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Sample records for mungbeans

  1. Genomic resources in mungbean for future breeding programs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue K.; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Lee, Jayern; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Among the legume family, mungbean (Vigna radiata) has become one of the important crops in Asia, showing a steady increase in global production. It provides a good source of protein and contains most notably folate and iron. Beyond the nutritional value of mungbean, certain features make it a well-suited model organism among legume plants because of its small genome size, short life-cycle, self-pollinating, and close genetic relationship to other legumes. In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean. The recent release of a reference genome of the cultivated mungbean (V. radiata var. radiata VC1973A) and an additional de novo sequencing of a wild relative mungbean (V. radiata var. sublobata) has provided a framework for mungbean genetic and genome research, that can further be used for genome-wide association and functional studies to identify genes related to specific agronomic traits. Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean. This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement. PMID:26322067

  2. Evaluation of mungbean genotypes based on yield stability and reaction to mungbean yellow mosaic virus disease.

    PubMed

    Alam, Akm Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-09-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition.

  3. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  4. Biofortification of mungbean (Vigna radiata) as a whole food to enhance human health.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ramakrishnan M; Yang, Ray-Yu; Easdown, Warwick J; Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Hughes, Jacqueline d'A; Keatinge, J D H Dyno

    2013-06-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata) is one of the most important pulse crops grown in South, East and Southeast Asia. It provides significant amounts of protein (240 g kg(-1)) and carbohydrate (630 g kg(-1)) and a range of micronutrients in diets. Mungbean protein and carbohydrate are easily digestible and create less flatulence than proteins derived from other legumes. In addition, mungbean is lower in phytic acid (72% of total phosphorus content) than pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp.), soybean (Glycine max L.) and cereals; phytic acid is commonly found in cereal and legume crops and has a negative impact on iron and zinc bioavailability in plant-based diets. Owing to its palatable taste and nutritional quality, mungbean has been used as an iron-rich whole food source for baby food. The wide genetic variability of mineral concentrations (e.g. 0.03-0.06 g Fe kg(-1), 0.02-0.04 g Zn kg(-1)) in mungbean indicates possibilities to improve its micronutrient content through biofortification. Therefore biofortification of existing mungbean varieties has great potential for enhancing the nutritional quality of diets in South and Southeast Asia, where protein and micronutrient malnutrition are among the highest in the world. This review paper discusses the importance of mungbean in agricultural production and traditional diets and the potential of enhancing the nutritional quality of mungbean through breeding and other means, including agronomic practices.

  5. Nutritional composition of mungbean and soybean sprouts compared to their adult growth stage.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Andreas W; Chang, Ching-Huan; Yan, Miao-Rong; Yang, Ray-Yu

    2017-12-15

    This study determined the level of phytonutrients in mungbean and soybean sprouts compared to mature mungbean grain and vegetable soybean. The comparison included landraces and improved mungbean and soybean varieties to assess the effect of breeding on the phytonutrient content of both crops. Sprouting mungbean enhanced vitamin C content 2.7-fold compared to mature mungbean grain. Relatively old mungbean accessions were superior in protein, calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), carotenoid and vitamin C content compared to improved mungbean lines at the fully mature stage. With regard to nutritional value, the vegetable soybean stage was superior to soybean sprouts in terms of content of protein (14% increase), Zn (45%), Ca (72%), and Fe (151%). Isoflavones, reported to have beneficial effects on human health, are found at high concentrations in soybean sprouts and could easily provide the recommended anticarcinogenic dose range from 1.5 to 2.0mg/kg of body weight per day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The specific host plant DNA detection suggests a potential migration of Apolygus lucorum from cotton to mungbean fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bao, Wei-Fang; Yang, Fan; Xu, Bin; Yang, Yi-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The polyphagous mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Heteroptera: Miridae) has more than 200 species of host plants and is an insect pest of important agricultural crops, including cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and mungbean (Vigna radiata). Previous field trials have shown that A. lucorum adults prefer mungbean to cotton plants, indicating the considerable potential of mungbean as a trap crop in cotton fields. However, direct evidence supporting the migration of A. lucorum adults from cotton to mungbean is lacking. We developed a DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach to reveal the movement of A. lucorum between neighboring mungbean and cotton fields. Two pairs of PCR primers specific to cotton or mungbean were designed to target the trnL-trnF region of chloroplast DNA. Significant differences in the detectability half-life (DS50) were observed between these two host plants, and the mean for cotton (8.26 h) was approximately two times longer than that of mungbean (4.38 h), requiring weighted mean calculations to compare the detectability of plant DNA in the guts of field-collected bugs. In field trials, cotton DNA was detected in the guts of the adult A. lucorum individuals collected in mungbean plots, and the cotton DNA detection rate decreased successively from 5 to 15 m away from the mungbean-cotton midline. In addition to the specific detection of cotton- and mungbean-fed bugs, both cotton and mungbean DNA were simultaneously detected within the guts of single individuals caught from mungbean fields. This study successfully established a tool for molecular gut-content analyses and clearly demonstrated the movement of A. lucorum adults from cotton to neighboring mungbean fields, providing new insights into understanding the feeding characteristics and landscape-level ecology of A. lucorum under natural conditions.

  7. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation profile in mungbean

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yang Jae; Bae, Ahra; Shim, Sangrea; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation on cytosine residues is known to affect gene expression and is potentially responsible for the phenotypic variations among different crop cultivars. Here, we present the whole-genome DNA methylation profiles and assess the potential effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for two mungbean cultivars, Sunhwanogdu (VC1973A) and Kyunggijaerae#5 (V2984). By measuring the DNA methylation levels in leaf tissue with the bisulfite sequencing (BSseq) approach, we show both the frequencies of the various types of DNA methylation and the distribution of weighted gene methylation levels. SNPs that cause nucleotide changes from/to CHH – where C is cytosine and H is any other nucleotide – were found to affect DNA methylation status in VC1973A and V2984. In order to better understand the correlation between gene expression and DNA methylation levels, we surveyed gene expression in leaf tissues of VC1973A and V2984 using RNAseq. Transcript expressions of paralogous genes were controlled by DNA methylation within the VC1973A genome. Moreover, genes that were differentially expressed between the two cultivars showed distinct DNA methylation patterns. Our mungbean genome-wide methylation profiles will be valuable resources for understanding the phenotypic variations between different cultivars, as well as for molecular breeding. PMID:28084412

  9. Effects of Lanthanum and Cerium on the Growth and Mineral Nutrition of Corn and Mungbean

    PubMed Central

    Diatloff, Eugene; Smith, Frank W.; Asher, Colin J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant growth responses to the rare earth elements lanthanum (La) and cerium (Ce) have been reported, but little is known about the effects of these two elements on plant mineral nutrition. Methods Corn (Zea mays ‘Hycorn 82’) and mungbean (Vigna radiata ‘Berken’) were grown in continuous flowing nutrient solutions containing 0, 0·2, 1·0 and 5·0 µm La or Ce. At harvest plants were divided into roots and shoots, dried, weighed and analysed for macro- and micronutrients, as well as for La and Ce. Key Results La and Ce did not increase the growth of corn or mungbean. The dry weight of corn shoots was decreased by 32 % in the presence of 5·0 µm Ce; the other La and Ce concentrations had no effect. La and Ce concentrations of 0·9 and 5·0 µm decreased the shoot dry weight of mungbean by 75 or 95 %, the two elements having closely similar effects. Decreases in the uptake of Ca, Na, Zn and Mn by corn were observed with increases in solution La and Ce. For mungbean, the uptake rates of all measured elements decreased with increases in solution La and Ce. The concentrations of La and Ce in the roots of both species were higher than in the shoots and increased strongly with increasing concentrations of La or Ce in solution. The La and Ce concentrations in mungbean shoots were always higher than in corn shoots. Conclusions La and Ce did not enhance the growth of corn or mungbean, but decreased the growth, root function and consequently the nutritional status of mungbean at concentrations >0·2 µm in solution. It is concluded that if La or Ce have positive effects on corn and mungbean growth, they can only occur at solution concentrations below 0·2 µm. PMID:18292604

  10. Rhizodeposition of nitrogen and carbon by mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and its contribution to intercropped oats (Avena nuda L.).

    PubMed

    Zang, Huadong; Yang, Xuechao; Feng, Xiaomin; Qian, Xin; Hu, Yuegao; Ren, Changzhong; Zeng, Zhaohai

    2015-01-01

    Compounds released by mungbean roots potentially represent an enormous source of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in mungbean-oat intercropping systems. In this study, an in situ experiment was conducted using a 15N - 13C double stem-feeding method to measure N and C derived from the rhizodeposition (NdfR and CdfR) of mungbean and their transfer to oats in an intercropping system. Mungbean plants were sole cropped (S) or intercropped (I) with oat. The plants were labeled 5 weeks after planting and were harvested at the beginning of pod setting (Ip and Sp) and at maturity (Im and Sm). More than 60% and 50% of the applied 15N and 13C, respectively, were recovered in each treatment, with 15N and 13C being quite uniformly distributed in the different plant parts. NdfR represented 9.8% (Sp), 9.2% (Ip), 20.1% (Sm), and 21.2% (Im) of total mungbean plant N, whereas CdfR represented 13.3% (Sp), 42.0% (Ip), 15.4% (Sm), and 22.6% (Im) of total mungbean plant C. When considering the part of rhizodeposition transferred to associated oat, intercropping mungbean released more NdfR and CdfR than mungbean alone. About 53.4-83.2% of below-ground plant N (BGP-N) and 58.4-85.9% of BGP-C originated from NdfR and CdfR, respectively. The N in oats derived from mungbean increased from 7.6% at the pod setting stage to 9.7% at maturity, whereas the C in oats increased from 16.2% to 22.0%, respectively. Only a small percentage of rhizodeposition from mungbean was transferred to oats in the intercropping systems, with a large percentage remaining in the soil. This result indicates that mungbean rhizodeposition might contribute to higher N and C availability in the soil for subsequent crops.

  11. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems—biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions. PMID:27446183

  12. Salinity and High Temperature Tolerance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] from a Physiological Perspective.

    PubMed

    HanumanthaRao, Bindumadhava; Nair, Ramakrishnan M; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic constraints seriously affect the productivity of agriculture worldwide. The broadly recognized benefits of legumes in cropping systems-biological nitrogen fixation, improving soil fertility and broadening cereal-based agro-ecologies, are desirable now more than ever. Legume production is affected by hostile environments, especially soil salinity and high temperatures (HTs). Among legumes, mungbean has acceptable intrinsic tolerance mechanisms, but many agro-physiological characteristics of the Vigna species remain to be explored. Mungbean has a distinct advantage of being short-duration and can grow in wide range of soils and environments (as mono or relay legume). This review focuses on salinity and HT stresses on mungbean grown as a fallow crop (mungbean-rice-wheat to replace fallow-rice-wheat) and/or a relay crop in cereal cropping systems. Salinity tolerance comprises multifaceted responses at the molecular, physiological and plant canopy levels. In HTs, adaptation of physiological and biochemical processes gradually may lead to improvement of heat tolerance in plants. At the field level, managing or manipulating cultural practices can mitigate adverse effects of salinity and HT. Greater understanding of physiological and biochemical mechanisms regulating these two stresses will contribute to an evolving profile of the genes, proteins, and metabolites responsible for mungbean survival. We focus on abiotic stresses in legumes in general and mungbean in particular, and highlight gaps that need to be bridged through future mungbean research. Recent findings largely from physiological and biochemical fronts are examined, along with a few agronomic and farm-based management strategies to mitigate stress under field conditions.

  13. Amelioration of arsenic toxicity by phosphate salts in mungbean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Swarnakar, Arpita; Mukherji, Subhendu

    2005-07-01

    Sodium arsenate (Na2HAsO4.7H2O) is a potent inhibitor of mungbean seed germination and seedling growth. Germination is totally stopped at or above 50 microM Na2HAsO4.7H2O. Inhibition of seedling elongation started at a lower concentration of 5 microM As(V) and was drastically reduced at 20 microM As(V). Nutrients like salts of macroelements viz., NaH2PO4.2H2O, KH2PO4, K2SO4, MgSO4.7H2O, CaCl2.2H2O, (NH4)2SO4 NH4NO3 solutions at a concentration of 10mM and microelements viz., ZnSO4, CuSO4.5H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, MnCl2.4H2O, CoCl2.6H2O, FeSO4.7H2O solutions at a concentration of 1mM could help to ameliorate the toxic effects of As(V) to different degrees. Amelioration of As(V) toxicity was possible only when the mungbean seeds were pretreated with the above mentioned nutrients for 24 hr and then transferred to sodium arsenate. Simultaneous treatment of nutrients with As(V) or using nutrient solutions following As(V) treatment were of no help to reverse the toxic effects of sodium arsenate.

  14. Detection of quantitative trait loci for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Kitsanachandee, Ratanakorn; Somta, Prakit; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; Akhtar, Khalid P.; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Bains, Tejinderjit S.; Sirari, Asmita; Kaur, Livinder; Srinives, Peerasak

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is one of the major diseases affecting mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek). In this study, we report the mapping of the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) resistance in mungbean. An F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) mapping population was generated in Thailand from a cross between NM10-12-1 (MYMIV resistance) and KPS2 (MYMIV susceptible). One hundred and twenty-two RILs and their parents were evaluated for MYMIV resistance in infested fields in India and Pakistan. A genetic linkage map was developed for the RIL population using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Composite interval mapping identified five QTLs for MYMIV resistance: three QTLs for India (qYMIV1, qYMIV2 and qYMIV3) and two QTLs for Pakistan (qYMIV4 and qYMIV5). qYMIV1, qYMIV2, qYMIV3, qYMIV4 and qYMIV5 explained 9.33%, 10.61%, 12.55%, 21.93% and 6.24% of variation in disease responses, respectively. qYMIV1 and qYMIV4 appeared to be the same locus and were common to a major QTL for MYMIV resistance in India identified previously using a different resistant mungbean. PMID:24399908

  15. The identification of starch phosphorylase in the developing mungbean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Chang, Jin-Yi; Lee, Ya-Ting; Wu, Yi-Hui

    2005-07-13

    Starch phosphorylase (SP) in immature mungbean (Vigna radiata L. cv KPS1) seed soluble extract was detected by in situ activity staining and identified by MALDI-TOF mass analysis. After in situ SP assay on native-PAGE, a major starch-enzyme complex was located on the gel zymogram in a dose-dependent manner. This complex depicted two major SP-activity related proteins, 105 kDa and 55 kDa, by SDS-PAGE. The mass and predicted sequence of the tryptic fragments of the isolated 105 kDa protein, analyzed by MALDI-TOF spectroscopy and bioinformatic analysis, confirmed it to be mungbean SP as a result of high similarity to the L-SP of known plant. Polyclonal antibodies raised from the 55 kDa recognized both the 105 kDa and the 55 kDa proteins on the Western blot and neutralized partial SP activity, indicating that the two proteins were immunologically related. The 55 kDa protein possess high similarity to the N-terminal half of the 105 kDa SP was further confirmed. The SP activity and the activity stained protein density in mungbean soluble extract decreased as the seed size increased during early seed growth. These data indicate that mungbean 105 kDa SP and SP activity-related 55 kDa were identified in the developing mungbean.

  16. Physicochemical properties of starches and proteins in alkali-treated mungbean and cassava starch granules.

    PubMed

    Israkarn, Kamolwan; Na Nakornpanom, Nantarat; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2014-05-25

    This study explored the influences of envelope integrity of cooked starch granules on physicochemical and thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches. Alkali treatment was used to selectively leach amylose from the amorphous region of both starches and partially fragmented starch molecules into lower-molecular-weight polymers. It was found that despite the loss of 40% of the original content of amylose, both mungbean and cassava starches retained similar crystallinities, gelatinization temperature ranges, and pasting profiles compared to the native starches. However, the loss of granule-bound starch synthases during alkali treatment and subsequent alkali cooking in excess water played significant roles in determining granular disintegration. The alterations in envelope integrity due to the negative charge repulsion among polymers within the envelope of swollen granules, and the fragmentation of starch molecules, were responsible for the alterations in thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches cooked under alkaline conditions.

  17. Characterization of microsatellites and gene contents from genome shotgun sequences of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mungbean is an important economical crop in Asia. However, genomic research has lagged behind other crop species due to the lack of polymorphic DNA markers found in this crop. The objective of this work is to develop and characterize microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from genome shotgun sequencing of mungbean. Result We have generated and characterized a total of 470,024 genome shotgun sequences covering 100.5 Mb of the mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) genome using 454 sequencing technology. We identified 1,493 SSR motifs that could be used as potential molecular markers. Among 192 tested primer pairs in 17 mungbean accessions, 60 loci revealed polymorphism with polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranging from 0.0555 to 0.6907 with an average of 0.2594. Majority of microsatellite markers were transferable in Vigna species, whereas transferability rates were only 22.90% and 24.43% in Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max, respectively. We also used 16 SSR loci to evaluate phylogenetic relationship of 35 genotypes of the Asian Vigna group. The genome survey sequences were further analyzed to search for gene content. The evidence suggested 1,542 gene fragments have been sequence tagged, that fell within intersected existing gene models and shared sequence homology with other proteins in the database. Furthermore, potential microRNAs that could regulate developmental stages and environmental responses were discovered from this dataset. Conclusion In this report, we provided evidence of generating remarkable levels of diverse microsatellite markers and gene content from high throughput genome shotgun sequencing of the mungbean genomic DNA. The markers could be used in germplasm analysis, accessing genetic diversity and linkage mapping of mungbean. PMID:19930676

  18. Promoters, transcripts, and regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic geminivirus.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-07-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing.

  19. Promoters, Transcripts, and Regulatory Proteins of Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Geminivirus†

    PubMed Central

    Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Geminiviruses package circular single-stranded DNA and replicate in the nucleus via a double-stranded intermediate. This intermediate also serves as a template for bidirectional transcription by polymerase II. Here, we map promoters and transcripts and characterize regulatory proteins of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV), a bipartite geminivirus in the genus Begomovirus. The following new features, which might also apply to other begomoviruses, were revealed in MYMV. The leftward and rightward promoters on DNA-B share the transcription activator AC2-responsive region, which does not overlap the common region that is nearly identical in the two DNA components. The transcription unit for BC1 (movement protein) includes a conserved, leader-based intron. Besides negative-feedback regulation of its own leftward promoter on DNA-A, the replication protein AC1, in cooperation with AC2, synergistically transactivates the rightward promoter, which drives a dicistronic transcription unit for the coat protein AV1. AC2 and the replication enhancer AC3 are expressed from one dicistronic transcript driven by a strong promoter mapped within the upstream AC1 gene. Early and constitutive expression of AC2 is consistent with its essential dual function as an activator of viral transcription and a suppressor of silencing. PMID:15956560

  20. The effects of bathophenanthroline, bathophenanthrolinesulphonate and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone on mung-bean mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Rich, P R; Moore, A L; Bonner, W D

    1977-01-15

    The effects of bathophenanthroline, bathophenanthrolinesulphonate and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone on mung-bean mitochondria and submitochondrial particles were investigated. A variety of inhibitory effects on the oxidations of NADH, succinate and malate were observed. The results are discussed in relation to sites of inhibition and their relation to the effects on mammalian mitochondria.

  1. Rhizodeposition of Nitrogen and Carbon by Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and Its Contribution to Intercropped Oats (Avena nuda L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Huadong; Yang, Xuechao; Feng, Xiaomin; Qian, Xin; Hu, Yuegao; Ren, Changzhong; Zeng, Zhaohai

    2015-01-01

    Compounds released by mungbean roots potentially represent an enormous source of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in mungbean-oat intercropping systems. In this study, an in situ experiment was conducted using a 15N - 13C double stem-feeding method to measure N and C derived from the rhizodeposition (NdfR and CdfR) of mungbean and their transfer to oats in an intercropping system. Mungbean plants were sole cropped (S) or intercropped (I) with oat. The plants were labeled 5 weeks after planting and were harvested at the beginning of pod setting (Ip and Sp) and at maturity (Im and Sm). More than 60% and 50% of the applied 15N and 13C, respectively, were recovered in each treatment, with 15N and 13C being quite uniformly distributed in the different plant parts. NdfR represented 9.8% (Sp), 9.2% (Ip), 20.1% (Sm), and 21.2% (Im) of total mungbean plant N, whereas CdfR represented 13.3% (Sp), 42.0% (Ip), 15.4% (Sm), and 22.6% (Im) of total mungbean plant C. When considering the part of rhizodeposition transferred to associated oat, intercropping mungbean released more NdfR and CdfR than mungbean alone. About 53.4–83.2% of below-ground plant N (BGP-N) and 58.4–85.9% of BGP-C originated from NdfR and CdfR, respectively. The N in oats derived from mungbean increased from 7.6% at the pod setting stage to 9.7% at maturity, whereas the C in oats increased from 16.2% to 22.0%, respectively. Only a small percentage of rhizodeposition from mungbean was transferred to oats in the intercropping systems, with a large percentage remaining in the soil. This result indicates that mungbean rhizodeposition might contribute to higher N and C availability in the soil for subsequent crops. PMID:25821975

  2. Cropping system diversification for food production in Mindanao rubber plantations: a rice cultivar mixture and rice intercropped with mungbean.

    PubMed

    Hondrade, Rosa Fe; Hondrade, Edwin; Zheng, Lianqing; Elazegui, Francisco; Duque, Jo-Anne Lynne Joy E; Mundt, Christopher C; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Garrett, Karen A

    2017-01-01

    Including food production in non-food systems, such as rubber plantations and biofuel or bioenergy crops, may contribute to household food security. We evaluated the potential for planting rice, mungbean, rice cultivar mixtures, and rice intercropped with mungbean in young rubber plantations in experiments in the Arakan Valley of Mindanao in the Philippines. Rice mixtures consisted of two- or three-row strips of cultivar Dinorado, a cultivar with higher value but lower yield, and high-yielding cultivar UPL Ri-5. Rice and mungbean intercropping treatments consisted of different combinations of two- or three-row strips of rice and mungbean. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the yield of each crop alone and in the mixture or intercropping treatments. We also evaluated a land equivalent ratio for yield, along with weed biomass (where Ageratum conyzoides was particularly abundant), the severity of disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae and Cochliobolus miyabeanus, and rice bug (Leptocorisa acuta) abundance. We analyzed the yield ranking of each cropping system across site-year combinations to determine mean relative performance and yield stability. When weighted by their relative economic value, UPL Ri-5 had the highest mean performance, but with decreasing performance in low-yielding environments. A rice and mungbean intercropping system had the second highest performance, tied with high-value Dinorado but without decreasing relative performance in low-yielding environments. Rice and mungbean intercropped with rubber have been adopted by farmers in the Arakan Valley.

  3. Infectivity analysis of a blackgram isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus and genetic assortment with MYMIV in selective hosts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Rouhibakhsh, A; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2011-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent is caused by two important virus species viz. Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. The genomic components of a begomovirus causing yellow mosaic disease in blackgram in southern India were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison of DNA A component shows the virus isolate to be a variant of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus:-(MYMV-[IN:Vam:05]). However, DNA B component of the present virus isolate has greater similarity (92%) to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus. Agroinoculations of the viral clones produced typical yellow mosaic symptoms in blackgram and mungbean, severe leaf curl and stunting in French bean, similar to blackgram isolate of MYMIV. Blackgram isolates of both the virus species were only mildly infectious on cowpea, produced atypical leaf curl symptoms and not yellow or golden mosaic. In agroinoculations done by exchanging genomic components, symptom expression was seen only in French bean. In cowpea, blackgram and mungbean there was no visible symptoms though viral DNA could be detected by PCR.

  4. Cropping system diversification for food production in Mindanao rubber plantations: a rice cultivar mixture and rice intercropped with mungbean

    PubMed Central

    Elazegui, Francisco; Duque, Jo-Anne Lynne Joy E.; Mundt, Christopher C.; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.

    2017-01-01

    Including food production in non-food systems, such as rubber plantations and biofuel or bioenergy crops, may contribute to household food security. We evaluated the potential for planting rice, mungbean, rice cultivar mixtures, and rice intercropped with mungbean in young rubber plantations in experiments in the Arakan Valley of Mindanao in the Philippines. Rice mixtures consisted of two- or three-row strips of cultivar Dinorado, a cultivar with higher value but lower yield, and high-yielding cultivar UPL Ri-5. Rice and mungbean intercropping treatments consisted of different combinations of two- or three-row strips of rice and mungbean. We used generalized linear mixed models to evaluate the yield of each crop alone and in the mixture or intercropping treatments. We also evaluated a land equivalent ratio for yield, along with weed biomass (where Ageratum conyzoides was particularly abundant), the severity of disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae and Cochliobolus miyabeanus, and rice bug (Leptocorisa acuta) abundance. We analyzed the yield ranking of each cropping system across site-year combinations to determine mean relative performance and yield stability. When weighted by their relative economic value, UPL Ri-5 had the highest mean performance, but with decreasing performance in low-yielding environments. A rice and mungbean intercropping system had the second highest performance, tied with high-value Dinorado but without decreasing relative performance in low-yielding environments. Rice and mungbean intercropped with rubber have been adopted by farmers in the Arakan Valley. PMID:28194318

  5. Mechanism of Resistance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata] to bruchids, Callosobruchus spp. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    War, Abdul R; Murugesan, Surya; Boddepalli, Venkata N; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Nair, Ramakrishnan M

    2017-01-01

    Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata] is an important pulse crop in Asia, and is consumed as dry seeds and as bean sprouts. It is an excellent source of digestible protein. Bruchids [Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) and Callosobruchus maculatus (F.)] are the important pests of mungbean and cause damage in the field and in storage. Bruchid infestation reduces the nutritional and market value of the grain and renders seeds unfit for human consumption, agricultural and commercial uses. These pests are controlled mainly by fumigation with highly toxic chemicals such as carbon disulfide, phosphene, and methyl bromide, or by dusting with several other insecticides, which leave residues on the grain, thus, threatening food safety. Some plant-based extracts have been found useful in controlling bruchids, but are not fully successful due to their short-term activity, rapid degradability, and potentially negative effect on seed germination. Although some wild sources of bruchid resistance in mungbean have been reported, which have been used to develop bruchid- resistant lines, undesirable genetic linkages threaten the proper exploitation of genetic diversity from wild germplasm into commercial cultivars. Further, biotype variation in bruchids has rendered some mungbean lines susceptible that otherwise would have been resistant to the pest. Host plant resistance is a cost-effective and a safe alternative to control bruchids in mungbean and is associated with morphological, biochemical, and molecular traits. These traits affect insect growth and development, thereby, reduce the yield losses by the pests. Understanding the defense mechanisms against insect pests could be utilized in exploiting these traits in crop breeding. This review discusses different traits in mungbean involved in defense against bruchids and their utility in pest management. We also highlight the breeding constraints for developing bruchid-resistant mungbean and how can these constraints be

  6. Mechanism of Resistance in Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata] to bruchids, Callosobruchus spp. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul R.; Murugesan, Surya; Boddepalli, Venkata N.; Srinivasan, Ramasamy; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.

    2017-01-01

    Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek var. radiata] is an important pulse crop in Asia, and is consumed as dry seeds and as bean sprouts. It is an excellent source of digestible protein. Bruchids [Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) and Callosobruchus maculatus (F.)] are the important pests of mungbean and cause damage in the field and in storage. Bruchid infestation reduces the nutritional and market value of the grain and renders seeds unfit for human consumption, agricultural and commercial uses. These pests are controlled mainly by fumigation with highly toxic chemicals such as carbon disulfide, phosphene, and methyl bromide, or by dusting with several other insecticides, which leave residues on the grain, thus, threatening food safety. Some plant-based extracts have been found useful in controlling bruchids, but are not fully successful due to their short-term activity, rapid degradability, and potentially negative effect on seed germination. Although some wild sources of bruchid resistance in mungbean have been reported, which have been used to develop bruchid- resistant lines, undesirable genetic linkages threaten the proper exploitation of genetic diversity from wild germplasm into commercial cultivars. Further, biotype variation in bruchids has rendered some mungbean lines susceptible that otherwise would have been resistant to the pest. Host plant resistance is a cost-effective and a safe alternative to control bruchids in mungbean and is associated with morphological, biochemical, and molecular traits. These traits affect insect growth and development, thereby, reduce the yield losses by the pests. Understanding the defense mechanisms against insect pests could be utilized in exploiting these traits in crop breeding. This review discusses different traits in mungbean involved in defense against bruchids and their utility in pest management. We also highlight the breeding constraints for developing bruchid-resistant mungbean and how can these constraints be

  7. Biochemical characterization of the alpha-amylase inhibitor in mungbeans and its application in inhibiting the growth of Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Wisessing, Anussorn; Engkagul, Arunee; Wongpiyasatid, Arunee; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee

    2010-02-24

    The insect Callosobruchus maculatus causes considerable damage to harvested mungbean seeds every year, which leads to commercial losses. However, recent studies have revealed that mungbean seeds contain alpha-amylase inhibitors that can inhibit the protein C. maculatus, preventing growth and development of the insect larvae in the seed, thus preventing further damage. For this reason, the use of alpha-amylase inhibitors to interfere with the pest's digestion process has become an interesting alternative biocontrolling agent. In this study, we have isolated and purified the alpha-amylase inhibitor from mungbean seeds (KPS1) using ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography and reversed phase HPLC. We found that the alpha-amylase inhibitor, isolated as a monomer, had a molecular weight of 27 kDa. The alpha-amylase inhibitor was purified 750-fold with a final yield of 0.4 mg of protein per 30 g of mungbean seeds. Its specific activity was determined at 14.5 U (mg of protein)(-1). Interestingly, we found that the isolated alpha-amylase inhibitor inhibits C. maculatus alpha-amylase but not human salivary alpha-amylase. After preincubation of the enzyme with the inhibitor, the mungbean alpha-amylase inhibitor inhibited C. maculatus alpha-amylase activity by decreasing V(max) while increasing the K(m) constant, indicating that the mungbean alpha-amylase is a mix noncompetitive inhibitor. The in vivo effect of alpha-amylase inhibitor on the mortality of C. maculatus shows that the alpha-amylase inhibitor acts on C. maculatus during the development stage, by reducing carbohydrate digestion necessary for growth and development, rather than during the end laying/hatching stage. Our results suggest that mungbean alpha-amylase inhibitor could be a useful future biocontrolling agent.

  8. Heterosis for the improvement of yield in mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek].

    PubMed

    Tantasawat, P A; Khajudparn, P; Prajongjai, T; Poolsawat, O

    2015-09-08

    Heterotic effects of mungbean hybrids from 25 crosses between parents differing in 9 agronomic and physiological traits were evaluated for various selected traits and seed yield. Significant heteroses were observed in most selected traits, except for the number of seeds per plant. When the heterosis of seed yield was evaluated in these hybrids, significant heterosis was found in 9 crosses, which were selected based on the number of pods per plant, number of clusters per plant, pod length, number of seeds per pod, total dry matter, and root length density. These crosses may be exploited for mungbean yield improvement. Nine F8 lines from 2 of these 9 crosses (KPS 1 x V 2106 and SUT 1 x V 4785), a selection based on significant heterosis for seed yield and high seed yield of F1 and F2, which possessed a higher seed yield than their respective certified variety parents, were identified and these may be useful in future breeding programs.

  9. Effect of mungbean (Vigna radiate) living mulch on density and dry weight of weeds in corn (Zea mays) field.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, M Bakhtiari; Vazan, S; Darvishi, B; Golzardi, F; Farahani, M Esfini

    2011-01-01

    Living mulch is a suitable solution for weeds ecological management and is considered as an effective method in decreasing of weeds density and dry weight. In order to evaluate of mungbean living mulch effect on density and dry weight of weeds in corn field, an experiment was conducted as a split plot based on randomized complete block design with four blocks in Research Field of Department of Agronomy, Karaj Branch, Islamic Azad University in 2010. Main plots were time of mungbean suppression with 2,4-D herbicide in four levels (4, 6, 8 and 10 leaves stages of corn) and control without weeding and sub plots were densities of mungbean in three levels (50%, 100% and 150% more than optimum density). Density and dry weight of the weeds were measured in all plots with a quadrate (60 x 100 cm) in 10 days after tasseling. Totally, 9 species of weeds were identified in the field, which included 4 broad leave species that were existed in all plots. The results showed that the best time for suppression of mungbean is the 8 leaves stage of corn, which decreased density and dry weight of weeds, 53% and 51% in comparison with control, respectively. Increase of density of mungbean from 50% into 150% more than optimum density, decrease the density and dry weight of weeds, 27.5% and 22%, respectively. It is concluded that the best time and density for suppression mungbean was 8 leaves stage of corn, and 150% more than optimum density, which decreased density and dry weight of the weeds 69% and 63.5% in comparison with control, respectively.

  10. Phylogenetic diversity and symbiotic functioning in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) bradyrhizobia from contrast agro-ecological regions of Nepal.

    PubMed

    Risal, Chandra Prasad; Djedidi, Salem; Dhakal, Dhruba; Ohkama-Ohtsu, Naoko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Tadashi

    2012-02-01

    Nepal consists wide range of climatic and topographical variations. Here, we explored the phylogeny of native mungbean bradyrhizobia isolated from different agro-ecological regions of Nepal and accessed their nodulation and nitrogen fixation characteristics. Soil samples were collected from three agro-ecological regions with contrasting climate and topography. A local mungbean cultivar, Kalyan, was used as a trap plant. We characterized isolates based on the full nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA, ITS region, and nodA genes; and partial sequences of nodD1 and nifD genes. We found 50% of isolates phylogenetically related to B. yuanmingense, 13% to B. japonicum, 8% to B. elkanii, and 29% to novel phylogenetic origin. Results of the inoculation test suggested that expression of different symbiotic genes in isolates resulted in different degrees of symbiotic functioning. Our results indicate B. yuanmingense and novel strains are more efficient symbiotic partners than B. elkanii for the local mungbean cv. Kalyan. We also found most mungbean rhizobial genotypes were conserved across agro-ecological regions. All the strains from tropical Terai region belonged to B. yuanmingense or a novel lineage of B. yuanmingense, and dominance of B. japonicum related strains was observed in the Hill region. Higher genetic diversity of Bradyrhizobium strains was observed in temperate and sub-tropical region than in the tropical region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptomic Profiling Reveals Metabolic and Regulatory Pathways in the Desiccation Tolerance of Mungbean (Vigna radiata [L.] R. Wilczek)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiangrong; Li, Sidi; Liu, Yisong; Liu, Xuanming

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiate L. Wilczek) is an important legume crop for its valuable nutritional and health benefits. Desiccation tolerance (DT) is a capacity of seeds to survive and maintain physiological activities during storage and under stress conditions. Many studies of DT have been reported in other legume crop, such as soybean and Medicago truncatula with little studies in the mungbean. In this study, the transcript profiles of mungbean seeds under different imbibition times were investigated for DT using RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). A total of 3210 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found at the key period of DT (3–18 h of imbibition). Gene ontology (GO) and KEGG analysis showed that the terms of “response to stimulus,” “transcription regulator,” “methylation,” and “starch and sucrose metabolism” were enriched for DT. Clustering analysis also showed that many transcription factors (MYB, AP2, and NAC), HSPs, embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and genes encoding methyltransferase and histone were differentially expressed. Nine of these DEGs were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Our study extends our knowledge of mungbean transcriptomes and further provides insight into the molecular mechanism of DT as well as new strategies for developing drought-tolerant crops. PMID:28066476

  12. Enhanced nicking activity of Rep in presence of pre-coat protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus.

    PubMed

    Rouhibakhsh, A; Choudhury, N R; Mukherjee, S K; Malathi, V G

    2012-04-01

    Yellow mosaic disease causes severe yield loss in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent and south east Asia. The disease is caused by two virus species, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV). They have genome organization typical of Old World begomoviruses, the unique feature being the presence of an open reading frame (ORF) AV2 upstream of coat protein gene. In order to elucidate its function, ORF AV2 of blackgram isolate, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Blackgram 3:1991] MYMIV-[IN:ND:Bg3:91] and cowpea isolate, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Cowpea7:1998] MYMIV-[IN:ND:Cp7:98], respectively, were over expressed in Escherichia coli in fusion with maltose binding protein (MBP). The recombinant protein did not show efficient binding to DNA. However, both MBP-BgAV2 and MBP-CpAV2 proteins modulated nicking and ATPase activity of replication initiation protein (Rep). Even low concentration, 20 ng of MBP-BgAV2 and MBP-CpAV2 could bring 20 folds increase in nicking activity of Rep. Similarly in the presence of AV2 protein, two to three fold increase in ATPase activity was observed. It is hypothesized that AV2 protein may play a role of accessory protein modulating Rep activities.

  13. Detection of proteins related to starch synthase activity in the developing mungbean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Ya-Ting; Chang, Jin-Yi

    2005-06-15

    Proteins associated with starch synthase (SS) activities were identified in immature mungbeans (Vigna radiata L. cv KPS1). Seed soluble extract was separated by native-PAGE and subjected to in situ activity staining. The gel zymogram located starch-enzyme complex bands. The soluble extract was also partitioned by preparative-IEF and screened for SS activity using radioactive assay. IEF fractions eluted within pH 4-6 revealed enriched SS activity of 145-fold. Parallel comparison of the protein profiles among the activity stained enzyme complex and the active isoelectric focused fractions on SDS-PAGE depicted three SS-activity-related proteins with molecular size of 32, 53, and 85 kDa. The 85 kDa protein, however, was identified to be methionine synthase by MALDI-TOF analysis and should be a protein physically associated with the active SS. Polyclonal antibodies raised from eluted native enzyme complex neutralized up to 90% activity and antigenically recognize the other 53 and 32 kDa proteins on Western blot. Antibodies raised from the two individual denatured proteins were able to neutralize SS activities near 60% separately, indicating that the 53 kDa and 32 proteins associated with SS activity are potentially involved in starch biosynthesis during mungbean seed development.

  14. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  15. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT downward arrow AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring > or =6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3'-->5' direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation ( approximately 24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  16. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT↓ AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring ≥6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3′→5′ direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation (∼24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV). PMID:17142233

  17. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  18. The host factor RAD51 is involved in mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Suyal, Geetika; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Choudhury, Nirupam R

    2013-09-01

    Geminiviruses replicate their single-stranded genomes with the help of only a few viral factors and various host cellular proteins primarily by rolling-circle replication (RCR) and/or recombination-dependent replication. AtRAD51 has been identified, using the phage display technique, as a host factor that potentially interacts with the Rep protein of mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), a member of the genus Begomovirus. In this study, we demonstrate the interaction between MYMIV Rep and a host factor, AtRAD51, using yeast two-hybrid and β-galactosidase assays, and this interaction was confirmed using a co-immunoprecipitation assay. The AtRAD51 protein complemented the rad51∆ mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an ex vivo yeast-based geminivirus DNA replication restoration assay. The semiquantitative RT-PCR and northern hybridization data revealed a higher level of expression of the Rad51 transcript in MYMIV-infected mungbean than in uninfected, healthy plants. Our findings provide evidence for a possible cross-talk between RAD51 and MYMIV Rep, which essentially controls viral DNA replication in plants, presumably in conjunction with other host factors. The present study demonstrates for the first time the involvement of a eukaryotic RAD51 protein in MYMIV replication, and this is expected to shed light on the machinery involved in begomovirus DNA replication.

  19. Physicochemical and flavor characteristics of flavoring agent from mungbean protein hydrolyzed by bromelain.

    PubMed

    Sonklin, Chanikan; Laohakunjit, Natta; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin

    2011-08-10

    Enzymatic bromelain mungbean meal protein hydrolysate (eb-MPH) was produced from mungbean meal protein isolate (MPI). Enzymatic bromelain, with a known protease activity of 98,652 (unit/g), was used at concentrations of 0, 2, 6, 10, 14 and 18% (w/w) and with hydrolysis times of 0.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. The pH and temperature were controlled at 6.0 and 50 °C, respectively. It was found that the best treatment combination for eb-MPH production by response surface methodology (RSM) was 18% bromelain and a hydrolysis time of 3 h, resulting in the greatest degree of hydrolysis (% DH) and percent yield, with values of 61.04 and 45.63%, respectively. Results also showed that the phenylalanine, tyrosine and leucine contents of the optimally produced eb-MPH were 20.88, 14.50 and 10.93%, respectively. Twelve volatile compounds were identified using gas chromatography mass spectrometry in eb-MPH; benzaldehyde, 2-pentylfuran and furfural were the predominant odorants.

  20. Nitrogen level and physiological basis of yield of mungbean at varying plant population in High Ganges River Flood Plain soil of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Mian, M A K; Hossain, J

    2014-07-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Regional Agricultural Research Station of Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Jessore during early kharif season of 2009 and 2010 to observe the effect of nitrogen on the physiological basis of yield of mungbean at varying plant population. In the experiment, four nitrogen levels (N0, N40, N60 and N80 kg ha(-1)) were assigned in the main plots and three plant population (P30, P35 and P40 m(-2)) in the sub plots. The results revealed that mungbean showed better growth in N60 and N80 kg ha(-1) representing higher values of CGR, TDM, LAI and plant height while N40 exhibited intermediate growth. Again, growth of mungbean was better in higher plant population (35-40 m(-2)) representing higher values of growth parameters. Seed yield of mungbean was obtained the highest (1908 kg ha(-1)) associated with the highest No. of pods plant(-1) (29.98), seeds pod(-1) (10.41) and 1000-seed weight (37.70 g) in N40 kg ha(-1). Further, seed yield of mungbean was the highest (1919 kg ha(-1)) in plant population of 40 m(-2). In interaction, seed yield was the highest (1963 kg ha(-1)) in N40 kg ha(-1) with plant population of 40 m(-2). The effect of applied nitrogen on the seed yield of mungbean can be explained 78% (R2 = 0.78) by this function (Y = 1540.70+16.069x-0.173x2). The optimum nitrogen level was 46 kg ha(-1) by using the developed functional model and then the predicted seed yield of mungbean would be 1944 kg ha(-1).

  1. Effects of Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Its Interaction With Aphids on the Seed Productions of Mungbean and Rapeseed Plants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duan; Zeng, Ling; Lu, Yongyue; Xu, Yijuan

    2014-10-01

    Although many reports suggested the economic importance of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, few attempts to test the hypothesis that the red imported fire ant-aphid mutualism enhances the occurrence of red imported fire ant on crops, thereby interfering with their flowering and fruiting and affecting their output. To address this problem, we compare the effects of red imported fire ant on the flowering and fruiting of self-pollinating and cross-pollinating crops by field investigations and indoor experiments. In the field, our results revealed that regardless of the aphid interaction, red imported fire ant preferred flowering mungbean plants, and their activities decreased the yields of single plants, total pod number, kernel number, and kernel weight. The interaction of red imported fire ant and aphids generated unfavorable effects on rapeseed yields per plant, total pod number, grain number, grain weight, and thousand-kernel weight and stimulated an elevated proportion of malformed seeds. However, the differences were not significant if only red imported fire ant was present. In the laboratory, although red imported fire ant display no apparent preference toward the seedlings of mungbean or rapeseed, the ants clearly favor the flowering plants of mungbeans. Therefore, this study indicated that one of the main mechanisms whereby red imported fire ants affect the crop yield is by compromising the reproduction processes. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  2. Studies on glucose-metabolizing enzymes in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris L.) nodules.

    PubMed

    Munjral, N; Gupta, A K; Kaur, N

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen is exported in the form of ureides or amides from the nodules in pulse crops. In order to understand the carbon metabolism in ureide and amide exporting nodules, activities of enzymes involved in glucose metabolism were compared in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (ureide exporter) and lentil (amide exporter) nodules during development. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, phosphohexose isomerase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were detected in cytosolic fraction of nodules of both the crops during development. Out of these enzymes, specific activity of phosphohexose isomerase was the highest in nodules of both the crops, in comparison with other enzymes. In comparison with mungbean, activities of various enzymes were less in cytosolic fraction of lentil. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase were present only in cytosolic fraction of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.), however, low activity of these enzymes was also observed in lentil (Lens culinaris L.) bacteroids. Activities of phosphohexose isomerase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were higher in bacteroids of lentil, as compared to mungbean during early nodule development, but this pattern was reversed with progress of crop development. Higher activities of phosphoglucomutase and fructose-1,6-phosphatase in mungbean cytosolic fraction could lead to increased flow of carbon towards pentose phosphate pathway.

  3. Birch pollen-related food allergy to legumes: identification and characterization of the Bet v 1 homologue in mungbean (Vigna radiata), Vig r 1.

    PubMed

    Mittag, D; Vieths, S; Vogel, L; Wagner-Loew, D; Starke, A; Hunziker, P; Becker, W-M; Ballmer-Weber, B K

    2005-08-01

    Recently allergic reactions to legumes mediated by Bet v 1-homologous food allergens were described for soy and peanut. In this study we assessed allergic reactions to another legume, to mungbean seedlings, and identified its Bet v 1-homologous allergen Vig r 1. Ten patients were selected who had a history of allergic reactions to mungbean seedlings and a respiratory allergy to birch pollen. The Bet v 1 homologue in mungbean seedlings, Vig r 1, was cloned by a PCR strategy, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified by preparative SDS-PAGE. In all sera, specific IgE against birch pollen, Bet v 1, Bet v 2, Vig r 1, and the Bet v 1 homologues in soy (Gly m 4) and cherry (Pru av 1) was determined by CAP-FEIA. Cross-reactivity of specific IgE with Vig r 1, Bet v 1, Gly m 4, and Pru av 1 was assessed by immunoblot inhibition. Expression of Vig r 1 during development of mungbean seedlings and under wounding stress was analysed by immunoblotting. The Vig r 1 double band was analysed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). All patients were sensitized to birch pollen and Bet v 1, 20% to Bet v 2, and 90% to Gly m 4. Seventy percent of the patients showed IgE binding to a double band at 15 kDa in mungbean extract that was inhibited after pre-incubation of sera with rBet v 1. PCR cloning revealed that the mungbean homologue of Bet v 1 had a molecular weight of 16.2 kDa, a calculated pI of 4.6% and 42.8% amino acid sequence identity with Bet v 1. MS analysis confirmed similarity of the double band with the deduced Vig r 1 sequence, but also indicated the existence of other Vig r 1 isoforms. ImmunoCAP analysis detected IgE against Vig r 1 in 80% of the sera. IgE binding to Vig r 1 was inhibited with Gly m 4 in six of six and with rPru av 1 in four of six patients. Vig r 1 expression occurred during development of seedlings and was increased by wounding stress. Food allergy to mungbean

  4. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV.

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum of mung-bean cotyledons : Biosynthesis during seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Gilkes, N R; Chrispeels, M J

    1980-01-01

    Germination and seedling growth of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) are accompanied by the incorporation of radioactive amino acids, glycerol, galactose, and glucosamine in an organelle fraction of the cotyledons which co-equilibrates with NADH-cytochrome-c-reductase activity at 1.13 g·cm(-3) on isopycnic gradients containing 1 mM EDTA. Up to 20% of the newly synthesized proteins accumulate in this organelle fraction. The organelle fraction has been identified as rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) on the basis of its increased density (1.16 g·cm(-3)) when 3 mM MgCl2 is included in all media. Seedling growth is also accompanied by a marked rise (more than 5-fold) in ER-associated NADH- and NADPH-cytochrome-c-reductase activity, and by the incorporation of(59)Fe into ER-associated heme. Other manifestations of the reorganization of the ER in the cotyledons include a relative increase in membrane-associated RNA (from 12% of total RNA after 12 h of imbibition to 23% after 6 d of growth), and a change in the pattern of polypeptides associated with the ER. These results provide further evidence for the extensive reorganization of the ER of the cotyledons which accompanies seedling growth. The reorganization includes the simultaneous breakdown of the pre-existing tubular ER and the biosynthesis of new ER components.

  6. Effect of seed pelleting with biocontrol agents on growth and colonisation of roots of mungbean by root-infecting fungi.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Nadia; Noreen, Nayara; Perveen, Zahida; Shahzad, Saleem

    2016-08-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is a leguminous pulse crop that is a major source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Root-infecting fungi produce severe plant diseases like root rot, charcoal rot, damping-off and stem rot. The soil-borne pathogens can be controlled by chemicals, but these chemicals have several negative effects. Use of microbial antagonist such as fungi and bacteria is a safe, effective and eco-friendly method for the control of many soil-borne pathogens. Biological control agents promote plant growth and develop disease resistance. Application of bacteria and fungi as seed dressing suppressed the root-infecting fungi on leguminous crops. Seeds of mungbean were pelleted with different biocontrol agents to determine their effect on plant growth and colonisation of roots by root-infecting fungi, viz. Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Treatment of mungbean seeds with fungal antagonists showed more shoot and root length as compared to bacterial antagonists, whereas seed treated with bacterial antagonists showed maximum shoot and root weight. Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis were the best among all the biocontrol agents since they provided the highest plant growth and greater reduction in root colonisation by all root-infecting fungi. Bacillus cereus, Trichoderma virens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus varians were also effective against root-infecting fungi but to a lesser extent. T. harzianum, T. virens, B. subtilis and P. fluorescens were found to be best among all biocontrol agents. The root-infecting fungi can be controlled by pelleting seeds with biocontrol agents as it is safe and effective method. Additionally, plant growth was promoted more by this method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Development of combined dry heat and chlorine dioxide gas treatment with mechanical mixing for inactivation of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo on mungbean seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foodborne outbreaks have been associated with the consumption of fresh sprouted beans. The sprouting conditions of mungbean seeds provide optimal conditions of temperature and humidity for any potential pathogenic contaminant on the seeds to grow. The lack of a kill step post-sprouting is a major sa...

  8. A gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) is a candidate gene for bruchid (Coleoptera: bruchidae) resistance in mungbean (Vigna radiata).

    PubMed

    Chotechung, Sathaporn; Somta, Prakit; Chen, Jinbing; Yimram, Tarika; Chen, Xin; Srinives, Peerasak

    2016-09-01

    The Br locus confers bruchid resistance in mungbean; VrPGIP2 (encoding a polygalacturonase inhibitor) is a strong candidate gene for this resistance. The VrPGIP2 sequence differs between resistant and susceptible lines. Azuki bean weevil (Callosobruchus chinensis) and cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) are serious insect pests of mungbean during storage. Bruchid resistance in mungbean is controlled by a single dominant locus, Br. Although the Br locus has been located on a genetic map, molecular basis and function of the gene remain unknown. In this study, high-resolution mapping using a BC11F2 population of 418 plants derived from a cross between 'Kamphaeng Saen 1' (KPS1; susceptible) and 'V2802' (resistant) using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers delimited the Br locus to a genomic region of 38 Kb of chromosome 5 containing two annotated genes. EST-SSR marker DMB-SSR158 co-segregated perfectly with the Br locus. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that DMB-SSR158 corresponds to a gene encoding a polygalacturonase inhibitor (polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein PGIP) and was designated as VrPGIP2. Comparison of VrPGIP2 coding sequences between four bruchid-resistant (V2802, V1128, V2817 and TC1966) and four bruchid-susceptible (KPS1, Sulu-1, CM and an unknown accession) mungbean lines revealed six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the resistant and susceptible groups. Three of the six SNPs resulted in amino acid changes; namely, alanine (A) to serine (S) at position 320, leucine (L) to proline (P) at position 332, and threonine (T) to P at position 335 of the VrPGIP2 sequence in resistant lines, compared with that in susceptible lines. The A to S change at position 320 may affect the interaction between PGIP and polygalacuronase. These results indicate that VrPGIP2 is very likely the gene at the Br locus responsible for bruchid resistance in mungbean.

  9. Physiochemical Studies of Sodium Chloride on Mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) and Its Possible Recovery with Spermine and Gibberellic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sanglap; Paul, Atreyee

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical responses to increasing NaCl concentrations, along with low concentrations of gibberellic acid or spermine, either alone or in their combination, were studied in mungbean seedlings. In the test seedlings, the root-shoot elongation, biomass production, and the chlorophyll content were significantly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Salt toxicity severely affected activities of different antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers. Activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) increased significantly over water control. Similarly, oxidative stress markers such as proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents also increased as a result of progressive increase in salt stress. Combined application of NaCl along with low concentrations of either gibberellic acid (5 µM) or spermine (50 µM) in the test seedlings showed significant alterations, that is, drastic increase in seedling elongation, increased biomass production, increased chlorophyll content, and significant lowering in all the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as oxidative stress marker contents in comparison to salt treated test seedlings, leading to better growth and metabolism. Our study shows that low concentrations of either gibberellic acid or spermine will be able to overcome the toxic effects of NaCl stress in mungbean seedlings. PMID:25734186

  10. Physiochemical studies of sodium chloride on mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) and its possible recovery with spermine and gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srijita; Mitra, Sanglap; Paul, Atreyee

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical responses to increasing NaCl concentrations, along with low concentrations of gibberellic acid or spermine, either alone or in their combination, were studied in mungbean seedlings. In the test seedlings, the root-shoot elongation, biomass production, and the chlorophyll content were significantly decreased with increasing NaCl concentrations. Salt toxicity severely affected activities of different antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress markers. Activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) increased significantly over water control. Similarly, oxidative stress markers such as proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) contents also increased as a result of progressive increase in salt stress. Combined application of NaCl along with low concentrations of either gibberellic acid (5 µM) or spermine (50 µM) in the test seedlings showed significant alterations, that is, drastic increase in seedling elongation, increased biomass production, increased chlorophyll content, and significant lowering in all the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as oxidative stress marker contents in comparison to salt treated test seedlings, leading to better growth and metabolism. Our study shows that low concentrations of either gibberellic acid or spermine will be able to overcome the toxic effects of NaCl stress in mungbean seedlings.

  11. Morphological and pathogenic variability among Macrophomina phaseolina isolates associated with mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Umer; Mukhtar, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing, 11 as slow growing, and the rest of the isolates as medium growing. Nine isolates were classified as large sized, 26 as small sized, and the remaining 30 isolates as medium sized. Thirty five isolates were ranked as heavy weight, 12 as low weight, and the rest of isolates were grouped as medium weight. Ten fungal isolates appeared to be least virulent, whereas eight isolates of diverse origin proved to be highly virulent against mungbean cultivars. The remaining isolates were regarded as moderately virulent. No relationship was found among the morphological characters and pathogenicity of the isolates. These morphological and pathogenic variations in various isolates of M. phaseolina may be considered important in disease management systems and will be useful in breeding programmes of mungbean cultivars resistant to charcoal rot.

  12. Morphological and Pathogenic Variability among Macrophomina phaseolina Isolates Associated with Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) Wilczek from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Umer

    2014-01-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina is a serious pathogen of many crops. In the present studies, 65 isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina from different agroecological regions of Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provinces of Pakistan were analyzed for morphological and pathogenic variability. Regardless of their geographic origins, significant differences were detected among 65 isolates in their radial growth, sclerotial size, and weight as well as in pathogenicity. Sixteen isolates were rated as fast growing, 11 as slow growing, and the rest of the isolates as medium growing. Nine isolates were classified as large sized, 26 as small sized, and the remaining 30 isolates as medium sized. Thirty five isolates were ranked as heavy weight, 12 as low weight, and the rest of isolates were grouped as medium weight. Ten fungal isolates appeared to be least virulent, whereas eight isolates of diverse origin proved to be highly virulent against mungbean cultivars. The remaining isolates were regarded as moderately virulent. No relationship was found among the morphological characters and pathogenicity of the isolates. These morphological and pathogenic variations in various isolates of M. phaseolina may be considered important in disease management systems and will be useful in breeding programmes of mungbean cultivars resistant to charcoal rot. PMID:24558345

  13. Properties of blend film based on cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) skin gelatin and mungbean protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Sazedul; Benjakul, Soottawat; Prodpran, Thummanoon; Songtipya, Ponusa

    2011-11-01

    Blend films based on cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) ventral skin gelatin (CG) and mungbean protein isolate (MPI) at different blend ratios (CG/MPI=10:0, 8:2, 6:4, 4:6, 2:8 and 0:10, w/w) prepared at pH 11 using 50% glycerol (based on total protein) as plasticizer were characterized. CG films incorporated with MPI at increasing amounts had the decreases in tensile strength (TS) (p<0.05). The increases in elongation at break (EAB) were observed when CG/MPI ratios of 6:4 or 4:6 were used (p<0.05). Decreased water vapor permeability (WVP) was obtained for films having the increasing proportion of MPI (p<0.05). CG/MPI blend films with higher MPI proportion had lower film solubility and L*-values (lightness) but higher b*-values (yellowness) and ΔE*-values (total color difference) (p<0.05). Electrophoretic study revealed that disulfide bond was present in MPI and CG/MPI blend films. However, hydrogen bonds between CG and MPI in the film matrix were dominant, as elucidated from FTIR spectroscopic analysis. Moreover, thermal stability of CG/MPI blend film was improved as compared to that of films from respective single proteins. Differential scanning calorimetry result suggested solid-state morphology of CG/MPI (6:4) blend film that consisted of amorphous phase of partially miscible CG/MPI mixture and the coexisting two different order phases of individual CG and MPI domains. Thus, the incorporation of MPI into gelatin film could improve the properties of resulting blend film, which were governed by CG/MPI ratio. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Prodduk, Vara; Annous, Bassam A; Liu, Linshu; Yam, Kit L

    2014-11-01

    Although freshly sprouted beans and grains are considered to be a source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide good matrices for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill step postsprouting is a major safety concern. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to reduce Salmonella on artificially inoculated mungbean sprouts. The effectiveness of gaseous chlorine dioxide (0.5 mg/liter of air) with or without tumbling (mechanical mixing) was compared with an aqueous chlorine (200 ppm) wash treatment. Tumbling the inoculated sprouts during the chlorine dioxide gas application for 15, 30, and 60 min reduced Salmonella populations by 3.0, 4.0, and 5.5 log CFU/g, respectively, as compared with 3.0, 3.0, and 4.0 log CFU/g reductions obtained without tumbling, respectively. A 2.0 log CFU/g reduction in Salmonella was achieved with an aqueous chlorine wash. The difference in microbial reduction between chlorine dioxide gas versus aqueous chlorine wash points to the important role of surface topography, pore structure, bacterial attachment, and/or biofilm formation on sprouts. These data suggested that chlorine dioxide gas was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells that are attached to inaccessible sites and/or are within biofilms on the sprout surface as compared with an aqueous chlorine wash. Consequently, scanning electron microscopy imaging indicated that chlorine dioxide gas treatment was capable of penetrating and inactivating cells attached to inaccessible sites and within biofilms on the sprout surfaces.

  15. Magnetic field can alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ping; Li, Ran; He, Jun-Min

    2011-06-01

    To alleviate toxicological effect induced by cadmium in mungbean seedlings, seeds were divided into four groups: The controls groups (CK, without treatment), magnetic field treated groups (MF), cadmium treated groups (CS), and magnetic field treated followed by cadmium treated groups (MF + CS).The results showed: (i) Compared with the controls, cadmium stress resulted in enhancing in the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage while decreasing in the nitrice oxide synthase (NOS) activity, the concentration of nitrice oxide (NO), chlorophyll and total carbon and nitrogen, the net photosynthetic rate, the stomatal conductance, the transpiration rate, the water use efficiency, the lateral number and seedlings growth except for intercellular CO(2) concentration increase. However, the seedlings treated with 600 mT magnetic field followed by cadmium stress the concentration of malondialdehyde, H(2)O(2) and O(2-), and the conductivity of electrolyte leakage decreased, while the above mentioned NO concentration, NOS activity, photosynthesis and growth parameters increased compared to cadmium stress alone. (ii) Compared with the cadmium stress (CS), the seedling growth were inhibited when the seeds were treated with NO scavenger (hemoglobin, HB) and inhibition of NO generating enzyme (sodium tungstate, ST), conversely, the seedling growth were improved by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and CaCl(2). In the case of the HB and ST treatment followed by magnetic field and then the seedling subjected to CS, the seedlings growth was better than that of hemoglobin (HB) followed by CS and ST followed by CS. The seeds were treated with SNP and CaCl(2) followed by MF, and then subjected to CS, the seedlings growth were better than that of SNP followed by CS, and CaCl(2) followed by CS. These results suggested that magnetic field compensates for the toxicological effects of cadmium exposure are related to NO signal.

  16. Genetic diversity of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) in iron and zinc content as impacted by farmers' varietal selection in Northern India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Renu; van Heusden, Adriaan W; Kumar, Ram; Visser, Richard G F; Yadav, Ram C

    2013-01-01

    From the last few years a debate has been continuing over the issue of malnutrition and hunger in the developing countries. The present article investigates the importance of participatory varietal selection in the development of a suitable cultivar of mungbean along with the nutritional content and the agronomic traits of the cultivars selected by farmers in participatory varietal selection. A combination of the conventional survey strategy, participatory varietal selection, molecular markers, and chemical analysis were used to carry out the study, and results revealed that the farmers have the capacity to utilize available genetic resources to manage disease, and they can identify the disease at early stages of plant development. The genetic diversity was studied using 23 inter-simple sequence repeat marker, which shows that the extent of genetic diversity ranges from 65% to 87%, while chemical analysis of selected mungbean cultivars shows a moderate amount of iron (3.9 mg/100 g) and zinc (2.5 mg/100 g).

  17. Infectivity analysis of two variable DNA B components of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna in Vigna mungo and Vigna radiata.

    PubMed

    Balaji, V; Vanitharani, R; Karthikeyan, A S; Anbalagan, S; Veluthambi, K

    2004-09-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig), a Begomovirus that causes yellow mosaic disease, was cloned from field-infected blackgram (Vigna mungo). One DNA A clone (KA30) and five different DNA B clones (KA21, KA22, KA27, KA28 and KA34) were obtained. The sequence identity in the 150-nt common region (CR) between DNA A and DNA B was highest (95%) for KA22 DNA B and lowest (85.6%) for KA27 DNA B. The Rep-binding domain had three complete 11-nt (5'-TGTATCGGTGT-3') iterons in KA22 DNA B (and KA21, KA28 and KA34), while the first iteron in KA27 DNA B (5'-ATCGGTGT-3') had a 3-nt deletion. KA27 DNA B, which exhibited 93.9% CR sequence identity to the mungbean-infecting MYMV, also shared the 3-nt deletion in the first iteron besides having an 18-nt insertion between the third iteron and the conserved nonanucleotide. MYMV was found to be closely related to KA27 DNA B in amino acid sequence identity of BV1 (94.1%) and BC1 (97.6%) proteins and in the organization of nuclear localization signal (NLS), nuclear export signal (NES) and phosphorylation sites. Agroinoculation of blackgram (V. mungo) and mungbean (V. radiata) with partial dimers of KA27 and KA22 DNA Bs along with DNA A caused distinctly different symptoms. KA22 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in blackgram. In contrast, KA27 DNA B caused more intense yellow mosaic symptoms with high viral DNA titre in mungbean. Thus, DNA B of MYMVVig is an important determinant of host-range between V. mungo and V. radiata.

  18. Biopreservation in modified atmosphere stored mungbean sprouts: the use of vegetable-associated bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria to control the growth of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Bennik, M H; van Overbeek, W; Smid, E J; Gorris, L G

    1999-03-01

    Two bacteriocinogenic strains of Pediococcus parvulus and one bacteriocinogenic Enterococcus mundtii strain were evaluated for their potential to control the growth of Listeria monocytogenes on refrigerated, modified atmosphere (MA) stored mungbean sprouts. These three strains, which were isolated from minimally-processed vegetables, were shown to grow in culture broth at 4, 8, 15 and 30 degrees C. However, only Ent. mundtii was capable of bacteriocin production at 4-8 degrees C. Examination of the growth of these strains on agar under 1.5% O2 in combination with 0, 5, 20 or 50% CO2 revealed significantly higher maximum specific growth rates for Ent. mundtii than for Pediococcus parvulus at CO2 concentrations below 20%, which are relevant for MA-storage of vegetables. Enterococcus mundtii was subsequently evaluated for its ability to control the growth of L. monocytogenes on vegetable agar and fresh mungbean sprouts under 1.5% O2/20% CO2/78.5% N2 at 8 degrees C. The growth of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by bacteriocinogenic Ent. mundtii on sterile vegetable-medium but not on fresh produce. However, mundticin, the bacteriocin produced by Ent. mundtii, was found to have potential as a biopreservative agent for MA-stored mungbean sprouts when used in a washing step or a coating procedure.

  19. Characterization of resistance to Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in mungbean variety VC6089A and its resistance-associated protein VrD1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chan; Chen, Ching-San; Horng, Shwu-Bin

    2005-08-01

    Characteristics of resistance of VC6089A, a mungbean, Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek, bred by using a wild Vigna species, V. sublobata (Roxburgh) Verdcourt (accession no. TC1966), and containing a novel protein, VrD1, were investigated against the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). The seeds of VC6089A showed high level of resistance; > 96% of the bruchid eggs failed to develop into adults, whereas 85% of eggs laid on susceptible cultivar VC1973A became adults. Mortality of surviving bruchids raised for five generations on VC6089A remained higher than 96%; however, female adults maintained high fecundity and thus showed a positive population growth through these generations. We therefore cannot exclude the possibility that the beetles could develop resistance to the resistant mungbean VC6089A. The protein VrD1 purified from seeds of VC6089A showed marked toxicity to C. maculatus when beetles were reared on artificial seeds containing varying levels of VrD1. Thorough inhibition of development was observed when artificial seeds containing 0.2% (wt:wt) VrD1 was provided for insect feeding. Our findings demonstrated the insecticidal activity of VC6089A mungbean seeds and VrD1 protein against C. maculatus. These results may facilitate safer control against bruchid infestation.

  20. Analysis of an isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) with a highly variable DNA B component.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, A S; Vanitharani, R; Balaji, V; Anuradha, S; Thillaichidambaram, P; Shivaprasad, P V; Parameswari, C; Balamani, V; Saminathan, M; Veluthambi, K

    2004-08-01

    One DNA A (KA30) and five different DNA B components (KA21, KA22, KA27, KA28 and KA34) of a geminivirus, Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig) were cloned from a pooled sample of field-infected Vigna mungo plants from Vamban, South India. MYMV-Vig DNA A (KA30) and one of the DNA B components (KA27) exhibited 97% and 95% sequence identities, respectively, to those of MYMV reported from Thailand. However, the DNA B components KA21, KA22, KA28 and KA34 exhibited only 71 to 72% sequence identity to MYMV DNA B. Co-existence of multiple DNA B components in field-infected V. mungo was proved by Southern and PCR analyses. Each of the five DNA B components was infective together with the DNA A upon agroinoculation. Agroinoculation with mixed cultures of Agrobacterium with partial dimers of DNA A and all five DNA Bs proved that all five DNA B components can co-infect a single V. mungo plant.

  1. Factors contributing to deletion within Mungbean yellow mosaic virus partial dimers in binary vectors used for agroinoculation.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, P V; Thomas, M; Balamani, V; Biswas, D; Vanitharani, R; Karthikeyan, A S; Veluthambi, K

    2006-10-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV) sequences cloned as partial dimers within the T-DNA of a binary vector were deleted at a high frequency upon conjugal mobilization from Escherichia coli into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This deletion involving the genome-length viral DNA did not occur when the binary plasmid was inside E. coli and when the binary plasmid was introduced into Agrobacterium by electroporation. Deletions occurred in both DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A minimum of 500-nt continuity on either side of the nonanucleotide in the duplicated common region is required for deletion. A. tumefaciens cells in which deletion was complete, grew as larger colonies reflecting a growth advantage. The small, slow-growing colonies eventually lost the genome-length viral sequences after a few more cycles of growth. Partial dimers in binary plasmids pGA472 and pBin19 with RK2 replicon underwent deletion while those in pPZP with pVS1 replicon did not undergo deletion. Deletion was observed in A. tumefaciens strains C58, A136, A348 and A281 with C58 chromosome background, but not in Ach5 and T37. Interestingly, deletion did not occur in A. tumefaciens strain AGL1 with a recA mutation in C58 chromosome, implying a clear role for recombination in deletion. These observations suggest the choice of Agrobacterium strains and binary vectors for agroinoculation of geminiviruses.

  2. Ethylene-induced changes in lignification and cell wall-degrading enzymes in the roots of mungbean (Vigna radiata) sprouts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Na; Liu, Hong-Kai; Zhang, Hua-Hua; Chen, Zhen; Guo, Yang-Dong; Kang, Yu-Fan

    2013-12-01

    As an important regulator, ethylene inhibits root growth and development in plants. To determine the mechanism of ethylene on root elongation growth and lateral root formation, ethylene-induced lignification and cell wall-degrading enzymes in the roots of mungbean sprouts were tested. We initially observed that primary root elongation and lateral root numbers were inhibited, while lignin content was enhanced by ethephon (ETH). Cell wall remolding proteins, polygalacturonase (PG) and carboxymethyl cellulose (Cx) activities were reduced, but α-expansins and xyloglucan endotransglucosylases/hydrolases (XTH) were enhanced by ETH. The promotion in lignin production was correlated with changes in activities of key lignin biosynthesis enzymes and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content. These actions induced by ETH were altered via treatment with an ethylene perception antagonist (Ag+). We subsequently demonstrated that the role of endogenous ethylene in regulating root elongation growth and lateral root formation were correlated with lignification and cell wall-degrading enzymes, respectively. These results suggested that the ethylene-regulated inhibition of primary root elongation growth was caused by an increase in lignification that reinforced the cell wall and shortened root length, and the suppression of lateral root formation was linked to activities of PG, Cx, α-expansins and XTH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of sodium chloride on the regulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and enzymes of respiratory chain in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saha, Papiya; Kunda, Pranamita; Biswas, Asok K

    2012-11-01

    The effect of common salt (NaCl) on ion contents, Krebs cycle intermediates and its regulatory enzymes was investigated in growing mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek, B 105) seedlings. Sodium and chloride ion contents increased in both root and shoot whereas potassium ion content decreased in shoot of test seedlings with increasing concentrations of NaCl. Organic acids like pyruvate and citrate levels increased whereas malate level decreased under stress in both roots and shoots. Salt stress also variedly affected the activities of different enzymes of respiratory chain. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.4.1) decreased in 50 mM NaCl but increased in 100 mM and 150 mM concentrations, in both root and shoot samples. Succinate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.3.5.1) activity was reduced in root whereas stimulated in shoot under increasing concentrations of salt. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.41) and malate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.37) decreased in both root and shoot samples under salt stress. On the contrary, pretreatment of mungbean seeds with sublethal dose of NaCl was able to overcome the adverse effects of stress imposed by NaCl to variable extents with significant alterations of all the tested parameters, resulting in better growth and efficient respiration in mungbean seedlings. Thus, plants can acclimate to lethal level of salinity by pretreatment of seeds with sublethal level of NaCl, which serves to improve their health and production under saline condition, but the sublethal concentration of NaCl should be carefully chosen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  5. Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AC4 suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing and an AC4 hairpin RNA gene reduces MYMV DNA accumulation in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Balamani, Veluthambi; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2013-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a legume-infecting geminivirus that causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram, mungbean, soybean, Frenchbean and mothbean. AC4/C4, which is nested completely within the Rep gene, is less conserved among geminiviruses. Much less is known about its role in viral pathogenesis other than its known role in the suppression of host-mediated gene silencing. Transient expression of MYMV AC4 by agroinfiltration suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana 16c expressing green fluorescence protein, at a level comparable to MYMV TrAP expression. AC4 full-length gene and an inverted repeat of AC4 (comprising the full-length AC4 sequence in sense and antisense orientations with an intervening intron) which makes a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) upon transcription were introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium-mediated leaf disc transformation. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants were agroinoculated with partial dimers of MYMV and used to study the effect of the AC4-sense and AC4 hpRNA genes on MYMV DNA accumulation. Leaf discs of two transgenic plants that express the AC4-sense gene displayed an increase in MYMV DNA accumulation. Leaf discs of six transgenic plants containing the AC4 hpRNA gene accumulated small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific to AC4, and upon agroinoculation with MYMV they exhibited a severe reduction in the accumulation of MYMV DNA. Thus, the MYMV AC4 hpRNA gene has emerged as a good candidate to engineer resistance against MYMV in susceptible plants.

  6. Native halo-tolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Enterococcus and Pantoea sp. improve seed yield of Mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) under soil salinity by reducing sodium uptake and stress injury.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Meenu; Tewari, Rupinder; Nayyar, Harsh

    2016-10-01

    The beneficial microbial-plant interaction plays important role in the soil health, crop growth and productivity. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are such beneficial microorganisms, which in association with plant roots not only promote their growth but also help in counteracting the detrimental effects of soil stresses. Salt stress is one such stress, frequently confronted by the plants. The present study aimed at isolation and identification of PGPR inhabiting the mungbean rhizosphere, testing them for salt (NaCl) tolerance and subsequently in salt-supplemented mungbean crop. For this purpose, two salt-tolerant bacterial strains belonging to genus Pantoea and Enterococcus, characterized for their P-solubilization ability, indole acetic acid and siderophore production were selected. These two PGPR were further evaluated for their effect on the salt-stressed mungbean plants, grown at two salt concentrations (5 and 10 dS/m). The plants treated with the combination of PGPR showed better performance in growth (16-37 %) and yield (22-32 %), under salt stress, as compared with control. The increasing salt concentration was found to increase the membrane damage, Na(+) concentration in the plants. PGPR treatments effectively reduced the Na(+) concentration (17-41 %), membrane damage (1.1-1.5 folds) and enhanced the antioxidants i.e. ascorbic acid (8-26 %) and glutathione (10-30 %) in salt-stressed plants, in comparison to uninoculated stressed plants. Overall, the results indicated that both PGPR were effective as stress mitigators however, in combination they showed relatively better improvement in growth, yield as well as oxidative parameters of the salt-affected plants. These findings about the effects of native salt-tolerant PGPR Pantoea and Enterococcus sp. in mungbean crop are novel.

  7. Physicochemical properties of native and recombinant mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) 8S globulins and the effects of the N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Roberta N; Adachi, Motoyasu; Tecson-Mendoza, Evelyn Mae; Bernardo, Amy Emiliana N; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2006-08-09

    We have previously cloned and characterized the cDNAs of three isoforms of the 8S globulin of mungbean, expressed the major 8Salpha isoform in Escherichia coli, and purified and successfully crystallized it (Bernardo, A. E. N.; Garcia, R. N.; Adachi, M.; Angeles, J. G. C.; Kaga, A; Ishimoto, M.; Utsumi, S.; Tecson-Mendoza, E. M. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2004, 52, 2552-2560). Herein, we report the physicochemical and emulsifying properties of the native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulin or vicilin. The circular dichroism spectra analysis of the native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulins revealed that the recombinant 8Salpha formed a secondary structure close to that of the native 8S. Further, gel filtration analysis showed that 8Salpha was able to assemble into trimers. The native 8S and recombinant 8Salpha globulins were soluble at pH 3.4 and at pH 7.4-9.0 at low ionic strength, mu = 0.08. Interestingly, the native 8S was more soluble at pH 7.0 and pH 7.4 than the recombinant 8Salpha at mu = 0.08. Both forms were very soluble at pH 3.4-9.0 at high ionic strength, mu = 0.50. The native form exhibited a higher T(m) (69.2, 79.5, and 83.8 degrees C) than the recombinant form (65.6, 71.6, 77.5 degrees C) at mu = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.5, respectively. The recombinant form was found to have greater surface hydrophobicity than the native form. There was little difference in the emulsifying ability between the native 8S and 8Salpha at pH 3.4 and pH 7.6. The results indicate that the presence of N-linked glycans is not essential in the assembly and stable conformation of the mungbean vicilin. However, the N-linked glycans might have contributed to the higher solubility at low ionic strength, greater thermal stability, and decreased surface hydrophobicity of the native vicilin as compared to the recombinant 8Salpha. On the other hand, the N-linked glycans showed little effect on the emulsifying ability of the protein.

  8. Effect of Tillage Practices on Soil Properties and Crop Productivity in Wheat-Mungbean-Rice Cropping System under Subtropical Climatic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Monirul; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to know cropping cycles required to improve OM status in soil and to investigate the effects of medium-term tillage practices on soil properties and crop yields in Grey Terrace soil of Bangladesh under wheat-mungbean-T. aman cropping system. Four different tillage practices, namely, zero tillage (ZT), minimum tillage (MT), conventional tillage (CT), and deep tillage (DT), were studied in a randomized complete block (RCB) design with four replications. Tillage practices showed positive effects on soil properties and crop yields. After four cropping cycles, the highest OM accumulation, the maximum root mass density (0–15 cm soil depth), and the improved physical and chemical properties were recorded in the conservational tillage practices. Bulk and particle densities were decreased due to tillage practices, having the highest reduction of these properties and the highest increase of porosity and field capacity in zero tillage. The highest total N, P, K, and S in their available forms were recorded in zero tillage. All tillage practices showed similar yield after four years of cropping cycles. Therefore, we conclude that zero tillage with 20% residue retention was found to be suitable for soil health and achieving optimum yield under the cropping system in Grey Terrace soil (Aeric Albaquept). PMID:25197702

  9. Morphology, associated protein analysis, and identification of 58-kDa starch synthase in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. cv. KPS1) starch granule preparations.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yuan-Tih; Dong, Yu-Ling; Hsieh, Ying-Fang; Kuo, Ja-Chi

    2009-05-27

    Raw starch granules of mature mungbean (Vigna radiata L. cv. KPS1) seeds were prepared by two methods into crude and cesium chloride (CsCl)-washed forms. The purity, shape, size distribution, and associated protein profiles were examined. The appearance of raw starch granules showed a bimodal type distribution in which average granules had typical ovoid shapes, whereas the small ones were spherical. Abnormal granule surface with distinct tumor-like or dented hole features were also observed in raw starch granules. CsCl-washed granules had a smooth surface compared to that of the crude form. The granule size distribution ranged from 6-35 μm; most 15-25 μm (∼53%), followed by 25-35 μm (∼26%). Small granules (<15 μm) amounted to ∼18%, and granules >35 μm consisted of ∼3%. The two forms were further refined by trichloroacetic (TCA) treatment to reveal surface proteins on the crude granules or tightly bound proteins on CsCl-washed granules. In the washed-refined granules, only a few integral proteins were retained. The major 58-kDa protein was identified to be granule-bound starch synthase I by sequence homology with that in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) and maize (Zea mays) using MALDI-TOF mass and Mascot search.

  10. Coat proteins of Rice tungro bacilliform virus and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus contain multiple nuclear-localization signals and interact with importin alpha.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Peraza, O; Kirk, D; Seltzer, V; Veluthambi, K; Schmit, A C; Hohn, T; Herzog, E

    2005-06-01

    Transport of the viral genome into the nucleus is an obligatory step in the replication cycle of plant pararetro- and geminiviruses. In both these virus types, the multifunctional coat protein (CP) is thought to be involved in this process. Here, a green fluorescent protein tagging approach was used to demonstrate nuclear import of the CPs of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus--Vigna (MYMV) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia protoplasts. In both cases, at least two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were identified and characterized. The NLSs of RTBV CP are located within both N- and C-terminal regions (residues 479KRPK/497KRK and 744KRK/758RRK), and those of MYMV CP within the N-terminal part (residues 3KR and 41KRRR). The MYMV and RTBV CP NLSs resemble classic mono- and bipartite NLSs, respectively. However, the N-terminal MYMV CP NLS and both RTBV CP NLSs show peculiarities in the number and position of basic residues. In vitro pull-down assays revealed interaction of RTBV and MYMV CPs with the nuclear import factor importin alpha, suggesting that both CPs are imported into the nucleus via an importin alpha-dependent pathway. The possibility that this pathway could serve for docking of virions to the nucleus is discussed.

  11. Expression of full-length and truncated Rep genes from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna inhibits viral replication in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Thillaichidambaram, P; Balaji, Vasudevan; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2006-12-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV-Vig) is a bipartite geminivirus that causes a severe yellow mosaic disease in blackgram. An assay was developed to study MYMV-Vig replication by agroinoculation of tobacco leaf discs with partial dimers of the virus. This assay, in a non-host model plant, was used to evaluate pathogen-derived resistance contributed by MYMV-Vig genes in transgenic plants. Viral DNA accumulation was optimum in tobacco leaf discs cultured for 10 days after infection with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain Ach5 containing partial dimers of both DNA A and DNA B of MYMV-Vig. Transgenic tobacco plants with MYMV-Vig genes for coat protein (CP), replication-associated protein (Rep)-sense, Rep-antisense, truncated Rep (T-Rep), nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) and movement protein (MP) were generated. Leaf discs from transgenic tobacco plants, harbouring MYMV-Vig genes, were agroinoculated with partial dimers of MYMV-Vig and analyzed for viral DNA accumulation. The leaf discs from transgenic tobacco plants harbouring CP and MP genes supported the accumulation of higher levels of MYMV-Vig DNA. However, MYMV-Vig accumulation was inhibited in one transgenic plant harbouring the Rep-sense gene and in two plants harbouring the T-Rep gene. Northern analysis of these plants revealed a good correlation between expression of Rep or T-Rep genes and inhibition of MYMV-Vig accumulation.

  12. The mungbean yellow mosaic begomovirus transcriptional activator protein transactivates the viral promoter-driven transgene and causes toxicity in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2007-12-01

    The Begomovirus transcriptional activator protein (TrAP/AC2/C2) is a multifunctional protein which activates the viral late gene promoters, suppresses gene silencing, and determines pathogenicity. To study TrAP-mediated transactivation of a stably integrated gene, we generated transgenic tobacco plants with a Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) AV1 late gene promoter-driven reporter gene and supertransformed them with the MYMV TrAP gene driven by a strong 35S promoter. We obtained a single supertransformed plant with an intact 35S-TrAP gene that activated the reporter gene 2.5-fold. However, 10 of the 11 supertransformed plants did not have the TrAP region of the T-DNA, suggesting the likely toxicity of TrAP in plants. Upon transformation of wild-type tobacco plants with the TrAP gene, six of the seven transgenic plants obtained had truncated T-DNAs which lacked TrAP. One plant, which had the intact TrAP gene, did not express TrAP. The apparent toxic effect of the TrAP transgene was abolished by mutations in its nuclear-localization signal or zinc-finger domain and by deletion of its activation domain. Therefore, all three domains of TrAP, which are required for transactivation and suppression of gene silencing, also are needed for its toxic effect.

  13. Effect of tillage practices on soil properties and crop productivity in wheat-mungbean-rice cropping system under subtropical climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Khairul; Islam, Md Monirul; Salahin, Nazmus; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to know cropping cycles required to improve OM status in soil and to investigate the effects of medium-term tillage practices on soil properties and crop yields in Grey Terrace soil of Bangladesh under wheat-mungbean-T. aman cropping system. Four different tillage practices, namely, zero tillage (ZT), minimum tillage (MT), conventional tillage (CT), and deep tillage (DT), were studied in a randomized complete block (RCB) design with four replications. Tillage practices showed positive effects on soil properties and crop yields. After four cropping cycles, the highest OM accumulation, the maximum root mass density (0-15 cm soil depth), and the improved physical and chemical properties were recorded in the conservational tillage practices. Bulk and particle densities were decreased due to tillage practices, having the highest reduction of these properties and the highest increase of porosity and field capacity in zero tillage. The highest total N, P, K, and S in their available forms were recorded in zero tillage. All tillage practices showed similar yield after four years of cropping cycles. Therefore, we conclude that zero tillage with 20% residue retention was found to be suitable for soil health and achieving optimum yield under the cropping system in Grey Terrace soil (Aeric Albaquept).

  14. Proteomics approach combined with biochemical attributes to elucidate compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions between Vigna mungo and Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vigna mungo, a tropical leguminous plant, highly susceptible to yellow mosaic disease caused by Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) resulting in high yield penalty. The molecular events occurring during compatible and incompatible interactions between V. mungo and MYMIV pathosystem are yet to be explored. In this study biochemical analyses in conjunction with proteomics of MYMIV-susceptible and -resistant V. mungo genotypes were executed to get an insight in the molecular events during compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions. Results Biochemical analysis revealed an increase in phenolics, hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrate contents in both compatible and incompatible interactions; but the magnitudes were higher during incompatible interaction. In the resistant genotype the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase increased significantly, while catalase activity decreased. Comparative proteome analyses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 109 differentially abundant proteins at 3, 7 and 14 days post MYMIV-inoculation. Proteins of several functional categories were differentially changed in abundance during both compatible and incompatible interactions. Among these, photosynthesis related proteins were mostly affected in the susceptible genotype resulting in reduced photosynthesis rate under MYMIV-stress. Differential intensities of chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll contents are in congruence with proteomics data. It was revealed that Photosystem II electron transports are the primary targets of MYMIV during pathogenesis. Quantitative real time PCR analyses of selected genes corroborates with respective protein abundance during incompatible interaction. The network of various cellular pathways that are involved in inducing defense response contains several conglomerated cores of nodal proteins, of which ascorbate peroxidase, rubisco activase and serine

  15. High throughput sequencing reveals modulation of microRNAs in Vigna mungo upon Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus inoculation highlighting stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anirban; Paul, Sujay; Dey, Avishek; Pal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20-24 nucleotides long non-coding RNAs known to play important regulatory roles during biotic and abiotic stresses by controlling gene expression. Blackgram (Vigna mungo), an economically important grain legume is highly susceptible to pathogenic begomovirus Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) and resulting in high yield loss. In this study two different leaf-small-RNA libraries were prepared from the pooled RNA at three different time points of resistant V. mungo inbred line VM84 inoculated either with viruliferous or non-viruliferous whiteflies carrying MYMIV and performed high-throughput Illumina sequencing. Sequencing followed by bioinformatics analysis of the small RNA reads indicated that the expression patterns of most of the known and novel miRNAs were altered in resistant line over mock-inoculated sample during the plant virus incompatible interaction. Highly altered miRNAs belong to the families of miR156, miR159, miR160, miR166, miR398, miR1511, miR1514, miR2118 and novel vmu-miRn7, vmu-miRn8, vmu-miRn13 and vmu-miRn14. These results were validated using qPCR, and most of the miRNAs showed similar pattern of expression like that of Illumina reads. The expression patterns of some selected known and novel miRNAs were also compared between the infected MYMIV-resistant and -susceptible genotypes and most of these were modulated after MYMIV-inoculation. Target transcripts like NB-LRR, NAC, MYB, Zinc finger, CCAAT-box transcription factor, fructose 2-6 bisphosphate, HDZIP protein that confers immune response were predicted as targets amongst identified miRNAs using psRNATarget server. Some selected target transcripts including NB-LRR, ARF, SOD, SPB, Basic blue copper protein were validated and their differential expression were demonstrated between MYMIV-resistant and -susceptible V. mungo by qPCR data analyses. In the present study we have identified miRNAs that implicate in the regulation of MYMIV-induced stress response in V

  16. Genome-Wide SNP Identification and Characterization in Two Soybean Cultivars with Contrasting Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus Disease Resistance Traits

    PubMed Central

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Mukherjee, Minakshi; Khan, Yusuf; Rathi, Pushpendra; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a bipartite Geminivirus, which causes severe yield loss in soybean (Glycine max). Considering this, the present study was conducted to develop large-scale genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and identify potential markers linked with known disease resistance loci for their effective use in genomics-assisted breeding to impart durable MYMIV tolerance. The whole-genome re-sequencing of MYMIV resistant cultivar ‘UPSM-534’ and susceptible Indian cultivar ‘JS-335’ was performed to identify high-quality SNPs and InDels (insertion and deletions). Approximately 234 and 255 million of 100-bp paired-end reads were generated from UPSM-534 and JS-335, respectively, which provided ~98% coverage of reference soybean genome. A total of 3083987 SNPs (1559556 in UPSM-534 and 1524431 in JS-335) and 562858 InDels (281958 in UPSM-534 and 280900 in JS-335) were identified. Of these, 1514 SNPs were found to be present in 564 candidate disease resistance genes. Among these, 829 non-synonymous and 671 synonymous SNPs were detected in 266 and 286 defence-related genes, respectively. Noteworthy, a non-synonymous SNP (in chromosome 18, named 18-1861613) at the 149th base-pair of LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE gene responsible for a G/C transversion [proline (CCC) to alanine(GCC)] was identified and validated in a set of 12 soybean cultivars. Taken together, the present study generated a large-scale genomic resource such as, SNPs and InDels at a genome-wide scale that will facilitate the dissection of various complex traits through construction of high-density linkage maps and fine mapping. In the present scenario, these markers can be effectively used to design high-density SNP arrays for their large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping in diverse natural and mapping populations, which could accelerate genomics-assisted MYMIV disease resistance breeding in soybean. PMID:25875830

  17. Genome-wide SNP identification and characterization in two soybean cultivars with contrasting Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus disease resistance traits.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Chandra Bhan; Bhareti, Priyanka; Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Mukherjee, Minakshi; Khan, Yusuf; Rathi, Pushpendra; Prasad, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a bipartite Geminivirus, which causes severe yield loss in soybean (Glycine max). Considering this, the present study was conducted to develop large-scale genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and identify potential markers linked with known disease resistance loci for their effective use in genomics-assisted breeding to impart durable MYMIV tolerance. The whole-genome re-sequencing of MYMIV resistant cultivar 'UPSM-534' and susceptible Indian cultivar 'JS-335' was performed to identify high-quality SNPs and InDels (insertion and deletions). Approximately 234 and 255 million of 100-bp paired-end reads were generated from UPSM-534 and JS-335, respectively, which provided ~98% coverage of reference soybean genome. A total of 3083987 SNPs (1559556 in UPSM-534 and 1524431 in JS-335) and 562858 InDels (281958 in UPSM-534 and 280900 in JS-335) were identified. Of these, 1514 SNPs were found to be present in 564 candidate disease resistance genes. Among these, 829 non-synonymous and 671 synonymous SNPs were detected in 266 and 286 defence-related genes, respectively. Noteworthy, a non-synonymous SNP (in chromosome 18, named 18-1861613) at the 149th base-pair of LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE gene responsible for a G/C transversion [proline (CCC) to alanine(GCC)] was identified and validated in a set of 12 soybean cultivars. Taken together, the present study generated a large-scale genomic resource such as, SNPs and InDels at a genome-wide scale that will facilitate the dissection of various complex traits through construction of high-density linkage maps and fine mapping. In the present scenario, these markers can be effectively used to design high-density SNP arrays for their large-scale validation and high-throughput genotyping in diverse natural and mapping populations, which could accelerate genomics-assisted MYMIV disease resistance breeding in soybean.

  18. 8S globulin of mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek]: cloning and characterization of its cDNA isoforms, expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and crystallization of the major recombinant 8S isoform.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Amy Emiliana N; Garcia, Roberta N; Adachi, Motoyasu; Angeles, Jorge Gil C; Kaga, Akito; Ishimoto, Masao; Utsumi, Shigeru; Tecson-Mendoza, Evelyn Mae

    2004-05-05

    Three isoforms of the cDNA of the major 8S globulin of mungbean, 8Salpha, 8Salpha', and 8Sbeta, were isolated, cloned, and characterized. The cDNA sequences of 8Salpha, 8Salpha', and 8Sbeta had open reading frames of 1362, 1359 or 1362, and 1359 bp, respectively, which code for 454, 453 or 454, and 453 amino acids corresponding to molecular weights of 51 973, 51 627 or 51 758, and 51 779, respectively. Homology in terms of cDNA and amino acid sequences was 91-92% between 8Salpha and 8Salpha', 87% between 8Salpha and 8Sbeta, and 86-88% between 8Salpha' and 8Sbeta. The signal peptide was found to be 1-25, 1-24 or 25, and 1-23 for 8Salpha, 8Salpha', and 8Sbeta, respectively, using the signalP website (Nielsen, H.; Engelbrecht, J.; Brunak, S.; von Heijne, G. Protein Eng. 1997, 10, 1-6). The propeptide was determined to be IVHREN. A single site for glycosylation (N-X-S/T) was observed about 90 amino acids from the C terminus. Homology between mungbean 8S isoforms and other 7-8S proteins ranged from 45 to 68% within members of the legume family and 29 to 34% for crops of different species. The major isoform 8Salpha was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by successive ammonium sulfate fractionation, hydrophobic interaction, and Mono Q column chromatography. The recombinant 8Salpha, but not the native form, was successfully crystallized producing rhombohedral crystals.

  19. Selectable marker elimination in the T0 generation by Agrobacterium-mediated co-transformation involving Mungbean yellow mosaic virus TrAP as a non-conditional negative selectable marker and bar for transient positive selection.

    PubMed

    RamanaRao, Mangu Venkata; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2010-05-01

    Transient selection involving the bar gene and non-conditional negative selection against stable T-DNA integration through the use of the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) transcriptional activator protein gene (TrAP) were used in a novel co-transformation strategy to generate selectable marker gene (SMG)-eliminated transgenic tobacco plants in the T(0) generation itself. Two compatible binary plasmids, pCam-bar-TrAP-gus harbouring bar as an SMG and the MYMV TrAP gene as a non-conditional negative selectable marker, and pGA472 with the nptII gene as an unselected experimental gene of interest (GOI) were placed in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 and used for co-transformation. Transient selection with 5 mg l(-1) phosphinothricin (PPT) for 2-4 weeks and subsequent establishment in a PPT-minus medium yielded 114 plants from 200 leaf discs. The unselected nptII gene was detected by Southern blot analysis in 13 plants, revealing a co-transformation efficiency of 11.5%. Five of these plants harboured only the nptII gene (GOI) and not the bar gene (SMG). Thus, SMG elimination was achieved in the T(0) generation itself in 4.4% (5/114) of plants, which were transiently selected for 2-4 weeks on PPT. MYMV TrAP, a non-conditional negative selectable marker, effectively reduced the recovery of plants with stable integration of the SMG (bar).

  20. Severe stunting in blackgram caused by the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) KA27 DNA B component is ameliorated by co-infection or post-infection with the KA22 DNA B: MYMV nuclear shuttle protein is the symptom determinant.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Nagrani; Parameswari, Chidambaram; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2011-04-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, has five variable and infective DNA B components of which KA22 and KA27 DNA Bs share only 72% nucleotide sequence identity between them. Agroinoculation of blackgram with partial dimers of DNA A and KA27 DNA B caused severe stunting and an inordinate delay in flowering. Interestingly, co-agroinoculation of KA27+KA22 DNA B components along with DNA A ameliorated severe stunting, rescued from the delay in flowering and caused the appearance of yellow mosaic symptom characteristic of KA22 DNA B. Post-agroinoculation of KA27 DNA B-infected blackgram plants with KA22 DNA B also resulted in the amelioration from severe stunting and in the alleviation from the delay in flowering. Alleviation from KA27 DNA B-type of symptom by co-infection or post-infection with KA22 DNA B did not result in a corresponding reduction in KA27 DNA B levels. Swapping of KA27 DNA B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA B abolished severe stunting and caused the appearance of mild yellow symptom, suggesting that the NSP is the major symptom determinant in MYMV DNA B.

  1. Evaluation of chlorine dioxide gas treatment to inactivate Salmonella enterica on mungbean sprouts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although fresh-sprouted beans and grains are considered a good source of nutrients, they have been associated with foodborne outbreaks. Sprouts provide a good matrix for microbial localization and growth due to optimal conditions of temperature and humidity while sprouting. Also, the lack of a kill...

  2. The allelic relationship of genes giving resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus in blackgram.

    PubMed

    Verma, R P; Singh, D P

    1986-09-01

    The allelic relationship of resistance genes for MYMV was studied in blackgram (V. mungo (L.) Hepper). The resistant donors to MYMV - 'Pant U84' and 'UPU 2', and their F1, F2 and F3 generations - were inoculated artificially using an insect vector, whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.). The two recessive genes previously reported for resistance were found to be the same in both donors.

  3. Biogenic synthesis and spatial distribution of silver nanoparticles in the legume mungbean plant (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rima; Singh, Jay Shankar; Singh, Devendra Pratap

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study the in vivo synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the legume Vigna radiata. The level of plant metabolites such as total phenolics, lipid, terpenoids, alkaloids and amino acid increased by 65%, 133%, 19%, 67% and 35%, respectively, in AgNO3 (100 mg L(-1)) treated plants compared to control. Whereas protein and sugar contents in the treated plants were reduced by 38% and 27%, respectively. FTIR analysis of AgNO3 (20-100 mg L(-1)) treated plants exhibited changes in the IR regions between 3297 and 3363 cm(-1), 1635-1619 cm(-1), 1249-1266 cm(-1) and that corresponded to alterations in OH groups of carbohydrates, OH and NH groups of amide I and II regions of protein, when compared with the control. Transmission electron micrographs showed the spatial distribution of AgNPs in the chloroplast, cytoplasmic spaces, vacuolar and nucleolar plant regions. Metal quantification in different tissues of plants exposed to 20-100 mg L(-1) AgNO3 showed about a 22 fold accumulation of Ag in roots as compared to shoots. The phytotoxic parameters such as percent seed germination and shoot elongation remained almost unaltered at low AgNO3 doses (20-50 mg L(-1)). However, at higher levels of exposure (100 mg L(-1)), the percent seed germination as well as root and shoot elongation exhibited concentration dependent decline. In conclusion, synthesis of AgNPs in V. radiata particularly at lower doses of AgNO3, could be used as a sustainable and environmentally safe technology for large scale production of metal nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum of mung-bean cotyledons: Quantitative morphology of cisternal and tubular ER during seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Harris, N; Chrispeels, M J

    1980-04-01

    The ultrastructure of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in storage parenchyma cells in the cotyledons of mung beans (Vigna radiata L.) was examined during germination and seedling growth. Two different methods were used to visualize the ER: thin (0.08 μm) sections of tissue fixed in formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde and post-fixed with osmium tetroxide, and thick (1 μm) sections of tissue fixed in buffered aldehyde and post-fixed with zinc iodide-osmium tetroxide (ZIO). Changes in relative amounts of ER were quantified by morphometry (stereology).The ER occurs in two forms: a cisternal form with associated ribosomes which can be seen at all stages from imbibition to cotyledon senescence, and a tubular form which initially has associated ribosomes. Stereoscopic images of thick sections of cotyledons of 2-day-old seedlings show that the tubular ER consists of a three-dimensional array of interconnecting tubules which have numerous connections with the cisternal ER. The network of tubules and cisternae extends throughout the cytoplasm enveloping the protein bodies. Germination and seedling growth are accompanied by a reduction in the total volume occupied by the ER. This reduction is the result of a preferential loss of tubular ER and occurs largely before protein mobilization. Cisternal ER decreases during the first 48 h of imbibition and seedling growth, but storage cells subsequently show an increase in cisternal ER just prior to and during the period of protein mobilization. Cisternal ER remains conspicuous during the last phase of reserve mobilization when starch is broken down and the cells are starting autophagy.

  5. Plant flavokinase. Affinity-chromatographic procedure for the purification of the enzyme from mung-bean (Phaseolus aureus) seeds and conformational changes on its interaction with orthophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Sobhanaditya, J; Rao, N A

    1981-01-01

    Flavokinase was purified, for the first time from a plant source [mung bean (Phaseolus aureus)] by affinity chromatography in the presence of orthophosphate and by using C-8 ATP-agarose (ATP linked through the C-8 position to beaded agarose), Cibacron Blue and riboflavin--Sepharoses. An altered substrates-saturation pattern was observed in the presence of K2HPO4. The conformational changes of the enzyme in the presence of K2HPO4 were monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. These results highlight the regulatory nature of this enzyme. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6274324

  6. Survival of Aeromonas hydrophila and Listeria monocytogenes on fresh vegetables stored under moderate vacuum.

    PubMed

    Aytac, S A; Gorris, L G

    1994-11-01

    Storage at 6.5°C under moderate vacuum effectively prevented growth of Aeromonas hydrophila on chicory endive, but had only a limited inhibitory effect on the growth of the organism on mung bean sprouts. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on chicory endive was strongly stimulated under these conditions, whereas it was decreased on mung-bean sprouts.

  7. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Ko, Chia-Yun; Kuo, Ching-I; Liu, Mao-Sen; Schafleitner, Roland; Chen, Long-Fang Oliver

    2015-01-01

    We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911). In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum), two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays), two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba) and one moss (Physcomitrella patens). Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  8. Effect of manganese toxicity on pigment content, Hill activity and photosynthetic rate of Vigna radiata L. Wilczek seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Suchita; Mukherji, S; Dutta, Jayanta

    2002-07-01

    Effect of different concentrations, viz. 10(-4) M, 5 x 10(-4) M, 10(-3) M and 5 x 10(-3) M of manganese sulphate (MnSO4, 7H2O) on chlorophyll, carotenoid pigment content and photosynthesis of mungbean seedlings was examined Progressive increase in manganese sulphate concentration upto 5 x 10(-3) M brought about a progressive decrease in total chlorophyll and chl a content. Chl b content changed very little by excess manganese treatment. Total carotenoid pigment content decreased considerably in comparison to control with every concentration of manganese sulphate tried here. Hill activity of chloroplasts isolated from leaves of mungbean seedling and rate of photosynthesis in terms of CO2 uptake showed progressive reduction along with the increase in concentration of the manganese.

  9. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    PubMed

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  10. Impact of mirid (Creontiades spp.) (Hemiptera: Miridae) pest management on Helicoverpa spp. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) outbreaks: the case for conserving natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Knight, Kristen M M; Brier, Hugh B; Lucy, Michael J; Kopittke, Rosemary A

    2007-05-01

    Creontiades spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) are sucking pests that attack buds, flowers and young pods in mungbeans, Vigna radiata (L.), causing these structures subsequently to abort. If left uncontrolled, mirids can cause 25-50% yield loss. Traditional industry practice has involved prophylactic applications of dimethoate to control mirids at budding and again a week later. The present trial was initiated to highlight the dangers of such a practice, in particular the risk of a subsequent Helicoverpa spp. lepidopteran pest outbreak. A single application of dimethoate halved the population of important natural enemies of Helicoverpa spp., and caused an above-threshold outbreak of Helicoverpa spp. within 11 days. This shows that even a moderate (e.g. 50%) reduction in natural enemies may be sufficient to increase Helicoverpa spp. populations in mungbeans. As a result, prophylactic sprays should not be used for the control of mirids in mungbeans, and dimethoate should be applied only when mirids are above the economic threshold. Indoxacarb was also tested to establish its effect on Helicoverpa spp., mirids and natural enemies. Indoxacarb showed potential for Helicoverpa spp. control and suppression of mirids and had little impact on natural enemies.

  11. Antioxidant Properties of the Mung Bean Flavonoids on Alleviating Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Che, Huilian; Cao, Jiankang; Yang, Liu; Zhu, Chunqiu; Jiang, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Background It is a widespread belief in Asian countries that mung bean soup (MBS) may afford a protective effect against heat stress. Lack of evidence supports MBS conferring a benefit in addition to water. Results Here we show that vitexin and isovitexin are the major antioxidant components in mungbean (more than 96% of them existing in the bean seed coat), and both of them could be absorbed via gavage into rat plasma. In the plasma of rats fed with mungbean coat extract before or after exposure to heat stress, the levels of malonaldehyde and activities of lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide synthase were remarkably reduced; the levels of total antioxidant capacity and glutathione (a quantitative assessment of oxidative stress) were significantly enhanced. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that MBS can play additional roles to prevent heat stress injury. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying mungbean beneficial effects should help in the design of diet therapy strategies to alleviate heat stress, as well as provide reference for searching natural medicines against oxidative stress induced diseases. PMID:21695166

  12. Characterization of betasatellite associated with the yellow mosaic disease of grain legumes in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Satya, V K; Malathi, V G; Velazhahan, R; Rabindran, R; Jayamani, P; Alice, D

    2013-01-01

    Yellow mosaic disease caused by mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus (the family Geminiviridae) is a major constraint in cultivation of grain legumes in India. The urdbean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) and mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek) samples affected with yellow mosaic disease exhibits yellow mosaic symptoms along with leaf puckering and leaf distortion in Tamil Nadu. Hence the study was performed to find out if there was any association and influence of betasatellite DNA on the symptom expression of MYMV. Full length viral clones of DNA A and DNA B were obtained through rolling circle amplification from YMD infected samples and identified as mungbean yellow mosaic virus. Interestingly, betasatellite was found to associate with MYMV, and its nucleotide sequence analysis showed its 95% identity with papaya leaf curl betasatellite (DQ118862) from cowpea. The present study represents the first report about the association of papaya leaf curl betasatellite with MYMV and represents a new member of the emerging group of bipartite begomovirus associated with betasatellite DNA.

  13. Molecular characterization of two soybean-infecting begomoviruses from India and evidence for recombination among legume-infecting begomoviruses from South [corrected] South-East Asia.

    PubMed

    Girish, K R; Usha, R

    2005-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of two soybean-infecting begomoviruses have been determined from central and southern parts of India. Sequence analyses show that the isolate from central India is a strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and the southern Indian isolate is a strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV). Multiple DNA B components could be detected with the soybean strain of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus species. The nucleotide sequence similarity between the DNA A components of the two isolates is higher (82%) than that between the corresponding DNA B components (71%). Analyses of the common region of the genomic components of these two virus isolates indicate considerable divergence in the origin of replication (ori), which did not impair their infectivity as demonstrated for the central Indian isolate by agroinfection with partial tandem repeats (PTRs) of the genomic components. Detailed sequence and phylogenetic analyses reveal the distribution and possible recombination events among legume-infecting begomoviruses from South-East Asia.

  14. Effect of germination periods and hydrothermal treatments on in vitro protein and starch digestibility of germinated legumes.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Veny; Bains, Kiran

    2012-04-01

    Germination of legumes followed by hydrothermal treatments is an effective mean of improving nutritive value of legumes. The protein content of mungbean, chickpea and cowpea increased by 9-11, 11-16 and 8-11% after germination. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decrease in protein content was observed on pressure cooking and microwaving in all three legumes. The carbohydrates decreased by 1 to 3% during soaking and 2 to 6% during germination. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) improvement in in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) was observed after soaking as well as after three germination periods. Germination resulted in an increase in IVPD from 15 to 25% in mungbean, 6 to 17% in chickpea and 6 to 17% in cowpea. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in IVPD was observed when raw sprouts of three legumes were subjected to pressure cooking and microwaving. In vitro starch digestibility (IVSD) increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) after germination, the percent increase being 8 to 12% in mungbean, 9 to 11% in chickpea and 10 to 13% in cowpea. The duration of germination had significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on IVSD. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) improvement in IVSD was observed when legume sprouts were subjected to pressure cooking and microwave cooking.

  15. Role of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Phytoremediation of Soil Rhizosphere Spiked with Poly Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Results from an innovative approach to improve remediation in the rhizosphere by encouraging healthy plant growth and thus enhancing microbial activity are reported. The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Am) on remediation efficacy of wheat, mungbean and eggplant grown in soil spiked with polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was assessed in a pot experiment. The results of this study showed that Am inoculation enhanced dissipation amount of PAHs in planted soil, plant uptake PAHs, dissipation amount of PAHs in planted versus unplanted spiked soil and loss of PAHs by the plant-promoted biodegradation. A number of parameters were monitored including plant shoot and root dry weight, plant tissue water content, plant chlorophyll, root lipid content, oxido-reductase enzyme activities in plant and soil rhizosphere and total microbial count in the rhizospheric soil. The observed physiological data indicate that plant growth and tolerance increased with Am, but reduced by PAH. This was reflected by levels of mycorrhizal root colonization which were higher for mungbean, moderate for wheat and low for eggplant. Levels of Am colonization increased on mungbean > wheat > eggplant. This is consistent with the efficacy of plant in dissipation of PAHs in spiked soil. Highly significant positive correlations were shown between of arbuscular formation in root segments (A)) and plant water content, root lipids, peroxidase, catalase polyphenol oxidase and total microbial count in soil rhizosphere as well as PAH dissipation in spiked soil. As consequence of the treatment with Am, the plants provide a greater sink for the contaminants since they are better able to survive and grow. PMID:24049473

  16. Living bio-membrane bi-template route for simultaneous synthesis of lead selenide nanorods and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Ding, Ya-Ping

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a novel method is reported by which semiconductor materials are synthesized via controlled organism membranes. Semiconductor lead selenide nanorods and nanotubes have been successfully prepared simultaneously through living bio-membrane bi-templates of the mungbean sprout. The lead selenide nanorods are approximately 45 nm in diameter, and up to 1100 nm in length; all of them are single crystalline in structure. Lead selenide nanotubes are 50 nm in diameter, and up to 2000 nm in length, and are poly-crystalline in structure. The characteristics of the products are illustrated by various means, and their possible formation mechanism is explored.

  17. Antibegomoviral activity of the agrobacterial virulence protein VirE2.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Sukumaran; Marian, Dolly; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2011-12-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic geminivirus (MYMV) causes severe yellow mosaic disease in blackgram, mungbean, Frenchbean, pigeonpea, soybean and mothbean. We attempted to induce resistance against this virus using the transcriptional activator protein gene deleted in the C-terminal activation domain (TrAP-∆AD) and Agrobacterium tumefaciens virE2. MYMV is known to replicate in agroinoculated tobacco leaf discs. Three transgenic tobacco plants which harboured a truncated MYMV transcriptional activator protein gene and two tobacco plants transformed with the octopine type A. tumefaciens virE2 gene were agroinoculated with an A. tumefaciens strain which harboured the partial dimers of both DNA A and DNA B of MYMV. The level of viral DNA accumulation in leaf discs of transgenic plants correlated inversely to the level of the MYMV TrAP-∆AD transcript. Two VirE2-transgenic plants, which complemented tumorigenesis of a virE2 mutant A. tumefaciens strain, effectively reduced MYMV DNA accumulation in the leaf disc agroinoculation assay.

  18. Genetic diversity of the black gram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper] gene pool as revealed by SSR markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaewwongwal, Anochar; Kongjaimun, Alisa; Somta, Prakit; Chankaew, Sompong; Yimram, Tarikar; Srinives, Peerasak

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 520 cultivated and 14 wild accessions of black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) were assessed for diversity using 22 SSR markers. Totally, 199 alleles were detected with a mean of 9.05 alleles per locus. Wild black gram showed higher gene diversity than cultivated black gram. Gene diversity of cultivated accessions among regions was comparable, while allelic richness of South Asia was higher than that of other regions. 78.67% of the wild gene diversity presented in cultivated accessions, indicating that the domestication bottleneck effect in black gram is relatively low. Genetic distance analysis revealed that cultivated black gram was more closely related to wild black gram from South Asia than that from Southeast Asia. STRUCTURE, principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses consistently revealed that 534 black gram accessions were grouped into three major subpopulations. The analyses also revealed that cultivated black gram from South Asia was genetically distinct from that from West Asia. Comparison by SSR analysis with other closely related Vigna species, including mungbean, azuki bean, and rice bean, revealed that level of gene diversity of black gram is comparable to that of mungbean and rice bean but lower than that of azuki bean. PMID:26069442

  19. Mode of inheritance of increased host acceptance in a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Messina, F J; Peña, N M

    2012-10-01

    Colonization of a novel plant by herbivorous insects is frequently accompanied by genetic changes that progressively improve larval or adult performance on the new host. This study examined the genetic basis of adaptation to a marginal host (lentil) by the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (F.). Quasi-natural selection in the laboratory rapidly increased the tendency to oviposit on lentil. The mode of inheritance of this increase in host acceptance was determined from crosses between three lentil-adapted lines and a line maintained on the ancestral host, mung bean. In each set of crosses, females from the lentil lines laid two to three times more eggs on lentil than did females from the mung-bean line. Hybrid females consistently displayed an intermediate level of host acceptance, which did not differ between reciprocal crosses. Alleles promoting greater oviposition on lentil thus were inherited additively, with no evidence of sex-linkage or cytoplasmic effects. In a time-course study, hybrid females initially resembled the parent from the mung-bean line, as few eggs were laid on lentil during the first 24 h. However, oviposition rates on lentil after 72 h were closer to the rate observed in the lentil-line parent. Inferences about additivity vs. dominance in genes affecting oviposition may, therefore, depend on experimental protocol. Comparison with earlier work suggests that inheritance patterns observed in crosses between recently derived selection lines (as in this study) may differ from those obtained in crosses between long-divergent geographic populations.

  20. A Homoploid Hybrid Between Wild Vigna Species Found in a Limestone Karst

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Iseki, Kohtaro; Kitazawa, Kumiko; Muto, Chiaki; Somta, Prakit; Irie, Kenji; Naito, Ken; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2015-01-01

    Genus Vigna comprise several domesticated species including cowpea and mungbean, and diverse wild species. We found an introgressive hybrid population derived from two wild species, Vigna umbellata and Vigna exilis, in Ratchaburi district, Thailand. The hybrid was morphologically similar to V. umbellata but habituated in a limestone rock mountain, which is usually dominated by V. exilis. Analyzing simple sequence repeat loci indicated the hybrid has undergone at least one round of backcross by V. umbellata. We found the hybrid acquired vigorous growth from V. umbellata and drought tolerance plus early flowering from V. exilis, and thus has taken over some habitats of V. exilis in limestone karsts. Given the wide crossability of V. umbellata, the hybrid can be a valuable genetic resource to improve drought tolerance of some domesticated species. PMID:26648953

  1. Effects of gamma irradiation on the flavor composition of food commodities.

    PubMed

    Yang, J S

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen food products including potato, sweet potato, shallot, onion, garlic, ginger, papaya, mango, rice, tobacco, small red bean, mungbean, soybean, wheat, flour and spices have been approved for irradiation by the National Health Administration in Taiwan. Market tests (Wu et al., 1996) provided strong proof that Taiwanese consumers would accept irradiated foods. However, researchers in the food industry are concerned about the possibility of chemical changes, especially in volatile composition, during irradiation processing. This study considers several food commodities, including garlic, ginger, shiitake, onion, potato, day-lily, tilapia, silver carp and shrimp. Food samples were irradiated with optimum doses and then studied for possible occurrence of chemical changes and effects on compositional characteristics of foods.

  2. Screening of bioagents against root rot of mung bean caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Chand, H

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory and green house experiment was carried out on the comparative antagonistic performance of four different bioagents (Aspergillus sp., Gliocladium virens, Trichoderma harzianum and T. viride) isolated from soil against Rhizoctonia solani. Under laboratory conditions, T. harzianum exhibited maximum (75.55%) mycelial growth inhibition of R. solani This was followed by T. viride, which showed 65.93 per cent mycelial growth inhibition of the pathogen. Gliocladium virens was also found to be effective antagonists, which exhibited 57.77 per cent mycelial growth inhibition. While Aspergillus sp exhibited minimum growth inhibition (45.74%) in comparison to other bioagents. Under green house conditions, T. harzianum gave maximum protection of the disease (72.72%) followed by T. viride, which exhibited 54.54 per cent disease control. However, G. virens and Aspergillus sp were found least effective in controlling root rot of mungbean.

  3. Screening of bioagents against root rot of mung bean caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surender; Chand, Hari

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory and green house experiment was carried out on the comparative antagonistic performance of four different bioagents (Aspergillus sp. Gliocladium virens, Trichoderma harzianum and T. viride) isolated from soil against Rhizoctonia solani. Under laboratory conditions, T. harzianum exhibited maximum (75.55%) mycelial growth inhibition of R. solani. This was followed by T. viride, which showed 65.93% mycelial growth inhibition of the pathogen. Gliocladium virens was also found to be effective antagonists, which exhibited 57.77% mycelial growth inhibition. While Aspergillus sp exhibited minimum growth inhibition (45.74%) in comparison to other bioagents. Under green house conditions, T. harzianum gave maximum protection of the disease (72.72%) followed by T. viride, which exhibited 54.54% disease control. However, G. virens and Aspergillus sp were found least effective in controlling root rot of mungbean.

  4. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in aqueous solutions after UV-peroxide treatment: focus on toxicity of effluent to primary producers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dennis N; Macawile, Maria Cristina A; Abella, Leonila C; Gallardo, Susan M

    2011-09-01

    The combination of UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide (UV-H(2)O(2)) was shown to be effective in treating water spiked with 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobipheny (PCB 153), reducing its concentration by as much as 98%. To test the toxicity of the effluent, bioassays involving three species of primary producers were performed. Results showed the effluent exerting an adverse effect on the algae Scenedesmus bijugatus and the duckweed Lemna paucicostata. On the other hand, exposure of the mungbean Vigna radiata to the effluent revealed mostly no statistically significant adverse effect or growth stimulation. This suggested that on an exposure period of 96 h, higher forms of chlorophyll-bearing species such as plants are relatively unaffected by trace concentrations of PCBs and degradation products, while less differentiated species like algae and duckweeds are vulnerable.

  5. Radiation-induced mutations and plant breeding

    SciTech Connect

    Naqvi, S.H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ionizing radiation could cause genetic changes in an organism and could modify gene linkages. The induction of mutation through radiation is random and the probability of getting the desired genetic change is low but can be increased by manipulating different parameters such as dose rate, physical conditions under which the material has been irradiated, etc. Induced mutations have been used as a supplement to conventional plant breeding, particularly for creating genetic variability for specific characters such as improved plant structure, pest and disease resistance, and desired changes in maturity period; more than 200 varieties of crop plants have been developed by this technique. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission has used this technique fruitfully to evolve better germplasm in cotton, rice, chickpea, wheat and mungbean; some of the mutants have become popular commercial varieties. This paper describes some uses of radiation induced mutations and the results achieved in Pakistan so far.

  6. Unfolding of in planta activity of anti-rep ribozyme in presence of a RNA silencing suppressor.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sumona Karjee; Chilakamarthi, Ushasri; Deb, J K; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2014-05-21

    Antisense RNA ribozymes have intrinsic endonucleolytic activity to effect cleavage of the target RNA. However, this activity in vivo is often controlled by the dominance of antisense or other double-stranded RNA mechanism. In this work, we demonstrate the in planta activity of a hammerhead ribozyme designed to target rep-mRNA of a phytopathogen Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India virus (MYMIV) as an antiviral agent. We also found RNA-silencing is induced on introduction of catalytically active as well as inactive ribozymes. Using RNA-silencing suppressors (RSS), we demonstrate that the endonucleolytic activity of ribozymes is a true phenomenon, even while a mutated version may demonstrate a similar down-regulation of the target RNA. This helps to ease the confusion over the action mechanism of ribozymes in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Rock phosphate enriched compost: an approach to improve low-grade Indian rock phosphate.

    PubMed

    Biswas, D R; Narayanasamy, G

    2006-12-01

    In this study, rock phosphate enriched composts (RP-compost) were prepared by mixing four low-grade Indian rock phosphates with rice straw with and without Aspergillus awamori. RP-compost had higher total P, citrate soluble P (CSP), organic P (Org.P), acid and alkaline phosphatase activities, and lower water soluble P (WSP) and microbial biomass C (MBC) than normal compost. Inoculation with A. awamori increased total P, WSP, CSP, Org.P, MBC and acid phosphatase activity. RP-compost recorded lower Olsen P at the initial period of incubation study than diammonium phosphate (DAP), but improved significantly with the progress of time. RP-compost prepared at 4% charged rate resulted in higher Olsen P throughout the incubation period compared to 2% charged rate. Similar trend were obtained with those RP-composts prepared with A. awamori. Data on pot experiment revealed higher yield and P uptake by mungbean (Vigna radiata) due to addition of RP-composts over control. The effectiveness of RP-compost ranged from 61.4% (MussoorieRP-compost) to 94.1% (PuruliaRP-compost) as that of DAP on dry matter yield and 48.8% (JhabuaRP-compost) to 83.7% (PuruliaRP-compost) on total P uptake. Enriched compost prepared at 4% charged rate recorded 15.8% and 10.6% extra yield and P uptake, respectively by mungbean over 2% charged compost. Also RP-compost inoculated with A. awamori resulted in 13.0 and 21.5% extra yield and P uptake than without A. awamori treated group. Thus, RP enriched compost could be an alternative and viable technology to utilize both low-grade RPs and rice straw efficiently.

  8. Characterization of mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse intestine by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism: Utility of sampling strategies and methods to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts.

    PubMed

    Costa, Estela; Puhl, Nathan J; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2009-08-01

    Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) is a molecular technique used for comparative analysis of microbial community structure and dynamics. We evaluated three sampling methods for recovering bacterial community DNA associated with intestinal mucosa of mice (i.e. mechanical agitation with PBS, hand washing with PBS containing Tween 80, and direct DNA extraction from mucosal plugs). In addition, the utility of two methods (i.e. Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease) to reduce single-stranded DNA artifacts was tested. T-RFLP analysis indicated that diverse communities of bacteria are associated with mucosa of the ileum, cecum, and descending colon of mice. Although there was no significant difference in bacterial community structure between the mechanical agitation and direct DNA extraction methods regardless of intestinal location, community diversity was reduced for the hand wash method in the colon. The use of Klenow fragment and mung-bean nuclease have been reported to eliminate single-stranded DNA artifacts (i.e. pseudo-T-restriction fragments), but neither method was beneficial for characterizing mucosa-associated bacterial communities of the mouse cecum. Our study showed that the mechanical agitation and direct plug extraction methods yielded equivalent bacterial community DNA from the mucosa of the small and large intestines of mice, but the latter method was superior for logistical reasons. We also applied a combination of different statistical approaches to analyze T-RFLP data, including statistical detection of true peaks, analysis of variance for peak number, and group significance test, which provided a quantitative improvement for the interpretation of the T-RFLP data.

  9. Total polyphenols and bioactivity of seeds and sprouts in several legumes.

    PubMed

    Chon, Sang-Uk

    2013-01-01

    Seeds and sprouts from legume crop plants have received attention as functional foods, because of their nutritive values including amino acid, fiber, trace elements, vitamins, flavonoids, and phenolic acids. Consumption of seeds and sprouts has become increasingly popular among people interested in improving and maintaining their health status by changing dietary habits. The seeds and sprouts are excellent examples of functional food defined as lowering the risk of various diseases and/or exerting health promoting effects in addition to its nutritive value. Phenolic compounds are considered as secondary metabolites that are synthesized by plants during normal development and in response to stress conditions, and the compounds occur ubiquitously in plants as the diversified group of phytochemicals derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Plant phenolics include simple phenols, phenolic acids, coumarins, flavonoids, stilbenes, hydrolyzable and condensed tannins, lignans, and lignins. In plant, phenolics may act as phytoalexins, antifeedants, attractants for pollinators, contributors to the plant pigmentation, antioxidants, and protective agents against UV light, among others. In food, phenolics may contribute to the bitterness, astringency, color, flavor, odor, and oxidative stability of products. In addition, health-protecting capacity of some and antinutritional properties of other plant phenolics are of great importance to producers, processors and consumers. Several researches were conducted to compare the content of phenolics and flavonoids, antioxidant activity and antioxidant enzyme activity from seeds and sprouts of legume plants. Total phenolics (TP) content and total flavonoids (TF) level were highest in soybean sprout extracts, followed by cowpea and mungbean sprout extracts (p < 0.05). DPPH (1, 1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl radical) free radical scavenging activity was higher in cowpea or mungbean sprouts than in soybean sprouts. Among antioxidant enzymes

  10. Dietary fibre and fermentability characteristics of root crops and legumes.

    PubMed

    Mallillin, Aida C; Trinidad, Trinidad P; Raterta, Ruby; Dagbay, Kevin; Loyola, Anacleta S

    2008-09-01

    The dietary fibre and fermentability characteristics of local root crops and legumes were determined. Total, soluble and insoluble fibre were determined in six root crops (kamote, gabi, potato, tugi, ube, cassava) and ten legumes (mungbean, soyabean, peanut, pole sitao, cowpea, chickpea, green pea, lima bean, kidney bean and pigeon pea) using Association of Official Analytical Chemists methods. The dietary fibre from test foods was isolated and fermented in vitro using human faecal inoculum simulating conditions in the human colon. The SCFA, e.g. acetate, propionate, butyrate, produced after fibre fermentation was measured using HPLC. The dietary fibre content of root crops ranged from 4.6 to 13.5 g/100 g while legumes ranged from 20.9 to 46.9 g/100 g, suggesting that root crops and legumes are good sources of dietary fibre. Significant amounts of SCFA were produced after in vitro fermentation of the fibre isolate of both root crops and legumes. The best sources (as mmol/g fibre isolate) of acetate among the legumes were pole sitao (5.6 (sem 0.5)) and mungbean (5.3 (sem 0.1)) and among the root crops, tugi (2.5 (sem 0.4)) and cassava (2.4 (sem 0.1)); of propionate, kidney bean (7.2 (sem 1.5)) and pigeon pea (3.3 (sem 0.2)) for legumes, and tugi (1.8 (sem 0.2)) for root crops; and of butyrate, peanut (6.0 (sem 0.2)) and cowpea (5.4 (sem 0.2)) for legumes, and tugi (0.8 (sem 0.0)) and cassava (0.8 (sem 0.0)) for root crops. In conclusion, root crops and legumes are good sources of dietary fibre and produced SCFA after fibre fermentation, such as acetate, propionate and butyrate. SCFA production after in vitro fermentation can be estimated using human faecal inoculum and can be used to model the human colon.

  11. Metal uptake via phosphate fertilizer and city sewage in cereal and legume crops in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, G; Javed, W; Hussain, A; Wahid, A; Murtaza, B; Owens, G

    2015-06-01

    Crop irrigation with heavy metal-contaminated effluents is increasingly common worldwide and necessitates management strategies for safe crop production on contaminated soils. This field study examined the phytoavailability of three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn) in two cereal (wheat, maize) and legume (chickpea, mungbean) crops in response to the application of either phosphatic fertilizer or sewage-derived water irrigation over two successive years. Five fertilizer treatments, i.e. control, recommended nitrogen (N) applied alone and in combination of three levels of phosphorus (P), half, full and 1.5 times of recommended P designated as N0P0, N1P0, N1P0.5, N1P1.0, and N1P1.5, respectively. Tissue concentrations of Cd, Cu, Zn, and P were determined in various plant parts, i.e., root, straw, and grains. On the calcareous soils studied while maximum biomass production was obtained with application of P at half the recommended dose, the concentrations of metals in the crops generally decreased with increasing P levels. Tissue metal concentrations increased with the application of N alone. Translocation and accumulation of Zn and Cu were consistently higher than Cd. And the pattern of Cd accumulation differed among plant species; more Cd being accumulated by dicots than monocots, especially in their grains. The order of Cd accumulation in grains was maize > chickpea > mungbean > wheat. Mungbean and chickpea straws also had higher tissue Cd concentration above permissible limits. The two legume species behaved similarly, while cereal species differed from each other in their Cd accumulation. Metal ion concentrations were markedly higher in roots followed by straw and grains. Increasing soil-applied P also increased the extractable metal and P concentrations in the post-harvest soil. Despite a considerable addition of metals by P fertilizer, all levels of applied P effectively decreased metal phytoavailability in sewage-irrigated soils, and applying half of the

  12. Metabolism of 5-methylthioribose to methionine

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.; Yang, S.F.

    1987-06-01

    During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine is released as 5'-methylthioadenosine, which is recycled to methionine via 5-methylthioribose (MTR). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted into labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB), as intermediates. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, indicating the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR. Tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract requires an amino donor. Among several potential donors examined, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Anaerobiosis inhibited only partially the oxidation of MTR to formate, KMB/HMB, and methionine by avocado extract. The role of O/sub 2/ in the conversion of MTR to methionine is discussed.

  13. Methionine salvage pathway in relation to ethylene biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recycling of methionine during ethylene biosynthesis (the methionine cycle) was studied. During ethylene biosynthesis, the H/sub 3/CS-group of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is released at 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which is recycled to methionine via 5'-methylthioribose (MTS). In mungbean hypocotyls and cell-free extracts of avocado fruit, (/sup 14/C)MTR was converted to labeled methionine via 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyric acid (KMB) and 2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyric acid (HMB) as intermediates. Radioactive tracer studies showed that KMB was converted readily in vivo and in vitro to methionine, while HMB was converted much more slowly. The conversion of KMB to methionine by dialyzed avocado extract required an amino group donor. Among several potential donors tested, L-glutamine was the most efficient. Incubation of (ribose-U-/sup 14/C)MTR with avocado extract resulted in the production of (/sup 14/C)formate, with little evolution of other /sup 14/C-labeled one-carbon compounds, indicating that the conversion of MTR to KMB involves a loss of formate, presumably from C-1 of MTR.

  14. Variability of chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal DNA in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) and its wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Fregene, M A; Vargas, J; Ikea, J; Angel, F; Tohme, J; Asiedu, R A; Akoroda, M O; Roca, W M

    1994-11-01

    Chloroplast DNA (cp) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) variation was investigated in 45 accessions of cultivated and wild Manihot species. Ten independent mutations, 8 point mutations and 2 length mutations were identified, using eight restriction enzymes and 12 heterologous cpDNA probes from mungbean. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis defined nine distinct chloroplast types, three of which were found among the cultivated accessions and six among the wild species. Cladistic analysis of the cpDNA data using parsimony yielded a hypothetical phylogeny of lineages among the cpDNAs of cassava and its wild relatives that is congruent with morphological evolutionary differentiation in the genus. The results of our survey of cpDNA, together with rDNA restriction site change at the intergenic spacer region and rDNA repeat unit length variation (using rDNA cloned fragments from taro as probe), suggest that cassava might have arisen from the domestication of wild tuberous accessions of some Manihot species, followed by intensive selection. M. esculenta subspp flabellifolia is probably a wild progenitor. Introgressive hybridization with wild forms and pressures to adapt to the widely varying climates and topography in which cassava is found might have enhanced the crop's present day variability.

  15. Glutathione and Homoglutathione Synthesis in Legume Root Nodules1

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Moran, Jose F.; Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Iñaki; Rubio, Maria C.; Becana, Manuel

    1999-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection was used to study thiol metabolism in legume nodules. Glutathione (GSH) was the major non-protein thiol in all indeterminate nodules examined, as well as in the determinate nodules of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), whereas homoglutathione (hGSH) predominated in soybean (Glycine max), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and mungbean (Vigna radiata) nodules. All nodules had greater thiol concentrations than the leaves and roots of the same plants because of active thiol synthesis in nodule tissue. The correlation between thiol tripeptides and the activities of glutathione synthetase (GSHS) and homoglutathione synthetase (hGSHS) in the nodules of eight legumes, and the contrasting thiol contents and activities in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves (98% hGSH, 100% hGSHS) and nodules (72% GSH, 80% GSHS) indicated that the distribution of GSH and hGSH is determined by specific synthetases. Thiol contents and synthesis decreased with both natural and induced nodule senescence, and were also reduced in the senescent zone of indeterminate nodules. Thiols and GSHS were especially abundant in the meristematic and infected zones of pea (Pisum sativum) nodules. Thiols and γ-glutamylcysteinyl synthetase were also more abundant in the infected zone of bean nodules, but hGSHS was predominant in the cortex. Isolation of full-length cDNA sequences coding for γ-glutamylcysteinyl synthetase from legume nodules revealed that they are highly homologous to those from other higher plants. PMID:10557236

  16. Fermentation and quality of yellow pigments from golden brown rice solid culture by a selected Monascus mutant.

    PubMed

    Yongsmith, Busaba; Thongpradis, Panida; Klinsupa, Worawan; Chantrapornchai, Withida; Haruthaithanasan, Vichai

    2013-10-01

    A single peak (λmax 370) yellow pigment-producing mutant derived from Monascus sp. TISTR 3179 was used for the pigment production in solid rice culture. Various factors affecting yellow tones were investigated. Hom-mali rice variety was the best amongst five Thai local varieties used for fungus culture. It was also better than corn, mungbean, soybean, potato, sweet potato, or cassava tubers. The moisture content and temperature were the key environmental factors affecting the color tones of creamy, tangerine, and golden brown rice solid cultures. The golden brown rice culture gave the highest yellow pigment concentration. Under an optimum room temperature of 28-32 °C, an initial moisture content of 42 %, and 7-day-old inoculum size of 2 % (v/w) the maximum yield at 2,224.63 A370U/gdw of yellow pigment was produced. A mellow yellow powder at 550 A370U/gdw could be obtained using spray-drying techniques. The powder had a moisture content of 5.15 %, a water activity value of 0.398, a hue angle of 73.70 ° (yellowish orange), high lightness (L) of 74.63, color saturation (C) of 28.97, a neutral pH of 7.42, 0.12 % acidity and solubility of 0.211 g/10 ml. It was noteworthy that the Chinese fresh noodle with spray-dried yellow powder showed no discoloration during 8-day storage.

  17. Metabolomic Profiling of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens-Induced Root Nodules Reveals Both Host Plant-Specific and Developmental Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Lardi, Martina; Murset, Valérie; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Ahrens, Christian H.; Zamboni, Nicola; Pessi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont, which can grow inside root-nodule cells of the agriculturally important soybean and other host plants. Our previous studies described B. diazoefficiens host-specific global expression changes occurring during legume infection at the transcript and protein level. In order to further characterize nodule metabolism, we here determine by flow injection–time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis the metabolome of (i) nodules and roots from four different B. diazoefficiens host plants; (ii) soybean nodules harvested at different time points during nodule development; and (iii) soybean nodules infected by two strains mutated in key genes for nitrogen fixation, respectively. Ribose (soybean), tartaric acid (mungbean), hydroxybutanoyloxybutanoate (siratro) and catechol (cowpea) were among the metabolites found to be specifically elevated in one of the respective host plants. While the level of C4-dicarboxylic acids decreased during soybean nodule development, we observed an accumulation of trehalose-phosphate at 21 days post infection (dpi). Moreover, nodules from non-nitrogen-fixing bacteroids (nifA and nifH mutants) showed specific metabolic alterations; these were also supported by independent transcriptomics data. The alterations included signs of nitrogen limitation in both mutants, and an increased level of a phytoalexin in nodules induced by the nifA mutant, suggesting that the tissue of these nodules exhibits defense and stress reactions. PMID:27240350

  18. Tropical food legumes: virus diseases of economic importance and their control.

    PubMed

    Hema, Masarapu; Sreenivasulu, Pothur; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Kumar, P Lava; Reddy, Dodla V R

    2014-01-01

    Diverse array of food legume crops (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) have been adopted worldwide for their protein-rich seed. Choice of legumes and their importance vary in different parts of the world. The economically important legumes are severely affected by a range of virus diseases causing significant economic losses due to reduction in grain production, poor quality seed, and costs incurred in phytosanitation and disease control. The majority of the viruses infecting legumes are vectored by insects, and several of them are also seed transmitted, thus assuming importance in the quarantine and in the epidemiology. This review is focused on the economically important viruses of soybean, groundnut, common bean, cowpea, pigeonpea, mungbean, urdbean, chickpea, pea, faba bean, and lentil and begomovirus diseases of three minor tropical food legumes (hyacinth bean, horse gram, and lima bean). Aspects included are geographic distribution, impact on crop growth and yields, virus characteristics, diagnosis of causal viruses, disease epidemiology, and options for control. Effectiveness of selection and planting with virus-free seed, phytosanitation, manipulation of crop cultural and agronomic practices, control of virus vectors and host plant resistance, and potential of transgenic resistance for legume virus disease control are discussed.

  19. Identification and structure elucidation of a novel antifungal compound produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Muthusubramanian, Shanmugam; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 was found to protect mungbean plants from charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina. Secondary metabolites from the culture supernatant of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 were extracted with ethyl acetate and the antifungal compound was purified by preparative HPLC using reverse phase chromatography. The purified compound showed antifungal activity against M. phaseolina and other phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium sp., Rhizoctonia sp. Alternaria sp., and Aspergillus sp.). The structure of the purified compound was determined using (1)H, (13)C, 2D NMR spectra and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Spectral data suggest that the antifungal compound is 3,4-dihydroxy-N-methyl-4-(4-oxochroman-2-yl)butanamide, with the chemical formula C14H17NO5 and a molecular mass of 279. Though chemically synthesized chromanone derivatives have been shown to have antifungal activity, we report for the first time, the microbial production of a chromanone derivative with antifungal activity. This ability of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 makes it a suitable strain for biocontrol.

  20. Proteolytic enzyme mediated antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Anuj, Nishanth Lipton; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-11-01

    A new antagonistic bacterial strain PGPR2 was isolated from the mungbean rhizosphere and documented for the production of hydrolytic enzymes with antifungal activity. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence and phenotyping, this strain was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Maximum protease activity (235 U/mL) was obtained at 24 h of fermentation. The protease was purified to homogeneity in three steps: ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography on DEAE- cellulose resin and gel filtration chromatography using P6 column. The purified enzyme had a molecular weight of -33 kDa. The purified protease exhibited maximum activity at pH 6.0 and retained 80% of activity in a pH range of 5.0 - 9.0. Proteolytic activity was maximum in a temperature range of 40-70 degrees C. However, the enzyme was stable at 40 degrees C for 60 min. Among the metals tested, Mg2+ enhanced the protease activity. Internal amino acid sequence of the protease obtained by MALDI -ToF and subsequent Mascot database search showed maximum similarity to the HtpX protease of P. aeruginosa strain PA7. Thus, by virtue of its early production time, thermostability and effective antifungal ability, the protease purified and characterized from P. aeruginosa PGPR2 has several potential applications as fungicidal agents in agriculture.

  1. BIOPESTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF Calotropis procera L. AGAINST Macrophomina phaseolina.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Nidra; Jabeen, Khajista; Iqbal, Sumera; Javaid, Arshad

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek] is an important pulse crop globally. This imperative crop is severely affected by charcoal rot disease caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid. In the present study, the leaves of Calotropis procera L. were tested for their antifungal potential against M. phaseolina. Various concentrations i.e. 1%, 2.5%, 4%, 5.5% and 7% of methanolic extract of C. procera leaves were prepared and their in vitro bioactivity was examined against the test fungus. Methnolic leaf extract was partitioned using n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol and antifungal activity of each fraction was evaluated. n-Hexane fraction was subjected to GC-MS analysis. The higher concentration of methanolic leaf extract (7%) caused maximum inhibition in the diameter of M. phaseolina i.e. 38%. The n-hexane fraction of methanolic leaf extract was found to be the most effective against M. phaseolina. Seven compounds belonging to classes of chlorocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, azocompounds, aromatic carboxylic acids and fatty acids were identified in GC-MS analysis of n-hexane fraction. Antifungal activity of the methanolic leaf extract of C. procera might be due to the presence of the identified compounds in n-hexane fraction of methanolic leaf extract.

  2. Suppression of Meloidogyne javanica by antagonistic and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Xie, Guan-lin; Soad, A.; Coosemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    Four rhizobacteria selected out of over 500 isolates from rhizosphere of the vegetables in China were further studied for suppression of the root-knot nematode and soil-borne fungal pathogens in laboratory and greenhouse in Belgium. They were identified as Brevibacillus brevis or Bacillus subtilis by Biolog test and partial 16s rDNA sequence comparison. They not only inhibited the radial growth of the root-infecting fungi Rhizoctonia solani SX-6, Pythium aphanidermatum ZJP-1 and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cucumerinum ZJF-2 in vitro, but also exhibited strong nematicidal activity by killing the second stage larvae of Meloidogyne javanica to varying degrees in the greenhouse. The toxic principles of bacterium B7 that showed the highest juvenile mortality were partially characterized. The active factors were heat stability and resistance to extreme pH values. B7 used either as seed dressing or soil drench significantly reduced the nematode populations in the rhizosphere and enhanced the growth of mungbean plants over the controls in the presence or absence of R. solani. PMID:15909333

  3. MYMIV-AC2, a geminiviral RNAi suppressor protein, has potential to increase the transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Jamilur; Karjee, Sumona; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Gene silencing is one of the limiting factors for transgene expression in plants. But the plant viruses have learnt to suppress gene silencing by encoding the protein(s), called RNA silencing suppressor(s) (RSS). Hence, these proteins could be used to overcome the limitation for transgene expression. The RNAi suppressors, namely HC-Pro and P19, have been shown to enhance the transgene expression but other RSS proteins have not been screened for similar role. Moreover, none of RSSs from the DNA viruses are known for enhancing the expression of transgenes. The Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus within the family of Geminiviridae encodes an RSS called the AC2 protein. Here, we used AC2 to elevate the expression of the transgenes. Upon introduction of MYMIV-AC2 in the silenced GFP transgenic tobacco lines, by either genetic hybridisation or transgenesis, the GFP expression was enhanced several fold in F1 and T0 lines. The GFP-siRNA levels were much reduced in F1 and T0 lines compared with those of the initial parental silenced lines. The enhanced GFP expression was also observed at the cellular level. This approach was also successful in enhancing the expression of another transgene, namely topoisomeraseII.

  4. Suppression of RNA Silencing by a Geminivirus Nuclear Protein, AC2, Correlates with Transactivation of Host Genes†

    PubMed Central

    Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Oakeley, Edward J.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped. In a model Nicotiana benthamiana plant, in which silencing can be triggered biolistically, AC2 reduced local silencing and prevented its systemic spread. Mutations in the AC2 NLS or Zn finger or deletion of its activator domain abolished both these effects, suggesting that suppression of silencing by AC2 requires transactivation of host suppressor(s). In line with this, in Arabidopsis protoplasts, MYMV AC2 or its homologue from African cassava mosaic geminivirus coactivated >30 components of the plant transcriptome, as detected with Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips. Several corresponding promoters cloned from Arabidopsis were strongly induced by both AC2 proteins. These results suggest that silencing suppression and transcription activation by AC2 are functionally connected and that some of the AC2-inducible host genes discovered here may code for components of an endogenous network that controls silencing. PMID:15681452

  5. Suppression of RNA silencing by a geminivirus nuclear protein, AC2, correlates with transactivation of host genes.

    PubMed

    Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Oakeley, Edward J; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-02-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped. In a model Nicotiana benthamiana plant, in which silencing can be triggered biolistically, AC2 reduced local silencing and prevented its systemic spread. Mutations in the AC2 NLS or Zn finger or deletion of its activator domain abolished both these effects, suggesting that suppression of silencing by AC2 requires transactivation of host suppressor(s). In line with this, in Arabidopsis protoplasts, MYMV AC2 or its homologue from African cassava mosaic geminivirus coactivated >30 components of the plant transcriptome, as detected with Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips. Several corresponding promoters cloned from Arabidopsis were strongly induced by both AC2 proteins. These results suggest that silencing suppression and transcription activation by AC2 are functionally connected and that some of the AC2-inducible host genes discovered here may code for components of an endogenous network that controls silencing.

  6. Parvo-like virus in the hepatopancreas of freshwater prawns Macrobrachium rosenbergii cultivated in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Gangnonngiw, Warachin; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Sriurairatana, Siriporn; Laisutisan, Kesinee; Chuchird, Niti; Limsuwan, Chalor; Flegel, Timothy W

    2009-07-23

    A survey of cultivated giant freshwater prawns Macrobrachium rosenbergii from Thailand revealed the presence of unusual spherical to ovoid inclusions in nuclei of hepatopancreas tubule epithelial cells. These began as small eosinophilic inclusions that became more basophilic as they increased in size. They were present in both R-cells and E-cells but were largest and deeply basophilic only in the E-cells. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that stained nucleic acid fluorescence from the inclusions was lost by treatment with DNase I specific for double- and single-stranded DNA and also lost or reduced by treatment with mungbean nuclease specific for single-stranded nucleic acids. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the inclusions contained tightly packed, unenveloped, viral-like particles of approximately 25 to 30 nm diameter, resembling those produced by shrimp parvoviruses. However, PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical tests for shrimp parvoviruses previously reported from Thailand were all negative. These results suggested that the inclusions contained a parvo-like virus, not previously reported from M. rosenbergii in Thailand.

  7. Host-specific symbiotic requirement of BdeAB, a RegR-controlled RND-type efflux system in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Andrea; Koch, Marion; Pessi, Gabriella; Müller, Andreas J; Balsiger, Sylvia; Hennecke, Hauke; Fischer, Hans-Martin

    2010-11-01

    Multidrug efflux systems not only cause resistance against antibiotics and toxic compounds but also mediate successful host colonization by certain plant-associated bacteria. The genome of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum encodes 24 members of the family of resistance/nodulation/cell division (RND) multidrug efflux systems, of which BdeAB is genetically controlled by the RegSR two-component regulatory system. Phylogenetic analysis of the membrane components of these 24 RND-type transporters revealed that BdeB is more closely related to functionally characterized orthologs in other bacteria, including those associated with plants, than to any of the other 23 paralogs in B. japonicum. A mutant with a deletion of the bdeAB genes was more susceptible to inhibition by the aminoglycosides kanamycin and gentamicin than the wild type, and had a strongly decreased symbiotic nitrogen-fixation activity on soybean, but not on the alternative host plants mungbean and cowpea, and only very marginally on siratro. The host-specific role of a multidrug efflux pump is a novel feature in the rhizobia-legume symbioses. Consistent with the RegSR dependency of bdeAB, a B. japonicum regR mutant was found to have a greater sensitivity against the two tested antibiotics and a symbiotic defect that is most pronounced for soybean.

  8. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed.

  9. The cytochromes in microsomal fractions of germinating mung beans.

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, G A; Houghton, J D; Jones, O T

    1981-01-01

    Detailed studies of microsomal cytochromes from mung-bean radicles showed the presence of cytochrome P-420, particularly in dark-grown seedlings, accompanied by smaller quantities of cytochrome P-450. Similar proportions of cytochrome P-420 to cytochrome P-450 were found spectrophotometrically in vivo with whole radicles and hypocotyls. Assayed in vitro, maximum concentrations of both cytochromes were attained after 4 days of growth, before undergoing rapid degradation. Illumination of seedlings stabilized cytochrome P-450 and decreased the amount of cytochrome P-420. Three b cytochromes were present in the microsomal fraction, namely cytochromes b-562.5 (Em + 105 +/- 23 mV), b-560.5 (Em + 49 +/- 13 mV) and b5 (Em - 45 +/- 14 mV), all at pH 7.0. Of the b cytochromes, cytochrome b5 alone undergoes a rapid degradation after day 4, Changes in cytochrome b concentrations were confined to the microsomal fraction: mitochondrial b cytochrome concentrations were unaltered with age. Protohaem degradation (of exogenous methaemalbumin) was detected in microsomal fractions of mung beans. The rates of degradation were highest in extracts of young tissue and declined after day 4. The degradation mechanism and products did not resemble those of mammalian haem oxygenase. PMID:7306021

  10. MicroRNA detection using lateral flow nucleic acid strips with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shao-Yi; Hsiao, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ming-Shu; Yen, Chun-Che; Chang, Chi-Sheng

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the tested microRNA and the detection probe perfectly match with the capture probe instead of the traditional sandwich methods in which the tested oligonucleotide matches with the detection and capture probes. To avoid non-specific signals, mung-bean nuclease, a single-strand-specific nuclease, catalyzes the degradation of the capture probe if there is no tested miRNA in the samples. The gold nanoparticles conjugate the thiol-DNA as the detection probe and the biotin-single strand DNA serves as the capture probe. The avidin-biotin-Au-sample complex is captured by the anti-avidin antibody immobilized on a flow strip. The detection and quantification of the gold nanoparticle signal indicate the existence and quantity of the target miRNA. One fmol and five amol of the synthetic microRNA were detected without and with the silver enhancement, respectively. This highly sensitive and specific assay takes about 70 min after the RNA purification and preparation. It is simple, convenient, fast, and suitable for point-of-care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of Cyanogenic Compounds in Edible Plants by Ion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye-Jeon; Do, Byung-Kyung; Shim, Soon-Mi; Lee, Dong-Ha; Nah, Ahn-Hee; Choi, Youn-Ju; Lee, Sook-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are HCN-producing phytotoxins; HCN is a powerful and a rapidly acting poison. It is not difficult to find plants containing these compounds in the food supply and/or in medicinal herb collections. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of total cyanide in nine genera (Dolichos, Ginkgo, Hordeum, Linum, Phaseolus, Prunus, Phyllostachys, Phytolacca, and Portulaca) of edible plants and the effect of the processing on cyanide concentration. Total cyanide content was measured by ion chromatography following acid hydrolysis and distillation. Kernels of Prunus genus are used medicinally, but they possess the highest level of total cyanide of up to 2259.81 CN−/g dry weight. Trace amounts of cyanogenic compounds were detected in foodstuffs such as mungbeans and bamboo shoots. Currently, except for the WHO guideline for cassava, there is no global standard for the allowed amount of cyanogenic compounds in foodstuffs. However, our data emphasize the need for the guidelines if plants containing cyanogenic glycosidesare to be developed as dietary supplements. PMID:24278641

  12. Carbohydrate-rich foods: glycaemic indices and the effect of constituent macronutrients.

    PubMed

    Widanagamage, Rahal D; Ekanayake, Sagarika; Welihinda, Jayantha

    2009-01-01

    The glycaemic index (GI) ranks foods according to their acute glycaemic impact and is used in planning meals for patients invoking glycaemic control through diet. Kurakkan (Eleusine coracana) flour roti, rice flour roti, atta flour roti, boiled breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis/Artocarpus communis) and boiled legumes (mungbean, cowpea and chickpea) were categorized as low-GI foods (relative to white bread; Prima Crust Top), and the corresponding GI (+/- standard error of the mean) values were 70+/-8, 69+/-7, 67+/-9, 64+/-7, 57+/-6, 49+/-8 and 29+/-5, respectively. Kurakkan flour pittu and wheat flour roti were classified as medium-GI foods with GI values of 85+/-6 and 72+/-6. Hoppers, rice flour pittu, wheat flour pittu and Olu-milk rice (seeds of Nymphaea lotus) were categorized as high-GI foods, and the corresponding GI (+/- standard error of the mean) values were 120+/-8, 103+/-7, 101+/-8 and 91+/-8, respectively. The GI values significantly (P<0.01) and negatively correlated with the insoluble dietary fibre (rho = - 0.780), soluble dietary fibre (rho = - 0.712) and protein (rho = - 0.738) contents in grams per 100 g digestible starch containing foods.

  13. Rapid and efficient method for cloning of blunt-ended DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Upcroft, P; Healey, A

    1987-01-01

    We describe a system to generate cDNA or genomic libraries from DNA segments that have blunt termini. Background and rearrangement levels are low, but efficiencies are high and the procedural times very short. T4 ligase in the presence of polyethylene glycol produces high Mr oligomers of vector and insert. These concatemers are reduced to vector-insert monomers at a high frequency by subsequent cleavage with a restriction endonuclease, which recognises the insert rarely, if at all, and the vector once. The monomers are recircularised under standard ligation conditions prior to transformation. Thus insertion conditions are optimised independently of those for recircularisation. All reading frames for expression libraries are generated by short BAL 31 cleavage followed by the blunt-end cloning procedure. Similarly, genomic expression libraries can be made by BAL 31 or mung-bean nuclease treatment after cleavage with DNase I is the presence of Mn2+. The technique is suitable for any DNA segment that is blunt-ended or can be made so. When the vector is treated with alkaline phosphatase, recombinants are generated at a frequency greater than 90% and have single inserts. Yields are 3-5 X 10(6) colony-forming units per micrograms of insert.

  14. Applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmy, N.; Hendranto, K.

    1994-12-31

    Applications of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques have been developed by the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) since early 1970 in Indonesia. The scope of these applications covers various fields such as agriculture, hydrology, sedimentology and industry. Some applications of tracer techniques in industry which have been done such as measurement of homogeneity of mixing process in fertiliser and paper factory, residence time distribution in gold processing plant, mercury inventory in caustic soda plant, enhanced oil recovery in oil production wells, leakage investigation in dust chamber of fertiliser plant and blockage of pipeline, are presented in this paper. In the field of NDT by radiographic technique, BATAN regularly conducts training courses and also issues licences for Level I and II. Some applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture such as mutation breeding, animal production and animal health have shown the potential of radiation in creating variability as a basis for varietal improvements in several food crop species, the potential of using isotopes as tracers in the studies on metabolism, particularly in relation to the efficiency of rumen fermentative digestion and biological evaluation of locally available feedstuffs from agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts. So far, four varieties of nice, two varieties of soybean, and one variety of mungbean have been officially approved for release, and one formulation of feed supplement utilizing locally available agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts has been established and used for cattle and goats. In animal health, a radiovaccine against coccidiosis in poultry has been produced and used routinely.

  15. Transcript Dynamics at Early Stages of Molecular Interactions of MYMIV with Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of the Leguminous Host, Vigna mungo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anirban; Patel, Anju; Paul, Sujay; Pal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Initial phases of the MYMIV- Vigna mungo interaction is crucial in determining the infection phenotype upon challenging with the virus. During incompatible interaction, the plant deploys multiple stratagems that include extensive transcriptional alterations defying the virulence factors of the pathogen. Such molecular events are not frequently addressed by genomic tools. In order to obtain a critical insight to unravel how V. mungo respond to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), we have employed the PCR based suppression subtractive hybridization technique to identify genes that exhibit altered expressions. Dynamics of 345 candidate genes are illustrated that differentially expressed either in compatible or incompatible reactions and their possible biological and cellular functions are predicted. The MYMIV-induced physiological aspects of the resistant host include reactive oxygen species generation, induction of Ca2+ mediated signaling, enhanced expression of transcripts involved in phenylpropanoid and ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways; all these together confer resistance against the invader. Elicitation of genes implicated in salicylic acid (SA) pathway suggests that immune response is under the regulation of SA signaling. A significant fraction of modulated transcripts are of unknown function indicating participation of novel candidate genes in restricting this viral pathogen. Susceptibility on the other hand, as exhibited by V. mungo Cv. T9 is perhaps due to the poor execution of these transcript modulation exhibiting remarkable repression of photosynthesis related genes resulting in chlorosis of leaves followed by penalty in crop yield. Thus, the present findings revealed an insight on the molecular warfare during host-virus interaction suggesting plausible signaling mechanisms and key biochemical pathways overriding MYMIV invasion in resistant genotype of V. mungo. In addition to inflate the existing knowledge base, the genomic resources identified in

  16. An optimized method for NMR-based plant seed metabolomic analysis with maximized polar metabolite extraction efficiency, signal-to-noise ratio, and chemical shift consistency.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangyu; Li, Ning; Li, Hongde; Tang, Huiru

    2014-04-07

    Plant metabolomic analysis has become an essential part of functional genomics and systems biology and requires effective extraction of both primary and secondary metabolites from plant cells. To establish an optimized extraction method for the NMR-based analysis, we used the seeds of mungbean (Vigna radiata cv. Elü no. 1) as a model and systematically investigated the dependence of the metabolite composition in plant extracts on various extraction parameters including cell-breaking methods, extraction solvents, number of extraction repeats, tissue-to-solvent ratio, and extract-to-buffer ratio (for final NMR analysis). We also compared two NMR approaches for quantitative metabolomic analysis from completely relaxed spectra directly and from partially relaxed spectra calculated with T1. By maximizing the extraction efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio but minimizing inter-sample chemical-shift variations and metabolite degradations, we established a parameter-optimized protocol for NMR-based plant seed metabolomic analysis. We concluded that aqueous methanol was the best extraction solvent with an optimal tissue-to-solvent ratio of about 1 : 10-1 : 15 (mg per μL). The combination of tissuelyser homogenization with ultrasonication was the choice of cell-breaking method with three repeated extractions being necessary. For NMR analysis, the optimal extract-to-solvent was around 5-8 mg mL(-1) and completely relaxed spectra were ideal for intrinsically quantitative metabolomic analysis although partially relaxed spectra were employable for comparative metabolomics. This optimized method will offer ensured data quality for high-throughput and reliable plant metabolomics studies.

  17. An SSR-based linkage map of yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Sesquipedalis Group) and QTL analysis of pod length.

    PubMed

    Kongjaimun, Alisa; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Somta, Prakit; Shimizu, Takehiko; Shu, Yujian; Isemura, Takehisa; Vaughan, Duncan A; Srinives, Peerasak

    2012-02-01

    Yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Sesquipedalis Group) (2n = 2x = 22) is one of the most important vegetable legumes of Asia. The objectives of this study were to develop a genetic linkage map of yardlong bean using SSR makers from related Vigna species and to identify QTLs for pod length. The map was constructed from 226 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. subsp. unguiculata Unguiculata Group), azuki bean (Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & Ohashi), and mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) in a BC(1)F(1) ((JP81610 × TVnu457) × JP81610) population derived from the cross between yardlong bean accession JP81610 and wild cowpea (Vigna unguiculata subsp. unguiculata var. spontanea) accession TVnu457. The markers were clustered into 11 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 852.4 cM in total length with a mean distance between adjacent markers of 3.96 cM. All markers on LG11 showed segregation distortion towards the homozygous yardlong bean JP81610 genotype. The markers on LG11 were also distorted in the rice bean (Vigna umbellata (Thunb.) Ohwi & Ohashi) map, suggesting the presence of common segregation distortion factors in Vigna species on this LG. One major and six minor QTLs were identified for pod length variation between yardlong bean and wild cowpea. Using flanking markers, six of the seven QTLs were confirmed in an F(2) population of JP81610 × TVnu457. The molecular linkage map developed and markers linked to pod length QTLs would be potentially useful for yardlong bean and cowpea breeding.

  18. Rapid development of microsatellite markers for Callosobruchus chinensis using Illumina paired-end sequencing.

    PubMed

    Duan, Can-Xing; Li, Dan-Dan; Sun, Su-Li; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Zhen-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The adzuki bean weevil, Callosobruchus chinensis L., is one of the most destructive pests of stored legume seeds such as mungbean, cowpea, and adzuki bean, which usually cause considerable loss in the quantity and quality of stored seeds during transportation and storage. However, a lack of genetic information of this pest results in a series of genetic questions remain largely unknown, including population genetic structure, kinship, biotype abundance, and so on. Co-dominant microsatellite markers offer a great resolving power to determine these events. Here, we report rapid microsatellite isolation from C. chinensis via high-throughput sequencing. In this study, 94,560,852 quality-filtered and trimmed reads were obtained for the assembly of genome using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. In total, the genome with total length of 497,124,785 bp, comprising 403,113 high quality contigs was generated with de novo assembly. More than 6800 SSR loci were detected and a suit of 6303 primer pair sequences were designed and 500 of them were randomly selected for validation. Of these, 196 pair of primers, i.e. 39.2%, produced reproducible amplicons that were polymorphic among 8 C. chinensis genotypes collected from different geographical regions. Twenty out of 196 polymorphic SSR markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 18 C. chinensis populations. The results showed the twenty SSR loci were highly polymorphic among these populations. This study presents a first report of genome sequencing and de novo assembly for C. chinensis and demonstrates the feasibility of generating a large scale of sequence information and SSR loci isolation by Illumina paired-end sequencing. Our results provide a valuable resource for C. chinensis research. These novel markers are valuable for future genetic mapping, trait association, genetic structure and kinship among C. chinensis.

  19. The occurrence of Salmonella in raw and ready-to-eat bean sprouts and sprouted seeds on retail sale in England and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Sadler-Reeves, L; Aird, H; de Pinna, E; Elviss, N; Fox, A; Kaye, M; Jorgensen, F; Lane, C; Willis, C; McLauchlin, J

    2016-02-01

    A total of 554 samples of bean sprouts or other sprouted seeds were collected at retail sale and submitted to nine Official Control Laboratories in England and Northern Ireland during January to March 2011. Samples (100 g) were tested for the presence of Salmonella using the EN ISO 6579:2002 method. Products labelled as ready-to-eat comprised 23% of the samples and 61% were labelled as raw or to-cook: the remaining 12% had no indication if the food was intended as ready-to-eat or ready-to-cook, and 4% were not recorded. Salmonella spp. were detected from four samples of mung-bean sprouts (0·7% of all the 554 samples) and all four isolates were confirmed as Salmonella enterica serovar Abaetetuba (11 : k : 1,5). Two of the samples where Salmonella was detected were sold as ready-to-eat (labelled 'rinse and serve' only): The remaining two were from samples labelled as ready-to-cook. Consumption of sprouted seeds have been associated with infections from a range of foodborne pathogens, particularly Salmonella and shigatoxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC). However, there is limited data (including that from EU monitoring) on foodborne pathogens in samples of this food type which are not associated with outbreaks of infection. Out of 554 raw and ready-to-eat bean sprouts and sprouted seeds sampled at retail, Salmonella spp. was detected from four samples. This study illustrated the potential of this product to be contaminated with a human pathogen and the importance of considering the intended use and preparation of specific food in assessing microbiological risks. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Spectral reflectance pattern in soybean for assessing yellow mosaic disease.

    PubMed

    Gazala, I F Saad; Sahoo, R N; Pandey, Rakesh; Mandal, Bikash; Gupta, V K; Singh, Rajendra; Sinha, P

    2013-09-01

    Remote sensing technique is useful for monitoring large crop area at a single time point, which is otherwise not possible by visual observation alone. Yellow mosaic disease (YMD) is a serious constraint in soybean production in India. However, hardly any basic information is available for monitoring YMD by remote sensing. Present study examines spectral reflectance of soybean leaves due to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) infection in order to identify YMD sensitive spectral ratio or reflectance. Spectral reflectance measurement indicated significant (p < 0.001) change in reflectance in the infected soybean canopy as compared to the healthy one. In the infected canopy, reflectance increased in visible region and decreased in near infra-red region of spectrum. Reflectance sensitivity analysis indicated wavelength ~642, ~686 and ~750 nm were sensitive to YMD infection. Whereas, in yellow leaves induced due to nitrogen deficiency, the sensitive wavelength was ~589 nm. Due to viral infection, a shift occurred in red and infra-red slope (called red edge) on the left in comparison to healthy one. Red edge shift was a good indicator to discriminate yellow mosaic as chlorophyll gets degraded due to MYMIV infection. Correlation of reflectance at 688 nm (R688) and spectral reflectance ratio at 750 and 445 nm (R750/R445) with the weighted mosaic index indicated that detection of yellow mosaic is possible based on these sensitive bands. Our study for the first time identifies the yellow mosaic sensitive band as R688 and R750/R445, which could be utilized to scan satellite data for monitoring YMD affected soybean cropping regions.

  1. Diversity of Rhizoctonia solani associated with pulse crops in different agro-ecological regions of India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sunil C; Tripathi, Aradhika; Upadhyay, Balendu K; Deka, Utpal K

    2014-06-01

    Four hundred seventy Rhizoctonia solani isolates from different leguminous hosts originating from 16 agro-ecological regions of India covering 21 states and 72 districts were collected. The disease incidence caused by R. solani varied from 6.8 to 22.2 % in the areas surveyed. Deccan plateau and central highlands, hot sub-humid ecoregion followed by northern plain and central highlands and hot semi-arid ecoregion showed the highest disease incidence. R. solani isolates were highly variable in growth diameter, number, size and pattern of sclerotia formation as well as hyphal width. The isolates obtained from aerial part of the infected plants showing web blight symptoms produced sclerotia of 1-2 mm in size whereas, the isolates obtained from infected root of the plants showing wet root rot symptoms produced microsclerotia (<1 mm). Majority of R. solani isolates showed <8 μm hyphal diameter. Based on morphological characters the isolates were categorized into 49 groups. Seven anastomosis groups (AGs) were identified among the populations of R. solani associated with the pulse crops. The frequency (25.6 %) of AG3 was the highest followed by AG2-3 (20.9 %) and AG5 (17.4 %). The cropping sequence of rice/sorghum/wheat-chickpea/mungbean/urdbean/cowpea/ricebean influenced the dominance of AG1 (16.3 %). Phylogenetic analysis utilizing ITS-5.8S rDNA gene sequences indicated high level of genetic similarity among isolates representing different AGs, crops and regions. ITS groups did not correspond to the morphological characters. The sequence data from this article has been deposited with NCBI data libraries with JF701707 to JF701795 accession numbers.

  2. Effect of diatomaceous earths Fossil Shield and Silico-Sec on the egg laying behaviour of Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Prasantha, B D Rohitha; Reichmuth, Ch; Büttner, C

    2002-01-01

    The pulse beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) is a destructive pest of pulses in both storage and field. It is well known that diatomaceous earth (DE) kill the insects by locally absorbing the epicuticular lipid layers leading to high rate of water loss through the cuticle. However, the effectiveness of DE depends on its ability to kill the adults before copulation and egg-laying. Newly emerged virgin males and females of Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) were exposed to the DEs, Fossil-Shield and Silico-Sec on 30 treated mungbeans (Vigna radita (L)). Fecundity, number of beans used for egg-laying and beans without eggs were evaluated after four days; the number of unhatched eggs was evaluated after ten days. It was determined, that the fecundity of female insects decreased sigmoidely with increasing rate of DE content. Percentages of unhatched eggs and seeds without eggs increased with increasing DE dosages. However, the maximum egg densities (eggs per used secd) occurred at 1200 mg DE/kg for Fossil-Shield and Silico-Sec. The reason for such DE-stimulated behaviour of egg laying expressed as a number of seeds with eggs of C. maculatus is not known, but it may be related to the stress caused by the inert dusts or to the reduction of both chemical and physical (tactile) stimuli. Treatment with DEs altered the surface texture of the beans and caused less cohesion between eggs and the seed surface. Only few larvae managed to penetrate into the grains, possibly due to increased grain roughness and repellent effect of DE. A relatively high number of eggs were laid on the surface of those beans where the amount of dust had been locally reduced by adults' movement and their pick up of DE. Therefore, several larvae tried to penetrate into these treated beans, causing a high larval density per partially cleaned bean. All these reasons lead to a progeny decline.

  3. Loss of adaptation following reversion suggests trade-offs in host use by a seed beetle.

    PubMed

    Messina, F J; Durham, S L

    2015-10-01

    Experimental evolution has provided little support for the hypothesis that the narrow diets of herbivorous insects reflect trade-offs in performance across hosts; selection lines can sometimes adapt to an inferior novel host without a decline in performance on the ancestral host. An alternative approach for detecting trade-offs would be to measure adaptation decay after selection is relaxed, that is, when populations newly adapted to a novel host are reverted to the ancestral one. Lines of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus rapidly adapted to a poor host (lentil); survival in lentil seeds increased from 2% to > 90% in < 30 generations. After the lines had reached a plateau with respect to survival in lentil, sublines were reverted to the ancestral host, mung bean. Twelve generations of reversion had little effect on performance in lentil, but after 25-35 generations, the reverted lines exhibited lower survival, slower development and smaller size. The most divergent pair of lines was then assayed on both lentil and mung bean. Performance on lentil was again much poorer in the reverted line than in the nonreverted one, but the lines performed equally well on mung bean. Moreover, the performance of the nonreverted line on mung bean remained comparable to that of the original mung-bean population. Our results thus present a paradox: loss of adaptation to lentil following reversion implies a trade-off, but the continued strong performance of lentil-adapted lines on mung bean does not. Genomic comparisons of the reverted, nonreverted and ancestral lines may resolve this paradox and determine the importance of selection vs. drift in causing a loss of adaptation following reversion.

  4. Review: Weak radiofrequency radiation exposure from mobile phone radiation on plants.

    PubMed

    Halgamuge, Malka N

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the hypothesis that non-thermal, weak, radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have an effect on living plants. In this study, we performed an analysis of the data extracted from the 45 peer-reviewed scientific publications (1996-2016) describing 169 experimental observations to detect the physiological and morphological changes in plants due to the non-thermal RF-EMF effects from mobile phone radiation. Twenty-nine different species of plants were considered in this work. Our analysis demonstrates that the data from a substantial amount of the studies on RF-EMFs from mobile phones show physiological and/or morphological effects (89.9%, p < 0.001). Additionally, our analysis of the results from these reported studies demonstrates that the maize, roselle, pea, fenugreek, duckweeds, tomato, onions and mungbean plants seem to be very sensitive to RF-EMFs. Our findings also suggest that plants seem to be more responsive to certain frequencies, especially the frequencies between (i) 800 and 1500 MHz (p < 0.0001), (ii) 1500 and 2400 MHz (p < 0.0001) and (iii) 3500 and 8000 MHz (p = 0.0161). The available literature on the effect of RF-EMFs on plants to date observed the significant trend of radiofrequency radiation influence on plants. Hence, this study provides new evidence supporting our hypothesis. Nonetheless, this endorses the need for more experiments to observe the effects of RF-EMFs, especially for the longer exposure durations, using the whole organisms. The above observation agrees with our earlier study, in that it supported that it is not a well-grounded method to characterize biological effects without considering the exposure duration. Nevertheless, none of these findings can be directly associated with human; however, on the other hand, this cannot be excluded, as it can impact the human welfare and health, either directly or indirectly, due to their complexity and varied effects (calcium metabolism, stress

  5. Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus) naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Kumar, P Lava; Mgbechi-Ezeri, J U; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2010-05-01

    Two new 'legumoviruses' (genus Begomovirus; family Geminiviridae) naturally infecting soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Nigeria were molecularly characterized. Based on characteristic symptoms in soybean, the two viruses are provisionally designated as Soybean mild mottle virus (SbMMV) and Soybean chlorotic blotch virus (SbCBV). SbCBV has a bipartite genome, whereas SbMMV has only a DNA A component. The DNA A component of SbMMV is 2,768 nucleotides (nt) long and the DNA A and DNA B components of SbCBV are 2,708 and 2,647 nt long, respectively. In pairwise comparisons, the DNA A component of SbMMV and SbCBV showed 62% nt sequence identity, indicating that these two viruses are distinct. Whereas the DNA A of SbMMV contains two virion- and four complementary-sense open reading frames, that of SbCBV lacks the virus-sense AV2, a signature gene present in 'Old World' begomoviruses. A pairwise comparison with the corresponding nucleotide sequence of other begomoviruses in the databases indicated that SbCBV had a maximum of 74% identity with cowpea golden mosaic virus and SbMMV had a maximum of 65% identity with mungbean yellow mosaic India virus and kudzu mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the DNA A component of SbCBV and SbMMV together with those of other begomoviruses available in the databases showed clustering of the two viruses within the 'legumovirus' clade of the begomovirus phylogenetic tree. In addition, the DNA A and B components of SbCBV from Centrosema pubescens Benth were found to be identical to those from soybean, indicating that leguminous wild species are a potential alternative host for the virus. Since soybean is an introduced crop, the identification of two distinct begomoviruses naturally infecting soybean in Nigeria suggests the occurrence of 'legumoviruses' in plant species indigenous to Africa and underscores their potential threat to sustainable cultivation of soybean on the African continent.

  6. The studies and legislation on radiation disinfestation, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying-Kai; Chang, Ming-Shia; Hu, Tsan

    .O.C. in January 1983, not only on sprout inhibition on potatoes, sweat potatoes, shallot, onions, garlic within 150 Gy, radurization on papaya, mango within 1.5 kGy, but also on radiation disinfestation on rice, tobacco with 1 kGy and small red bean, mungbean within 200 Gy. The prospects for the radiation disinfestation are very promising and bright in Taiwan, R.O.C. and all preparation are being made to adopt this technology from research to commercial scale.

  7. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Global Warming Potential of Traditional and Diversified Tropical Rice Rotation Systems including Impacts of Upland Crop Management Practices i.e. Mulching and Inter-crop Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janz, Baldur; Weller, Sebastian; Kraus, David; Wassmann, Reiner; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    crop rotations indicated a SOC loss for the R-M system, while for the other systems SOC stocks were unaffected. This trend for R-M systems needs to be followed since it has significant consequences not only for the GWP balance but also with regard to soil fertility. New upland crop management practices where first implemented during land-preparation for dry season (July) 2015 where i) 6t/ha rice straw was returned to the field and incorporated into soil as mulch treatment and ii) mungbean was grown as a cover-crop between dry and wet season in addition to the rice straw application. The input of organic material led to higher methanogenic substrate availability during the following wet season. GHG measurements for upland cropping systems (R-M and R-A) indicate increased CH4 and N2O emissions with mulching and inter-crop cultivation when compared to a control treatment. Subsequent measurements will be necessary to further quantify and assess the mitigation potentials or risks of new management practices. Nevertheless, regarding a future increase of water scarcity it can be expected that mixed lowland-upland systems will expand in SE Asia as water requirements were cut by more than half in both rotation systems with upland crops.