data shows a coherence length of the large-scale magnetic field of {l}B≃ 0.3 pc, which is the same order of magnitude as the distance traveled by the relativistic shocks. This result suggests that there is a connection between the intranight polarimetric variations and spatial changes of the magnetic field. Analysis of the complete R-band data along with the historical optical light curve found for this object shows that Mrk 421 varies with a period of 16.26 ± 1.78 yr.

  2. Multiwavelength analysis of the TeV Blazar RGB J0152+017

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, S.; Hauser, M.; Herzog, J.; Wagner, S.; Gerard, L.; Giebels, B.; Nedbal, D.

    2008-12-24

    VHE gamma-ray emission was discovered from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RGB J0152+017 in November 2007. The instantaneously triggered multiwavelength observations with the X-ray satellites Swift and RXTE, the optical telescope ATOM and the radio telescope Nancay provided the first simultaneous SED for RGB J0152+017. While these and further observations with H.E.S.S. gives no indication for variability, the follow-up observations until January 2008 with Swift (X-ray and UV-optical telescope) and ATOM (optical) show flux variations on time scales of {approx}10 days with different variability patterns. This non-monotonically flux variation of the simultaneous multiwavelength observations lead to the conclusion that the shape of the synchrotron spectrum changes.

  3. A Multiwavelength Study of Three Hybrid Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, E. C.; Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Marshall, H. L.; O'Dea, C.; Baum, S.

    2015-07-01

    We present multiwavelength imaging observations of PKS 1045-188, 8C 1849+670, and PKS 2216-038, three radio-loud active galactic nuclei from the MOJAVE-Chandra Sample that straddle the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) boundary between low- and high-power jets. These hybrid sources provide an excellent opportunity to study jet emission mechanisms and the influence of the external environment. We used archival VLA observations, and new Hubble and Chandra observations to identify and study the spectral properties of five knots in PKS 1045-188, two knots in 8C 1849+670, and three knots in PKS 2216-038. For the seven X-ray visible knots, we constructed and fit the broadband spectra using synchrotron and inverse Compton/cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB) emission models. In all cases, we found that the lack of detected optical emission ruled out the X-ray emission from the same electron population that produces radio emission. All three sources have high total extended radio power, similar to that of FR II sources. We find this is in good agreement with previously studied hybrid sources, where high-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via IC/CMB and the low-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via synchrotron emission. This supports the idea that it is total radio power rather than FR morphology that determines the X-ray emission mechanism. We found no significant asymmetries in the diffuse X-ray emission surrounding the host galaxies. Sources PKS 1045-188 and 8C 1849+670 show significant differences in their radio and X-ray termination points, which may result from the deceleration of highly relativistic bulk motion.

  4. A MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF THREE HYBRID BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, E. C.; Lister, M. L.; Kharb, P.; Marshall, H. L.; O’Dea, C.; Baum, S.

    2015-07-01

    We present multiwavelength imaging observations of PKS 1045−188, 8C 1849+670, and PKS 2216−038, three radio-loud active galactic nuclei from the MOJAVE-Chandra Sample that straddle the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) boundary between low- and high-power jets. These hybrid sources provide an excellent opportunity to study jet emission mechanisms and the influence of the external environment. We used archival VLA observations, and new Hubble and Chandra observations to identify and study the spectral properties of five knots in PKS 1045−188, two knots in 8C 1849+670, and three knots in PKS 2216−038. For the seven X-ray visible knots, we constructed and fit the broadband spectra using synchrotron and inverse Compton/cosmic microwave background (IC/CMB) emission models. In all cases, we found that the lack of detected optical emission ruled out the X-ray emission from the same electron population that produces radio emission. All three sources have high total extended radio power, similar to that of FR II sources. We find this is in good agreement with previously studied hybrid sources, where high-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via IC/CMB and the low-power hybrid sources emit X-rays via synchrotron emission. This supports the idea that it is total radio power rather than FR morphology that determines the X-ray emission mechanism. We found no significant asymmetries in the diffuse X-ray emission surrounding the host galaxies. Sources PKS 1045−188 and 8C 1849+670 show significant differences in their radio and X-ray termination points, which may result from the deceleration of highly relativistic bulk motion.

  5. Multi-wavelength studies of VHE gamma-ray blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Daniel D.

    2010-12-01

    Blazars, particularly those detected in TeV gamma-rays, are some of the most violent astrophysical objects yet observered. They display extreme variability on multiple timescales over a broad range of energies. These sources make excellent laboratories for studying the environment within the jets of active galactic nuclei, as the bulk of the detected emission is from the jets. These sources have been well studied at multiple wavelengths, and much insight has been gained into the nature of these extreme objects. This work described in this dissertation attempts to expand the understanding of two particular blazars, Markarian 421 and Markarian 501, by improving on previous observational techniques and utilizing state of the art detectors for obtaining data. The first project described focused on obtaining strictly simultaneous multi-wavelength data, covering a broad energy range, to search for any multi-wavelength correlations and to provide an accurate spectral energy distribution. This simultaneous data is essential for these sources due to their rapid variability. The most widely accepted models for emission within blazars, known as synchrotron self Compton, depend on a strong connection between the X-ray and gamma-ray photons. The simplest of these models predicts a strong correlation between the observed flux in these two bands, but this study did not observe such a correlation, though the synchrotron self Compton models could match the data. The second project focused on obtaining a state of the art measurement of the quiescent state of the blazar Markarian 501. This object is generally quite weak, and previous very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray experiments were not able to detect the source in the quiescent state. Neither was the source detected by previous gamma-ray space telescopes operating in a lower energy range. This project used data from the current generation of experiments to obtain a carefully sampled spectral energy distribution of the source

  6. Intensive Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Blazar 3C279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    We propose a month-long IUE campaign to monitor intensively the unique blazar 3C279, for correlation with studies at other wavelengths, notably including -y-rays. 3C279 is one of the brightest and most violently variable blazars known, and the recent discovery of its strong, variable -y-ray emission marks it as the brightest AGN in the -y-ray sky. The -Y-ray emission can be understood, in the context of existing inhomogeneous relativistic jet models, as Compton-scattered radiation from the optical-ultraviolet range. The proposed highdensity, regularly sampled observations are designed to detect and correlate the continuum variations expected on time scales of few days. Together with the superluminal motion measured with VLBI, the simultaneously measured broad-band spectra and variability, extending up to -y-rays, will provide an essentially model-independent estimate of the relativistic beaming factor. This IUE campaign, in coordination with the already-approved GRO observation, offers a unique opportunity to test the relativistic jet paradigm, and to determine separately the bulk velocity, the viewing angle, and the physical parameters of the jet (magnetic field, relativistic electron energy density, dimensions, etc.). Simultaneous ROSAT monitoring is being proposed, and the campaign will also cover optical, infrared, and radio wavelengths, including multiwavelength VLBI mapping.

  7. Long-Term Multiwavelength Studies of High-Redshift Blazar 0836+710

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Akyuz, A.; Donato, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Larsson, S.; Sokolovsky, K.; Fuhrmann, L.; Kurtanidze, O.

    2012-01-01

    Following gamma-ray flaring activity of high-redshift (z=2.218) blazar 0836+710 in 2011, we have assembled a long-term multiwavelength study of this object. Although this source is monitored regularly by radio telescopes and the Fermi Large Area Telescope, its coverage at other wavelengths is limited. The optical flux appears generally correlated with the gamma-ray flux, while little variability has been seen at X-ray energies. The gamma-ray/radio correlation is complex compared to some other blazars. As for many blazars, the largest variability is seen at gamma-ray wavelengths.

  8. Multiwavelength observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence

    DOE PAGES

    Palma, N. I.; Böttcher, M.; de la Calle, I.; ...

    2011-06-16

    Here, we present multiwavelength observations of the ultraluminous blazar-type radio loud quasar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence during the period July to December 2009. Four Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) observations with the XMM-Newton Satellite in the 0.2 – 10 keV range were supplemented with optical observations.

  9. Multiwavelength observations of the gamma-ray blazar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, N. I.; Böttcher, M.; de la Calle, I.; Agudo, I.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Bach, U.; Benítez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Escande, L.; Gómez, J. L.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Li, Y.; López, J. M.; Lott, B.; Madejski, G.; Marscher, A. P.; Morozova, D. A.; Raiteri, C. M.; Roberts, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Villata, M.; Wylezalek, D.

    2011-06-16

    Here, we present multiwavelength observations of the ultraluminous blazar-type radio loud quasar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence during the period July to December 2009. Four Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) observations with the XMM-Newton Satellite in the 0.2 – 10 keV range were supplemented with optical observations.

  10. A correlative multi-wavelength study of blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the final results of work performed by the P.I. on this task. The scientific focus of this program was the broad-band spectroscopic study of the subclass of quasi-stellar objects known as 'Blazars' using primarily, data obtained with Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), and ground-based optical and radio observatories.

  11. A new method to unveil blazars among multiwavelength counterparts of unassociated Fermi γ-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiano, S.; Franceschini, A.; Stamerra, A.

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a new method for unveiling the possible blazar active galactic nucleus nature among the numerous populations of unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGSs) in the Fermi catalogues. Our tool relies on the positional correspondence of the Fermi object with X-ray sources (mostly from Swift-XRT), correlated with other radio, infrared and optical data in the field. We built a set of spectral energy distribution templates representative of the various blazar classes, and we quantitatively compared them to the observed multiwavelength flux density data for all Swift-XRT sources found within the Fermi error box, by taking advantage of some well-recognized regularities in the broad-band spectral properties of the objects. We tested the procedure by comparison with a few well-known blazars, and tested the chance for false-positive recognition of UGSs against known pulsars and other Galactic and extragalactic sources. Based on our spectral recognition tool, we find the blazar candidate counterparts for 14 2FGL UGSs among 183 selected at high galactic latitudes. Furthermore, our tool also allows us to obtain rough estimates of the redshift for the candidate blazar. In a few cases in which this has been possible (i.e. when the counterpart was an SDSS object), we verified that our estimate is consistent with the measured redshift. The estimated redshifts of the proposed UGS counterparts are larger, on average, than those of known Fermi blazars, a fact that might explain the lack of previous association or identification in published catalogues.

  12. Multiwavelength polarimetry and integrated MHD+Polarized Radiation simulation reveal the blazar flaring mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Taylor, Gregory B.

    2017-08-01

    In addition to multiwavelength variability, blazar polarization signatures are highly variable. Optical polarimetry has shown two distinct features: first, in both quiescent and flaring states, blazar polarization degree generally stays around 10% to 30%; second, after major polarization variations, such as polarization angle swings, the polarization degree quickly restores to its initial state. We have performed integrated relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) + radiation and polarization simulations of the blazar emission region. Our approach evolves the magnetic fields and flows using the first principles, so we can calculate the spatial and temporal dependent polarization signatures and compare them with observations.Our results show that the above two observational trends indicate the blazar flaring region should be strongly magnetized with the magnetic energy density higher than the plasma rest mass energy density. In such an environment, the 3D kink instability may trigger magnetic reconnection to accelerate particles and give rise to flares. In view of future high-energy polarimetry, this integrated MHD+polarization simulation technique will deliver new constraints on jet’s physical conditions and particle acceleration mechanisms.

  13. Multiwavelength temporal variability of the blazar 3C 454.3 during 2014 activity phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Pankaj; Gupta, Alok C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Singh, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength temporal analysis of the blazar 3C 454.3 during the high γ-ray active period from May to December, 2014. Except for X-rays, the period is well sampled at near-infrared (NIR)-optical by the Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) facility, and the source is detected continuously on daily time-scale in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope γ-ray band. The source exhibits diverse levels of variability with many flaring/active states in the continuously sampled γ-ray light curve which are also reflected in the NIR-optical light curves and the sparsely sampled X-ray light curve by the Swift-XRT. Multiband correlation analysis of this continuous segment during different activity periods shows a change of state from no lags between IR and γ-ray, optical and γ-ray, and IR and optical to a state where γ-ray lags the IR/optical by ˜3 d. The results are consistent with the previous studies of the same during various γ-ray flaring and active episodes of the source. This consistency, in turn, suggests an extended localized emission region with almost similar conditions during various γ-ray activity states. On the other hand, the delay of γ-ray with respect to IR/optical and a trend similar to IR/optical in X-rays along with strong broad-band correlations favour magnetic field related origin with X-ray and γ-ray being inverse Comptonization of IR/optical photons and external radiation field, respectively.

  14. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PKS 0528+134 IN QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, N. I.; Boettcher, M.; Li, Y.; De la Calle, I.; Agudo, I.; Jorstad, S. G.; Joshi, M.; Aller, M.; Aller, H.; Bach, U.; BenItez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Leto, P.; Escande, L.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Laehteenmaeki, A.; Larionov, V. M. E-mail: marscher@bu.edu E-mail: jlgomez@iaa.es

    2011-07-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of the ultraluminous blazar-type radio loud quasar PKS 0528+134 in quiescence during the period 2009 July-December. Four Target-of-Opportunity observations with the XMM-Newton satellite in the 0.2-10 keV range were supplemented with optical observations at the MDM Observatory, radio and optical data from the GLAST-AGILE Support Program of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope and the Very Long Baseline Array, additional X-ray data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (2-10 keV) and from Suzaku (0.5-10 keV) as well as {gamma}-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the 100 MeV-200 GeV range. In addition, publicly available data from the SMARTS blazar monitoring program and the University of Arizona/Steward Observatory Fermi Support program were included in our analysis. We found no evidence of significant flux or spectral variability in {gamma}-rays and most radio bands. However, significant flux variability on a timescale of several hours was found in the optical regime, accompanied by a weak trend of spectral softening with increasing flux. We suggest that this might be the signature of a contribution of unbeamed emission, possibly from the accretion disk, at the blue end of the optical spectrum. The optical flux is weakly polarized with rapid variations of the degree and direction of polarization, while the polarization of the 43 GHz radio core remains steady, perpendicular to the jet direction. Optical spectropolarimetry of the object in the quiescent state suggests a trend of increasing degree of polarization with increasing wavelength, providing additional evidence for an unpolarized emission component, possibly thermal emission from the accretion disk, contributing toward the blue end of the optical spectrum. Over an extended period of several months, PKS 0528+134 shows moderate (amplitude {approx}< 50%) flux variability in the X-rays and most radio frequencies on {approx}1-2 week timescales. We constructed four

  15. Wide-Range Multiwavelength Observations of Northern TeV Blazars With MAGIC / HESS, Suzaku And KVA

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, M.; Rugamer, S.; Mazin, D.; Firpo, R.; Mannheim, K.; Tavecchio, F.; Teshima, M.; Horns, D.; Costamante, L.; Schwarzburg, S.; Wagner, S.; Takahashi, T.; Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Sato, R.; Ushio, M.; /JAXA, Sagamihara

    2007-11-14

    We have conducted multiwavelength observations of several northern TeV blazars employing the ground-based {gamma}-ray observatories MAGIC and HESS, the optical KVA telescope, and the Suzaku X-ray satellite. The data taken in 2006 establish measurements of the contemporaneous spectral energy distributions of the rapidly variable blazar emission over a wide range of frequencies. Results allow us to test leptonic and hadronic emission and particle acceleration models which predict different correlations between the optical, X-ray, and very high energy {gamma}-ray emissions. In this presentation, we report on the highlights of the results of these observations.

  16. The role of GLAST in multiwavelength observations of bright TeV blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J.G.; Collmar, W.; Strong, A.; Schönfelder, V.; Carramiñana, A.

    The TeV blazars Mrk 421, Mrk 501, PSK 2155-304 and 1ES1959+650 are among the brightest known blazars, yet the existing experimental set of data does not allow one to make unambiguous statements about the physical mechanisms responsible for the electromagnetic emission. The lack of sensitive coverage in the energy range 1 MeV to 500 GeV (up to 2004), and the scarce truly simultaneous data result in a big inter-model and intra-model degeneracy. The LAT instrument on board of the GLAST satellite, which will start operation in the fall 2007, aims to perform gamma-ray astronomy in the energy range 20 MeV to 300 GeV. The sensitivity of LAT is about 25 times better than its predecessor, EGRET. Together with the enhanced sensitivity of the current generationn of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) in the energy range 100 GeV - 500 GeV, LAT observations offer unprecedented capabilities to study the high energy emission of these objects in both quiescent and flaring state. In the conference we will present the capabilities of the LAT instrument to study these objects, as well as the planned multiwavelength campaigns during the first year of GLAST operation.

  17. F-GAMMA: variability Doppler factors of blazars from multiwavelength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodakis, I.; Marchili, N.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Nestoras, I.; Myserlis, I.; Karamanavis, V.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Sievers, A.; Ungerechts, H.; Zensus, J. A.

    2017-04-01

    Recent population studies have shown that variability Doppler factors can describe blazars as a population adequately. We use the flux-density variations found within the extensive radio multiwavelength data sets of the F-GAMMA programme, a total of 10 frequencies from 2.64 up to 142.33 GHz, in order to estimate the variability Doppler factors for 58 γ-ray bright sources, for 20 of which no variability Doppler factor has been estimated before. We employ specifically designed algorithms in order to obtain a model for each flare at each frequency. We then identify each event and track its evolution through all the available frequencies for each source. This approach allows us to distinguish significant events producing flares from stochastic variability in blazar jets. It also allows us to constrain effectively the variability brightness temperature and hence the variability Doppler factor, as well as error estimates. Our method can produce the most accurate (16 per cent error, on average) estimates in the literature to date.

  18. Multi-wavelength Study of Blazars Using Variability as a Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baliyan, Kiran S.; Kaur, Navpreet; Chandra, Sunil; Sameer, Sameer; Ganesh, Shashikiran

    2016-09-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are too compact to be resolved by any existing optical telescope facility, making it difficult to understand their structure and the emission processes responsible for their huge energy output. However, variability, one of their characteristic properties, provides a tool to probe the inner regions of AGN. Blazars are the best candidates for such a study, and hence a considerable amount of effort is being made to investigate variability in these sources across the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, using the Mt. Abu infrared observatory (MIRO) blazar monitoring program, we present intra-night, inter-night, and long term aspects of the variability in S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287. These stars show significant variability on short (a few tens of mins, to a few hours, to a few days) to long term (months to years) timescales. Based on the light travel time argument, the shortest variability timescales (micro-variability) provide upper limits to the size of the emission region. While S5 0716 shows a very high duty cycle of variability (> 80 %), 3C66A shows a much lower intra day variability (IDV) duty cycle (< 20 %). All three show rapid variations within 2.5 to 3.5 hr, which, perhaps, are generated near the vicinity of black holes. Assuming this, estimates of the masses of the black holes are made at 10^{9} , 8×10^{8}, and 2.7×10^{9} M⨀ for S5 0716+71, 3C66A, and OJ 287, respectively. Multi-wavelength light-curves for the blazar PKS 1510-089 are discussed to infer the emission processes responsible for the recent flaring episodes in this source.

  19. MAGIC long-term study of the distant TeV blazar PKS 1424+240 in a multiwavelength context

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksić, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims. We present a study of the very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) γ-ray emission of the blazar PKS 1424+240 observed with the MAGIC telescopes. The primary aim of this paper is the multiwavelength spectral characterization and modeling of this blazar, which is made particularly interesting by the recent discovery of a lower limit of its redshift of z ≥ 0.6 and makes it a promising candidate to be the most distant VHE source. Methods. The source has been observed with the MAGIC telescopes in VHE rays for a total observation time of ~33.6 h from 2009 to 2011. A detailed analysis of its γ-ray spectrum and time evolution has been carried out. Moreover, we have collected and analyzed simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous multiwavelength data. Results. The source was marginally detected in VHE rays during 2009 and 2010, and later, the detection was confirmed during an optical outburst in 2011. The combined significance of the stacked sample is ~7.2σ. The differential spectra measured during the different campaigns can be described by steep power laws with the indices ranging from 3.5 ± 1.2 to 5.0 ± 1.7. The MAGIC spectra corrected for the absorption due to the extragalactic background light connect smoothly, within systematic errors, with the mean spectrum in 2009-2011 observed at lower energies by the Fermi-LAT. The absorption-corrected MAGIC spectrum is flat with no apparent turn down up to 400 GeV. The multiwavelength light curve shows increasing flux in radio and optical bands that could point to a common origin from the same region of the jet. The large separation between the two peaks of the constructed non-simultaneous spectral energy distribution also requires an extremely high Doppler factor if an one zone synchrotron self-Compton model is applied. We find that a two-component synchrotron self-Compton model describes the spectral energy distribution of the source well, if the source is located at z ~ 0.6.

  20. MAGIC long-term study of the distant TeV blazar PKS 1424+240 in a multiwavelength context

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksić, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims. We present a study of the very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) γ-ray emission of the blazar PKS 1424+240 observed with the MAGIC telescopes. The primary aim of this paper is the multiwavelength spectral characterization and modeling of this blazar, which is made particularly interesting by the recent discovery of a lower limit of its redshift of z ≥ 0.6 and makes it a promising candidate to be the most distant VHE source. Methods. The source has been observed with the MAGIC telescopes in VHE rays for a total observation time of ~33.6 h from 2009 to 2011. Amore » detailed analysis of its γ-ray spectrum and time evolution has been carried out. Moreover, we have collected and analyzed simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous multiwavelength data. Results. The source was marginally detected in VHE rays during 2009 and 2010, and later, the detection was confirmed during an optical outburst in 2011. The combined significance of the stacked sample is ~7.2σ. The differential spectra measured during the different campaigns can be described by steep power laws with the indices ranging from 3.5 ± 1.2 to 5.0 ± 1.7. The MAGIC spectra corrected for the absorption due to the extragalactic background light connect smoothly, within systematic errors, with the mean spectrum in 2009-2011 observed at lower energies by the Fermi-LAT. The absorption-corrected MAGIC spectrum is flat with no apparent turn down up to 400 GeV. The multiwavelength light curve shows increasing flux in radio and optical bands that could point to a common origin from the same region of the jet. The large separation between the two peaks of the constructed non-simultaneous spectral energy distribution also requires an extremely high Doppler factor if an one zone synchrotron self-Compton model is applied. We find that a two-component synchrotron self-Compton model describes the spectral energy distribution of the source well, if the source is located at z ~ 0.6.« less

  1. The Swift/UVOT Blazar Image Processing For Multi-Wavelength Campaigns And OJ287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, Francesco; Leto, C.; Giommi, P.; Ciprini, S.; et al.

    2016-10-01

    In the last years the Swift mission monitoring of non-GRB sources has become an essential tool in multi-frequencies time- domain studies. The ASI Science Data Center (ASDC), which hosts one of the three official Swift data archives and was deputy for the X-ray Telescope (XRT) Deep and Serendipitous surveys, has a long experience on Blazar multi-wavelength campaigns and has recently participated to various campaigns contemporary to observations of new space missions, such as Planck and NuSTAR (Balokovic et al 2016, Furniss et al. 2015, Giommi et al 2012). Since 2006 at the ASDC we have started an activity of UltraViolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) Blazar image processing. The dedicated standard processing procedure of UVOT images, using official software and calibrations, has the goal to add UVOT fluxes to source Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and also support variability studies with comparison to X and gamma-ray data, even on the intra-observation time-scale. Currently data of about 430 sources have been processed, and results have been used in recent papers, such as those on Mkn 421 (Balokovic et al.2016) and OJ 287. The OJ287 UVOT image complete data processing is updated at each observation campaign and results have been published in some survey papers. The 2015 observations have been included in the internal long-term monitoring of the source and considered in the recent multi-frequency study Valtonen et al.(2016) of the new optical-UV outburst of the 12 years cycle, with comparison to the ground optical data and the contemporaneous Swift X-ray ones. We will report the results obtained with UVOT data.

  2. The TANAMI Multiwavelength Program: Dynamic spectral energy distributions of southern blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Krauß, F.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Schulz, R.; Trüstedt, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Stevens, J.; Ros, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Blanchard, J.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Dauser, T.; Falkner, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Müller, C.; Nesci, R.; Pursimo, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.

    2016-06-28

    Simultaneous broadband spectral and temporal studies of blazars are an important tool for investigating active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet physics. Aims. Here, we study the spectral evolution between quiescent and flaring periods of 22 radio-loud AGN through multiepoch, quasi-simultaneous broadband spectra. For many of these sources these are the first broadband studies. We also use a Bayesian block analysis of Fermi/LAT light curves to determine time ranges of constant flux for constructing quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The shapes of the resulting 81 SEDs are described by two logarithmic parabolas and a blackbody spectrum where needed. The peak frequencies and luminosities agree well with the blazar sequence for low states with higher luminosity implying lower peak frequencies. This is not true for sources in high states. The γ-ray photon index in Fermi/LAT correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency in low and intermediate states. No correlation is present in high states. The black hole mass cannot be determined from the SEDs. Surprisingly, the thermal excess often found in FSRQs at optical/UV wavelengths can be described by blackbody emission and not an accretion disk spectrum. The so-called harder-when-brighter trend, typically seen in X-ray spectra of flaring blazars, is visible in the blazar sequence. Furthermore, our results for low and intermediate states, as well as the Compton dominance, are in agreement with previous results. Black hole mass estimates using recently published parameters are in agreement with some of the more direct measurements. For two sources, estimates disagree by more than four orders of magnitude, possibly owing to boosting effects. The shapes of the thermal excess seen predominantly in flat spectrum radio quasars are inconsistent with a direct accretion disk origin.

  3. The TANAMI Multiwavelength Program: Dynamic spectral energy distributions of southern blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Krauß, F.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    Simultaneous broadband spectral and temporal studies of blazars are an important tool for investigating active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet physics. Aims. Here, we study the spectral evolution between quiescent and flaring periods of 22 radio-loud AGN through multiepoch, quasi-simultaneous broadband spectra. For many of these sources these are the first broadband studies. We also use a Bayesian block analysis of Fermi/LAT light curves to determine time ranges of constant flux for constructing quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The shapes of the resulting 81 SEDs are described by two logarithmic parabolas and a blackbody spectrum where needed. The peak frequencies andmore » luminosities agree well with the blazar sequence for low states with higher luminosity implying lower peak frequencies. This is not true for sources in high states. The γ-ray photon index in Fermi/LAT correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency in low and intermediate states. No correlation is present in high states. The black hole mass cannot be determined from the SEDs. Surprisingly, the thermal excess often found in FSRQs at optical/UV wavelengths can be described by blackbody emission and not an accretion disk spectrum. The so-called harder-when-brighter trend, typically seen in X-ray spectra of flaring blazars, is visible in the blazar sequence. Furthermore, our results for low and intermediate states, as well as the Compton dominance, are in agreement with previous results. Black hole mass estimates using recently published parameters are in agreement with some of the more direct measurements. For two sources, estimates disagree by more than four orders of magnitude, possibly owing to boosting effects. The shapes of the thermal excess seen predominantly in flat spectrum radio quasars are inconsistent with a direct accretion disk origin.« less

  4. Fourier Analysis of Blazar Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Justin D.; Becker, Peter A.

    2014-08-01

    Blazars display strong variability on multiple timescales and in multiple radiation bands. Their variability is often characterized by power spectral densities (PSDs) and time lags plotted as functions of the Fourier frequency. We develop a new theoretical model based on the analysis of the electron transport (continuity) equation, carried out in the Fourier domain. The continuity equation includes electron cooling and escape, and a derivation of the emission properties includes light travel time effects associated with a radiating blob in a relativistic jet. The model successfully reproduces the general shapes of the observed PSDs and predicts specific PSD and time lag behaviors associated with variability in the synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton, and external Compton emission components, from submillimeter to γ-rays. We discuss applications to BL Lacertae objects and to flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), where there are hints that some of the predicted features have already been observed. We also find that FSRQs should have steeper γ-ray PSD power-law indices than BL Lac objects at Fourier frequencies <~ 10-4 Hz, in qualitative agreement with previously reported observations by the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  5. MULTIWAVELENGTH EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-PERIODIC MODULATION IN THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PG 1553+113

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Baldini, L.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Atwood, W. B.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier, CNRS Bruel, P. E-mail: sara.cutini@asdc.asi.it E-mail: stefan@astro.su.se [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2015-11-10

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18 ± 0.08 year period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Tuorla, Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, and Catalina Sky Survey monitoring programs and Swift-UVOT. The optical cycle appearing in ∼10 years of data has a similar period, while the 15 GHz oscillation is less regular than seen in the other bands. Further long-term multiwavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.

  6. MULTIWAVELENGTH EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-PERIODIC MODULATION IN THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PG 1553+113

    DOE PAGES

    Ackerman, M.

    2015-11-10

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly-periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18±0.08 year-period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the OVRO, Tuorla, KAIT, and CSS monitoring programs and Swift UVOT. The optical cycle appearing in ~ 10 years of data has a similar period, while the 15 GHz oscillationmore » is less regular than seen in the other bands. Further long-term multi-wavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.« less

  7. MULTIWAVELENGTH EVIDENCE FOR QUASI-PERIODIC MODULATION IN THE GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PG 1553+113

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, M.

    2015-11-10

    We report for the first time a γ-ray and multiwavelength nearly-periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) we have discovered an apparent quasi-periodicity in the γ-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The marginal significance of the 2.18±0.08 year-period γ-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the OVRO, Tuorla, KAIT, and CSS monitoring programs and Swift UVOT. The optical cycle appearing in ~ 10 years of data has a similar period, while the 15 GHz oscillation is less regular than seen in the other bands. Further long-term multi-wavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.

  8. Multiwavelength Observations Of The Previously Unidentified Blazar RX J0648.7+1516

    DOE PAGES

    Aliu, E.

    2011-11-15

    We report on the VERITAS discovery of very-high-energy (VHE) gammaray emission above 200 GeV from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RXJ0648.7+1516 (GBJ0648+1516), associated with 1FGL J0648.8+1516. The photon spectrum above 200 GeV is fit by a power law dN/dE = F0(E/E0)-Γ with a photon index Γ of 4.4 ± 0.8stat ± 0.3syst and a flux normalization F0 of (2.3±0.5stat ±1.2sys)×10-11 TeV-1cm-2s-1 with E0 = 300 GeV. No VHE variability is detected during VERITAS observations of RXJ0648.7+1516 between 2010 March 4 and April 15. Following the VHE discovery, the optical identification and spectroscopic redshift were obtained using the Shane 3–m Telescopemore » at the Lick Observatory, showing the unidentified object to be a BL Lac type with a redshift of z = 0.179. Broadband multiwavelength observations contemporaneous with the VERITAS exposure period can be used to sub-classify the blazar as a high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object, including data from the MDM observatory, Swift -UVOT and XRT, and continuous monitoring at photon energies above 1 GeV from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We find that in the absence of undetected, high-energy rapid variability, the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model (SSC) overproduces the high-energy gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi -LAT over 2.3 years. The SED can be parameterized satisfactorily with an external-Compton or lepto-hadronic model, which have two and six additional free parameters, respectively, compared to the one-zone SSC model.« less

  9. The TANAMI Multiwavelength Program: Dynamic spectral energy distributions of southern blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauß, F.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Schulz, R.; Trüstedt, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Stevens, J.; Ros, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Blanchard, J.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Dauser, T.; Falkner, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Müller, C.; Natusch, T.; Nesci, R.; Pursimo, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Simultaneous broadband spectral and temporal studies of blazars are an important tool for investigating active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet physics. Aims: We study the spectral evolution between quiescent and flaring periods of 22 radio-loud AGN through multiepoch, quasi-simultaneous broadband spectra. For many of these sources these are the first broadband studies. Methods: We use a Bayesian block analysis of Fermi/LAT light curves to determine time ranges of constant flux for constructing quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The shapes of the resulting 81 SEDs are described by two logarithmic parabolas and a blackbody spectrum where needed. Results: The peak frequencies and luminosities agree well with the blazar sequence for low states with higher luminosity implying lower peak frequencies. This is not true for sources in high states. The γ-ray photon index in Fermi/LAT correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency in low and intermediate states. No correlation is present in high states. The black hole mass cannot be determined from the SEDs. Surprisingly, the thermal excess often found in FSRQs at optical/UV wavelengths can be described by blackbody emission and not an accretion disk spectrum. Conclusions: The so-called harder-when-brighter trend, typically seen in X-ray spectra of flaring blazars, is visible in the blazar sequence. Our results for low and intermediate states, as well as the Compton dominance, are in agreement with previous results. Black hole mass estimates using recently published parameters are in agreement with some of the more direct measurements. For two sources, estimates disagree by more than four orders of magnitude, possibly owing to boosting effects. The shapes of the thermal excess seen predominantly in flat spectrum radio quasars are inconsistent with a direct accretion disk origin. Tables of the fluxes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or

  10. Detection of the cosmic γ-ray horizon from multiwavelength observations of blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Finke, J. D.; Prada, F.; Primack, J. R.; Kitaura, F. S.; Siana, B.; Paneque, D.

    2013-05-24

    The first statistically significant detection of the cosmic γ-ray horizon (CGRH) that is independent of any extragalactic background light (EBL) model is presented. The CGRH is a fundamental quantity in cosmology. It gives an estimate of the opacity of the Universe to very high energy (VHE) γ-ray photons due to photon-photon pair production with the EBL. The only estimations of the CGRH to date are predictions from EBL models and lower limits from γ-ray observations of cosmological blazars and γ-ray bursts. Here, we present homogeneous synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models of the spectral energy distributions of 15 blazars based on (almost) simultaneous observations from radio up to the highest energy γ-rays taken with the Fermi satellite. These synchrotron/SSC models predict the unattenuated VHE fluxes, which are compared with the observations by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The comparison provides an estimate of the optical depth of the EBL, which allows a derivation of the CGRH through a maximum likelihood analysis that is EBL-model independent. We find that the observed CGRH is compatible with the current knowledge of the EBL.

  11. Multiwavelength Observations Of The Previously Unidentified Blazar RX J0648.7+1516

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.

    2011-11-15

    We report on the VERITAS discovery of very-high-energy (VHE) gammaray emission above 200 GeV from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object RXJ0648.7+1516 (GBJ0648+1516), associated with 1FGL J0648.8+1516. The photon spectrum above 200 GeV is fit by a power law dN/dE = F0(E/E0) with a photon index Γ of 4.4 ± 0.8stat ± 0.3syst and a flux normalization F0 of (2.3±0.5stat ±1.2sys)×10-11 TeV-1cm-2s-1 with E0 = 300 GeV. No VHE variability is detected during VERITAS observations of RXJ0648.7+1516 between 2010 March 4 and April 15. Following the VHE discovery, the optical identification and spectroscopic redshift were obtained using the Shane 3–m Telescope at the Lick Observatory, showing the unidentified object to be a BL Lac type with a redshift of z = 0.179. Broadband multiwavelength observations contemporaneous with the VERITAS exposure period can be used to sub-classify the blazar as a high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object, including data from the MDM observatory, Swift -UVOT and XRT, and continuous monitoring at photon energies above 1 GeV from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We find that in the absence of undetected, high-energy rapid variability, the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model (SSC) overproduces the high-energy gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi -LAT over 2.3 years. The SED can be parameterized satisfactorily with an external-Compton or lepto-hadronic model, which have two and six additional free parameters, respectively, compared to the one-zone SSC model.

  12. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE VERY HIGH ENERGY BLAZAR 1ES 2344+514

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Fegan, S. J.; Aune, T.; Furniss, A.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Cannon, A.; Ciupik, L.; Fortson, L. F.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Gall, D.; Fortin, P.

    2011-09-10

    Multiwavelength observations of the high-frequency-peaked blazar 1ES 2344+514 were performed from 2007 October to 2008 January. The campaign represents the first contemporaneous data on the object at very high energy (VHE, E >100 GeV) {gamma}-ray, X-ray, and UV energies. Observations with VERITAS in VHE {gamma}-rays yield a strong detection of 20{sigma} with 633 excess events in a total exposure of 18.1 hr live time. A strong VHE {gamma}-ray flare on 2007 December 7 is measured at F(>300 GeV) = (6.76 {+-} 0.62) x 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, corresponding to 48% of the Crab Nebula flux. Excluding this flaring episode, nightly variability at lower fluxes is observed with a time-averaged mean of F(>300 GeV) = (1.06 {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -11} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (7.6% of the Crab Nebula flux). The differential photon spectrum between 390 GeV and 8.3 TeV for the time-averaged observations excluding 2007 December 7 is well described by a power law with a photon index of {Gamma} = 2.78 {+-} 0.09{sub stat} {+-} 0.15{sub syst}. On the flaring night of 2007 December 7 the measured VHE {gamma}-ray photon index was {Gamma} = 2.43 {+-} 0.22{sub stat} {+-} 0.15{sub syst}. Over the full period of VERITAS observations contemporaneous X-ray and UV data were taken with Swift and RXTE. The measured 2-10 keV flux ranged by a factor of {approx}7 during the campaign. On 2007 December 8 the highest ever observed X-ray flux from 1ES 2344+514 was measured by Swift X-ray Telescope at a flux of F(2-10 keV) = (6.28 {+-} 0.31) x 10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Evidence for a correlation between the X-ray flux and VHE {gamma}-ray flux on nightly timescales is indicated with a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = 0.60 {+-} 0.11. Contemporaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 1ES 2344+514 are presented for two distinct flux states. A one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model describes both SEDs using parameters consistent with previous SSC modeling of 1ES

  13. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE PREVIOUSLY UNIDENTIFIED BLAZAR RX J0648.7+1516

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Decerprit, G.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A. E-mail: miki@ucolick.org; Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2011-12-01

    We report on the VERITAS discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission above 200 GeV from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object RX J0648.7+1516 (GB J0648+1516), associated with 1FGL J0648.8+1516. The photon spectrum above 200 GeV is fitted by a power law dN/dE = F{sub 0}(E/E{sub 0}){sup -{Gamma}} with a photon index {Gamma} of 4.4 {+-} 0.8{sub stat} {+-} 0.3{sub syst} and a flux normalization F{sub 0} of (2.3 {+-} 0.5{sub stat} {+-} 1.2{sub sys}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} TeV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with E{sub 0} = 300 GeV. No VHE variability is detected during VERITAS observations of RX J0648.7+1516 between 2010 March 4 and April 15. Following the VHE discovery, the optical identification and spectroscopic redshift were obtained using the Shane 3 m Telescope at the Lick Observatory, showing the unidentified object to be a BL Lac type with a redshift of z = 0.179. Broadband multiwavelength observations contemporaneous with the VERITAS exposure period can be used to subclassify the blazar as an HBL object, including data from the MDM observatory, Swift-UVOT, and X-Ray Telescope, and continuous monitoring at photon energies above 1 GeV from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We find that in the absence of undetected, high-energy rapid variability, the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model overproduces the high-energy gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi-LAT over 2.3 years. The spectral energy distribution can be parameterized satisfactorily with an external-Compton or lepto-hadronic model, which have two and six additional free parameters, respectively, compared to the one-zone SSC model.

  14. Multiwavelength Observations of the Very High Energy Blazar 1ES 2344+514

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Dickherber, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L. F.; Furniss, A.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Toner, J. A.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2011-09-01

    Multiwavelength observations of the high-frequency-peaked blazar 1ES 2344+514 were performed from 2007 October to 2008 January. The campaign represents the first contemporaneous data on the object at very high energy (VHE, E >100 GeV) γ-ray, X-ray, and UV energies. Observations with VERITAS in VHE γ-rays yield a strong detection of 20σ with 633 excess events in a total exposure of 18.1 hr live time. A strong VHE γ-ray flare on 2007 December 7 is measured at F(>300 GeV) = (6.76 ± 0.62) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1, corresponding to 48% of the Crab Nebula flux. Excluding this flaring episode, nightly variability at lower fluxes is observed with a time-averaged mean of F(>300 GeV) = (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1 (7.6% of the Crab Nebula flux). The differential photon spectrum between 390 GeV and 8.3 TeV for the time-averaged observations excluding 2007 December 7 is well described by a power law with a photon index of Γ = 2.78 ± 0.09stat ± 0.15syst. On the flaring night of 2007 December 7 the measured VHE γ-ray photon index was Γ = 2.43 ± 0.22stat ± 0.15syst. Over the full period of VERITAS observations contemporaneous X-ray and UV data were taken with Swift and RXTE. The measured 2-10 keV flux ranged by a factor of ~7 during the campaign. On 2007 December 8 the highest ever observed X-ray flux from 1ES 2344+514 was measured by Swift X-ray Telescope at a flux of F(2-10 keV) = (6.28 ± 0.31) × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1. Evidence for a correlation between the X-ray flux and VHE γ-ray flux on nightly timescales is indicated with a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = 0.60 ± 0.11. Contemporaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 1ES 2344+514 are presented for two distinct flux states. A one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model describes both SEDs using parameters consistent with previous SSC modeling of 1ES 2344+514 from non-contemporaneous observations.

  15. Multi-wavelength observations of blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 flaring state

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S. -H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rastawicki, D.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Sbarra, C.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Szostek, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Bravo Calle, O. J. A.; Buemi, C. S.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Diltz, C.; Di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jordan, B.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Lin, H. C.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Oksman, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sievers, A.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanpää, A.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; Angelakis, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Nestoras, I.; Riquelme, D.; Krips, M.; Trippe, S.; Arai, A.; Kawabata, K. S.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Uemura, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Yoshida, M.; Belloni, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; Bonning, E. W.; Isler, J.; Urry, C. M.; Hoversten, E.; Falcone, A.; Pagani, C.; Stroh, M.

    2012-05-17

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February.Here, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We also find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. Finally, we model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  16. Multi-wavelength Observations of Blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 Flaring State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rastawicki, D.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Sbarra, C.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Szostek, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Bravo Calle, O. J. A.; Buemi, C. S.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Diltz, C.; Di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jordan, B.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Lin, H. C.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Oksman, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sievers, A.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanpää, A.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; GASP-WEBT Consortium; Angelakis, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Nestoras, I.; Riquelme, D.; F-GAMMA; Krips, M.; Trippe, S.; Iram-PdBI; Arai, A.; Kawabata, K. S.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Uemura, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kanata; Belloni, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; RXTE; Bonning, E. W.; Isler, J.; Urry, C. M.; SMARTS; Hoversten, E.; Falcone, A.; Pagani, C.; Stroh, M.; (Swift-XRT

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  17. Multiwavelength Study of Fermi-LAT blazars Variability and Radiation Production Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britto, R. J.; Bottacini, E.; Böttcher, M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Buson, S.; Lott, B.; Marais, J. P.; Meintjes, P. J.; Razzaque, S.; van Soelen, B.

    2016-12-01

    Quasars constitute a subclass of radio-loud active galactic nuclei that release a tremendous amount of non-thermal radiation through a pair of twin jets. When one of these jets is aligned close to the direction of the Earth, the object is then called a blazar. A consistent monitoring of these sources can help to unveil physical mechanisms at the origin of the radiation production that spreads throughout the whole electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ rays. The goal of this paper is to report some current works being undertaken in term of both spectral studies and time domain analyses of bright blazars which are observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and by South Africa-based optical telescopes. In particular, we present our recent and current studies on blazars 3C 454.3 and NVSS J141922-083830 respectively.

  18. Doppler-beamed AGN Jets and the Blazar Divide: Insights from Multiwavelength Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Prajval

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the systematics of the properties of highly Doppler-beamed relativistic jets at multiple frequencies, including gamma-ray data from the Fermi telescope and MOJAVE radio imaging on parsec scales. We test the hypothesis that the Blazar divide constitutes a dichotomy. For samples dominated by highly Doppler-beamed active galactic nuclei, there are limitations to using the standard radio core-dominance parameter as a statistical measure of orientation. ­­­­We therefore explore alternate measures to probe the Doppler factor in the context of the Blazar divide.

  19. Multi-wavelength observations of blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 flaring state

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; ...

    2012-05-17

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February.Here, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazarmore » emission models. We also find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. Finally, we model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.« less

  20. Multiwavelength Observations of a Dramatic High-Energy Flare in the Blazar 3C 279

    SciTech Connect

    Wehrle, A.E.; Pian, E. |; Urry, C.M.; Maraschi, L.; McHardy, I.M.; Lawson, A.J.; Ghisellini, G.; Hartman, R.C.; Madejski, G.M.; Marscher, A.P.; Wagner, S.J.; Webb, J.R. |; Aller, M.F.; Aller, H.D.; Backman, D.E.; Balonek, T.J.; Boltwood, P.; and others

    1998-04-01

    The blazar 3C 279, one of the brightest identified extragalactic objects in the {gamma}-ray sky, underwent a large (factor of {approximately}10 in amplitude) flare in {gamma}-rays toward the end of a 3 week pointing by {ital Compton Gamma Ray} Observatory (CGRO), in 1996 January{endash}February. The flare peak represents the highest {gamma}-ray intensity ever recorded for this object. During the high state, extremely rapid {gamma}-ray variability was seen, including an increase of a factor of 2.6 in {approximately}8 hr, which strengthens the case for relativistic beaming. Coordinated multifrequency observations were carried out with {ital Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA; or, Astro-D), Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT),} and {ital International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE)} and from many ground-based observatories, covering most accessible wavelengths. The well-sampled, simultaneous {ital RXTE} light curve shows an outburst of lower amplitude (factor of {approx_equal}3) well correlated with the {gamma}-ray flare without any lag larger than the temporal resolution of {approximately}1 day. The optical-UV light curves, not well sampled during the high-energy flare, exhibit more modest variations (factor of {approximately}2) and a lower degree of correlation. The flux at millimetric wavelengths was near a historical maximum during the {gamma}-ray flare peak, and there is a suggestion of a correlated decay. We present simultaneous spectral energy distributions of 3C 279 prior to and near to the flare peak. The {gamma}-rays vary by more than the square of the observed IR{endash}optical flux change, which poses some problems for specific blazar emission models. The synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model would require that the largest synchrotron variability occurred in the mostly unobserved submillimeter/far-infrared region. Alternatively, a large variation in the external photon field could occur over a timescale of a few

  1. Multi-Epoch Multiwavelength Spectra and Models for Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Boettcher, M.; Aldering, G.; Aller, H.; Aller, M.; Backman, D. E.; Balonek, T. J.; Bertsch, D. L.; Bloom, S. D.; Bock, H.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Of the blazars detected by EGRET in GeV gamma-rays, 3C 279 is not only the best-observed by EGRET, but also one of the best-monitored at lower frequencies. We have assembled eleven spectra, from GHz radio through GeV gamma-rays, from the time intervals of EGRET observations. Although some of the data have appeared in previous publications, most are new, including data taken during the high states in early 1999 and early 2000. All of the spectra show substantial gamma-ray contribution to the total luminosity of the object; in a high state, the gamma-ray luminosity dominates over that at all other frequencies by a factor of more than 10. There is no clear pattern of time correlation; different bands do not always rise and fall together, even in the optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands. The spectra are modeled using a leptonic jet, with combined synchrotron self-Compton + external Compton gamma-ray production. Spectral variability of 3C 279 is consistent with variations of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet, accompanied by changes in the spectral shape of the electron distribution. Our modeling results are consistent with the UV spectrum of 3C 279 being dominated by accretion disk radiation during times of low gamma-ray intensity.

  2. Long-term multiwavelength studies of high-redshift blazar 0836+710

    DOE PAGES

    Akyuz, A.; Thompson, D. J.; Donato, D.; ...

    2013-07-30

    The observation of γ-ray flares from blazar 0836+710 in 2011, following a period of quiescence, offered an opportunity to study correlated activity at different wavelengths for a high-redshift (z = 2.218) active galactic nucleus. Here, optical and radio monitoring, plus Fermi-LAT γ-ray monitoring provided 20082–2012 coverage, while Swift offered auxiliary optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray information. Other contemporaneous observations were used to construct a broad-band spectral energy distribution. As a result, there is evidence of correlation but not a measurable lag between the optical and γ-ray flaring emission. In contrast, there is no clear correlation between radio and γ-ray activity, indicatingmore » radio emission regions that are unrelated to the parts of the jet that produce the γ rays. In conclusion, the γ-ray energy spectrum is unusual in showing a change of shape from a power law to a curved spectrum when going from the quiescent state to the active state.« less

  3. Long-term multiwavelength studies of high-redshift blazar 0836+710

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuz, A.; Thompson, D. J.; Donato, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Larsson, S.; Sokolovsky, K.; Kurtanidze, O.

    2013-07-30

    The observation of γ-ray flares from blazar 0836+710 in 2011, following a period of quiescence, offered an opportunity to study correlated activity at different wavelengths for a high-redshift (z = 2.218) active galactic nucleus. Here, optical and radio monitoring, plus Fermi-LAT γ-ray monitoring provided 20082–2012 coverage, while Swift offered auxiliary optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray information. Other contemporaneous observations were used to construct a broad-band spectral energy distribution. As a result, there is evidence of correlation but not a measurable lag between the optical and γ-ray flaring emission. In contrast, there is no clear correlation between radio and γ-ray activity, indicating radio emission regions that are unrelated to the parts of the jet that produce the γ rays. In conclusion, the γ-ray energy spectrum is unusual in showing a change of shape from a power law to a curved spectrum when going from the quiescent state to the active state.

  4. Prominent activity of the blazar OJ 287 in 2005. XMM-Newton and multiwavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.; Raiteri, C. M.; Rizzi, N.; Agudo, I.; Foschini, L.; Fiorucci, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Villata, M.; Ostorero, L.; Sillanpää, A.; Valtonen, M.; Tosti, G.; Wagner, S. J.; Aller, H.; Aller, M. F.; Arai, A.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bakis, V.; Bagaglia, M.; Böttcher, M.; Buemi, C.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Efimov, Y.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Erdem, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Frasca, A.; Fullhart, M.; Goyal, A.; Heidt, J.; Hovatta, T.; Hroch, F.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Jilková, L.; Joshi, M.; Kamada, M.; Katsuura, M.; Kinoshita, D.; Kostov, A.; Kotaka, D.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Krejcová, T.; Krichbaum, T.; Gopal-Krishna; Kurosaki, M.; Kurtanidze, O.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lanteri, L.; Larionov, V.; Lee, C.-U.; Letho, H.; Leto, P.; Li, J.; Lindfors, E.; Münz, F.; Marilli, E.; Matsubara, Y.; Mizoguchi, S.; Mondal, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nieppola, E.; Nilsson, K.; Nishiyama, S.; Nucciarelli, G.; Ogino, A.; Ohlert, J.; Oksanen, A.; Ovcharov, E.; Pak, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pullen, C.; Pursimo, T.; Ros, J. A.; Sadakane, K.; Sadun, A. C.; Sagar, R.; Sohnk, B.-W.; Sumitomo, N.; Tanaka, K.; Trigilio, C.; Torniainenk I.; Tornikoski, M.; Umana, G.; Ungerechts, H.; Valtaoja, E.; Volvach, A.; Webb, J. R.; Wu, J.; Yim, H.-S.; Zhang, Y.

    Two guest-observer XMM-Newton pointings of the blazar OJ 287 in 2005 are introduced, along with part of the radio, mm, near-IR, and optical data obtained during a coordinated and intensive WEBT campaign, during longer-term monitoring observations performed by teams of the ENIGMA network, and during other independent observing programs (like VLBA observations). In that year OJ 287 showed an interesting variable behavior in the optical band. An optical outburst, well matched by our WEBT observations, is claimed in the period Oct.-Nov. 2005, and the XMM-Newton X-ray observations are performed in correspondence with two active optical states (an intermediate flare and such outburst). X-ray data indicates different flux levels, spectral slopes, and emission components, and VLBA radio maps are consistent with a jet precession model. This appreciable observing effort is still ongoing (a further XMM-Newton pointing is planned in 2008), joined with further parallel/multi-monitoring observing programmes devoted to this interesting object.

  5. Multi-Wavelength Observations On The Gamma-Ray Blazar PG1553+113 As A Probe For Geometrical Periodical Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamerra, Antonio; Prandini, E.; Paiano, S.; Da Vela, P.; Gareth, H.; Covino, S.; Cutini, S.; Sandrinelli, A.; Sobacchi, E.; Sormani, M. C.

    2016-10-01

    New claims of periodic variability from gamma-ray blazars have been reported, possibly pointing at milli-pc SMBH binary systems. A modulation of 2 year on 3.5 cycles was recently discovered with Fermi/LAT on the blazar PG1553+113 - for the first time in gamma-rays with high significance - and confirmed by optical lightcurves. Other possible gamma-ray periodic variations have been claimed on PKS 2155-304 and PKS 0537 by Sandrinelli et al. (2015, 2016). The interpretation of such periodicity, when confirmed with continuous observations in following years, is not straightforward. Emission from blazars is dominated by non-thermal emission from the jet; different processes in the jet or at its base, may lead to quasi-periodic emission. We used multi-wavelength (MWL) observations on PG1553+113 to investigate if the observed modulation can be explained with geometrical variations in the jet, possibly pointing to jet precession or to an helical pattern. The ongoing MWL monitoring campaign from radio to very-high energy gamma-ray bands, led by the MAGIC collaboration, will follow the maximum expected at the beginning of 2017, and will allow to set tighter constrains on underlying periodic processes.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of the blazar 1ES 1011+496 in Spring 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Di Pierro, F.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Elsaesser, D.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Guberman, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Vercellone, S.; Berdyugin, A.; Carini, M. T.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Pasanen, M.; Pease, A.; Sainio, J.; Tornikoski, M.; Walters, R.

    2016-07-01

    The BL Lac object 1ES 1011+496 was discovered at very high energy (VHE, E > 100GeV) γ-rays by Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) in Spring 2007. Before that the source was little studied in different wavelengths. Therefore, a multiwavelength (MWL) campaign was organized in Spring 2008. Along MAGIC, the MWL campaign included the Metsähovi Radio Observatory, Bell and Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien (KVA) optical telescopes and the Swift and AGILE satellites. MAGIC observations span from 2008 March to May for a total of 27.9 h, of which 19.4 h remained after quality cuts. The light curve showed no significant variability yielding an integral flux above 200 GeV of (1.3 ± 0.3) × 10-11 photons cm-2 s-1. The differential VHE spectrum could be described with a power-law function with a spectral index of 3.3 ± 0.4. Both results were similar to those obtained during the discovery. Swift X-ray Telescope observations revealed an X-ray flare, characterized by a harder-when-brighter trend, as is typical for high synchrotron peak BL Lac objects (HBL). Strong optical variability was found during the campaign, but no conclusion on the connection between the optical and VHE γ-ray bands could be drawn. The contemporaneous spectral energy distribution shows a synchrotron-dominated source, unlike concluded in previous work based on non-simultaneous data, and is well described by a standard one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We also performed a study on the source classification. While the optical and X-ray data taken during our campaign show typical characteristics of an HBL, we suggest, based on archival data, that 1ES 1011+496 is actually a borderline case between intermediate and high synchrotron peak frequency BL Lac objects.

  7. Analysis of the Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi bright blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparrini, D.; Cutini, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Giommi, P.; Raino, S.

    2010-03-26

    Blazars are a small fraction of all extragalactic sources but, unlike other objects, they are strong emitters across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. In this study we have conducted a detailed investigation of the broad-band spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining the accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, NIR-Optical and hard-X/gamma-ray data, collected within three months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. Here we show the procedure for the multi wavelength analysis.

  8. THE BRIGHTEST GAMMA-RAY FLARING BLAZAR IN THE SKY: AGILE AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF 3C 454.3 DURING 2010 NOVEMBER

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellone, S.; Romano, P.; Vittorini, V.; Donnarumma, I.; Pacciani, L.; Fiocchi, M.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Bianchin, V.; Bulgarelli, A.; Maraschi, L.; Pian, E.; Chen, A. W.

    2011-08-01

    Since 2005, the blazar 3C 454.3 has shown remarkable flaring activity at all frequencies, and during the last four years it has exhibited more than one {gamma}-ray flare per year, becoming the most active {gamma}-ray blazar in the sky. We present for the first time the multi-wavelength AGILE, Swift, INTEGRAL, and GASP-WEBT data collected in order to explain the extraordinary {gamma}-ray flare of 3C 454.3 which occurred in 2010 November. On 2010 November 20 (MJD 55520), 3C 454.3 reached a peak flux (E >100 MeV) of F{sup p}{sub {gamma}} = (6.8 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -5} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} on a timescale of about 12 hr, more than a factor of six higher than the flux of the brightest steady {gamma}-ray source, the Vela pulsar, and more than a factor of three brighter than its previous super-flare on 2009 December 2-3. The multi-wavelength data make possible a thorough study of the present event: the comparison with the previous outbursts indicates a close similarity to the one that occurred in 2009. By comparing the broadband emission before, during, and after the {gamma}-ray flare, we find that the radio, optical, and X-ray emission varies within a factor of 2-3, whereas the {gamma}-ray flux by a factor of 10. This remarkable behavior is modeled by an external Compton component driven by a substantial local enhancement of soft seed photons.

  9. A three-year multi-wavelength study of the very-high-energy γ-ray blazar 1ES 0229+200

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Byrum, K.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J. E-mail: jeremy.s.perkins@nasa.gov; and others

    2014-02-10

    The high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object 1ES 0229+200 is a relatively distant (z = 0.1396), hard-spectrum (Γ ∼ 2.5), very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) emitting γ-ray blazar. VHE measurements of this active galactic nucleus have been used to place constraints on the intensity of the extragalactic background light and the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). A multi-wavelength study of this object centered around VHE observations by Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is presented. This study obtained, over a period of three years, an 11.7 standard deviation detection and an average integral flux F(E > 300 GeV) = (23.3 ± 2.8{sub stat} ± 5.8{sub sys}) × 10{sup –9} photons m{sup –2} s{sup –1}, or 1.7% of the Crab Nebula's flux (assuming the Crab Nebula spectrum measured by H.E.S.S). Supporting observations from Swift and RXTE are analyzed. The Swift observations are combined with previously published Fermi observations and the VHE measurements to produce an overall spectral energy distribution which is then modeled assuming one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton emission. The χ{sup 2} probability of the TeV flux being constant is 1.6%. This, when considered in combination with measured variability in the X-ray band, and the demonstrated variability of many TeV blazars, suggests that the use of blazars such as 1ES 0229+200 for IGMF studies may not be straightforward and challenges models that attribute hard TeV spectra to secondary γ-ray production along the line of sight.

  10. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF FERMI -LAT BLAZARS ABOVE 50 GEV

    DOE PAGES

    Domínguez, Alberto; Ajello, Marco

    2015-11-04

    We present an analysis of the intrinsic (unattenuated by the extragalactic background light, EBL) power-law spectral indices of 128 extragalactic sources detected up to z ~ 2 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) at very high energies (VHEs, E ≥50 GeV). The median of the intrinsic index distribution is 2.20 (versus 2.54 for the observed distribution). We also analyze the observed spectral breaks (i.e., the difference between the VHE and high energy, HE, 100 MeV ≤ E ≤ 300 GeV, spectral indices). The Fermi-LAT has now provided a large sample of sources detected both at VHE and HE with comparablemore » exposure that allows us to test models of extragalactic γ-ray photon propagation. We find that our data are compatible with simulations that include intrinsic blazar curvature and EBL attenuation. There is also no evidence of evolution with redshift of the physics that drives the photon emission in high-frequency synchrotron peak (HSP) blazars. This makes HSP blazars excellent probes of the EBL.« less

  11. Oscillation signature from multi-wavelength analysis on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2014-03-24

    In this work, we investigate how the solar chromosphere responds to the photospheric dynamics by using tomography study, implementing multiwavelength analysis observations obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. By using high resolution, high-quality, simultaneous image sequences of multi-wavelength data, we try to obtain the oscillation signature that might play important role on chromospheric dynamic by using H-alpha (Hα) as primary diagnostic tool.

  12. Multiwavelength analysis of four millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2011-08-01

    Radio timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in support of Fermi LAT observations of the gamma-ray sky enhance the sensitivity of high-energy pulsation searches. With contemporaneous ephemerides we have detected gamma-ray pulsations from PSR B1937+21, the first MSP ever discovered, and B1957+20, the first known black-widow system. The two MSPs share a number of properties: they are energetic and distant compared to other gamma-ray MSPs, and both of them exhibit aligned radio and gamma-ray emission peaks, indicating co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere of the pulsars. However, radio observations are also crucial for revealing MSPs in Fermi unassociated sources. In a search for radio pulsations at the position of such unassociated sources, the Nançay Radio Telescope discovered two MSPs, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, increasing the sample of known Galactic disk MSPs. Subsequent radio timing observations led to the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from these two MSPs as well. We describe multiwavelength timing and spectral analysis of these four pulsars, and the modeling of their gamma-ray light curves in the context of theoretical models.

  13. Time-Resolved Spectral Analysis of Blazar 0716+714

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Rosamaria; Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    As electromagnetic (EM) waves from sources such as blazars travel through the intergalactic medium (IGM), they are slowed by electrons; a phenomenon called dispersion delay [2]. We study the propagation effects in emissions of EM waves from blazar source BL 0716+714 by estimating the average electron density, or dispersion measure (DM), of the IGM on a line of sight to the blazar. Measuring the variations in these effects with time allow us to understand the properties of the intervening material. Toward this goal we analyzed months of archived observations of BL 0716+714 taken by the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The ATA's correlator produces cross-power vs. frequency spectra for every baseline (distance between a pair of antennas) in ten-second intervals. To reduce this immense load of data we used a technique based on interferometry called bispectrum, which does not depend on complicated array calibration and simplifies our work. The bispectrum multiplies baselines, three at a time, so that they form a closed loop, then the cube root of spectra are averaged [1]. This technique is independent of phase errors associated with any individual antenna and has a better SNR ratio than simply taking the average of all the baselines. We developed a numerical analysis program that takes in archived blazar files containing correlation data, computes the bispectrum, and outputs FITS images for each day of observations. The results show that our observations do not have sufficient sensitivity to reveal blazar variations in the frequency ranges that were studied. It is suggested that future observations at higher frequencies and/or with another telescope having greater sensitivity would reveal the time/frequency dependence of emission structure that would allow measurements of electron content. This work shows that but bispectrum is a useful tool for rapid characterization of interferometer data that does not require interferometer caclibration which could introduce artifacts

  14. Analysis of multiwavelength coherent beam combining effect.

    PubMed

    Kai, Han; Xiaojun, Xu; Zejin, Liu

    2012-12-01

    The combination effect of multiwavelength active coherent beam combination (CBC) is investigated theoretically. The dependence of the combination effect on the optical path control precision, spectral width, wavelength number, and channel number is revealed. In the case of small optical path variance, the combination effect approximately decreases in quadratic form with wavelength number N, spectral width Δν, and optical path variance σ increasing. In the case of large optical path variance, the combination effect is independent of the optical path variance and the spectral width. The larger the wavelength number is, the smaller the Strehl ratio expectation is, and it finally degenerates to the incoherent combination. The necessity of optical path control is discussed. This study is helpful for multiwavelength CBC system design and the combination effect estimation.

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH VARIABILITY OF THE BLAZARS Mrk 421 AND 3C 454.3 IN THE HIGH STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Haritma; Gupta, Alok C.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2012-01-15

    We report the results of photometric observations of the blazars Mrk 421 and 3C 454.3 designed to search for intraday variability (IDV) and short-term variability (STV). Optical photometric observations were spread over 18 nights for Mrk 421 and 7 nights for 3C 454.3 during our observing run in 2009-2010 at the 1.04 m telescope at Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, India. Genuine IDV is found for the source 3C 454.3 but not for Mrk 421. Genuine STV is found for both sources. Mrk 421 was revealed by the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) X-ray detector on the International Space Station to be in an exceptionally high flux state in 2010 January-February. We performed a correlation between the X-ray and optical bands to search for time delays and found a weak correlation with higher frequencies leading the lower frequencies by about 10 days. The blazar 3C 454.3 was found to be in a high flux state in 2009 November-December. We performed correlations in optical observations made at three telescopes, along with X-ray data from the MAXI camera and public release {gamma}-ray data from the Fermi space telescope. We found strong correlations between the {gamma}-ray and optical bands at a time lag of about four days, but the X-ray flux is not correlated with either. We briefly discuss the possible reasons for the time delays between these bands within the framework of existing models for X-ray and {gamma}-ray emission mechanisms.

  16. Test of models of the cosmic infrared background with multiwavelength observations of the blazar 1ES 1218+30.4 in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; and others

    2014-06-20

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength campaign targeting the blazar 1ES 1218+30.4 with observations with the 1.3 m McGraw-Hill optical telescope, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, and the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The RXTE and VERITAS observations were spread over a 13 day period and revealed clear evidence for flux variability, and a strong X-ray and γ-ray flare on 2009 February 26 (MJD 54888). The campaign delivered a well-sampled broadband energy spectrum with simultaneous RXTE and VERITAS very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) observations, as well as contemporaneous optical and Fermi observations. The 1ES 1218+30.4 broadband energy spectrum—the first with simultaneous X-ray and VHE γ-ray energy spectra—is of particular interest as the source is located at a high cosmological redshift for a VHE source (z = 0.182), leading to strong absorption of VHE gamma rays by photons from the optical/infrared extragalactic background light (EBL) via γ{sub VHE} + γ{sub EBL} → e {sup +} e {sup –} pair-creation processes. We model the data with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission model and with the extragalactic absorption predicted by several recent EBL models. We find that the observations are consistent with the SSC scenario and all the EBL models considered in this work. We discuss observational and theoretical avenues to improve on the EBL constraints.

  17. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH POLARIMETRIC STUDY OF THE BLAZAR CTA 102 DURING A GAMMA-RAY FLARE IN 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Carolina; Gómez, José L.; Agudo, Iván; Molina, Sol N.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Bala, Vishal; Joshi, Manasvita; Taylor, Brian; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Blinov, Dmitry A.; Grishina, Tatiana S.; Hagen-Thorn, Vladimir A.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Borman, George A.; Paola, Andrea Di; and others

    2015-11-01

    We perform a multi-wavelength polarimetric study of the quasar CTA 102 during an extraordinarily bright γ-ray outburst detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2012 September–October when the source reached a flux of F{sub >100} {sub MeV} = 5.2 ± 0.4 × 10{sup −6} photons cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. At the same time, the source displayed an unprecedented optical and near-infrared (near-IR) outburst. We study the evolution of the parsec-scale jet with ultra-high angular resolution through a sequence of 80 total and polarized intensity Very Long Baseline Array images at 43 GHz, covering the observing period from 2007 June to 2014 June. We find that the γ-ray outburst is coincident with flares at all the other frequencies and is related to the passage of a new superluminal knot through the radio core. The powerful γ-ray emission is associated with a change in direction of the jet, which became oriented more closely to our line of sight (θ ∼ 1.°2) during the ejection of the knot and the γ-ray outburst. During the flare, the optical polarized emission displays intra-day variability and a clear clockwise rotation of electric vector position angles (EVPAs), which we associate with the path followed by the knot as it moves along helical magnetic field lines, although a random walk of the EVPA caused by a turbulent magnetic field cannot be ruled out. We locate the γ-ray outburst a short distance downstream of the radio core, parsecs from the black hole. This suggests that synchrotron self-Compton scattering of NIR to ultraviolet photons is the probable mechanism for the γ-ray production.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Analysis of the Quasar CTA102 during a Dramatic Outburst in 2016 December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Marscher, Alan P.; Williamson, Karen E.; Larionov, Valeri M.; Smith, Paul S.; Gurwell, Mark A.; Lahteenmaki, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Abstract: The quasar CTA102 underwent a dramatic outburst from gamma-ray toradio wavelengths in late 2016. The gamma-ray emission at 0.1-200 GeV roseup to (12.1+-0.7)x10^{-6} phot/s/cm^2, with a significant flattening of the spectral index. The blazar reached an optical brightness level never observed previously, < 11 mag in R band, and an increase of the radio flux density at millimeter wavelengths with flattening of the radio spectrum was observed as well.We present analysis of multi-wavelength data during the event obtained at gamma-rays with the Fermi Large Area telescope, at X-rays provided by the NuStar X-ray telescope and Swift XRT and UVOT, in optical bands measured at different telescopes around the world along with polarimetric observations, and at mm-waves obtained at Metsahovi Radio Observatory and SubMillimeter Array, along with imaging of theparsec-scale jet of the quasar with the VLBA at 43 GHz. This research is funded in part by NASA through Fermi Guest Investigator grant NNX14AQ58G and by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1615796.

  19. Multiwavelength analysis of a solar quiet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: We examine oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region from multi-wavelength observations obtained by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) and by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO). The observations were obtained during a coordinated observing campaign in October 2005. Aims: We investigate the temporal variations of the intensities and the velocities in two distinct regions of the quiet Sun, one containing several dark mottles and the other several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB). The aim is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as the propagation characteristics of waves. Methods: Intensity and velocity variations are studied with wavelet and phase difference analyses. Results: Both regions (i.e. mottles and NB) show a periodicity of ~5 min in all considered lines. The V-V phase differences in the NB region point to an upward propagation of waves; in the region of mottles, for periods of 250-400 s, the phase difference is mainly negative, which suggests a downward propagation, in turn indicating a refraction of waves from the inclined magnetic field of mottles along the line-of-sight. Conclusions: The phase differences at the NB arise from a predominance of upward propagating waves. In the mottles' region, the negative phase differences we found suggest that propagating waves encounter a boundary and are refracted and reflected. Of course, several limitations exist in the exact interpretation of the phase differences, e.g. the complex topology of the magnetic field, the formation conditions and heights of the examined spectral lines, and the low spatial resolution.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Dynamic SEDs of southern blazars - DSSB (Krauss+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, F.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Schulz, R.; Trustedt, J.; Edwards, P. G.; Stevens, J.; Ros, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Blanchard, J.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Dauser, T.; Falkner, S.; Gehrels, N.; Grafe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Muller, C.; Natusch, T.; Nesci, R.; Pursimo, T.; Phillips, C.; Plotz, C.; Quick, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.

    2016-05-01

    The Dynamic SEDs of southern blazars catalog is based on a TANAMI multiwavelength project that has been monitoring a sample of 22 radio-loud blazars of the southern sky from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. (4 data files).

  1. ANTARES Constrains a Blazar Origin of Two IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. J.; Baret, B.; Barrios, J.; Basa, S.; Gehrels, N.; Baumgartner, W.; Thompson, D. J.; Ojha, R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The source(s) of the neutrino excess reported by the IceCube Collaboration is unknown. The TANAMI Collaboration recently reported on the multiwavelength emission of six bright, variable blazars which are positionally coincident with two of the most energetic IceCube events. Objects like these are prime candidates to be the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and thus of associated neutrino emission. Aims. We present an analysis of neutrino emission from the six blazars using observations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. Methods. The standard methods of the ANTARES candidate list search are applied to six years of data to search for an excess of muons - and hence their neutrino progenitors - from the directions of the six blazars described by the TANAMI Collaboration, and which are possibly associated with two IceCube events. Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to both signal and background particle fluxes are used to estimate the sensitivity of this analysis for di erent possible source neutrino spectra. A maximum-likelihood approach, using the reconstructed energies and arrival directions of through-going muons, is used to identify events with properties consistent with a blazar origin. Results. Both blazars predicted to be the most neutrino-bright in the TANAMI sample (1653-329 and 1714-336) have a signal flux fitted by the likelihood analysis corresponding to approximately one event. This observation is consistent with the blazar-origin hypothesis of the IceCube event IC 14 for a broad range of blazar spectra, although an atmospheric origin cannot be excluded. No ANTARES events are observed from any of the other four blazars, including the three associated with IceCube event IC20. This excludes at a 90% confidence level the possibility that this event was produced by these blazars unless the neutrino spectrum is flatter than -2.4.

  2. ANTARES Constrains a Blazar Origin of Two IceCube PeV Neutrino Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J. J.; Baret, B.; Barrios, J.; Basa, S.; Gehrels, N.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Context. The source(s) of the neutrino excess reported by the IceCube Collaboration is unknown. The TANAMI Collaboration recently reported on the multiwavelength emission of six bright, variable blazars which are positionally coincident with two of the most energetic IceCube events. Objects like these are prime candidates to be the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and thus of associated neutrino emission. Aims. We present an analysis of neutrino emission from the six blazars using observations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. Methods. The standard methods of the ANTARES candidate list search are applied to six years of data to search for an excess of muons - and hence their neutrino progenitors - from the directions of the six blazars described by the TANAMI Collaboration, and which are possibly associated with two IceCube events. Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to both signal and background particle fluxes are used to estimate the sensitivity of this analysis for di erent possible source neutrino spectra. A maximum-likelihood approach, using the reconstructed energies and arrival directions of through-going muons, is used to identify events with properties consistent with a blazar origin. Results. Both blazars predicted to be the most neutrino-bright in the TANAMI sample (1653-329 and 1714-336) have a signal flux fitted by the likelihood analysis corresponding to approximately one event. This observation is consistent with the blazar-origin hypothesis of the IceCube event IC 14 for a broad range of blazar spectra, although an atmospheric origin cannot be excluded. No ANTARES events are observed from any of the other four blazars, including the three associated with IceCube event IC20. This excludes at a 90% confidence level the possibility that this event was produced by these blazars unless the neutrino spectrum is flatter than -2.4.

  3. ANTARES constrains a blazar origin of two IceCube PeV neutrino events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANTARES Collaboration; Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; TANAMI Collaboration; Krauß, F.; Kadler, M.; Mannheim, K.; Schulz, R.; Trüstedt, J.; Wilms, J.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Blanchard, J.; Bürkel, C.; Carpenter, B.; Edwards, P. G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Fritsch, U.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Großberger, C.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Kappes, A.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Müller, C.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The source(s) of the neutrino excess reported by the IceCube Collaboration is unknown. The TANAMI Collaboration recently reported on the multiwavelength emission of six bright, variable blazars which are positionally coincident with two of the most energetic IceCube events. Objects like these are prime candidates to be the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and thus of associated neutrino emission. Aims: We present an analysis of neutrino emission from the six blazars using observations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. Methods: The standard methods of the ANTARES candidate list search are applied to six years of data to search for an excess of muons - and hence their neutrino progenitors - from the directions of the six blazars described by the TANAMI Collaboration, and which are possibly associated with two IceCube events. Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to both signal and background particle fluxes are used to estimate the sensitivity of this analysis for different possible source neutrino spectra. A maximum-likelihood approach, using the reconstructed energies and arrival directions of through-going muons, is used to identify events with properties consistent with a blazar origin. Results: Both blazars predicted to be the most neutrino-bright in the TANAMI sample (1653-329 and 1714-336) have a signal flux fitted by the likelihood analysis corresponding to approximately one event. This observation is consistent with the blazar-origin hypothesis of the IceCube event IC 14 for a broad range of blazar spectra, although an atmospheric origin cannot be excluded. No ANTARES events are observed from any of the other four blazars, including the three associated with IceCube event IC20. This excludes at a 90% confidence level the possibility that this event was produced by these blazars unless the neutrino spectrum is flatter than -2.4. Figures 2, 3 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Multi-wavelength analysis of Ellerman Bomb Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlender, M.; Berlicki, A.

    We present the results of a multi-wavelength photometric analysis of Ellerman Bomb (EB) observations obtained from the Dutch Open Telescope. In our data we have found 6 EBs located in the super-penumbra of the main spot in the active region NOAA 10781. We present light curves of EB observed in the Hα line centre and wing +0.7 Å, in the Ca II H line centre and wing~+2.35 Å, in the G-band and in the TRACE 1600 Å filter. We have shown that EBs were visible in the G-band and moreover, there was a good correlation between the light curves in the G-band and in the Hα line wings. We also found quasi-periodic oscillations of EBs brightness in the G-band, CaII H line and TRACE 1600 Å filter.

  5. Multi-wavelength analysis from tomography study on solar chromosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpuni, Emanuel Sungging; Herdiwijaya, Dhani; Djamal, Mitra

    2015-04-16

    The Sun as the most important star for scientific laboratory in astrophysics as well as encompassing all living aspect on Earth, still holds scientific mystery. As the established model that the Sun’s energy fueled by the nuclear reaction, along with transport process to the typical Solar surface on around 6000-K temperature, many aspects still left as an open questions, such as how the chromosphere responded to the photospheric dynamics. In this preliminary work, we try to analyze the Solar chromosphere respond to the Photospheric dynamics using tomography study implementing multi-wavelength analysis observation obtained from Dutch Open Telescope. Using the Hydrogen-alpha Doppler signal as the primary diagnostic tool, we try to investigate the inter-relation between the magnetic and gas pressure dynamics that occur in the chromosphere.

  6. Discovery of VHE γ-rays from the blazar 1ES 1215+303 with the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Ansoldi, S.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jankowski, F.; Jogler, T.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Berdyugin, A.; Buson, S.; Järvelä, E.; Larsson, S.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tammi, J.

    2012-08-01

    Context. We present the discovery of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the BL Lac object 1ES 1215+303 by the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength data in a broad energy range from radio to γ-rays. Aims: We study the VHE γ-ray emission from 1ES 1215+303 and its relation to the emissions in other wavelengths. Methods: Triggered by an optical outburst, MAGIC observed the source in 2011 January - February for 20.3 h. The target was monitored in the optical R-band by the KVA telescope that also performed optical polarization measurements. We triggered target of opportunity observations with the Swift satellite and obtained simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and from the Metsähovi radio telescope. We also present the analysis of older MAGIC data taken in 2010. Results: The MAGIC observations of 1ES 1215+303 carried out in 2011 January - February resulted in the first detection of the source at VHE with a statistical significance of 9.4σ. Simultaneously, the source was observed in a high optical and X-ray state. In 2010 the source was observed in a lower state in optical, X-ray, and VHE, while the GeV γ-ray flux and the radio flux were comparable in 2010 and 2011. The spectral energy distribution obtained with the 2011 data can be modeled with a simple one zone SSC model, but it requires extreme values for the Doppler factor or the electron energy distribution.

  7. Discovery of VHE γ -rays from the blazar 1ES 1215+303 with the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Ansoldi, S.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jankowski, F.; Jogler, T.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Paiano, S.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puerto Gimenez, I.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Berdyugin, A.; Buson, S.; Järvelä, E.; Larsson, S.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tammi, J.

    2012-08-15

    Here, we present the discovery of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the BL Lac object 1ES 1215+303 by the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength data in a broad energy range from radio to γ-rays. We also study the VHE γ-ray emission from 1ES 1215+303 and its relation to the emissions in other wavelengths. Triggered by an optical outburst, MAGIC observed the source in 2011 January - February for 20.3 h. The target was monitored in the optical R-band by the KVA telescope that also performed optical polarization measurements. Furthermore, we triggered target of opportunity observations with the Swift satellite and obtained simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and from the Metsähovi radio telescope. We also present the analysis of older MAGIC data taken in 2010. The MAGIC observations of 1ES 1215+303 carried out in 2011 January - February resulted in the first detection of the source at VHE with a statistical significance of 9.4σ. Simultaneously, the source was observed in a high optical and X-ray state. In 2010 the source was observed in a lower state in optical, X-ray, and VHE, while the GeV γ-ray flux and the radio flux were comparable in 2010 and 2011. The spectral energy distribution obtained with the 2011 data can be modeled with a simple one zone SSC model, but it requires extreme values for the Doppler factor or the electron energy distribution.

  8. Discovery of VHE γ -rays from the blazar 1ES 1215+303 with the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength observations

    DOE PAGES

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; ...

    2012-08-15

    Here, we present the discovery of very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) γ-ray emission from the BL Lac object 1ES 1215+303 by the MAGIC telescopes and simultaneous multi-wavelength data in a broad energy range from radio to γ-rays. We also study the VHE γ-ray emission from 1ES 1215+303 and its relation to the emissions in other wavelengths. Triggered by an optical outburst, MAGIC observed the source in 2011 January - February for 20.3 h. The target was monitored in the optical R-band by the KVA telescope that also performed optical polarization measurements. Furthermore, we triggered target of opportunitymore » observations with the Swift satellite and obtained simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and from the Metsähovi radio telescope. We also present the analysis of older MAGIC data taken in 2010. The MAGIC observations of 1ES 1215+303 carried out in 2011 January - February resulted in the first detection of the source at VHE with a statistical significance of 9.4σ. Simultaneously, the source was observed in a high optical and X-ray state. In 2010 the source was observed in a lower state in optical, X-ray, and VHE, while the GeV γ-ray flux and the radio flux were comparable in 2010 and 2011. The spectral energy distribution obtained with the 2011 data can be modeled with a simple one zone SSC model, but it requires extreme values for the Doppler factor or the electron energy distribution.« less

  9. B-FlaP: Classifying Gamma-ray Blazars Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David John; Chiaro, Graziano; Giroletti, Marcello; Salvetti, David; La Mura, Giovanni; Bastieri, Denis

    2017-01-01

    In the Third Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources, 573 are listed as Blazar Candidates of Uncertain type (BCU), or sources without a conclusive classification. Blazar Flaring Patterns (B-FlaP) uses Empirical Cumulative Distribution Function and Artificial Neural Network machine-learning techniques for a fast method of screening and classification of BCUs based on gamma-ray data only, when rigorous multiwavelength analysis is not available. In this study radio analysis and direct observations by ground-based optical observatories are used to validate the B-FlaP method. Tests indicate that the method is effective, suggesting that 342 sources are likely BL Lac objects, 154 are likely Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars, with only 77 remaining uncertain. 53 of the BCUs appear to be High Synchrotron Peaked blazars, a class of particular interest to ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.

  10. Multi-wavelength analysis of young pulsars: an overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maritz, J. M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Buchner, S. J.

    Young pulsars emit a broad spectrum of radiation that range from radio to gamma ray energies. These pulsars are considered as rotation powered pulsars that spin rapidly and are strongly magnetized. Following the discovery of pulsars nearly four decades ago, the population of known pulsars already reached a number of roughly two thousand. This known population of pulsars includes both millisecond and normal pulsars that were discovered by several telescopes. We analyze both HartRAO radio data and Fermi gamma ray data of the Vela pulsar. We also explore a proposed method of probing the electron column density of the instellar gas through analyzing the gamma ray diffuse data associated with the Fermi two-year observation. This paper serves as an overview of gamma ray and radio timing analysis of bright young pulsars with respect to the use of open source timing analysis tools (Tempo2, Psrchive, Enrico and the Fermi tools). We reason that the multi-wavelength picture of pulsars can help clarify questions regarding the origin of pulsed radiation emission mechanisms in several energy bands, but that radio observations will prove adequate for timing noise analysis, given the accurate and long radio data sets. The process of identifying gravitational waves in timing data, rests on gaining a deeper insight into the timing noise phenomena.

  11. Multiwavelength variability analysis of the FSRQ 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Chavushyan, V.; León-Tavares, J.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Fernandes, S.; Schlegel, E. M.; López-Rodríguez, E.

    2015-03-01

    We present a multifrequency analysis of the variability in the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 from 2008 to 2014. Our multiwavelength dataset includes gamma-ray data from Fermi/LAT (Abdo et al. 2009), observations in 1mm from SMA (Gurwell et al. 2007), Near Infrared from OAGH (Carramiñana & Carrasco 2009) and SMARTS (Bonning et al. 2012); optical V band from the Steward Observatory (Smith et al. 2009) and SMARTS; optical spectra from OAGH (Patiño-Álvarez et al. 2013) and the Steward Observatory; and polarization spectra from the Steward Observatory. The light curves are shown in Fig. 1. Six out of seven optical activity periods identified within our dataset show clear counterparts in mm, NIR and gamma-rays, however, the late 2011 - early 2012 optical flare does not have a counterpart in the GeV regime. In this contribution, we discuss the flaring evolution of 3C 279 and speculate about the production of the anomalous activity period.

  12. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF FERMI -LAT BLAZARS ABOVE 50 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Domínguez, Alberto; Ajello, Marco

    2015-11-04

    We present an analysis of the intrinsic (unattenuated by the extragalactic background light, EBL) power-law spectral indices of 128 extragalactic sources detected up to z ~ 2 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) at very high energies (VHEs, E ≥50 GeV). The median of the intrinsic index distribution is 2.20 (versus 2.54 for the observed distribution). We also analyze the observed spectral breaks (i.e., the difference between the VHE and high energy, HE, 100 MeV ≤ E ≤ 300 GeV, spectral indices). The Fermi-LAT has now provided a large sample of sources detected both at VHE and HE with comparable exposure that allows us to test models of extragalactic γ-ray photon propagation. We find that our data are compatible with simulations that include intrinsic blazar curvature and EBL attenuation. There is also no evidence of evolution with redshift of the physics that drives the photon emission in high-frequency synchrotron peak (HSP) blazars. This makes HSP blazars excellent probes of the EBL.

  13. MULTIWAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; White, Stephen M.; Zhang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a multiwavelength analysis of the solar limb flare on 2002 April 15. The observations all indicate that the flare occurred in an active region with an asymmetric dipole magnetic configuration. The earlier conclusion that magnetic reconnection is occurring in a large-scale current sheet in this flare is M e r supported by these observations: (1) Several bloblike sources, seen in RHESSI 12-25 keV X-ray images later in the flare, appeared along a line above the flare loops. These indicate the continued presence of the current sheet and are likely to be magnetic islands in the stretched sheet produced by the tearing-mode instability. (2) A cusplike structure is seen in Nobeyama Radioheliogiaph (NoRH) 34 GHz microwave images around the time of the peak flare emission. We quantitatively demonstrate that the X-ray-emitting thermal plasma seen with RHESSI had a higher temperature than the microwave-emitting plasma seen with NoRH. Since the radio data preferentially see cooler thermal plasma, this result is consistent with the picture in which energy release occurs at progressively greater heights and the hard X-rays see hot new loops while the radio sees older cooling loops. The kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare was found to be about 1 order of magnitude less than both the thermal energy in the hot plasma and the nonthermal energy carried by the accelerated electrons in the flare, as deduced from the RHESSI observations. This contrasts with the higher CME kinetic energies typically deduced for large flares.

  14. MULTIWAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF A SOLAR FLARE ON 2002 APRIL 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; White, Stephen M.; Zhang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a multiwavelength analysis of the solar limb flare on 2002 April 15. The observations all indicate that the flare occurred in an active region with an asymmetric dipole magnetic configuration. The earlier conclusion that magnetic reconnection is occurring in a large-scale current sheet in this flare is M e r supported by these observations: (1) Several bloblike sources, seen in RHESSI 12-25 keV X-ray images later in the flare, appeared along a line above the flare loops. These indicate the continued presence of the current sheet and are likely to be magnetic islands in the stretched sheet produced by the tearing-mode instability. (2) A cusplike structure is seen in Nobeyama Radioheliogiaph (NoRH) 34 GHz microwave images around the time of the peak flare emission. We quantitatively demonstrate that the X-ray-emitting thermal plasma seen with RHESSI had a higher temperature than the microwave-emitting plasma seen with NoRH. Since the radio data preferentially see cooler thermal plasma, this result is consistent with the picture in which energy release occurs at progressively greater heights and the hard X-rays see hot new loops while the radio sees older cooling loops. The kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare was found to be about 1 order of magnitude less than both the thermal energy in the hot plasma and the nonthermal energy carried by the accelerated electrons in the flare, as deduced from the RHESSI observations. This contrasts with the higher CME kinetic energies typically deduced for large flares.

  15. Swift multi-wavelength observations of the high-redshift Blazar S5 0836+710 (4C 71.07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercellone, Stefano; Romano, Patrizia; Raiteri, Claudia Maria; Acosta Pulido, Jose; Villata, Massimo; Carnerero Martin, Maria Isabel

    2016-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of a year-long Swift monitoring campaign of the high-redshift (z=2.172) flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) S5 0836+710 (4C 71.07). The campaign, based on one observation per month, 5 ks each observation, for 12 months, allowed us to investigate the synchrotron and nuclear emission contributions to the optical-UV frequency range of its spectral energy distribution and the X-ray spectral variations along a baseline of a year. We obtained a high-accuracy determination of UVOT magnitudes, an X-ray photon index with an uncertainty of the order of 5%, and well-sampled light curves both in the optical-UV and X-ray energy bands to study their possible modulations and correlations. Our study allowed us to exploit the unique Swift capabilities in terms of both simultaneous energy coverage and schedule flexibility. The Swift monitoring campaign was supported by observations by the GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) Collaboration, which provided radio, near-infrared, and optical photometric data as well as optical polarimetry. Moreover, a spectroscopic monitoring was obtained at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT). All these observations will allow us to obtain a comprehensive picture of the jet as well as of the nuclear source emission.

  16. Multiwavelength Examination of the COS B Field 2CG 075+00 Yields a Blazar Identification for 3EG J2016+3657

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, R.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, Jules P.; Tavani, M.; Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a high-energy study of the intriguing COS B gamma-ray field, 2CG 075+00, in order to search for possible counterparts. New EGRET data show that the COS B emission probably corresponds to two localized gamma-ray sources, 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2021+3716. Spectral fits to these EGRET sources, assuming a power-law model, yield photon indices of approx. 2 for each object. We examine archival ROSAT and ASCA X-ray data that overlap both EGRET error boxes and find several point sources in the region to a flux limit of approximately 6.5 x 10(exp -13) ergs/sq cm s. We conclude that the most probable candidate for 3EG J2016+3657 is the compact, variable, flat-spectrum radio and millimeter source B2013+370 (G74.87+1.22), which has blazar like properties. The other source, 3EG J2021+3716, remains unidentified.

  17. Analysis Techniques for a Multiwavelength Study of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    Our study of radio galaxies combines X-ray, radio, and optical data to address scientific objectives including: Are the radio jets in pressure balance with an external hot medium? What is the rate of fuel supply to the active nuclei? What physical mechanisms produce the nuclear and jet emission? Needs for our data-analysis include the ability to: calibrate, clean, and map radio-synthesis continuum and spectral-line data. regrid images of poorer detector resolution than the radio (such as X-ray), display them superimposed on the radio image, and compare features in the images. perform joint spectral-spatial deconvolution of the photon-limited X-ray data to fit point-source and extended X-ray emission components in the presence of a spectrally- and spatially-dependent point-spread function; resolved components are typically not much larger than the point-spread. take into account absorbing gas when fitting the X-ray spectra; the hydrogen column density is measured in the spectral-line radio work. compare the temperature of X-ray emission thought to be due to hot gas with the maximum for gas in hydrostatic equilibrium; this maximum is indicated by the velocity dispersion of stars associated with the radio galaxy and galaxies in its group. extract surface brightness and temperature profiles across extended X-ray emission associated with hot gas; calculate the pressure at different locations and the cooling time of the gas; compare pressures with published minimum pressures for the radio components. plot a multiwavelength spectrum for a given spatial component of the galaxy, using the data-sets being analyzed and supplemented by results from published work, and fit to analytical or numerical emission models. Our current data-reduction, display, and analysis uses IRAF, AIPS, MONGO, and home-grown FORTRAN programs in a somewhat cumbersome and disjointed fashion, and simplifications are made in the analysis due to the current limitations of the tools and procedures. Work

  18. Analysis of the cumulative neutrino flux from Fermi LAT blazar populations using 3 years of IceCube data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glüsenkamp, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse neutrino flux up to PeV energies raises the question of which populations of astrophysical sources contribute to this diffuse signal. One extragalactic candidate source population to produce high-energy neutrinos are Blazars. We present results from a likelihood analysis searching for cumulative neutrino emission from Blazar populations selected with the 2nd Fermi LAT AGN catalogue (2LAC) using an IceCube data set that has been optimized for the detection of individual sources. In contrast to previous searches with IceCube, the investigated populations contain up to hundreds of sources, the biggest one being the entire Blazar sample measured by the Fermi-LAT. No significant neutrino signal was found from any of these populations. Some implications of this non-observation for the origin of the observed PeV diffuse signal will be discussed.

  19. Lone Blazar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-12

    This image from NASA WISE spacecraft shows a blazar, a voracious supermassive black hole inside a galaxy with a jet that happens to be pointed right toward Earth. Active black holes are often found at the hearts of elliptical galaxies.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES WITH MULTIFREQUENCY ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowperthwaite, Philip S.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-11-01

    Blazars are a highly variable, radio-loud subclass of active galactic nuclei. In order to better understand such objects we must be able to easily identify candidate blazars from the growing population of unidentified sources. Working toward this goal, we attempt to identify new gamma-ray blazar candidates from a sample of 102 previously unidentified sources. These sources are selected from The Astronomer's Telegram and the literature on the basis of non-periodic variability and multi-wavelength behavior. We then attempt to associate these objects to an IR counterpart in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey. We are able to identify 16 candidate sources whose IR colors are consistent with those of the blazar population. Of those, 13 sources have IR colors indicative of being gamma-ray emitting blazar candidates. These sources all possess archival multi-wavelength observations that support their blazar-like nature.

  1. Does the Blazar Gamma-ray Spectrum Harden with Increasing Flux? - Analysis of Nine Years of EGRET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandikotkur, Giridhar; Jahoda, Keith M.; Hartman, R. C.; Mukherjee, R.; Sreekumar, P.; Boettcher, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) discovered gamma-ray emission from more than 67 blazars during its nine-year lifetime. We conducted an exhaustive search of the EGRET archives and selected all the blazars that were observed multiple times and were bright enough to enable a spectral analysis using standard powerlaw models. The sample consists of 18 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 6 low-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (LBLs) and 2 high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs). We do not detect any clear pattern in'the variation of spectral index with flux. Some of the blazars do not show any statistical evidence for spectral variability. The spectrum hardens with increasing flux in a few cases. There is also evidence for a flux-hardness anticorrelation at lo\\v fluxes in five blazars. The well observed blazars (3C 279,3C 273, PKS 0528-i-134, PKS 1622-297, PKS 0208- 512) do not show any overall trend in the long-term spectral dependence on flux, but the sample shows a mixture of hard and soft states. We observed spectral hysteresis at weekly timescales in all the three FSRQs for which data from flares lasting for 3 approx. 4 weeks were available. All three sources show a counterclockwise rotation despite the widely different flux profiles. Hysteresis in the spectral index vs. flux space has never been observed in FSRQs in gamma-rays at weekly timescales. itre analyze the observed spectral behavior in the context of various inverse-Compton mechanisms believed to be responsible for emission in the EGRET energy range. Our analysis uses the EGRET skymaps that were regenerated to include the changes in performance during the mission.

  2. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P. F.; Cameron, R. A.; Digel, S. W.; Thompson, D. J.; Wood, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-spectrum blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  3. GLAST Large Area Telescope Multiwavelength Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, O.; Michelson, P.F.; Cameron, R.A.; Digel, S.W.; Thompson, D.J.; Wood, K.S.

    2007-01-03

    Gamma-ray astrophysics depends in many ways on multiwavelength studies. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) Collaboration has started multiwavelength planning well before the scheduled 2007 launch of the observatory. Some of the high-priority multiwavelength needs include: (1) availability of contemporaneous radio and X-ray timing of pulsars; (2) expansion of blazar catalogs, including redshift measurements; (3) improved observations of molecular clouds, especially at high galactic latitudes; (4) simultaneous broad-band blazar monitoring; (5) characterization of gamma-ray transients, including gamma ray bursts; (6) radio, optical, X-ray and TeV counterpart searches for reliable and effective sources identification and characterization. Several of these activities are needed to be in place before launch.

  4. Computing the Periods of Light Variation of Blazar Objects 3C279 and OJ 287 with Autoregressive Spectral Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-juan; Pang, Qiao; Zhang, Hao-Jing; Zheng, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Xiong

    2010-04-01

    The light variability is one of the main characteristics of blazar objects. Because of the complexity of their light curves, the present periodicity analysis methods are not yet perfect. Based on the modern spectral estimate theory, this paper has described in details the principles of the maximum entropy spectral estimate and autoregressive (AR) spectral estimate, analyzed the effect of the order number selection on the resultant model. Applying these methods to the periodicity analysis of the quasar 3C 279 and BL Lac object OJ 287, their light periods are obtained to be 7.14 and 11.76 yr, respectively. As is verified by experiments, the AR spectral estimate has a high resolution and is a rather good periodicity analysis method. Finally, the items noteworthy for the application of these spectrum estimation methods to the periodicity analysis of the light variations of blazars are mentioned.

  5. Can Turbulence Dominate Depolarization of Optical Blazars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Mao, Jirong; Wang, Jiancheng

    2017-07-01

    We carefully examine the depolarization feature of blazars in the optical and near-infrared bands using the sample of Mead et al. Magnetohydrodynamics turbulence could be one possible reason for the depolarization of optical/infrared blazars when we apply the theoretical analysis of Lazarian & Pogosyan. We further identify in the sample that the depolarization results shown in most blazars roughly obey the form of the three-dimensional anisotropic Kolmogorov scaling. The effective Faraday rotation window length scale is not small enough to resolve the polarization correlation length scale in the blazar sample. The depolarization and the related turbulent features show diversities in different blazar sources. We suggest more simultaneous observations in both the optical/infrared and the high-energy bands for the study of the blazar polarization.

  6. Highlights of the first XMM-Newton observations of OJ 287 and coordinated multiwavelength campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, S.

    2006-10-01

    One of the aims of the European Network for the Investigation of Galactic nuclei through Multifrequency Analysis (ENIGMA) was the organization and implementation of international multiwavelength campaigns, exploiting space-borne and ground-based astrophysical facilities, and the development of blazar multifrequency analysis and modelling. A short summary of a campaign devoted to the peculiar blazar OJ 287 is reported here, as one of the main activity performed during the recruitment of the author in this Research Network. X-ray data obtained during the two proposed XMM-Newton observations of OJ 287 in 2005, showed different brightness states and different spectral slopes and components. The X-ray observation epochs corresponded also to two active and flaring stages at optical wavelengths.

  7. A Multiwavelength Study of Three Hybrid Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Ethan; Kharb, Preeti; Lister, Matthew L.; Marshall, Herman L.; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid active galactic nuclei (AGN) are rare objects that show jet morphology like that of low-power, Fanaroff-Riley Type I (FR-I) AGN on one side of the central black hole and that of high-power, FR-II AGN on the other. As such, they offer an excellent opportunity to study the physical causes of differences between FR-I and FR-II AGN, but so far very few have been well studied. We obtained new Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory observations plus archival Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array observations of three hybrid AGN to study their spectral energy distributions and model the emission mechanisms of their jets, knots, and hotspots. Based on our parsec-scale VLBA radio observations, these sources have jets that are highly aligned with the line of sight, and the FR-I morphology jet is pointing toward the observer for two of the sources, and the FR-II jet is for the third. Regardless of these alignment differences, all three yielded only optical upper limits on their jet emission, which definitively rules out a single synchrotron emission mechanism for radio through X-ray energies and implies that their emission mechanisms are more similar to FR-II AGN. Additionally, all three sources show high total radio power typical of FR-II AGN. When these 3 AGN are considered alongside the 10 previously well-studied hybrid AGN, a trend emerges that the majority have approaching FR-I morphology jets with FR-II emission mechanisms. In all 13 cases, the X-ray emission is found in the approaching jet. This raises unresolved questions regarding these sources, highlighting the need for additional multifrequency observations of hybrid AGN.

  8. Broadband Observations of High Redshift Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Stalin, C. S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of four high redshift blazars, S5 0014+81 (z = 3.37), CGRaBS J0225+1846 (z = 2.69), BZQ J1430+4205 (z = 4.72), and 3FGL J1656.2-3303 (z = 2.40) using quasi-simultaneous data from the Swift, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) and also archival XMM-Newton observations. Other than 3FGL J1656.2-3303, none of the sources were known as γ-ray emitters, and our analysis of ˜7.5 yr of LAT data reveals the first time detection of statistically significant γ-ray emission from CGRaBS J0225+1846. We generate the broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of all the objects, centering at the epoch of NuSTAR observations and reproduce them using a one-zone leptonic emission model. The optical-UV emission in all the objects can be explained by radiation from the accretion disk, whereas the X-ray to γ-ray windows of the SEDs are found to be dominated by inverse Compton scattering off the broad line region photons. All of them host black holes that are billions of solar masses. Comparing the accretion disk luminosity and the jet power of these sources with a large sample of blazars, we find them to occupy a high disk luminosity-jet power regime. We also investigate the X-ray spectral properties of the sources in detail with a major focus on studying the causes of soft X-ray deficit, a feature generally seen in high redshift radio-loud quasars. We summarize that this feature could be explained based on the intrinsic curvature in the jet emission rather than being due to the external effects predicted in earlier studies, such as host galaxy and/or warm absorption.

  9. Blazar flaring patterns (B-FlaP) classifying blazar candidate of uncertain type in the third Fermi-LAT catalogue by artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaro, G.; Salvetti, D.; La Mura, G.; Giroletti, M.; Thompson, D. J.; Bastieri, D.

    2016-11-01

    The Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) is currently the most important facility for investigating the GeV γ-ray sky. With Fermi-LAT, more than three thousand γ-ray sources have been discovered so far. 1144 (˜40 per cent) of the sources are active galaxies of the blazar class, and 573 (˜20 per cent) are listed as blazar candidate of uncertain type (BCU), or sources without a conclusive classification. We use the empirical cumulative distribution functions and the artificial neural networks for a fast method of screening and classification for BCUs based on data collected at γ-ray energies only, when rigorous multiwavelength analysis is not available. Based on our method, we classify 342 BCUs as BL Lacs and 154 as flat-spectrum radio quasars, while 77 objects remain uncertain. Moreover, radio analysis and direct observations in ground-based optical observatories are used as counterparts to the statistical classifications to validate the method. This approach is of interest because of the increasing number of unclassified sources in Fermi catalogues and because blazars and in particular their subclass high synchrotron peak objects are the main targets of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.

  10. Kepler light-curve analysis of the blazar W2R 1926+42

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Bachev, Rumen; Strigachev, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We study the long term Kepler light curve of the blazar W2R 1926+42 (˜1.6 yr) which indicates a variety of variability properties during different intervals of observation. The normalized excess variance, Fvar ranges from 1.8 per cent in the quiescent phase and 43.3 per cent in the outburst phase. We find no significant deviation from linearity in the Fvar-flux relation. Time series analysis is conducted using the Fourier power spectrum and the wavelet analysis methods to study the power spectral density (PSD) shape, infer characteristic time-scales and statistically significant quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). A bending power law with an associated time-scale of T_B = 6.2^{+6.4}_{-3.1} hours is inferred in the PSD analysis. We obtain a black hole mass of M• = (1.5-5.9) × 107 M⊙ for the first time using Fvar and the bend time-scale for this source. From a mean outburst lifetime of days, we infer a distance from the jet base r ≤ 1.75 pc indicating that the outburst originates due to a shock. A possible QPO peaked at 9.1 d and lasting 3.4 cycles is inferred from the wavelet analysis. Assuming that the QPO is a true feature, r = (152-378)GM•/c2 and supported by the other timing analysis products such as a weighted mean PSD slope of -1.5 ± 0.2 from the PSD analysis, we argue that the observed variability and the weak and short duration QPO could be due to jet based processes including orbital features in a relativistic helical jet and others such as shocks and turbulence.

  11. Constraining Emission Models of Luminous Blazar Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Stawarz, Lukasz; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Many luminous blazars which are associated with quasar-type active galactic nuclei display broad-band spectra characterized by a large luminosity ratio of their high-energy ({gamma}-ray) and low-energy (synchrotron) spectral components. This large ratio, reaching values up to 100, challenges the standard synchrotron self-Compton models by means of substantial departures from the minimum power condition. Luminous blazars have also typically very hard X-ray spectra, and those in turn seem to challenge hadronic scenarios for the high energy blazar emission. As shown in this paper, no such problems are faced by the models which involve Comptonization of radiation provided by a broad-line-region, or dusty molecular torus. The lack or weakness of bulk Compton and Klein-Nishina features indicated by the presently available data favors production of {gamma}-rays via up-scattering of infrared photons from hot dust. This implies that the blazar emission zone is located at parsec-scale distances from the nucleus, and as such is possibly associated with the extended, quasi-stationary reconfinement shocks formed in relativistic outflows. This scenario predicts characteristic timescales for flux changes in luminous blazars to be days/weeks, consistent with the variability patterns observed in such systems at infrared, optical and {gamma}-ray frequencies. We also propose that the parsec-scale blazar activity can be occasionally accompanied by dissipative events taking place at sub-parsec distances and powered by internal shocks and/or reconnection of magnetic fields. These could account for the multiwavelength intra-day flares occasionally observed in powerful blazars sources.

  12. Strong constraints on hadronic models of blazar activity from Fermi and IceCube stacking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, Andrii; Semikoz, Dmitri V.; Ptitsyna, Ksenia

    2017-07-01

    Context. High-energy emission from blazars is produced by electrons that are either accelerated directly, under the assumption of leptonic models of blazar activity, or produced in interactions of accelerated protons with matter and radiation fields, under the assumption of hadronic models. The hadronic models predict that γ-ray emission is accompanied by neutrino emission with comparable total energy. Aims: We derive constraints on the hadronic models of activity of blazars imposed by non-detection of neutrino flux from a population of γ-ray emitting blazars. Methods: We stacked the γ-ray and muon neutrino flux from 749 blazars situated in the declination strip above - 5°. Results: Non-detection of neutrino flux from the stacked blazar sample rules out the proton-induced cascade models in which the high-energy emission is powered by interactions of a shock-accelerated proton beam in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet with the ambient matter or radiation field of the black hole accretion disk. The result also remains valid for the case of interactions in the scattered radiation field in the broad line region. The IceCube constraint could be avoided if the spectrum of accelerated protons is sharply peaking in the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray range, as in the models of acceleration in the magnetic reconnection regions or in the vacuum gaps of black hole magnetospheres. Models based on these acceleration mechanisms are only consistent with the data if characteristic energies of accelerated protons are higher than 1019 eV. The constraint could also be avoided if the hadronic emission component of γ-ray flux is largely sub-dominant compared to the leptonic component and/or if it only appears during flaring activity episodes, which provide negligible contribution to the time-averaged source flux.

  13. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - III. Compton-dominant blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we develop the extended jet model of Potter & Cotter to model the simultaneous multiwavelength spectra of six Compton-dominant blazars. We include an accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by observations of M87 and consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate several jet models and find that the optically thick to thin synchrotron break in the radio spectrum requires the jet to first come into equipartition at large distances along the jet, consistent with the observed transition from parabolic to conical at 105Rs in the jet of M87. We confirm this result analytically and calculate the expected frequency core-shift relations for the models under consideration. We find that a parabolic jet transitioning to a ballistic conical jet at 105Rs, which starts in equipartition and becomes more particle dominated at larger distances, fits the multiwavelength data of the six blazars well, whilst an adiabatic equipartition conical section requires very large bulk Lorentz factors to reproduce the Compton dominance of the blazars. We find that all these blazars require high power (>1039 W), high bulk Lorentz factor (>20) jets observed close to the line of sight (<2°) as we expect from the blazar sequence and consistent with the results from Paper II. The inverse-Compton emission in our fits is due to inverse-Compton scattering of high-redshift cosmic microwave background photons at large distances along the jet due to the high bulk Lorentz factors of the jets. We postulate a new interpretation of the blazar sequence based on the radius of the transition region of the jet (where the jet is brightest in synchrotron emission) scaling linearly with black hole mass.

  14. General statistics and principal component analysis of multiwavelength properties of Seyfert galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dultzin-Hacyan, D.; Ruano, C.

    1996-01-01

    We present a statistical study including principal component analysis (PCA) of multiwavelength properties of types 1 and 2 Seyfert galaxies. We have applied PCA to an ensemble of X-ray, optical, near and far infrared, and radio data of Seyfert galaxies. We used Lipovetsky et al. (1987) catalog which provides the largest list of Seyfert galaxies with multiwavelength data. Our main result is that the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of Seyfert 1 galaxies is well accounted by one and only one underlying variable, at least to a first approximation. On the other hand, in the case of Seyfert 2 galaxies, at least three variables are required. Several details of the analysis lead us to the following interpretation of this result: In the case of Seyfert 1 galaxies, the main process at the origin of radiation is the release of energy of gravitational origin by accretion unto a supermassive black hole. In the case of Seyfert 2 galaxies, there are other important processes apart from energy of gravitational origin, which we may identify with stellar and interstellar radiation (mainly dust absortion and re-emission) from the circumnuclear region. In the framework of this interpretation the analysis reveals that the variance in luminosity related to radiation of stellar/interstellar origin in no case exceeds ~13% for Seyfert 1 galaxies. In contrast, for Seyfert 2 galaxies the radiation of stellar/interstellar origin can account for ~46% of the variance in certain luminosities.

  15. Multi-wavelength Analysis of a Solar Network Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    We analyse co-temporal observations of a network region found near the solar disc centre, obtained by the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) and the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on-board SOHO during a coordinated observing campaign in October 2005. DOT obtained images in 5 wavelengths along the ha\\ profile, while CDS obtained sit-and-stare observations in several EUV spectral lines that span the upper solar atmosphere. After fitting the CDS spectral line profiles we obtained 2-D space-time maps of intensities, Doppler velocities and Doppler widths. We study the appearance of the network region in the different spectral lines and the temporal variations of the obtained physical parameters. We employ a wavelet analysis to examine the existence of oscillations at the network in the different solar layers.

  16. Multiwavelength analysis of dark matter annihilation and RX-DMFIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaniel, A.; Jeltema, T.; Profumo, S.; Storm, E.

    2017-09-01

    Dark matter (DM) particles are predicted by several well motivated models to yield Standard Model particles through self-annihilation that can potentially be detected by astrophysical observations. In particular, the production of charged particles from DM annihilation in astrophysical systems that contain magnetic fields yields radio emission through synchrotron radiation and X-ray emission through inverse Compton scattering of ambient photons. We introduce RX-DMFIT, a tool used for calculating the expected secondary emission from DM annihilation. RX-DMFIT includes a wide range of customizable astrophysical and particle parameters and incorporates important astrophysics including the diffusion of charged particles, relevant radiative energy losses, and magnetic field modelling. We demonstrate the use and versatility of RX-DMFIT by analyzing the potential radio and X-ray signals for a variety of DM particle models and astrophysical environments including galaxy clusters, dwarf spheroidal galaxies and normal galaxies. We then apply RX-DMFIT to a concrete example using Segue I radio data to place constraints for a range of assumed DM annihilation channels. For WIMP models with Mχ <= 100 GeV and assuming weak diffusion, we find that the leptonic μ+μ‑ and τ+τ‑ final states provide the strongest constraints, placing limits on the DM particle cross-section well below the thermal relic cross-section, while even for the bbar b channel we find limits close to the thermal relic cross-section. Our analysis shows that radio emission provides a highly competitive avenue for dark matter searches.

  17. Optical spectroscopic observations of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates in the sloan digital sky survey data release nine

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Funk, S.

    2014-09-09

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra available in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release nine (SDSS DR9) for the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and for the γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to their IR colors. First, we adopt a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo simulations to find the optical counterparts of the blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT catalog. Then, we crossmatched the SDSS spectroscopic catalog with our selected samples of blazars and γ-ray blazar candidates, searching for those with optical spectra available to classify our blazar-like sources and, whenever possible, to confirm their redshifts. Our main objectives are to determine the classification of uncertain blazars listed in the ROMA-BZCAT and to discover new gamma-ray blazars. For the ROMA-BZCAT sources, we investigated a sample of 84 blazars, confirming the classification for 20 of them and obtaining 18 new redshift estimates. For the γ-ray blazars, indicated as potential counterparts of unassociated Fermi sources or with uncertain nature, we established the blazar-like nature of 8 out of the 27 sources analyzed and confirmed 14 classifications.

  18. General physical properties of bright Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Maraschi, L.; Celotti, A.

    2010-02-01

    We studied all blazars of known redshift detected by the Fermi satellite during its first 3-month survey. For the majority of them, pointed Swift observations ensure a good multiwavelength coverage, enabling us to reliably construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We model the SEDs using a one-zone leptonic model and study the distributions of the derived interesting physical parameters as a function of the observed γ-ray luminosity. We confirm previous findings concerning the relation of the physical parameters with source luminosity which are at the origin of the blazar sequence. The SEDs allow to estimate the luminosity of the accretion disc for the majority of broad emitting line blazars, while for the lineless BL Lac objects in the sample upper limits can be derived. We find a positive correlation between the jet power and the luminosity of the accretion disc in broad-line blazars. In these objects, we argue that the jet must be proton dominated, and that the total jet power is of the same order of (or slightly larger than) the disc luminosity. We discuss two alternative scenarios to explain this result.

  19. Multiwavelength spectrophotometric determination of acid dissociation constants: Part II. First derivative vs. target factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, K Y; Takács-Novák, K

    1999-03-01

    Acid dissociation constants (pKa values) denote the extent of ionization of drug molecules at different pH values, which is important in understanding their penetration through biological membranes and their interaction with the receptors. However, many drug molecules are sparingly soluble in water or contain ionization centres with overlapping pKa values, making precise pKa determination difficult using conventional spectrophotometric titration. In this work, we investigate a multiwavelength spectrophotometric titration (WApH) method for the determination of pKa values. Spectral changes which arise during pH-metric titrations of substances with concentration of about 10(-5) M were captured by means of an optical system developed in this study. All experiments were carried out in 0.15 M KCI solution at 25 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Mathematical treatments based on the first derivative spectrophotometry procedure and the target factor analysis method were applied to calculate the pKa values from the multiwavelength absorption titration data. pKa values were determined by the WApH technique for six ionizable substances, namely, benzoic acid, phenol, phthalic acid, nicotinic acid, p-aminosalicylic acid and phenolphthalein. The pKa values measured using the WApH technique are in excellent agreement with those measured pH-metrically. We have demonstrated that the first derivative spectrophometry procedure provides a relatively simple way to visualize the pKa values which are consistent with those determined using the target factor analysis method. However, for ionization systems with insufficient spectral data obtained around the sought pKa values or with closely overlapping pKa values, the target factor analysis method outperforms the first derivative procedure in terms of obtaining the results. Using the target factor analysis method, it has been shown that the two-step ionization of phenolphthalein involves a colorless anion intermediate and a red colored di-anion.

  20. Towards a multi-wavelength spectroscopy platform for blood characterization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kisomi, Alireza Avakh; Landari, Hamza; Boukadoum, Mounir; Miled, Amine; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-08-01

    Passing multiple light wavelengths through a blood sample makes it possible to investigate the presence and composition of cells, metabolytes and analytes such as blood cells, glucose, lactate and oxygen, providing valuable indications for diagnostic and health monitoring. In this paper, we present a test prototype of a multi-wavelength blood spectroscopy platform integrated with a microfluidic substrate to collect and convey blood samples through a series of micro-LEDs and a photo-detector. This spectroscopy platform is a proof of concept for a system that can collect absorbance and transmittance parameters of blood samples at several wavelengths within the visible and NIR spectrum, and transmit them wirelessly to a base station for real-time calculation and analysis. In-vitro measurements are performed with the proposed prototype with 5 channels covering wavelength from 400 nm to 940 nm A full characterization results of the proposed device are presented.

  1. Noctilucent cloud particle size determination based on multi-wavelength all-sky analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, Oleg S.; Galkin, Alexey A.; Pilgaev, Sergey V.; Roldugin, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with the analysis of color distribution in noctilucent clouds (NLC) in the sky based on multi-wavelength (RGB) CCD-photometry provided with the all-sky camera in Lovozero in the north of Russia (68.0°N, 35.1°E) during the bright expanded NLC performance in the night of August 12, 2016. Small changes in the NLC color across the sky are interpreted as the atmospheric absorption and extinction effects combined with the difference in the Mie scattering functions of NLC particles for the three color channels of the camera. The method described in this paper is used to find the effective monodisperse radius of particles about 55 nm. The result of these simple and cost-effective measurements is in good agreement with previous estimations of comparable accuracy. Non-spherical particles, Gaussian and lognormal distribution of the particle size are also considered.

  2. [Remote system of natural gas leakage based on multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Lu, Xu-Tao; Yang, Ze-Hui

    2014-05-01

    In order to be able to quickly, to a wide range of natural gas pipeline leakage monitoring, the remote detection system for concentration of methane gas was designed based on static Fourier transform interferometer. The system used infrared light, which the center wavelength was calibrated to absorption peaks of methane molecules, to irradiated tested area, and then got the interference fringes by converging collimation system and interference module. Finally, the system calculated the concentration-path-length product in tested area by multi-wavelength characteristics spectrum analysis algorithm, furthermore the inversion of the corresponding concentration of methane. By HITRAN spectrum database, Selected wavelength position of 1. 65 microm as the main characteristic absorption peaks, thereby using 1. 65 pm DFB laser as the light source. In order to improve the detection accuracy and stability without increasing the hardware configuration of the system, solved absorbance ratio by the auxiliary wave-length, and then get concentration-path-length product of measured gas by the method of the calculation proportion of multi-wavelength characteristics. The measurement error from external disturbance is caused by this innovative approach, and it is more similar to a differential measurement. It will eliminate errors in the process of solving the ratio of multi-wavelength characteristics, and can improve accuracy and stability of the system. The infrared absorption spectrum of methane is constant, the ratio of absorbance of any two wavelengths by methane is also constant. The error coefficients produced by the system is the same when it received the same external interference, so the measured noise of the system can be effectively reduced by the ratio method. Experimental tested standards methane gas tank with leaking rate constant. Using the tested data of PN1000 type portable methane detector as the standard data, and were compared to the tested data of the system

  3. RXTE Observations of Selected Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2002-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycles 4 and 5 of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project is part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars in collaboration with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK).

  4. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Luo, G. Y.; Lin, C.; Yuan, Y. H.; Xiao, H. B.; Zhou, A. Y.; Hua, T. X.; Pei, Z. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, multiwavelength data are compiled for a sample of 1425 Fermi blazars to calculate their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). A parabolic function, {{log}}{(ν {F}ν )={P}1({{log}}ν -{P}2)}2+{P}3, is used for SED fitting. Synchrotron peak frequency ({log}{ν }{{p}}), spectral curvature (P1), peak flux ({ν }{{p}}{F}{ν {{p}}}), and integrated flux (ν {F}ν ) are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars (461 flat-spectrum radio quasars [FSRQs], 620 BL Lacs [BLs], and 311 blazars of uncertain type [BCUs]; 999 sources have known redshifts). Monochromatic luminosity at radio 1.4 GHz, optical R band, X-ray at 1 keV and γ-ray at 1 GeV, peak luminosity, integrated luminosity, and effective spectral indices of radio to optical ({α }{{RO}}) and optical to X-ray ({α }{{OX}}) are calculated. The “Bayesian classification” is employed to log {ν }{{p}} in the rest frame for 999 blazars with available redshift, and the results show that three components are enough to fit the log {ν }{{p}} distribution; there is no ultra-high peaked subclass. Based on the three components, the subclasses of blazars using the acronyms of Abdo et al. are classified, and some mutual correlations are also studied. Conclusions are finally drawn as follows: (1) SEDs are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars. The fitted peak frequencies are compared with common sources from available samples. (2) Blazars are classified as low synchrotron peak sources if log {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 14.0, intermediate synchrotron peak sources if 14.0\\lt {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 15.3, and high synchrotron peak sources if {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})\\gt 15.3. (3) Gamma-ray emissions are strongly correlated with radio emissions. Gamma-ray luminosity is also correlated with synchrotron peak luminosity and integrated luminosity. (4) There is an anticorrelation between peak frequency and peak luminosity within the whole blazar sample. However, there is a marginally positive correlation for high

  5. The Blazar 3C 66A in 2003-2004: hadronic versus leptonic model fits

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, A.

    2008-12-24

    The low-frequency peaked BL Lac object 3C 66A was the subject of an extensive multi-wavelength campaign from July 2003 till April 2004, which included quasi-simultaneous observations at optical, X-rays and very high energy gamma-rays. Here we apply the hadronic Synchrotron-Proton Blazar (SPB) model to the observed spectral energy distribution time-averaged over a flaring state, and compare the resulting model fits to those obtained from the application of the leptonic Synchrotron-Self-Compton (SSC) model. The results are used to identify diagnostic key predictions of the two blazar models for future multi-wavelength observations.

  6. Unusual flaring activity in the blazar PKS 1424-418 during 2008-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Buson, S.; Longo, F.; Larsson, S.; Cutini, S.; Finke, J.; Ciprini, S.; Ojha, R.; D’Ammando, F.; Donato, D.; Thompson, D. J.; Desiante, R.; Bastieri, D.; Wagner, S.; Hauser, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Dutka, M.; Müller, C.; Kadler, M.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Stevens, J.; Blanchard, J. M.; Edwards, P. G.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Gurwell, M. A.; Wehrle, A. E.; Zook, A.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Blazars are a subset of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets that are oriented along our line of sight. Variability and spectral energy distribution (SED) studies are crucial tools for understanding the physical processes responsible for observed AGN emission. Aims. We report peculiar behaviour in the bright γ-ray blazar PKS 1424-418 and use its strong variability to reveal information about the particle acceleration and interactions in the jet. Methods. Correlation analysis of the extensive optical coverage by the ATOM telescope and nearly continuous γ-ray coverage by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is combined with broadband, time-dependent modeling of the SED incorporating supplemental information from radio and X-ray observations of this blazar. Results. We analyse in detail four bright phases at optical-GeV energies. These flares of PKS 1424-418 show high correlation between these energy ranges, with the exception of one large optical flare that coincides with relatively low γ-ray activity. Although the optical/ γ-ray behaviour of PKS 1424-418 shows variety, the multiwavelength modeling indicates that these differences can largely be explained by changes in the flux and energy spectrum of the electrons in the jet that are radiating. We find that for all flares the SED is adequately represented by a leptonic model that includes inverse Compton emission from external radiation fields with similar parameters. Conclusions. Detailed studies of individual blazars like PKS 1424-418 during periods of enhanced activity in different wavebands are helping us identify underlying patterns in the physical parameters in this class of AGN.

  7. Unusual flaring activity in the blazar PKS 1424-418 during 2008-2011

    DOE PAGES

    Buson, S.; Longo, F.; Larsson, S.; ...

    2014-09-01

    Context. Blazars are a subset of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets that are oriented along our line of sight. Variability and spectral energy distribution (SED) studies are crucial tools for understanding the physical processes responsible for observed AGN emission. Aims. We report peculiar behaviour in the bright γ-ray blazar PKS 1424-418 and use its strong variability to reveal information about the particle acceleration and interactions in the jet. Methods. Correlation analysis of the extensive optical coverage by the ATOM telescope and nearly continuous γ-ray coverage by the Fermi Large Area Telescope is combined with broadband, time-dependent modeling of themore » SED incorporating supplemental information from radio and X-ray observations of this blazar. Results. We analyse in detail four bright phases at optical-GeV energies. These flares of PKS 1424-418 show high correlation between these energy ranges, with the exception of one large optical flare that coincides with relatively low γ-ray activity. Although the optical/ γ-ray behaviour of PKS 1424-418 shows variety, the multiwavelength modeling indicates that these differences can largely be explained by changes in the flux and energy spectrum of the electrons in the jet that are radiating. We find that for all flares the SED is adequately represented by a leptonic model that includes inverse Compton emission from external radiation fields with similar parameters. Conclusions. Detailed studies of individual blazars like PKS 1424-418 during periods of enhanced activity in different wavebands are helping us identify underlying patterns in the physical parameters in this class of AGN.« less

  8. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF BLAZAR VARIABILITY: KLEIN–NISHINA EFFECTS AND THE JET SCATTERING ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, Justin D.; Becker, Peter A. E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu

    2015-08-10

    The strong variability of blazars can be characterized by power spectral densities (PSDs) and Fourier frequency-dependent time lags. In previous work, we created a new theoretical formalism for describing the PSDs and time lags produced via a combination of stochastic particle injection and emission via the synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton, and external Compton (EC) processes. This formalism used the Thomson cross section and simple δ-function approximations to model the synchrotron and Compton emissivities. Here we expand upon this work, using the full Compton cross section and detailed and accurate emissivities. Our results indicate good agreement between the PSDs computed using the δ-function approximations and those computed using the accurate expressions, provided the observed photons are produced primarily by electrons with energies exceeding the lower limit of the injected particle population. Breaks are found in the PSDs at frequencies corresponding to the cooling timescales of the electrons primarily responsible for the observed emission, and the associated time lags are related to the difference in electron cooling timescales between the two energy channels, as expected. If the electron cooling timescales can be determined from the observed time lags and/or the observed EC PSDs, then one could in principle use the method developed here to determine the energy of the external seed photon source for EC, which is an important unsolved problem in blazar physics.

  9. Synchrotron Polarization in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for γ-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full three-dimensional radiation transfer code, assuming a helical magnetic field throughout the jet. The code considers synchrotron emission from an ordered magnetic field, and takes into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with the two-dimensional Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck (MCFP) code. We consider several possible mechanisms through which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet may affect the jet plasma to produce a synchrotron and high-energy flare. Most plausibly, the shock is expected to lead to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component and thereby changing the direction of the magnetic field in the region affected by the shock. We find that such a scenario leads to correlated synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle. Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large polarization angle rotations by >~ 180°, as observed in connection with γ-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other nonaxisymmetric jet features.

  10. Polarization swings reveal magnetic energy dissipation in blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳ 180°) polarization angle swings are observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light-travel-time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization information in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic-field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.

  11. POLARIZATION SWINGS REVEAL MAGNETIC ENERGY DISSIPATION IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Böttcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳180°) polarization angle swings are sometimes observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light travel time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization information in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.

  12. Polarization Swings Reveal Magnetic Energy Dissipation in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳180°) polarization angle swings are sometimes observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light travel time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization information in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.

  13. Polarization swings reveal magnetic energy dissipation in blazars

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; ...

    2015-05-01

    The polarization signatures of blazar emissions are known to be highly variable. In addition to small fluctuations of the polarization angle around a mean value, large (≳ 180°) polarization angle swings are observed. We suggest that such phenomena can be interpreted as arising from light-travel-time effects within an underlying axisymmetric emission region. We present the first simultaneous fitting of the multi-wavelength spectrum, variability, and time-dependent polarization features of a correlated optical and gamma-ray flaring event of the prominent blazar 3C279, which was accompanied by a drastic change in its polarization signatures. This unprecedented combination of spectral, variability, and polarization informationmore » in a coherent physical model allows us to place stringent constraints on the particle acceleration and magnetic-field topology in the relativistic jet of a blazar, strongly favoring a scenario in which magnetic energy dissipation is the primary driver of the flare event.« less

  14. Nine years of multi-frequency monitoring of the blazar PKS 0048-097: spectral and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzcholska, Alicja

    2015-08-01

    Context. Blazars are highly variable, radio-loud active galactic nuclei with jets oriented at a small angle to the line of sight. The observed emission of these sources covers the whole electromagnetic spectrum from radio frequencies up to the high or even very high energy gamma-ray range. To understand the complex physics of these objects, multi-wavelength observations and studies on the variability and correlations between different wavelengths are therefore essential. Aims: The long-term multi-frequency observations of PKS 0048-097 are analysed here to investigate its spectral and temporal features. The studies includes nine years of observations of the blazar, which is well studied in the optical and radio domain, but not in the other frequencies. Methods: Multi-wavelength data collected with OVRO, KAIT, Catalina, Swift/UVOT, Swift/XRT, and Fermi/LAT were studied. Results: The performed analysis revealed strong variability in all wavelengths that is most clearly manifested in the X-ray range. The correlation studies do not exhibit any relation between different wavelengths, except for the very strong positive correlation between the optical emission in V and R bands.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Oscillations of a Solar Quiet Region Using Multi-Wavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the temporal behavior of a solar quiet region using a set of multi-wavelength observations obtained during a coordinated campaign. The observations were acquired by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on-board SOHO and the UV filters of the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE). A large range of height in the solar atmosphere, from the deep photosphere to the upper chromosphere is covered by these instruments. We investigate the oscillation properties of the intensities and velocities in distinct regions of the quiet Sun, i.e. internetwork, bright points (NBP) defining the network boundaries and dark mottles forming a well-defined rosette, as observed by the different instruments and in the different heights. The variations of the intensities and velocities are studied with wavelet analysis. The aim of our work is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in the different examined regions, as well as comprehensive information on the interaction of the oscillations and the magnetic field.

  16. Multiwavelength monitoring of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent multiwavelength monitoring of active galactic nuclei (AGN), particularly with the IUE satellite, has produced extraordinay advances in our understanding of the energy-generation mechanism(s) in the central engine and of the structure of the surrounding material. Examples discussed here include both ordinary AGN and blazars (the collective name for highly variable, radio-loud AGN like BL Lac objects and Optically Violently Variable quasars). In the last decade, efforts to obtain single-epoch multiwavelength spectra led to fundamentally new models for the structure of AGN, involving accretion disks for AGN and relativistic jets for blazars. Recent extensions of multiwavelength spectroscopy into the temporal domain have shown that while these general pictures may be correct, the details were probably wrong. Campaigns to monitor Seyfert 1 galaxies like NGC 4151, NGC 5548 and Fairall 9 at infrared, optical, ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths indicate that broad-emission line regions are stratified by ionization, density, and velocity; argue against a standard thin accretion disk model; and suggest that X-rays represent primary rather than reprocessed radiation. For blazars, years of radio monitoring indicated emission from an inhomogeneous synchrotron-emitting plasma, which could also produce at least some of the shorter-wavelength emission. The recent month-long campaign to observe the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 has revealed remarkably rapid variability that extends from the infrared through the X-ray with similar amplitude and little or no discernible lag. This lends strong support to relativistic jet models and rules out the proposed accretion disk model for the ultraviolet-X-ray continuum.

  17. AGILE confirmation of enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Blazar 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-06-01

    Following ATel #9148, reporting multi-wavelength activity from the BL Lac type blazar 1ES 1959+650, AGILE also detects increased gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a position compatible with this BL Lac source.

  18. Lights and shadows: multi-wavelength analysis of young stellar objects and their protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Stars form from the collapse of molecular clouds and evolve in an environment rich in gas and dust before becoming Main Sequence stars. During this phase, characterised by the presence of a protoplanetary disc, stars manifest changes in the structure and luminosity. This thesis performs a multi-wavelength analysis, from optical to mm range, on a sample of young stars (YSOs), mainly Classical T Tauri (CTTS). The purpose is to study optical and infrared variability and its relation with the protoplanetary disc. Longer wavelength, in the mm range, are used instead to investigate the evolution of the disc, in terms of dust growth. In optical, an F-test on a sample of 39 CTTS reveals that 67% of the stars are variable. The variability, quantified through pooled sigma, is visible both in magnitude amplitudes and changes over time. Time series analysis applied on the more variable stars finds the presence of quasi periodicity, with periods longer than two weeks, interpreted either as eclipsing material in the disc happening on a non-regular basis, or as a consequence of star-disc interaction via magnetic field lines. The variability of YSOs is confirmed also in infrared, even if with lower amplitude. No strong correlations are found between optical and infrared variability, which implies a different cause or a time shift in the two events. By using a toy model to explore their origin, I find that infrared variations are likely to stem from emissions in the inner disc. The evolution of discs in terms of dust growth is confirmed in most discs by the analysis of the slope of the spectral energy distribution (SED), after correcting for wind emission and optical depth effects. However, the comparison with a radiative transfer model highlights that a number of disc parameters, in particular disc masses and temperature, dust size distribution and composition, can also affect the slope of the SED.

  19. Studying Gamma-Ray Blazars With the GLAST-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, B.; Carson, J.; Madejski, G.; Ciprini, S.; Dermer, C.D.; Giommi, P.; Lonjou, V.; Reimer, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-11-13

    Thanks to its sensitivity (4 10{sup -9} ph (E> 100 MeV) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for one year of observation), the GLAST LAT should detect many more (over a thousand) gamma-ray blazars than currently known. This large blazar sample will enable detailed population studies to be carried out. Moreover, the LAT large field-of-view combined with the scanning mode will provide a very uniform exposure over the sky, allowing a constant monitoring of several tens of blazars and flare alerts to be issued. This poster presents the LAT performance relevant to blazar studies, more particularly related to timing and spectral properties. Major specific issues regarding the blazar phenomenon that the LAT data should shed light on thanks to these capabilities will be discussed, as well as the different approaches foreseen to address them. The associated data required in other bands, to be collected in contemporaneous/simultaneous multiwavelength campaigns are mentioned as well.

  20. RXTE Observations of Selected Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Margo F.

    2002-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycles 4 and 5 of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project is part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars in cooperation with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK). The goals of the program are to study the X-ray emission mechanism in blazars and the relation of the X-ray emission to changes in the relativistic jet. The program includes contemporaneous brightness and linear polarization monitoring at radio and optical wavelengths, total and polarized intensity imaging at 43 GHz with a resolution of 0.1 milliarcseconds with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), and well-sampled X-ray light curves obtained from a series of approved RXTE programs.

  1. Rapid variability of blazar 3C 279 during flaring states in 2013-2014 with joint FERMI-LAT, NuSTAR, SWIFT, and ground-based multi-wavelength observations

    DOE PAGES

    Hayashida, M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madejski, G. M.; ...

    2015-07-02

    Here we report the results of a multiband observing campaign on the famous blazar 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The γ-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flares reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with F(E>100 MeV) of 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1, and with a flux-doubling time scale as short as 2 hr. The γ-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of Γγ =1.7±0.1, which is rarely seen in flat-spectrum radio quasars. The lack of concurrent optical variability implies a very high Compton dominance parameter Lγ/Lsyn > 300. Two 1 day NuSTAR observations with accompanying Swift pointings were separated by 2 weeks, probing different levels of source activity. While the 0.5-70 keV X-ray spectrum obtained during the first pointing, and fitted jointly with Swift-XRT is well-described by a simple power law, the second joint observation showed an unusual spectral structure: the spectrum softens by ΔΓxmore » $$\\simeq$$ 0.4 at ~ keV. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution during this flare with the standard synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model requires: (1) the location of the γ-ray emitting region is comparable with the broad-line region radius, (2) a very hard electron energy distribution index p $$\\simeq$$ 1, (3) total jet power significantly exceeding the accretion-disk luminosity Lj/Ld ≳ 10, and (4) extremely low jet magnetization with LB/Lj ≲ 10-4. In conclusion, we also find that single-zone models that match the observed γ-ray and optical spectra cannot satisfactorily explain the production of X-ray emission.« less

  2. Rapid variability of blazar 3C 279 during flaring states in 2013-2014 with joint FERMI-LAT, NuSTAR, SWIFT, and ground-based multi-wavelength observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madejski, G. M.; Sikora, M.; Itoh, R.; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Buson, S.; Chiang, J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Furniss, A. K.; Urry, C. M.; Hasan, I.; Harrison, F. A.; Alexander, D. M.; Baloković, M.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B.; Hailey, C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Westergaard, N. J.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Uemura, M.; Akitaya, H.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kanda, Y.; Moritani, Y.; Takaki, K.; Ui, T.; Yoshida, M.; Agarwal, A.; Gupta, A. C.

    2015-07-02

    Here we report the results of a multiband observing campaign on the famous blazar 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The γ-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flares reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with F(E>100 MeV) of 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1, and with a flux-doubling time scale as short as 2 hr. The γ-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of Γγ =1.7±0.1, which is rarely seen in flat-spectrum radio quasars. The lack of concurrent optical variability implies a very high Compton dominance parameter Lγ/Lsyn > 300. Two 1 day NuSTAR observations with accompanying Swift pointings were separated by 2 weeks, probing different levels of source activity. While the 0.5-70 keV X-ray spectrum obtained during the first pointing, and fitted jointly with Swift-XRT is well-described by a simple power law, the second joint observation showed an unusual spectral structure: the spectrum softens by ΔΓx $\\simeq$ 0.4 at ~ keV. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution during this flare with the standard synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model requires: (1) the location of the γ-ray emitting region is comparable with the broad-line region radius, (2) a very hard electron energy distribution index p $\\simeq$ 1, (3) total jet power significantly exceeding the accretion-disk luminosity Lj/Ld ≳ 10, and (4) extremely low jet magnetization with LB/Lj ≲ 10-4. In conclusion, we also find that single-zone models that match the observed γ-ray and optical spectra cannot satisfactorily explain the production of X-ray emission.

  3. Rapid Variability of Blazar 3C 279 during Flaring States in 2013-2014 with Joint Fermi-LAT, NuSTAR, Swift, and Ground-Based Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, M.; Nalewajko, K.; Madejski, G. M.; Sikora, M.; Itoh, R.; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Buson, S.; Chiang, J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Furniss, A. K.; Urry, C. M.; Hasan, I.; Harrison, F. A.; Alexander, D. M.; Baloković, M.; Barret, D.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Grefenstette, B.; Hailey, C.; Hornstrup, A.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Madsen, K. K.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Perri, M.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Puccetti, S.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Westergaard, N. J.; Zhang, W. W.; Zoglauer, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Uemura, M.; Akitaya, H.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kanda, Y.; Moritani, Y.; Takaki, K.; Ui, T.; Yoshida, M.; Agarwal, A.; Gupta, A. C.

    2015-07-01

    We report the results of a multiband observing campaign on the famous blazar 3C 279 conducted during a phase of increased activity from 2013 December to 2014 April, including first observations of it with NuSTAR. The γ-ray emission of the source measured by Fermi-LAT showed multiple distinct flares reaching the highest flux level measured in this object since the beginning of the Fermi mission, with F(E\\gt 100 {MeV}) of 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1, and with a flux-doubling time scale as short as 2 hr. The γ-ray spectrum during one of the flares was very hard, with an index of {{{Γ }}}γ =1.7+/- 0.1, which is rarely seen in flat-spectrum radio quasars. The lack of concurrent optical variability implies a very high Compton dominance parameter {L}γ /{L}{syn}\\gt 300. Two 1 day NuSTAR observations with accompanying Swift pointings were separated by 2 weeks, probing different levels of source activity. While the 0.5-70 keV X-ray spectrum obtained during the first pointing, and fitted jointly with Swift-XRT is well-described by a simple power law, the second joint observation showed an unusual spectral structure: the spectrum softens by {{Δ }}{{{Γ }}}{{X}}≃ 0.4 at ˜4 keV. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution during this flare with the standard synchrotron plus inverse-Compton model requires: (1) the location of the γ-ray emitting region is comparable with the broad-line region radius, (2) a very hard electron energy distribution index p≃ 1, (3) total jet power significantly exceeding the accretion-disk luminosity {L}j/{L}d≳ 10, and (4) extremely low jet magnetization with {L}B/{L}j≲ {10}-4. We also find that single-zone models that match the observed γ-ray and optical spectra cannot satisfactorily explain the production of X-ray emission.

  4. Novel Analysis of the Multiwavelength Structure of the Relativistic Jet in Quasar 3C 273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Volodymyr; Harris, D. E.; Ostrowski, Michał; Stawarz, Łukasz; Bohdan, Artem; Jamrozy, Marek; Hnatyk, Bohdan

    2017-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the best-quality multiwavelength data gathered for the large-scale jet in the core-dominated quasar 3C 273. We analyze all the archival observations of the target with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the far-ultraviolet observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, and the 8.4 GHz map obtained with the Very Large Array. In our study, we focus on investigating the morphology of the outflow at different frequencies, and therefore we apply various techniques for the image deconvolution, paying particular attention to a precise modeling of the Chandra and Hubble point-spread functions. We find that the prominent brightness enhancements in the X-ray and far-ultraviolet jet of 3C 273—the “knots”—are not point-like, and can be resolved transversely as extended features with sizes of about ≃ 0.5 {kpc}. Also, the radio outflow is wider than the deconvolved X-ray/ultraviolet jet. We have also found circumstantial evidence that the intensity peaks of the X-ray knots are located systematically upstream of the corresponding radio intensity peaks, with the projected spatial offsets along the jet ranging from ≲ 0.2 {kpc} up to ≃ 1 {kpc}. We discuss our findings in the wider context of multi-component models for the emission and structure of large-scale quasar jets, and speculate on the physical processes enabling an efficient acceleration of the emitting ultrarelativistic electrons along the entire jet length that exceeds 100 kpc.

  5. A Multiwavelength Scattered Light Analysis of the Dust Grain Population in the GG Tauri Circumbinary Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchêne, G.; McCabe, C.; Ghez, A. M.; Macintosh, B. A.

    2004-05-01

    We present the first 3.8 μm image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10 m telescope's adaptive optics system. This is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multiwavelength analysis of the scattering properties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelength, Hubble Space Telescope images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 μm implies a significant increase in the population of large (>~1 μm) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 μm image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 μm polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 μm scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 μm. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located ~50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located ~25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical dust settling and/or preferred grain growth in the densest parts of the ring.

  6. VERITAS Blazar Observations - Recent Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cogan, Peter

    2008-12-24

    We present the discovery of very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object 1ES 0806+524 (z = 0.138) and the intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lac object W Comae (z = 0.102) with VERITAS. VHE emission was discovered from these objects during the 2007/2008 observing campaign, with a strong outburst from W Comae detected in mid-March, lasting a few days. Quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions are presented, incorporating optical (AAVSO), and X-ray (Swift/RXTE) observations. We also present the energy spectrum of the distant BL Lac (z = 0.182) 1ES 1218+304 which was detected by VERITAS during the 2006/2007 observing campaign. The energy spectrum is discussed in the context of different models of absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background radiation. We present multiwavelength observations of the blazar Markarian 421 (z = 0.03), including a strong flare initially detected by the Whipple 10 m gamma-ray telescope. Finally we present a broadband spectral energy distribution for 1ES 2344+514 (z = 0.044) which is successfully fit using a one zone synchrotron self-Compton model.

  7. Blazars: Artist Conception

    NASA Image and Video Library

    What astronomers once thought were two blazar families may in fact be one, as shown in this artist's concept. Energy stored in the black hole during its salad days of intense accretion may later be...

  8. Blazar Compton Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Peel, M. W.

    2012-03-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has dramatically increased the number of gamma-ray blazars known and means that for the first time, a large sample of blazars selected by the strength of their inverse Compton emission exists. We have cross-identified the blazars listed in the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) with the CRATES radio catalogue. Using the 8.4 GHz flux density as a proxy for the jet power, we have computed their Compton efficiencies, a measure of the ability of the jet to convert the power in the ultrarelativistic jet electrons into gamma-rays through the inverse Compton process. We have compared the Compton efficiencies of the two blazar subsets, BL Lacs and FSRQs, and find no evidence that they are different. We also do not find an anti-correlation between Compton efficiency and synchrotron peak frequency.

  9. Synchrotron emission from the blazar PG 1553+113. An analysis of its flux and polarization variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, C. M.; Nicastro, F.; Stamerra, A.; Villata, M.; Larionov, V. M.; Blinov, D.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Arévalo, M. J.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bachev, R.; Borman, G. A.; Carnerero, M. I.; Carosati, D.; Cecconi, M.; Chen, W.-P.; Damljanovic, G.; Di Paola, A.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Frasca, A.; Giroletti, M.; González-Morales, P. A.; Griñon-Marín, A. B.; Grishina, T. S.; Huang, P.-C.; Ibryamov, S.; Klimanov, S. A.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Kurtanidze, S. O.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Lázaro, C.; Leto, G.; Liodakis, I.; Martínez-Lombilla, C.; Mihov, B.; Mirzaqulov, D. O.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Moody, J. W.; Morozova, D. A.; Nazarov, S. V.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Ohlert, J. M.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Pinna, F.; Protasio, C.; Rizzi, N.; Sadun, A. C.; Savchenko, S. S.; Semkov, E.; Sigua, L. A.; Slavcheva-Mihova, L.; Strigachev, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Troitskaya, Yu. V.; Troitsky, I. S.; Vasilyev, A. A.; Vera, R. J. C.; Vince, O.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2017-04-01

    In 2015 July 29-September 1, the satellite XMM-Newton pointed at the BL Lac object PG 1553+133 six times, collecting data for 218 h. During one of these epochs, simultaneous observations by the Swift satellite were requested to compare the results of the X-ray and optical-UV instruments. Optical, near-infrared and radio monitoring was carried out by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration for the whole observing season. We here present the results of the analysis of all these data, together with an investigation of the source photometric and polarimetric behaviour over the last 3 yr. The 2015 EPIC spectra show slight curvature and the corresponding light curves display fast X-ray variability with a time-scale of the order of 1 h. In contrast to previous results, during the brightest X-ray states detected in 2015 the simple log-parabolic model that best fits the XMM-Newton data also reproduces reasonably well the whole synchrotron bump, suggesting a peak in the near-UV band. We found evidence of a wide rotation of the polarization angle in 2014, when the polarization degree was variable, but the flux remained almost constant. This is difficult to interpret with deterministic jet emission models, while it can be easily reproduced by assuming some turbulence of the magnetic field.

  10. RoboPol: Unveiling the Physics of Blazar Jets from Skinakas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, V.

    2016-06-01

    Blazars are powered by relativistic jets and radiate exclusively through extreme, nonthermal particle interactions, energized by accretion onto supermassive black holes. Despite intensive observational and theoretical efforts over the last four decades, the details of blazar astrophysics remain elusive. The launch of NASA's Fermi Gammaray Space Telescope in 2008 provided an unprecedented opportunity for the systematic study of blazar jets and has prompted large-scale blazar monitoring efforts across wavelengths. In such a multi-wavelength campaign, a novel effect was discovered: fast changes in the optical polarization during gamma-ray flares. Optical emission from blazars is significantly polarized and the polarization probes the magnetic field structure in the jet. For this reason, such polarization rotations reveal important information about the evolution of disturbances responsible for blazar flares. The RoboPol program for the polarimetric monitoring of statistically complete samples of blazars was developed in 2013 to systematically study this class of events. RoboPol is a collaboration between the University of Crete, Caltech, the Max-Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in India, and the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland. Using a novel polarimeter operating at the 1.3m telescope of the Skinakas Observatory in Crete, it has succeeded in its 3 years of operation in taking optopolarimetric rotations of blazars from novelty status to a well-studied phenomenon that can be used to answer long-standing questions in our theoretical understanding of jets. We review the RoboPol program and its most important results in the classification of the optopolarimetric properties of blazars, the statistical properties of polarization rotations, and their relation to gamma-ray activity in blazar jets.

  11. High redshift blazars .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    Blazars are sources whose jet is pointing at us. Since their jets are relativistic, the flux is greatly amplified in the direction of motion, making blazars the most powerful persistent objects in the Universe. This is true at all frequencies, but especially where their spectrum peaks. Although the spectrum of moderate powerful sources peaks in the ˜GeV range, extremely powerful sources at high redshifts peak in the ˜MeV band. This implies that the hard X-ray band is the optimal one to find powerful blazars beyond a redshift of ˜4. First indications strongly suggest that powerful high-z blazars harbor the most massive and active early black holes, exceeding a billion solar masses. Since for each detected blazars there must exist hundreds of similar, but misaligned, sources, the search for high-z blazars is becoming competitive with the search of early massive black holes using radio-quiet quasars. Finding how the two populations of black holes (one in jetted sources, the other in radio-quiet objects) evolve in redshift will shed light on the growth of the most massive black holes and possibly on the feedback between the central engine and the rest of the host galaxy.

  12. Numerical analysis of multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser exploiting four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Yao, Yong; Chen, Deying

    2008-08-04

    In this paper, a model is proposed to study the behavior of four-wave mixing assisted multiwavelength erbium doped fiber ring laser based on the theoretical model of the multiple FWM processes and Gile's theory of erbium-doped fiber. It is demonstrated that the mode competition can be effectively suppressed through FWM. The effect of phase matching, the nonlinear coefficient, the power in the cavity and the length of the nonlinear medium on output spectrum uniformity are also investigated.

  13. Intrinsic Correlations for Flaring Blazars Detected by Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Xiao, H. B.; Lin, C.; Constantin, D.; Luo, G. Y.; Pei, Z. Y.; Hao, J. M.; Mao, Y. W.

    2017-02-01

    Blazars are an extreme subclass of active galactic nuclei. Their rapid variability, luminous brightness, superluminal motion, and high and variable polarization are probably due to a beaming effect. However, this beaming factor (or Doppler factor) is very difficult to measure. Currently, a good way to estimate it is to use the timescale of their radio flares. In this Letter, we use multiwavelength data and Doppler factors reported in the literature for a sample of 86 flaring blazars detected by Fermi to compute their intrinsic multiwavelength data and intrinsic spectral energy distributions and investigate the correlations among observed and intrinsic data. Quite interestingly, intrinsic data show a positive correlation between luminosity and peak frequency, in contrast with the behavior of observed data, and a tighter correlation between γ-ray luminosity and the lower-energy ones. For flaring blazars detected by Fermi, we conclude that (1) observed emissions are strongly beamed; (2) the anti-correlation between luminosity and peak frequency from the observed data is an apparent result, the correlation between intrinsic data being positive; and (3) intrinsic γ-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with other intrinsic luminosities.

  14. A multi-wavelength analysis of Hickson Compact Groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitsakis, T.; Charmandaris, V.

    2012-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study on the impact of the environment of compact galaxy groups on the evolution of their members using a multi-wavelength analysis, from the UV to the infrared, for a sample of 32 Hickson compact groups (HCGs) containing 135 galaxies. Fitting the SEDs of all galaxies with the state-of-the-art model of da Cunha (2008) we can accurately calculate their mass, SFR, and extinction, as well as estimate their infrared luminosity and dust content. We compare our findings with samples of field galaxies, early-stage interacting pairs, and cluster galaxies with similar data. We find that classifying the groups as dynamically "old" or "young", depending on whether or not at least one quarter of their members are early-type systems, is physical and consistent with past classifications of HCGs based on their atomic gas content. Dynamically "old" groups are more compact and display higher velocity dispersions than "young" groups. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "young" groups have specific star formation rates (sSFRs), NUV-r, and mid-infrared colors which are similar to those of field and early stage interacting pair spirals. Late-type galaxies in dynamically "old" groups have redder NUV-r colors, as they have likely experienced several tidal encounters in the past building up their stellar mass, and display lower sSFRs. We identify several late-type galaxies which have sSFRs and colors similar to those of elliptical galaxies, since they lost part of their gas due to numerous interactions with other group members. Also, 25% of the elliptical galaxies in these groups have bluer UV/optical colors than normal ellipticals in the field, probably due to star formation as they accreted gas from other galaxies of the group, or via merging of dwarf companions. Finally, our SED modeling suggests that in 13 groups, 10 of which are dynamically "old", there is diffuse cold dust in the intragroup medium. All this evidence point to an evolutionary scenario in which

  15. Swift Multi-wavelength Observing Campaigns: Strategies and Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2007-01-01

    The Swift gamma-ray burst explorer has been operating since December 2004 as both a gamma-ray burst (GRB) monitor and telescope and a multi-wavelength observatory, covering the energy range from V band and near UV to hard X rays above 150 keV. It is designed to rapidly repoint to observe newly discovered GRBs, and this maneuverability, combined with an easily changed observing program, allows Swift to also be an effective multiwavelength observatory for non-GRB targets, both as targets of opportunity and pre-planned multi-wavelength observing campaigns. Blazars are particularly attractive targets for coordinated campaigns with TeV experiments since many blazars are bright in both the hard X-ray and TeV energy ranges. Successful coordinated campaigns have included observations of 3C454.3 during its 2005 outburst. The latest Swift funding cycles allow for non- GRB related observations to be proposed. The Burst Alert Telescope on Swift also serves as a hard X-ray monitor with a public web page that includes light curves for over 400 X-ray sources and is used to alert the astronomical community about increased activity from both known and newly discovered sources. This presentation mill include Swift capabilities, strategies and policies for coordinated multi-wavelength observations as well as discussion of the potential outcomes of such campaigns.

  16. The Fermi blazar sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Righi, C.; Costamante, L.; Tavecchio, F.

    2017-07-01

    We revisit the blazar sequence exploiting the complete, flux-limited sample of blazars with known redshift detected by the Fermi satellite after 4 yr of operations (the 3LAC sample). We divide the sources into γ-ray luminosity bins, collect all the archival data for all blazars, and construct their spectral energy distribution (SED). We describe the average SED of blazars in the same luminosity bin through a simple phenomenological function consisting of two broken power laws connecting with a power law describing the radio emission. We do that separately for BL Lacs and for flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and also for all blazars together. The main results are: (i) FSRQs display approximately the same SED as the luminosity increases, but the relative importance of the high-energy peak increases; (ii) as a consequence, the X-ray spectra of FSRQs become harder for larger luminosities; (iii) BL Lacs indeed form a sequence: they become redder (i.e. smaller peak frequencies) with increasing luminosities, with a softer γ-ray slope and a larger dominance of the high-energy peak; (iv) for all blazars (BL Lacs+FSRQs), these properties become more prominent, as the highest luminosity bin is populated mostly by FSRQs and the lowest luminosity bin mostly by BL Lacs. This agrees with the original blazar sequence, although BL Lacs never have an average γ-ray slope as hard as found in the original sequence. (v) At high luminosities, a large fraction of FSRQs show signs of thermal emission from the accretion disc, contributing to the optical-UV (ultraviolet).

  17. Multiwavelength Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plionis, M.

    2004-07-01

    The recent scientific efforts in Astrophysics & Cosmology have brought a revolution to our understanding of the Cosmos. Amazing results is the outcome of amazing experiments! The huge scientific, technological & financial effort that has gone into building the 10-m class telescopes as well as many space and balloon observatories, essential to observe the multitude of cosmic phenomena in their manifestations at different wavelengths, from gamma-rays to the millimetre and the radio, has given and is still giving its fruits of knowledge. These recent scientific achievements in Observational and Theoretical Cosmology were presented in the "Multiwavelength Cosmology" conference that took place on beautiful Mykonos island in the Aegean between 17 and 20 June 2003. More than 180 Cosmologists from all over the world gathered for a four-day intense meeting in which recent results from large ground based surveys (AAT/2-df, SLOAN) and space missions (WMAP, Chandra, XMM, ISO, HST) were presented and debated, providing a huge impetus to our knowledge of the Cosmos. The future of the subject (experiments, and directions of research) was also discussed. The conference was devoted mostly on the constraints on Cosmological models and galaxy formation theories that arise from the study of the high redshift Universe, from clusters of galaxies, and their evolution, from the cosmic microwave background, the large-scale structure and star-formation history. Link: Simultaneous multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry based on principal component analysis with a color CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jingping; Lu, Xiaoxu; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhong, Liyun

    2016-05-01

    From a sequence of simultaneous multi-wavelength phase-shifting interferograms (SMWPSIs) recorded by a color CMOS, a principal component analysis (PCA) based multi-wavelength interferometry (MWI) is proposed. First, a sequence of SMWPSIs with unknown phase shifts are recorded with a single-chip color CMOS camera. Subsequently, the wrapped phases of single-wavelength are retrieved with the PCA algorithm. Finally, the unambiguous phase of the extended synthetic wavelength is achieved by the subtraction between the wrapped phases of single-wavelength. In addition, to eliminate the additional phase introduced by the microscope and intensity crosstalk among three-color channels, a two-step phase compensation method with and without the measured object in the experimental system is employed. Compared with conventional single-wavelength phase-shifting interferometry, due to no requirements for phase shifts calibration and the phase unwrapping operation, the actual unambiguous phase of the measured object can be achieved with the proposed PCA-based MWI method conveniently. Both numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PCA-based MWI method can enlarge not only the measuring range, but also no amplification of noise level.

  18. What Drives Star Formation in Galaxies?: A Multiwavelength Analysis of Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    the star formation rate density at this key epoch of star formation and AGN activity and therefore, understanding the origin of these extreme luminosities is fundamental to our understanding of the relative role of several important processes in galaxy evolution. Morphological studies of local (U)LIRGs have shown unambiguously that a galaxy's infrared luminosity is correlated with the presence of galaxy mergers and interactions as well as with the stage that these mergers are in (e.g., Veilleux et al. 2002). However, the role of mergers and interactions at higher redshifts, where these populations dominate, is not yet well constrained. We will put strong constraints on this role at high redshift for the first time by constructing and analyzing a large comprehensive sample of (U)LIRGs at 0multiwavelength data set, to investigate the AGN activity. Spectroscopic data, from the HST grism as well as from several ground-based datasets, will enable us to measure redshifts, study galaxy kinematics, identify galaxy pairs, and probe several AGN diagnostics. By combining these key data sets, we will be able to quantify the role of galaxy mergers and interactions to the cosmic SFR and AGN activity. This work will involve a detailed morphological analysis (including visual classifications as well as several automated statistical techniques), a comparison of multiple SFR measures, a stacking analysis of the Herschel and X-ray data, and spectral analysis of HST-grism observations.

  19. The 'Crazy Diamond' (and other blazars)

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellone, S.; Giuliani, A.

    2009-04-08

    During the first year of observations, AGILE detected several blazars at high significance: 3 C 279, 3C 454.3, PKS 1510-089, S5 0716+714, 3 C 273, MKN 421, and W Comae. We obtained long-term coverage of the Crazy Diamond 3 C 454.3, for more than 100 days at energies above 100 MeV. 3 C 273 was the first blazar detected simultaneously by the AGILE gamma-ray imaging detector and by its hard X-ray monitor. S5 0716+714, an intermediate BL Lac object, exhibited a very fast and intense gamma-ray transient event during an optical high-state phase, while MKN 421 and W Comae where detected during an AGILE target of opportunity (ToO) repointing. Thanks to the rapid dissemination of our alerts, we were able to obtain multi-wavelength ToO data from other observatories such as Spitzer, Swift, INTEGRAL, RXTE, Suzaku, MAGIC, VERITAS, as well as optical coverage by means of the WEBT Consortium and REM.

  1. A Radiative Transport Model for Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, often with strong variability throughout. We start from first-principles to build up a transport model, whose solution is the electron distribution, rather than assuming a convenient functional form. Our analytical transport model considers shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration, Bohm diffusion, and synchrotron radiation. We use this solution to give predictions for the X-ray spectrum and time lags, comparing the results with BeppoSAX observations of X-ray flares from Mrk 421. This new self-consistent model provides an unprecedented view into the jet physics at play in this source, especially the strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration components and the size of the acceleration region. More recently, we augmented the transport model to incorporate Compton scattering, including Klein-Nishina effects. Here, an analytical solution cannot be derived. Therefore we obtain the steady-state electron distribution computationally. We compare the resulting radiation spectrum with multi-wavelength data for 3C 279. We show that our new Compton + synchrotron blazar model is the first to successfully fit the FermiLAT gamma-ray data for this source based on a first-principles physical calculation.

  2. A Radiative Transport Model for Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Justin, Finke; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are observed across the electromagnetic spectrum, often with strong variability throughout. The underlying electron distribution associated with the observed emission is typically not computed from first principles. We start from first-principles to build up a transport model, whose solution is the electron distribution, rather than assuming a convenient functional form. Our analytical transport model considers shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration, Bohm diffusion, and synchrotron radiation. We use this solution to generate predictions for the X-ray spectrum and time lags, and compare the results with data products from BeppoSAX observations of X-ray flares from Mrk 421. This new self-consistent model provides an unprecedented view into the jet physics at play in this source, especially the strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration components and the size of the acceleration region.More recently, we augmented the transport model to incorporate Compton scattering, including Klein-Nishina effects. In this case, an analytical solution cannot be derived, and therefore we obtain the steady-state electron distribution computationally. We compare the resulting radiation spectrum with multi-wavelength data for 3C 279. We show that our new Compton + synchrotron blazar model is the first to successfully fit the FermiLAT gamma-ray data for this source based on a first-principles physical calculation.

  3. Blazar Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-24

    Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are the most common sources detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. As matter falls toward the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center, some of it is accelerated outward at nearly the speed of light along jets pointed in opposite directions. When one of the jets happens to be aimed in the direction of Earth, as illustrated here, the galaxy appears especially bright and is classified as a blazar. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20912

  4. SMARTScience Tools: Interacting With Blazar Data In The Web Browser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Imran; Isler, Jedidah; Urry, C. Megan; MacPherson, Emily; Buxton, Michelle; Bailyn, Charles D.; Coppi, Paolo S.

    2014-08-01

    The Yale-SMARTS blazar group has accumulated 6 years of optical-IR photometry of more than 70 blazars, mostly bright enough in gamma-rays to be detected with Fermi. Observations were done with the ANDICAM instrument on the SMARTS 1.3 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. As a result of this long-term, multiwavelength monitoring, we have produced a calibrated, publicly available data set (see www.astro.yale.edu/smarts/glast/home.php), which we have used to find that (i) optical-IR and gamma-ray light curves are well correlated, supporting inverse-Compton models for gamma-ray production (Bonning et al. 2009, 2012), (ii) at their brightest, blazar jets can contribute significantly to the photoionization of the broad-emission-line region, indicating that gamma-rays are produced within 0.1 pc of the black hole in at least some cases (Isler et al. 2014), and (iii) optical-IR and gamma-ray flares are symmetric, implying the time scales are dominated by light-travel-time effects rather than acceleration or cooling (Chatterjee et al. 2012). The volume of data and diversity of projects for which it is used calls out for an efficient means of visualization. To this end, we have developed a suite of visualization tools called SMARTScience Tools, which allow users to interact dynamically with our dataset. The SMARTScience Tools is publicly available via our webpage and can be used to customize multiwavelength light curves and color magnitude diagrams quickly and intuitively. Users can choose specific bands to construct plots, and the plots include features such as band-by-band panning, dynamic zooming, and direct mouse interaction with individual data points. Human and machine readable tables of the plotted data can be directly printed for the user's convenience and for further independent study. The SMARTScience Tools significantly improves the public’s ability to interact with the Yale-SMARTS 6-year data base of blazar photometry, and should make

  5. Selenomethionyl proteins produced for analysis by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD): a vehicle for direct determination of three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, W A; Horton, J R; LeMaster, D M

    1990-01-01

    An expression system has been established for the incorporation of selenomethionine into recombinant proteins produced from plasmids in Escherichia coli. Replacement of methionine by selenomethionine is demonstrated at the level of 100% for both T4 and E. coli thioredoxins. The natural recombinant proteins and the selenomethionyl variants of both thioredoxins crystallize isomorphously. Anomalous scattering factors were deduced from synchrotron X-ray absorption measurements of crystals of the selenomethionyl proteins. Taken with reference to experience in the structural analysis of selenobiotinyl streptavidin by the method of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD), these data indicate that recombinant selenomethionyl proteins analyzed by MAD phasing offer a rather general means for the elucidation of atomic structures. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2184035

  6. High-redshift Blazars through NuSTAR Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotulli, L.; Paliya, V. S.; Ajello, M.; Kaur, A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Gasparrini, D.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Baloković, M.; Stern, D.; Madejski, G.

    2017-04-01

    The most powerful sources among the blazar family are MeV blazars. Often detected at z > 2, they usually display high X- and γ-ray luminosities, larger-than-average jet powers, and black hole masses ≳109 M ⊙. In the present work, we perform a multiwavelength study of three high-redshift blazars: 3FGL J0325.5+2223 (z = 2.06), 3FGL J0449.0+1121 (z = 2.15), and 3FGL J0453.2-2808 (z = 2.56), analyzing quasi-simultaneous data from GROND, Swift-UVOT and XRT, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), and Fermi-LAT. Our main focus is on the hard X-ray band recently unveiled by NuSTAR (3-79 keV) where these objects show a hard spectrum that enables us to constrain the inverse Compton (IC) peak and the jet power. We found that all three targets resemble the most powerful blazars, with the synchrotron peak located in the submillimeter range and the IC peak in the MeV range, and therefore belong to the MeV blazar class. Using a simple one-zone leptonic emission model to reproduce the spectral energy distributions, we conclude that a simple combination of synchrotron and accretion disk emission reproduces the infrared-optical spectra, while the X-ray to γ-ray part is well reproduced by the IC scattering of low-energy photons supplied by the broad-line region. The black hole masses for each of the three sources are calculated to be ≳4 × 108 M ⊙. The three studied sources have jet power at the level of, or beyond, the accretion luminosity.

  7. High-redshift Blazars through NuSTAR eyes

    DOE PAGES

    Marcotulli, L.; Paliya, V. S.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2017-04-20

    The most powerful sources among the blazar family are MeV blazars. Often detected at z > 2, they usually display high X- and γ-ray luminosities, larger-than-average jet powers, and black hole masses ≳109 M⊙. In the present work, we perform a multiwavelength study of three high-redshift blazars: 3FGL J0325.5+2223 (z = 2.06), 3FGL J0449.0+1121 (z = 2.15), and 3FGL J0453.2–2808 (z = 2.56), analyzing quasi-simultaneous data from GROND, Swift-UVOT and XRT, Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), and Fermi-LAT. Our main focus is on the hard X-ray band recently unveiled by NuSTAR (3–79 keV) where these objects show a hard spectrummore » that enables us to constrain the inverse Compton (IC) peak and the jet power. We found that all three targets resemble the most powerful blazars, with the synchrotron peak located in the submillimeter range and the IC peak in the MeV range, and therefore belong to the MeV blazar class. Using a simple one-zone leptonic emission model to reproduce the spectral energy distributions, we conclude that a simple combination of synchrotron and accretion disk emission reproduces the infrared–optical spectra, while the X-ray to γ-ray part is well reproduced by the IC scattering of low-energy photons supplied by the broad-line region. The black hole masses for each of the three sources are calculated to be ≳4 × 108 M⊙. Finally, the three studied sources have jet power at the level of, or beyond, the accretion luminosity.« less

  8. VERITAS and multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object 1ES 1741+196

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Huetten, M.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Brien, S.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Petrashyk, A.; Petry, D.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Ratliff, G.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Reynolds, K.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from multiwavelength observations of the BL Lacertae object 1ES 1741 + 196, including results in the very high energy γ-ray regime using the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The VERITAS time-averaged spectrum, measured above 180 GeV, is well modelled by a power law with a spectral index of 2.7 ± 0.7stat ± 0.2syst. The integral flux above 180 GeV is (3.9 ± 0.8stat ± 1.0syst) × 10-8 m-2 s-1, corresponding to 1.6 per cent of the Crab nebula flux on average. The multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of the source suggests that 1ES 1741+196 is an extreme-high-frequency-peaked BL Lacertae object. The observations analysed in this paper extend over a period of six years, during which time no strong flares were observed in any band. This analysis is therefore one of the few characterizations of a blazar in a non-flaring state.

  9. Closed Box Nature of Galaxy Clusters through Multi-wavelength Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahi, Arya; Mulroy, Sarah; Evrard, August E.; Smith, Graham

    2017-08-01

    Relating observations of cluster galaxies or the gas content to the total mass of the underlying dark matter halos is a key challenge in the current cluster cosmology community. On the other hand, accurate measurement of hot and cold phase baryon covariance in clusters will offer important constraints on hydrodynamic models of cluster formation. This property covariance has been predicted by hydrodynamics simulations of Wu et al. (2015). Wu et al. (2015) predicts massive dark-matter halos are essentially ``Closed Box'' that retain all their gaseous and stellar matter, despite a diverse set of astrophysical disruptions happening inside them.We build a forward Bayesian model to constrain the mass observable scaling relation and test ``Closed Box'' scenario through the property covariance, simultanously. We, then, present results of this method applied to multi-wavelength observations of clusters from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS). We find ~3σ evidence that at least one of the covariances between hot gaseous probes and stellar mass probes is negative. These results provide the first observational evidence in favor of the ``Closed Box'' nature of clusters at the high mass end.

  10. Multiwavelength Observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Kranich, D.; Paneque, D.; Cesarini, A.; Falcone, A.; Giroletti, M.; Hoversten, E.; Hovatta, T.; Kovalev, Y.Y.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Nieppola, E.; Pagani, C.; Pichel, A.; Satalecka, K.; Scargle, J.; Steele, D.; Tavecchio, F.; Tescaro, D.; Tornikoski, M.; Villata, M.; /Turin Observ.

    2010-08-25

    The well-studied VHE (E > 100 GeV) blazar Mrk 501 was observed between March and May 2008 as part of an extensive multiwavelength observation campaign including radio, optical, X-ray and VHE gamma-ray instruments. Mrk 501 was in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a low VHE flux of about 20% the Crab Nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations could be observed in X-rays as well as {gamma}-rays. Overall Mrk 501 showed increased variability when going from radio to {gamma}-ray energies. The broadband spectral energy distribution during the two different emission states of the campaign was well described by a homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The high emission state was satisfactorily modeled by increasing the amount of high energy electrons with respect to the low emission state. This parameterization is consistent with the energy-dependent variability trend observed during the campaign.

  11. OSSE Observations of Blazars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    directly down a relativistically out owing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole . Many of the current theoretical interpretations of...these results indicate that the gamma rays are associated with jet activity near a supermassive back hole , but the origin of the gamma radia- tion is...standard model for blazar sources involves a black - hole accretion disk with colli- mated jets that are oriented at nearly right angles to the plane of

  12. Cobinamide-Based Cyanide Analysis by Multiwavelength Spectrometry in a Liquid Core Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    A novel cyanide analyzer based on sensitive cobinamide chemistry relies on simultaneous reagent and sample injection and detection in a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell illuminated by a white light emitting diode. The transmitted light is read by a fiber-optic charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Alkaline cobinamide (orange, λmax = 510 nm) changes to violet (λmax = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. Multiwavelength detection permits built-in correction for artifact responses intrinsic to a single-line flow injection system and corrects for drift. With optimum choice of the reaction medium, flow rate, and mixing coil length, the limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is 30 nM and the linear dynamic range extends to 10 μM. The response base width for 1% carryover is <95 s, permitting a throughput of 38 samples/h. The relative standard deviations (rsd) for repetitive determinations at 0.15, 0.5, and 1 μM were 7.6% (n = 5), 3.2% (n = 7), and 1.7% (n = 6), respectively. Common ions at 250–80 000× concentrations do not interfere except for sulfide. For the determination of 2 μM CN−, the presence of 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 1000 μM HS− results in 22, 27, 48, 58, 88, and 154% overestimation of cyanide. The sulfide product actually has a different characteristic absorption, and in those samples where significant presence is likely, this can be corrected for. We demonstrate applicability by analyzing the hydrolytic cyanide extract of apple and pear seeds with orange seeds as control and also measure HCN in breath air samples. Spike recoveries in these sample extracts ranged from 91 to 108%. PMID:20560532

  13. Cobinamide-based cyanide analysis by multiwavelength spectrometry in a liquid core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R

    2010-07-15

    A novel cyanide analyzer based on sensitive cobinamide chemistry relies on simultaneous reagent and sample injection and detection in a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell illuminated by a white light emitting diode. The transmitted light is read by a fiber-optic charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Alkaline cobinamide (orange, lambda(max) = 510 nm) changes to violet (lambda(max) = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. Multiwavelength detection permits built-in correction for artifact responses intrinsic to a single-line flow injection system and corrects for drift. With optimum choice of the reaction medium, flow rate, and mixing coil length, the limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is 30 nM and the linear dynamic range extends to 10 microM. The response base width for 1% carryover is <95 s, permitting a throughput of 38 samples/h. The relative standard deviations (rsd) for repetitive determinations at 0.15, 0.5, and 1 microM were 7.6% (n = 5), 3.2% (n = 7), and 1.7% (n = 6), respectively. Common ions at 250-80,000x concentrations do not interfere except for sulfide. For the determination of 2 microM CN(-), the presence of 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 1000 microM HS(-) results in 22, 27, 48, 58, 88, and 154% overestimation of cyanide. The sulfide product actually has a different characteristic absorption, and in those samples where significant presence is likely, this can be corrected for. We demonstrate applicability by analyzing the hydrolytic cyanide extract of apple and pear seeds with orange seeds as control and also measure HCN in breath air samples. Spike recoveries in these sample extracts ranged from 91 to 108%.

  14. A Multi-wavelength Analysis of Dust and Gas in the SR 24S Transition Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, P.; Pérez, L. M.; Andrews, S.; van der Marel, N.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Ataiee, S.; Benisty, M.; Birnstiel, T.; Juhász, A.; Natta, A.; Ricci, L.; Testi, L.

    2017-04-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum observations of the SR 24S transition disk with an angular resolution ≲ 0\\buildrel{ \\prime}\\over{.} 18 (12 au radius). We perform a multi-wavelength investigation by combining new data with previous ALMA data at 0.45 mm. The visibilities and images of the continuum emission at the two wavelengths are well characterized by a ring-like emission. Visibility modeling finds that the ring-like emission is narrower at longer wavelengths, in good agreement with models of dust-trapping in pressure bumps, although there are complex residuals that suggest potentially asymmetric structures. The 0.45 mm emission has a shallower profile inside the central cavity than the 1.3 mm emission. In addition, we find that the 13CO and C18O (J = 2-1) emission peaks at the center of the continuum cavity. We do not detect either continuum or gas emission from the northern companion to this system (SR 24N), which is itself a binary system. The upper limit for the dust disk mass of SR 24N is ≲ 0.12 {M}\\bigoplus , which gives a disk mass ratio in dust between the two components of {M}{dust,{SR}24{{S}}}/{M}{dust,{SR}24{{N}}}≳ 840. The current ALMA observations may imply that either planets have already formed in the SR 24N disk or that dust growth to millimeter sizes is inhibited there and that only warm gas, as seen by rovibrational CO emission inside the truncation radii of the binary, is present.

  15. Receiver Performance Analysis of a Multi-wavelength Sampling Integrated Path Differential Absorption CO2 Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A multi-wavelength sampling integrated path differential (IPDA) CO2 lidar is analyzed and modeled. The instrument transmits laser pulses at a series of wavelengths across the 1572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. The receiver measures the received laser pulse energy and time of flight at each wavelength. The measurements are then fit to a CO2 absorption line shape to determine the total column CO2 mixing ratio. The receiver model includes effects of solar background, photon detection shot noise, detector dark current, preamplifier noise and laser speckle noise. The least-square curve fit is a linear fit in the optical depth domain and the logarithm of the raw measurements. The column CO2 mixing ratio is proportional to the scaling factor resulted from the curve fit. There are several advantages to performing the curve fit in the optical depth domain: (a) the result is directly proportional to the CO2molecule number density of the column; (b) it is a standard linear least square error fit where the theory is well established; (c) there is no need to separately estimate the off-line optical transmission. The receiver model further gives insight about the effects of various instrument parameters and the difference between the atmosphere model used in the curve fit and the actual atmosphere. For example, we can use the model to estimate the biases in the retrieved CO2 mixing ratio from small errors in the meteorological data used to generate the line shape used in the curve fit. We have shown that the estimated instrument performance using this receiver model agrees with the results from our recent airborne measurements. The receiver model is also used in the simulation of the impact of the lidar measurements of the global greenhouse gas distribution and their projected impact on quantification of surface sources and sinks.

  16. Modeling Broadband Variability of Blazars with Time-Dependent Multi-Zone Radiative Transfer Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Giovanni

    This proposal aims at fully exploiting the large body of X-ray and multiwavelength observational data on TeV gamma-ray bright blazars for a detailed comparison with state- of-the art blazar radiation transfer simulations. The aim of this investigation is to develop diagnostics on critical jet parameters and shock physics, such as the magnetic field, the kinetic energy content in the jets, the characteristics of the shock acceleration mechanisms, and the detailed influence on geometry on the observed spectral variability features. Our project will comprises a systematic, uniform re-analysis of the relevant (in particular, X-ray) data sets. We will extract time-dependent spectral energy distributions, light curves, and intra-band as well as inter-band time lags from the available data. The modeling tasks will start with a quick sweep through parameter space using a semi- analytical internal-shock model. This will help to narrow down parameters such as the Lorentz factors of interacting emission regions, the overall energy requirements, the characteristics of the electron distributions accelerated at internal shocks, and the magnetic field. The parameters of this semi-analytical internal-shock model that allow for a representation of time-dependent SEDs, light curves and inter-band time lags, will form the starting point for our detailed modeling using our state-of-the-art time-dependent multi-zone Monte-Carlo simulation code. Using that code, we will explore in more detail the characteristics of the particle acceleration in active regions and the influence of various geometries on the observable features. By capitalizing on archival data of several NASA space astrophysics missions our proposal is in agreement with the NASA ADAP research objective, "the analysis io NASA space astrophysics data that are archived in the public domain at the time of submission", as stated in the NASA Research announcement.

  17. Jet and accretion power in the most powerful Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Ghirlanda, G.

    2009-11-01

    Among the blazars detected by the Fermi satellite, we have selected the 23 blazars that in the 3months of survey had an average γ-ray luminosity above 1048ergs-1. For 17 out of the 23 sources we found and analysed X-ray and optical-ultraviolet data taken by the Swift satellite. With these data, implemented by archival and not simultaneous data, we construct the spectral energy distributions, and interpreted them with a simple one-zone, leptonic, synchrotron and inverse Compton model. When possible, we also compare different high-energy states of single sources, like 0528+134 and 3C454.3, for which multiple good sets of multiwavelength data are available. In our powerful blazars the high energy emission always dominates the electromagnetic output, and the relatively low level of the synchrotron radiation often does not hide the accretion disc emission. We can then constrain the black hole mass and the disc luminosity. Both are large (i.e. masses equal or greater than 109M solar and disc luminosities above 10 per cent of Eddington). By modelling the non-thermal continuum we derive the power that the jet carries in the form of bulk motion of particles and fields. On average, the jet power is found to be slightly larger than the disc luminosity, and proportional to the mass accretion rate.

  18. Quantified H I morphology - I. Multi-wavelength analysis of the THINGS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Pirzkal, N.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Bouchard, A.; Blyth, S.-L.; van der Heyden, K. J.; Elson, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    Galaxy evolution is driven to a large extent by interactions and mergers with other galaxies and the gas in galaxies is extremely sensitive to the interactions. One method to measure such interactions uses the quantified morphology of galaxy images. Well-established parameters are Concentration, Asymmetry, Smoothness, Gini and M20 of a galaxy image. Thus far, the application of this technique has mostly been restricted to rest-frame ultraviolet and optical images. However, with the new radio observatories being commissioned [South African Karoo Array Telescope (MeerKAT), Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP), Extended Very Large Array (EVLA), Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope/APERture Tile In Focus instrument (WSRT/APERTIF) and ultimately the Square Kilometer Array (SKA)], a new window on the neutral atomic hydrogen gas (H I) morphology of large numbers of galaxies will open up. The quantified morphology of gas discs of spirals can be an alternative indicator of the level and frequency of interaction. The H I in galaxies is typically spatially more extended and more sensitive to low-mass or weak interactions. In this paper, we explore six morphological parameters calculated over the extent of the stellar (optical) disc and the extent of the gas disc for a range of wavelengths spanning ultraviolet (UV), optical, near- and far-infrared and 21 cm (H I) of 28 galaxies from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS). Although the THINGS sample is small and contains only a single ongoing interaction, it spans both non-interacting and post-interacting galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data. We find that the choice of area for the computation of the morphological parameters is less of an issue than the wavelength at which they are measured. The signal of interaction is as good in the H I as at any of the other wavelengths at which morphology has been used to trace the interaction rate to date, mostly star formation dominated ones (near- and far-ultraviolet). The

  19. The effect of Brown Carbon on thermal-optical analysis: a correction based on optical multi-wavelength analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dario, Massabò; Lorenzo, Caponi; Chiara, Bove Maria; Paolo, Prati

    2016-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol (CA) has an important impact on air quality, human health and climate change. Total Carbon (TC) is generally divided in organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) (although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon (CC) may be present). This classification is based on their thermo-optical properties: while EC is strongly light absorbing, OC is generally transparent in the visible range except for some particular compounds. In fact, another fraction of light-absorbing organic carbon exists which is not black and is generally called brown carbon (BrC) (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We recently introduced a new method to apportion the absorption coefficient (babs) of carbonaceous atmospheric aerosols starting from multi-wavelength optical analysis (Massabò et al., 2015). This analysis is performed by the MWAA, an instrument developed at the Physics Department of University of Genoa (Massabò et al., 2013) able to measure the aerosol absorption coefficient at 5 different wavelengths ranging from UV to IR. The method is based on the information gathered at these five different wavelengths, in a renewed and upgraded version of the approach usually referred to as Aethalometer model (Sandradewi et al., 2008). The resulting optical apportionment provides the quantification of EC and, with some assumptions, also of OC coming from fossil fuels and wood burning. Thermal-optical methods are presently the most widespread approach to OC/EC speciation. Despite their popularity, there is still a disagreement among the results, especially for what concerns EC as different thermal protocols can be used. In fact, the pyrolysis occurring during the analysis can heavily affect OC/EC separation, depending on PM composition in addition to the used protocol. Furthermore, the presence in the sample of BrC can shift the split point since it is light absorbing also @ 635nm, the typical laser wavelength used in this technique (Chen et al., 2015). We present here the

  20. RoboPol: blazar astrophysics from Skinakas with a unique optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, V.

    2013-09-01

    Blazars are the most active galaxies known. They are powered by relativistic jets of matter speeding towards us almost head-on at the speed of light, radiating exclusively through extreme, non-thermal particle interactions, energized by accretion onto supermassive black holes. Despite intensive observational and theoretical efforts over the last four decades, the details of blazar astrophysics remain elusive. The launch of NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in 2008 has provided an unprecedented opportunity for the systematic study of blazar jets and has prompted large-scale blazar monitoring efforts across wavelengths. In such a multi-wavelength campaign, a novel effect was discovered: fast changes in the optical polarization during gamma-ray flares. Such events probe the magnetic field structure in the jet and the evolution of disturbances responsible for blazar flares. Their systematic study can answer long-standing questions in our theoretical understanding of jets; however, until recently, optical polarimetry programs in operation were not adequate to find and follow similar events with the efficiency and time-resolution needed. RoboPol is a massive program of optical polarimetric monitoring of over 100 blazars, using an innovative, specially-designed and built polarimeter mounted on the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory, a dynamical observing schedule, and a large amount of dedicated telescope time. The program is a collaboration between the University of Crete and the Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas in Greece, the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy in Germany, Caltech in the US, the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Poland, and the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in India. The instrument was successfully commissioned in March of 2013 and has been taking data since. In this talk we will review the RoboPol program, its potential for discovery in blazar astrophysics, and we will present results from its first

  1. Probing acceleration and turbulence at relativistic shocks in blazar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Böttcher, Markus; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2017-02-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at relativistic shocks is widely thought to be an important acceleration mechanism in various astrophysical jet sources, including radio-loud active galactic nuclei such as blazars. Such acceleration can produce the non-thermal particles that emit the broad-band continuum radiation that is detected from extragalactic jets. An important recent development for blazar science is the ability of Fermi-Large Area Telescope spectroscopy to pin down the shape of the distribution of the underlying non-thermal particle population. This paper highlights how multiwavelength spectra spanning optical to X-ray to gamma-ray bands can be used to probe diffusive acceleration in relativistic, oblique, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in blazar jets. Diagnostics on the MHD turbulence near such shocks are obtained using thermal and non-thermal particle distributions resulting from detailed Monte Carlo simulations of DSA. These probes are afforded by the characteristic property that the synchrotron νFν peak energy does not appear in the gamma-ray band above 100 MeV. We investigate self-consistently the radiative synchrotron and inverse Compton signatures of the simulated particle distributions. Important constraints on the diffusive mean free paths of electrons, and the level of electromagnetic field turbulence are identified for three different case study blazars, Mrk 501, BL Lacertae and AO 0235+164. The X-ray excess of AO 0235+164 in a flare state can be modelled as the signature of bulk Compton scattering of external radiation fields, thereby tightly constraining the energy-dependence of the diffusion coefficient for electrons. The concomitant interpretations that turbulence levels decline with remoteness from jet shocks, and the probable significant role for non-gyroresonant diffusion, are posited.

  2. The nature of transition blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J. J.; Anderson, S. F.; Plotkin, R. M.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Burnett, T. H.; Myers, A. D.

    2014-12-10

    Blazars are classically divided into the BL Lacertae (BLL) and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) subclasses, corresponding to radiatively inefficient and efficient accretion regimes, respectively, largely based on the equivalent width (EW) of their optical broad emission lines (BELs). However, EW-based classification criteria are not physically motivated, and a few blazars have previously transitioned' from one subclass to the other. We present the first systematic search for these transition blazars in a sample of 602 unique pairs of repeat spectra of 354 blazars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, finding six clear cases. These transition blazars have bolometric Eddington ratios of ∼0.3 and low-frequency synchrotron peaks, and are thus FSRQ-like. We show that the strong EW variability (up to an unprecedented factor of >60) is due to swamping of the BELs from variability in jet continuum emission, which is stronger in amplitude and shorter in timescale than typical blazars. Although these transition blazars appear to switch between FSRQ and BLL according to the phenomenologically based EW scheme, we show that they are most likely rare cases of FSRQs with radiatively efficient accretion flows and especially strongly beamed jets. These results have implications for the decrease of the apparent BLL population at high redshifts, and may lend credence to claims of a negative BLL redshift evolution.

  3. Multiwavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    I have developed a technique for measuring multi-variate luminosity functions of galaxies. Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principle component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multiwavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and show that the results are consistent with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  4. Polarization swings in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Kravchenko, Evgeniya V.

    2017-06-01

    We present a model of blazar variability that can both reproduce smooth large polarization angle swings and at the same time allow for the seemingly random behaviour of synchrotron fluxes, polarization fraction and, occasionally, π/2 polarization jumps. We associate the blazar flaring activity with a jet carrying helical magnetic fields and propagating along a variable direction (and possibly with a changing bulk Lorentz factor). The model predicts that for various jet trajectories (i) electric vector position angle (EVPA) can experience large smooth temporal variations, while at the same time polarization fraction (Π) can be highly variable; (ii) Π ∼ 0 near sudden EVPA jumps of 90°, but can also remain constant for large, smoother EVPA swings; (iii) the total angle of EVPA rotation can be arbitrarily large; and (iv) intensity I is usually maximal at points of fastest EVPA changes, but can have a minimum. Thus, even for a regular, deterministic motion of a steadily emitting jet, the observed properties can vary in a non-monotonic and/or seemingly stochastic way. Intrinsic fluctuations of the emissivity will further complicate the intensity profiles, but are expected to preserve the polarization structure.

  5. Time correlation between the radio and gamma-ray activity in blazars and the production site of the gamma-ray emission

    DOE PAGES

    Max-Moerbeck, W.; Hovatta, T.; Richards, J. L.; ...

    2014-09-22

    In order to determine the location of the gamma-ray emission site in blazars, we investigate the time-domain relationship between their radio and gamma-ray emission. Light-curves for the brightest detected blazars from the first 3 years of the mission of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope are cross-correlated with 4 years of 15GHz observations from the OVRO 40-m monitoring program. The large sample and long light-curve duration enable us to carry out a statistically robust analysis of the significance of the cross-correlations, which is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations including the uneven sampling and noise properties of the light-curves. Modeling the light-curvesmore » as red noise processes with power-law power spectral densities, we find that only one of 41 sources with high quality data in both bands shows correlations with significance larger than 3σ (AO0235+164), with only two more larger than even 2.25σ (PKS 1502+106 and B2 2308+34). Additionally, we find correlated variability in Mrk 421 when including a strong flare that occurred in July-September 2012. These results demonstrate very clearly the difficulty of measuring statistically robust multiwavelength correlations and the care needed when comparing light-curves even when many years of data are used. This should be a caution. In all four sources the radio variations lag the gamma-ray variations, suggesting that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Continuous simultaneous monitoring over a longer time period is required to obtain high significance levels in cross-correlations between gamma-ray and radio variability in most blazars.« less

  6. Time correlation between the radio and gamma-ray activity in blazars and the production site of the gamma-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max-Moerbeck, W.; Hovatta, T.; Richards, J. L.; King, O. G.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Shepherd, M. C.; Stevenson, M. A.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Pavlidou, V.; Romani, R. W.; Zensus, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    In order to determine the location of the gamma-ray emission site in blazars, we investigate the time-domain relationship between their radio and gamma-ray emission. Light curves for the brightest detected blazars from the first 3 yr of the mission of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope are cross-correlated with 4 yr of 15 GHz observations from the Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 m monitoring programme. The large sample and long light-curve duration enable us to carry out a statistically robust analysis of the significance of the cross-correlations, which is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations including the uneven sampling and noise properties of the light curves. Modelling the light curves as red noise processes with power-law power spectral densities, we find that only one of 41 sources with high-quality data in both bands shows correlations with significance larger than 3σ (AO 0235+164), with only two more larger than even 2.25σ (PKS 1502+106 and B2 2308+34). Additionally, we find correlated variability in Mrk 421 when including a strong flare that occurred in 2012 July-September. These results demonstrate very clearly the difficulty of measuring statistically robust multiwavelength correlations and the care needed when comparing light curves even when many years of data are used. This should be a caution. In all four sources, the radio variations lag the gamma-ray variations, suggesting that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Continuous simultaneous monitoring over a longer time period is required to obtain high significance levels in cross-correlations between gamma-ray and radio variability in most blazars.

  7. Time correlation between the radio and gamma-ray activity in blazars and the production site of the gamma-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Max-Moerbeck, W.; Hovatta, T.; Richards, J. L.; King, O. G.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Shepherd, M. C.; Stevenson, M. A.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Pavlidou, V.; Romani, R. W.; Zensus, J. A.

    2014-09-22

    In order to determine the location of the gamma-ray emission site in blazars, we investigate the time-domain relationship between their radio and gamma-ray emission. Light-curves for the brightest detected blazars from the first 3 years of the mission of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope are cross-correlated with 4 years of 15GHz observations from the OVRO 40-m monitoring program. The large sample and long light-curve duration enable us to carry out a statistically robust analysis of the significance of the cross-correlations, which is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations including the uneven sampling and noise properties of the light-curves. Modeling the light-curves as red noise processes with power-law power spectral densities, we find that only one of 41 sources with high quality data in both bands shows correlations with significance larger than 3σ (AO0235+164), with only two more larger than even 2.25σ (PKS 1502+106 and B2 2308+34). Additionally, we find correlated variability in Mrk 421 when including a strong flare that occurred in July-September 2012. These results demonstrate very clearly the difficulty of measuring statistically robust multiwavelength correlations and the care needed when comparing light-curves even when many years of data are used. This should be a caution. In all four sources the radio variations lag the gamma-ray variations, suggesting that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Continuous simultaneous monitoring over a longer time period is required to obtain high significance levels in cross-correlations between gamma-ray and radio variability in most blazars.

  8. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CENTRAL BLACK-HOLE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Kenji; Mori, Masaki

    2013-08-20

    Radiation from the blazar class of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) exhibits fast time variability which is usually ascribed to instabilities in the emission region near the central supermassive black hole. The variability time scale is generally faster in higher energy region, and data recently provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the GeV energy band enable a detailed study of the temporal behavior of AGN. Due to its wide field-of-view in the scanning mode, most sky regions are observed for several hours per day and daily light curves of many AGNs have been accumulated for more than 4 yr. In this paper we investigate the time variability of 15 well-detected AGNs by studying the normalized power spectrum density of their light curves in the GeV energy band. One source, 3C 454.3, shows a specific time scale of 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} s, and this value suggests, assuming the internal shock model, a mass for the central black hole of (10{sup 8}-10{sup 10}) M{sub Sun} which is consistent with other estimates. It also indicates the typical time interval of ejected blobs is (7-70) times the light crossing time of the Schwarzschild radius.

  9. Locating the γ-ray emission site in Fermi/LAT blazars from correlation analysis between 37 GHz radio and γ-ray light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Hovatta, T.; Nieppola, E.; Tornikoski, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Valtaoja, E.

    2015-09-01

    We address the highly debated issue of constraining the γ-ray emission region in blazars from cross-correlation analysis using discrete correlation function between radio and γ-ray light curves. The significance of the correlations is evaluated using two different approaches: simulating light curves and mixed source correlations. The cross-correlation analysis yielded 26 sources with significant correlations. In most of the sources, the γ-ray peaks lead the radio with time lags in the range +20 and +690 d, whereas in sources 1633+382 and 3C 345 we find the radio emission to lead the γ-rays by -15 and -40 d, respectively. Apart from the individual source study, we stacked the correlations of all sources and also those based on subsamples. The time lag from the stacked correlation is +80 d for the whole sample and the distance travelled by the emission region corresponds to 7 pc. We also compared the start times of activity in radio and γ-rays of the correlated flares using Bayesian block representation. This shows that most of the flares at both wavebands start at almost the same time, implying a co-spatial origin of the activity. The correlated sources show more flares and are brighter in both bands than the uncorrelated ones.

  10. Analysis of complex samples using a portable multi-wavelength light emitting diode (LED) fluorescence spectrometer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spectroscopic analysis of chemically complex samples often requires an increase n the dimensionality of the measured response surface. This often involves the measurement of emitted light intensities as functions of both wavelengths of excitation and emission resulting in the generation of an excita...

  11. Optical polarization of gamma-ray bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Dmitry; Angelakis, E.; Balokovic, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hovatta, T.; Katarzyski, K.; Khodade, P.; King, O.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Myserlis, I.; Panopoulou, G.; Papadakis, I.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Pearson, T.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A.; Reig, P.; Rouneq, R.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, A.

    2014-07-01

    We report about first results of the RoboPol project. RoboPol is a large-sample, high-cadence, polarimetric monitoring program of blazars in optical wavelengths, using a camera specifically constructed for this project, mounted at the University of Crete's Skinakas Observatory 1.3 m telescope. The analysis of RoboPol data is conducted in conjunction with Fermi LAT gamma-ray data, and multifrequency radio data from the OVRO (Caltech), F-GAMMA (MPIfR), and Torun (NCU) monitoring programs. Using carefully selected samples of gamma-ray bright and weak blazars we investigate a connection between their optical polarization behaviour and variability properties in gamma. We examine a relationship of gamma flares with polarization angle rotations relying on robust statistical criteria. We analyse also the optical polarization variability itself in order to establish some restrictions on physical models of blazars jets.

  12. Observations of variability of TeV gamma-ray blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi

    The boom in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy since the beginning of the 21st century has enabled a new probe of the universe using very-high-energy photons. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is an array of four 12-m imaging Cherenkov telescopes that is sensitive to gamma rays in the energy range between ~100 GeV and ~30 TeV. Among all known TeV sources, blazars, a particular type of active galactic nuclei, have shown exceptional variabilities over a wide range of timescales and energies. The observations of such variabilities have been previously limited at lower energies, ranging from radio to X-ray. However, the superior sensitivity of VERITAS has made the detection of fast TeV gamma-ray variability of blazars possible. The studies of their gamma-ray variability can, in a relatively model-independent way, shed significant light on the emitting regions and production mechanisms in blazars. This thesis describes my work on blazar variability, based primarily on the VERITAS observations but are interpreted in a multi-wavelength context. One of the most exceptional phenomena observed in blazars with VERITAS is the fast variability of the TeV gamma rays. The short duration of these flares strongly constrains the size of the emitting region, and provides insights to the kinetics and location of the emitting region. We describe the fast TeV flare of BL Lacertae as an example, and discuss the connection between TeV flares and multi-wavelength observations that may help localize the TeV emitting region. To study the persistent variability of TeV blazars, we examine a variety of statistical properties in the time and frequency domains. We study both local properties of time series, e.g. time lags between different energy bands and spectral hysteresis during flares, and global properties, e.g. variability amplitude and power spectrum. These properties are connected to the physical processes in blazars, although they are also limited by

  13. CMOS buried quad p-n junction photodetector for multi-wavelength analysis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Charles; Courcier, Thierry; Pittet, Patrick; Martel, Stéphane; Ouellet, Luc; Lu, Guo-Neng; Aimez, Vincent; Charette, Paul G

    2012-01-30

    This paper presents a buried quad p-n junction (BQJ) photodetector fabricated with a HV (high-voltage) CMOS process. Multiple buried junction photodetectors are wavelength-sensitive devices developed for spectral analysis applications where a compact integrated solution is preferred over systems involving bulk optics or a spectrometer due to physical size limitations. The BQJ device presented here is designed for chip-based biochemical analyses using simultaneous fluorescence labeling of multiple analytes such as with advanced labs-on-chip or miniaturized photonics-based biosensors. Modeling and experimental measurements of the spectral response of the device are presented. A matrix-based method for estimating individual spectral components in a compound spectrum is described. The device and analysis method are validated via a test setup using individually modulated LEDs to simulate light from 4-component fluorescence emission.

  14. Analysis and design of concave grating-based devices for multi-wavelength optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churin, Evgeny G.

    This thesis is focused on the analysis and design of concave holographic gratings for applications in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical network devices, such as multi/demultiplexers, routers and channel equalizers. The main advantage of this approach is that a single optical element can perform both functions of dispersion and imaging. However, the design of such gratings for operation in optical fibre communication networks requires the understanding and control of dominant optical aberrations, stray light, and polarization sensitivity. The solution of these problems forms the basis of the work in this thesis. Chapter 1 presents the motivation for the work, describes the major objectives and lists the main original contributions. Chapter 2 reviews related works in the field of WDM optical networks. Different published methods and techniques used for channel separation are described. Chapter 3 describes the analysis of crosstalk in free-space WDM demultiplexers and wavelength routers due to aberrations, diffraction at the aperture, and diffuse scattering from non-uniformities. It is demonstrated experimentally that holographic grating can give background crosstalk as low as -60 dB. Holographic grating-based wavelength routers are shown to be absolutely scalable from the coherent crosstalk point of view, allowing a large number of subscribers/nodes to be interconnected. Chapter 4 presents aberration analysis of concave grating. New general analytic formulae that define the parameters of concave grating mounts providing stationary and superstationary astigmatism are derived. These mounts offer diffraction-limited imaging within operating spectral range of WDM demultiplexers. A novel retro-reflective scheme of demultiplexer with concave grating and convex mirror resulting in double dispersion and large image field is proposed and analyzed. Chapter 5 describes in detail all stages of design and adjustment of an athermal 49-channel demultiplexer. The method

  15. Limits on Lorentz invariance violation at the Planck energy scale from H.E.S.S. spectral analysis of the blazar Mrk 501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentz, Matthias; Brun, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    Some extensions to the Standard Model lead to the introduction of Lorentz symmetry breaking terms, expected to induce deviations from Lorentz symmetry around the Planck scale. A parameterization of effects due to Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) can be introduced by adding an effective term to the photon dispersion relation. This affects the kinematics of electron-positron pair creation by TeV γ rays on the extragalactic background light (EBL) and translates into modifications of the standard EBL opacity for the TeV photon spectra of extragalactic sources. Exclusion limits are presented, obtained with the spectral analysis of H.E.S.S. observations taken on the blazar Mrk 501 during the exceptional 2014 flare. The energy spectrum, extending very significantly above 10 TeV, allows to place strong limits on LIV in the photon sector at the level of the Planck energy scale for linear perturbations in the photon dispersion relation, and provides the strongest constraints presently for the case of quadratic perturbations.

  16. Multiwavelength variability study and search for periodicity of PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castignani, G.; Pian, E.; Belloni, T. M.; D'Ammando, F.; Foschini, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Pursimo, T.; Bazzano, A.; Beckmann, V.; Bianchin, V.; Fiocchi, M. T.; Impiombato, D.; Raiteri, C. M.; Soldi, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Treves, A.; Türler, M.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Blazars are the most luminous and variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs). They are thus excellent probes of accretion and emission processes close to the central engine. Aims: We concentrate here on PKS 1510-089 (z = 0.36), a blazar belonging to the flat-spectrum radio quasar subclass, an extremely powerful gamma-ray source and one of the brightest in the Fermi-LAT catalog. We aim to study the complex variability of this blazar's bright multiwavelength spectrum, to identify the physical parameters responsible for the variations and the timescales of possible recurrence and quasi-periodicity at high energies. Methods: The blazar PKS 1510-089 was observed twice in hard X-rays with the IBIS instrument onboard INTEGRAL during the flares of Jan. 2009 and Jan. 2010, and simultaneously with Swift and the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), in addition to the constant Fermi monitoring. We also measured the optical polarization in several bands on 18 Jan. 2010 at the NOT.Using these and archival data we constructed historical light curves at gamma-to-radio wavelengths covering nearly 20 yr and applied tests of fractional and correlated variability. We assembled spectral energy distributions (SEDs) based on these data and compared them with those at two previous epochs, by applying a model based on synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation from blazars. Results: The modeling of the SEDs suggests that the physical quantities that undergo the largest variations are the total power injected into the emitting region and the random Lorentz factor of the electron distribution cooling break, that are higher in the higher gamma-ray states. This suggests a correlation of the injected power with enhanced activity of the acceleration mechanism. The cooling likely takes place at a distance of 1000 Schwarzschild radii( 0.03 pc) from the central engine - a distance muchsmaller than the broad line region (BLR) radius.The emission at a few hundred GeV can be reproduced with inverse

  17. Two new high-energy γ-ray blazar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, R.; Maselli, A.; Bernieri, E.; Massaro, E.

    2017-03-01

    We report the detection of two new γ-ray sources in the Fermi-Large Area Telescope sky (Pass 8) at energies higher than 20 GeV and confirmed at lower energies, using a source detection tool based on the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. One of these sources, at a Galactic latitude of about -4°, is a new discovery, while the other was previously reported above 50 GeV in the 2FHL catalogue. We searched for archival multiwavelength data of possible counterparts and found interesting candidates. Both objects are radio sources and their Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer infrared colours are typical of blazars. While, for the former source, no optical spectra are available, for the latter, a puzzling optical spectrum corresponding to a white dwarf star is found in the 6dF data base. We discuss the spectral energy distributions of both sources and possible interpretations.

  18. A Multi-wavelength Analysis of Active Regions and Sunspots by Comparison of Automatic Detection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeeck, C.; Higgins, P. A.; Colak, T.; Watson, F. T.; Delouille, V.; Mampaey, B.; Qahwaji, R.

    2013-03-01

    Since the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began recording ≈ 1 TB of data per day, there has been an increased need to automatically extract features and events for further analysis. Here we compare the overall detection performance, correlations between extracted properties, and usability for feature tracking of four solar feature-detection algorithms: the Solar Monitor Active Region Tracker ( SMART) detects active regions in line-of-sight magnetograms; the Automated Solar Activity Prediction code ( ASAP) detects sunspots and pores in white-light continuum images; the Sunspot Tracking And Recognition Algorithm ( STARA) detects sunspots in white-light continuum images; the Spatial Possibilistic Clustering Algorithm ( SPoCA) automatically segments solar EUV images into active regions (AR), coronal holes (CH), and quiet Sun (QS). One month of data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and SOHO/ Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) instruments during 12 May - 23 June 2003 is analysed. The overall detection performance of each algorithm is benchmarked against National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Solar Influences Data Analysis Center (SIDC) catalogues using various feature properties such as total sunspot area, which shows good agreement, and the number of features detected, which shows poor agreement. Principal Component Analysis indicates a clear distinction between photospheric properties, which are highly correlated to the first component and account for 52.86% of variability in the data set, and coronal properties, which are moderately correlated to both the first and second principal components. Finally, case studies of NOAA 10377 and 10365 are conducted to determine algorithm stability for tracking the evolution of individual features. We find that magnetic flux and total sunspot area are the best indicators of active-region emergence. Additionally, for NOAA 10365, it is shown that the

  19. Multi-wavelength analysis of supernova remnant MSH11-61A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel

    MSH11-61A (G290.1-0.8) has been identified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR) from its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile. The evolutionary sequence which leads to these unusual X-ray properties is not well understood and currently different models can only explain some of the features seen in individual cases. In this analysis we present a study of MSH 11-61A using archival Suzaku data. Our preliminary results indicate enhanced abundances, as previously suggested by ASCA observations and we derive the associated age, energy and ambient density conditions of the remnant using models that we constructed in an attempt to reproduce the observed X-ray properties. Observational evidence from thermal and non-thermal emission of SNRs has provided increasing support in favour of cosmic rays being accelerated at the shock front of the remnant. Whether the observed gamma-ray emission from these accelerated CRs is hadronic or leptonic in nature is currently a hotly debated topic in the literature. SNRs known to be interacting with molecular clouds provide effective targets for detecting and studying gamma-rays. As MSH11-61A is thought to be interacting with a molecular cloud towards the south west of the remnant, we perform a spatial and spectral analysis of the gamma-ray emission in the region of this remnant by using ~64 months of data from the Fermi-LAT telescope. This analysis allows us to constrain the origin of the detected gamma-ray emission.

  20. Multi-wavelength Spectral Analysis of Ellerman Bombs Observed by FISS and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D.; Cao, Wenda

    2017-04-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are a kind of solar activity that is suggested to occur in the lower solar atmosphere. Recent observations using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) show connections between EBs and IRIS bombs (IBs), which imply that EBs might be heated to a much higher temperature (8 × 104 K) than previous results. Here we perform a spectral analysis of EBs simultaneously observed by the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph and IRIS. The observational results show clear evidence of heating in the lower atmosphere, indicated by the wing enhancement in Hα, Ca ii 8542 Å, and Mg ii triplet lines and also by brightenings in images of the 1700 Å and 2832 Å ultraviolet continuum channels. Additionally, the intensity of the Mg ii triplet line is correlated with that of Hα when an EB occurs, suggesting the possibility of using the triplet as an alternative way to identify EBs. However, we do not find any signal in IRIS hotter lines (C ii and Si iv). For further analysis, we employ a two-cloud model to fit the two chromospheric lines (Hα and Ca ii 8542 Å) simultaneously, and obtain a temperature enhancement of 2300 K for a strong EB. This temperature is among the highest of previous modeling results, albeit still insufficient to produce IB signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths.

  1. Multi-wavelength analysis of a 2011 stellar occultation by Chiron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, Amanda A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Bosh, Amanda S.; Person, Michael J.; Zuluaga, Carlos; Ruprecht, Jessica D.; Bianco, Federica; Bus, Schelte J.; Zangari, Amanda Marie

    2016-10-01

    The centaur (2060) Chiron was originally thought to be asteroid-like; however, photometry in the late 1980s revealed an increase in brightness and eventually a directly-imaged coma (e.g. Meech, K.J., & Belton, M.J.S., 1990, AJ, 100,4). Previous stellar occultation observations for Chiron have detected features thought to be narrow jets, a gravitationally-bound dust coma, and a near-circular ring or shell of material (Elliot, J.L., 1995, Nature, 373, 46; Bus, S.J., et al., 1996, Icarus, 123, 478; Ruprecht, J.D., et al. 2015, Icarus, 252, 271). These detections are unusual given Chiron's relatively large distance from the Sun and its relatively large nucleus compared to comet nuclei. The discovery of a ring system around the centaur Chariklo (Braga-Ribas, F., et al. 2014, Nature, 508, 78) provides context for Chiron. A ring system for Chiron has recently been proposed based on a combined analysis of occultation data, the rotational light curve, and spectral variability (Ortiz, J.L., et al. 2015, A&A, 576, A18).Chiron occulted a fairly bright star (R = 14.8) on 2011 November 29. We observed the event with high-speed, visible imaging from NASA's 3-m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea and the 2-m Faulkes Telescope North at Haleakala (run by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network, LCOGT). At the IRTF, we simultaneously obtained low-resolution, near-infrared spectra spanning 0.9-2.4 microns. Here, we present an analysis of the combined visible and near-infrared occultation data. Distinct extinction features were detected in the visible data, located roughly 300 km from the center (Ruprecht, J.D., et al. 2015, Icarus, 252, 271). We investigate flux versus wavelength trends in the near-infrared data in order to constrain the properties of extinction-causing particles.

  2. A multi-wavelength scattered light analysis of the dust grain population in the GG Tau circumbinary ring

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Ghez, A; Macintosh, B

    2004-02-04

    We present the first 3.8 {micro}m image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10m telescope's adaptive optics system. THis is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multi-wavelength analysis of the scattering proiperties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelengths, HST images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 {micro}m implies a significant increase in the population of large ({approx}> 1 {micro}m) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 {micro}m. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located {approx} 50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located {approx} 25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical

  3. High-redshift Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Foschini, L.; Ghirlanda, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Della Ceca, R.; Haardt, F.; Volonteri, M.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-02-01

    With the release of the first-year Fermi catalogue, the number of blazars detected above 100 MeV lying at high redshift has been largely increased. There are 28 blazars at z > 2 in the `clean' sample. All of them are flat spectrum radio quasars. We study and model their overall spectral energy distribution in order to find the physical parameters of the jet-emitting region, and for all of them, we estimate their black hole masses and accretion rates. We then compare the jet with the accretion disc properties, setting these sources in the broader context of all the other bright γ-ray or hard X-ray blazars. We confirm that the jet power correlates with the accretion luminosity. We find that the high-energy emission peak shifts to smaller frequencies as the observed luminosity increases, according to the blazar sequence, making the hard X-ray band the most suitable for searching the most-luminous and distant blazars.

  4. Multi-wavelength Analysis of the Galactic Supernova Remnant MSH 11-61A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Castro, Daniel; Foster, Adam R.; Smith, Randall K.

    2015-09-01

    Due to its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile, MSH 11-61A (G290.1-0.8) is classified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR). H i and CO observations determined that the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds found toward the north and southwest regions of the remnant. In this paper we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with MSH 11-61A, using 70 months of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. To investigate the origin of this emission, we perform broadband modeling of its non-thermal emission considering both leptonic and hadronic cases and concluding that the γ-ray emission is most likely hadronic in nature. Additionally we present our analysis of a 111 ks archival Suzaku observation of this remnant. Our investigation shows that the X-ray emission from MSH 11-61A arises from shock-heated ejecta with the bulk of the X-ray emission arising from a recombining plasma, while the emission toward the east arises from an ionizing plasma.

  5. MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT MSH 11-61A

    SciTech Connect

    Auchettl, Katie; Slane, Patrick; Foster, Adam R.; Smith, Randall K.; Castro, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Due to its centrally bright X-ray morphology and limb brightened radio profile, MSH 11–61A (G290.1–0.8) is classified as a mixed morphology supernova remnant (SNR). H i and CO observations determined that the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds found toward the north and southwest regions of the remnant. In this paper we report on the detection of γ-ray emission coincident with MSH 11–61A, using 70 months of data from the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. To investigate the origin of this emission, we perform broadband modeling of its non-thermal emission considering both leptonic and hadronic cases and concluding that the γ-ray emission is most likely hadronic in nature. Additionally we present our analysis of a 111 ks archival Suzaku observation of this remnant. Our investigation shows that the X-ray emission from MSH 11–61A arises from shock-heated ejecta with the bulk of the X-ray emission arising from a recombining plasma, while the emission toward the east arises from an ionizing plasma.

  6. 3D fingerprint analysis using transmission-mode multi-wavelength digital holographic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywickrema, Ujitha; Banerjee, Partha; Kota, Akash; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Swiontek, Stephen E.

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of fingerprints is important for biometric identification. Two-wavelength digital holographic interferometry is used to study the topography of various types of fingerprints. This topography depends on several conditions such as the temperature, time of the day, and the proportions of eccrine and sebaceous sweat. With two-wavelength holographic interferometry, surface information can be measured with a better accuracy compared to single-wavelength phase-retrieving techniques. Latent fingerprints on transparent glass, a forensically relevant substrate are first developed by the deposition of 50-1000-nm-thick columnar thin films, and then analyzed using the transmission-mode two-wavelength digital holographic technique. In this technique, a tunable Argon-ion laser (457.9 nm to 514.5 nm) is used and holograms are recorded on a CCD camera sequentially for several sets of two wavelengths. Then the phase is reconstructed for each wavelength, and the phase difference which corresponds to the synthetic wavelength (4 μm to 48 μm) is calculated. Finally, the topography is obtained by applying proper phase-unwrapping techniques to the phase difference. Interferometric setups that utilize light reflected from the surface of interest have several disadvantages such as the effect of multiple reflections as well as the effects of the tilt of the object and its shadow (for the Mach-Zehnder configuration). To overcome these drawbacks, digital holograms of fingerprints in a transmission geometry are used. An approximately in-line geometry employing a slightly tilted reference beam to facilitate separation of various diffraction orders during holographic reconstruction is employed.

  7. Very High Energy gamma-rays from blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sol, Helene

    2014-07-01

    The extragalactic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray sky is dominated at the moment by more than fifty blazars detected by the present imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT), with a majority (about 90%) of high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects (HBL) and a small number of low-frequency peaked and intermediate BL Lac objects (LBL and IBL) and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ). A significant variability is often observed, with time scales from a few minutes to months and years. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of these blazars typically shows two bumps from the radio to the TeV range, which can usually be described by leptonic or hadronic processes. While elementary bricks of the VHE emission scenarios seem now reasonably well identified, a global picture of these sources, describing the geometry and dynamics of the VHE zone, is not yet available. Multiwavelength monitoring and global alert network will be important to better constrain the picture, especially with the perspective of CTA, a major project of the next generation in ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  8. TANAMI blazars in the IceCube PeV-neutrino fields

    DOE PAGES

    Krauß, F.

    2014-06-01

    The IceCube Collaboration has announced the discovery of a neutrino flux in excess of the atmospheric background. Owing to the steeply falling atmospheric background spectrum, events at PeV energies most likely have an extraterrestrial origin. We present the multiwavelength properties of the six radio-brightest blazars that are positionally coincident with these events using contemporaneous data of the TANAMI blazar sample, including high-resolution images and spectral energy distributions. Assuming the X-ray to γ-ray emission originates in the photoproduction of pions by accelerated protons, the integrated predicted neutrino luminosity of these sources is high enough to explain the two detected PeV events.

  9. Optical and near infrared observations of the blazar 3C 279 with the REM telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impiombato, D.; Tosti, G.; Ciprini, C.; REM Collaboration.

    The Rapid Eye Mount (REM) telescope installed at La Silla (Cile) on June 2003, is a robotic telescope able the capability to observe in optical and infrared bands. Since the late commissioning phase a optical and infrared monitoring program of a sample of blazars, most emitting also in the gamma-ray band, was started. Such program is still on going and it make part of an observational activity aimed to the multiwavelength characterization possible blazars candidate to be observed also in gamma-ray by the instruments on board of AGILE satellites(launched on 23 April 2007) and Glast (that will be launched at the end of the 2007). In this poster we present the optical/near-IR data obtained during the January 2007, outburst of 3C279 (the prototype of the gamma-ray loud).

  10. Study of Multi-Band Flux/spectral Variations in the Blazar Markarian 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paneque, David

    We are organizing a 1 year long campaign with dense multi-frequency (from radio to TeV) coverage on the nearby TeV blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk421). This data set will allow us to study flux/spectral variations over short and long timescales with unprecedented sensitivity, hence improving our knowledge on the physical processes occurring in Mrk421, and blazars in general. The coverage of the source is already granted at various energy ranges through various instruments/programs (OVRO, GASP, GAMMA, Fermi, MAGIC...). RXTE observations would play a uniquely important role in this multi-wavelength campaign by providing high quality and simultaneous (to ground observatories) X-ray data. For this campaign, we request 276 ks with RXTE, which will be split in 184 individual observations of 1.5 ks.

  11. SUZAKU WIDE BAND ANALYSIS OF THE X-RAY VARIABILITY OF TeV BLAZAR Mrk 421 IN 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ushio, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Sato, Rie; Tanaka, Takaaki; Madejski, Grzegorz; Hayashida, Masaaki; Kataoka, Jun; Mazin, Daniel; Ruegamer, Stefan; Teshima, Masahiro; Wagner, Stefan; Yaji, Yuichi

    2009-07-10

    We present the results of X-ray observations of the well studied TeV blazar Mrk 421 with the Suzaku satellite in 2006 April 28. During the observation, Mrk 421 was undergoing a large flare and the X-ray flux was variable, decreasing by {approx}50%, from 7.8 x 10{sup -10} to 3.7 x 10{sup -10} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in about 6 hr, followed by an increase by {approx}35%. Thanks to the broad bandpass coupled with high sensitivity of Suzaku, we measured the evolution of the spectrum over the 0.4-60 keV band in data segments as short as {approx}1 ks. The data show deviations from a simple power-law model, but also a clear spectral variability. The time-resolved spectra are fitted by a synchrotron model, where the observed spectrum is due to a exponentially cutoff power-law distribution of electrons radiating in uniform magnetic field; this model is preferred over a broken power law. As another scenario, we separate the spectrum into 'steady' and 'variable' components by subtracting the spectrum in the lowest-flux period from those of other data segments. In this context, the difference ('variable') spectra are all well described by a broken power-law model with photon index {gamma} {approx} 1.6, breaking at energy {epsilon}{sub brk} {approx_equal} 3 keV to another photon index {gamma} {approx} 2.1 above the break energy, differing from each other only by normalization, while the spectrum of the 'steady' component is best described by the synchrotron model. We suggest that the rapidly variable component is due to relatively localized shock (Fermi I) acceleration, while the slowly variable ('steady') component is due to the superposition of shocks located at larger distance along the jet, or due to other acceleration process, such as the stochastic acceleration on magnetic turbulence (Fermi II) in the more extended region.

  12. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  13. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  14. HERSCHEL PACS AND SPIRE OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR PKS 1510-089: A CASE FOR TWO BLAZAR ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Greg M.; Szostek, Anna; Szczerba, Ryszard; Kidger, Mark R.; Lorente, Rosario

    2012-11-20

    We present the results of observations of blazar PKS 1510-089 with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, together with multiwavelength data from Fermi/LAT, Swift, SMARTS, and Submillimeter Array. The source was found in a quiet state, and its far-infrared spectrum is consistent with a power law with a spectral index of {alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7. Our Herschel observations were preceded by two 'orphan' gamma-ray flares. The near-infrared data reveal the high-energy cutoff in the main synchrotron component, which cannot be associated with the main gamma-ray component in a one-zone leptonic model. This is because in such a model the luminosity ratio of the external-Compton (EC) and synchrotron components is tightly related to the frequency ratio of these components, and in this particular case an unrealistically high energy density of the external radiation would be implied. Therefore, we consider a well-constrained two-zone blazar model to interpret the entire data set. In this framework, the observed infrared emission is associated with the synchrotron component produced in the hot-dust region at the supra-parsec scale, while the gamma-ray emission is associated with the EC component produced in the broad-line region at the sub-parsec scale. In addition, the optical/UV emission is associated with the accretion disk thermal emission, with the accretion disk corona likely contributing to the X-ray emission.

  15. The Intrinsic Demographics of Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urry, C. Megan; Mao, Peiyuan; Brandt, Timothy D.

    2017-08-01

    Blazar surveys over the past three decades have revealed a range of spectral energy distributions (SEDs), with large systematic differences depending on survey wavelength. This means blazar samples suffer from strong selection effects. To date there has been no agreement on how to infer intrinsic population demographics from these samples, with a key issue being whether blazar jet power is related to the shape of the spectral energy distribution. We investigate this issue using Monte Carlo simulations of BL Lac and flat-spectrum radio quasar populations. We rule out the hypothesis that the SED shape is not linked to luminosity, as the simulated samples in that case disagree strongly with observed surveys. This means that the low-power blazars found primarily in X-ray surveys must be more common than the high-power blazars found primarily in radio surveys. Given an intrinsic correlation between luminosity and SED shape, our simulations predict distributions of flux, redshift, luminosity, and spectral index consistent with existing surveys. We also show that the observed evolution of X-ray-selected blazars, as measured through the average V/Vmax ratio, appears to be negative even when the underlying evolution is actually mildly positive. The apparent negative evolution of X-ray bright BL Lacs is a selection effect caused by redshifting a steeply falling UV-to-X-ray spectrum out of the X-ray band. As this conclusion would suggest, our simulations also show that the deeper the X-ray flux limit and/or the lower the frequency of the synchrotron peak in the SED, the less negative the apparent evolution.

  16. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  17. COMPTEL observations of the Virgo blazars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.; Zhang, S.; Bloemen, H.; Hermsen, W.; McConnell, M.; Bennett, K.; Williams, O. R.

    2001-10-01

    We report the main MeV properties (detections, light curves, spectra) of the Virgo blazars 3C 273 and 3C 279 which were derived from a consistent analysis of all COMPTEL Virgo observations between 1991 and 1997. .

  18. The Ultimate Multiwavelength Quasar Survey (ROSES-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon

    Our objective is to create the ultimate multi-wavelength quasar catalog by combining moderatelydeep, wide-field data in the NASA archives (from GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and WISE) with public optical imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This catalog will extend from deep samples with signficant multi-wavelength coverage in a small area (e.g., SDSS "Stripe 82"), to shallower samples over a larger area with less multiwavelength coverage. Our efforts are a crucial step to bridging between existing spectroscopic surveys and future photometric surveys. Using this catalog, we will investigate the clustering and luminosity function of faint (i »21-23), high-redshift (z > 2.5) quasars in order to break degeneracies between different models of "feedback" from active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our approach is unique in its application of a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm that has been demonstrated to out-perform standard methods and that has been tested on multi-wavelength data. Once quasars have been identified, we will apply our existing photometric redshift algorithms. Richards and Myers are among the world's experts in finding quasars and using their clustering and luminosity function to do cutting-edge science. Quasar clustering analysis will make use of the team's existing algorithms, which are designed to handle the inherently photometric nature of the quasar sample. The quasar luminosity function algorithms are already in place, allowing for timely completion of this project once the multi-wavelength NASA data have been incorporated. As with all quasar catalogs that represent the next generation in improvements, this multi-wavelength quasar catalog will have an impact that extends far beyond our own science goals. This time is ripe for the construction of such a catalog as only in the past year has this dataset covered such a large range of wavelengths and area. In terms of our own science, understanding the form of AGN feedback and the extent to which it

  19. Possible Quasi-Periodic Gamma-ray Emission from Blazar PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David; Cutini, Sara; Ciprini, Stefano; Larsson, Stefan; Stamerra, Antonio; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report an update on a possible gamma-ray and multiwavelength nearly periodic oscillation in an active galactic nucleus. Data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope exhibit an apparent quasi-periodicity in the gamma-ray flux (E > 100 MeV) from the GeV/TeV BL Lac object PG 1553+113. The indication of a 2.18 +/- 0.08 year period gamma-ray cycle is strengthened by correlated oscillations observed in radio and optical fluxes, through data collected in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Tuorla, Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope, and Catalina Sky Survey monitoring programs and Swift-UVOT. Further long-term multiwavelength monitoring of this blazar may discriminate among the possible explanations for this quasi-periodicity.

  20. Spectacular variability of gamma-ray emission in blazar 3C279 during the large outburst in June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madejski, Grzegorz Maria; Hayashida, Masaaki; Asano, Katsuaki; Thompson, David John; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek; Fermi-LAT Team

    2016-01-01

    The Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar 3C 279 has been one of the brightest gamma-ray blazars in the sky. In Dec. 2013, April 2014, and June 2015 it showed powerful outbursts with the gamma-ray flux higher than 1x10^{-5} ph/cm^2/s (above 100 MeV). The December 2013 outburst showed an unusually hard power-law gamma-ray spectrum (index~1.7), and an asymmetric light curve profile with a few-hour time scale variability. The outburst in June 2015 was extreme, revealing a record-breaking integral flux above 100 MeV of 4x10^{-5} ph/cm^2/s, more than an order of magnitude higher than the average gamma-ray flux of the Crab. At the same time, the X-ray flux also showed the highest level of soft X-ray flux ever measured by Swift-XRT. The high flux prompted a Fermi-LAT ToO pointing observation. The increase of exposure and the very high flux state of the source allowed us to resolve the gamma-ray flux on a sub-orbital time scales. Our analysis of the LAT data revealed variability on time scales of tens of minutes. In this contribution, we will present the observational results of those outbursts from 3C279 together with multi-wavelength observations, with a focus on detailed analysis of the 2015 June outburst.

  1. THE SPECTRAL INDEX PROPERTIES OF FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Yuan, Y. H.; Wang, J.; Gao, Y.

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, a sample of 451 blazars (193 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 258 BL Lacertae objects) with corresponding X-ray and Fermi {gamma}-ray data is compiled to investigate the correlation both between the X-ray spectral index and the {gamma}-ray spectral index and between the spectral index and the luminosity, and to compare the spectral indexes {alpha}{sub X}, {alpha}{sub {gamma}}, {alpha}{sub X{gamma}}, and {alpha}{sub {gamma}X{gamma}} for different subclasses. We also investigated the correlation between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray luminosity. The following results have been obtained. Our analysis indicates that an anti-correlation exists between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray spectral indexes for the whole sample. However, when we considered the subclasses of blazars (FSRQs, the low-peaked BL Lacertae objects (LBLs) and the high-peaked BL Lacertae objects (HBLs)) separately, there is not a clear relationship for each subclass. Based on the Fermi-detected sources, we can say that the HBLs are different from FSRQs, while the LBLs are similar to FSRQs.

  2. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MARKARIAN 421 DURING OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Butt, Y.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Chow, Y. C.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C. E-mail: cui@physics.purdue.ed

    2009-09-20

    We report on the results of two coordinated multiwavelength campaigns that focused on the blazar Markarian 421 during its 2006 and 2008 outbursts. These campaigns obtained UV and X-ray data using the XMM-Newton satellite, while the gamma-ray data were obtained utilizing three imaging atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes, the Whipple 10 m telescope and VERITAS, both based in Arizona, as well as the MAGIC telescope, based on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The coordinated effort between the gamma-ray groups allowed for truly simultaneous data in UV/X-ray/gamma-ray wavelengths during a significant portion of the XMM-Newton observations. This simultaneous coverage allowed for a reliable search for correlations between UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray variability over the course of the observations. Investigations of spectral hysteresis and modeling of the spectral energy distributions are also presented.

  3. Multiwavelength and Polarimetric Analysis of the Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sunil; Patiño-Álvarez, Victor; Chavushyan, Vahram; Schlegel, Eric M.; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; León-Tavares, Jonathan; Carrasco, Luis; Valdés, José; Carramiñana, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents results of multiwavelength analyses of 3C 273 and 3C 279. The main goals were to identify the gamma-ray emission region and dominant high-energy emission processes. Our methodology consisted of analyzing light curves from radio to gamma-rays over 6 - 8 years and polarimetric, spectral and line emission behavior.In 3C 279, we found that the emission from millimeter to ultraviolet was simultaneous and therefore co-spatial. We identified two active states where different high-energy emission processes were dominant. We found multiwavelength flaring events consistent with component ejections and shocks. We proposed that the gamma-ray emission region changed over time based on observations of both simultaneous and delayed gamma-rays emission with respect to low-energy emission during different time-frames.In 3C 273, we identified a non-thermal flare related to a component ejection and a thermal flare related to accretion. From reverberation mapping we found that the broad line region dynamical behavior over time possibly affects the derived supermassive black hole mass.In both objects we found that the gamma-ray spectral index was variable, and a trend of harder spectral index with higher gamma-ray luminosity. From the identification of different dominant high-energy emission processes, we concluded that the dominant high-energy emission mechanism changes with time. Overall, we concluded that similar results from both objects points to behavior that is potentially common to flat spectrum radio quasars. Increasing the sample size of objects analyzed with similar methodologies will provide more results to confirm or refine our conclusions.

  4. Multiwavelength and polarimetric analysis of the flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 273 and 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sunil Anthony

    This dissertation presents results of multiwavelength analyses of 3C 273 and 3C 279. The main goals were to identify the gamma-ray emission region and dominant high-energy emission processes. Our methodology consisted of analyzing light curves from radio to gamma-rays over 6 - 8 years and polarimetric, spectral and line emission behavior. In 3C 279, we found that the emission from millimeter to ultraviolet was simultaneous and therefore co-spatial. We identified two active states where different high-energy emission processes were dominant. We found multiwavelength flaring events consistent with component ejections and shocks. We proposed that the gamma-ray emission region changed over time based on observations of both simultaneous and delayed gamma-rays emission with respect to low-energy emission during different time-frames. In 3C 273, we identified a non-thermal flare related to a component ejection and a thermal flare related to accretion. From reverberation mapping we found that the broad line region dynamical behavior over time possibly affects the derived supermassive black hole mass. In both objects we found that the gamma-ray spectral index was variable, and a trend of harder spectral index with higher gamma-ray luminosity. From the identification of different dominant high-energy emission processes, we concluded that the dominant high-energy emission mechanism changes with time. Overall, we concluded that similar results from both objects points to behavior that is potentially common to flat spectrum radio quasars. Increasing the sample size of objects analyzed with similar methodologies will provide more results to confirm or refine our conclusions.

  5. Optical Observations Of Fermi LAT Monitored Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 8 years the Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University has been conducting R band monitoring of the variability of approximately 50 Blazars. A subset of these objects are being routinely observed with the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi Space Telescope. Adding the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory and observations with the AZT-11 telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CRAO), we are intensively monitoring the Blazars on the Lat monitoring list. We present the results of our long term monitoring of the LAT monitored Blazars, as well as the recent contemporaneous optical R band observations we have obtained of the LAT Blazars.

  6. The jets-accretion relation, mass-luminosity relation in Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Haojing; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Cha, Yongjuan; Chen, Yongyun; Huang, Xia; Wang, Yuwei

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 111 Fermi blazars each with a well-established radio core luminosity, broad-line luminosity, bolometric luminosity and black hole mass has been compiled from the literatures. We present a significant correlation between radio core and broad-line emission luminosities that supports a close link between accretion processes and relativistic jets. Analysis reveals a relationship of which is consistant with theoretical predicted coefficient and supports that blazar jets are powered by energy extraction from a rapidly spinning Kerr black hole through the magnetic field provided by the accretion disk. Through studying the correlation between the intrinsic bolometric luminosity and the black hole mass, we find a relationship of which supports mass-luminosity relation for Fermi blazars derived in this work is a powerlaw relation similar to that for main-sequence stars. Finally, EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE OF BLAZARS is discussed.

  7. 5-day photo-polarimetric WEBT Campaign on Blazar S5 0716+714 - a Study of Microvariabiltiy in Blazar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Gopal; Ostrwoski, Michal; Stawarz, Lukasz; Zola, Staszek; Jableka, Damian; Bachev, R.; Benitez, Erika; Dhalla, Sarah M.; Cason, Andy; Carosati, Daniele; Damljanovic, Goran; Frasca, A.; Hu, Shao Ming; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Kurtanidze, O.; Larionov, Valeri; Leto, Giuseppe; Marscher, Alan P.; Moody, Joseph; Ohlert, Johhanes; Rizzi, Nicola; Sadun, Alberto C.; Sasada, Mahito; Sergeev, Sergey; Strigachev, Anton; Vince, Oliver; Webb, James Raymond; Whole Earth Blazar Telescope

    2015-01-01

    A whole earth blazar telescope (WEBT) campaign on blazar S5 0716+714 was organized to simultaneously monitor the source in multiple photo-polarimetric filters as a study of the nature of microvariability in blazar. The campaign, starting on March 2nd 2014, lasted for five consecutive days resulting in a rich data set- flux in B,V,R,I and near IR filters, and polarization degree (PD) and position angle (PA) in mainly R filter. Such a rich information provides with an unique opportunity to look deep into the localized emission regions in the jet of the blazar. During the campaign, the source remained active with 0.93 duty cycle and went through an oscillation of 0.3 magnitudes along with 5% change in PD and 50 degrees swing in PA. For 6.19 hrs the activity suddenly stopped in all the filters resulting in a plateau around 14 magnitudes in R filter light curve and then brightens by 0.14 mag in 2.96 hr time. We employed time series analysis in search of possible quasi-periodic oscillations and found some of the significant timescales present in the light curve which could reflect on the physical processes in the turbulent jet environment. In the color-magnitude analysis, we looked for 'bluer-when-brighter' trend widely claimed to be found in some of the blazars including the source. Although we found some of such incidences, they could not claimed to be persistent through out the campaign period. Similarly, no clear trend of correlation between flux and PD, and flux and PA could be established. A modeling of the mini-flares lasting few hours as stochastic synchrotron pulses on top of relative stable back ground emission and that incorporates simultaneous the change of color, PA and PD is underway.

  8. Multiwavelength astronomy and big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Two major characteristics of modern astronomy are multiwavelength (MW) studies (fromγ-ray to radio) and big data (data acquisition, storage and analysis). Present astronomical databases and archives contain billions of objects observed at various wavelengths, both galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allows new studies and discoveries. Astronomers deal with big numbers. Surveys are the main source for discovery of astronomical objects and accumulation of observational data for further analysis, interpretation, and achieving scientific results. We review the main characteristics of astronomical surveys, compare photographic and digital eras of astronomical studies (including the development of wide-field observations), describe the present state of MW surveys, and discuss the Big Data in astronomy and related topics of Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics. The review includes many numbers and data that can be compared to have a possibly overall understanding on the Universe, cosmic numbers and their relationship to modern computational facilities.

  9. 2WHSP: A multi-frequency selected catalogue of high energy and very high energy γ-ray blazars and blazar candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.-L.; Arsioli, B.; Giommi, P.; Padovani, P.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: High synchrotron peaked blazars (HSPs) dominate the γ-ray sky at energies higher than a few GeV; however, only a few hundred blazars of this type have been cataloged so far. In this paper we present the 2WHSP sample, the largest and most complete list of HSP blazars available to date, which is an expansion of the 1WHSP catalogue of γ-ray source candidates off the Galactic plane. Methods: We cross-matched a number of multi-wavelength surveys (in the radio, infrared and X-ray bands) and applied selection criteria based on the radio to IR and IR to X-ray spectral slopes. To ensure the selection of genuine HSPs, we examined the SED of each candidate and estimated the peak frequency of its synchrotron emission (νpeak) using the ASDC SED tool, including only sources with νpeak > 1015 Hz (equivalent to νpeak > 4 eV). Results: We have assembled the largest and most complete catalogue of HSP blazars to date, which includes 1691 sources. A number of population properties, such as infrared colours, synchrotron peak, redshift distributions, and γ-ray spectral properties have been used to characterise the sample and maximize completeness. We also derived the radio log N-log S distribution. This catalogue has already been used to provide seeds to discover new very high energy objects within Fermi-LAT data and to look for the counterparts of neutrino and ultra high energy cosmic ray sources, showing its potential for the identification of promising high-energy γ-ray sources and multi-messenger targets. Table 4 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/598/A17

  10. Blazar Anti-Sequence of Spectral Variability for Individual TeV Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Liang, En-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We compile from literature the broadband SEDs of twelve TeV blazars observed simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously with Fermi/LAT and other instruments. Two SEDs are available for each of the objects and the state is identified as a low or high state according to its flux density at GeV/TeV band. The observed SEDs of BL Lac objects (BL Lacs) are fitted well with the synchrotron + synchrotron-self-Compton (syn+SSC) model, whereas the SEDs of the two flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) need to include the contributions of external Compton scattering. In this scenario, it is found that the Doppler factor δ of FSRQs is smaller than that of BL Lacs, but the magnetic field strength B of FSRQs is larger than that of BL Lacs. The increase of the peak frequency of the SEDs is accompanied with the increase of the flux for the individual sources, which seems opposite to the observational phenomena of the blazar sequence. We refer this phenomenonto blazar anti-sequence of spectral variability for individual TeV blazars. However, both the blazar sequence from FSRQs to BL Lacs and blazar anti-sequence of the spectral variability from low state to high state are accompanied by an increase of the break Lorentz factor of the electron's spectrum γb and a decrease of B. We propose a model in which the mass accretion rate Ṁ is the driving force behind both the blazar sequence for ensembles of blazars and the blazar anti-sequence for individual blazars. Specifically we suggest that the differences in <Ṁ> of different blazars produce the observed blazar sequence, but ΔṀ in each blazar results in the observed blazar anti-sequence.

  11. Contemporaneous Multiwaveband Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Bloom, Steven D.; Zhang, Yun Fei; Gear, Walter K.

    1994-01-01

    We have observed a number of blazars at wavebands ranging from radio to gamma-ray. We find bright gamma-ray emission to be associated with strong synchrotron flares observed at lower frequencies. The x-ray flux and entire radio spectrum of 4C 39.25 have each increased in strength by 30% over a 2-year period, in agreement with the prediction of the bent relativistic jet model.

  12. Multi-wavelength holographic profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, E. A.; Gesualdi, M. R.; Muramatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for surface profilometry by holography is presented. We used a diode laser emitting at many wavelengths simultaneously as the light source and a Bi 12TiO 20 (BTO) crystal as the holographic medium in single exposure processes. The employ of multi-wavelength, large free spectral range (FSR) lasers leads to holographic images covered of interference fringes corresponding to the contour lines of the studied surface. In order to obtain the relief of the studied surface, the fringe analysis was performed by the phase stepping technique (PST) and the phase unwrapping was carried out by the Cellular-automata method. We analysed the relief of a tilted flat metallic bar and a tooth prosthesis.

  13. GPS Quasars as Special Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. M.; Lee, Myung Gyong

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we argue that the gigahertz peaked spectrum (GPS) quasars are special blazars, blazars in dense and dusty gas enviornment. The ROSAT detection rate of GPS quasars is similar to that of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), suggesting that the relativistic jets in GPS quasars are oriented at small angle to the line of sight. Due to strong inverse Compton scattering off infrared photons from dense and dusty nuclear interstellar media in GPS quasars, most of them may have significant soft gamma-ray and X-ray emission, which is consistent with ASCA X-ray observations. Because Compton cooling in GPS quasars is stronger than that in FSRQs, synchrotron emission in GPS quasars may less dominate over thermal emission of the accretion disk and hot dust, hence most GPS quasars show low optical polarization and small variability, consistent with observations. We suggest that it is the significant radio emission of electron/positron pairs produced by the interaction of gamma-rays with the dense gas and dust grains in GPS quasars that makes GPS quasars show steep radio spectra, low radio polarization, and relatively faint VLBI/VLBA cores. Whether GPS quasars are special blazars can be tested by gamma-ray observations with GLAST in the near future, with the detection rate of GPS quasars being similar to that of FSRQs.

  14. Chasing the most powerful blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotulli, Lea; Paliya, Vaidehi; Ajello, Marco; Gasparrini, Dario; Ojha, Roopesh

    2017-08-01

    High-redshift blazars are some of the most extreme sources in the Universe. With jet power exceeding 10^47 erg s-1, they host billion solar masses black holes and are found up to when the Universe was only two billions years old. These sources are of great astrophysical interest as they provide us crucial information about the origin and growth of supermassive black-holes in the early Universe. Detections in the hard X-rays and gamma-rays are desired to find the most powerful objects of this class. With the advent of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) and the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), it has been possible to increase the sample of high-redshift blazars and to constrain more accurately their physical properties. The improved sensitivity of the LAT has also allowed gamma-ray detection of such sources up to redshift 4.3. Here we present the latest high-redshift blazar detection with NuSTAR and the LAT, and discuss some of their implications.

  15. Polarization Signatures of Kink Instabilities in the Blazar Emission Region from Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; ...

    2017-01-23

    Kink instabilities are likely to occur in the current-carrying magnetized plasma jets. Recent observations of the blazar radiation and polarization signatures suggest that the blazar emission region may be considerably magnetized. While the kink instability has been studied with first-principle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the corresponding time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures have not been investigated. Here, in this paper, we perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of the kink instability in the blazar emission region based on relativistic MHD (RMHD) simulations. We find that the kink instability may give rise to strong flares with polarization angle (PA) swings or weak flares withmore » polarization fluctuations, depending on the initial magnetic topology and magnetization. These findings are consistent with observations. In addition, compared with the shock model, the kink model generates polarization signatures that are in better agreement with the general polarization observations. Therefore, we suggest that kink instabilities may widely exist in the jet environment and provide an efficient way to convert the magnetic energy and produce multiwavelength flares and polarization variations.« less

  16. X-ray temporal and spectral studies of blazars with the Ginga satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) concerning NASA grant NAG8-697. This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to a proposal, entitled 'X-Ray Temporal and Spectral Studies of Blazars with the Ginga Satellite', to collaborate with Japanese colleagues in using the Ginga X-ray satellite. The grant was originally awarded on 2/27/88 and expired on 3/31/94. The Ginga X-ray satellite had unprecedented sensitivity in the 2-20 keV energy band, allowing us to make detailed temporal and spectral studies of a large number of blazars, which are a kind of unusually luminous and variable active galactic nuclei. We were successful with several proposals and were able to observe a number of different active galactic nuclei. Our investigations under this grant fall broadly into two categories: (1) Ginga observations of blazars, usually in conjunction with simultaneous multiwavelength observations using other facilities; and (2) the application of calculated pair plasma spectra to the X-ray colors of active galactic nuclei. These are described in turn.

  17. Polarization Signatures of Kink Instabilities in the Blazar Emission Region from Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; Taylor, Greg

    2017-02-01

    Kink instabilities are likely to occur in the current-carrying magnetized plasma jets. Recent observations of the blazar radiation and polarization signatures suggest that the blazar emission region may be considerably magnetized. While the kink instability has been studied with first-principle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the corresponding time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures have not been investigated. In this paper, we perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of the kink instability in the blazar emission region based on relativistic MHD (RMHD) simulations. We find that the kink instability may give rise to strong flares with polarization angle (PA) swings or weak flares with polarization fluctuations, depending on the initial magnetic topology and magnetization. These findings are consistent with observations. Compared with the shock model, the kink model generates polarization signatures that are in better agreement with the general polarization observations. Therefore, we suggest that kink instabilities may widely exist in the jet environment and provide an efficient way to convert the magnetic energy and produce multiwavelength flares and polarization variations.

  18. Constraining the particle spectrum in blazar jets: importance of the hard X-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Atreyee; Sahayanathan, Sunder; Chitnis, Varsha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of the spectral curvature in blazar jets can throw light on the underlying particle spectral distribution, and hence, the acceleration and diffusion processes at play. With the advent of NuSTAR and ASTROSAT, and the upcoming ASTRO-H, this curvature can now be measured accurately across the broadband X-ray energies. We will discuss results from our recent works on two HBLs, Mkn421 (Sinha et al, A&A 2015) and 1ES1011+496 (Sinha et al, ApJ submitted), and show how simultaneous measurement at hard and soft X-ray energies can be crucial in understanding the underlying particle spectrum. Detection of lognormality in blazars is beginning to hint at strong disk-jet connections. India's recently launched multiwavelength satellite, the ASTROSAT will provide simultaneous time resolved data between 0.2-80keV, along with measurements at Optical-UV energies. We will discuss prospects from ASTROSAT for studying jet triggering mechanisms in blazars.

  19. Multiwavelength analysis for interferometric (sub-)mm observations of protoplanetary disks. Radial constraints on the dust properties and the disk structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazzari, M.; Testi, L.; Ercolano, B.; Natta, A.; Isella, A.; Chandler, C. J.; Pérez, L. M.; Andrews, S.; Wilner, D. J.; Ricci, L.; Henning, T.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Corder, S. A.; Dullemond, C. P.; Carpenter, J. M.; Sargent, A. I.; Mundy, L.; Storm, S.; Calvet, N.; Greaves, J. A.; Lazio, J.; Deller, A. T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The growth of dust grains from sub-μm to mm and cm sizes is the first step towards the formation of planetesimals. Theoretical models of grain growth predict that dust properties change as a function of disk radius, mass, age, and other physical conditions. High angular resolution observations at several (sub-)mm wavelengths constitute the ideal tool with which to directly probe the bulk of dust grains and to investigate the radial distribution of their properties. Aims: We lay down the methodology for a multiwavelength analysis of (sub-)mm and cm continuum interferometric observations to self-consistently constrain the disk structure and the radial variation of the dust properties. The computational architecture is massively parallel and highly modular. Methods: The analysis is based on the simultaneous fit in the uv-plane of observations at several wavelengths with a model for the disk thermal emission and for the dust opacity. The observed flux density at the different wavelengths is fitted by posing constraints on the disk structure and on the radial variation of the grain size distribution. Results: We apply the analysis to observations of three protoplanetary disks (AS 209, FT Tau, DR Tau) for which a combination of spatially resolved observations in the range ~0.88 mm to ~10 mm is available from SMA, CARMA, and VLA. In these disks we find evidence of a decrease in the maximum dust grain size, amax, with radius. We derive large amax values up to 1 cm in the inner disk 15 AU ≤ R ≤ 30 AU and smaller grains with amax ~ 1 mm in the outer disk (R ≳ 80 AU). Our analysis of the AS 209 protoplanetary disk confirms previous literature results showing amax decreasing with radius. Conclusions: Theoretical studies of planetary formation through grain growth are plagued by the lack of direct information on the radial distribution of the dust grain size. In this paper we develop a multiwavelength analysis that will allow this missing quantity to be

  20. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. I. A NEW METHOD FOR THE ASSOCIATION OF GAMMA-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Giroletti, M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a new method for identifying blazar candidates by examining the locus, i.e., the region occupied by the Fermi {gamma}-ray blazars in the three-dimensional color space defined by the WISE infrared colors. This method is a refinement of our previous approach that made use of the two-dimensional projection of the distribution of WISE {gamma}-ray-emitting blazars (the Strip) in the three WISE color-color planes. In this paper, we define the three-dimensional locus by means of a principal component analysis of the color distribution of a large sample of blazars composed of all the ROMA-BZCAT sources with counterparts in the WISE All-Sky Catalog associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL; the WISE Fermi blazars sample, WFB). Our new procedure yields a total completeness of c {sub tot} {approx} 81% and a total efficiency of e {sub tot} {approx} 97%. We also obtain local estimates of the efficiency and completeness as functions of the WISE colors and galactic coordinates of the candidate blazars. The catalog of all WISE candidate blazars associated with the WFB sample is also presented, complemented by archival multi-frequency information for the alternative associations. Finally, we apply the new association procedure to all {gamma}-ray blazars in the 2FGL and provide a catalog containing all the {gamma}-ray candidate blazars selected according to our procedure.

  1. Optical Variability of the Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, T. J.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2002-05-01

    We present a fourteen year optical (R) light curve for the blazar 3C 279 from 1989 through 2002. We study both the long and short timescale variations during this period, but concentrate on the longer timescale variations. Although 3C 279 has been the object of several previous studies, our investigation of the long term activity covering several outbursts is among the most extensive and well-sampled at visual wavelengths. Some of the observations reported here have been used in earlier multi-wavelength campaigns to study the radio through gamma-ray broadband spectrum and variability. Observations were conducted at the Foggy Bottom Observatory at Colgate University using a sixteen inch Cassegrain telescope and CCD camera. Images are obtained on most clear nights during the observing season for this object, which for our site extends from mid-November to early August. In a typical year observations are obtained on fifty to sixty nights. In total, approximately 4500 images have been obtained on about 800 nights. The blazar has been active throughout the fourteen year period of this study, with the brightness ranging over four magnitudes (from R = 16.7 to 12.5). Several outbursts (which we define as periods of sustained activity lasting between half a year and several years) have been observed, perhaps superposed on a decade timescale underlying "base level" increase. During the outbursts there are multiple (usually overlapping) flares lasting from one to several weeks. During the flares, intra-night and night-to-night variations (which we categorize as microvariablity) can be as large as 0.2 magnitude in five hours or 0.5 magnitude in one day.

  2. HIGH ENERGY POLARIZATION OF BLAZARS: DETECTION PROSPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  3. High Energy Polarization of Blazars: Detection Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, N.; Pavlidou, V.; Fields, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from blazar jets in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared is polarized. If these low-energy photons were inverse-Compton scattered, the upscattered high-energy photons retain a fraction of the polarization. Current and future X-ray and gamma-ray polarimeters such as INTEGRAL-SPI, PoGOLITE, X-Calibur, Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter, GEMS-like missions, ASTRO-H, and POLARIX have the potential to discover polarized X-rays and gamma-rays from blazar jets for the first time. Detection of such polarization will open a qualitatively new window into high-energy blazar emission; actual measurements of polarization degree and angle will quantitatively test theories of jet emission mechanisms. We examine the detection prospects of blazars by these polarimetry missions using examples of 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, and 3C 454.3, bright sources with relatively high degrees of low-energy polarization. We conclude that while balloon polarimeters will be challenged to detect blazars within reasonable observational times (with X-Calibur offering the most promising prospects), space-based missions should detect the brightest blazars for polarization fractions down to a few percent. Typical flaring activity of blazars could boost the overall number of polarimetric detections by nearly a factor of five to six purely accounting for flux increase of the brightest of the comprehensive, all-sky, Fermi-LAT blazar distribution. The instantaneous increase in the number of detections is approximately a factor of two, assuming a duty cycle of 20% for every source. The detectability of particular blazars may be reduced if variations in the flux and polarization fraction are anticorrelated. Simultaneous use of variability and polarization trends could guide the selection of blazars for high-energy polarimetric observations.

  4. Correlation between -ray flux density and redshift for Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hu-Bing; Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Xie, Hong-Jing; Hao, Jing-Meng; Yang, Jiang-He; Yuan, Yu-Hai; Liu, Yi; Fan, Jun-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Blazars are strong -ray emitters, the -ray emissions are likely strongly beamed, therefore, one should use the intrinsic (de-beamed) emissions to investigate its emission nature. In this work, we compiled a sample of Fermi blazars with available beaming Doppler factors, , to investigate the correlation between -ray flux density, , and redshift, . The analysis shows that there is no correlation between and for the observed -ray flux density, but there is a clear strong correlation between the intrinsic flux densities, and . We also discussed the relationship of -ray luminosity and short time scale for the observed data and the intrinsic data. Our analysis suggests that the intrinsic -ray flux density obeys the flux density and redshift relation, and the jet in -rays maybe a continuous case. The intrinsic luminosity and the short time scales obey the Elliot and Shapiro relation and Abramowicz and Nobili relation as well.

  5. The Utilization of the RCT Telescope for Studies of Blazar Continuum Emission during the GLAST Gamma-Ray Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Cominsky, L.; Spear, G.; Carinni, M.; Gelderman, R.; McGruder, C. H.; Guinan, E.; Howell, S.; Davis, D. R.; Everett, M.; Walter, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The RCT Consortium successfully proposed to refurbish and automate the Kitt Peak 1.3-m telescope, and to operate it as the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT). Refurbishment is nearing completion, and observations have begun. The capabilities of the RCT for broad-band optical photometry will be described. A program for systematic optical monitoring of blazars with the RCT is planned. We anticipate that an important utilization of the RCT will be in conjunction with multi-wavelength studies of blazar continuum emission during the operation of NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) satellite, now scheduled for launch in 2006. Refurbishment of the RCT has been made possible by NASA grant NAG58762.

  6. Simultaneous Radio to (Sub-) Mm-Monitoring of Variability and Spectral Shape Evolution of Potential GLAST Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J.A.; Krichbaum, T.P.; Angelakis, E.; Readhead, A.C.S.; /Caltech

    2011-11-29

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument onboard GLAST offers a tremendous opportunity for future blazar studies. In order to fully benefit from its capabilities and to maximize the scientific return from the LAT, it is of great importance to conduct dedicated multi-frequency monitoring campaigns that will result comprehensive observations. Consequently, we initiated an effort to conduct a GLAST-dedicated, quasi-simultaneous, broad-band flux-density (and polarization) monitoring of potential GLAST blazars with the Effelsberg and OVRO radio telescopes (11 cm to 7mm wavelength). Here, we present a short overview of these activities which will complement the multi-wavelengths activities of the GLAST/LAT collaboration towards the 'low-energy' radio bands. Further we will give a brief outlook including the extension of this coordinated campaign towards higher frequencies and future scientific aims.

  7. Herschel PACS and SPIRE Observations of Blazar PKS 1510-089: A Case for Two Blazar Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Greg M.; Exter, Katrina; Szostek, Anna; Szczerba, Ryszard; Kidger, Mark R.; Lorente, Rosario

    2012-11-06

    In this paper, we present the results of observations of blazar PKS 1510–089 with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, together with multiwavelength data from Fermi/LAT, Swift, SMARTS, and Submillimeter Array. The source was found in a quiet state, and its far-infrared spectrum is consistent with a power law with a spectral index of α ≃ 0.7. Our Herschel observations were preceded by two "orphan" gamma-ray flares. The near-infrared data reveal the high-energy cutoff in the main synchrotron component, which cannot be associated with the main gamma-ray component in a one-zone leptonic model. This is because in such a model the luminosity ratio of the external-Compton (EC) and synchrotron components is tightly related to the frequency ratio of these components, and in this particular case an unrealistically high energy density of the external radiation would be implied. Therefore, we consider a well-constrained two-zone blazar model to interpret the entire data set. Finally, in this framework, the observed infrared emission is associated with the synchrotron component produced in the hot-dust region at the supra-parsec scale, while the gamma-ray emission is associated with the EC component produced in the broad-line region at the sub-parsec scale. In addition, the optical/UV emission is associated with the accretion disk thermal emission, with the accretion disk corona likely contributing to the X-ray emission.

  8. Herschel PACS and SPIRE Observations of Blazar PKS 1510-089: A Case for Two Blazar Zones

    DOE PAGES

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Sikora, Marek; Madejski, Greg M.; ...

    2012-11-06

    In this paper, we present the results of observations of blazar PKS 1510–089 with the Herschel Space Observatory PACS and SPIRE instruments, together with multiwavelength data from Fermi/LAT, Swift, SMARTS, and Submillimeter Array. The source was found in a quiet state, and its far-infrared spectrum is consistent with a power law with a spectral index of α ≃ 0.7. Our Herschel observations were preceded by two "orphan" gamma-ray flares. The near-infrared data reveal the high-energy cutoff in the main synchrotron component, which cannot be associated with the main gamma-ray component in a one-zone leptonic model. This is because in suchmore » a model the luminosity ratio of the external-Compton (EC) and synchrotron components is tightly related to the frequency ratio of these components, and in this particular case an unrealistically high energy density of the external radiation would be implied. Therefore, we consider a well-constrained two-zone blazar model to interpret the entire data set. Finally, in this framework, the observed infrared emission is associated with the synchrotron component produced in the hot-dust region at the supra-parsec scale, while the gamma-ray emission is associated with the EC component produced in the broad-line region at the sub-parsec scale. In addition, the optical/UV emission is associated with the accretion disk thermal emission, with the accretion disk corona likely contributing to the X-ray emission.« less

  9. STACEE observations of Markarian 421 above 100 GeV and a new method for high-energy spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jennifer Elaine

    Markarian 421 is a nearby (z =0.03) blazar that is actively studied to constrain both physical blazar models and models of the extragalactic background light. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE), a wavefront- sampling detector sensitive to ~ 100 GeV gamma rays, detected Mkn 421 during a multiwavelength campaign in early 2004. This thesis covers the 2004 STACEE observations of Mkn 421 and their analysis. The goal of the project was to measure the gamma-ray spectrum of Mkn 421; such a spectral result would be STACEE's first and one of the first from any detector in STACEE's energy range. Achieving this goal required the development of a new method for reconstructing gamma-ray energies from the STACEE data. The reconstruction method is described in detail, and the resulting spectrum is presented. Finally, the implications of the results for understanding high-energy emission mechanisms in AGN are discussed.

  10. A Continuing Blazar Monitoring Campaign at Radio Wavelengths with the Morehead State University 21-Meter Space Tracking Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuti, Thomas; Grimes, C. K.; Tussey, J. M.; Goff, E. J.; Fite, N. D.; Cahall, B. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Morehead State University 21-Meter Space Tracking Antenna is a particularly unique scientific instrument for pursuing undergraduate research in astrophysics. Current research projects in the radio continuum include pointed observations of Galactic supernova remnants and blazars. In the latter case, undergraduate students and faculty have routinely conducted observations of such well-known blazars as BL Lac, CTA 102 and 3C 454.3: in addition, observations of other blazars detected in outburst at other wavelengths (such as the gamma-ray) have also been observed. We present the results of these observations and an initial analysis of the light curves generated by our observations.

  11. Contribution to the extragalactic gamma-ray background from the cascades of very-high energy gamma rays from blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venters, Tonia M.

    2009-06-01

    As very-high-energy photons propagate through the extragalactic background light (EBL), they interact with the soft photons and initiate electromagnetic cascades of lower energy photons and electrons. The collective intensity of a cosmological population emitting at very-high energies (VHE) will be attenuated at the highest energies through interactions with the EBL and enhanced at lower energies by the resulting cascade. We calculate the cascade radiation created by VHE photons produced by blazars and investigate the effects of cascades on the collective intensity of blazars and the resulting effects on the extragalactic gamma-ray background. We find that cascade radiation greatly enhances the collective intensity from blazars at high energies before turning over due to attenuation. The prominence of the resulting features depends on the blazar gamma-ray luminosity function, spectral index distribution, and the model of the EBL. We additionally calculate the cascade radiation from the distinct spectral sub-populations of blazars, BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), finding that the collective intensity of BL Lacs is considerably more enhanced by cascade radiation than that of the FSRQs. Finally, we discuss the implications that this analysis and upcoming Fermi observations could have for the nature of the EBL, the evolution of blazars, blazar spectra, and other sources of gamma-ray emission.

  12. Monitoring of blazars on the SPbSU 16" telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskiy, I. S.; Morozova, D. A.; Blinov, D. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Ershtadt, S. G.

    2012-05-01

    The fast variability in the total and polarized fluxes is prominent feature of blazars. The analysis demands dense series of observations. Meade 16" LX200 telescope is one of the basic instruments for these purposes in St.Petersburg State University. The photometry in B, V, R, I bands and polarimetry of the majority of program sources are spent. Thanks to organizational, methodical and technical solutions it was possible to achieve high efficiency of usage of the telescope for blazar monitoring. Unique observаtions series have been received. Results were included into articles published in such magazines, as the Astronomy Letters, Astronomy Reports, A&A, ApJ, Nature. International programs of active galactic nuclei monitoring are regularly spent.

  13. THE SMARTS MULTI-EPOCH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY ATLAS (SaMOSA): AN ANALYSIS OF EMISSION LINE VARIABILITY IN SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, Jedidah C.; Urry, C. M.; Bailyn, C.; Coppi, P.; Brady, M.; MacPherson, E.; Hasan, I.; Buxton, M.; Smith, P. S.

    2015-05-01

    We present multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of seven southern Fermi-monitored blazars from 2008 to 2013 using the Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS), with supplemental spectroscopy and polarization data from the Steward Observatory. We find that the emission lines are much less variable than the continuum; four of seven blazars had no detectable emission line variability over the 5 yr observation period. This is consistent with photoionization primarily by an accretion disk, allowing us to use the lines as a probe of disk activity. Comparing optical emission line flux with Fermi γ-ray flux and optical polarized flux, we investigate whether relativistic jet variability is related to the accretion flow. In general, we see no such dependence, suggesting that the jet variability is likely caused by internal processes like turbulence or shock acceleration rather than a variable accretion rate. However, three sources showed statistically significant emission line flares in close temporal proximity to very large Fermi γ-ray flares. While we do not have sufficient emission line data to quantitatively assess their correlation with the γ-ray flux, it appears that in some cases the jet might provide additional photoionizing flux to the broad-line region (BLR), which implies that some γ-rays are produced within the BLR, at least for these large flares.

  14. Analysis of air-mass modification over Poland and Romania by means of multiwavelength lidars - a case study 19-21/07/2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Surós, Montserrat; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Nicolae, Doina; Nemuc, Anca; Janicka, Lucja; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Belegante, Livio; Talianu, Camelia; Heese, Birgit; Engelmann, Ronny

    2015-04-01

    A case study of air-mass modification over Poland and Romania, assessing the role of the Carpathian Mountains, during 19-21/07/2014 is analyzed. The study is based mainly on measurements taken by two multiwavelength Raman lidars at two different sites: the Radiative Transfer Laboratory (RT-Lab) at the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw in Warsaw (Poland) and at the RADO site of the National Institute of R&D in Optoelectronics in Magurele (Romania). These data were complemented with meteorological data collected at two other sites: SolarAOT in Strzyżów (Poland) - equipped also with AERONET photometer and CHM15k ceilometer, and in Cluj (Romania). The RADO site, with its 7-wavelength aerosol-Raman-depolarization lidar (RALi) is integrated into EARLINET network. The RT-Lab site, with its 8-wavelength aerosol-Raman-depolarization (PollyXT-type) lidar, started the procedure to join in EARLINET last year. Moreover, RT-Lab and SolarAOT sites are part of the Poland AOD network. The analysis is focused on evaluating both multi-wavelength lidar data sets in order to search for similarities and differences in the vertical profiles describing the atmospheric layers above the two stations. Accordingly to GDAS Hysplit 4-days backward trajectory ending up in Magurele at 0.5, 1.5 and 3 km an air-mass from western Europe entered Poland from the north-west on 19/07/2014, descended on the following day over the Poland AOD station in Strzyżów, followed by Cluj and end up at Magurele on 21/07/2014. As the four stations are located along a north-west to south-east line the objective was to evaluate the aerosol properties of the air flow transported over Poland and further to Romania. At both sites, backscatter profiles at 355, 532 and 1064nm, extinction profiles at 355 and 532nm, and depolarization profiles at 532nm and 355nm, show distinctly layered structure in the atmosphere. Along with these we used data from stations in Strzyżów and Cluj as well as information

  15. Detecting the EBL attenuation of blazars with GLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Luis C.

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) due for launch in late 2007 will study the gamma-ray sky in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV. GLAST-LAT's improved sensitivity with respect to previous missions will increase the number of known gamma-ray blazars from about 100 to thousands, with redshifts up to z~3-5. Since g-rays with energy above 10 GeV interact via pair-production with photons from the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL), the systematic attenuation of GLAST-detected blazars as a function of redshift would constitute and effective and unique probe of the optical-UV EBL density and its evolution over cosmic history. Analysis techniques introduced in this dissertation make use of the large number of blazars detected by GLAST to study the collective behavior of their spectra as a function of redshift. These techniques are shown to offer powerful ways to help separate the common level of attenuation due to the EBL from the intrinsic peculiarities of individual blazars. The capability of GLAST to perform these measurements depends in great measure on the acceptance of the instrument to high energy g-rays ( E > 10 GeV), which in previous space-experiments has been drastically reduced due to backsplash self-veto. This dissertation includes a study of the backsplash effect as measured with flight-like detectors during a beam test of the LAT calibration unit. This analysis was used to verify the capabilities of the GLAST simulations tools to reproduce backsplash effects.

  16. Dynamic range multiwavelength particle characterization using analytical ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Johannes; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how a sophisticated data analysis methodology enables us to perform multiwavelength evaluations of dynamic rotor speed gradient experiments obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with a multiwavelength detector. Our data evaluation tool HDR-MULTIFIT allows for the accurate analysis of sedimentation coefficient distributions which can be converted to particle size distributions. By means of multiwavelength evaluation, species dependent extinction spectra can be determined even for complex mixtures. Moreover, optical and hydrodynamic properties can be correlated for spherical particles of known optical properties applying multiwavelength evaluation and Mie's theory leading to a significant increase in the dynamic range of the experiment. We provide the theoretical background about the operation principle of our methodology and compare the performance of the multiwavelength analysis to the conventional single wavelength analysis as it is applied in turbidity analysis. We validate our technique using NIST traceable reference particles and show that our technique is universally applicable to materials of known and unknown optical properties, thus clearly extending the possibilities of particle analysis.

  17. Blazar emission modeling: going beyond spherical cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannios, Dimitrios

    Blazars are a subclass of Active Galactic Nuclei with non-thermal, variable emission extending over most of the electromagnetic spectrum, i.e., from radio up to gamma-rays. The blazar emission is believed to originate in relativistic jets emerging from supermassive black holes at galactic centers, when the jet points close to the line of sight. Because of their very high-energy emission and high luminosity, blazars have long been considered as prime candidates for the acceleration of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). It comes as no surprise, therefore, that blazars have been the target of multiple observational campaigns. NASA satellite missions in synergy with ground-based facilities have led to huge observational progress in recent years. Yet, the theoretical understanding of the non-thermal processes responsible for the blazar emission lags far behind the observational progress. There is no reliable theory built from first principles for the energy dissipation and particle acceleration mechanisms at work in blazar jets. As a result, there exists no broadly-accepted framework for the particle distribution, geometry and magnetic field in the high-energy emitting regions in blazars. Over the past several years, Co-PI Giannios has argued that blazar emission can be understood as the result of magnetic energy dissipation via magnetic reconnection. In particular, the physical properties in the reconnection layer - where the emission is assumed to take place - can naturally reproduce the extreme energetics and timescales of the observed flaring episodes in blazars. Here, we propose to put the theory of magnetic reconnection in the context of blazar emission on a much more robust footing by capitalizing on new observational constraints and large progress in fully-kinetic particlein-cell (PIC) simulations led by Co-PI Sironi. Thanks to large-scale PIC simulations, we have recently demonstrated that reconnection can satisfy all the basic conditions for the blazar

  18. Core shift effect in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, A.; Mohan, P.; Gupta, Alok C.; Mangalam, A.; Volvach, A. E.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Gu, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Volvach, L. N.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the pc-scale core shift effect using radio light curves for three blazars, S5 0716+714, 3C 279 and BL Lacertae, which were monitored at five frequencies (ν) between 4.8 and 36.8 GHz using the University of Michigan Radio Astronomical Observatory (UMRAO), the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CrAO) and Metsähovi Radio Observatory for over 40 yr. Flares were Gaussian fitted to derive time delays between observed frequencies for each flare (Δt), peak amplitude (A) and their half width. Using A ∝ να, we infer α in the range of -16.67-2.41 and using Δ t ∝ ν ^{1/k_r}, we infer kr ∼ 1, employed in the context of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energy density for parameter estimation. From the estimated core position offset (Ωrν) and the core radius (rcore), we infer that opacity model may not be valid in all cases. The mean magnetic field strengths at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are in agreement with previous estimates. We apply the magnetically arrested disc model to estimate black hole spins in the range of 0.15-0.9 for these blazars, indicating that the model is consistent with expected accretion mode in such sources. The power-law-shaped power spectral density has slopes -1.3 to -2.3 and is interpreted in terms of multiple shocks or magnetic instabilities.

  19. Blazar Observations with the Robotically Controlled Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R.; Carini, M. T.; Mattox, J.; Gelderman, R.

    2004-12-01

    Blazars are the most highly variable AGNs known. By virtue of their featureless spectrum, the only diagnostic we have of the physics at work in these objects is their continuum variability. Optical continuum variations, when combined with observations at higher energies, provide valuable insights into the nature of the emission processes at work in these objects. We present the first results of our program to obtain and analyze high time resolution light curves of Blazars using the Robotically Controlled Telescope.

  20. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. I. MULTI-WAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-03-15

    We present an IRAC 3.6+4.5 {mu}m selected catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) containing photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and stellar parameters derived from the analysis of the multi-wavelength data. In this paper, we describe the method used to build coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all the sources. In a forthcoming companion paper, we analyze those SEDs to obtain robust estimations of stellar parameters such as photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates. The catalog comprises 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 mag (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey in the EGS) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. For approximately 16% of this sample, we are able to deconvolve the IRAC data to obtain robust fluxes for the multiple counterparts found in ground-based optical images. Typically, the SEDs of the IRAC sources in our catalog count with more than 15 photometric data points, spanning from the ultraviolet wavelengths probed by GALEX to the far-infrared observed by Spitzer, and going through ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared data taken with 2-8 m class telescopes. Approximately 95% and 90% of all IRAC sources are detected in the deepest optical and near-infrared bands. These fractions are reduced to 85% and 70% for S/N > 5 detections in each band. Only 10% of the sources in the catalog have optical spectroscopy and redshift estimations. Almost 20% and 2% of the sources are detected by MIPS at 24 and 70 {mu}m, respectively. We also cross-correlate our catalog with public X-ray and radio catalogs. Finally, we present the Rainbow Navigator public Web interface utility, designed to browse all the data products resulting from this work, including images, spectra, photometry, and stellar parameters.

  1. A Coordinated X-Ray and Optical Campaign of the Nearest Massive Eclipsing Binary, δ Orionis Aa. IV. A Multiwavelength, Non-LTE Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenar, T.; Oskinova, L.; Hamann, W.-R.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Pablo, H.; Richardson, N. D.; Waldron, W. L.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Nichols, J. S.; Todt, H.; Nazé, Y.; Hoffman, J. L.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Negueruela, I.

    2015-08-01

    Eclipsing systems of massive stars allow one to explore the properties of their components in great detail. We perform a multi-wavelength, non-LTE analysis of the three components of the massive multiple system δ Ori A, focusing on the fundamental stellar properties, stellar winds, and X-ray characteristics of the system. The primary’s distance-independent parameters turn out to be characteristic for its spectral type (O9.5 II), but usage of the Hipparcos parallax yields surprisingly low values for the mass, radius, and luminosity. Consistent values follow only if δ Ori lies at about twice the Hipparcos distance, in the vicinity of the σ-Orionis cluster. The primary and tertiary dominate the spectrum and leave the secondary only marginally detectable. We estimate the V-band magnitude difference between primary and secondary to be {{Δ }}V≈ 2\\buildrel{{m}}\\over{.} 8. The inferred parameters suggest that the secondary is an early B-type dwarf (≈B1 V), while the tertiary is an early B-type subgiant (≈B0 IV). We find evidence for rapid turbulent velocities (˜200 km s-1) and wind inhomogeneities, partially optically thick, in the primary’s wind. The bulk of the X-ray emission likely emerges from the primary’s stellar wind ({log}{L}{{X}}/{L}{Bol}≈ -6.85), initiating close to the stellar surface at {R}0˜ 1.1 {R}*. Accounting for clumping, the mass-loss rate of the primary is found to be {log}\\dot{M}≈ -6.4 ({M}⊙ {{yr}}-1), which agrees with hydrodynamic predictions, and provides a consistent picture along the X-ray, UV, optical, and radio spectral domains.

  2. The Multiwavelength Milky Way Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. A.; Leisawitz, D.; Boyd, P. T.; Digel, S. W.; Friedlander, J.; Kessel, R. L.; Smale, A. P.

    2000-12-01

    We describe an ongoing effort to communicate what is known about the Milky Way, and how our understanding of the Galaxy has advanced in recent decades with observations across the electromagnetic spectrum. Our aim is to help students, educators, and the general public understand the structure of the Milky Way, and our location within it. Inspired by the warm reception to our Multiwavelength Milky Way poster (26,000 copies distributed; requested by people in over 50 countries) we created several related products and a new version of the poster. The updated poster contains ten Galactic plane maps and a legend that points out prominent features and objects. The Multiwavelength Milky Way web site at http://adc.gsfc.nasa.gov/mw provides an image browsing capability, links to data files and journal articles, lesson plans and suggested activities for teachers, and a poster order form. We created a slide set comprised of multiwavelength all-sky maps and a ``Multiwavelength Milky Way'' image corresponding to the poster. The Galactic plane maps featured on the poster raise questions in the minds of many non-astronomers: ``Where are we in this picture?'' and ``How do we know what we know?'' To help answer these questions we developed a realistic three-dimensional model of the Milky Way and used state-of-the-art animation techniques to create a 28-minute video called The Milky Way's Invisible Light. The viewer is taken on a tour of the Galaxy that ends at the Sun's location, from which the 3-D model is shown to resemble the Galactic plane surveys depicted on the Multiwavelength Milky Way poster. The video can be ordered on the web at http://space.gsfc.nasa.gov/astro/education/mw_film or from the ASP catalog. The Multiwavelength Milky Way project is sponsored by the Astrophysics Data Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

  3. GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES OF TeV-DETECTED BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sentuerk, G. D.; Errando, M.; Mukherjee, R.; Boettcher, M.

    2013-02-20

    The synergy between the Fermi-LAT and ground-based Cherenkov telescope arrays gives us the opportunity for the first time to characterize the high-energy emission from blazars over 5 decades in energy, from 100 MeV to 10 TeV. In this study, we perform a Fermi-LAT spectral analysis for TeV-detected blazars and combine it with archival TeV data. We examine the observational properties in the {gamma}-ray band of our sample of TeV-detected blazars and compare the results with X-ray and GeV-selected populations. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that result from combining Fermi-LAT and ground-based spectra are studied in detail. Simple parameterizations such as a power-law function do not always reproduce the high-energy SEDs, where spectral features that could indicate intrinsic absorption are observed.

  4. Fermi large area telescope observations of blazar 3C 279 occultations by the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Chiang, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ciprini, S.; Cecchi, C.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheung, C. C. E-mail: phdmitry@stanford.edu; and others

    2014-04-01

    Observations of occultations of bright γ-ray sources by the Sun may reveal predicted pair halos around blazars and/or new physics, such as, e.g., hypothetical light dark matter particles—axions. We use Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) data to analyze four occultations of blazar 3C 279 by the Sun on October 8 each year from 2008 to 2011. A combined analysis of the observations of these occultations allows a point-like source at the position of 3C 279 to be detected with significance of ≈3σ, but does not reveal any significant excess over the flux expected from the quiescent Sun. The likelihood ratio test rules out complete transparency of the Sun to the blazar γ-ray emission at a 3σ confidence level.

  5. Blazar Monitoring at The Bank of Kentucky Observatory of Thomas More College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryle, Wes T.; Hageman, M.; Broering, M.; Sketch, R.; Miller, H.; Marshall, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first results from a new blazar monitoring campaign at The Bank of Kentucky Observatory, located on the campus of Thomas More College. Long-term monitoring carried out with small aperture telescopes will be combined with microvariability studies obtained from the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory. Combining these data and archival lightcurves, we are able to obtain a comprehensive picture of optical variability for a select number of bright blazars. With regular sampling, it will be possible to perform time series analysis on these data in order to better understand the mechanism behind blazar variability. This study focuses on the variability of the objects OJ287, BL Lac, and 3C454.3.

  6. Multiwavelength observations of Mrk 501 in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carreto Fidalgo, D.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Caneva, G.; de Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Bouvier, A.; Bugaev, B.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Griffiths, S. T.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Rajotte, J.; Ratliff, G.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Sheidaei, F.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Theiling, M.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weekes, T. C.; Welsing, R.; Williams, D. A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Ajello, M.; Perri, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Larionov, V. M.; Efimova, N. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Chen, W. P.; Koptelova, E.; Hsiao, H. Y.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Jordan, B.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Nieppola, E.; Tornikoski, M.; Sainio, J.; Kadenius, V.; Giroletti, M.; Cesarini, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Blazars are variable sources on various timescales over a broad energy range spanning from radio to very high energy (>100 GeV, hereafter VHE). Mrk 501 is one of the brightest blazars at TeV energies and has been extensively studied since its first VHE detection in 1996. However, most of the γ-ray studies performed on Mrk 501 during the past years relate to flaring activity, when the source detection and characterization with the available γ-ray instrumentation was easier toperform. Aims: Our goal is to characterize the source γ-ray emission in detail, together with the radio-to-X-ray emission, during the non-flaring (low) activity, which is less often studied than the occasional flaring (high) activity. Methods: We organized a multiwavelength (MW) campaign on Mrk 501 between March and May 2008. This multi-instrument effort included the most sensitive VHE γ-ray instruments in the northern hemisphere, namely the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes MAGIC and VERITAS, as well as Swift, RXTE, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments. This provided extensive energy and temporal coverage of Mrk 501 throughout the entire campaign. Results: Mrk 501 was found to be in a low state of activity during the campaign, with a VHE flux in the range of 10%-20% of the Crab nebula flux. Nevertheless, significant flux variations were detected with various instruments, with a trend of increasing variability with energy and a tentative correlation between the X-ray and VHE fluxes. The broadband spectral energy distribution during the two different emission states of the campaign can be adequately described within the homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model, with the (slightly) higher state described by an increase in the electron number density. Conclusions: The one-zone SSC model can adequately describe the broadband spectral energy distribution of the source during the two months covered by the MW campaign. This agrees with previous

  7. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are < log Rrangle = 0.99±0.87 for FDBs and < log Rrangle = -0.62±1.15 for the non-FDBs. A K-S test shows that the probability for the two distributions of FDBs and non-FDBs to come from the same parent distribution is near zero (P =9.12×10^{-52}). Secondly, we also investigated the variability index (V.I.) in the γ-ray band for FDBs, and we found V.I.=(0.12 ±0.07) log R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0

  8. A physical classification scheme for blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landt, Hermine; Padovani, Paolo; Perlman, Eric S.; Giommi, Paolo

    2004-06-01

    Blazars are currently separated into BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and flat spectrum radio quasars based on the strength of their emission lines. This is performed rather arbitrarily by defining a diagonal line in the Ca H&K break value-equivalent width plane, following Marchã et al. We readdress this problem and put the classification scheme for blazars on firm physical grounds. We study ~100 blazars and radio galaxies from the Deep X-ray Radio Blazar Survey (DXRBS) and 2-Jy radio survey and find a significant bimodality for the narrow emission line [OIII]λ5007. This suggests the presence of two physically distinct classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). We show that all radio-loud AGN, blazars and radio galaxies, can be effectively separated into weak- and strong-lined sources using the [OIII]λ5007-[OII]λ3727 equivalent width plane. This plane allows one to disentangle orientation effects from intrinsic variations in radio-loud AGN. Based on DXRBS, the strongly beamed sources of the new class of weak-lined radio-loud AGN are made up of BL Lacs at the ~75 per cent level, whereas those of the strong-lined radio-loud AGN include mostly (~97 per cent) quasars.

  9. Pushing the Limits: High Redshift Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Gasparrini, Dario; Lott, Benoit; Cutini, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift blazars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are of great astrophysical import as they are extreme objects whose energetics remain a mystery. Such blazars are intrinsically interesting since they inform us about the evolution of gamma-ray blazars and are, by definition, some of the more luminous blazars in the LAT sample. They are also an excellent tool to study the EBL and thus the gamma-ray horizon. We present the latest high redshift blazar detections in the LAT and discuss some of their implications.

  10. The characterization of the distant blazar GB6 J1239+0443 from flaring and low activity periods

    DOE PAGES

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Denney, K. D.; ...

    2012-08-27

    In 2008, AGILE and Fermi detected gamma-ray flaring activity from the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1236+0457, recently associated with a flat spectrum radio quasar (GB6 J1239+0443) at z = 1.762. The optical counterpart of the gamma-ray source underwent a flux enhancement of a factor of 15–30 in six years, and of ~10 in six months. Here, we interpret this flare-up in terms of a transition from an accretion-disc-dominated emission to a synchrotron-jet-dominated one. We analysed a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archival optical spectrum taken during a period of low radio and optical activity of the source. We estimated themore » mass of the central black hole using the width of the C iv emission line. In our work, we have also investigated SDSS archival optical photometric data and ultraviolet GALEX observations to estimate the thermal disc emission contribution of GB6 J1239+0443. This analysis of the gamma-ray data taken during the flaring episodes indicates a flat gamma-ray spectrum, with an extension of up to 15 GeV, with no statistically relevant sign of absorption from the broad-line region, suggesting that the blazar zone is located beyond the broad-line region. Our result is confirmed by the modelling of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (well constrained by the available multiwavelength data) of the flaring activity periods and by the accretion disc luminosity and black hole mass estimated by us using archival data.« less

  11. The characterization of the distant blazar GB6 J1239+0443 from flaring and low activity periods

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Denney, K. D.; Assef, R. J.; Ikejiri, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Uemura, M.; Domingo, A.; Giommi, P.; Tarchi, A.; Verrecchia, F.; Longo, F.; Rainó, S.; Giusti, M.; Vercellone, S.; Chen, A. W.; Striani, E.; Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Giuliani, A.; Pucella, G.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Costa, E.; De Paris, G.; Monte, E. Del; Cocco, G. Di; Evangelista, Y.; Ferrari, A.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Marisaldi, M.; Mereghetti, S.; Morelli, E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Pellizzoni, A.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Prest, M.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Rubini, A.; Sabatini, S.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Santolamazza, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.

    2012-08-27

    In 2008, AGILE and Fermi detected gamma-ray flaring activity from the unidentified EGRET source 3EG J1236+0457, recently associated with a flat spectrum radio quasar (GB6 J1239+0443) at z = 1.762. The optical counterpart of the gamma-ray source underwent a flux enhancement of a factor of 15–30 in six years, and of ~10 in six months. Here, we interpret this flare-up in terms of a transition from an accretion-disc-dominated emission to a synchrotron-jet-dominated one. We analysed a Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) archival optical spectrum taken during a period of low radio and optical activity of the source. We estimated the mass of the central black hole using the width of the C iv emission line. In our work, we have also investigated SDSS archival optical photometric data and ultraviolet GALEX observations to estimate the thermal disc emission contribution of GB6 J1239+0443. This analysis of the gamma-ray data taken during the flaring episodes indicates a flat gamma-ray spectrum, with an extension of up to 15 GeV, with no statistically relevant sign of absorption from the broad-line region, suggesting that the blazar zone is located beyond the broad-line region. Our result is confirmed by the modelling of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (well constrained by the available multiwavelength data) of the flaring activity periods and by the accretion disc luminosity and black hole mass estimated by us using archival data.

  12. A Luminous and Isolated Gamma-Ray Flare from the Blazar B2 1215+30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rulten, C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; VERITAS Collaboration; Fegan, S.; Giebels, B.; Horan, D.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Berdyugin, A.; Kuan, J.; Lindfors, E.; Nilsson, K.; Oksanen, A.; Prokoph, H.; Reinthal, R.; Takalo, L.; Zefi, F.

    2017-02-01

    B2 1215+30 is a BL-Lac-type blazar that was first detected at TeV energies by the MAGIC atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and subsequently confirmed by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) observatory with data collected between 2009 and 2012. In 2014 February 08, VERITAS detected a large-amplitude flare from B2 1215+30 during routine monitoring observations of the blazar 1ES 1218+304, located in the same field of view. The TeV flux reached 2.4 times the Crab Nebula flux with a variability timescale of < 3.6 {hr}. Multiwavelength observations with Fermi-LAT, Swift, and the Tuorla Observatory revealed a correlated high GeV flux state and no significant optical counterpart to the flare, with a spectral energy distribution where the gamma-ray luminosity exceeds the synchrotron luminosity. When interpreted in the framework of a one-zone leptonic model, the observed emission implies a high degree of beaming, with Doppler factor δ > 10, and an electron population with spectral index p< 2.3.

  13. The connection between the 15 GHz radio and gamma-ray emission in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max-Moerbeck, W.; Richards, J. L.; Hovatta, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; King, O. G.; Reeves, R.

    2015-03-01

    Since mid-2007 we have carried out a dedicated long-term monitoring programme at 15 GHz using the Owens Valley Radio Observatory 40 meter telescope (OVRO 40m). One of the main goals of this programme is to study the relation between the radio and gamma-ray emission in blazars and to use it as a tool to locate the site of high energy emission. Using this large sample of objects we are able to characterize the radio variability, and study the significance of correlations between the radio and gamma-ray bands. We find that the radio variability of many sources can be described using a simple power law power spectral density, and that when taking into account the red-noise characteristics of the light curves, cases with significant correlation are rare. We note that while significant correlations are found in few individual objects, radio variations are most often delayed with respect to the gamma-ray variations. This suggests that the gamma-ray emission originates upstream of the radio emission. Because strong flares in most known gamma-ray-loud blazars are infrequent, longer light curves are required to settle the issue of the strength of radio-gamma cross-correlations and establish confidently possible delays between the two. For this reason continuous multiwavelength monitoring over a longer time period is essential for statistical tests of jet emission models.

  14. Discovery of a GeV blazar shining through the galactic plane

    DOE PAGES

    Vandenbroucke, J.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-07-14

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = –1more » $$ο\\atop{.}$$2) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. Here, we report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray absorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new GeV source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width >5 Å, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.« less

  15. Discovery of a GeV blazar shining through the galactic plane

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbroucke, J.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellini, A.; Bolte, M.; Cheung, C. C.; Civano, F.; Donato, D.; Fuhrmann, L.; Funk, S.; Healey, S. E.; Hill, A. B.; Knigge, C.; Madejski, G. M.; Romani, R. W.; Santander-García, M.; Shaw, M. S.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Van Etten, A.; Williams, K. A.

    2010-07-14

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = –1$ο\\atop{.}$2) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. Here, we report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray absorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new GeV source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width >5 Å, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.

  16. A Luminous and Isolated Gamma-Ray Flare from the Blazar B2 1215+30

    DOE PAGES

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; ...

    2017-02-21

    We report that B2 1215+30 is a BL-Lac-type blazar that was first detected at TeV energies by the MAGIC atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and subsequently confirmed by the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) observatory with data collected between 2009 and 2012. In 2014 February 08, VERITAS detected a large-amplitude flare from B2 1215+30 during routine monitoring observations of the blazar 1ES 1218+304, located in the same field of view. The TeV flux reached 2.4 times the Crab Nebula flux with a variability timescale ofmore » $$\\lt 3.6\\,\\mathrm{hr}$$. Multiwavelength observations with Fermi-LAT, Swift, and the Tuorla Observatory revealed a correlated high GeV flux state and no significant optical counterpart to the flare, with a spectral energy distribution where the gamma-ray luminosity exceeds the synchrotron luminosity. Lastly, when interpreted in the framework of a one-zone leptonic model, the observed emission implies a high degree of beaming, with Doppler factor $$\\delta \\gt 10$$, and an electron population with spectral index $$p\\lt 2.3$$.« less

  17. Discovery of a GeV Blazar Shining Through the Galactic Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbroucke, J.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellini, A.; Bolte, M.; Cheung, C.C.; Civano, F.; Donato, D.; Fuhrmann, L.; Funk, S.; Healey, S.E.; Hill, A.B.; Knigge, C.; Madejski, G.M.; Romani, R.W.; Santander-Garcia, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M.A.P.; Van Etten, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Texas U., Astron. Dept.

    2011-08-11

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) discovered a new gamma-ray source near the Galactic plane, Fermi J0109+6134, when it flared brightly in 2010 February. The low Galactic latitude (b = -1.2{sup o}) indicated that the source could be located within the Galaxy, which motivated rapid multi-wavelength follow-up including radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We report the results of analyzing all 19 months of LAT data for the source, and of X-ray observations with both Swift and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We determined the source redshift, z = 0.783, using a Keck LRIS observation. Finally, we compiled a broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) from both historical and new observations contemporaneous with the 2010 February flare. The redshift, SED, optical line width, X-ray obsorption, and multi-band variability indicate that this new Gev source is a blazar seen through the Galactic plane. Because several of the optical emission lines have equivalent width > 5 {angstrom}, this blazar belongs in the flat-spectrum radio quasar category.

  18. The Contribution of Fermi-2LAC Blazars to Diffuse TeV-PeV Neutrino Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Axani, S.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blot, S.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Burgman, A.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Giang, W.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Kittler, T.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Krüger, C.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mancina, S.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Moulai, M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Penek, Ö.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Rysewyk, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sanchez Herrera, S. E.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Satalecka, K.; Schimp, M.; Schlunder, P.; Schmidt, T.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Rossem, M.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wickmann, S.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wills, L.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woolsey, E.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of a diffuse cosmic neutrino flux extending up to PeV energies raises the question of which astrophysical sources generate this signal. Blazars are one class of extragalactic sources which may produce such high-energy neutrinos. We present a likelihood analysis searching for cumulative neutrino emission from blazars in the 2nd Fermi-LAT AGN catalog (2LAC) using IceCube neutrino data set 2009-12, which was optimized for the detection of individual sources. In contrast to those in previous searches with IceCube, the populations investigated contain up to hundreds of sources, the largest one being the entire blazar sample in the 2LAC catalog. No significant excess is observed, and upper limits for the cumulative flux from these populations are obtained. These constrain the maximum contribution of 2LAC blazars to the observed astrophysical neutrino flux to 27% or less between around 10 TeV and 2 PeV, assuming the equipartition of flavors on Earth and a single power-law spectrum with a spectral index of -2.5. We can still exclude the fact that 2LAC blazars (and their subpopulations) emit more than 50% of the observed neutrinos up to a spectral index as hard as -2.2 in the same energy range. Our result takes into account the fact that the neutrino source count distribution is unknown, and it does not assume strict proportionality of the neutrino flux to the measured 2LAC γ-ray signal for each source. Additionally, we constrain recent models for neutrino emission by blazars.

  19. Brown carbon and thermal-optical analysis: A correction based on optical multi-wavelength apportionment of atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, D.; Caponi, L.; Bove, M. C.; Prati, P.

    2016-01-01

    Thermo-optical analysis is widely adopted for the quantitative determination of total, TC, organic, OC and elemental, EC, Carbon in aerosol samples collected on quartz fibre filters. Nevertheless, the methodology presents several issues in particular about the artefacts related to the formation of pyrolytic carbon. It is usually neglected the uncertainty due to the possible presence of brown carbon (BrC) in the sample under analysis, i.e. the optically active fraction of OC produced by biomass burning and with characteristics intermediate between OC and EC. We introduce here a novel correction to the standard thermo-optical protocol based on the determination of the fraction of the sample absorbance due to the (possible) presence of BrC. This is achievable thanks to the coupled use of the Multi Wavelength Absorbance Analyser (MWAA) of the University of Genoa and a standard Sunset Inc. EC/OC analyser. Our correction provides a firmer OC/EC separation as well as an operative quantification of the BrC mass. The methodology has been validated against independent determination of the levoglucosan content in the same filters sent to the Sunset analysis. Corrections up to 23% in the OC and EC values, determined via the standard and new thermo-optical analysis, have been found in a set of PM10 (i.e. Particulate Matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) samples collected wintertime at a mountain site in Northern Italy.

  20. Plasma properties from the multi-wavelength analysis of the November 1st 2003 CME/shock event.

    PubMed

    Benna, Carlo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Giordano, Silvio; Gioannini, Lorenzo

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of the spectral properties and dynamic evolution of a CME/shock event observed on November 1st 2003 in white-light by the LASCO coronagraph and in the ultraviolet by the UVCS instrument operating aboard SOHO, has been performed to compute the properties of some important plasma parameters in the middle corona below about 2R ⊙. Simultaneous observations obtained with the MLSO/Mk4 white-light coronagraph, providing both the early evolution of the CME expansion in the corona and the pre-shock electron density profile along the CME front, were also used to study this event. By combining the above information with the analysis of the metric type II radio emission detected by ground-based radio spectrographs, we finally derive estimates of the values of the local Alfvén speed and magnetic field strength in the solar corona.

  1. What determines the observational differences of blazars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Mao, Ji-Rong

    2016-11-01

    We examine the scenario that the Doppler factor determines the observational differences of blazars. Significantly negative correlations are found between the observational synchrotron peak frequency and the Doppler factor. After correcting the Doppler boosting, the intrinsic peak frequency has a tight linear relation with the Doppler factor. It is interesting that this relation is consistent with the scenario that the black hole mass governs both the bulk Lorentz factor and the synchrotron peak frequency. In addition, the distinction between the kinetic jet powers of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars disappears after the boosting factor δ 2 is considered. The negative correlation between the peak frequency and the observational isotropic luminosity, known as the blazar sequence, also disappears after the Doppler boosting is corrected. We also find that the correlation between the Compton dominance and the Doppler factor exists for all types of blazars. Therefore, this correlation is unsuitable for examining the external Compton emission dominance.

  2. Blazars in Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2009-05-01

    Although blazars are thought to emit most of their luminosity in the γ-ray band, there are subclasses of them very prominent in hard X-rays. These are the best candidates to be studied by Simbol-X. They are at the extremes of the blazar sequence, having very small or very high jet powers. The former are the class of TeV emitting BL Lacs, whose synchrotron emission often peaks at tens of keV or more. The latter are the blazars with the most powerful jets, have high black hole masses accreting at high (i.e. close to Eddington) rates. These sources are predicted to have their high energy peak even below the MeV band, and therefore are very promising candidates to be studied with Simbol-X.

  3. Multi-wavelength polarimetric studies of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Carolina

    This Thesis is focussed on the study of relativistic jets, commonly present in multiple astrophysical sites, from active galactic nuclei (AGN), to micro- quasars or gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of AGN, huge amounts of energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum are released as a conse- quence of the accretion of material onto a supermassive back hole (SMBH) lurking at their centers. The accretion leads to the formation of a pair of very powerful and highly collimated jets extending far beyond the size of the host galaxy. We analyzed the correlation between the multi-wavelength emission and the radio jet in three powerful AGN, the radio galaxies 3C 120 and M 87, and the quasar CTA 102. The main goal of this Thesis is to obtain a better understanding of the jet dynamics and the role played by the magnetic field, and to determine what are the sites and mechanisms for the production of the γ-ray emission observed in these sources. We have performed multi-wavelength studies of the radio galaxy 3C 120 and the blazar CTA 102 during unprecedented γ-ray flares for both sources. The NASA satellite Fermi registered in September-October 2012 a bright γ-ray flare in CTA 102, and between December 2012 and October 2014 a prolonged γ-ray activity in the radio galaxy 3C 120. In both studies, to determine where the γ-ray emission is produced, the analysis of Fermi data has been compared with a detailed study of the morphology and evolution of the parsec scale jet through a series of extremely-high angular resolution Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) images at 43 GHz from the Boston University blazar monitoring program, in which our research group is actively participating. In the case of 3C 120 we have also collected 15 GHz VLBA data from the MOJAVE monitoring program, extending our study of the radio jet from June 2008 to May 2014. For the study of CTA 102 a total of 80 VLBA images at 43 GHz have been analyzed and compared with observations across the whole

  4. GRB 130427A and SN 2013cq: A Multi-wavelength Analysis of An Induced Gravitational Collapse Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a data analysis of the observations by the Swift, NuStar, and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae (SNe) in the terra incognita of GRB 130427A. We compare our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early 104 s of the XRT observations. This has led to the identification of the four different episodes of the binary driven hypernovae (BdHNe) and to the prediction, on 2013 May 2, of the occurrence of SN 2013cq, which was also observed in the optical band on 2013 May 13. The exceptional quality of the data has allowed the identification of novel features in Episode 3 including: (1) the confirmation and the extension of the existence of the recently discovered nested structure in the late X-ray luminosity in GRB 130427A, as well as the identification of a spiky structure at 102 s in the cosmological rest-frame of the source; (2) a power law emission of the GeV luminosity light curve and its onset at the end of Episode 2; and (3) different Lorentz Γ factors for the emitting regions of the X-ray and GeV emissions in this Episode 3. These results make it possible to test the details of the physical and astrophysical regimes at work in the BdHNe: (1) a newly born neutron star and the supernova ejecta, originating in Episode 1; (2) a newly formed black hole originating in Episode 2; and (3) the possible interaction among these components, observable in the standard features of Episode 3.

  5. GRB 130427A AND SN 2013cq: A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF AN INDUCED GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffini, R.; Wang, Y.; Enderli, M.; Muccino, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Penacchioni, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    We performed a data analysis of the observations by the Swift, NuStar, and Fermi satellites in order to probe the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with supernovae (SNe) in the terra incognita of GRB 130427A. We compare our data analysis with those in the literature. We have verified that GRB 130427A conforms to the IGC paradigm by examining the power law behavior of the luminosity in the early 10{sup 4} s of the XRT observations. This has led to the identification of the four different episodes of the binary driven hypernovae (BdHNe) and to the prediction, on 2013 May 2, of the occurrence of SN 2013cq, which was also observed in the optical band on 2013 May 13. The exceptional quality of the data has allowed the identification of novel features in Episode 3 including: (1) the confirmation and the extension of the existence of the recently discovered nested structure in the late X-ray luminosity in GRB 130427A, as well as the identification of a spiky structure at 10{sup 2} s in the cosmological rest-frame of the source; (2) a power law emission of the GeV luminosity light curve and its onset at the end of Episode 2; and (3) different Lorentz Γ factors for the emitting regions of the X-ray and GeV emissions in this Episode 3. These results make it possible to test the details of the physical and astrophysical regimes at work in the BdHNe: (1) a newly born neutron star and the supernova ejecta, originating in Episode 1; (2) a newly formed black hole originating in Episode 2; and (3) the possible interaction among these components, observable in the standard features of Episode 3.

  6. Quasars, blazars, and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, C D; Schlickeiser, R

    1992-09-18

    Before the launch of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), the only source of >100-megaelectron volt (MeV) gamma radiation known outside our galaxy was the quasar 3C 273. After less than a year of observing, 13 other extragalactic sources have been discovered with the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on CGRO, and it is expected that many more will be found before the full sky survey is complete. All 14 sources show evidence of blazar properties at other wavelengths; these properties include high optical polarization, extreme optical variability, flat-spectrum radio emission associated with a compact core, and apparent superluminal motion. Such properties are thought to be produced by those few, rare extragalactic radio galaxies and quasars that are favorably aligned to permit us to look almost directly down a relativistically outflowing jet of matter expelled from a supermassive black hole. Although the origin of the gamma rays from radio jets is a subject of much controversy, the gamma-ray window probed by CGRO is providing a wealth of knowledge about the central engines of active galactic nuclei and the most energetic processes occurring in nature.

  7. A model for periodic blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobacchi, Emanuele; Sormani, Mattia C.; Stamerra, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    We describe a scenario to explain blazar periodicities with time-scales of ˜ few years. The scenario is based on a binary supermassive black hole (SMBH) system in which one of the two SMBHs carries a jet. We discuss the various mechanisms that can cause the jet to precess and produce corkscrew patterns through space with a scale of ˜ few pc. It turns out that the dominant mechanism responsible for the precession is simply the imprint of the jet-carrying SMBH orbital speed on the jet. Gravitational deflection and Lense-Thirring precession (due to the gravitational field of the other SMBH) are second-order effects. We complement the scenario with a kinematical jet model which is inspired to the spine-sheath structure observed in M87. One of the main advantages of such a structure is that it allows the peak of the synchrotron emission to scale with frequency according to νF ∝ νξ as the viewing angle is changed, where ξ is not necessarily 3 or 4 as in the case of jets with uniform velocity, but can be ξ ˜ 1. Finally, we apply the model to the source PG1553+113, which has been recently claimed to show a Tobs = (2.18 ± 0.08) yr periodicity. We are able to reproduce the optical and gamma-ray light curves and multiple synchrotron spectra simultaneously. We also give estimates of the source mass and size.

  8. Q0906+6930: Highest Redshift Blazar

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, R

    2004-06-25

    The authors report the discovery of a radio-loud flat-spectrum QSO at z = 5.47 with properties similar to those of the EGRET {gamma}-ray blazars. This source is the brightest radio QSO at z > 5, with a pc-scale radio jet and a black hole mass estimate {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}}. It appears to be the most distant blazar discovered to date. High energy observations of this source can provide powerful probes of the background radiation in the early universe.

  9. Coordinated Multiwavelength Observations of PKS 0528+134 in Quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Markus; Palma, N.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of an intensive multiwavelength campaign on the prominent high-redshift (z = 2.06) gamma-ray bright blazar PKS 0528+134 in September - October 2009. The campaign was centered on four 30 ksec pointings with XMM-Newton, supplemented with ground-based optical (MDM, Perkins) and radio (UMRAO, Medicina, Metsaehovi, Noto, SMA) observations as well as long-term X-ray monitoring with RXTE and gamma-ray monitoring by Fermi. We find significant variability on 1 day time scales in the optical regime, accompanied by a weak redder-when-brighter trend. X-ray variability is found on longer ( 1 week) time scales, while the Fermi light curve shows no evidence for variability, neither in flux nor spectral index. We constructed four simultaneous spectral energy distributions, which can all be fit satisfactorily with a one-zone leptonic jet model. This work was supported by NASA through XMM-Newton Guest Observer Grant NNX09AV45G.

  10. TIME DELAY AND ACCRETION DISK SIZE MEASUREMENTS IN THE LENSED QUASAR SBS 0909+532 FROM MULTIWAVELENGTH MICROLENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to {Delta}t{sub AB} = 50{sub -4}{sup +2} days, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1{sigma} confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {l_brace}(r{sub s,r}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 15.3 {+-} 0.3 and log {l_brace}(r{sub s,g}/cm)[cos i/0.5]{sup 1/2}{r_brace} = 14.8 {+-} 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  11. Time Delay and Accretion Disk Size Measurements in the Lensed Quasar SBS 0909+532 from Multiwavelength Microlensing Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.; Falco, Emilio E.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to \\Delta t_{AB} = 50^{+2}_{-4}\\,{days}, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1σ confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {(r s, r /cm)[cos i/0.5]1/2} = 15.3 ± 0.3 and log {(r s, g /cm)[cos i/0.5]1/2} = 14.8 ± 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  12. Tracking a CME from Cradle to Grave: A Multi-wavelength Analysis of the February 6-7, 1997 Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kundu, M. R.; Hanaoka, Y.; Kosugi, T.; Hudson, H.; Nitta, N.; Thompson, B.; Gurman, J.; Plunkett, S.; Howard, R.; Burkepile, J.

    1997-05-01

    The partially earth-directed coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 1997 February 6-7 originated from the southwest quadrant of the sun. The CME accelerated from 170 km/s to about 830 km/s when it reached a distance of 25 solar radii. The CME was an arcade eruption followed by bright prominence core structures. The prominence core was tracked continuously from the solar surface to the interplanetary medium by combining data from the Nobeyama radioheliograph (microwaves), Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (He 10830 { Angstroms}), SOHO/EIT (EUV) and SOHO/LASCO (white light). The CME was accompanied by an arcade formation, fully observed by the YOHKOH/SXT (soft X-rays) and SOHO/EIT (EUV). The X-ray and EUV observations suggest that the reconnection proceeded from the northwest end to the southeast end of a filament channel. In the SOHO/EIT images, the the feet of the soft X-ray arcade were observed as EUV ribbons. The CME event also caused a medium sized geomagnetic storm: The hourly equatorial Dst values attained storm level during 18:00-19:00 UT on February 09. This means the disturbance took about 2.25 days to reach the Earth. The first signatures of an IP shock was a pressure jump in the WIND data around 13:00 UT on Feb 09, 1997 which lasted for about 14 hours, followed by flux rope signatures. This CME event confirms a number of ideas about CMEs: The three part structure (frontal bright arcade, dark cavity and prominence core), disappearing filament, elongated arcade formation, and terrestrial effects. We make use of the excellent data coverage from the solar surface to the Earth to address a number of issues regarding the origin and propagation of the geoeffective solar disturbances. We benefited from discussions at the first SOHO-Yohkoh Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop, held March 3-7, 1997, at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  13. FERMI view of the TeV blazar Markarian 421

    SciTech Connect

    Paneque, D; Raino, S.; Chiang, J.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Tramacere, A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /CIFS, Turin

    2010-08-26

    The high energy component of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 has been extensively studied since the beginning of the 90s, when the source was first detected at gamma-rays with EGRET and the Whipple Telescope, yet the source is still far from being understood. The high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and excellent time coverage of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), all representing significant advances over previous gamma-ray observations, will play a key role in the elucidation of the physical processes underlying the high energy emission of this blazar. In this presentation we show the results from almost 6 months (4 August 2008 to 20 January 2009) of observation with LAT. We report significant flux/spectral variability on a range of time scales from weeks to days, and an energy spectrum from 0.1 GeV to 300 GeV, overlapping with the energy ranges covered by the current generation of Cherenkov Telescopes. Results on the observations of the BLLac object Markarian 421 collected in the first months of operation of the Fermi satellite have been presented. Light curves on weekly and daily timescales have been shown, as well as the results of the spectral analysis in the energy range between 100 MeV and 300 GeV, covered for the first time by a satellite experiment overlapping the lower energy observations from Cherenkov telescopes on earth. These results are still preliminary and will be enriched and completed soon by a forthcoming publication. The results shown here demonstrate the great performance of Fermi-LAT to study the gamma-emission from Mrk421 (and blazars in general) over a large dynamic range and also on short timescales, which is expected to be of key importance for the study of the emission of the source in a coordinated way with other instruments covering other energy ranges.

  14. Simultaneous Swift and Rapid Eye Mount telescope observations of the blazar PKS 0537-441

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Pan; Luo, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Li; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Hai-Tao; Cai, Yan

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of simultaneous multiwavelength observations of the blazar PKS 0537-441 performed with the Rapid Eye Mount telescope (REM) and Swift in the period 2009-2011. During our campaign, PKS 0537-441 showed prominent activity with well-correlated light curves from near-infrared to X-rays in different time epochs. The multiwavelength light curves exhibit several significant flares, in which the 2009 November flare particularly presents a double-peak feature, while the 2010 February flare shows strong optical variability (up to a factor of ˜5). The REM data show smaller fractional variability amplitudes than the Swift data. There is a general correlation between optical and X-rays, time-lags have been determined with data correlation methods and their uncertainties with Monte Carlo runs, but they are either very uncertain or too long (of the order of 300 d) to be physically relevant. The X-ray spectra exhibit neither absorption nor emission features characteristically. A slight harder-when-brighter trend in the 2-10 keV energy band is detected. The optical/ultraviolet spectra suggest the presence of thermal emission. We find evidence that the broad-band spectrum is steeper when the degree of variability is larger.

  15. PKS 1954-388: RadioAstron Detection on 80,000 km Baselines and Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Ojha, R.; An, H.; Bignall, H.; Carpenter, B.; Hovatta, T.; Stevens, J.; Voytsik, P.; Andrianov, A. S.; Dutka, M.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Jauncey, D. L.; Kadler, M.; Lisakov, M.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J.; Müller, C.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Reynolds, C.; Schulz, R.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Zuga, V.

    2017-04-01

    We present results from a multiwavelength study of the blazar PKS 1954-388 at radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray energies. A RadioAstron observation at 1.66 GHz in June 2012 resulted in the detection of interferometric fringes on baselines of 6.2 Earth-diameters. This suggests a source frame brightness temperature of greater than 2 × 1012 K, well in excess of both equipartition and inverse Compton limits and implying the existence of Doppler boosting in the core. An 8.4-GHz TANAMI VLBI image, made less than a month after the RadioAstron observations, is consistent with a previously reported superluminal motion for a jet component. Flux density monitoring with the Australia Telescope Compact Array confirms previous evidence for long-term variability that increases with observing frequency. A search for more rapid variability revealed no evidence for significant day-scale flux density variation. The ATCA light-curve reveals a strong radio flare beginning in late 2013, which peaks higher, and earlier, at higher frequencies. Comparison with the Fermi gamma-ray light-curve indicates this followed 9 months after the start of a prolonged gamma-ray high-state-a radio lag comparable to that seen in other blazars. The multiwavelength data are combined to derive a Spectral Energy Distribution, which is fitted by a one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model with the addition of external Compton (EC) emission.

  16. Upper Limits from Five Years of Blazar Observations with the VERITAS Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Fumagalli, M.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2016-06-01

    Between the beginning of its full-scale scientific operations in 2007 and 2012, the VERITAS Cherenkov telescope array observed more than 130 blazars; of these, 26 were detected as very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray sources. In this work, we present the analysis results of a sample of 114 undetected objects. The observations constitute a total live-time of ˜570 hr. The sample includes several unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources (located at high Galactic latitude) as well as all the sources from the second Fermi-LAT catalog that are contained within the field of view of the VERITAS observations. We have also performed optical spectroscopy measurements in order to estimate the redshift of some of these blazars that do not have spectroscopic distance estimates. We present new optical spectra from the Kast instrument on the Shane telescope at the Lick observatory for 18 blazars included in this work, which allowed for the successful measurement or constraint on the redshift of four of them. For each of the blazars included in our sample, we provide the flux upper limit in the VERITAS energy band. We also study the properties of the significance distributions and we present the result of a stacked analysis of the data set, which shows a 4σ excess.

  17. The radio-γ-ray connection in Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Foschini, L.; Bonnoli, G.

    2011-05-01

    We study the correlation between the γ-ray flux (Fγ), averaged over the first 11 months of the Fermi survey and integrated above 100 MeV, and the radio flux density (Fr at 20 GHz) of Fermi sources associated with a radio counterpart in the 20-GHz Australia Telescope Compact Array (AT20G) survey. Considering the blazars detected in both bands, the correlation is highly significant and has the form Fγ∝F0.85±0.04r, similar to BL Lacertae objects and flat-spectrum radio quasars. However, only a small fraction (˜1/15) of the AT20G radio sources with flat radio spectra are detected by Fermi. To understand if this correlation is real, we examine the selection effects introduced by the flux limits of both the radio and the γ-ray surveys, and the importance of variability of the γ-ray flux. After accounting for these effects, we find that the radio-γ-ray flux correlation is real, but its slope is steeper than the observed one, that is, Fγ∝Fδr with δ in the range 1.25-1.5. The observed Fγ-Fr correlation and the fraction of radio sources detected by Fermi are reproduced assuming a long-term γ-ray flux variability, following a lognormal probability distribution with standard deviation σ≥ 0.5 (corresponding to Fγ varying by at least a factor of 3). Such a variability is compatible, even if not necessarily equal, with what is observed when comparing, for the sources in common, the EGRET and the Fermi γ-ray fluxes (even if the Fermi fluxes are averaged over ˜1 yr). Another indication of variability is the non-detection of 12 out of 66 EGRET blazars by Fermi, despite its higher sensitivity. We also study the strong linear correlation between the γ-ray and the radio luminosity of the 144 AT20G-Fermi associations with known redshift and show, through partial correlation analysis, that it is statistically robust. Two possible implications of these correlations are discussed: the contribution of blazars to the extragalactic γ-ray background and the prediction

  18. Radio variability and random walk noise properties of four blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Ho; Trippe, Sascha E-mail: trippe@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-04-10

    We present the results of a time series analysis of the long-term radio light curves of four blazars: 3C 279, 3C 345, 3C 446, and BL Lacertae. We exploit the database of the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory monitoring program which provides densely sampled light curves spanning 32 years in time in three frequency bands located at 4.8, 8, and 14.5 GHz. Our sources show mostly flat or inverted (spectral indices –0.5 ≲ α ≲ 0) spectra, in agreement with optically thick emission. All light curves show strong variability on all timescales. Analyzing the time lags between the light curves from different frequency bands, we find that we can distinguish high-peaking flares and low-peaking flares in accordance with the classification of Valtaoja et al. The periodograms (temporal power spectra) of the observed light curves are consistent with random-walk power-law noise without any indication of (quasi-)periodic variability. The fact that all four sources studied are in agreement with being random-walk noise emitters at radio wavelengths suggests that such behavior is a general property of blazars.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New gamma-ray blazar candidates in the 3PBC (Maselli+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; D'Abrusco, R.; La Parola, V.; Paggi, A.; Segreto, A.; Smith, H. A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-06-01

    We searched for γ-ray blazar candidates among the 382 unidentified hard X-ray sources of the third Palermo BAT Catalog (3PBC) obtained from the analysis of 66 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data and listing 1586 sources. We adopted a recently developed association method based on the peculiar infrared colors that characterize the γ-ray blazars included in the second catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We used this method exploiting the data of the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to establish correspondences between unidentified 3PBC sources and WISE γ-ray blazar candidates located within the BAT positional uncertainty region at a 99% confidence level. We obtained a preliminary list of candidates for which we analyzed all the available data in the Swift archive to complement the information in the literature and in the radio, infrared, and optical catalogs with the information on their optical-UV and soft X-ray emission. Requiring the presence of radio and soft X-ray counterparts consistent with the infrared positions of the selected WISE sources, as well as a blazar-like radio morphology, we finally obtained a list of 24 γ-ray blazar candidates. (2 data files).

  20. Searching for New γ-Ray Blazar Candidates in the Third Palermo BAT Hard X-Ray Catalog with WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Massaro, F.; Cusumano, G.; D'Abrusco, R.; La Parola, V.; Paggi, A.; Segreto, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-06-01

    We searched for γ-ray blazar candidates among the 382 unidentified hard X-ray sources of the third Palermo BAT Catalog (3PBC) obtained from the analysis of 66 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data and listing 1586 sources. We adopted a recently developed association method based on the peculiar infrared colors that characterize the γ-ray blazars included in the second catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We used this method exploiting the data of the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to establish correspondences between unidentified 3PBC sources and WISE γ-ray blazar candidates located within the BAT positional uncertainty region at a 99% confidence level. We obtained a preliminary list of candidates for which we analyzed all the available data in the Swift archive to complement the information in the literature and in the radio, infrared, and optical catalogs with the information on their optical-UV and soft X-ray emission. Requiring the presence of radio and soft X-ray counterparts consistent with the infrared positions of the selected WISE sources, as well as a blazar-like radio morphology, we finally obtained a list of 24 γ-ray blazar candidates.

  1. SEARCHING FOR NEW {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR CANDIDATES IN THE THIRD PALERMO BAT HARD X-RAY CATALOG WITH WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Maselli, A.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.; Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2013-06-01

    We searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates among the 382 unidentified hard X-ray sources of the third Palermo BAT Catalog (3PBC) obtained from the analysis of 66 months of Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey data and listing 1586 sources. We adopted a recently developed association method based on the peculiar infrared colors that characterize the {gamma}-ray blazars included in the second catalog of active galactic nuclei detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We used this method exploiting the data of the all-sky survey performed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to establish correspondences between unidentified 3PBC sources and WISE {gamma}-ray blazar candidates located within the BAT positional uncertainty region at a 99% confidence level. We obtained a preliminary list of candidates for which we analyzed all the available data in the Swift archive to complement the information in the literature and in the radio, infrared, and optical catalogs with the information on their optical-UV and soft X-ray emission. Requiring the presence of radio and soft X-ray counterparts consistent with the infrared positions of the selected WISE sources, as well as a blazar-like radio morphology, we finally obtained a list of 24 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates.

  2. Are Jets Monoparametric? Extending the Blazar Sequence to the Blazar Envelope in the Fermi Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, G.; Georganopoulos, M.; Lister, M.

    2011-01-01

    The blazar sequence, first discovered by Fossati et al. (1998), unified the broad emission line, high-powered flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) with the optically featureless BL Lac objects through a simple anti-correlation between synchrotron peak luminosity and peak frequency. This paradigm has come under scrutiny as increasing numbers of sources have emerged off the sequence. We have found evidence for a simple underlying scheme for the apparent 'blazar envelope': blazar jets are mono-parametric engines, such that source power (as measured from the low-frequency, un-beamed extended emission) creates a monotonic relationship between the intrinsic peak luminosity and peak frequency of the synchrotron and inverse Compton components. The envelope naturally emerges below the sequence due to the drop in peak luminosity and frequency as sources are progressively aligned away from our line-of-sight and relativistic beaming drops. We present key evidence for this scheme which has impact on theoretical models of blazar jets with velocity profiles. The envelope also allows us to more clearly unify blazars and the parent population of FR I and II radio galaxies. I will discuss some of the difficulties and caveats in measuring the source power through extended emission, current results, and future applications of this simple idea to broader unification schemes and other source classes.

  3. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    DOE PAGES

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; ...

    2016-04-18

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission ofmore » the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. In this paper, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424–418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. Finally, the outburst of PKS B1424–418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.« less

  4. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    SciTech Connect

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; Ojha, R.; Müller, C.; Schulz, R.; Anton, G.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Eberl, T.; Edwards, P.  G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; James, C.  W.; Kappes, A.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Longo, F.; Lovell, J.  E.  J.; McEnery, J.; Natusch, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Ros, E.; Stecker, F.  W.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D.  J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A.  K.; Weston, S.; Wilms, J.; Zensus, J.  A.

    2016-04-18

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. In this paper, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424–418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. Finally, the outburst of PKS B1424–418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.

  5. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadler, M.; Krauß, F.; Mannheim, K.; Ojha, R.; Müller, C.; Schulz, R.; Anton, G.; Baumgartner, W.; Beuchert, T.; Buson, S.; Carpenter, B.; Eberl, T.; Edwards, P. G.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsässer, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gräfe, C.; Gulyaev, S.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; James, C. W.; Kappes, A.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kreikenbohm, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Langejahn, M.; Leiter, K.; Litzinger, E.; Longo, F.; Lovell, J. E. J.; McEnery, J.; Natusch, T.; Phillips, C.; Plötz, C.; Quick, J.; Ros, E.; Stecker, F. W.; Steinbring, T.; Stevens, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Trüstedt, J.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Weston, S.; Wilms, J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The astrophysical sources of the extraterrestrial, very high-energy neutrinos detected by the IceCube collaboration remain to be identified. Gamma-ray (γ-ray) blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the γ-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. As the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of extraterrestrial origin are those at petaelectronvolt energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two petaelectronvolt neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and positional coincidence with a third petaelectronvolt-energy neutrino event (HESE-35) detected by IceCube. On the basis of an analysis of the full sample of γ-ray blazars in the HESE-35 field, we show that the long-term average γ-ray emission of blazars as a class is in agreement with both the measured all-sky flux of petaelectronvolt neutrinos and the spectral slope of the IceCube signal. The outburst of PKS B1424-418 provides an energy output high enough to explain the observed petaelectronvolt event, suggestive of a direct physical association.

  6. Flaring Activity from S5 0836+71 (4C71.07): What Can We Learn with Limited Multiwavelength Coverage?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Donato, D.; Akyuz, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Sokolovsky, K.; Kurtanidze, O.

    2011-01-01

    After a long period of quiescence in gamma rays, blazar S5 0836+71 (4C71.07) flared in the Spring of 2011. We found only limited multiwavelength coverage of the source. An indication of correlated optical/gamma-ray variability is not surprising for a FSRQ like this one. Radio observations at high frequencies, however, had seen a flare in late 2010, with no apparent related gamma-ray activity. This case seems to differ from the traditional pattern of finding gamma-ray flares during times of rising radio emission.

  7. Multiwavelength and Statistical Research in Space Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    1997-01-01

    The accomplishments in the following three research areas are summarized: multiwavelength study of active galactic nuclei; magnetic activity of young stellar objects; and statistical methodology for astronomical data analysis. The research is largely based on observations of the ROSAT and ASCA X-ray observatories, complemented by ground-based optical and radio studies. Major findings include: discovery of inverse Compton X-ray emission from radio galaxy lobes; creation of the largest and least biased available sample of BL Lac objects; characterization of X-ray and nonthermal radio emission from T Tauri stars; obtaining an improved census of young stars in a star forming region and modeling the star formation history and kinematics; discovery of X-ray emission from protostars; development of linear regression methods and codes for interpreting astronomical data; and organization of the first cross-disciplinary conferences for astronomers and statisticians.

  8. Multiwavelength pyrometry to correct for reflected radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P.

    1990-01-01

    Computer curve fitting is used in multiwavelength pyrometry to measure the temperature of a surface in the presence of reflected radiation by decomposing its radiation spectrum. Computer-simulated spectra (at a surface temperature of 1000 K; in the wavelength region 0.3 to 20 microns; with a reflected radiation-source temperature of 700 to 2500 K; and reflector emissivity from 0.1 to 0.9) were generated and decomposed. This method of pyrometry determined the surface temperatures under these conditions to within 5 percent. The practicability of the method was further demonstrated by the successful analysis of a related problem--decomposition of the real spectrum of an infrared source containing two emitters to determine their temperatures.

  9. Multi-wavelength applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadely, Ross

    2010-12-01

    Using an array of multi-wavelength data, we examine a variety of astrophysical problems with gravitational lensing. First, we seek to understand the mass distribution of an early-type galaxy with an analysis of the lens Q0957+561. We dissect the lens galaxy into luminous and dark components, and model the environment using results from weak lensing. Combining constraints from newly-discovered lensed images and stellar population models, we find the lens has a density profile which is shallower than isothermal, unlike those of typical early-type galaxies. Finally, using the measured time delay between the quasar images we find the Hubble constant to be H 0 = 79.3+6.7-8.5 km s-1 Mpc-1 . One intriguing application of lensing is to exploit the lens magnification boost to study high-redshift objects in greater detail than otherwise possible. Here, we analyze the mid-infrared properties of two lensed z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, using Spitzer /IRS spectra to study their rest-frame ˜ 5-12 μm emission. Both systems exhibit strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in the spectra, indicating strong star formation and the absence of significant AGN activity. For SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, this detection belies that inferred from optical measurements, indicating mid-IR spectroscopy provides key information needed to understand the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. While lensing provides measurements of the macroscopic properties of lens systems, it can also shed light on small-scale structure of galaxies. To identify and understand lens substructure, we examine the multi-wavelength properties of flux ratios for six lenses. Variations of the flux ratios with wavelength can be used to study the lensed quasars and the small-scale mass distribution of lens galaxies. We detect strong multi-wavelength variations in the lenses HE 0435-1223 and SDSS 0806+2006. For HE 0435-1223, we study its

  10. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  11. Radio observations of a few selected blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saikia, D. J.; Salter, C. J.; Neff, S. G.; Gower, A. C.; Sinha, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents total-intensity and linear-polarization observations of four selected blazars, 0716+714, 0752+258, 1156+295 and 1400+162, with the VLA A-array, and MERLIN and EVN observations of 1400+162. The sources 0752+258 and 1400+162 which have nearly constant optical polarization, have well-defined double-lobed radio structure, with relatively weak radio cores, and are likely to be at large viewing angles. In addition, 0752+258 appears to be a twin-jet blazar. The position angle (PA) of the VLBI jet in 1400+162 is close to that of the arcsec-scale jet near the nucleus, as well as the optical and 2-cm core polarization PAs. The blazars 0716+714 and 1156+295, which exhibit strongly variable optical polarization, have a core-dominated radio structure and perhaps have their jet axes close to the line-of-sight. From polarization observations at 20, 18, 6, and 2 cm, it is found that the rotation measure of the radio core in 0716+714 is about -20 rad/sq m. It is suggested that low values of core rotation measure in core-dominated sources could be consistent with the relativistic beaming models.

  12. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  13. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  14. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  15. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  16. Multiwavelength Strontium Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    Based on an analysis of experimental and theoretical works, modern notion on conditions of forming of population density inversion on self-terminating IR transitions of alkali-earth metals is given. It is demonstrated that there is a significant difference in the inversion formation in lasers on self-terminating transitions in the visible and near-IR ranges and lasers on self-terminating transitions of alkali-earth metals lasing IR lines in the mid-IR range. It is shown that in the discharge circuit of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions (LSMT) there are processes strengthening the influence of the known mechanism limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation caused by the presence of prepulse electron concentration. The mechanism of influence of these processes on FEC of the LSMT and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. The possibility of obtaining average lasing power of ~200 W from one liter volume of the active medium of the strontium vapor laser is demonstrated under conditions of neutralization of these processes.

  17. GeV Blazar flares several parsecs from the central engine. Who pays the seed photon bill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiding, Peter; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    In Blazars, multi-wavelength observations suggest that some GeV flares take place at the location of the mm VLBI core, several pc from the black hole. This location for the GeV emission requires a yet un-identified source of seed photons to be Inverse Compton scattered to GeV energies. Our model for these flares involves a fast spine and slow sheath configuration for the relativistic jet, where the mildly beamed sheath emission will illuminate with a large opening angle the outer regions of the Molecular Torus. The heated clouds will then radiate and their emission will be relativistically boosted in the spine frame where it can they be up-scattered to GeV energies. We argue, through analytical work and simulations, that this can be the seed photon source that produces the GeV flares.

  18. A First-Principles Spectral Model for Blazar Jet Acceleration and Emission with Klein-Nishina Scattering of Multiple Broad Line Region Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tiffany R.; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2017-08-01

    Blazars are a sub-class of active galactic nuclei, with a polar jet aligned along our line of sight. Emission from blazar jets is observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. In our model we assume that the emission emanates from one homogeneous zone in the jet, which is in the process of passing through the Broad Line Region (BLR). We start from first-principles to build up a particle transport model, whose solution is the electron distribution, rather than assuming a convenient functional form. Our transport model considers shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration, Bohm diffusion, synchrotron radiation, and Klein-Nishina radiation pulling seed photons from the BLR and dusty torus. We obtain the steady-state electron distribution computationally, and calculate individual spectral contributions due to synchrotron with self-absorption, disk, synchrotron self-Compton, and external-Compton emission, using numerical integration. We compare the resulting radiation spectrum with multi-wavelength data for 3C 279, during quiescence and two flares. Our preliminary results suggest that the jet emission is produced in a region with a sub-equipartition magnetic field, and that the magnetic field in the jet decreases during flaring events, implying that reconnection may play a role in blazar flares.

  19. The Spectral Index Distribution of EGRET Blazars: Prospects for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki; /SLAC

    2011-11-29

    The intrinsic distribution of spectral indices in GeV energies of gamma-ray-loud blazars is a critical input in determining the spectral shape of the unresolved blazar contribution to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as an important test of blazar emission theories. We present a maximum-likelihood method of determining the intrinsic spectral index distribution (ISID) of a population of {gamma}-ray emitters which accounts for error in measurement of individual spectral indices, and we apply it to EGRET blazars. We find that the most likely Gaussian ISID for EGRET blazars has a mean of 2.27 and a standard deviation of 0.20. We additionally find some indication that FSRQs and BL Lacs may have different ISIDs (with BL Lacs being harder). We also test for spectral index hardening associated with blazar variability for which we find no evidence. Finally, we produce simulated GLAST spectral index datasets and perform the same analyses. With improved statistics due to the much larger number of resolvable blazars, GLAST data will help us determine the ISIDs with much improved accuracy. Should any difference exist between the ISIDs of BL Lacs and FSRQs or between the ISIDs of blazars in the quiescent and flaring states, GLAST data will be adequate to separate these ISIDs at a significance better than 3{sigma}.

  20. Extreme blazars studied with Fermi-lat and Suzaku: 1ES 0347–121 and blazar candidate HESS J1943+213

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Finke, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Dermer, C. D.; Kataoka, J.; Bamba, A.; Dubus, G.; Fukazawa, Y.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    We report on our study of high-energy properties of two peculiar TeV emitters: the 'extreme blazar' 1ES 0347–121 and the 'extreme blazar candidate' HESS J1943+213 located near the Galactic plane. Both objects are characterized by quiescent synchrotron emission with flat spectra extending up to the hard X-ray range, and both were reported to be missing GeV counterparts in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) two-year Source Catalog. We analyze a 4.5 yr accumulation of the Fermi-LAT data, resulting in the detection of 1ES 0347–121 in the GeV band, as well as in improved upper limits for HESS J1943+213. We also present the analysis results of newly acquired Suzaku data for HESS J1943+213. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power law extending up to 25 keV with photon index 2.00 ± 0.02 and a moderate absorption in excess of the Galactic value, which is in agreement with previous X-ray observations. No short-term X-ray variability was found over the 80 ks duration of the Suzaku exposure. Under the blazar hypothesis, we modeled the spectral energy distributions of 1ES 0347–121 and HESS J1943+213, and we derived constraints on the intergalactic magnetic field strength and source energetics. We conclude that although the classification of HESS J1943+213 has not yet been determined, the blazar hypothesis remains the most plausible option since, in particular, the broadband spectra of the two analyzed sources along with the source model parameters closely resemble each other, and the newly available Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey data for HESS J1943+213 are consistent with the presence of an elliptical host at the distance of approximately ∼600 Mpc.

  1. Extreme Blazars Studied With Fermi -Lat And Suzaku : 1es 0347–121 And Blazar Candidate Hess J1943+213

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Finke, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Dermer, C. D.; Kataoka, J.; Bamba, A.; Dubus, G.; De Naurois, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Fukazawa, Y.; Thompson, D. J.

    2014-05-14

    We report on our study of high-energy properties of two peculiar TeV emitters: the “extreme blazar" 1ES 0347-121 and the “extreme blazar candidate" HESS J1943+213 located near the Galactic Plane. Both objects are characterized by quiescent synchrotron emission with flat spectra extending up to the hard X-ray range, and both were reported to be missing GeV counterparts in the Fermi-LAT 2–year Source Catalog. We analyze a 4.5 year accumulation of the Fermi-LAT data, resulting in the detection of 1ES 0347-121 in the GeV band, as well as in improved upper limits for HESS J1943+213. We also present the analysis results of newly acquired Suzaku data for HESS J1943+213. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power law extending up to 25 keV with photon index 2.00±0.02 and a moderate absorption in excess of the Galactic value, in agreementwith previous X-ray observations. No short-term X-ray variability was found over the 80 ks duration of the Suzaku exposure. Under the blazar hypothesis, we modeled the spectral energy distributions of 1ES 0347-121 and HESS J1943+213, and derived constraints on the intergalactic magnetic field strength and source energetics. We conclude that although the classification of HESS J1943+213 has not yet been determined, the blazar hypothesis remains the most plausible option, since in particular the broad-band spectra of the two analyzed sources along with the source model parameters closely resemble each other, and the newly available WISE and UKIDSS data for HESS J1943+213 are consistent with the presence of an elliptical host at the distance of approximatel ~ 600Mpc.

  2. Extreme Blazars Studied With Fermi -Lat And Suzaku : 1es 0347–121 And Blazar Candidate Hess J1943+213

    DOE PAGES

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Stawarz, Ł.; Finke, J.; ...

    2014-05-14

    We report on our study of high-energy properties of two peculiar TeV emitters: the “extreme blazar" 1ES 0347-121 and the “extreme blazar candidate" HESS J1943+213 located near the Galactic Plane. Both objects are characterized by quiescent synchrotron emission with flat spectra extending up to the hard X-ray range, and both were reported to be missing GeV counterparts in the Fermi-LAT 2–year Source Catalog. We analyze a 4.5 year accumulation of the Fermi-LAT data, resulting in the detection of 1ES 0347-121 in the GeV band, as well as in improved upper limits for HESS J1943+213. We also present the analysis resultsmore » of newly acquired Suzaku data for HESS J1943+213. The X-ray spectrum is well represented by a single power law extending up to 25 keV with photon index 2.00±0.02 and a moderate absorption in excess of the Galactic value, in agreementwith previous X-ray observations. No short-term X-ray variability was found over the 80 ks duration of the Suzaku exposure. Under the blazar hypothesis, we modeled the spectral energy distributions of 1ES 0347-121 and HESS J1943+213, and derived constraints on the intergalactic magnetic field strength and source energetics. We conclude that although the classification of HESS J1943+213 has not yet been determined, the blazar hypothesis remains the most plausible option, since in particular the broad-band spectra of the two analyzed sources along with the source model parameters closely resemble each other, and the newly available WISE and UKIDSS data for HESS J1943+213 are consistent with the presence of an elliptical host at the distance of approximatel ~ 600Mpc.« less

  3. Time Dependent Leptonic and Lepto-Hadronic Modeling of Blazar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DIltz, Christopher S.

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are known to exhibit multi-wavelength variability across the whole electromagnetic spectrum. In the context of blazars, the variability timescale can be as short as a few minutes. Correlated variability has been seen in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum: from radio wavelengths to high energy gamma-rays. This correlated variability in different wavelength bands can put constraints on the particle content, acceleration mechanisms and radiative properties of the relativistic jets that produce blazar emission. Two models are typically invoked to explain the origin of the broadband emission across the electromagnetic spectrum: Leptonic and Hadronic Modeling. Both models have had success in reproducing the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazar emission with different input parameters, making the origin of the emission difficult to determine. However, flaring events cause the spectral components that produce the SED to evolve on different timescales, producing different light curve behavior for both models. My Ph.D. research involves developing one-zone time dependent leptonic and lepto-hadronic codes to reproduce the broadband SEDs of blazars and then model flaring scenarios in order to find distinct differences between the two models. My lepto-hadronic code also considers the time dependent evolution of the radiation emitted by secondary particles (pions and muons) generated from photo-hadronic interactions between the photons and protons in the emission region. I present fits to the broadband SEDs of the flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) 3C 273 and 3C 279 using my one-zone leptonic and lepto-hadronic model, respectively. I showed that by considering perturbations of any one of the selected input parameters for both models: magnetic field, particle injection luminosity, particle spectral index, and stochastic acceleration time scale, distinct differences arise in the light curves for the optical, X-ray and

  4. Future Multiwavelength Studies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    With two and a half years of experience, Fermi LAT contributions to multiwavelength studies have become an integral part of many astrophysical research projects. Future efforts will benefit from (1) Deeper LAT exposures} resulting in more sources; (2) More high-energy, high-angular resolution photons, giving better source locations and imaging; (3) Faster analysis of variability and announcements to the community; and (4) Longer time series for studies of variable source properties in comparison to other wavelengths.

  5. Multiwavelength studies of X-ray selected extragalactic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    The joint catalogue of Active Galactic Nuclei selected from optical identications of X-ray sources was created as a combination of two samples: Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both are based on optical identications of X-ray sources from ROSAT catalogues using low-dispersion spectra of Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS). However, HRC and BHRC contain a number of misidentications and using the recent optical and multiwavelength (MW) catalogues we have revised both samples excluding false AGN and adding new genuine ones. Thus a new large homogeneous complete sample of 4253 X-ray selected AGN was created. 3352 of them are listed in the Catalogue of QSOs and Active Galaxies and 387 also are in Roma Multifrequency Catalogue of Blazars. 901 candidate AGN are subjects for further study. We classified 173 of these objects using their SDSS DR12 spectra. Following activity types were revealed: 61 AGN, 21 HII galaxies, 12 emission-line galaxies without definite type, 71 absorption-line galaxies, 2 stars, and 6 were classified as "Unknown". A special emphasis is made on narrow-line Sy1.0-Sy1.5 galaxies and QSOs, as many of them have soft X-ray, strong FeII lines, and relatively narrow lines coming from BLR ("narrow broad lines"). As a result, the sample of genuine AGN was enlarged to 3413 objects. We have retrieved MW data from recent catalogues and carried out statistical investigations for the whole AGN sample. An attempt to find connections between fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and to identify their characteristics thus confirming candidate AGNs has been carried out. We have analyzed X-ray properties of these sources to nd a limit between normal galaxies and X-ray AGN.

  6. Suzaku Observation of TeV Blazar the 1ES 1218+304: Clues on Particle Acceleration in an Extreme TeV Blazar

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, R.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, T.; Madejski, G.M.; Rugamer, S.; Wagner, S.J.

    2008-04-22

    We observed the TeV blazar 1ES 1218+304 with the X-ray astronomy satellite Suzaku in May 2006. At the beginning of the two-day continuous observation, we detected a large flare in which the 5-10 keV flux changed by a factor of {approx}2 on a timescale of 5 x 10{sup 4} s. During the flare, the increase in the hard X-ray flux clearly lagged behind that observed in the soft X-rays, with the maximum lag of 2.3 x 10{sup 4} s observed between the 0.3?1 keV and 5?10 keV bands. Furthermore we discovered that the temporal profile of the flare clearly changes with energy, being more symmetric at higher energies. From the spectral fitting of multi-wavelength data assuming a one-zone, homogeneous synchrotron self-Compton model, we obtain B {approx} 0.047 G, emission region size R = 3.0 x 10{sup 16} cm for an appropriate beaming with a Doppler factor of {delta} = 20. This value of B is in good agreement with an independent estimate through the model fit to the observed time lag ascribing the energy-dependent variability to differential acceleration timescale of relativistic electrons provided that the gyro-factor {zeta} is 10{sup 5}.

  7. Discovery of an Extreme MeV Blazar with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, R. M.; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Tueller, J.; Hartman, R.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D> P.; Falcone, A.; Cucchiara, A.; Aller, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift detected bright emission from 15-195 keV from the source SWIFT J0746.3+2548 (J0746 in the following), identified with the optically-faint (R approx. 19), z=2.979 quasar SDSS J074625.87+244901.2. Here we present Swift and multiwavelength observations of this source. The X-ray emission from J0746 is variable on timescales of hours to weeks in 0.5-8 keV and of a few months in 15-195 keV, but there is no accompanying spectral variability in the 0.5-8 keV band. There is a suggestion that the BAT spectrum, initially very hard (photon index Gamma approx. 0.7), steepened to Gamma approx. 1.3 in a few months, together with a decrease of the 15-195 keV flux by a factor approx. 2. The 0.5-8 keV continuum is well described by a power law with Gamma approx. 1.3, and spectral flattening below 1 keV. The latter can be described with a column density in excess of the Galactic value with intrinsic column density Nz(sub H) approx. 10(exp 22)/sq cm , or with a flatter power law, implying a sharp (Delta(Gamma) less than or approx. 1) break across 16 keV in the quasar's rest-frame. The Spectral Energy Distribution of J0746 is double-humped, with the first component peaking at IR wavelengths and the second component at MeV energies. These properties suggest that J0746 is a a blazar with high gamma-ray luminosity and low peak energy (MeV) stretching the blazar sequence to an extreme.

  8. DEEP BROADBAND OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISTANT GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR PKS 1424+240

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Aune, T.; Behera, B.; Chen, X.; Federici, S.; Beilicke, M.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration; and others

    2014-04-10

    We present deep VERITAS observations of the blazar PKS 1424+240, along with contemporaneous Fermi Large Area Telescope, Swift X-ray Telescope, and Swift UV Optical Telescope data between 2009 February 19 and 2013 June 8. This blazar resides at a redshift of z ≥ 0.6035, displaying a significantly attenuated gamma-ray flux above 100 GeV due to photon absorption via pair-production with the extragalactic background light. We present more than 100 hr of VERITAS observations over three years, a multiwavelength light curve, and the contemporaneous spectral energy distributions. The source shows a higher flux of (2.1 ± 0.3) × 10{sup –7} photons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 120 GeV in 2009 and 2011 as compared to the flux measured in 2013, corresponding to (1.02 ± 0.08) × 10{sup –7} photons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} above 120 GeV. The measured differential very high energy (VHE; E ≥ 100 GeV) spectral indices are Γ = 3.8 ± 0.3, 4.3 ± 0.6 and 4.5 ± 0.2 in 2009, 2011, and 2013, respectively. No significant spectral change across the observation epochs is detected. We find no evidence for variability at gamma-ray opacities of greater than τ = 2, where it is postulated that any variability would be small and occur on timescales longer than a year if hadronic cosmic-ray interactions with extragalactic photon fields provide a secondary VHE photon flux. The data cannot rule out such variability due to low statistics.

  9. Microvariability of the Blazar 3C 279 During the 2001 Optical Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, T. J.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    We present a thirteen year optical (R) light curve for the blazar 3C 279 from 1989 through 2001. We study the long and short time scale variations during this period, but concentrate on the intra-night and night-to-night variations during the intense outburst in 2001. Although 3C 279 has been the object of several previous multiwavelength campaigns, our investigation of both the intra-day and long term activity during an extended outburst is the most extensive and well-sampled at optical wavelengths. Observations were conducted at the Foggy Bottom Observatory at Colgate University using a sixteen inch Cassegrain telescope and CCD camera. During 2001 the brightness of 3C 279 ranged over three magnitudes, with night-to-night variations of up to one half magnitude. The 2001 outburst began in March, after 3C 279 had faded to its faintest level, R = 15.5, in four years. The blazar was still active in August, at its brightest level (R = 12.5) in the thirteen years of our study, at which time it became unobservable due to its proximity to the Sun. The source flared numerous times during the six month outburst period, with day-to-day variations (and intra-night microvariability of 0.2 mag in five hours) superposed upon approximately week-long one magnitude flares. In a companion study, Marscher (this meeting) finds that some of the flares appear to be strongly correlated with x-ray events, while others do not exhibit simple correlations. Different physical phenomena may be needed in order to explain the differences in these events.

  10. COMPTEL Observations of the Neighboring Blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Collmar, W.; Schönfelder, V.; Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, H.; McConnell, M.; Bennett, K.; Williams, O. R.

    The detection of MeV emission from the Gamma-Ray blazars 3C 454.3 and CTA 102 were reported by Blom et al. (1995) using data of the first 18 months of the COMPTEL mission (0.75-30 MeV). We have analyzed/reanalyzed these 2 blazars, which are located only 7 degrees apart on the sky, using all available COMPTEL data from 1991 to 1999. In the 10-30 MeV band, emission from the sources is found at the 3.9σ-level, being consistent with contributions from both sources. Below 10 MeV only 3C 454.3 is significantly detected. The strongest evidence (5.6σ) is found in the 3-10 MeV band. A reanalysis of the data of the first 18 months with improved methods provided skymaps and spectra similar to those obtained by Blom et al. (1995). Significant flux variability is not observed for both sources. In fact, the light curves indicate a low (near the COMPTEL threshold) but rather stable MeV emission of 3C 454.3 in the 3-10 MeV band during the years. The time-averaged COMPTEL spectra are not well determined due to the insignificant detections below 3 MeV. However, the combined quasi-simultaneous OSSE/COMPTEL/ EGRET energy spectra show strong breaks at MeV energies for both sources. Two maxima, located at similar energy regions for both sources, are obvious in multi-wavelength spectra.

  11. The Effect of Blazar Spectral Breaks on the Blazar Contribution to the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venters, Tonia M.; Pavlidou, Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    The spectral shapes of the contributions of different classes of unresolved gamma-ray emitters can provide insight into their relative contributions to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) and the natures of their spectra at GeV energies, We calculate the spectral shapes of the contributions to the EGB arising from BL Lacertae type objects (BL Lacs) and flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) assuming blazar spectra can be described as broken power laws, We fit the resulting total blazar spectral shape to the Fermi Large Area Telescope measurements of the EGB, finding that the best-fit shape reproduces well the shape of the Fermi EGB for various break scenarios. We conclude that a scenario in which the contribution of blazars is dominant cannot be excluded on spectral grounds alone, even if spectral breaks are shown to be common among Fermi blazars. We also find that while the observation of a featureless (within uncertainties) power-law EGB spectrum by Fermi does not necessarily imply a single class of contributing unresolved sources with featureless individual spectra, such an observation and the collective spectra of the separate contributing populations determine the ratios of their contributions. As such, a comparison with studies including blazar gamma-ray luminosity functions could have profound implications for the blazar contribution to the EGB, blazar evolution, and blazar gamma-ray spectra and emission.

  12. Lock-in amplification for implantable multiwavelength pulse oximeters.

    PubMed

    Theodor, Michael; Karakas, Utku; Ruh, Dominic; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Standard as well as multiwavelength pulse oximetry as established methods for measuring blood oxygen saturation or fractions of dyshemoglobins suffer from different kinds of interference and noise. Employing lock-in technique as a read-out approach for multiwavelength pulse oximetry is proposed here and strongly decreases such signal disturbance. An analog lock-in amplifier was designed to modulate multiple LEDs simultaneously and to separate the signals detected by a single photodiode. In vivo measurements show an improved signal-to-noise ratio of photoplethysmographic signals and a suppression of interference by means of the lock-in approach. This allows the detection of higher order overtones and, therefore, more detailed data for pulse wave analysis, especially for implantable sensors directly applied at arteries.

  13. Understanding the nature of the blazar CGRaBS J0211+1051

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Sunil; Baliyan, Kiran S.; Ganesh, S.; Foschini, L.

    2014-08-20

    The source CGRaBS J0211+1051 (MG1 J021114+1051, z = 0.20) flared up on 2011 January 23 in high-energy γ-rays as reported by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board Fermi. This event was followed by increased activity at the UV, optical, and radio frequencies as detected by the observing facilities worldwide. The source also showed a high and variable optical polarization based on which it was proposed to be a low-energy peaked BL Lac object (LBL). The present work reports first comprehensive multi-wavelength study of this source using data in the radio, optical, UV, X- and γ-rays, and optical polarization. Using these multi-wavelength data on the source, we have estimated various parameters and verified its classification vis-a-vis blazar sequence. Multi-waveband light curves are used to discuss the flaring events of 2011 January in an attempt to address the nature of the source and pinpoint the possible physical processes responsible for the emission. The light curves show variations in the high-energy γ-rays to be correlated with X-ray, UV, and optical variations, perhaps indicating their co-spatial origin. Our optical data, quasi-simultaneous with UV (Swift-UVOT) and X-ray (Swift-XRT) data, enabled us to trace the low-energy (synchrotron) component of the spectral energy distribution (SED) for CGRaBS J0211+1051 for the first time. The SED shows the synchrotron peak to lie at ∼1.35 × 10{sup 14} Hz, confirming that CGRaBS J0211+1051 is an LBL. Some other parameters, such as the local magnetic field (∼5.93 G) and black hole mass (∼2.4 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}), are also estimated which are in agreement with their typical values for the blazars. Based on the present study, identification of the Fermi/LAT source, 2FGL J0211.2+1050, with its BL Lac counterpart CGRaBS J0211+1051 is confirmed.

  14. Understanding the Nature of the Blazar CGRaBS J0211+1051

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sunil; Baliyan, Kiran S.; Ganesh, S.; Foschini, L.

    2014-08-01

    The source CGRaBS J0211+1051 (MG1 J021114+1051, z = 0.20) flared up on 2011 January 23 in high-energy γ-rays as reported by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board Fermi. This event was followed by increased activity at the UV, optical, and radio frequencies as detected by the observing facilities worldwide. The source also showed a high and variable optical polarization based on which it was proposed to be a low-energy peaked BL Lac object (LBL). The present work reports first comprehensive multi-wavelength study of this source using data in the radio, optical, UV, X- and γ-rays, and optical polarization. Using these multi-wavelength data on the source, we have estimated various parameters and verified its classification vis-a-vis blazar sequence. Multi-waveband light curves are used to discuss the flaring events of 2011 January in an attempt to address the nature of the source and pinpoint the possible physical processes responsible for the emission. The light curves show variations in the high-energy γ-rays to be correlated with X-ray, UV, and optical variations, perhaps indicating their co-spatial origin. Our optical data, quasi-simultaneous with UV (Swift-UVOT) and X-ray (Swift-XRT) data, enabled us to trace the low-energy (synchrotron) component of the spectral energy distribution (SED) for CGRaBS J0211+1051 for the first time. The SED shows the synchrotron peak to lie at ~1.35 × 1014 Hz, confirming that CGRaBS J0211+1051 is an LBL. Some other parameters, such as the local magnetic field (~5.93 G) and black hole mass (~2.4 × 108 M ⊙), are also estimated which are in agreement with their typical values for the blazars. Based on the present study, identification of the Fermi/LAT source, 2FGL J0211.2+1050, with its BL Lac counterpart CGRaBS J0211+1051 is confirmed.

  15. Gamma Ray Pulsars: Multiwavelength Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2004-01-01

    High-energy gamma rays are a valuable tool for studying particle acceleration and radiation in the magnetospheres of energetic pulsars. The seven or more pulsars seen by instruments on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) show that: the light curves usually have double-peak structures (suggesting a broad cone of emission); gamma rays are frequently the dominant component of the radiated power; and all the spectra show evidence of a high-energy turnover. For all the known gamma-ray pulsars, multiwavelength observations and theoretical models based on such observations offer the prospect of gaining a broad understanding of these rotating neutron stars. The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), now in planning for a launch in 2006, will provide a major advance in sensitivity, energy range, and sky coverage.

  16. Multiwavelength metasurfaces through spatial multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Arbabi, Ehsan; Arbabi, Amir; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces are two-dimensional arrangements of optical scatterers rationally arranged to control optical wavefronts. Despite the significant advances made in wavefront engineering through metasurfaces, most of these devices are designed for and operate at a single wavelength. Here we show that spatial multiplexing schemes can be applied to increase the number of operation wavelengths. We use a high contrast dielectric transmittarray platform with amorphous silicon nano-posts to demonstrate polarization insensitive metasurface lenses with a numerical aperture of 0.46, that focus light at 915 and 1550 nm to the same focal distance. We investigate two different methods, one based on large scale segmentation and one on meta-atom interleaving, and compare their performances. An important feature of this method is its simple generalization to adding more wavelengths or new functionalities to a device. Therefore, it provides a relatively straightforward method for achieving multi-functional and multiwavelength metasurface devices. PMID:27597568

  17. Renewed gamma-ray activity from the blazar PKS 1510-089 detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, C.; Tavani, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-08-01

    AGILE is now detecting transient gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with the blazar PKS 1510-089. Integrating from 2016-08-07 09:00 UT to 2016-08-09 09:00 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection above 100 MeV positioned at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (350.64,40.32) +/- 0.7 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.).

  18. Multiwavelength Observations of AB Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slee, O. B.; Erkan, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Budding, E.

    2014-04-01

    We have observed the bright, magnetically active multiple star AB Doradus in a multiwavelength campaign centring around two large facility allocations in November 2006 and January, 2007. Our observations have covered at least three large flares. These flares were observed to produce significant hardening of the X-ray spectra during their very initial stages. We monitored flare-related effects using the Suzaku X-ray satellite and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 3.6 and 6 cm. Observations at 11 and 21 cm were also included, but they were compromised by interference. Optical monitoring was also provided by broadband B and V photometry and some high-dispersion spectrograms. From this multiwavelength coverage we find that the observed flare effects can be mainly associated with a large active region near longitude zero. The second major X-ray and microwave flare of Jan 8, 2007 was observed with a favourable geometry that allowed its initial high-energy impulsive phase to be observed in the higher frequency range of Suzaku's XIS detectors. The fractional circular polarisation (Stokes V/I) was measured in the uv data for the complete runs, for 25 min integrations and, at 4.80 GHz, for 5 min integrations, using the radio data of Nov 21 2006 and Jan 08 2007. Most of the full data sets showed V/I fractions from AB Dor B that were significant at greater than the 3σ level. In several of the 5 min integrations at 4.80 and 8.64 GHz this fraction reached a significance level between 3 and 9σ. Lack of angular resolution prevented identification of these high V/I values with one or other of the two low-mass red-dwarf components of AB Dor B.

  19. Dust Temperatures and Opacities in the Central Parsec of the Galactic Center Modeled from Analysis of Multi-Wavelength Mid-Infrared Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varosi, F.; Gezari, D.; Dwek, E.; Telesco, C.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed multi-wavelength mid-infrared images of the central parsec of the Galactic Center using a two-temperature line-of-sight (LOS) radiative transfer model at each pixel of the images, giving maps of temperatures, luminosities and opacities of the hot, warm, cold (dark)dust components. The data consists of images at nine wavelengths in the mid-infrared (N-band and Q-band) from the Thermal Region Camera and Spectrograph (T-ReCS) instrument operating at the Gemini South Observatory. The results of the LOS modeling indicate that the extinction optical depth is quite large and varies substantially over the FOV. The high-resolution images of the central parsec of the Galactic center region were obtained with T-ReCS at Gemini South in January 2004. These images provide nearly diffraction-limited resolution (approx. 0.5) of the central parsec. The T-ReCS images were taken with nine filters (3.8, 4.7, 7.7, 8.7, 9.7, 10.3, 12.3, 18.3 and 24.5m), over a field-of-view (FOV) of 20 x 20 arcsec.

  20. Detection of VHE gamma-ray emission from the distant blazar 1ES 1101-232 with HESS and broadband characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Bazer-Bachi, A. R.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Berge, D.; Bernlöhr, K.; Boisson, C.; Bolz, O.; Borrel, V.; Braun, I.; Brion, E.; Brown, A. M.; Bühler, R.; Büsching, I.; Boutelier, T.; Carrigan, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chounet, L.-M.; Coignet, G.; Cornils, R.; Costamante, L.; Degrange, B.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Egberts, K.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Feinstein, F.; Ferrero, E.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Funk, Seb.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Goret, P.; Hadjichristidis, C.; Hauser, D.; Hauser, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Hofmann, W.; Holleran, M.; Hoppe, S.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; de Jager, O. C.; Kendziorra, E.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Khélifi, B.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Lamanna, G.; Latham, I. J.; Le Gallou, R.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lohse, T.; Martin, J. M.; Martineau-Huynh, O.; Marcowith, A.; Masterson, C.; Maurin, G.; McComb, T. J. L.; Moulin, E.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nolan, S. J.; Noutsos, A.; Olive, J.-P.; Orford, K. J.; Osborne, J. L.; Panter, M.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Ranchon, S.; Raubenheimer, B. C.; Raue, M.; Rayner, S. M.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rolland, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Sahakian, V.; Santangelo, A.; Saugé, L.; Schlenker, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schröder, R.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Shalchi, A.; Sol, H.; Spangler, D.; Spanier, F.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Superina, G.; Tam, P. H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    Context: The blazar 1ES 1101-232 was observed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) of Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACT) in 2004 and 2005, for a live time of 43 h. VHE (E > 1011 eV) γ-rays were detected for the first time from this object. Aims: VHE observations of blazars are used to investigate the inner parts of the blazar jets, and also to study the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the near-infrared band. Methods: Observations in 2005 were conducted in a multiwavelength campaign, together with the RXTE satellite and optical observations. In 2004, simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton were obtained. Results: 1ES 1101-232 was detected with HESS with an excess of 649 photons, at a significance of 10σ. The measured VHE γ-ray flux amounts to dN/dE = (5.63 ± 0.89) × 10-13 (E/TeV)-(2.94±0.20) cm-2 s-1 TeV-1, above a spectral energy threshold of 225 GeV. No significant variation of the VHE γ-ray flux on any time scale was found. 1ES 1101-232 exhibits a very hard spectrum, and at a redshift of z = 0.186, is the blazar with the highest confirmed redshift detected in VHE γ-rays so far. Conclusions: The data allow the construction of truly simultaneous spectral energy distributions of the source, from the optical to the VHE band. Using an EBL model with ν Fν = 14 nWm-2 sr-1 at 1.5~μm as presented in Aharonian et al. (2006a) suggests an intrinsic VHE power output peak of the source at above 3 TeV.

  1. Frequency-Dependent Time Lags in Three Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Aller, Margo F.

    2004-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycle 6 of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project is part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars in collaboration with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK). The goals of the program are to study the X-ray emission mechanism in blazars and the relation of the X-ray emission to changes in the relativistic jet. The program includes contemporaneous brightness and linear polarization monitoring at radio and optical wavelengths, total and polarized intensity imaging at 43 GHz with a resolution of 0.1 milliarcseconds with the VLBA, and well-sampled X-ray light curves obtained from a series of approved RXTE programs. During RXTE cycle 6, the project was awarded RXTE time to monitor three quasars: PKS 1510-089 two times per week, and 3C 273 and 3C 279 three times per week each. The X-ray data, including those from earlier cycles, were compared with radio measurements obtained 2-3 times per week in the centimeter-wave band with the Michigan radio telescope, monthly imaging observations with the VLBA at 43 GHz, and optical observations obtained at several telescopes around the world. Since it is the long-term X-ray light curve that is of greatest value, this report includes discussion of all the data collected through August 2003 rather than just the Cycle 6 data.

  2. Frequency-Dependent Time Lags in Three Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Aller, Margo F.

    2004-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycle 6 of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project is part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars in collaboration with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK). The goals of the program are to study the X-ray emission mechanism in blazars and the relation of the X-ray emission to changes in the relativistic jet. The program includes contemporaneous brightness and linear polarization monitoring at radio and optical wavelengths, total and polarized intensity imaging at 43 GHz with a resolution of 0.1 milliarcseconds with the VLBA, and well-sampled X-ray light curves obtained from a series of approved RXTE programs. During RXTE cycle 6, the project was awarded RXTE time to monitor three quasars: PKS 1510-089 two times per week, and 3C 273 and 3C 279 three times per week each. The X-ray data, including those from earlier cycles, were compared with radio measurements obtained 2-3 times per week in the centimeter-wave band with the Michigan radio telescope, monthly imaging observations with the VLBA at 43 GHz, and optical observations obtained at several telescopes around the world. Since it is the long-term X-ray light curve that is of greatest value, this report includes discussion of all the data collected through August 2003 rather than just the Cycle 6 data.

  3. Bimodal radio variability in OVRO-40 m-monitored blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.; Hovatta, T.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.; Richards, J. L.; Readhead, A. C. S.

    2017-06-01

    Blazars are known to show periods of quiescence followed by outbursts visible throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. We present a novel maximum likelihood approach to capture this bimodal behaviour by examining blazar radio variability in the flux-density domain. We separate quiescent and flaring components of a source's light curve by modelling its flux-density distribution as a series of 'off'- and 'on'-states. Our modelling allows us to extract information regarding the flaring ratio, duty cycle, and the modulation index in the 'off'-state, in the 'on'-state, as well as throughout the monitoring period of each blazar. We apply our method to a flux-density-limited subsample from the Owens Valley Radio Observatory's 15 GHz blazar monitoring programme, and explore differences in the variability characteristics between BL Lacs and FSRQs as well as between γ-ray detected and non-detected sources. We find that (1) BL Lacs are more variable and have relatively larger outbursts than the FSRQs; (2) unclassified blazar candidates in our sample show similar variability characteristics as the FSRQs and (3) γ-ray detected differ from the γ-ray non-detected sources in all their variability properties, suggesting a link between the production of γ-rays and the mechanism responsible for the radio variability. Finally, we fit distributions for blazar flaring ratios, duty cycles, and on- and off-modulation indices that can be used in population studies of variability-dependent blazar properties.

  4. NIR flaring of the blazar OJ248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Valdes, J. R.; Escobedo, G.; Torres, I.

    2010-09-01

    We report on our recent observation of the blazar OJ248 also known as 3EGJ0829+2413 and B2 0827+24 with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. On September 30th, 2010 (JD245554569.9898), we found this source to be in outburst. On this date the source was found to have a flux corresponding to H = 14.59 +/- 0.02, J=15.29 +/- 0.04 and Ks = 13.72 +/- 0.06.

  5. External Compton Scattering in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Justin

    2017-08-01

    In many low-peaked blazars, especially flat spectrum radio quasars, it is thought that the gamma-rays are produced through the Compton scattering of seed photons external to the jet, most likely from the broad line region and dust torus. I will present detailed, realistic models of broad line regions and dust tori, useful for computation of Compton scattering. I will discuss the location of the gamma-ray emitting region in the context of Compton-scattering of these seed radiation fields.

  6. Fermi Spots a Record Flare from Blazar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-10

    Blazar 3C 279's historic gamma-ray flare can be seen in this image from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on NASA's Fermi satellite. Gamma rays with energies from 100 million to 100 billion electron volts (eV) are shown; for comparison, visible light has energies between 2 and 3 eV. The image spans 150 degrees, is shown in a stereographic projection, and represents an exposure from June 11 at 00:28 UT to June 17 at 08:17 UT. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration

  7. Microphysical aerosol parameters from multiwavelength lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Christine; Mironova, Irina; Müller, Detlef; Schneidenbach, Lars; Nessler, Remo

    2005-03-01

    The hybrid regularization technique developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University (IMP) is used to derive microphysical properties such as effective radius, surface-area concentration, and volume concentration, as well as the single-scattering albedo and a mean complex refractive index, from multiwavelength lidar measurements. We present the continuation of investigations of the IMP method. Theoretical studies of the degree of ill-posedness of the underlying model, simulation results with respect to the analysis of the retrieval error of microphysical particle properties from multiwavelength lidar data, and a comparison of results for different numbers of backscatter and extinction coefficients are presented. Our analysis shows that the backscatter operator has a smaller degree of ill-posedness than the operator for extinction. This fact underlines the importance of backscatter data. Moreover, the degree of ill-posedness increases with increasing particle absorption, i.e., depends on the imaginary part of the refractive index and does not depend significantly on the real part. Furthermore, an extensive simulation study was carried out for logarithmic-normal size distributions with different median radii, mode widths, and real and imaginary parts of refractive indices. The errors of the retrieved particle properties obtained from the inversion of three backscatter (355, 532, and 1064 nm) and two extinction (355 and 532 nm) coefficients were compared with the uncertainties for the case of six backscatter (400, 710, 800 nm, additionally) and the same two extinction coefficients. For known complex refractive index and up to 20% normally distributed noise, we found that the retrieval errors for effective radius, surface-area concentration, and volume concentration stay below approximately 15% in both cases. Simulations were also made with unknown complex refractive index. In that case the integrated parameters stay below approximately 30%, and the

  8. Mrk 421 and other blazars at 60 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David

    2002-04-01

    The CELESTE gamma ray telescope collects atmospheric Cherenkov light using 53 heliostats of the former solar facility "Themis", in the French Pyrennees. The CAT Cherenkov imager operates at the same site.We present measurements of the flux from Mrk 421 obtained with both instruments in March 2000 which we use to constrain the Inverse Compton peak of this blazar's spectral energy distribution. Combining this information with BeppoSAX measurements of the synchrotron peak position allows us to constrain the physical parameters of the blazar in a simple Synchrotron Self Compton framework. We further present the results of searches for other blazars in this previously unexplored energy range.

  9. The Multiwavelength Analysis Of Galaxies At z 1.5 And 4: Morphologies And SEDs Of Balmer-break Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, Sara M.; de Mello, D. F.; Wiklind, T.; Gardner, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of high-z galaxies at z 1.5 and 4, using Hubble Space Telescope optical (ACS), near-infrared (NICMOS), and mid-infrared images (Spitzer/IRAC). The morphologies of detected objects are categorized quantitatively by the Gini coefficient, M20, and the 2D Sersic index. A catalog of sources has been created and cross-matched between the multiple wavelengths. The data includes the ACS filters F606W and 850LP; NICMOS filters F110W, and F160W; and IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm filters. The galaxies are extracted from the NICMOS parallel pointings as part of the UDF05 campaign. We use the Balmer-break to fit SEDs for 301 galaxies and obtain photometric redshifts, dust extinction, starburst age, bolometric luminosities, and metallicities. We measure G, M20, and Sérsic for a selection of the SED fitted data in the redshift regions 1.3 < z < 2 and 3 < z < 4. The quantitative morphologies are compared in the F606W, F850LP, F110W, and F160W images and are compared with a sample of LBGs at z 1.5 and 4. We compare the morphologies with the SED derived physical parameters. One major result shows that the luminosities are 16 times brighter for galaxies at z 4. Our purpose is to determine trends in morphologies as a function of redshift and physical parameters for Balmer-break selected galaxies which have older stellar populations than LBGs.

  10. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE γ-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.

    2014-11-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate γ-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed γ-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE γ-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q {sub 22} parameter, which is analogous to the q {sub 24} parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 μm. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate γ-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources.

  11. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  12. A Multiwavelength View of Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-03-01

    In the last few years interest in isolated galaxies has been renewed within a context regarding secular evolution. This adds to their value as a control sample for environmental studies of galaxies. This presentation will review important results from recent studies of isolated galaxies. I will emphasize work involving statistically significant samples of isolated galaxies culminating with refinement of the CIG in the AMIGA program. The AMIGA project (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies, http://amiga.iaa.es) has identified a significant sample of the most isolated (Tcc(nearest-neighbor) ˜ 2-3Gyr) galaxies in the local Universe and revealed that they have different properties than galaxies in richer environments. Our analysis of a multiwavelength database includes quantification of degree of isolation, morphologies, as well as FIR and radio line/continuum properties. Properties usually regarded as susceptible to interaction enhancement show lower averages in AMIGA-lower than any galaxy sample yet identified. We find lower MIR/ FIR measures, low levels of radio continuum emission, no radio excess above the radio-FIR correlation, a small number of AGN, and lower molecular gas content. The late-type spiral majority in our sample show very small bulge/total ratios (largely < 0.1) and Sersic indices consistent with an absence of classical bulges. They have redder g-r colors and lower color dispersion for AMIGA subtypes and larger disks, and present the narrowest (Gaussian) distribution of HI profile asymmetries of any sample yet studied.

  13. Expanding the Gamma-ray Universe: High Redshift Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Paliya, Vaidehi; Gasparrini, Dario; Ajello, Marco; Cutini, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    High-redshift blazars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are of great astrophysical import as they are extreme objects whose energetics remain a mystery. Such blazars are intrinsically interesting since they inform us about the evolution of gamma-ray blazars and are, by definition, some of the more luminous blazars in the Fermi-LAT sample. These blazars appear to host very massive black holes and could shed light on the origin and growth of black holes in the early Universe. We present the latest high redshift blazar detections in the LAT and discuss some of their implications.

  14. Variability-Based Identifications of Blazar Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Tim; Djorgovski, S.; Glikman, E.; Mahabal, A.; Nugent, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present initial results of a study exploring the feasibility of blazar identification by optical variability alone. Using multi-epoch data from the Palomar-Quest survey, supplemented by the data from the JPL NEAT team processed at the LBNL Nearby Supernova Factory, we investigate the optical variability in the fields of a sample of WMAP point sources, all of which we assume to be blazars. Most of these sources have previously reported radio counterparts. In 10 arcmin fields around each of these objects, we find that in about half the cases, these purported WMAP point source IDs are the most variable objects. We suggest that IDs with low variability may be mis-identifications, and propose several alternate IDs selected on the basis of higher variability, which will be targets for future spectroscopic study. We also present potential IDs for previously unidentified WMAP sources. Understanding the variability of high-frequency radio sources will be important for the interpretation of the cosmological CMBR measurements at high angular frequencies. Moreover, since the positional uncertainties of WMAP sources are similar to those expected for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, we conclude that optical variability selection will be a useful tool in correctly identifying optical counterparts to previously unknown Fermi point sources.

  15. The Fermi blazars' divide based on the diagnostic of the SEDs peak frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramacere, A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Giommi, P.; Mazziotta, N.; Monte, C.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) of 48 LBAS blazars, detected within the three months of the LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS) data taking period, combining Fermi and Swift data with radio NIR-Optical and hard- X/gamma-ray data. Using these quasi-simultaneous SEDs, sampling both the low and the high energy peak of the blazars broad band emission, we were able to apply a diagnostic tool based on the estimate of the peak frequencies of the synchrotron (S) and Inverse Compton (IC) components. Our analysis shows a Fermi blazar's divide based on the peak frequencies of the SED. The robust result is that the Synchrotron Self Compton (SSC) region divides in two the νpS-γpSSC plane. Objects within or below this region, radiating likely via the SSC process, are high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object (HBL), or low/intermediate-frequency-peaked BL Lac object (LBL/IBL). All of the IBLs/LBLs within or below the SSC region are not Compton dominated. The objects lying above the SSC region, radiating likely via the External radiation Compton (ERC) process, are Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars and IBLs/LBLs. All of the IBLs/LBLs in the ERC region show a significant Compton dominance.

  16. X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC JET MODELS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Boettcher, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the expected X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarization signatures resulting from synchrotron self-Compton emission in leptonic models compared to the polarization signatures from proton synchrotron and cascade synchrotron emission in hadronic models for blazars. Source parameters resulting from detailed spectral-energy-distribution modeling are used to calculate photon-energy-dependent upper limits on the degree of polarization, assuming a perfectly organized mono-directional magnetic field. In low-synchrotron-peaked blazars, hadronic models exhibit substantially higher maximum degrees of X-ray and gamma-ray polarization than leptonic models, which may be within reach of existing X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarimeters. In high-synchrotron-peaked blazars (with electron-synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission), leptonic and hadronic models predict the same degree of X-ray polarization but substantially higher maximum {gamma}-ray polarization in hadronic models than leptonic ones. These predictions are particularly relevant in view of the new generation of balloon-borne X-ray polarimeters (and possibly GEMS, if revived), and the ability of Fermi-LAT to measure {gamma}-ray polarization at <200 MeV. We suggest observational strategies combining optical, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray polarimetry to determine the degree of ordering of the magnetic field and to distinguish between leptonic and hadronic high-energy emissions.

  17. PKS 1954–388: RadioAstron detection on 80,000 km baselines and multiwavelength observations

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, P. G.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Ojha, R.; ...

    2017-04-26

    Here, we present results from a multiwavelength study of the blazar PKS 1954–388 at radio, UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray energies. A RadioAstron observation at 1.66 GHz in June 2012 resulted in the detection of interferometric fringes on baselines of 6.2 Earth-diameters. This suggests a source frame brightness temperature of greater than 2 × 1012 K, well in excess of both equipartition and inverse Compton limits and implying the existence of Doppler boosting in the core. An 8.4-GHz TANAMI VLBI image, made less than a month after the RadioAstron observations, is consistent with a previously reported superluminal motion for a jetmore » component. Flux density monitoring with the Australia Telescope Compact Array confirms previous evidence for long-term variability that increases with observing frequency. A search for more rapid variability revealed no evidence for significant day-scale flux density variation. The ATCA light-curve reveals a strong radio flare beginning in late 2013, which peaks higher, and earlier, at higher frequencies. Comparison with the Fermi gamma-ray light-curve indicates this followed ~ 9 months after the start of a prolonged gamma-ray high-state—a radio lag comparable to that seen in other blazars. The multiwavelength data are combined to derive a Spectral Energy Distribution, which is fitted by a one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton (SSC) model with the addition of external Compton (EC) emission.« less

  18. Suzaku Observations of Extreme MeV Blazar Swift J0746.3+2548

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Rie; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kataoka, Jun; Madejski, Greg; Sikora, Marek; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Sambruna, Rita; Romani, Roger; Edwards, Philip G.; Pursimo, Tapio

    2008-12-01

    We report the Suzaku observations of the high luminosity blazar SWIFT J0746.3+2548 (J0746) conducted in November 2005. This object, with z = 2.979, is the highest redshift source observed in the Suzaku Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) period, is likely to show high gamma-ray flux peaking in the MeV range. As a result of the good photon statistics and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum, the Suzaku observation clearly confirms that J0746 has an extremely hard spectrum in the energy range of 0.3-24 keV, which is well represented by a single power-law with a photon index of {Lambda}{sub ph} {approx_equal} 1.17 and Galactic absorption. The multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of J0746 shows two continuum components, and is well modeled assuming that the high-energy spectral component results from Comptonization of the broad-line region photons. In this paper we search for the bulk Compton spectral features predicted to be produced in the soft X-ray band by scattering external optical/UV photons by cold electrons in a relativistic jet. We discuss and provide constraints on the pair content resulting from the apparent absence of such features.

  19. 3C454.3 Revelas the Structure and Physics of its 'Blazar Zone'

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, M.; Moderski, R.; Madejski, G.M.

    2007-11-28

    Recent multi-wavelength observations of 3C454.3, in particular during its giant outburst in 2005, put severe constraints on the location of the 'blazar zone', its dissipative nature, and high energy radiation mechanisms. As the optical, X-ray, and millimeter light-curves indicate, significant fraction of the jet energy must be released in the vicinity of the millimeter-photosphere, i.e. at distances where, due to the lateral expansion, the jet becomes transparent at millimeter wavelengths. We conclude that this region is located at {approx} 10 parsecs, the distance coinciding with the location of the hot dust region. This location is consistent with the high amplitude variations observed on {approx} 10 day time scale, provided the Lorentz factor of a jet is {Gamma}{sub j} {approx} 20. We argue that dissipation is driven by reconfinement shock and demonstrate that X-rays and {gamma}-rays are likely to be produced via inverse Compton scattering of near/mid IR photons emitted by the hot dust. We also infer that the largest gamma-to-synchrotron luminosity ratio ever recorded in this object - having taken place during its lowest luminosity states - can be simply due to weaker magnetic fields carried by a less powerful jet.

  20. Connection of Very High Energy Gamma-ray Flares in Blazars to Activity at Lower Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2016-04-01

    The author will briefly review the results of multi-wavelength observations of blazars that emit very high-energy (VHE) gamma rays. The VHE gamma-ray emission is generally episodic, including flares that are often very short-lived. While many of these flares have counterparts only at X-ray energies, or no counterparts at all, some events are seen also at optical wavelengths, and a number are associated with the passage of new superluminal knots passing through the core in mm-wave VLBA images. Two explanations for the short-term VHE flares in the relativistic jets are supersonic turbulence and ultra-fast plasma jets resulting from magnetic reconnections. Observations of frequency-dependent linear polarization during flares can potentially decide between these models. VLBA images can help to locate VHE events that are seen at millimeter wavelengths. In some cases, the flares take place near the parsec-scale core, while in others they occur closer to the black hole.This research is supported in part by NASA through Swift Guest Investigator grants NNX15AR45G and NNX15AR34G.

  1. Gamma-ray blazar spectra with H.E.S.S. II mono analysis: The case of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Donaggio, B.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment's sensitivityto lower energies. The lowest energy threshold is obtained using monoscopic analysis of data taken with CT5, providing access to gamma-ray energies below 100 GeV for small zenith angle observations. Such an extension of the instrument's energy range is particularly beneficial for studies of active galactic nuclei with soft spectra, as expected for those at a redshift ≥0.5. The high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects PKS 2155-304 (z = 0.116) and PG 1553+113 (0.43 < z < 0.58) are among the brightest objects in the gamma-ray sky, both showing clear signatures of gamma-ray absorption at E > 100 GeV interpreted as being due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Aims: The aims of this work are twofold: to demonstrate the monoscopic analysis of CT5 data with a low energy threshold, and to obtain accurate measurements of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 near their SED peaks at energies ≈100 GeV. Methods: Multiple observational campaigns of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were conducted during 2013 and 2014 using the full H.E.S.S. II instrument (CT1-5). A monoscopic analysis of the data taken with the new CT5 telescope was developed along with an investigation into the systematic uncertainties on the spectral parameters which are derived from this analysis. Results: Using the data from CT5, the energy spectra of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were reconstructed down to conservative threshold energies of 80 GeV for PKS 2155-304, which transits near zenith, and 110 GeV for the more northern PG 1553+113. The measured spectra, well fitted in both cases by a log-parabola spectral model (with a 5.0σ statistical preference for non-zero curvature for PKS 2155-304 and 4.5σ for PG 1553+113), were found consistent with spectra derived from contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data, indicating a sharp break in the

  2. Implications for High Energy Blazar Spectra from Intergalactic Absorption Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F

    2008-01-01

    Given a knowledge of the density spectra intergalactic low energy photons as a function of redshift, one can derive the intrinsic gamma-ray spectra and luminosities of blazars over a range of redshifts and look for possible trends in blazar evolution. Stecker, Baring & Summerlin have found some evidence hinting that TeV blazars with harder spectra have higher intrinsic TeV gamma-ray luminosities and indicating that there may be a correlation of spectral hardness and luminosity with redshift. Further work along these lines, treating recent observations of the blazers lES02291+200 and 3C279 in the TeV and sub-TeV energy ranges, has recently been explored by Stecker & Scully. GLAST will observe and investigate many blazars in the GeV energy range and will be sensitive to blazers at higher redshifts. I examine the implications high redshift gamma-ray absorption for both theoretical and observational blazer studies.

  3. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Enigmatic Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 PMN J0948 0022 in March-July 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R. Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E. Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; Caliandro, G.A.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    Following the recent discovery of {gamma} rays from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846), we started a multiwavelength campaign from radio to {gamma} rays, which was carried out between the end of 2009 March and the beginning of July. The source displayed activity at all the observed wavelengths: a general decreasing trend from optical to {gamma}-ray frequencies was followed by an increase of radio emission after less than two months from the peak of the {gamma}-ray emission. The largest flux change, about a factor of about 4, occurred in the X-ray band. The smallest was at ultraviolet and near-infrared frequencies, where the rate of the detected photons dropped by a factor 1.6-1.9. At optical wavelengths, where the sampling rate was the highest, it was possible to observe day scale variability, with flux variations up to a factor of about 3. The behavior of PMN J0948+0022 observed in this campaign and the calculated power carried out by its jet in the form of protons, electrons, radiation, and magnetic field are quite similar to that of blazars, specifically of flat-spectrum radio quasars. These results confirm the idea that radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies host relativistic jets with power similar to that of average blazars.

  4. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Enigmatic Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 PMN J0948+0022 in 2009 March-July

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2009-11-25

    For this research, following the recent discovery of γ rays from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846), we started a multiwavelength campaign from radio to γ rays, which was carried out between the end of 2009 March and the beginning of July. The source displayed activity at all the observed wavelengths: a general decreasing trend from optical to γ-ray frequencies was followed by an increase of radio emission after less than two months from the peak of the γ-ray emission. The largest flux change, about a factor of about 4, occurred in the X-ray band.more » The smallest was at ultraviolet and near-infrared frequencies, where the rate of the detected photons dropped by a factor 1.6-1.9. At optical wavelengths, where the sampling rate was the highest, it was possible to observe day scale variability, with flux variations up to a factor of about 3. The behavior of PMN J0948+0022 observed in this campaign and the calculated power carried out by its jet in the form of protons, electrons, radiation, and magnetic field are quite similar to that of blazars, specifically of flat-spectrum radio quasars. In conclusion, these results confirm the idea that radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies host relativistic jets with power similar to that of average blazars.« less

  5. Multiwavelength Monitoring of the Enigmatic Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 PMN J0948+0022 in 2009 March-July

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Celotti, A.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collmar, W.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Foschini, L.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Parent, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Richards, J. L.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wehrle, A. E.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Ziegler, M.; Angelakis, E.; Bailyn, C.; Bignall, H.; Blanchard, J.; Bonning, E. W.; Buxton, M.; Canterna, R.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Colomer, F.; Doi, A.; Ghisellini, G.; Hauser, M.; Hong, X.; Isler, J.; Kino, M.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Kutyrev, A.; Lahteenmaki, A.; van Langevelde, H. J.; Lister, M. L.; Macomb, D.; Maraschi, L.; Marchili, N.; Nagai, H.; Paragi, Z.; Phillips, C.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Recillas, E.; Roming, P.; Sekido, M.; Stark, M. A.; Szomoru, A.; Tammi, J.; Tavecchio, F.; Tornikoski, M.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Urry, C. M.; Wagner, S.

    2009-11-25

    For this research, following the recent discovery of γ rays from the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PMN J0948+0022 (z = 0.5846), we started a multiwavelength campaign from radio to γ rays, which was carried out between the end of 2009 March and the beginning of July. The source displayed activity at all the observed wavelengths: a general decreasing trend from optical to γ-ray frequencies was followed by an increase of radio emission after less than two months from the peak of the γ-ray emission. The largest flux change, about a factor of about 4, occurred in the X-ray band. The smallest was at ultraviolet and near-infrared frequencies, where the rate of the detected photons dropped by a factor 1.6-1.9. At optical wavelengths, where the sampling rate was the highest, it was possible to observe day scale variability, with flux variations up to a factor of about 3. The behavior of PMN J0948+0022 observed in this campaign and the calculated power carried out by its jet in the form of protons, electrons, radiation, and magnetic field are quite similar to that of blazars, specifically of flat-spectrum radio quasars. In conclusion, these results confirm the idea that radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies host relativistic jets with power similar to that of average blazars.

  6. Mass, shape and thermal properties of Abell 1689 using a multiwavelength X-ray, lensing and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro; Ettori, Stefano; Umetsu, Keiichi; Baldi, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the mass and concentration of galaxy clusters is crucial for an understanding of their formation and evolution. Unbiased estimates require an understanding of the shape and orientation of the halo as well as its equilibrium status. We propose a novel method to determine the intrinsic properties of galaxy clusters from a multiwavelength data set, spanning from X-ray spectroscopic and photometric data to gravitational lensing to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. The method relies on two non-informative geometrical assumptions: the distributions of total matter or gas are approximately ellipsoidal and co-aligned; they have different, constant axial ratios but share the same degree of triaxiality. Weak and strong lensing probe the features of the total mass distribution in the plane of the sky. X-ray data measure the size and orientation of the gas in the plane of the sky. Comparison with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich amplitude fixes the elongation of the gas along the line of sight. These constraints are deprojected as a result of Bayesian inference. The mass distribution is described as a Navarro-Frenk-White halo with arbitrary orientation, and the gas density and temperature are modelled with parametric profiles. We have applied the method to Abell 1689. Independently of the priors, the cluster is massive, M200 = (1.3 ± 0.2) × 1015 M⊙, and overconcentrated, c200 = 8 ± 1, but it is still consistent with theoretical predictions. The total matter is triaxial (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.5 ± 0.1, exploiting priors from N-body simulations) with the major axis nearly orientated along the line of sight. The gas is rounder (minor to major axial ratio ˜0.6 ± 0.1) and deviates from hydrostatic equilibrium. The contribution of non-thermal pressure is ˜20-50 per cent in the inner regions, ≲ 300 kpc, and ˜25 ± 5 per cent at ˜1.5 Mpc. This picture of A1689 was obtained with a small number of assumptions and in a single framework, suitable for application to a

  7. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  8. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  9. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  10. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  11. Interferometric multiwavelength system for long gauge blocks measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengierow, Michal; Sałbut, Leszek; Ramotowski, Zbigniew

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes common efforts of Warsaw University of Technology and Polish Central Office of Measure to build a multiwavelength interferometer with extended measurement range to calibrate long gauge blocks. To achieve this goal modified automatic fringe pattern analysis method based on fringe fraction method is proposed. The setup with special chamber with active temperature control to stabilize environmental conditions has been build. To assure correctness of measure factors like temperature, pressure, humidity and concentration of CO2 are need to be constantly monitored by network of sensors. Summarizing all this efforts we are presenting gauge blocks calibration results with uncertainty analysis.

  12. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  13. Gamma-ray blazar spectra with H.E.S.S. II mono analysis: The case of PKS 2155$-$304 and PG 1553+113

    DOE PAGES

    Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; ...

    2017-04-05

    In this paper, the addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment’s sensitivityto lower energies. The lowest energy threshold is obtained using monoscopic analysis of data taken with CT5, providing access to gamma-ray energies below 100 GeV for small zenith angle observations. Such an extension of the instrument’s energy range is particularly beneficial for studies of active galactic nuclei with soft spectra, as expected for those at a redshift ≥0.5. The high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects PKS 2155–304 (z = 0.116) and PG 1553+113 (0.43 < z < 0.58) are among the brightestmore » objects in the gamma-ray sky, both showing clear signatures of gamma-ray absorption at E > 100 GeV interpreted as being due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Furthermore, the aims of this work are twofold: to demonstrate the monoscopic analysis of CT5 data with a low energy threshold, and to obtain accurate measurements of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of PKS 2155–304 and PG 1553+113 near their SED peaks at energies ≈100 GeV. Multiple observational campaigns of PKS 2155–304 and PG 1553+113 were conducted during 2013 and 2014 using the full H.E.S.S. II instrument (CT1–5). A monoscopic analysis of the data taken with the new CT5 telescope was developed along with an investigation into the systematic uncertainties on the spectral parameters which are derived from this analysis. As a result, using the data from CT5, the energy spectra of PKS 2155–304 and PG 1553+113 were reconstructed down to conservative threshold energies of 80 GeV for PKS 2155–304, which transits near zenith, and 110 GeV for the more northern PG 1553+113. The measured spectra, well fitted in both cases by a log-parabola spectral model (with a 5.0σ statistical preference for non-zero curvature for PKS 2155–304 and 4.5σ for PG 1553+113), were found consistent with spectra derived from contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data

  14. Unified Models of AGN Accretion Disks and Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Ramos, E.; Becker, P.; Subramanian, P.; Yang, R.

    1996-01-01

    Accretion disks around supermassive black holes are expected to be the power sources in all AGNS, including blazars. To date, though, little direct evidence for such disks exists in AGN observations. In blazars, the intense relativistic beaming would mask any underlying disk component. Here we present relevant work that our group at GMU is carrying out on unified aspects of disk accretion onto supermassive black holes and the possible coupling of thick disks to beams in the inner regions.

  15. Time Delays of Blazar Flares Observed at Different Wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2001-01-01

    Correlated variability at different frequencies can probe the structure and physics of the jet of a blazar on size scales much smaller than can be resolved by telescopes and interferometers. I discuss some observations of frequency dependent time lags and how these place constraints on models for the nonthermal emission in blazars. The time lags can be either positive (high frequency variations leading those at lower frequencies) or negative, while simultaneous flares are also possible.

  16. Time Delays of Blazar Flares Observed at Different Wavebands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2000-01-01

    Correlated variability at different frequencies can probe the structure and physics of the jet of a blazar on size scales much smaller than can be resolved by telescopes and interferometers. I discuss some observations of frequency dependent time lags and how these place constraints on models for the nonthermal emission in blazars. The time lags can be either positive (high frequency variations leading those at lower frequencies) or negative, while simultaneous flares are also possible.

  17. Gamma-ray blazar spectra with H.E.S.S. II mono analysis: The case of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaborov, D.; Taylor, A. M.; Sanchez, D. A.; Lenain, J.-P.; Romoli, C.; H.E.S.S. Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment's sensitivity to lower energies, providing new opportunities for studies of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) with soft intrinsic spectra and at high redshifts. The high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects PKS 2155-304 (z = 0.116) and PG 1553+113 (0.43 < z ≤ 0.58) are among the brightest objects in the gamma-ray sky, both showing clear signatures of gamma-ray absorption at E > 100 GeV interpreted as being due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Multiple observational campaigns of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were conducted during 2013 using the full H.E.S.S. II array (CT1-5). To achieve the lowest energy threshold, a monoscopic analysis of the data taken with CT5 was developed along with an investigation into the systematic uncertainties on the spectral parameters which are derived from this analysis. The energy spectra were reconstructed down to energies of 80 GeV for PKS 2155-304, which transits near zenith, and 110 GeV for the more northern PG 1553+113. The measured spectra, well fitted in both cases by a log-parabola spectral model (with a 5σ statistical preference for non-zero curvature for PKS 2155-304 and 4.5σ for PG 1553+113), were found consistent with spectra derived from contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data, indicating a sharp break in the observed spectra of both sources at E ≈ 100 GeV. When corrected for EBL absorption, the intrinsic spectrum of PKS 2155-304 was found to show significant curvature. For PG 1553+113, however, no significant detection of curvature in the intrinsic spectrum could be found within statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  18. Catching blazars in the act exlamation GLAST triggers for TeV observation of blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Behera, Bagmeet; Wagner, Stefan J.

    2008-12-24

    The double humped SED (Spectral Energy Distribution) of blazars, and their flaring phenomena can be explained by various leptonic and hadronic models. However, accurate modeling of the high frequency component and clear identification of the correct emission mechanism would require simultaneous measurements in both the MeV-GeV band and the TeV band. Due to the differences in the sensitivity and the field of view of the instruments required to do these measurements, it is essential to identify active states of blazars likely to be detected with TeV instruments.Using a reasonable intergalactic attenuation model, various extrapolations of the EGRET spectra, as a proxy for GLAST (Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope) measurements, are made into TeV energies for selecting EGRET blazars expected to be VHE-bright. Furthermore, estimates of the threshold fluxes at GLAST energies are provided, at which sources are expected to be detectable at TeV energies, with Cherenkov telescopes like HESS, MAGIC or VERITAS.

  19. GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BLAZARS BEHIND THE GALACTIC PLANE: B2013+370 AND B2023+336

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, E.; Errando, M.; Aliu, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.; Boettcher, M.; Fortin, P.

    2012-02-20

    B2013+370 and B2023+336 are two blazars at low-galactic latitude that were previously proposed to be the counterparts for the EGRET unidentified sources 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2027+3429. Gamma-ray emission associated with the EGRET sources has been detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and the two sources, 1FGL J2015.7+3708 and 1FGL J2027.6+3335, have been classified as unidentified in the 1 year catalog. This analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data collected during 31 months reveals that the 1FGL sources are spatially compatible with the blazars and are significantly variable, supporting the hypothesis of extragalactic origin for the gamma-ray emission. The gamma-ray light curves are compared with 15 GHz radio light curves from the 40 m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. Simultaneous variability is seen in both bands for the two blazar candidates. The study is completed with the X-ray analysis of 1FGL J2015.7+3708 using Swift observations that were triggered in 2010 August by a Fermi-detected flare. The resulting spectral energy distribution shows a two-component structure typical of blazars. We also identify a second source in the field of view of 1FGL J2027.6+3335 with similar characteristics to the known LAT pulsars. This study gives solid evidence favoring blazar counterparts for these two unidentified EGRET and Fermi sources, supporting the hypothesis that a number of unidentified gamma-ray sources at low-galactic latitudes are indeed of extragalactic origin.

  20. Gamma-Ray Emission From Two Blazars Behind The Galactic Plane: B2013+370 And B2023+336

    DOE PAGES

    Kara, E.; Errando, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; ...

    2012-02-02

    B2013+370 and B2023+336 are two blazars at low-galactic latitude that were previously proposed to be the counterparts for the EGRET unidentified sources 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2027+3429. Gamma-ray emission associated with the EGRET sources has been detected by the Fermi Gammaray Space Telescope, and the two sources, 1FGL J2015.7+3708 and 1FGL J2027.6+3335, have been classified as unidentified in the 1-year catalog. This analysis of the Fermi-LAT data collected during 31 months reveals that the 1FGL sources are spatially compatible with the blazars, and are significantly variable, supporting the hypothesis of extragalactic origin for the gamma-ray emission. The gammaray light curvesmore » are compared with 15 GHz radio light curves from the 40-m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). Simultaneous variability is seen in both bands for the two blazar candidates. The study is completed with the X-ray analysis of 1FGL J2015.7+3708 using Swift observations that were triggered in August 2010 by a Fermi-detected are. The resulting spectral energy distribution shows a two-component structure typical of blazars. We also identify a second source in the field of view of 1FGL J2027.6+3335 with similar characteristics to the known LAT pulsars. This study gives solid evidence favoring blazar counterparts for these two unidentified EGRET and Fermi sources, supporting the hypothesis that a number of unidentified gamma-ray sources at low galactic latitudes are indeed of extragalactic origin.« less

  1. Gamma-Ray Emission from Two Blazars Behind the Galactic Plane: B2013+370 and B2023+336

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, E.; Errando, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Aliu, E.; Böttcher, M.; Fortin, P.; Halpern, J. P.; Mukherjee, R.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.

    2012-02-01

    B2013+370 and B2023+336 are two blazars at low-galactic latitude that were previously proposed to be the counterparts for the EGRET unidentified sources 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2027+3429. Gamma-ray emission associated with the EGRET sources has been detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, and the two sources, 1FGL J2015.7+3708 and 1FGL J2027.6+3335, have been classified as unidentified in the 1 year catalog. This analysis of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data collected during 31 months reveals that the 1FGL sources are spatially compatible with the blazars and are significantly variable, supporting the hypothesis of extragalactic origin for the gamma-ray emission. The gamma-ray light curves are compared with 15 GHz radio light curves from the 40 m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory. Simultaneous variability is seen in both bands for the two blazar candidates. The study is completed with the X-ray analysis of 1FGL J2015.7+3708 using Swift observations that were triggered in 2010 August by a Fermi-detected flare. The resulting spectral energy distribution shows a two-component structure typical of blazars. We also identify a second source in the field of view of 1FGL J2027.6+3335 with similar characteristics to the known LAT pulsars. This study gives solid evidence favoring blazar counterparts for these two unidentified EGRET and Fermi sources, supporting the hypothesis that a number of unidentified gamma-ray sources at low-galactic latitudes are indeed of extragalactic origin.

  2. Gamma-Ray Emission From Two Blazars Behind The Galactic Plane: B2013+370 And B2023+336

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, E.; Errando, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Aliu, E.; Böttcher, M.; Fortin, P.; Halpern, J. P.; Mukherjee, R.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Richards, J. L.

    2012-02-02

    B2013+370 and B2023+336 are two blazars at low-galactic latitude that were previously proposed to be the counterparts for the EGRET unidentified sources 3EG J2016+3657 and 3EG J2027+3429. Gamma-ray emission associated with the EGRET sources has been detected by the Fermi Gammaray Space Telescope, and the two sources, 1FGL J2015.7+3708 and 1FGL J2027.6+3335, have been classified as unidentified in the 1-year catalog. This analysis of the Fermi-LAT data collected during 31 months reveals that the 1FGL sources are spatially compatible with the blazars, and are significantly variable, supporting the hypothesis of extragalactic origin for the gamma-ray emission. The gammaray light curves are compared with 15 GHz radio light curves from the 40-m telescope at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). Simultaneous variability is seen in both bands for the two blazar candidates. The study is completed with the X-ray analysis of 1FGL J2015.7+3708 using Swift observations that were triggered in August 2010 by a Fermi-detected are. The resulting spectral energy distribution shows a two-component structure typical of blazars. We also identify a second source in the field of view of 1FGL J2027.6+3335 with similar characteristics to the known LAT pulsars. This study gives solid evidence favoring blazar counterparts for these two unidentified EGRET and Fermi sources, supporting the hypothesis that a number of unidentified gamma-ray sources at low galactic latitudes are indeed of extragalactic origin.

  3. Is the Blazar Sequence related to accretion disk winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boula, Stella; Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2016-08-01

    Adopting the hypothesis that the nonthermal emission of blazars is primarily due to the acceleration of electrons, we construct a simple leptonic model in order to explain the Blazar Sequence. The acceleration process is assumed to be of the first order Fermi type and the injected electrons and photons in the emitting region of the blazar are described by spatially averaged kinetic equations. According to the leptonic scenario, the spectral energy distributions of blazars have two basic components: a low frequency component, peaking in the optical through X-rays, from synchrotron emission; and a high frequency one, peaking in the γ rays, probably originating from Compton scattering of some seed photon source, either internal (synchrotron self-Compton) and/or external to the jet (external Compton). We find an adequate description of the Blazar Sequence by assuming a wind density profile of the form n(r) 1/r. Higher luminosity objects have higher accretion rates, higher optical thicknesses of the wind to Compton scattering and thus higher external photon fields than the lower luminosity ones. Therefore, we present indicative Blazar Sequence models which reproduce the basic observational trends just by varying one parameter, namely the mass accretion rate dot{m}.

  4. Multiwavelength Monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Bradley M.

    2001-01-01

    By intensive monitoring of AGN variability over a large range in wavelength, we can probe the structure and physics of active galactic nuclei on microarcsecond angular scales. For example, multi-wavelength variability data allow us (a) to establish causal relationships between variations in different wavebands, and thus determine which physical processes are primary and which spectral changes are induced by variations at other wavelengths, and (b) through reverberation mapping of the UV/optical emission lines, to determine the structure and kinematics of the line-emitting region, and thus accurately determine the central masses in AGNs. Multiwavelength monitoring is resource-intensive, and is difficult to implement with general-purpose facilities. As a result, virtually all programs undertaken to date have been either sparsely sampled, or short in duration, or both. The potentially high return on this type of investigation, however, argues for dedicated facilities for multiwavelength monitoring programs.

  5. First multi-wavelength campaign on the gamma-ray-loud active galaxy IC 310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arcaro, C.; Babić, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Ishio, K.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nöthe, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Krauß, F.; Schulz, R.; Kadler, M.; Wilms, J.; Ros, E.; Bach, U.; Beuchert, T.; Langejahn, M.; Wendel, C.; Gehrels, N.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Markwardt, C. B.; Müller, C.; Grinberg, V.; Hovatta, T.; Magill, J.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The extragalactic very-high-energy gamma-ray sky is rich in blazars. These are jetted active galactic nuclei that are viewed at a small angle to the line-of-sight. Only a handful of objects viewed at a larger angle are so far known to emit above 100 GeV. Multi-wavelength studies of such objects up to the highest energies provide new insights into the particle and radiation processes of active galactic nuclei. Aims: We aim to report the results from the first multi-wavelength campaign observing the TeV detected nucleus of the active galaxy IC 310, whose jet is observed at a moderate viewing angle of 10°-20°. Methods: The multi-instrument campaign was conducted between 2012 November and 2013 January, and involved observations with MAGIC, Fermi, INTEGRAL, Swift, OVRO, MOJAVE and EVN. These observations were complemented with archival data from the AllWISE and 2MASS catalogs. A one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model was applied to describe the broadband spectral energy distribution. Results: IC 310 showed an extraordinary TeV flare at the beginning of the campaign, followed by a low, but still detectable TeV flux. Compared to previous measurements in this energy range, the spectral shape was found to be steeper during the low emission state. Simultaneous observations in the soft X-ray band showed an enhanced energy flux state and a harder-when-brighter spectral shape behavior. No strong correlated flux variability was found in other frequency regimes. The broadband spectral energy distribution obtained from these observations supports the hypothesis of a double-hump structure. Conclusions: The harder-when-brighter trend in the X-ray and VHE emission, observed for the first time during this campaign, is consistent with the behavior expected from a synchrotron self-Compton scenario. The contemporaneous broadband spectral energy distribution is well described with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model using parameters that are comparable to those found for

  6. Detecting the elusive blazar counter-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.; Angelakis, E.

    2017-02-01

    Detection of blazar pc scale counter-jets is difficult, but it can provide invaluable insight into the relativistic effects, radiative processes and the complex mechanisms of jet production, collimation and accelation in blazars. We build on recent populations models (optimized using the MOJAVE apparent velocity and redshift distributions) in order to derive the distribution of jet-to-counter-jet ratios and the flux densities of the counter-jet at different frequencies, in an effort to set minimum sensitivity limits required for existing and future telescope arrays in order to detect these elusive counter-jets. We find that: for the BL Lacs, 5 per cent of their counter-jets have a flux density higher than 100 mJy, 15 per cent are higher than 10 mJy, and 32 per cent have higher flux density than 1 mJy, whereas for the FSRQs, 8 per cent have a flux density higher than 10 mJy, 17 per cent are higher than 1 mJy, and 32 per cent are higher than 0.1 mJy (at 15 GHz). Future telescopes like the SKA and newly operating like e-MERLIN and JVLA may detect up to 99 per cent of the BL Lac and 77 per cent of the FSRQ counter-jets. Sources with both low apparent velocity and a low Doppler factor make prime candidates for counter-jet detection. Combining our findings with the literature values, we have identified five such counter-jet detection candidates. Finally, we discuss possible effects beyond relativistic deboosting that may complicate the detection of counter-jets and that need to be accounted for in the interpretation of detections.

  7. An Investigation of Blazars without Redshifts: Not a Missing Population at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Peiyuan; Urry, C. Megan

    2017-06-01

    We investigate a sample of 622 blazars with measured fluxes at 12 wavebands across the radio-to-gamma-ray spectrum but without spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. This sample includes hundreds of sources with newly analyzed X-ray spectra reported here. From the synchrotron peak frequencies, estimated by fitting the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we find that the fraction of high-synchrotron-peaked blazars in these 622 sources is roughly the same as in larger samples of blazars that do have redshifts. We characterize the no-redshift blazars using their infrared colors, which lie in the distinct locus called the WISE blazar strip, then estimate their redshifts using a KNN regression based on the redshifts of the closest blazars in the WISE color-color plot. Finally, using randomly drawn values from plausible redshift distributions, we simulate the SEDs of these blazars and compare them to known blazar SEDs. Based on all these considerations, we conclude that blazars without redshift estimates are unlikely to be high-luminosity, high-synchrotron-peaked objects, which had been suggested in order to explain the “blazar sequence”—an observed trend of SED shape with luminosity—as a selection effect. Instead, the observed properties of no-redshift blazars are compatible with a causal connection between jet power and electron cooling, i.e., a true blazar sequence.

  8. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Monitoring of 3C66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, M.

    2004-01-01

    The radio-selected BL Lac object 3C66A was the target of an intensive multiwavelength campaign from Sept. 2003 through Feb. 2004. It was monitored by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration, in tandem with 20 X-ray monitoring observations by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), VHE gamma-ray observations by STACEE and VERITAS, and long-term monitoring at radio frequencies. In addition. 9 observations using the VLBA are being carried out during the campaign and throughout the year 2004 to follow possible structural changes of the source. 21 pointings with RXTE during the period Sept. 15 - Dec. 27, 2003. All collected data have been fully analyzed, and first results have already been published at the 8th HEAD Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in Sept. 2004, and will also be presented at the 205th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA, in Jan. 2005. A first Journal paper, to be submitted to the Astrophysical Journal, is currently in preparation, and we plan to have it ready for submission in January 2005. A gradual brightening of the source over the course of the campaign was observed at all optical frequencies, culminating in a very bright flare at the end of January 2004. Optical light curves indicate intraday microvariability on time scales down to about 1.3 hours. No significant color-magnitude correlation for the entire data set was evident, but there is a slight indication of a gradual spectral softening in the optical over the entire duration of multi-day outbursts (in both the rising and decaying phase). The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power-law with a photon spectral index of approx. 2.1, indicating that the RXTE energy band might be located right at the intersection of the synchrotron and the high-energy emission components. No significant flux or spectral variability at X-ray energies was detected, though there seems to be a trend of very modest brightening in tandem with the optical flux. The first 4 VLBA epochs indicate a rather smooth jet with

  9. Gamma-Ray Blazars within the First 2 Billion Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra Gonzalez, J.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Conrad, J.; Costantin, D.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Domínguez, A.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Green, D.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Marcotulli, L.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Ojha, R.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paliya, V. S.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Persic, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rani, B.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romani, R. W.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stalin, C. S.; Stawarz, L.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tanaka, K.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-03-01

    The detection of high-redshift (z > 3) blazars enables the study of the evolution of the most luminous relativistic jets over cosmic time. More importantly, high-redshift blazars tend to host massive black holes and can be used to constrain the space density of heavy black holes in the early universe. Here, we report the first detection with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope of five γ-ray-emitting blazars beyond z = 3.1, more distant than any blazars previously detected in γ-rays. Among these five objects, NVSS J151002+570243 is now the most distant known γ-ray-emitting blazar at z = 4.31. These objects have steeply falling γ-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and those that have been observed in X-rays have a very hard X-ray spectrum, both typical of powerful blazars. Their Compton dominance (ratio of the inverse Compton to synchrotron peak luminosities) is also very large (> 20). All of these properties place these objects among the most extreme members of the blazar population. Their optical spectra and the modeling of their optical-UV SEDs confirm that these objects harbor massive black holes ({M}{BH}˜ {10}8-10 {M}⊙ ). We find that, at z≈ 4, the space density of > {10}9 {M}⊙ black holes hosted in radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei are similar, implying that radio-loudness may play a key role in rapid black hole growth in the early universe.

  10. Gamma-ray blazars within the first 2 billion years

    DOE PAGES

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; ...

    2017-02-27

    Here, the detection of high-redshift (more » $$z\\,\\gt 3$$) blazars enables the study of the evolution of the most luminous relativistic jets over cosmic time. More importantly, high-redshift blazars tend to host massive black holes and can be used to constrain the space density of heavy black holes in the early universe. Here, we report the first detection with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope of five γ-ray-emitting blazars beyond z = 3.1, more distant than any blazars previously detected in γ-rays. Among these five objects, NVSS J151002+570243 is now the most distant known γ-ray-emitting blazar at z = 4.31. These objects have steeply falling γ-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and those that have been observed in X-rays have a very hard X-ray spectrum, both typical of powerful blazars. Their Compton dominance (ratio of the inverse Compton to synchrotron peak luminosities) is also very large ($$\\gt 20$$). All of these properties place these objects among the most extreme members of the blazar population. Their optical spectra and the modeling of their optical-UV SEDs confirm that these objects harbor massive black holes ($${M}_{\\mathrm{BH}}\\sim {10}^{8-10}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$$). We find that, at $$z\\approx 4$$, the space density of $$\\gt {10}^{9}\\,{M}_{\\odot }$$ black holes hosted in radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei are similar, implying that radio-loudness may play a key role in rapid black hole growth in the early universe.« less

  11. UNIDENTIFIED {gamma}-RAY SOURCES: HUNTING {gamma}-RAY BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Tosti, G.; Gasparrini, D.

    2012-06-10

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the major improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one-third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated with low-energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of active galactic nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated with the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray LAT catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart to each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated with {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  12. Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources: Hunting Gamma-Ray Blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; D'Abrusco, R.; Tosti, G.; Ajello, M.; Gasparrini, A.Paggi.D.

    2012-04-02

    One of the main scientific objectives of the ongoing Fermi mission is unveiling the nature of the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources (UGSs). Despite the large improvements of Fermi in the localization of {gamma}-ray sources with respect to the past {gamma}-ray missions, about one third of the Fermi-detected objects are still not associated to low energy counterparts. Recently, using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) survey, we discovered that blazars, the rarest class of Active Galactic Nuclei and the largest population of {gamma}-ray sources, can be recognized and separated from other extragalactic sources on the basis of their infrared (IR) colors. Based on this result, we designed an association method for the {gamma}-ray sources to recognize if there is a blazar candidate within the positional uncertainty region of a generic {gamma}-ray source. With this new IR diagnostic tool, we searched for {gamma}-ray blazar candidates associated to the UGS sample of the second Fermi {gamma}-ray catalog (2FGL). We found that our method associates at least one {gamma}-ray blazar candidate as a counterpart each of 156 out of 313 UGSs analyzed. These new low-energy candidates have the same IR properties as the blazars associated to {gamma}-ray sources in the 2FGL catalog.

  13. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  14. Constraining the location of gamma-ray flares in luminous blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    2014-07-10

    Locating the gamma-ray emission sites in blazar jets is a long standing and highly controversial issue. We jointly investigate several constraints on the distance scale r and Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray emitting regions in luminous blazars (primarily flat spectrum radio quasars). Working in the framework of one-zone external radiation Comptonization models, we perform a parameter space study for several representative cases of actual gamma-ray flares in their multiwavelength context. We find a particularly useful combination of three constraints: from an upper limit on the collimation parameter Γθ ≲ 1, from an upper limit on the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) luminosity L{sub SSC} ≲ L{sub X}, and from an upper limit on the efficient cooling photon energy E{sub cool,obs} ≲ 100 MeV. These three constraints are particularly strong for sources with low accretion disk luminosity L{sub d}. The commonly used intrinsic pair-production opacity constraint on Γ is usually much weaker than the SSC constraint. The SSC and cooling constraints provide a robust lower limit on the collimation parameter Γθ ≳ 0.1-0.7. Typical values of r corresponding to moderate values of Γ ∼ 20 are in the range 0.1-1 pc, and are determined primarily by the observed variability timescale t{sub var,obs}. Alternative scenarios motivated by the observed gamma-ray/millimeter connection, in which gamma-ray flares of t{sub var,obs} ∼ a few days are located at r ∼ 10 pc, are in conflict with both the SSC and cooling constraints. Moreover, we use a simple light travel time argument to point out that the gamma-ray/millimeter connection does not provide a significant constraint on the location of gamma-ray flares. We argue that spine-sheath models of the jet structure do not offer a plausible alternative to external radiation fields at large distances; however, an extended broad-line region is an idea worth exploring. We propose that the most definite additional constraint could be

  15. Constraining the Location of Gamma-Ray Flares in Luminous Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Sikora, Marek

    2014-07-01

    Locating the gamma-ray emission sites in blazar jets is a long standing and highly controversial issue. We jointly investigate several constraints on the distance scale r and Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray emitting regions in luminous blazars (primarily flat spectrum radio quasars). Working in the framework of one-zone external radiation Comptonization models, we perform a parameter space study for several representative cases of actual gamma-ray flares in their multiwavelength context. We find a particularly useful combination of three constraints: from an upper limit on the collimation parameter Γθ <~ 1, from an upper limit on the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) luminosity L SSC <~ L X, and from an upper limit on the efficient cooling photon energy E cool, obs <~ 100 MeV. These three constraints are particularly strong for sources with low accretion disk luminosity L d. The commonly used intrinsic pair-production opacity constraint on Γ is usually much weaker than the SSC constraint. The SSC and cooling constraints provide a robust lower limit on the collimation parameter Γθ >~ 0.1-0.7. Typical values of r corresponding to moderate values of Γ ~ 20 are in the range 0.1-1 pc, and are determined primarily by the observed variability timescale t var, obs. Alternative scenarios motivated by the observed gamma-ray/millimeter connection, in which gamma-ray flares of t var, obs ~ a few days are located at r ~ 10 pc, are in conflict with both the SSC and cooling constraints. Moreover, we use a simple light travel time argument to point out that the gamma-ray/millimeter connection does not provide a significant constraint on the location of gamma-ray flares. We argue that spine-sheath models of the jet structure do not offer a plausible alternative to external radiation fields at large distances; however, an extended broad-line region is an idea worth exploring. We propose that the most definite additional constraint could be provided by determination of the

  16. The WEBT Campaign on the Blazar 3C 279 in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, M.; Basu, S.; Joshi, M.; Villata, M.; Arai, A.; Aryan, N.; Asfandiyarov, I. M.; Bach, U.; Bachev, R.; Berduygin, A.; Blaek, M.; Buemi, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Frasca, A.; Fuhrmann, L.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Henson, G.; Hovatta, T.; Hudec, R.; Ibrahimov, M.; Ishii, Y.; Ivanidze, R.; Jelínek, M.; Kamada, M.; Kapanadze, B.; Katsuura, M.; Kotaka, D.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kubánek, P.; Kurosaki, M.; Kurtanidze, O.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lanteri, L.; Larionov, V. M.; Larionova, L.; Lee, C.-U.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Marilli, E.; Marshall, K.; Miller, H. R.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Mirabal, N.; Mizoguchi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Nieppola, E.; Nikolashvili, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishiyama, S.; Ohlert, J.; Osterman, M. A.; Pak, S.; Pasanen, M.; Peters, C. S.; Pursimo, T.; Raiteri, C. M.; Robertson, J.; Robertson, T.; Ryle, W. T.; Sadakane, K.; Sadun, A.; Sigua, L.; Sohn, B.-W.; Strigachev, A.; Sumitomo, N.; Takalo, L. O.; Tamesue, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Tosti, G.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Vennes, S.; Vitek, S.; Volvach, A.; Webb, J.; Yamanaka, M.; Yim, H.-S.

    2007-12-01

    The quasar 3C 279 was the target of an extensive multiwavelength monitoring campaign from 2006 January through April. An optical-IR-radio monitoring campaign by the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) collaboration was organized around target-of-opportunity X-ray and soft γ-ray observations with Chandra and INTEGRAL in 2006 mid-January, with additional X-ray coverage by RXTE and Swift XRT. In this paper we focus on the results of the WEBT campaign. The source exhibited substantial variability of optical flux and spectral shape, with a characteristic timescale of a few days. The variability patterns throughout the optical BVRI bands were very closely correlated with each other, while there was no obvious correlation between the optical and radio variability. After the ToO trigger, the optical flux underwent a remarkably clean quasi-exponential decay by about 1 mag, with a decay timescale of τd~12.8 days. In intriguing contrast to other (in particular, BL Lac type) blazars, we find a lag of shorter wavelength behind longer wavelength variability throughout the RVB wavelength ranges, with a time delay increasing with increasing frequency. Spectral hardening during flares appears delayed with respect to a rising optical flux. This, in combination with the very steep IR-optical continuum spectral index of α0~1.5-2.0, may indicate a highly oblique magnetic field configuration near the base of the jet, leading to inefficient particle acceleration and a very steep electron injection spectrum. An alternative explanation through a slow (timescale of several days) acceleration mechanism would require an unusually low magnetic field of B<~0.2 G, about an order of magnitude lower than inferred from previous analyses of simultaneous SEDs of 3C 279 and other flat-spectrum radio quasars with similar properties. For questions regarding the availability of the data from the WEBT campaign presented in this paper, please contact the WEBT President Massimo Villata at villata@oato.inaf.it.

  17. Multiwaveband Variability of Blazars from Turbulent Plasma Passing through a Standing Shock: The Mother of Multi-zone Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2011-09-01

    Multi-wavelength light curves of bright gamma-ray blazars (e.g., 3C 454.3) are compared with the model proposed by Marscher and Jorstad. In this scenario, much of the optical and high-energy radiation in a blazar is emitted near the 43 GHz core of the jet as seen in VLBA images, parsecs from the central engine. The main physical features are a turbulent ambient jet plasma that passes through a standing recollimation shock in the jet. The model allows for short time-scales of optical and gamma-ray variability by restricting the highest-energy electrons radiating at these frequencies to a small fraction of the turbulent cells, perhaps those with a particular orientation of the magnetic field relative to the shock front. Because of this, the volume filling factor at high frequencies is relatively low, while that of the electrons radiating below about 10 THz is near unity. Such a model is consistent with the (1) red-noise power spectra of flux variations, (2) shorter time-scales of variability at higher frequencies, (3) frequency dependence of polarization and its variability, and (4) breaks in the synchrotron spectrum by more than the radiative loss value of 0.5. Simulated light curves are generated by a numerical code that (as of May 2011) includes synchrotron radiation as well as inverse Compton scattering of seed photons from both a dust torus and a Mach disk at the jet axis. The latter source of seed photons produces more pronounced variability in gamma-ray than in optical light curves, as is often observed. More features are expected to be added to the code by the time of the presentation. This research is supported in part by NASA through Fermi grants NNX08AV65G and NNX10AO59G, and by NSF grant AST-0907893.

  18. VERY HIGH ENERGY γ-RAYS FROM THE UNIVERSE’S MIDDLE AGE: DETECTION OF THE z = 0.940 BLAZAR PKS 1441+25 WITH MAGIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnen, M. L.; Biland, A.; Ansoldi, S.; Biasuzzi, B.; Antonelli, L. A.; Bonnoli, G.; Carosi, A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Almeida, U. Barres de; Borracci, F.; Barrio, J. A.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Blanch, O.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E. E-mail: miguelnievas@ucm.es E-mail: josefa.becerra@nasa.gov; Collaboration: MAGIC Collaboration; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; and others

    2015-12-20

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5σ using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability timescale is estimated to be 6.4 ± 1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad-line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. The observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used to probe the extragalactic background light at an unprecedented distance scale for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  19. Very high energy γ-rays from the universe's middle age: detection of the z = 0.940 blazar PKS 1441+25 with magic

    DOE PAGES

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; ...

    2015-12-15

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5σ using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability timescale ismore » estimated to be 6.4 ± 1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad-line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. In conclusion, the observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used to probe the extragalactic background light at an unprecedented distance scale for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.« less

  20. Very high energy γ-rays from the universe's middle age: detection of the z = 0.940 blazar PKS 1441+25 with magic

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Almeida, U. Barres de; Barrio, J. A.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Vela, P. Da; Dazzi, F.; Angelis, A. De; Lotto, B. De; Wilhelmi, E. de Oña; Mendez, C. Delgado; Pierro, F. Di; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Glawion, D. Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Muñoz, A. González; Guberman, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Barbera, A. La; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Rosillo, M. Nievas; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; González, J. Becerra; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; Palma, F. de; Desiante, R.; Venere, L. Di; Domínguez, A.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Jogler, T.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Nuss, E.; Ojha, R.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Raino, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sgro, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.; Wood, K. S.; Balokovic, M.; Berdyugin, A.; Carraminana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Chavushyan, V.; Ramazani, V. Fallah; Feige, M.; Haarto, S.; Haeusner, P.; Hovatta, T.; Kania, J.; Klamt, J.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lorey, C.; Pacciani, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Reinthal, R.; Tornikoski, M.; Wolfert, D.; Zottmann, N.

    2015-12-15

    The flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1441+25 at a redshift of z = 0.940 is detected between 40 and 250 GeV with a significance of 25.5σ using the MAGIC telescopes. Together with the gravitationally lensed blazar QSO B0218+357 (z = 0.944), PKS 1441+25 is the most distant very high energy (VHE) blazar detected to date. The observations were triggered by an outburst in 2015 April seen at GeV energies with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. Multi-wavelength observations suggest a subdivision of the high state into two distinct flux states. In the band covered by MAGIC, the variability timescale is estimated to be 6.4 ± 1.9 days. Modeling the broadband spectral energy distribution with an external Compton model, the location of the emitting region is understood as originating in the jet outside the broad-line region (BLR) during the period of high activity, while being partially within the BLR during the period of low (typical) activity. In conclusion, the observed VHE spectrum during the highest activity is used to probe the extragalactic background light at an unprecedented distance scale for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy.

  1. Frequency-dependent core shifts and parameter estimation in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Aditi

    2016-07-01

    We study the core shift effect in the parsec-scale jet of blazars using the 4.8-36.8 GHz radio light curves obtained from four decades of continuous monitoring. From a piecewise Gaussian fit to each flare, time lags between the observation frequencies and spectral indices (α) based on peak amplitudes (A) are determined. Index k is calculated and found to be ˜1, indicating equipartition between the magnetic field energy density and the particle energy density. A mean magnetic field strength at 1 pc (B1) and at the core (Bcore) are inferred which are found to be consistent with previous estimates. The measure of core position offset is also performed by averaging over all frequency pairs. Based on the statistical trend shown by the measured core radius as a function of frequency, we infer that the synchrotron opacity model may not be valid for all cases. A Fourier periodogram analysis yields power-law slopes in the range -1.6 to -3.5 describing the power spectral density shape and gives bend timescales. This result, and both positive and negative spectral indices, indicate that the flares originate from multiple shocks in a small region. Important objectives met in our study include: the demonstration of the computational efficiency and statistical basis of the piecewise Gaussian fit; consistency with previously reported results; evidence for the core shift dependence on observation frequency and its utility in jet diagnostics in the region close to the resolving limit of very long baseline interferometry observations.

  2. High-energy Neutrinos from Recent Blazar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Kheirandish, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The energy density of cosmic neutrinos measured by IceCube matches the one observed by Fermi in extragalactic photons that predominantly originate in blazars. This has inspired attempts to match Fermi sources with IceCube neutrinos. A spatial association combined with a coincidence in time with a flaring source may represent a smoking gun for the origin of the IceCube flux. In 2015 June, the Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an intense flare from blazar 3C 279 that exceeded the steady flux of the source by a factor of 40 for the duration of a day. We show that IceCube is likely to observe neutrinos, if indeed hadronic in origin, in data that are still blinded at this time. We also discuss other opportunities for coincident observations that include a recent flare from blazar 1ES 1959+650 that previously produced an intriguing coincidence with AMANDA observations.

  3. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  4. A spine-sheath model for strong-line blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Marek; Rutkowski, Mieszko; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a quasi-analytical model for the production of radiation in strong-line blazars, assuming a spine-sheath jet structure. The model allows us to study how the spine and sheath spectral components depend on parameters describing the geometrical and physical structure of `the blazar zone'. We show that typical broad-band spectra of strong-line blazars can be reproduced by assuming the magnetization parameter to be of order unity and reconnection to be the dominant dissipation mechanism. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spine-sheath model can explain why γ-ray variations are often observed to have much larger amplitudes than the corresponding optical variations. The model is also less demanding of jet power than one-zone models, and can reproduce the basic features of extreme γ-ray events.

  5. Roma-BZCAT: a multifrequency catalogue of blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, E.; Giommi, P.; Leto, C.; Marchegiani, P.; Maselli, A.; Perri, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sclavi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new catalogue of blazars based on multifrequency surveys and on an extensive review of the literature. Blazars are classified as BL Lacertae objects, as flat spectrum radio quasars or as blazars of uncertain/transitional type. Each object is identified by a root name, coded as BZB, BZQ and BZU for these three subclasses respectively, and by its coordinates. This catalogue is being built as a tool useful for the identification of the extragalactic sources that will be detected by present and future experiments for X and gamma-ray astronomy, like Swift, AGILE, Fermi-GLAST and Simbol-X. An electronic version is available from the ASI Science Data Center web site at http://www.asdc.asi.it/bzcat.

  6. Probing the scale of ALP interactions with Fermi blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Reesman, Rebecca; Walker, T.P. E-mail: walker.33@osu.edu

    2014-08-01

    Gamma-rays from cosmological sources contain information about gamma-ray interactions. Standard model and non-standard model photon interactions along the path between the source and the observer can lead to changes in the energy or state of the photons, which in turn alters the observed energy spectrum of the source. In general, these interactions are a function of photon energy as well as source distance. Here we show how existing high energy gamma-ray observations of blazars can be used to constrain the coupling of axion-like-particles (ALPs) to the photon. The same ALP-photon coupling that has been invoked to explain the observations of TeV blazars beyond their pair production horizon is shown to have a potential effect on the data set of Fermi blazars.

  7. X-Ray Intraday Variability of Five TeV Blazars with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ashwani; Gupta, Alok C.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2017-06-01

    We have examined 40 Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) light curves (LCs) of five TeV emitting high synchrotron peaked blazars: 1ES 0229+200, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, 1ES 1959+650, and PKS 2155-304. Four of the blazars showed intraday variability in the NuSTAR energy range of 3-79 keV. Using an autocorrelation function analysis we searched for intraday variability timescales in these LCs and found indications of several between 2.5 and 32.8 ks in eight LCs of Mrk 421, a timescale around 8.0 ks for one LC of Mrk 501, and timescales of 29.6 and 57.4 ks in two LCs of PKS 2155-304. The other two blazars’ LCs do not show any evidence for intraday variability timescales shorter than the lengths of those observations; however, the data were both sparser and noisier for them. We found positive correlations with zero lag between soft (3-10 keV) and hard (10-79 keV) bands for most of the LCs, indicating that their emissions originate from the same electron population. We examined spectral variability using a hardness ratio analysis and noticed a general “harder-when-brighter” behavior. The 22 LCs of Mrk 421 observed between 2012 July and 2013 April show that this source was in a quiescent state for an extended period of time and then underwent an unprecedented double-peaked outburst while monitored on a daily basis during 2013 April 10-16. We briefly discuss models capable of explaining these blazar emissions.

  8. An innovative blazar classification based on radio jet kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervet, O.; Boisson, C.; Sol, H.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Blazars are usually classified following their synchrotron peak frequency (νF(ν) scale) as high, intermediate, low frequency peaked BL Lacs (HBLs, IBLs, LBLs), and flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), or, according to their radio morphology at large scale, FR I or FR II. However, the diversity of blazars is such that these classes seem insufficient to chart the specific properties of each source. Aims: We propose to classify a wide sample of blazars following the kinematic features of their radio jets seen in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). Methods: For this purpose we use public data from the MOJAVE collaboration in which we select a sample of blazars with known redshift and sufficient monitoring to constrain apparent velocities. We selected 161 blazars from a sample of 200 sources. We identify three distinct classes of VLBI jets depending on radio knot kinematics: class I with quasi-stationary knots, class II with knots in relativistic motion from the radio core, and class I/II, intermediate, showing quasi-stationary knots at the jet base and relativistic motions downstream. Results: A notable result is the good overlap of this kinematic classification with the usual spectral classification; class I corresponds to HBLs, class II to FSRQs, and class I/II to IBLs/LBLs. We deepen this study by characterizing the physical parameters of jets from VLBI radio data. Hence we focus on the singular case of the class I/II by the study of the blazar BL Lac itself. Finally we show how the interpretation that radio knots are recollimation shocks is fully appropriate to describe the characteristics of these three classes.

  9. Fermi Spots a Record Flare from Blazar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Blazar 3C 279's historic gamma-ray flare can be seen in this image from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on NASA's Fermi satellite. Gamma rays with energies from 100 million to 100 billion electron volts (eV) are shown; for comparison, visible light has energies between 2 and 3 eV. The image spans 150 degrees, is shown in a stereographic projection, and represents an exposure from June 11 at 00:28 UT to June 17 at 08:17 UT. Read more: go.nasa.gov/1TqBAdJ Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. NIR flaring of the blazar PKS0048-097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, L.; Carramiñana, A.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Escobedo, G.; Mayya, Y. D.; Valdes, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We call attention on our recent NIR observations of the gamma ray source 1FGL J0050.6-0928, an intermediate redshift Blazar PKS0048-097 (z=0.634), also known as FBQS J0050-0929. The observations were carried out with the CANICA NIR camera on the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astrofísico Guillermo Haro, located in Cananea, Mexico. We found this blazar to be in outburst. It shows fluxes about 1.7 magnitudes brighter than our previous NIR photometry (JD2455450.944784, H = 14.427 ± 0.11).

  11. Initial Blazar Studies with the CELESTE Cherenkov Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münz, F.

    1999-08-01

    CELESTE began systematic blazar observations in March 1999 with a 40-heliostat array at the site of the solar array at Themis in the French Pyrenees. Data is recorded using 1 GHz Flash ADC's which allow faint Cherenkov pulses to be measured. The hybrid analog-logic trigger scheme provides good hadron rejection and high efficiency for low-energy showers. A trigger threshold below 50 GeV allows CELESTE to probe the region near the peak of the inverse compton spectrum observed in many blazars. In this first observation campaign we are concentrating on Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and 1ES 1426+428.

  12. Multiwavelength Study of Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Veeresh

    2010-08-01

    Seyfert galaxies are a subclass of active galaxies and are categorized as nearby, low luminosity, radio-quiet Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) hosted in spiral or lenticular galaxies. Demographically, Seyfert galaxies may account for ~ 10% of the entire population of active galaxies in the nearby universe. Seyfert galaxies are classified mainly into two subclasses named as `type 1' and `type 2' Seyferts, based on the presence and absence of broad permitted emission lines in their optical spectra, respectively. Detection of broad permitted emission lines in some Seyfert type 2s observed in the polarized light laid the foundation of the Seyfert unification scheme, which hypothesizes that Seyfert type 1s and type 2s belong to the same parent population and appear different solely due to the differing orientations of the obscuring material having a torus-like geometry around the AGN (Antonucci and Miller 1985; Antonucci 1993). The primary objective of this thesis work is to examine the validity and limitations of the orientation and obscuration based Seyfert unification scheme using multiwavelength (mainly X-ray and radio) observations. The key issue in testing the Seyfert unification scheme has been acquiring a well defined rigorously selected Seyfert sample. I have argued that the Seyfert samples based on flux limited surveys at optical, IR, UV and X-ray are likely to be biased against obscured and faint sources. In order to test the predictions of Seyfert unification scheme I use a sample based on properties (i.e., cosmological redshift, [OIII] emission line luminosity, absolute bulge magnitude, absolute stellar magnitude of the host galaxy and the Hubble stage of the host galaxy) that are independent to the orientation of the obscuring torus, host galaxy and the AGN axis. Furthermore, two Seyfert subtypes of our sample have matched distributions in the orientation-independent properties and this ensures the intrinsic similarity between two Seyfert subtypes within the

  13. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  14. Multiwavelength Challenges in the Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    The gamma-ray surveys of the sky by AGILE and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offer both opportunities and challenges for multiwavelength and multi-messenger studies. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, binary sources, flaring Active Galactic Nuclei, and Galactic transient sources are all phenomena that can best be studied with a wide variety of instruments simultaneously or contemporaneously. From the gamma-ray side, a principal challenge is the latency from the time of an astrophysical event to the recognition of this event in the data. Obtaining quick and complete multiwavelength coverage of gamma-ray sources of interest can be difficult both in terms of logistics and in terms of generating scientific interest.

  15. From the Blazar Sequence to the Blazar Envelope: Revisiting the Relativistic Jet Dichotomy in Radio-Loud AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanini; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the concept of a blazar sequence that relates the synchrotron peak frequency (Vpeak) in blazars with synchrotron peak luminosity (Lpeak, in vLv) using a large sample of radio-loud AGN. We present observational evidence that the blazar sequence is formed from two populations in the synchrotron Vpeak - Lpeak plane, each forming an upper edge to an envelope of progressively misaligned blazars, and connecting to an adjacent group of radio galaxies having jets viewed at much larger angles to the line of sight. When binned by jet kinetic power (Lkin; as measured through a scaling relationship with extended radio power), we find that radio core dominance decreases with decreasing synchrotron Lpeak, revealing that sources in the envelope are generally more misaligned. We find population-based evidence of velocity gradients in jets at low kinetic powers (approximately 10(exp 42) - 10(exp 44.5) erg s(exp -1)), corresponding to FR I radio galaxies and most BL Lacs. These low jet power 'weak jet' sources, thought to exhibit radiatively inefficient accretion, are distinguished from the population of non-decelerating, low synchrotron-peaking (LSP) blazars and FR II radio galaxies ('strong' jets) which are thought to exhibit radiatively efficient accretion. The two-population interpretation explains the apparent contradiction of the existence of highly core-dominated, low-power blazars at both low and high synchrotron peak frequencies, and further implies that most intermediate synchrotron peak (ISP) sources are not intermediate in intrinsic jet power between LSP and high synchrotron-peaking (HSP) sources, but are more misaligned versions of HSP sources with similar jet powers.

  16. Multiwavelength Astronomy Modules for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christie; Brazas, J.; Lane, S.; York, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Chicago Multiwavelength Astronomy modules are web-based lessons covering the history, science, tools, and impact of astronomy across the wavebands, from gamma ray to infrared. Each waveband includes four lessons addressing one aspect of its development. The lessons are narrated by a historical docent or practicing scientist who contributed to a scientific discovery or instrument design significant to astronomical progress. The process of building each lesson began with an interview conducted with the scientist, or the consultation of a memoir or oral history transcript for historical docents. The source was then excerpted to develop a lesson and supplemented by archival material from the University of Chicago Library and other archives; NASA media; and participant contributed photographs, light curves, and spectra. Practicing educators also participated in the lesson development and evaluation. In July 2013, the University of Chicago sponsored 9 teachers and 15 students to participate in a STEM education program designed to engage participants as co-learners as they used the Multiwavelength Astronomy lessons in conjunction with talks given by the participating scientists. Teachers also practiced implementation of the resources with students and designed authentic research activities that make use of NASA mission data, which were undertaken as mini-research projects by student teams during the course of the program. This poster will introduce the Multiwavelength Astronomy web modules; highlight educator experiences in their use with high school audiences; and analyze the module development process, framing the benefits to and contributions of each of the stakeholders including practicing astronomers in research and space centers, high school science educators, high school students, University libraries and archives, and the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The development of these resources, and the summer professional development workshops were

  17. Rapid optical variability of TeV blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal-Krishna; Goyal, Arti; Joshi, S.; Karthick, Chrisphin; Sagar, R.; Wiita, Paul J.; Anupama, G. C.; Sahu, D. K.

    2011-09-01

    In this first systematic attempt to characterize the intranight optical variability (INOV) of TeV-detected blazars, we have monitored a well-defined set of nine TeV blazars on total 26 nights during 2004-10. In this R- or V-band-monitoring programme only one blazar was monitored per night and the minimum duration was close to 4 h, the average being 5.3 h per night. Using the CCD for strictly simultaneous photometry of the blazar and nearby reference stars (N-star photometry), an INOV detection threshold of ˜1-2 per cent was achieved in the densely sampled differential light curves derived from our data. We have further expanded the sample by including another 13 TeV blazars, taking advantage of the availability in the literature of INOV data, including those published earlier in our programme. The selection criteria for this set of 13 blazars conform to the basic criteria we had adopted for the first set of nine blazars we have monitored presently. This enlarged, well-defined representative sample of 22 TeV blazars, monitored on a total of 116 nights (including 55 nights newly reported here), has enabled us to arrive at the first estimate of the INOV duty cycle (DC) of TeV-detected blazars. Applying the conservative, but commonly employed, C-test, the INOV DC is found to be 59 per cent, which decreases to 47 per cent if only INOV fractional amplitudes (ψ) above 3 per cent are considered. These observations also permit, for the first time, a comparison of the INOV characteristics of the two major subclasses of TeV-detected BL Lac objects, namely low-peaked BL Lac objects (LBLs) and high-peaked BL Lac objects (HBLs), for which we find the INOV DCs to be ˜63 and 38 per cent, respectively. This demonstrates that the previously recognized INOV differential between LBLs and HBLs persists even when only their TeV-detected subsets are considered. Despite dense sampling, the intranight light curves of the 22 TeV blazars have not revealed even a single feature on time

  18. Science with the ASTRI mini-array for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: blazars and fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnoli, Giacomo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Andrea; Bigongiari, Ciro; Di Pierro, Federico; Stamerra, Antonio; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium

    2016-05-01

    ASTRI (“Astronomia a Specchi con Tecnologia Replicante Italiana”) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research (MIUR), devoted to the realization, operation and scientific validation of an end-to-end prototype for the Small Size Telescope (SST) envisaged to become part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype is characterized by a dual mirror, Schwarzschild-Couder optical design and a compact camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. It will be sensitive to multi-TeV very high energy (VHE) gamma rays up to 100 TeV, with a PSF ~ 6’ and a wide (9.6°) unaberrated optical field of view. Right after validation of the design in single-dish observations at the Serra La Nave site (Sicily, Italy) during 2015, the ASTRI collaboration will be able to start deployment, at the final CTA southern site, of the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to constitute the very first CTA precursor. Counting 9 ASTRI SST-2M telescopes, the ASTRI mini-array will overtake current IACT systems in differential sensitivity above 5 TeV, thus allowing unprecedented observations of known and predicted bright TeV emitters in this band, including some extragalactic sources such as extreme high-peaked BL Lacs with hard spectra. We exploited the ASTRI scientific simulator ASTRIsim in order to understand the feasibility of observations tackling blazar and cosmic ray physics, including discrimination of hadronic and leptonic scenarios for the VHE emission from BL Lac relativistic jets and indirect measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field and of the extragalactic background light. We selected favorable targets, outlining observation modes, exposure times, multi-wavelength coverage needed and the results expected. Moreover, the perspectives for observation of effects due to the existence of axion-like particles or to Lorentz invariance violations have been investigated.

  19. Long-term optical variability properties of blazars in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Lisheng; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-10-01

    The temporal and spectral variabilities of 31 blazars are investigated using the multi-epoch photometric data released in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. The performed chi-square tests indicate that all the objects show significant brightness variabilities in the Stripe 82 observational period. Two analysis methods, Spearman correlation analysis and linear regression taking into account measurement errors in both the dependent and independent variable, are combined to probe the spectral variability characteristics. As a result, 21 out of 31 blazars exhibit a significant bluer-when-brighter (BWB) trend, which is at least partly attributed to the effect of larger variability amplitude at higher frequencies. Our analysis shows that the BWB trend generally exists for the optical emission of BL Lacs on long time scales. Meanwhile, there are two sources (SDSS J211817.39+001316.8, SDSS J231000.83-000516.2) showing the opposite behavior, i.e., redder-when-brighter (RWB) trend, which might be attributed to the contribution of thermal emission from the accretion disk. Moreover, it is tentatively found that BL Lacs tend to show larger-amplitude brightness variability but smaller-amplitude spectral index variability with respect to FSRQs, implying that there are different physical conditions in these two populations.

  20. Constraints on cosmic ray and PeV neutrino production in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B. Theodore; Li, Zhuo

    2017-03-01

    IceCube has detected a cumulative flux of PeV neutrinos, which origin is unknown. Blazars, active galactic nuclei with relativistic jets pointing to us, are long and widely expected to be one of the strong candidates of high energy neutrino sources. The neutrino production depends strongly on the cosmic ray power of blazar jets, which is largely unknown. The recent null results in stacking searches of neutrinos for several blazar samples by IceCube put upper limits on the neutrino fluxes from these blazars. Here we compute the cosmic ray power and PeV neutrino flux of Fermi-LAT blazars, and find that the upper limits for known blazar sources give stringent constraint on the cosmic ray loading factor of blazar jets (i.e., the ratio of the cosmic ray to bolometric radiation luminosity of blazar jets), ξcr lesssim (2–10)ζ‑1 (with ζ lesssim 1 the remained fraction of cosmic ray energy when propagate into the blazar broad line region) for flat cosmic ray spectrum, and that the cumulative PeV neutrino flux contributed by all-sky blazars is a fraction lesssim (10–50)% of the IceCube detected flux.

  1. MC2: Multiwavelength and Dynamical Analysis of the Merging Galaxy Cluster ZwCl 0008.8+5215: An Older and Less Massive Bullet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovich, Nathan; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Dawson, William A.; Jee, M. James; Wittman, David

    2017-04-01

    We present and analyze a rich data set including Subaru/SuprimeCam, HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3, Keck/DEIMOS, Chandra/ACIS-I, and JVLA/C and D array for the merging cluster of galaxies ZwCl 0008.8+5215. With a joint Subaru+HST weak gravitational lensing analysis, we identify two dominant subclusters and estimate the masses to be {M}200={5.7}-1.8+2.8× {10}14 {M}ȯ and {1.2}-0.6+1.4× {10}14 {M}ȯ . We estimate the projected separation between the two subclusters to be {924}-206+243 {kpc}. We perform a clustering analysis of spectroscopically confirmed cluster member galaxies and estimate the line-of-sight velocity difference between the two subclusters to be 92+/- 164 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We further motivate, discuss, and analyze the merger scenario through an analysis of the 42 ks of Chandra/ACIS-I and JVLA/C and D array polarization data. The X-ray surface brightness profile reveals a merging gas-core reminiscent of the Bullet Cluster. The global X-ray luminosity in the 0.5–7.0 keV band is 1.7+/- 0.1× {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and the global X-ray temperature is 4.90 ± 0.13 keV. The radio relics are polarized up to 40 % , and along with the masses, velocities, and positions of the two subclusters, we input these quantities into a Monte Carlo dynamical analysis and estimate the merger velocity at pericenter to be {1800}-300+400 {km} {{{s}}}-1. This is a lower-mass version of the Bullet Cluster and therefore may prove useful in testing alternative models of dark matter (DM). We do not find significant offsets between DM and galaxies, but the uncertainties are large with the current lensing data. Furthermore, in the east, the BCG is offset from other luminous cluster galaxies, which poses a puzzle for defining DM–galaxy offsets.

  2. The ALMA Frontier Fields Survey. II. Multiwavelength Photometric analysis of 1.1 mm continuum sources in Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403 and MACSJ1149.5+2223

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, N.; Bauer, F. E.; Troncoso-Iribarren, P.; Huang, X.; González-López, J.; Kim, S.; Anguita, T.; Aravena, M.; Barrientos, L. F.; Bouwens, R.; Bradley, L.; Brammer, G.; Carrasco, M.; Carvajal, R.; Coe, D.; Demarco, R.; Ellis, R. S.; Ford, H.; Francke, H.; Ibar, E.; Infante, L.; Kneissl, R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Messias, H.; Muñoz Arancibia, A.; Nagar, N.; Padilla, N.; Pelló, R.; Postman, M.; Quénard, D.; Romero-Cañizales, C.; Treister, E.; Villard, E.; Zheng, W.; Zitrin, A.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope surveys of the Frontier Fields provide extremely deep images around six massive, strong-lensing clusters of galaxies. The ALMA Frontier Fields survey aims to cover the same fields at 1.1 mm, with maps reaching (unlensed) sensitivities of <70 μJy, in order to explore the properties of background dusty star-forming galaxies. Aims: We report on the multi-wavelength photometric analysis of all 12 significantly detected (>5σ) sources in the first three Frontier Fields clusters observed by ALMA, based on data from Hubble and Spitzer, the Very Large Telescope and the Herschel Space Observatory. Methods: We measure the total photometry in all available bands and determine the photometric redshifts and the physical properties of the counterparts via SED-fitting. In particular, we carefully estimate the far-infrared (FIR) photometry using 1.1 mm priors to limit the misidentification of blended FIR counterparts, which strongly affect some flux estimates in previous FIR catalogs. Due to the extremely red nature of these objects, we used a large range of parameters (e.g. 0.0

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF THE INFRARED NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Massaro, F.; Ajello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Smith, Howard A.

    2011-10-20

    Blazars constitute the most interesting and enigmatic class of extragalactic {gamma}-ray sources dominated by non-thermal emission. In this Letter, we show how the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) infrared data make it possible to identify a distinct region of the [3.4]-[4.6]-[12] {mu}m color-color diagram where the sources dominated by the thermal radiation are separated from those dominated by non-thermal emission, in particular the blazar population. This infrared non-thermal region, which we indicate as the WISE blazar strip (WBS), will constitute a new powerful diagnostic tool when the full WISE survey data are released. The WBS can be used to extract new blazar candidates, to identify those of uncertain type and also to search for the counterparts of unidentified {gamma}-ray sources. We show one example of the value of the use of the WBS identifying the TeV source VER J0648+152, recently discovered by VERITAS.

  4. The intrinsic γ-ray emissions of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao; Fan, Jun-Hui; Xiao, Hu-Bing

    2017-07-01

    The beaming effect is important for understanding the observational properties of blazars. In this work, we collect 91 Fermi blazars with available radio Doppler factors. γ-ray Doppler factors are estimated and compared with radio Doppler factors for some sources. The intrinsic (de-beamed) γ-ray flux density ({f}γ {{in}}), intrinsic γ-ray luminosity ({L}γ {{in}}) and intrinsic synchrotron peak frequency ({v}{{p}}{{in}}) are calculated. Then we study the correlations between {f}γ {{in}} and redshift and find that they follow the theoretical relation: {log} f=-2.0 {log} z+{{const}}. When the subclasses are considered, we find that stationary jets are perhaps dominant in low synchrotron peaked blazars. Sixty-three Fermi blazars with both available short variability time scales ({{Δ }}T) and Doppler factors are also collected. We find that the intrinsic relationship between {L}γ {{in}} and {{Δ }}{T}{{in}} obeys the Elliot & Shapiro and Abramowicz & Nobili relations. Strong positive correlation between {f}γ {{in}} and {v}{{p}}{{in}} is found, suggesting that synchrotron emissions are highly correlated with γ-ray emissions.

  5. The core dominance parameter for gamma-ray loud blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Z. Y.; Fan, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Xie, H. J.; Gao, Y.; Lin, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we compiled 604 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 149 blazars are known to have γ-ray emissions. We compared the logR between the 149 Fermi-detected blazars (FDB) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDB), and found that the average values are < log R > = 1.12 +/- 0.88 for FDBs and < log R > = 0.05 +/- 0.94 for non-FDBs. A K-S test shows that the probability for the distributions of FDB and non-FDB to come from the same parent distribution is P = 2.38 × 10-7. We also investigated the correlation between the core-dominance parameters and the γ-ray emission variability index (VI) for 125 FDBs (45 BLs and 79 FSRQs), and found that there is a tendency for VI to increase with the core-dominance parameter for 79 FSRQs, but there is no such tendency for 46 BLs.

  6. Violent optical activity of the blazar OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V.; Mokrushina, A. A.; Grishina, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    We perform optical photometric and polarimetric monitoring of a sample of gamma-bright blazars using 0.7-m AZT-8 telescope (Crimean Astrophysical Observatory) and 0.4-m LX-200 telescope (St.Petersburg), as a part of WEBT/GASP project.

  7. High-redshift Fermi blazars observed by GROND and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Nardini, M.; Tagliaferri, Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Rau, A.; Foschini, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Ghirlanda, G.; Sbarrato, T.

    2013-01-01

    We observed five γ-ray-loud blazars at redshift greater than 2 with the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) on-board the Swift satellite, and the Gamma-Ray burst Optical Near-Infrared Detector (GROND) instrument. These observations were quasi-simultaneous, usually within a few hours. For four of these blazars, the near-IR to UV data show the presence of an accretion disc, and we could reliably estimate its accretion rate and black hole mass. One of them, PKS 1348+007, was found in an extraordinarily high IR-optical state, almost two orders of magnitude brighter than at the epoch of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations. For all the five quasars, the physical parameters of the jet-emitting zone, derived by applying a one-zone emission model, are similar to that found for the bulk of other γ-ray-loud quasars. With our observations, we have X-ray data for the full sample of blazars at z > 2 present in the Fermi 2-year (2LAC) catalogue. This allows us to have a rather complete view of the spectral energy distribution of all high-redshift Fermi blazars, and to draw some conclusions about their properties, and especially about the relation between the accretion rate and the jet power.

  8. VSOP Observations of the Blazar S5 2007+77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabányi, K. É.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Kraus, A.; Witzel, A.; Zensus, J. A.

    2009-08-01

    The blazar, S5 2007+77 shows intraday variability in cm wavelengths. Seven epochs of VSOP observations were carried out in 1998 and 1999 at 5 GHz to look for the origin of the variability with the highest achievable angular resolution at cm wavelengths. Here the results of four epochs are analysed, which revealed ˜ 10 % variations in polarized flux density.

  9. A Catalog of Candidate High-redshift Blazars for GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Tersi M.; /SLAC /San Francisco State U.

    2006-09-27

    High-redshift blazars are promising candidates for detection by the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST, expected to be launched in the Fall of 2007, is a high-energy gamma-ray observatory designed for making observations of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy band extending from 10 MeV to more than 200 GeV. It is estimated that GLAST will find several thousand blazars. The motivations for measuring the gamma-ray emission from distant blazars include the study of the high-energy emission processes occurring in these sources and an indirect measurement of the extragalactic background light. In anticipation of the launch of GLAST we have compiled a catalog of candidate high-redshift blazars. The criteria for sources chosen for the catalog were: high radio emission, high redshift, and a flat radio spectrum. A preliminary list of 307 radio sources brighter than 70mJy with a redshift z {ge} 2.5 was acquired using data from the NASA Extragalactic Database. Flux measurements of each source were obtained at two or more radio frequencies from surveys and catalogs to calculate their radio spectral indices {alpha}. The sources with a flat-radio spectrum ({alpha} {le} 0.5) were selected for the catalog, and the final catalog includes about 200 sources.

  10. Multi-wavelength observations of the flaring gamma-ray blazar 3C 66A in 2008 October

    DOE PAGES

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; ...

    2010-12-14

    We report that Tthe BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with anmore » external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.« less

  11. Multi-wavelength observations of the flaring gamma-ray blazar 3C 66A in 2008 October

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S. -H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F. -W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Senturk, G. Demet; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Gurwell, M. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Aller, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Chen, W. P.; Berduygin, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Bachev, R.; Beltrame, P.; Benítez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Dashti, J.; Calcidese, P.; Capezzali, D.; Carosati, D.; Da Rio, D.; Paola, A. Di; Diltz, C.; Dolci, M.; Dultzin, D.; Forné, E.; Gómez, J. L.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Halkola, A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Hovatta, T.; Hsiao, H. -Y.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Leto, P.; Ligustri, R.; Lindfors, E.; Lopez, J. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Mommert, M.; Mujica, R.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Palma, N.; Pasanen, M.; Roca-Sogorb, M.; Ros, J. A.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sadun, A. C.; Saino, J.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanää, A.; Sorcia, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Turchetti, R.; Umana, G.; Belloni, T.; Blake, C. H.; Bloom, J. S.; Angelakis, E.; Fumagalli, M.; Hauser, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Riquelme, D.; Sievers, A.; Starr, D. L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ungerechts, H.; Wagner, S.; Zensus, J. A.

    2010-12-14

    We report that Tthe BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with an external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.

  12. Multi-wavelength Observations of the Flaring Gamma-ray Blazar 3C 66A in 2008 October

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Costamante, L.; Cutini, S.; Davis, D. S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nestoras, I.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ripken, J.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Senturk, G. Demet; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Gurwell, M. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Aller, M. F.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Chen, W. P.; Berduygin, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bach, U.; Bachev, R.; Beltrame, P.; Benítez, E.; Buemi, C. S.; Dashti, J.; Calcidese, P.; Capezzali, D.; Carosati, D.; Da Rio, D.; Di Paola, A.; Diltz, C.; Dolci, M.; Dultzin, D.; Forné, E.; Gómez, J. L.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Halkola, A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Hovatta, T.; Hsiao, H.-Y.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Leto, P.; Ligustri, R.; Lindfors, E.; Lopez, J. M.; Marscher, A. P.; Mommert, M.; Mujica, R.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Palma, N.; Pasanen, M.; Roca-Sogorb, M.; Ros, J. A.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sadun, A. C.; Saino, J.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanää, A.; Sorcia, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Turchetti, R.; Umana, G.; Belloni, T.; Blake, C. H.; Bloom, J. S.; Angelakis, E.; Fumagalli, M.; Hauser, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Riquelme, D.; Sievers, A.; Starr, D. L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ungerechts, H.; Wagner, S.; Zensus, J. A.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; VERITAS Collaboration; GASP-WEBT Consortium

    2011-01-01

    The BL Lacertae object 3C 66A was detected in a flaring state by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and VERITAS in 2008 October. In addition to these gamma-ray observations, F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, PAIRITEL, MDM, ATOM, Swift, and Chandra provided radio to X-ray coverage. The available light curves show variability and, in particular, correlated flares are observed in the optical and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray band. The resulting spectral energy distribution can be well fitted using standard leptonic models with and without an external radiation field for inverse Compton scattering. It is found, however, that only the model with an external radiation field can accommodate the intra-night variability observed at optical wavelengths.

  13. Redshift measurement of Fermi blazars for the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pita, S.; Goldoni, P.; Boisson, C.; Cotter, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lindfors, E.; Williams, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are active galactic nuclei, and the most numerous High Energy (HE) and Very High Energy (VHE) γ-ray emitters. Their optical emission is often dominated by non-thermal, and, in the case of BL Lacs, featureless continuum radiation. This makes the determination of their redshift extremely difficult. Indeed, as of today only about 50% of γ-ray blazars have a measured spectroscopic redshift. The knowledge of redshift is fundamental because it allows the precise modeling of the VHE emission and also of its interaction with the extragalactic background light (EBL). The beginning of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) operations in the near future will allow the detection of several hundreds of new blazars. Using the Fermi catalogue of sources above 50 GeV (2FHL), we performed simulations which indicate that a significant fraction of the 2FHL blazars detectable by CTA will not have a measured redshift. As a matter of fact, the organization of observing campaigns to measure the redshift of these blazars has been recognized as a necessary support for the AGN Key Science Project of CTA. We are planning such an observing campaign. In order to optimize our chances of success, we will perform preliminary deep imaging observations aimed at detecting or setting upper limits to the host galaxy. We will then take spectra of the candidates with the brightest host galaxies. Taking advantage of the recent success of an X-shooter GTO observing campaign, these observations will be different with respect to previous ones due to the use of higher resolution spectrographs and of 8 meter class telescopes. We are starting to submit proposals for these observations. In this paper we briefly describe how candidates are selected and the corresponding observation program.

  14. Blazar flares powered by plasmoids in relativistic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, Maria; Giannios, Dimitrios; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Powerful flares from blazars with short (˜min) variability time-scales are challenging for current models of blazar emission. Here, we present a physically motivated ab initio model for blazar flares based on the results of recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of relativistic magnetic reconnection. PIC simulations demonstrate that quasi-spherical plasmoids filled with high-energy particles and magnetic fields are a self-consistent by-product of the reconnection process. By coupling our PIC-based results (i.e. plasmoid growth, acceleration profile, particle and magnetic content) with a kinetic equation for the evolution of the electron distribution function we demonstrate that relativistic reconnection in blazar jets can produce powerful flares whose temporal and spectral properties are consistent with the observations. In particular, our model predicts correlated synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton flares of duration of several hours-days powered by the largest and slowest moving plasmoids that form in the reconnection layer. Smaller and faster plasmoids produce flares of sub-hour duration with higher peak luminosities than those powered by the largest plasmoids. Yet, the observed fluence in both types of flares is similar. Multiple flares with a range of flux-doubling time-scales (minutes to several hours) observed over a longer period of flaring activity (days or longer) may be used as a probe of the reconnection layer's orientation and the jet's magnetization. Our model shows that blazar flares are naturally expected as a result of magnetic reconnection in a magnetically dominated jet.

  15. The power and production efficiency of blazar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pjanka, Patryk; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    2017-03-01

    We use published data on the power and production efficiency of jets in blazars with double radio lobes in order to compare results obtained using different methods. In order to eliminate selection effects, we use cross-matched sub-samples containing only luminous blazars. We compare the three main existing methods, namely those based on the emission of radio lobes, on spectral fitting, and on radio-core shift. We find that the average jet power obtained for identical samples with the radio-lobe method is ∼10 times lower than that from the spectral fitting. In turn, the power from spectral fitting is compatible with that from core-shift modelling for plausible parameters of the latter. We also consider a phenomenological estimator based on the γ-ray luminosity. We examine uncertainties of those methods and discuss two alternative hypotheses. In one, the blazar-fit and core-shift methods are assumed to be correct, and the lower power from radio lobes is caused by intermittency of accretion. Long periods of quiescence cause the energy in the radio lobes, accumulated over the lifetime of the blazar, to be much less than that estimated based on the present luminous state. In addition, the power calculated using the radio lobes can be underestimated for intrinsically compact jets, in which the radio-core flux can be over-subtracted. In our second hypothesis, the radio-lobe method is assumed to be correct, and the blazar-fit and core-shift powers are reduced due to the presence of ∼15 pairs per proton and a larger magnetization than usually assumed, respectively.

  16. CLUSTERING OF γ-RAY-SELECTED 2LAC FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A.; Cappelluti, N.

    2014-12-20

    We present the first measurement of the projected correlation function of 485 γ-ray-selected blazars, divided into 175 BL Lacertae (BL Lacs) and 310 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) detected in the 2 year all-sky survey by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope. We find that Fermi BL Lacs and FSRQs reside in massive dark matter halos (DMHs) with log M{sub h} = 13.35{sub −0.14}{sup +0.20} and log M{sub h} = 13.40{sub −0.19}{sup +0.15} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}, respectively, at low (z ∼ 0.4) and high (z ∼ 1.2) redshift. In terms of clustering properties, these results suggest that BL Lacs and FSRQs are similar objects residing in the same dense environment typical of galaxy groups, despite their different spectral energy distributions, power, and accretion rates. We find no difference in the typical bias and hosting halo mass between Fermi blazars and radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), supporting the unification scheme simply equating radio-loud objects with misaligned blazar counterparts. This similarity in terms of the typical environment they preferentially live in, suggests that blazars tend to occupy the center of DMHs, as already pointed out for radio-loud AGNs. This implies, in light of several projects looking for the γ-ray emission from DM annihilation in galaxy clusters, a strong contamination from blazars to the expected signal from DM annihilation.

  17. Broad-Band Continuum and Line Emission of the gamma-Ray Blazar PKS 0537-441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, E.; Falomo, R.; Hartman, R. C.; Maraschi, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Tornikoski, M.; Treves, A.; Urry, C. M.; Ballo, L.; Mukherjee, R.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    PKS 0537-441, a bright gamma ray emitting blazar was observed at radio, optical, UV and X-ray frequencies during various EGRET paintings, often quasi-simultaneously. In 1995 the object was found in an intense emission state at all wavelengths. BeppoSAX observations made in 1998, non-simultaneously with exposures at other frequencies, allow us to characterize precisely the spectral shape of the high energy blazer component, which we attribute to inverse Compton scatter in The optical-to-gamma-ray spectral energy distributions at the different epochs show that the gamma-ray luminosity dominates the barometric output. This, together with the presence of optical and UV line emission, suggests that, besides the synchrotron self-Compton mechanism, the Compton upscattering of photons external to the jet (e.g., in the broad line region) may have a significant role for high energy radiation. The multiwavelength variability can be reproduced by changes of the plasma bulk Lorentz factor. The spectrum secured by ICE in 1995 appears to be partially absorbed shortward of approximately 1700 Angstroms. However, this signature is not detected in the HST spectrum taker during a lower state of the source. The presence of intervening absorbers is not supported by optical imaging and spectroscopy of the field.

  18. Cross-calibration of NuSTAR: A Multi-observatory Snapshot of Blazar 3C273

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Ballantyne, D. R.; Blandford, R. D.; Boggs, S. E.; Boydstun, K.; Brenneman, L.; Cappi, M.; Christensen, F.; Craig, W.; Elvis, M.; Fabian, A.; Fuerst, F.; Guainazzi, M.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F.; Madejski, G. M.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Nandra, K.; Reynolds, C. S.; Stern, D.; Walton, D.; Zhang, W.; NuSTAR Team

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is the first space-based observatory capable of focusing X-rays in the hard X-ray band between 3 and 79 keV. Following a successful launch in June 2012, NuSTAR performed a series of calibration observations, including an observation of the blazar 3C273. In this poster we present results of simultaneous observations of 3C273 by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku, Swift and INTEGRAL taken primarily for cross-calibration and demonstrate the unique capability of NuSTAR to extend high sensitivity observations above 10 keV. We further complement this rich X-ray data set with nearly simultaneous multi-wavelength data spanning the radio, infrared, optical and gamma-ray bands in order to constrain the low-state spectral energy distribution of 3C273. We discuss both early science from 3C273 as well as the NuSTAR cross-calibration targets and plans.

  19. Optical-microphysical properties of Saharan dust aerosols and composition relationship using a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, in situ sensors and modelling: a case study analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannis, A.; Mamouri, R. E.; Amiridis, V.; Remoundaki, E.; Tsaknakis, G.; Kokkalis, P.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Nenes, A.; Fountoukis, C.

    2012-05-01

    consistent with the retrieved refractive index values. Thus, the inferred chemical properties showed 12-40% of dust content, sulfate composition of 16-60%, and organic carbon content of 15-64%, indicating a possible mixing of dust with haze and smoke. PM10 concentrations levels, PM10 composition results and SEM-EDX (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive X-ray) analysis results on sizes and mineralogy of particles from samples during the Saharan dust transport event were used to evaluate the retrieval.

  20. Mrk 421 active state in 2008: the MAGIC view, simultaneous multi-wavelength observations and SSC model constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Alvarez, E. A.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Asensio, M.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Borla Tridon, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Cañellas, A.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido, D.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Häfner, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Huber, B.; Jogler, T.; Kellermann, H.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, A.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Pardo, S.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pilia, M.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vankov, H.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.

    2012-06-01

    Context. The blazar Markarian 421 is one of the brightest TeV gamma-ray sources of the northern sky. From December 2007 until June 2008 it was intensively observed in the very high energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) band by the single-dish Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov telescope (MAGIC-I). Aims: We aimed to measure the physical parameters of the emitting region of the blazar jet during active states. Methods: We performed a dense monitoring of the source in VHE with MAGIC-I, and also collected complementary data in soft X-rays and optical-UV bands; then, we modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) derived from simultaneous multi-wavelength data within the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) framework. Results: The source showed intense and prolonged γ-ray activity during the whole period, with integral fluxes (E > 200 GeV) seldom below the level of the Crab Nebula, and up to 3.6 times this value. Eight datasets of simultaneous optical-UV (KVA, Swift/UVOT), soft X-ray (Swift/XRT) and MAGIC-I VHE data were obtained during different outburst phases. The data constrain the physical parameters of the jet, once the spectral energy distributions obtained are interpreted within the framework of a single-zone SSC leptonic model. Conclusions: The main outcome of the study is that within the homogeneous model high Doppler factors (40 ≤ δ ≤ 80) are needed to reproduce the observed SED; but this model cannot explain the observed short time-scale variability, while it can be argued that inhomogeneous models could allow for less extreme Doppler factors, more intense magnetic fields and shorter electron cooling times compatible with hour or sub-hour scale variability.

  1. VARIABILITY OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM BLAZARS ON BLACK HOLE TIMESCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Vovk, Ie.; Neronov, A.

    2013-04-20

    We investigate the variability properties of blazars in the GeV band using data from the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) telescope. We find that blazars exhibit variability down to the minimum timescale resolvable by Fermi; this variability is a function of the peak photon count rate in the LAT. This implies that the real minimum variability timescales for the majority of blazars are typically shorter than those resolvable by the LAT. We find that for several blazars these minimum variability timescales reach those associated with the blazar central engine, the supermassive black hole. At the same time, none of the blazars exhibits variability on a timescale shorter than the black hole horizon light-crossing time and/or the period of rotation around the last stable circular orbit. Based on this fact, we argue that the timing properties of the {gamma}-ray signal could be determined by the processes in the direct vicinity of the supermassive black hole.

  2. Multiwavelength multistatic optical scattering for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.

    The main focus of this research is the development of a technique to remotely characterize aerosol properties, such as particle size distribution, concentration, and refractive index as a function of wavelength, through the analysis of optical scattering measurements. The proposed technique is an extension of the multistatic polarization ratio technique that has been developed by prior students at the Penn State Lidar Lab to include multiple wavelengths. This approach uses the ratio of polarized components of the scattering phase functions at multiple wavelengths across the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum to extract the microphysical and optical properties of aerosols. The scattering intensities at each wavelength are vertically separated across the face of the imager using a transmission diffraction grating, so that scattering intensities for multiple wavelengths at many angles are available for analysis in a single image. The ratio of the scattering phase function intensities collected using parallel and perpendicular polarized light are formed for each wavelength and analysis of the ratio is used to determine the microphysical properties of the aerosols. One contribution of the present work is the development of an inversion technique based on a genetic algorithm that retrieves lognormal size distributions from scattering measurements by minimizing the squared error between measured polarization ratios and polarization ratios calculated using the Mie solution to Maxwell's equations. The opportunities and limitations of using the polarization ratio are explored, and a genetic algorithm is developed to retrieve single mode and trimodal lognormal size distributions from multiwavelength, angular scattering data. The algorithm is designed to evaluate particles in the diameter size range of 2 nm to 60 im, and uses 1,000 linear spaced diameters within this range to compute the modeled polarization ratio. The algorithm returns geometric mean radii and

  3. Spectral evolution of flaring blazars from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, C. M.; Perucho, M.; Mimica, P.; Ros, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. High-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of active galactic nuclei revealed traveling and stationary or quasi-stationary radio components in several blazar jets. The traveling radio components are, in general, interpreted as shock waves generated by pressure perturbations injected at the jet nozzle. The stationary features can be interpreted as recollimation shocks in nonpressure matched jets if they show a quasi-symmetric bump in the spectral index distribution. In some jets there may be interactions between the two kinds of shocks. These shock-shock interactions are observable with VLBI techniques and their signature should also be imprinted on the single-dish light curves. Aims: In this paper, we investigate the spectral evolution produced by the interaction between a recollimation shock with traveling shock waves to address the question of whether these interactions contribute to the observed flares and what their signature in both single-dish and VLBI observations looks like. Methods: We performed relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of overpressured and pressure-matched jets. To simulate the shock interaction we injected a perturbation at the jet nozzle once a steady state was reached. We computed the nonthermal emission, including adiabatic and synchotron losses, resulting from the simulation. Results: We show that the injection of perturbations in a jet can produce a bump in emission at GHz frequencies previous to the main flare, which is produced when the perturbation fills the jet in the observer's frame. The detailed analysis of our simulations and the nonthermal emission calculations show that interaction between a recollimation shock and traveling shock produce a typical and clear signature in both the single-dish light curves and in the VLBI observations: the flaring peaks are higher and delayed with respect to the evolution of a perturbation through a conical jet. This fact can allow us to detect such

  4. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF 3C 454.3. II. THE AGILE 2007 DECEMBER CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Donnarumma, I.; Pucella, G.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Tavani, M.; Chen, W. P.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Mori, Y.; Tosti, G.; Impiombato, D.; Takahashi, T.; Sato, R.

    2009-12-20

    We report on the second Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) multiwavelength campaign of the blazar 3C 454.3 during the first half of 2007 December. This campaign involved AGILE, Spitzer, Swift, Suzaku, the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) consortium, the Rapid Eye Mount (REM), and the Multicolor Imaging Telescopes for Survey and Monstrous Explosions (MITSuME) telescopes, offering a broadband coverage that allowed for a simultaneous sampling of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) emissions. The two-week AGILE monitoring was accompanied by radio to optical monitoring by WEBT and REM, and by sparse observations in mid-infrared and soft/hard X-ray energy bands performed by means of Target of Opportunity observations by Spitzer, Swift, and Suzaku, respectively. The source was detected with an average flux of approx250 x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 100 MeV, typical of its flaring states. The simultaneous optical and gamma-ray monitoring allowed us to study the time lag associated with the variability in the two energy bands, resulting in a possible approx

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fermi bright blazars (Fuhrmann+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, J. A.; Nestoras, I.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Ungerechts, H.; Sievers, A.; Pavlidou, V.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Pearson, T. J.

    2015-02-01

    The present study is focusing on the sources observed at radio bands by the F-GAMMA monitoring programme. With a total of about 90 AGN/blazars ever observed since 2007 January, these sources constitute a sample of well known, frequently active and bright blazars (δ>-30°) for detailed studies of the most prominent behaviour of the brightest γ-ray-loud blazars. (1 data file).

  6. The low-frequency radio emission in blazar PKS2155-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey-Pommier, M.; Sirothia, S.; Chadwick, P.; Martin, J.-M.; Colom, P.; van Driel, W.; Combes, F.; Kharb, P.; Crespeau, P.-J.; Richard, J.; Guiderdoni, B.

    2016-12-01

    We report radio imaging and monitoring observations in the frequency range 0.235 - 2.7 GHz during the flaring mode of PKS 2155-304, one of the brightest BL Lac objects. The high sensitivity GMRT observations not only reveal extended kpc-scale jet and FRI type lobe morphology in this erstwhile 'extended-core' blazar but also delineate the morphological details, thanks to its arcsec scale resolution. The radio light curve during the end phase of the outburst measured in 2008 shows high variability (8.5%) in the jet emission in the GHz range, compared to the lower core variability (3.2%) seen at the lowest frequencies. The excess of flux density with a very steep spectral index in the MHz range supports the presence of extra diffuse emission at low frequencies. The analysis of multi wavelength (radio/optical/gamma-ray) light curves at different radio frequencies confirms the variability of the core region and agrees with the scenario of high energy emission in gamma-rays due to inverse Compton emission from a collimated relativistic plasma jet followed by synchrotron emission in radio. Clearly, these results give an interesting insight of the jet emission mechanisms in blazars and highlight the importance of studying such objects with low frequency radio interferometers like LOFAR and the SKA and its precursor instruments.

  7. Evidence of Two-Component Optical Polarization in Blazar 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorcia, Marco; Benítez, Erika; Hiriart, David

    2013-12-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the optical polarimetric variability of the TeV-blazar 1 ES 1959+650 from 2007 October 18 to 2011 May 5. The source showed a maximum variation of 1.2 mag in R- band, and a maximum polarization degree of 12.2%. The blazar presented a preferential position angle of the optical polarization of ~ 153°, with variations of 10° - 50°, which is in agreement with the projected position angle of the parsec-scale jet found at 43 GHz. We infer the existence of the two optically thin synchrotron components that contribute to the polarized flux, consistent with the spine-sheath model. One of them is stable with a constant polarization degree of 4%. Assuming a stationary shock, we estimated some parameters associated with the physics of the relativistic jet: the Doppler factor of δD ˜ 23, the viewing angle of the jet of Φ ~ 2°.4, and the size of the emission region of rb ~ 5.6 × 1017 cm.

  8. AWAKENING OF THE HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZAR CGRaBS J0809+5341

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Ramya, S.; Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Sahayanathan, S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-04-20

    CGRaBS J0809+5341, a high-redshift blazar at z = 2.144, underwent a giant optical outburst on 2014 April 19 when it brightened by ∼5 mag and reached an unfiltered apparent magnitude of 15.7 mag. This implies an absolute magnitude of −30.5 mag, making it one of the brightest quasars in the universe. This optical flaring triggered us to carry out observations during the decaying part of the flare covering a wide energy range using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Swift, and ground-based optical facilities. For the first time, the source is detected in γ-rays by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A high optical polarization of ∼10% is also observed. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, the accretion disk luminosity and black hole mass are estimated as 1.5 × 10{sup 45} erg s{sup −1} and 10{sup 8.4} M{sub ⊙}, respectively. Using a single zone leptonic emission model, we reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source during the flaring activity. This analysis suggests that the emission region is probably located outside the broad-line region, and the jet becomes radiatively efficient. We also show that the overall properties of CGRaBS J0809+5341 seem to not be in agreement with the general properties observed in high-redshift blazars up to now.

  9. Awakening of The High-Redshift Blazar CGRaBS J0809+5341

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Parker, M. L.; Stalin, C. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Ramya, S.; Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Sahayanathan, S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-04-01

    CGRaBS J0809+5341, a high-redshift blazar at z = 2.144, underwent a giant optical outburst on 2014 April 19 when it brightened by ˜5 mag and reached an unfiltered apparent magnitude of 15.7 mag. This implies an absolute magnitude of -30.5 mag, making it one of the brightest quasars in the universe. This optical flaring triggered us to carry out observations during the decaying part of the flare covering a wide energy range using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, Swift, and ground-based optical facilities. For the first time, the source is detected in γ-rays by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. A high optical polarization of ˜10% is also observed. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, the accretion disk luminosity and black hole mass are estimated as 1.5 × 1045 erg s-1 and 108.4 M⊙, respectively. Using a single zone leptonic emission model, we reproduce the spectral energy distribution of the source during the flaring activity. This analysis suggests that the emission region is probably located outside the broad-line region, and the jet becomes radiatively efficient. We also show that the overall properties of CGRaBS J0809+5341 seem to not be in agreement with the general properties observed in high-redshift blazars up to now.

  10. Gamma-ray flares in blazars accompanied by synchrotron polarization angle swings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Boettcher, Markus; Chen, Xuhui

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of time- and energy-dependent synchrotron polarization signatures in a shock-in-jet model for gamma-ray blazars. Our calculations employ a full 3D radiation transfer code, considering synchrotron emission from a helical magnetic field, and taking into account all light-travel-time and other relevant geometric effects, while the relevant synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton effects are handled with a 2D Monte-Carlo/Fokker-Planck code. We find that a scenario in which a relativistic shock propagating through the jet leads to a compression of the magnetic field, increasing the toroidal field component, can lead to correlated synchrotron + SSC flaring, associated with substantial variability in the synchrotron polarization percentage and position angle (PA). Most importantly, this scenario naturally explains large PA rotations by ≥180 deg, as observed in connection with gamma-ray flares in several blazars, without the need for bent or helical jet trajectories or other non-axisymmetric jet features.

  11. Rules of Emissivity Sample Choice in Multi-wavelength Pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Sun, B.; Sun, X.; Xie, J.; Yu, C.

    2017-03-01

    Since the theory for emissivity sample (example) is not clear, there exists unavoidable blindness in the sample choice for the true temperature determination (create emissivity samples using an assumption to calculate the true temperature according to brightness temperature and wavelength) in multi-wavelength pyrometry, resulting in considerable computational complexity and slow computing speed. In this article, the rules of the emissivity sample were first discovered through the theoretical analysis of the relationship between brightness temperature and emissivity, which provide a theoretical basis for the emissivity sample choice. Furthermore, the rules can reduce the sample size (amount) and improve the calculation speed. The effectiveness of the proposed rules was verified by measuring the true temperature of a solid rocket engine plume, in which the rules were applied to effectively select emissivity samples. The experimental results demonstrate that the computing speed of the true temperature determination can be improved by 5.73% to 48.64%.

  12. Multiwavelength ultrashort pulse generator using a diverging time-lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiangyu; Huo, Li; Wang, Dong; Chen, Xin; Lou, Caiyun

    2015-12-01

    A self-starting optoelectronic oscillator that employs a diverging time lens and a Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) in a fiber-extended cavity to generate a multiwavelength ultrashort pulse train is demonstrated. The switching window formed by the MZM is narrowed by the use of a diverging time lens, which is a phase modulator in our study. A wavelength assignment scheme is deployed to simultaneously suppress the pedestals of pulses on different wavelengths. A detailed analysis is given, and the results are presented by experiment. We have generated 25 GHz optical pulses simultaneously on four wavelengths as a proof-of-concept demonstration. The pulse width of the optical pulse, the phase noise, and the timing jitter performance of the generated microwave signal are experimentally measured.

  13. Multiwavelength electronic speckle pattern interferometry for surface shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Eduardo A.; Lino, Antonio C. L.

    2007-05-01

    Profilometry by electronic speckle pattern interferometry with multimode diode lasers is both theoretically and experimentally studied. The multiwavelength character of the laser emission provides speckled images covered with interference fringes corresponding to the surface relief in single-exposure processes. For fringe pattern evaluation, variations of the phase-stepping technique are investigated for phase mapping as a function of the number of laser modes. Expressions for two, three, and four modes in four and eight stepping are presented, and the performances of those techniques are compared in the experiments through the surface shaping of a flat bar. The surface analysis of a peach points out the possibility of applying the technique in the quality control of food production and agricultural research.

  14. Multiwavelength optical storage of diarylethene PMMA films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haobo; Zhang, Fushi; Sun, Fan; Pu, Shouzhi; Zhou, Xinhong

    2003-04-01

    Current applied optical storage technologies are all based on the heat effect of the recording laser, i.e., heat-mode optical storage. In the present work, photon-mode optical storage using photochromic diarylethene materials was investigated. Two diarylethene molecules dispersed into PMMA together was used as storage material. The recording layer was spin-coated on a glass substrate with Al reflective layer. Two laser beams of 532 nm and 650 nm were used in recording and readout by simultaneously writing and reading, and the reading lasers detected signals with high S/N ratio. Multi-wavelength storage was realized with the diarylethene PMMA film.

  15. WEBT multiwavelength monitoring and XMM-Newton observations of BL Lacertae in 2007-2008. Unveiling different emission components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Capetti, A.; Aller, M. F.; Bach, U.; Calcidese, P.; Gurwell, M. A.; Larionov, V. M.; Ohlert, J.; Nilsson, K.; Strigachev, A.; Agudo, I.; Aller, H. D.; Bachev, R.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Böttcher, M.; Buemi, C. S.; Buttiglione, S.; Carosati, D.; Charlot, P.; Chen, W. P.; Dultzin, D.; Forné, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Gómez, J. L.; Gupta, A. C.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Hsiao, W.-S.; Jelínek, M.; Jorstad, S. G.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Kostov, A.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lanteri, L.; Larionova, L. V.; Leto, P.; Latev, G.; Le Campion, J.-F.; Lee, C.-U.; Ligustri, R.; Lindfors, E.; Marscher, A. P.; Mihov, B.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nikolov, Y.; Ovcharov, E.; Principe, D.; Pursimo, T.; Ragozzine, B.; Robb, R. M.; Ros, J. A.; Sadun, A. C.; Sagar, R.; Semkov, E.; Sigua, L. A.; Smart, R. L.; Sorcia, M.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Uckert, K.; Umana, G.; Valcheva, A.; Volvach, A.

    2009-11-01

    Context: BL Lacertae is the prototype of the blazar subclass named after it. Yet, it has occasionally shown a peculiar behaviour that has questioned a simple interpretation of its broad-band emission in terms of synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) radiation. Aims: In the 2007-2008 observing season we carried out a new multiwavelength campaign of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) on BL Lacertae, involving three pointings by the XMM-Newton satellite in July and December 2007, and January 2008, to study its emission properties, particularly in the optical-X-ray energy range. Methods: The source was monitored in the optical-to-radio bands by 37 telescopes. The brightness level was relatively low. Some episodes of very fast variability were detected in the optical bands. Flux changes had larger amplitude at the higher radio frequencies than at longer wavelengths. Results: The X-ray spectra acquired by the EPIC instrument onboard XMM-Newton are well fitted by a power law with photon index Γ ˜ 2 and photoelectric absorption exceeding the Galactic value. However, when taking into account the presence of a molecular cloud on the line of sight, the EPIC data are best fitted by a double power law, implying a concave X-ray spectrum. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) built with simultaneous radio-to-X-ray data at the epochs of the XMM-Newton observations suggest that the peak of the synchrotron emission lies in the near-IR band, and show a prominent UV excess, besides a slight soft-X-ray excess. A comparison with the SEDs corresponding to previous observations with X-ray satellites shows that the X-ray spectrum is very variable, since it can change from extremely steep to extremely hard, and can be more or less curved in intermediate states. We ascribe the UV excess to thermal emission from the accretion disc, and the other broad-band spectral features to the presence of two synchrotron components, with their related SSC emission. We fit the thermal

  16. Blazar Jets Push Closer to Cosmic Speed Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have discovered jets of plasma blasted from the cores of distant galaxies at speeds within one-tenth of one percent of the speed of light, placing these plasma jets among the fastest objects yet seen in the Universe. "This tells us that the physical processes at the cores of these galaxies, called blazars, are extremely energetic and are capable of propelling matter very close to the absolute cosmic speed limit," said Glenn Piner of Whittier College in Whittier, California. Piner, who worked on the project with student Dipesh Bhattari, also of Whittier College, Philip Edwards of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Dayton Jones of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, California. According to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, no object with mass can be accelerated to the speed of light. To get even close to the speed of light requires enormous amounts of energy. "For example, to accelerate a bowling ball to the speed newly measured in these blazars would require all the energy produced in the world for an entire week," Piner said, "and the blobs of plasma in these jets are at least as massive as a large planet". Blazars are active galactic nuclei -- energetic regions surrounding massive black holes at the centers of galaxies. Material being drawn into the black hole forms a spinning disk called an accretion disk. Powerful jets of charged particles are ejected at high speeds along the poles of accretion disks. When these jets happen to be aimed nearly toward the Earth, the objects are called blazars. Taking advantage of the extremely sharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide VLBA, the scientists tracked individual features in the jets of three blazars at distances from Earth ranging from 7.3 to 9 billion light-years. A Boston University team led by Svetlana Jorstad earlier had identified

  17. Polarization-independent all-fiber multiwavelength-switchable filter based on a polarization-diversity loop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Wook; Han, Kyung Jun; Lee, Byoungho; Jung, Jaehoon

    2003-12-01

    In this paper a polarization-independent all-fiber multiwavelength-switchable filter based on a polarization-diversity loop configuration is newly proposed. The proposed apparatus consists of a polarization beam splitter, high birefringence fibers, and polarization controllers. Our theoretical analysis shows that the apparatus exhibits unique feature which allows it to operate as a polarization-independent multiwavelength periodic filter with a good channel isolation and to make its channel wavelength switchable by varying effective birefringence of the polarization-diversity loop through the proper adjustment of the polarization controllers contained within the loop. Theoretical prediction was experimentally verified.

  18. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Observation of Mkn 501 in a Low State in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Baixeras, C.; Balestra, S.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Becker, J. K.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Britvitch, I.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Costado, M. T.; Covino, S.; Curtef, V.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; de los Reyes, R.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Dominguez, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Firpo, R.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Goebel, F.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Jogler, T.; Kranich, D.; La Barbera, A.; Laille, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Meyer, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moles, M.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Ninkovic, J.; Otte, N.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Robert, A.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sidro, N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamerra, A.; Stark, L. S.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tluczykont, M.; Torres, D. F.; Turini, N.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Wittek, W.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Zapatero, J.; MAGIC Collaboration; Sato, R.; Ushio, M.; Kataoka, J.; Madejski, G.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-11-01

    We present results of the multiwavelength campaign on the TeV blazar Mkn 501 performed in 2006 July, including MAGIC for the very-high-energy (VHE) γ-ray band and Suzaku for the X-ray band. A VHE γ-ray signal was clearly detected with an average flux above 200 GeV of ~20% of the Crab Nebula flux, which indicates a low state of source activity in this energy range. No significant variability has been found during the campaign. The VHE γ-ray spectrum can be described by a simple power law from 80 GeV to 2 TeV with a photon index of 2.8 ± 0.1, which corresponds to one of the steepest photon indices observed in this energy range so far for this object. The X-ray spectrum covers a wide range from 0.6 to 40 keV, and is well described by a broken power law, with photon indices of 2.257 ± 0.004 and 2.420 ± 0.012 below and above the break energy of 3.24+0.13 -0.12 keV. No apparent high-energy cut-off is seen above the break energy. Although an increase of the flux of about 50% is observed in the X-ray band within the observation, the data indicate a consistently low state of activity for this source. Time-resolved spectra show an evidence for spectral hardening with a flux level. A homogeneous one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model can adequately describe the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the X-ray to the VHE γ-ray bands with a magnetic field intensity B = 0.313 G and a Doppler beaming factor δ = 20, which are similar to the values in the past multiwavelength campaigns in high states. Based on our SSC parameters derived for the low state, we are able to reproduce the SED of the high state by just changing the Lorentz factor of the electrons corresponding to the break energy in the primary electron spectrum. This suggests that the variation of the injected electron population in the jet is responsible for the observed low-high state variation of the SED.

  19. A BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO FLARE IN MRK 231

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Cormac; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Punsly, Brian; O'Dea, Christopher P. E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com

    2013-10-20

    Radio monitoring of the broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) Mrk 231 from 13.9 GHz to 17.6 GHz detected a strong flat spectrum flare. Even though BALQSOs are typically weak radio sources, the 17.6 GHz flux density doubled in ≈150 days, from ≈135 mJy to ≈270 mJy. It is demonstrated that the elapsed rise time in the quasar rest frame and the relative magnitude of the flare is typical of some of the stronger flares in blazars that are usually associated with the ejection of discrete components on parsec scales. The decay of a similar flare was found in a previous monitoring campaign at 22 GHz. We conclude that these flares are not rare. The implication is that Mrk 231 seems to be a quasar in which the physical mechanism that produces the broad absorption line wind is in tension with the emergence of a fledgling blazar.

  20. The broadband spectral energy distributions of SDSS blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huai-Zhen; Chen, Luo-En; Jiang, Yun-Guo; Yi, Ting-Feng

    2015-07-01

    We compiled the radio, optical and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broadband spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. On the other hand, the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to the fact that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme is also revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  1. GTC Optical Spectroscopy of TeV Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiano, Simona; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Landoni, M.; Scarpa, R.; Righi, C.

    2016-10-01

    We carried out an extensive spectroscopic campaign of blazars of unknown or uncertain redshift which are either detected in the TeV band by Cherenkov telescopes or good candidate as TeV emitters. We used the OSIRIS spectrograph at the Gran Telescopio of Canarias (GTC) at La Palma to secure high signal-to-noise ratio spectra at intermediate resolution in the range 3800-10000 Ang. These observations allow us to confirm the blazar classification, to find new redshift and/or to set stringent lower limits. The results are discussed in the context of emission modeling of TeV sources and are of importance for the characterization of the Extragalactic Background Light.

  2. Quasi-periodicities at Year-like Timescales in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Covino, S.; Dotti, M.; Treves, A.

    2016-03-01

    We searched for quasi-periodicities on year-like timescales in the light curves of six blazars in the optical—near-infrared bands and we made a comparison with the high energy emission. We obtained optical/NIR light curves from Rapid Eye Mounting photometry plus archival Small & Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System data and we accessed the Fermi light curves for the γ-ray data. The periodograms often show strong peaks in the optical and γ-ray bands, which in some cases may be inter-related. The significance of the revealed peaks is then discussed, taking into account that the noise is frequency dependent. Quasi-periodicities on a year-like timescale appear to occur often in blazars. No straightforward model describing these possible periodicities is yet available, but some plausible interpretations for the physical mechanisms causing periodic variabilities of these sources are examined.

  3. Frequency Stratification of the Nonthermal Emission in Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2001-01-01

    Research supported by this grant involved theoretical investigations of the multifrequency nonthermal emission from the relativistic jets in blazars, which are quasars and related objects with highly variable brightness. In the initial stage of the project, one-dimensional, conical (i.e., spherical symmetry between the jet axis and surface is assumed) jet models were used to explain the multi-waveband spectra and variability of blazars. The results were applied to two flares observed in the object PKS 2155-304, leading to the conclusion that the distinct differences in the observed characteristics of the two flares can be explained with the same jet model if two different physical parameters (the magnetic field in the first flare and the efficiency of acceleration of electrons to high energies in the second) varied.

  4. Egret detection of the blazar PKS 0420-014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radecke, H.-D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    During its full-sky survey, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) high-energy instrument aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected gamma-ray emission in the energy range above 30 MeV from a source identified as the blazar PKS 0420-014. This object was observed during two separate viewing periods in 1992 February/March and May/June. An intensity decrease above 100 MeV of a factor of at least 1.5 from a maximum of (5.0 +/- 1.4) x 10(exp -7) photons 1 sq cm/s was observed during that time interval indicating extensive variability. The photon spectrum in the range between 30 and 10,000 MeV at the time of the maximum intensity is well represented by a power law with an exponent of -1.9 +/- 0.3. Some similarities with other EGRET detected blazars are briefly discussed.

  5. Egret detection of the blazar PKS 0420-014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radecke, H.-D.; Bertsch, D. L.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lin, Y. C.; Mattox, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    During its full-sky survey, the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) high-energy instrument aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected gamma-ray emission in the energy range above 30 MeV from a source identified as the blazar PKS 0420-014. This object was observed during two separate viewing periods in 1992 February/March and May/June. An intensity decrease above 100 MeV of a factor of at least 1.5 from a maximum of (5.0 +/- 1.4) x 10(exp -7) photons 1 sq cm/s was observed during that time interval indicating extensive variability. The photon spectrum in the range between 30 and 10,000 MeV at the time of the maximum intensity is well represented by a power law with an exponent of -1.9 +/- 0.3. Some similarities with other EGRET detected blazars are briefly discussed.

  6. QUASI-PERIODICITIES AT YEAR-LIKE TIMESCALES IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Covino, S.; Dotti, M.

    2016-03-15

    We searched for quasi-periodicities on year-like timescales in the light curves of six blazars in the optical—near-infrared bands and we made a comparison with the high energy emission. We obtained optical/NIR light curves from Rapid Eye Mounting photometry plus archival Small and Moderate Aperture Research Telescope System data and we accessed the Fermi light curves for the γ-ray data. The periodograms often show strong peaks in the optical and γ-ray bands, which in some cases may be inter-related. The significance of the revealed peaks is then discussed, taking into account that the noise is frequency dependent. Quasi-periodicities on a year-like timescale appear to occur often in blazars. No straightforward model describing these possible periodicities is yet available, but some plausible interpretations for the physical mechanisms causing periodic variabilities of these sources are examined.

  7. Seed Photon Fields of Blazars in the Internal Shock Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M.; Marscher, A. P.; Böttcher, M.

    2014-04-01

    We extend our approach of modeling spectral energy distribution (SED) and light curves of blazars to include external Compton (EC) emission due to inverse Compton scattering of an external anisotropic target radiation field. We describe the time-dependent impact of such seed photon fields on the evolution of multifrequency emission and spectral variability of blazars using a multi-zone time-dependent leptonic jet model, with radiation feedback, in the internal shock model scenario. We calculate accurate EC-scattered high-energy (HE) spectra produced by relativistic electrons throughout the Thomson and Klein-Nishina regimes. We explore the effects of varying the contribution of (1) a thermal Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk, (2) a spherically symmetric shell of broad-line clouds, the broad-line region (BLR), and (3) a hot infrared emitting dusty torus (DT), on the resultant seed photon fields. We let the system evolve to beyond the BLR and within the DT and study the manifestation of the varying target photon fields on the simulated SED and light curves of a typical blazar. The calculations of broadband spectra include effects of γ-γ absorption as γ-rays propagate through the photon pool present inside the jet due to synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, but neglect γ-γ absorption by the BLR and DT photon fields outside the jet. Thus, our account of γ-γ absorption is a lower limit to this effect. Here, we focus on studying the impact of parameters relevant for EC processes on HE emission of blazars.

  8. Seed photon fields of blazars in the internal shock scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, M.; Marscher, A. P.; Böttcher, M.

    2014-04-20

    We extend our approach of modeling spectral energy distribution (SED) and light curves of blazars to include external Compton (EC) emission due to inverse Compton scattering of an external anisotropic target radiation field. We describe the time-dependent impact of such seed photon fields on the evolution of multifrequency emission and spectral variability of blazars using a multi-zone time-dependent leptonic jet model, with radiation feedback, in the internal shock model scenario. We calculate accurate EC-scattered high-energy (HE) spectra produced by relativistic electrons throughout the Thomson and Klein-Nishina regimes. We explore the effects of varying the contribution of (1) a thermal Shakura-Sunyaev accretion disk, (2) a spherically symmetric shell of broad-line clouds, the broad-line region (BLR), and (3) a hot infrared emitting dusty torus (DT), on the resultant seed photon fields. We let the system evolve to beyond the BLR and within the DT and study the manifestation of the varying target photon fields on the simulated SED and light curves of a typical blazar. The calculations of broadband spectra include effects of γ-γ absorption as γ-rays propagate through the photon pool present inside the jet due to synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, but neglect γ-γ absorption by the BLR and DT photon fields outside the jet. Thus, our account of γ-γ absorption is a lower limit to this effect. Here, we focus on studying the impact of parameters relevant for EC processes on HE emission of blazars.

  9. RELAXATION OF BLAZAR-INDUCED PAIR BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Elyiv, Andrii

    2013-06-10

    The stability properties of a low-density ultrarelativistic pair beam produced in the intergalactic medium (IGM) by multi-TeV gamma-ray photons from blazars are analyzed. The problem is relevant for probes of magnetic field in cosmic voids through gamma-ray observations. In addition, dissipation of such beams could considerably affect the thermal history of the IGM and structure formation. We use a Monte Carlo method to quantify the properties of the blazar-induced electromagnetic shower, in particular the bulk Lorentz factor and the angular spread of the pair beam generated by the shower, as a function of distance from the blazar itself. We then use linear and nonlinear kinetic theory to study the stability of the pair beam against the growth of electrostatic plasma waves, employing the Monte Carlo results for our quantitative estimates. We find that the fastest growing mode, like any perturbation mode with even a very modest component perpendicular to the beam direction, cannot be described in the reactive regime. Due to the effect of nonlinear Landau damping, which suppresses the growth of plasma oscillations, the beam relaxation timescale is found to be significantly longer than the inverse Compton loss time. Finally, density inhomogeneities associated with cosmic structure induce loss of resonance between the beam particles and plasma oscillations, strongly inhibiting their growth. We conclude that relativistic pair beams produced by blazars in the IGM are stable on timescales that are long compared with the electromagnetic cascades. There appears to be little or no effect of pair beams on the IGM.

  10. Extended Optical Flaring of the Blazar 3C 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, C. S.; Miller, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The blazar, 3C 279, was previously reported to be undergoing a major optical outburst (ATEL#10121 and ATEL#10161). We report optical observations of 3C 279 on March 19 when it was observed with the 24-inch telescope at Georgia State University's Hard Labor Creek Observatory with R=13.46+/-0.01 mag. These observations indicate that 3C 279 continues to be in an extremely bright state.

  11. Searching for the first blazars with LMT and GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Linan, Gustavo M.; Carraminana, Alberto

    2007-07-12

    Massive star formation and black hole growth are prone to be linked in massive protogalaxies. This relation has been studied at low redshifts, pointing to active galactic nuclei growing within dust enshrouded high redshift galaxies, a prime target of the Large Millimeter Telescope. The coincidence of GLAST sources with highly-obscured high-redshift LMT/GTM galaxies can be a powerful tool for studying the formation of the first blazars.

  12. On the lensed blazar B0218+357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Scarpa, R.; Paiano, S.; Landoni, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present an optical spectrum (λλ4000-10 500) of the lensed blazar B0218+357 secured at the 10 m GTC and aimed to investigate and clarify the properties of this intriguing system. We found that the emission line spectrum of the blazar is characterized by only one broad emission line that interpreted as Mg ii 2800 Å yields z = 0.95. In addition, we detect narrow absorption lines of Mg ii 2800 Å and Ca ii (H,K) and Na i 5892 Å at z = 0.68437 ± 0.00005 due to intervening interstellar gas. No stellar absorption features attributable to the lens galaxy are revealed. Thus, the assumed redshift of the lens is dubious. The continuum spectrum of the object exhibits a remarkable drop towards the short wavelengths likely due to a significant extinction. This extinction cannot be produced in the lens galaxy at z = 0.684 with any value of RV under the assumption that the intrinsic shape of the blazar is dominated by a power-law emission. However, the observed continuum is consistent with a power-law emission assuming a standard (RV = 3.1) extinction at the source redshift (z = 0.95) as supported also by the presence of Mg ii absorptions at the same redshift. HST images of B0218+357 exhibit the double image of the source together with extended image of a face on spiral galaxy. We argue that this galaxy is possibly not the lensing galaxy but the host galaxy of the blazar. This has substantial consequences on the models of the system and on the derived values of the Hubble constant.

  13. Correlation Investigation of Radio and Optical Variations in a Large Sample of Fermi Blazars

    NA