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Sample records for munitions container pa103

  1. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  2. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  3. Explosive Containment Chamber Vulnerability to Chemical Munition Fragment Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Benham, R.A.; Fischer, S.H.; Kipp, M.E.; Martinez, R.R.

    1999-02-01

    Scenarios in which the explosive burster charge in a chemical munition accidentally detonates inside demilitarization containment chambers are analyzed. The vulnerability of an inner Auxiliary Pressure Vessel and the primary Explosive Containment Chamber to impact by fragments from the largest explosive charge expected to be placed in these chambers (M426, 8 inch, chemical, 7 lbs Comp B) is evaluated. Numerical (CTH) and empirical (ConWep) codes are used to characterize the munition fragments, and assess the consequences of their impact and penetration on the walls of these vessels. Both pristine and corroded configurations of the munition have been considered, with and without liquid agent fill. When the munition burster charge detonates, munition case fragments impact and perforate the Auxiliary Pressure Vessel wall, resulting in extensive breakup of this inner chamber and the formation of additional fragments. These residual munition case and Auxiliary Pressure Vessel fragments have sufficient mass and velocity to crater the Explosive Containment Chamber inner wall layer, with accompanying localized permanent deformation (bulging) of both the inner and outer chamber walls. The integrity of the Explosive Containment Chamber was retained under all of the APV / munition configurations considered in this study, with no evidence that primary (munition) or secondary (munition and Auxiliary Pressure Vessel) fragments will perforate the inner chamber wall. Limited analyses of munition detonation without the Auxiliary Pressure Vessel present indicate that some munition span fragments could form under those conditions that have sufficient mass and velocity to perforate the inner wall of the Explosive Containment Chamber.

  4. Remediating munitions contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, P.J.; Comfort, S.D.

    1995-10-01

    The former Nebraska Ordnance Plant (NOP) at Mead, NE was a military loading, assembling, and packing facility that produced bombs, boosters and shells during World War II and the Korean War (1942-1945, 1950-1956). Ordnances were loaded with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), amatol (TNT and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}), tritonal (TNT and Al) and Composition B (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine [RDX] and TNT). Process waste waters were discharged into wash pits and drainage ditches. Soils within and surrounding these areas are contaminated with TNT, RDX and related compounds. A continuous core to 300 cm depth obtained from an NOP drainage ditch revealed high concentrations of TNT in the soil profile and substantial amounts of monoamino reduction products, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) and 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT). Surface soil contained TNT in excess of 5000 mg kg{sup -1} and is believed to contain solid phase TNT. This is supported by measuring soil solution concentrations at various soil to solution ratios (1:2 to 1:9) and obtaining similar TNT concentrations (43 and 80 mg L{sup -1}). Remediating munitions-contaminated soil at the NOP and elsewhere is of vital interest since many of the contaminants are carcinogenic, mutagenic or otherwise toxic to humans and the environment. Incineration, the most demonstrated remediation technology for munitions-containing soils, is costly and often unacceptable to the public. Chemical and biological remediation offer potentially cost-effective and more environmentally acceptable alternatives. Our research objectives are to: (a) characterize the processes affecting the transport and fate of munitions in highly contaminated soil; (b) identify effective chemical and biological treatments to degrade and detoxify residues; and (c) integrate these approaches for effective and practical remediation of soil contaminated with TNT, RDX, and other munitions residues.

  5. Mobile munitions assessment system development

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, L.C.; Watts, K.D.; Jorgensen, C.L.

    1996-05-01

    The United States has been involved in the development, testing, storage and disposal of chemical weapons since World War I. As a result, there are numerous sites which contain the presence of chemical warfare materiel. This materiel is in the form of buried surplus munitions, munitions that did not detonate during testing and other forms. These items pose a significant human health and environmental hazard and must be disposed of properly. The US Army was tasked by the Department of Defense with the remediation of all non-stockpile chemical warfare materiel. To help comply with this tasking, the Army Project Manager for Nonstockpile Chemical Materiel is sponsoring the development of a Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS). The system is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Dugway Proving Ground. The purpose of the system is to inspect suspect munitions and containers, identify the fill, evaluate the fuzing and firing train and analyze samples from the surrounding area to determine if chemical warfare materiel is present. The information gained from the application of the MMAS and other systems is intended to be used to establish the best method to handle and dispose of a given munition and its contents.

  6. Evaluation of oleoresin capsicum of Capsicum frutescenes var. Nagahari containing various percentages of capsaicinoids following inhalation as an active ingredient for tear gas munitions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Deb, Utsab; Kaushik, M P

    2012-08-01

    Comparative efficacy as peripheral sensory irritant, oral and inhalation exposure studies were carried out on oleoresin capsicum (OC) of Capsicum frutescence var. Nagahari containing various percentages of capsaicinoids and two synthetic isomers of capsaicin in Swiss albino male mouse model to come up with a suitable active ingredient from natural source for tear gas munitions. The compounds screened were OC having varying percentages of capsaicinoids (20, 40 and 80%, respectively) and synthetic isomers (E and Z) of capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide). Mice were exposed to pyrotechnically generated smoke of the compounds in an all glass static exposure chamber for 15 min to determine acute inhalation toxicity (LC₅₀) and quantitative sensory irritation potential (RD₅₀). Acute oral median lethal dose (LD₅₀) was also evaluated. Safety index of tear gas (SITG), a ratio of lethal concentration 50% (LC₅₀) and the concentration which depresses respiration by 50% (RD₅₀) due to peripheral sensory irritation is also proposed. The compound having highest SITG is considered as the most suitable to be used for tear gas munitions. The study revealed that oleoresin capsicum containing 40% capsaicinoids had the highest SITG among the compounds studied. The oral dosage versus mortality pattern of some compounds did not follow a true dose-response curve (DRC); however, following inhalation, all the compounds followed DRC. It was concluded that oleoresin capsicum (40% capsaicinoids) may be considered as the most suitable and environmental friendly compound from natural source to be used as an active ingredient for tear gas munitions.

  7. Classification of munition fill using laser acoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.G.; Blackwood, L.G.

    1997-08-01

    Identification of a munition fill is easier if one can determine if there is fill material present (empty versus full), and if so, the phase (solid or liquid) of the fill. Previous munition inspection efforts by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that resonance information could determine the fill. A portable, noncontacting laser-acoustic system was developed by INEEL that uses a low-power laser system to measure the container`s vibration characteristics in response to an acoustic excitation. These vibration characteristics were shown to be functions of the fill material and munition geometry. The laser acoustic system was used to characterize the fill of over one hundred 155-mm munitions. Additional research and development using this system is being performed for the Mobile Munitions Assessment System.

  8. The munitions provisions of the Federal Facility Compliance Act

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Queen, R.

    1994-03-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA) was signed by President Bush on October 6, 1992. This Act amends the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the primary law governing hazardous waste management in the US The most significant provision of the FFCA was the waiver of sovereign immunity. This waiver subjects Federal facilities to the same ``incentives`` as the private sector for compliance. While the waiver has broad implications for all Federal facilities, other provisions of the FFCA impact specific sectors of the Federal complex. The focus of this paper is the FFCA Munitions Provisions, which have the potential to change some aspects of the structure of munitions management within the military. The Munitions Provisions, contained in Section 107 of the FFCA, modifies Section 3004 of RCRA by adding a new subsection (y) on Munitions. Section 107 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop, after consultation with the Department of Defense (DOD) and appropriate State officials, regulations identifying when military munitions (including conventional and chemical munitions) become hazardous waste, and to provide for the safe transportation and storage of such waste. The FFCA requires EPA to promulgate the final ``Munitions Rule`` by October 6, 1994. These are the only provisions of the FFCA that require a new rulemaking. It is clear that the Munitions Rule could have a significant effect on the way in which DOD manages munitions. Demilitarization, range management, training activities, and emergency response actions may be affected. It is important for DOD, the Services, and individual installations, to be aware of potential impacts of the FFCA on munitions management operations. The purpose of this paper is to review several important munitions Rule issues, and to discuss potential impacts of these issues.

  9. Munitions integrity and corrosion features observed during the HUMMA deep-sea munitions disposal site investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Jeff A. K.; Chock, Taylor

    2016-06-01

    An evaluation of the current condition of sea-disposed military munitions observed during the 2009 Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment Project investigation is presented. The 69 km2 study area is located south of Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, and is positioned within a former deep-sea disposal area designated as Hawaii-05 or HI-05 by the United States Department of Defense. HI-05 is known to contain both conventional and chemical munitions that were sea-disposed between 1920 and 1951. Digital images and video reconnaissance logs collected during six remotely operated vehicle and 16 human-occupied vehicle surveys were used to classify the integrity and state of corrosion of the 1842 discarded military munitions (DMM) objects encountered. Of these, 5% (or 90 individual DMM objects) were found to exhibit a mild-moderate degree of corrosion. The majority (66% or 1222 DMM objects) were observed to be significantly corroded, but visually intact on the seafloor. The remaining 29% of DMM encountered were found to be severely corroded and breached, with their contents exposed. Chemical munitions were not identified during the 2009 investigation. In general, identified munitions known to have been constructed with thicker casings were better preserved. Unusual corrosion features were also observed, including what are termed here as 'corrosion skirts' that resembled the flow and cementation of corrosion products at and away from the base of many munitions, and 'corrosion pedestal' features resembling a combination of cemented corrosion products and seafloor sediments that were observed to be supporting munitions above the surface of the seafloor. The origin of these corrosion features could not be determined due to the lack of physical samples collected. However, a microbial-mediated formation hypothesis is presented, based on visual analysis, which can serve as a testable model for future field programs.

  10. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOEpatents

    Tschritter, Kenneth L.; Haroldsen, Brent L.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; DiBerardo, Raymond A.

    2005-04-19

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  11. Emergency destruction system for recovered chemical munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Shepodd, T.J.; Stofleth, J.H.; Haroldsen, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    At the request of the US Army Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a transportable system for destroying recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions. The system uses shaped charges to access the agent and burster followed by chemical neutralization to destroy them. The entire process takes place inside a sealed pressure vessel. In this paper, they review the design, operation, and testing of a prototype system capable of containing up to one pound of explosive.

  12. Munitions related feature extraction from LIDAR data.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Barry L.

    2010-06-01

    The characterization of former military munitions ranges is critical in the identification of areas likely to contain residual unexploded ordnance (UXO). Although these ranges are large, often covering tens-of-thousands of acres, the actual target areas represent only a small fraction of the sites. The challenge is that many of these sites do not have records indicating locations of former target areas. The identification of target areas is critical in the characterization and remediation of these sites. The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) of the DoD have been developing and implementing techniques for the efficient characterization of large munitions ranges. As part of this process, high-resolution LIDAR terrain data sets have been collected over several former ranges. These data sets have been shown to contain information relating to former munitions usage at these ranges, specifically terrain cratering due to high-explosives detonations. The location and relative intensity of crater features can provide information critical in reconstructing the usage history of a range, and indicate areas most likely to contain UXO. We have developed an automated procedure using an adaptation of the Circular Hough Transform for the identification of crater features in LIDAR terrain data. The Circular Hough Transform is highly adept at finding circular features (craters) in noisy terrain data sets. This technique has the ability to find features of a specific radius providing a means of filtering features based on expected scale and providing additional spatial characterization of the identified feature. This method of automated crater identification has been applied to several former munitions ranges with positive results.

  13. SERDP munition disposal source characterization pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Couch, R.G.; Fried, L.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting studies to develop and implement technologies for the safe, efficient, and environmentally sound disposal of obsolete munitions and propellants which are stored at various locations across the country. One proposed disposal technique is the open-air burning or detonation (OB/OD) of this material. Although OB/OD is viewed as an efficient and cost-effective method for reducing the inventory of unwanted munitions and propellants, questions regarding its safety and environmental impacts must be addressed. Since very large amounts of munitions and propellants must be consumed inexpensively in relatively short time periods and with the very restrictive Federal and State regulations on environmental issues, it is clear that traditional OB/OD procedures will not be acceptable and that it is necessary to develop modified or advanced OB/OD technology. The effectiveness and environmental impact of the OB/OD technology must be verified by experimental data and with validated numerical models for acceptance by Federal and State regulators. Specifically, technology must be developed and tested that minimizes toxic bum and detonation products the noise (peak pressure) and destructive effect (impulse) of the explosive blast generation and travel distance of shrapnel, and entrainment of dust. Three explosion attenuation scenarios are analyzed: Contained water, aqueous foams, and wet sand.

  14. The Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Margo H.; Shjegstad, Sonia M.; Wilkens, Roy; King, James C.; Carton, Geoff; Bala, Deserie; Bingham, Brian; Bissonnette, Martine C.; Briggs, Christian; Bruso, Natalie S.; Camilli, Rich; Cremer, Max; Davis, Roger B.; DeCarlo, Eric H.; DuVal, Carter; Fornari, Daniel J.; Kaneakua-Pia, Iolana; Kelley, Christopher D.; Koide, Shelby; Mah, Christopher L.; Kerby, Terry; Kurras, Gregory J.; Rognstad, Mark R.; Sheild, Lukas; Silva, Jeff; Wellington, Basil; Woerkom, Michael Van

    2016-06-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) is the most comprehensive deep-water investigation undertaken by the United States to look at sea-disposed chemical and conventional munitions. HUMMA's primary scientific objective is to bound, characterize and assess a historic deep-water munitions sea-disposal site to determine the potential impact of the ocean environment on sea-disposed munitions and of sea-disposed munitions on the ocean environment and those that use it. Between 2007 and 2012 the HUMMA team conducted four field programs, collecting hundreds of square kilometers of acoustic data for high-resolution seafloor maps, tens of thousands of digital images, hundreds of hours of video of individual munitions, hundreds of physical samples acquired within two meters of munitions casings, and a suite of environmental data to characterize the ocean surrounding munitions in the study area. Using these data we examined six factors in the study area: (1) the spatial extent and distribution of munitions; (2) the integrity of munitions casings; (3) whether munitions constituents could be detected in sediment, seawater or animals near munitions; (4) whether constituent levels at munitions sites differed significantly from levels at reference control sites; (5) whether statistically significant differences in ecological population metrics could be detected between the two types of sites; and (6) whether munitions constituents or their derivatives potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health. Herein we provide a general overview of HUMMA including overarching goals, methodologies, physical characteristics of the study area, data collected and general results. Detailed results, conclusions and recommendations for future research are discussed in the accompanying papers included in this volume.

  15. Dissolution of three insensitive munitions formulations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Park, Eileen; Bullion, Katherine; Dontsova, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    The US military fires live munitions during training. To save soldiers lives both during training and war, the military is developing insensitive munitions (IM) that minimize unintentional detonations. Some of the compounds in the IM formulation are, however, very soluble in water, raising environmental concerns about their fate and transport. We measured the dissolution of three of these IM formulations, IMX101, IMX104 and PAX21 using laboratory drip tests and studied the accompanying changes in particle structure using micro computed tomography. Our laboratory drip tests mimic conditions on training ranges, where spatially isolated particles of explosives scattered by partial detonations are dissolved by rainfall. We found that the constituents of these IM formulations dissolve sequentially and in the order predicted by their aqueous solubility. The order of magnitude differences in solubility among their constituents produce water solutions whose compositions and concentrations vary with time. For IMX101 and IMX104, that contain 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), the solutions also vary in pH. The good mass balances measured for the drip tests indicate that the formulations are not being photo-or bio-transformed under laboratory conditions. PMID:25043961

  16. Dissolution of three insensitive munitions formulations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Park, Eileen; Bullion, Katherine; Dontsova, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    The US military fires live munitions during training. To save soldiers lives both during training and war, the military is developing insensitive munitions (IM) that minimize unintentional detonations. Some of the compounds in the IM formulation are, however, very soluble in water, raising environmental concerns about their fate and transport. We measured the dissolution of three of these IM formulations, IMX101, IMX104 and PAX21 using laboratory drip tests and studied the accompanying changes in particle structure using micro computed tomography. Our laboratory drip tests mimic conditions on training ranges, where spatially isolated particles of explosives scattered by partial detonations are dissolved by rainfall. We found that the constituents of these IM formulations dissolve sequentially and in the order predicted by their aqueous solubility. The order of magnitude differences in solubility among their constituents produce water solutions whose compositions and concentrations vary with time. For IMX101 and IMX104, that contain 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), the solutions also vary in pH. The good mass balances measured for the drip tests indicate that the formulations are not being photo-or bio-transformed under laboratory conditions.

  17. Chemical munitions dumped at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Margo; Bełdowski, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    Modern chemical warfare is a byproduct of the industrial revolution, which created factories capable of rapidly producing artillery shells that could be filled with toxic chemicals such as chlorine, phosgene and mustard agent. The trench warfare of World War I inaugurated extensive deployments of modern chemical weapons in 1915. Concomitantly, the need arose to dispose of damaged, captured or excess chemical munitions and their constituents. Whereas today chemical warfare agents (CWA) are destroyed via chemical neutralization processes or high-temperature incineration in tandem with environmental monitoring, in the early to middle 20th century the options for CWA disposal were limited to open-air burning, burial and disposal at sea. The latter option was identified as the least likely of the three to impact mankind, and sea dumping of chemical munitions commenced. Eventually, the potential impacts of sea dumping human waste were recognized, and in 1972 an international treaty, the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, was developed to protect the marine environment from pollution caused by the dumping of wastes and other matter into the ocean. By the time this treaty, referred to as the London Convention, was signed by a majority of nations, millions of tons of munitions were known to have been disposed throughout the world's oceans.

  18. Locating and Evaluating Sea-Disposed Munitions--Examples from the Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M.; Wilkens, R. H.; Kelley, C.; de Carlo, E. H.; MacDonald, K.; Garcia, S.; Vanwoerkom, M.; Payne, Z.; Dupra, V.; Rosete, M.; Cox, M.; Fineran, S.; King, J. C.; Carton, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Army, under its Environmental Quality Technology (EQT) Program funded the HUMMA Project to assess the location of, and potential risk to human health posed by, sea disposed munitions (discarded military munitions (DMM)) at a study site south of Pearl Harbor, Hawai‘i known as HI-05. These conventional and chemical munitions are believed to have been exposed to undersea biochemical and mechanical erosion since the late 1940’s. To locate <2-meter long DMM at depths of 300-600 meters, we used a series of nested surveys beginning with an IMI-120 sidescan sonar survey of HI-05. From backscatter data gridded into 0.5-2m cells, we identified trails of highly reflective targets as candidate study sites. We initially surveyed these sites using a towed video camera. Subsequently, during a 12-day program aboard the R/V Kaimikai-o-Kanaloa, we surveyed selected targets using PISCES submersibles and an RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Lab. Every trail of reflective targets identified in the IMI-120 data was subsequently shown to contain DMM of various types. In combination with completing optical surveys to augment the IMI-120 acoustic data, the PISCES submersibles collected 96 sediment and 24 water samples within 1 and 2 meters of high-interest DMM as well as comparative background sites. The Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center supported dive operations to ensure crew personnel were not exposed to chemical agents (CA) and processed samples on board to determine if CA was present. The processed samples were then packaged and shipped to various shore-based laboratories to determine the presence of energetics and metals. Upon completion of the diving program, various species of locally consumed snapper and shrimp were collected near several of the sediment and water sample sites for analogous laboratory analyses. Our approach proved to be highly successful, identifying in a 5-day long IMI-120 survey the location of dozens of

  19. Prototype integration of the joint munitions assessment and planning model with the OSD threat methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, R.Y.S.; Bolmarcich, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this Memorandum is to propose a prototype procedure which the Office of Munitions might employ to exercise, in a supportive joint fashion, two of its High Level Conventional Munitions Models, namely, the OSD Threat Methodology and the Joint Munitions Assessment and Planning (JMAP) model. The joint application of JMAP and the OSD Threat Methodology provides a tool to optimize munitions stockpiles. The remainder of this Memorandum comprises five parts. The first is a description of the structure and use of the OSD Threat Methodology. The second is a description of JMAP and its use. The third discusses the concept of the joint application of JMAP and OSD Threat Methodology. The fourth displays sample output of the joint application. The fifth is a summary and epilogue. Finally, three appendices contain details of the formulation, data, and computer code.

  20. Chemical Munitions Search & Assessment-An evaluation of the dumped munitions problem in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełdowski, Jacek; Klusek, Zygmunt; Szubska, Marta; Turja, Raisa; Bulczak, Anna I.; Rak, Daniel; Brenner, Matthias; Lang, Thomas; Kotwicki, Lech; Grzelak, Katarzyna; Jakacki, Jaromir; Fricke, Nicolai; Östin, Anders; Olsson, Ulf; Fabisiak, Jacek; Garnaga, Galina; Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Majewski, Piotr; Broeg, Katja; Söderström, Martin; Vanninen, Paula; Popiel, Stanisław; Nawała, Jakub; Lehtonen, Kari; Berglind, Rune; Schmidt, Beata

    2016-06-01

    Chemical Munitions Search & Assessment (CHEMSEA) project has performed studies on chemical weapon (CW) detection, sediment pollution and spreading as well as biological effects of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) dumped in the Baltic Sea. Results suggest that munitions containing CWAs are more scattered on the seafloor than suspected, and previously undocumented dumpsite was discovered in Gdansk Deep. Pollution of sediments with CWA degradation products was local and close to the detected objects; however the pollution range was larger than predicted with theoretical models. Bottom currents observed in the dumpsites were strong enough for sediment re-suspension, and contributed to the transport of polluted sediments. Diversity and density of the faunal communities were poor at the dumping sites in comparison to the reference area, although the direct effects of CWA on benthos organisms were difficult to determine due to hypoxic or even anoxic conditions near the bottom. Equally, the low oxygen might have affected the biological effects assessed in cod and caged blue mussels. Nonetheless, both species showed significantly elevated molecular and cellular level responses at contaminated sites compared to reference sites.

  1. Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise ''Affordable Munitions Production for the 21st Century''

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, R.R.; Poggio, M.E.; Rosenberg, S.J.; McWilliams, T.

    2000-09-13

    The U.S. Army faces several munitions manufacturing issues: downsizing of the organic production base, timely fielding of affordable smart munitions, and munitions replenishment during national emergencies. Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise (TIME) is addressing these complex issues via the development and demonstration of an integrated enterprise. The enterprise will include the tools, network, and open modular architecture controllers to enable accelerated acquisition, shortened concept to volume production, lower life cycle costs, capture of critical manufacturing processes, and communication of process parameters between remote sites to rapidly spin-off production for replenishment by commercial sources. TIME addresses the enterprise as a system, integrating design, engineering, manufacturing, administration, and logistics.

  2. Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise ''Affordable Munitions Production for the 21st Century''

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, R.R.; Poggio, M.E.; Rosenberg, S.J.; McWilliams, T.

    2000-08-18

    The U.S. Army faces several munitions manufacturing issues: downsizing of the organic production base, timely fielding of affordable smart munitions, and munitions replenishment during national emergencies. Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise (TIME) is addressing these complex issues via the development and demonstration of an integrated enterprise. The enterprise will include the tools, network, and open modular architecture controllers to enable accelerated acquisition, shortened concept to volume production, lower life cycle costs, capture of critical manufacturing processes, and communication of process parameters between remote sites to rapidly spin-off production for replenishment by commercial sources. TIME addresses the enterprise as a system, integrating design, engineering, manufacturing, administration, and logistics.

  3. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

  4. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import permit requirements and other restrictions set forth in 27 CFR parts 47, 178, 179. ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section...

  5. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import permit requirements and other restrictions set forth in 27 CFR parts 47, 178, 179. ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section...

  6. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import permit requirements and other restrictions set forth in 27 CFR parts 47, 178, 179. ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section...

  7. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import permit requirements and other restrictions set forth in 27 CFR parts 47, 178, 179. ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section...

  8. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import permit requirements and other restrictions set forth in 27 CFR parts 47, 178, 179. ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section...

  9. Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise ''Affordable Munitions Production for the 21st Century''

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, R.R.; Poggio, M.E.; Rosenberg, S.J.; McWilliams, T.

    2000-07-14

    The U.S. Army faces several munitions manufacturing issues: downsizing of the organic production base, timely fielding of affordable smart munitions, and munitions replenishment during national emergencies. TIME is addressing these complex issues via the development and demonstration of an integrated enterprise. The enterprise will include the tools, network, and open modular architecture controller to enable accelerated acquisition, shortened concept to volume production, lower life cycle costs, capture of critical manufacturing processes, and communication of process parameters between remote sites to rapidly spin-off production for replenishment by commercial sources. TIME addresses the enterprise as a system, integrating design, engineering, manufacturing, administration, and logistics.

  10. Munitions classification using an Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.; Chen, J.T.; Vela, O.A.; Lewis, P.S.

    1993-12-01

    In support of the Bilateral Chemical Weapons Agreement between the United States and Russia, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique that discriminates between different types of artillery munitions. This NDE classification technique allows on-site inspectors to rapidly classify the munitions as chemical or high explosive, and furthermore discriminates between various subclasses of these types of munitions. This technique, based on acoustic resonance measurements, has been successfully demonstrated on a wide variety of high explosive and chemical munitions. The technique consists of building templates of spectral features from sets of known munitions. Spectral features of unknown munitions are compared with a library of templates, and the degree of match between the features and the templates is used to classify the munition. This paper describes the technique, including the feature extraction, clustering and classification algorithms.

  11. Guidance, navigation, and control for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilg, Mark Dean

    The United States Army is currently looking for new methods of guiding munitions, which would allow the military to employ guided munitions in place of traditional munitions. This will give the US Army an edge on the battle field and also allow the use of munitions in areas where traditional mortars and artillery cannot be used, including dense urban environments where collateral damage is not acceptable. In this thesis, an innovative approach to Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) is developed for a spinning projectile that utilizes a single axis canard actuation system. Utilizing the projectiles spin, the controller can provide a full range of aerodynamic forces, over the 360° of rotation, that provides maneuverability using only one actuator. This technique minimizes the need for multiple actuators and maintains the inherent aerodynamic stability provided by the spin. The GN&C system design described in this thesis consists of a tracking regulator for sinusoidally oscillating the canard system, a nonlinear state estimator for attitude measurement, and a guidance law to guide the projectile to a target. By combining the three components, we can demonstrate a closed-loop guidance system that will hit a target accurately at distances normally not achieved by an unguided projectile.

  12. Evaluation of Impact Damage to the Burster Detonation Vessel Caused by Fragments from a Drained M121A1 Chemical Munition Detonated with an Initiation Charge

    SciTech Connect

    KIPP, MARLIN E.

    2001-12-01

    Explosive charges placed on the fuze end of a drained chemical munition are expected to be used as a means to destroy the fuze and burster charges of the munition. Analyses are presented to evaluate the effect of these additional initiation charges on the fragmentation characteristics for the M121A1 155mm chemical munition, modeled with a T244 fuze attached, and to assess the consequences of these fragment impacts on the walls of a containment chamber--the Burster Detonation Vessel. A numerical shock physics code (CTH) is used to characterize the mass and velocity of munition fragments. Both two- and three-dimensional simulations of the munition have been completed in this study. Based on threshold fragment velocity/mass results drawn from both previous and current analyses, it is determined that under all fragment impact conditions from the munition configurations considered in this study, no perforation of the inner chamber wall will occur, and the integrity of the Burster Detonation Vessel is retained. However, the munition case fragments have sufficient mass and velocity to locally damage the surface of the inner wall of the containment vessel.

  13. Detection of munitions grade g-series nerve agents using Raman excitation at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Eric; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Hoffland, Soren; Pardoe, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining molecular structure information of a sample. While Raman spectroscopy is a common laboratory based analytical tool, miniaturization of opto-electronic components has allowed handheld Raman analyzers to become commercially available. These handheld systems are utilized by Military and First Responder operators tasked with rapidly identifying potentially hazardous chemicals in the field. However, one limitation of many handheld Raman detection systems is strong interference caused by fluorescence of the sample or underlying surface which obscures the characteristic Raman signature of the target analyte. Munitions grade chemical warfare agents (CWAs) are produced and stored in large batches and typically have more impurities from the storage container, degradation, or unreacted precursors. In this work, Raman spectra of munitions grade CWAs were collected using a handheld Raman spectrometer with a 1064 nm excitation laser. While Raman scattering generated by a 1064 nm laser is inherently less efficient than excitation at shorter wavelengths, high quality spectra were easily obtained due to significantly reduced fluorescence of the munitions grade CWAs. The spectra of these less pure, but more operationally relevant, munitions grade CWAs were then compared to spectra of CASARM grade CWAs, as well as Raman spectra collected using the more common 785 nm excitation laser.

  14. Occurrence and possible sources of arsenic in seafloor sediments surrounding sea-disposed munitions and chemical agents near O´ahu, Hawai´i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, Michael S.; De Carlo, Eric Heinen

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Defense disposed of conventional and chemical munitions as well as bulk containers of chemical agents in US coastal waters including those surrounding the State of Hawai´i. The Hawai´i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment has been collecting biota, water, and sediment samples from two disposal areas south of the island of O´ahu in waters 500 to 600 m deep known to have received both conventional munitions and chemical agents (specifically sulfur mustard). Unlike a number of other sea-disposed munitions investigations which used grabs or corers lowered from surface vessels, we used manned submersibles to collect the samples. Using this approach, we were able to visually identify the munitions and precisely locate our samples in relation to the munitions on the seafloor. This paper focuses on the occurrence and possible sources of arsenic found in the sediments surrounding the disposed military munitions and chemical agents. Using nonparametric multivariate statistical techniques, we looked for patterns in the chemical data obtained from these sediment samples in order to determine the possible sources of the arsenic found in these sediments. The results of the ordination technique nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicate that the arsenic is associated with terrestrial sources and not munitions. This was not altogether surprising given that: (1) the chemical agents disposed of in this area supposedly did not contain arsenic, and (2) the disposal areas studied were under terrestrial influence or served as dredge spoil disposal sites. The sediment arsenic concentrations during this investigation ranged from <1.3 to 40 mg/kg-dry weight with the lower concentrations typically found around control sites and munitions (not located in dredge disposal areas) and the higher values found at dredge disposal sites (with or without munitions). During the course of our investigation we did, however, discover that mercury appears to be loosely associated

  15. Investigations of emergency destruction methods for recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions: Interim emergency destruction methods - evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Cooper, P.W.; Kipp, M.E.

    1995-07-01

    At the request of the U.S. Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Material Office, the Sandia Explosives Containment System Design Team investigated mature destruction systems for destroying recovered chemical warfare munitions (CWM). The goal of the investigations was to identify and examine available techniques for the destruction of recovered CWM. The result of this study is a recommendation for an interim solution, a solution for use on any munitions found while an optimal, long-term solution is developed. Sandia is also performing the long-term solution study to develop a system that destroys CWM, contains the blast and fragments, and destroys the chemical agent without insult to the environment.

  16. Innovative permeable cover system to reduce risks at a chemical munitions burial site

    SciTech Connect

    Powels, C.C.; Bon, I.; Okusu, N.M.

    1997-12-31

    An innovative permeable sand cover with various integrated systems has been designed to contain and treat the Old O-Field chemical munitions landfill at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The 18,200 m{sup 2} (4.5 acre) landfill was used from the mid 1930s to the mid 1950s for the disposal of chemical, incendiary, and explosive munitions from domestic and foreign origins, together with contaminated wastes associated with the development and production of chemical warfare agents (CWA). The site is suspected to be contaminated with white phosphorous (WP) (which when dry, spontaneously burns when exposed to air), shock sensitive picric acid fuses and has the potential to contain large quantities of CWA-filled munitions. Historically, one to three explosions or fires occurred per ten-year period at the landfill. Such events have the potential to cause a CWA release to the environment, which could potentially affect densely populated areas. Recovery and decontamination projects conducted at the site in the late 1940s and early 1950s used large amounts of decontamination chemicals (containing solvents) and fuels which further contaminated the area. The groundwater downgradient of the landfill is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, metals, explosives and CWA degradation compounds and is currently being contained by a groundwater extraction and treatment system. This report describes a remedial action program for the site.

  17. Cluster munitions: a threat to health and human rights.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sujal M

    2010-01-01

    Over the course of 2009, dozens of nations signed a new convention on cluster munitions, and several nations ratified the convention. To determine how public health professionals can participate in preventing death and injury from cluster munitions, we review the history of these weapons, their effects on individuals and communities, the history of efforts to limit their use, the Convention on Cluster Munitions, and ways that health professionals can support efforts to ban their use. Cluster munitions are a threat to civilians in conflict and post-conflict settings. They render homes, farms and businesses dangerous and inaccessible, and delay resettlement after the end of a conflict. Health professionals have led efforts to limit the use and proliferation of other weapons, and global collaboration to support the Convention on Cluster Munitions would be a step towards protecting the public's health.

  18. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  19. Environmental factors affecting corrosion of munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.; Bricka, M.; Morales, A.

    1995-12-31

    Spent small arms munitions have accumulated for years at outdoor firing ranges operated by the DoD and other groups. Used bullets are often subjected to moisture sources. There is increasing concern that accumulations of lead-based munitions represent potential sources of water and soil pollution. To understand both the severity of and solutions to this problem, it is necessary to measure how rapidly bullets corrode and to determine the soil variables affecting the process. In this study M16 bullets were buried in samples of soil taken from Louisiana army firing ranges. Four environmental conditions were simulated; rain water, acid rain, sea water, and 50% sea water/50% acid rain. The three electrode technique was used to measure the bullet corrosion. Graphite rods served as counter electrodes. A saturated calomel reference electrode was used along with a specially constructed salt bridge. Electrochemical measurements were conducted using a computer-controlled potentiostat to determine corrosion potential, soil resistance, and corrosion current. The rate of corrosion was found to markedly increase with decreasing soil pH and increasing chloride and moisture contents, with the chloride content being the most influential variable. High soil resistance and noble corrosion potential were found to be associated with low corrosion rates. This is important since both parameters can be readily measured in the field.

  20. Fuel-air munition and device

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Gary A.

    1976-01-01

    An aerially delivered fuel-air munition consisting of an impermeable tank filled with a pressurized liquid fuel and joined at its two opposite ends with a nose section and a tail assembly respectively to complete an aerodynamic shape. On impact the tank is explosively ruptured to permit dispersal of the fuel in the form of a fuel-air cloud which is detonated after a preselected time delay by means of high explosive initiators ejected from the tail assembly. The primary component in the fuel is methylacetylene, propadiene, or mixtures thereof to which is added a small mole fraction of a relatively high vapor pressure liquid diluent or a dissolved gas diluent having a low solubility in the primary component.

  1. Safe arming system for two-explosive munitions

    DOEpatents

    Jaroska, Miles F.; Niven, William A.; Morrison, Jasper J.

    1978-01-01

    A system for safely and positively detonating high-explosive munitions, including a source of electrical signals, a split-phase square-loop transformer responsive solely to a unique series of signals from the source for charging an energy storage circuit through a voltage doubling circuit, and a spark-gap trigger for initiating discharge of the energy in the storage circuit to actuate a detonator and thereby fire the munitions.

  2. Mobile and stationary laser weapon demonstrators of Rheinmetall Waffe Munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, K.; Riesbeck, Th.; Baumgärtel, Th.; Schmitz, J.; Graf, A.; Jung, M.

    2014-10-01

    For some years Rheinmetall Waffe Munition has successfully developed, realised and tested a variety of versatile high energy laser (HEL) weapon systems for air- and ground-defence scenarios like C-RAM, UXO clearing. By employing beam superimposition technology and a modular laser weapon concept, the total optical power has been successively increased. Stationary weapon platforms and now military mobile vehicles were equipped with high energy laser effectors. Our contribution summarises the most recent development stages of Rheinmetalls high energy laser weapon program. We present three different vehicle based HEL demonstrators: the 5 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Track V integrated in an M113 tank, the 20 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Wheel XX integrated in a multirole armoured vehicle GTK Boxer 8x8 and the 50 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Container L integrated in a reinforced container carried by an 8x8 truck. As a highlight, a stationary 30 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator shows the capability to defeat saturated attacks of RAM targets and unmanned aerial vehicles. 2013 all HEL demonstrators were tested in a firing campaign at the Rheinmetall testing centre in Switzerland. Major results of these tests are presented.

  3. Microbial ecology and transformations associated with munitions contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.; Li, Z.; Kokjohn, T.A.; Shea, P.J.; Comfort, S.D.

    1994-12-31

    Many acres of soil at the former Nebraska Ordnance Plant (NOP) are contaminated with TNT and other munitions residues. In some areas, solid phase TNT is present and controls the concentration of the soil solution. Native microbial populations in uncontaminated soils similar to those at the NOP site were severely reduced when solid phase TNT was allowed to control the soil solution TNT concentration. However, examination of NOP soil revealed an active population of Pseudomonas sp. A single species that could utilize TNT as a sole C source was isolated from the contaminated soil and tentatively identified as Pseudomonas corrugata through the BIOLOG system. Subsequent growth and characterization experiments indicate that the Pseudomonad metabolizes TNT while in the exponential phase of growth in medium containing glucose as a sole N source. Low TNT mineralization rates (measured by CO{sub 2} evolution) in soil and media using the various isolates suggest reduced availability due to sorption and incorporation of transformation intermediates into the organic matrix and microbial biomass. Pretreatment of TNT by acid-metal catalyzed reduction resulted in an initially higher rate of mineralization following addition to TNT-contaminated soil. Observations indicate more rapid microbial utilization of the 2,4,6-triaminotoluene (TAT) reduction product and its spontaneous decay product, methylphloroglucinol (2,4,6-trihydroxytoluene), than TNT. Abiotic pretreatment may be useful in enhancing microbial transformation and detoxification of TNT in highly contaminated soils.

  4. Active source electromagnetic methods for marine munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory; Shubiditze, Fridon; Miller, Jonathan; Evans, Rob

    2011-06-01

    The detection of munitions targets obscured in coastal and marine settings has motivated the need for advanced geophysical technologies suited for underwater deployment. Building on conventional marine electromagnetic theory and based on the use of existing electric and magnetic field sensing designs, we analyze the electromagnetic fields emitted from excited targets in the frequency range between 1 kHz and 1 MHz. We present evidence that employing electromagnetic modes that are higher in frequency relative to those typically used in ground-based sensing yields greater range and sensitivity for underwater surveys. We develop potential design strategies for implementing both magnetic (B) and electric (E) field sources and sensors in the marine environment, and determine optimal arrangements for a potential combined E- and B-field sensing system. The implementation of both 1D analytical and 3D numerical simulations yields the primary and secondary field distributions in representative underwater settings for various sourcereceiver arrangements. We study the electromagnetic field distributions from both electric (voltage-fed dipole) and magnetic field (encased and submerged induction coil) active sources. Application of these concepts provide unique and useful information about targets from the addition of electric field sensing alone as well as through the combination of electric and magnetic field sensing.

  5. Army Tactical Missile System (TACMS) Block II Insensitive Munitions Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Jamie M.; Nelson, Steven G.

    2002-04-01

    The Army TACMS Block II missile system provides the soldier with long range precision fire against moving armored combat vehicles in support of deep operations beyond the capability of other currently existing munitions. As part of an ongoing IM program for the ATACMS/BAT, warhead components were subject to IM threats identified in the system's Threat Hazard Assessment. These tests were conducted to assess the reaction of the Block II warhead, containing BAT submunitions, to bullet impact, fragment impact and fast cook-off. This paper will provide a summary of the test item configurations, test setups, results and preliminary assessments.

  6. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  7. Application of POCIS for exposure assessment of munitions constituents during constant and fluctuating exposure.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jason B; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Biedenbach, James M; Sieve, Kristal K; Rosen, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    The present study examined the potential use of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) for exposure assessment of munitions constituents, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and their breakdown products (aminodinitrotoluenes [ADNTs], diaminonitrotoluenes [DANTs], and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine [TNX]). Loss of munitions constituents from the sorbent phase after uptake was observed for the "pesticide" POCIS configuration but not for the "pharmaceutical" configuration. Therefore, the latter was selected for further investigation. Under constant exposure conditions, TNT, ADNTs, DANT, RDX, and atrazine (a common environmental contaminant) accumulated at a linear rate for at least 14 d, with sampling rates between 34 mL/d and 215 mL/d. When POCIS were exposed to fluctuating concentrations, analyte accumulation values were similar to values found during constant exposure, indicating that the sampler was indeed integrative. In contrast, caffeine (a common polar contaminant) and TNX did not accumulate at a linear rate and had a reduction in accumulation of greater than 50% on the POCIS during fluctuating exposures, demonstrating that POCIS did not sample those chemicals in an integrative manner. Moreover, in a flow-through microcosm containing the explosive formulation Composition B, TNT and RDX were readily measured using POCIS, despite relatively high turnover rates and thus reduced water concentrations. Mean water concentrations estimated from POCIS were ± 37% of mean water concentrations measured by traditional grab sample collection. Thus, POCIS were found to have high utility for quantifying exposure to most munitions constituents evaluated (TNT, ADNTs, and RDX) and atrazine. PMID:25475692

  8. Explosive particle soil surface dispersion model for detonated military munitions.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, John E; Rishel, Jeremy P; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R; Taylor, Susan

    2015-07-01

    The accumulation of high explosive mass residue from the detonation of military munitions on training ranges is of environmental concern because of its potential to contaminate the soil, surface water, and groundwater. The US Department of Defense wants to quantify, understand, and remediate high explosive mass residue loadings that might be observed on active firing ranges. Previously, efforts using various sampling methods and techniques have resulted in limited success, due in part to the complicated dispersion pattern of the explosive particle residues upon detonation. In our efforts to simulate particle dispersal for high- and low-order explosions on hypothetical firing ranges, we use experimental particle data from detonations of munitions from a 155-mm howitzer, which are common military munitions. The mass loadings resulting from these simulations provide a previously unattained level of detail to quantify the explosive residue source-term for use in soil and water transport models. In addition, the resulting particle placements can be used to test, validate, and optimize particle sampling methods and statistical models as applied to firing ranges. Although the presented results are for a hypothetical 155-mm howitzer firing range, the method can be used for other munition types once the explosive particle characteristics are known.

  9. REMOTE SENSING IN DETECTING BURIED MUNITIONS FROM WORLD WAR I

    EPA Science Inventory



    During World War I, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among othe...

  10. LOCATING BURIED WW1 MUNITIONS WITH REMOTE SENSING AND GIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During World War I, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite. After the end of t...

  11. 75 FR 76935 - Revisions to the United States Munitions List

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Part 121 RIN 1400-AC78 Revisions to the United States Munitions List AGENCY: Department of State... exclusively available from the United States that provides a critical military or intelligence advantage. 2. A... almost exclusively available from the United States and that provide a critical military or...

  12. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material. Validation of the metabolic fate of munitions materials (TNT, RDX) in mature crops

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The goals of this effort were to confirm and expand data related to the behavior and impacts of munitions residues upon human food chain components. Plant species employed included corn (Zea mays), alfalfa (Medicago sativa). spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), and carrot (Daucus carota). Plants were grown from seed to maturity (70 to 120 days) in a low-fertility soil (Burbank) amended with either {sup 14}C-TNT or {sup 14}C-RDX at which time they were harvested and analyzed for munitions uptake, partitioning, and chemical form of the munition or munition-metabolite. All four of the plant species used in this study accumulated the {sup 14}C-TNT- and RDX-derived label. The carrot, alfalfa, and corn demonstrated a higher percentage of label retained in the roots (62, 73, and 83% respectively). The spinach contained less activity in its root (36%) but also contained the highest TNT specific activity observed (>4600 jig TNT equivalents/g dry wt.). The specific uptake values of RDX for the spinach and alfalfa were comparable to those previously reported for wheat and bean (314 to 590 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. respectively). An exception to this may be the carrot where the specific activity was found to exceed 4200 {mu}g RDX-equivalents/g dry wt. in the shoot. The total accumulation of TNT by the plants ranged from 1.24% for the spinach to 2.34% for the carrot. The RDX plants ranging from 15% for the spinach to 37% for the carrot. There was no identifiable TNT or amino dinitrotoluene (ADNT) isomers present in the plants however, the parent RDX compound was found at significant levels in the shoot of alfalfa (> 1 80 {mu}g/g) and corn (>18 {mu}g/g).

  13. Arsenic concentrations in Baltic Sea sediments close to chemical munitions dumpsites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełdowski, Jacek; Szubska, Marta; Emelyanov, Emelyan; Garnaga, Galina; Drzewińska, Anna; Bełdowska, Magdalena; Vanninen, Paula; Östin, Anders; Fabisiak, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    In addition to natural sources and land-originated pollution, the Baltic Sea has another anthropogenic source of arsenic in bottom sediments-arsenic-based Chemical Warfare Agents (CWA). To examine the potential usage of arsenic contents results for monitoring the leakage from chemical weapons, sediment samples were collected from officially reported and potential chemical weapon dumpsites located in the Baltic Sea, and total and inorganic arsenic concentrations were analyzed. Results showed an elevated arsenic content in dumpsite areas compared to reference areas. Correlations of arsenic with other metals and organic matter were studied to elucidate any unusual behavior of arsenic in the dumpsites. In the area of the Bornholm Deep, such behavior was observed for inorganic arsenic. It appears that in close vicinity of dumped munitions, the inorganic arsenic concentration of sediments is not correlated with either organic matter content or authigenic minerals formation, as is commonly observed elsewhere. Investigations on CWA concentrations, performed within the CHEMSEA (Chemical Munition Search and Assesment) project, allowed us to compare the results of arsenic concentrations with the occurrence of arsenic-containing CWA.

  14. Novel conformal sensor technologies that conform to munitions geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Carlos M.; Nguyen, Hai-Long; Romano, John M.; Rastegar, Jahangir S.; Tang, K. W.; Singh, Pritpal; Hoorfar, Ahmad

    2004-12-01

    Future sensing technologies are needed to provide higher accuracy, lower power consumption and occupy small real estate within munitions. The novel ideas being supported at the Army Research Development Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Dover, New Jersey, uses principles of electromagnetic propagation and the properties of waveguide cavities with various geometries to develop a new class of sensors for onboard direct measurement of the angular orientation and position of objects in flight and applications such as mobile robotic platforms. Currently available sensors for munitions are based on inertia, optics or heat. Inertia based sensing generally suffers from drift, noise and the currently available sensors cannot survive high firing accelerations while maintaining the required measurement sensitivity. Optical technologies generally have short range and require line-of-site. The sensing technologies presented in this paper employ radio frequency, make direct measurement of position and orientation, and do not require added information for their operation. The presented sensors employ waveguide cavities that are embedded into the structure of munitions. It is shown that the geometry of the waveguide cavity can be designed to achieve high angular orientation sensitivity with respect to a reference, polarized electromagnetic field. In this paper, the theoretical fundamentals describing the operation of the developed sensors are described. Studies of the interaction of the polarized signals with various waveguides and cavity geometries are presented. Simulations results as well as experimental results validating the theoretical and the simulation results are provided. The simulation and experimental results clearly demonstrate the potentials of the developed position and angular orientation sensors in general, and to munitions in particular.

  15. Mobile munitions assessment system design, testing, operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.D.; Snyder, A.M.; Rowe, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    The remnants of America`s chemical weapons program exist at more than 200 sites in the United States. The U.S. Army`s Project Manager for Non-stockpile Chemical Material (PMNSCM) has the responsibility for the remediation of non-stockpile chemical warfare material (CWM). PMNSCM must respond to a variety of situations involving discovered, recovered or buried material. This response requires unique hardware capabilities to characterize, assess, and provide information to develop plans for disposing of the material. PMNSCM sponsored the development of a Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet the need to characterize and assess non-stockpile chemical warfare material. The MMAS equipment is capable of distinguishing CWM from conventional munitions, identifying the agent fill and level, and assessing the status of the firing train. The MMAS has a data processing, collection, and storage subsystem and a communications link to a Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) database. A typical data package includes X-rays, elemental spectra, weather data, physical descriptions, photographs, video, etc. The MMAS data will be used by the Army`s Munition Assessment and Review Board (MARB) to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to store, transport, and dispose of non-stockpile CWM.

  16. Piezoelectric-based hybrid reserve power sources for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Pereira, Carlos M.; Feng, Dake

    2016-05-01

    Reserve power sources are used extensively in munitions and other devices such as emergency devices or remote sensors that have to be powered only once and for a relatively short duration. Current chemical reserve power sources, including thermal batteries and liquid reserve batteries require sometimes in excess of 100 msec to become fully activated. In many applications, however, electrical energy is required in a few msec following the launch event. In such applications, other power sources have to be provided to provide power until the reserve battery is fully activated. The amount of electrical energy that is required by most munitions before chemical reserve batteries are fully activated is generally small and can be provided by properly designed piezoelectric-based energy harvesting devices. In this paper the development of a hybrid reserve power source obtained by the integration of a piezoelectric-based energy harvesting device with a reserve battery that can provide power almost instantaneously upon munitions firing or other similar events is being reported. A review of the state of the art in piezoelectric-based electrical energy harvesting methods and devices and their charge collection electronics for use in the developed hybrid power sources is also provided together with the results of testing of the piezoelectric component of the power source and its electronic safety and charge collection electronics.

  17. Data communication through multiple physical media: applications to munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Kwok, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Electronic systems comprising of subassemblies, distributed across different physical media, require seamless communication between processors and sensors embedded in the disparate volumes. For example, smart munitions systems embed sensors and other key control electronics, throughout the structure, in vastly different physical media. In addition to the obvious space constraints, these structures are subjected to high G forces during launch. Thus, communications through wire harnesses becomes cumbersome, make assembly process and testing difficult, and challenging to make survive high G firing. Here we focus on an approach that takes advantage of the partial optical transparency of epoxy material commonly used in potting electronic components in munitions, as well as the wave guiding that is possible through the body of the munitions wall which is made from composite materials. Experimental results show that a wireless optical link, connecting various parts of the distributed system, is possible at near IR frequencies. Data can be rapidly parsed between a processor, sensors and actuators. We present experimental data for a commercial epoxy system, which is used to embed a number of IrDA devices inside the cone of 120 mm mortar shell. IrDA devices using the FIR data rates establish point-to-point communication through various media, representative of the environment inside the 120 mm mortar cone.

  18. Value added products from reclamation of military munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, D.; Johnson, M.; Sims, K.

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Defense has a backlog of excess, obsolete and unserviceable munitions for disposal. For many of these munition items the only method of disposal is open burning/open detonation (OB/OD) which destroys valuable resources which can be reclaimed and converted to useful products. The Crane Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center (NAVSURFWARCENDIV Crane) in support of the Navy`s Ordnance Reclamation Program and the Joint Service Large Rocket Motor Disposal Program has been developing technology for the removal and reclamation of the energetics from munitions. The University of Missouri-Rolla has demonstrated the use of high pressure waterjet technology for removal of PBX explosives from projectiles and warheads. Development work is nearing completion for demonstrating the capability to remove Class 1.1 propellant from strategic rocket motors using high pressure waterjets. Current projects are under way focusing on resource recovery and recycling (R3) of the reclaimed energetics while minimizing disposal. The current reclamation projects include reformulation of the explosives and Class 1.1 propellants into commercial blasting agents, reuse of Navy gun propellant for various applications including agriculture and oil-gas well stimulation. Other projects include the recovery of RDX/HMX from Class 1.1 explosives and propellants and the conversion of Explosive D into higher value products. Lab/bench scale testing has been completed on many of these processes, and for some pilot scale demonstrations have been or are scheduled to be completed during 1997.

  19. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Haroldsen, Brent L.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Didlake, Jr., John E.; Wu, Benjamin C-P

    2011-11-01

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  20. Hybrid analysis of multiaxis electromagnetic data for discrimination of munitions and explosives of concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, M.J.; Asch, T.H.; Oden, C.

    2012-01-01

    The remediation of land containing munitions and explosives of concern, otherwise known as unexploded ordnance, is an ongoing problem facing the U.S. Department of Defense and similar agencies worldwide that have used or are transferring training ranges or munitions disposal areas to civilian control. The expense associated with cleanup of land previously used for military training and war provides impetus for research towards enhanced discrimination of buried unexploded ordnance. Towards reducing that expense, a multiaxis electromagnetic induction data collection and software system, called ALLTEM, was designed and tested with support from the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. ALLTEM is an on-time time-domain system that uses a continuous triangle-wave excitation to measure the target-step response rather than traditional impulse response. The system cycles through three orthogonal transmitting loops and records a total of 19 different transmitting and receiving loop combinations with a nominal spatial data sampling interval of 20 cm. Recorded data are pre-processed and then used in a hybrid discrimination scheme involving both data-driven and numerical classification techniques. The data-driven classification scheme is accomplished in three steps. First, field observations are used to train a type of unsupervised artificial neural network, a self-organizing map (SOM). Second, the SOM is used to simultaneously estimate target parameters (depth, azimuth, inclination, item type and weight) by iterative minimization of the topographic error vectors. Third, the target classification is accomplished by evaluating histograms of the estimated parameters. The numerical classification scheme is also accomplished in three steps. First, the Biot–Savart law is used to model the primary magnetic fields from the transmitter coils and the secondary magnetic fields generated by currents induced in the target materials in the

  1. Hybrid analysis of multiaxis electromagnetic data for discrimination of munitions and explosives of concern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, M. J.; Asch, T. H.; Oden, C.

    2012-08-01

    The remediation of land containing munitions and explosives of concern, otherwise known as unexploded ordnance, is an ongoing problem facing the U.S. Department of Defense and similar agencies worldwide that have used or are transferring training ranges or munitions disposal areas to civilian control. The expense associated with cleanup of land previously used for military training and war provides impetus for research towards enhanced discrimination of buried unexploded ordnance. Towards reducing that expense, a multiaxis electromagnetic induction data collection and software system, called ALLTEM, was designed and tested with support from the U.S. Department of Defense Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. ALLTEM is an on-time time-domain system that uses a continuous triangle-wave excitation to measure the target-step response rather than traditional impulse response. The system cycles through three orthogonal transmitting loops and records a total of 19 different transmitting and receiving loop combinations with a nominal spatial data sampling interval of 20 cm. Recorded data are pre-processed and then used in a hybrid discrimination scheme involving both data-driven and numerical classification techniques. The data-driven classification scheme is accomplished in three steps. First, field observations are used to train a type of unsupervised artificial neural network, a self-organizing map (SOM). Second, the SOM is used to simultaneously estimate target parameters (depth, azimuth, inclination, item type and weight) by iterative minimization of the topographic error vectors. Third, the target classification is accomplished by evaluating histograms of the estimated parameters. The numerical classification scheme is also accomplished in three steps. First, the Biot-Savart law is used to model the primary magnetic fields from the transmitter coils and the secondary magnetic fields generated by currents induced in the target materials in the

  2. 40 CFR 266.203 - Standards applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transportation of solid waste military munitions. 266.203 Section 266.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS... applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions. (a) Criteria for hazardous...

  3. 40 CFR 266.205 - Standards applicable to the storage of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... solid waste military munitions. 266.205 Section 266.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS... applicable to the storage of solid waste military munitions. (a) Criteria for hazardous waste regulation...

  4. 28 CFR 0.89 - Authority to seize arms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... war. 0.89 Section 0.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.89 Authority to seize arms and munitions of war. The Director... arms and munitions of war, and other articles, pursuant to section 1 of title VI of the act of June...

  5. USE OF SALMONELLA MICROSUSPENSION BIOASSAY TO DETECT THE MUTGENICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS AT LOW CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Use of a Salmonella Microsuspension Bioassay to Detect the Mutagenicity of
    Munitions Compounds at Low Concentrations

    Abstract

    Past production and handling of munitions has resulted in soil contamination at various military facilities. Depending on...

  6. 28 CFR 0.89 - Authority to seize arms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... war. 0.89 Section 0.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.89 Authority to seize arms and munitions of war. The Director... arms and munitions of war, and other articles, pursuant to section 1 of title VI of the act of June...

  7. 28 CFR 0.89 - Authority to seize arms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... war. 0.89 Section 0.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.89 Authority to seize arms and munitions of war. The Director... arms and munitions of war, and other articles, pursuant to section 1 of title VI of the act of June...

  8. 28 CFR 0.89 - Authority to seize arms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... war. 0.89 Section 0.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.89 Authority to seize arms and munitions of war. The Director... arms and munitions of war, and other articles, pursuant to section 1 of title VI of the act of June...

  9. 28 CFR 0.89 - Authority to seize arms and munitions of war.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... war. 0.89 Section 0.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Federal Bureau of Investigation § 0.89 Authority to seize arms and munitions of war. The Director... arms and munitions of war, and other articles, pursuant to section 1 of title VI of the act of June...

  10. 22 CFR 123.8 - Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. 123.8 Section 123.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE... on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. (a) Transferring registration or control to a foreign person of any aircraft, vessel, or satellite on the U.S. Munitions List is...

  11. 22 CFR 123.8 - Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. 123.8 Section 123.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE... on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. (a) Transferring registration or control to a foreign person of any aircraft, vessel, or satellite on the U.S. Munitions List is...

  12. 22 CFR 123.8 - Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. 123.8 Section 123.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE... on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. (a) Transferring registration or control to a foreign person of any aircraft, vessel, or satellite on the U.S. Munitions List is...

  13. 22 CFR 123.8 - Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. 123.8 Section 123.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE... on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. (a) Transferring registration or control to a foreign person of any aircraft, vessel, or satellite on the U.S. Munitions List is...

  14. 48 CFR 252.225-7007 - Prohibition on Acquisition of United States Munitions List Items from Communist Chinese Military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... China. United States Munitions List means the munitions list of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation in 22 CFR Part 121. (b) Any supplies or services covered by the United States Munitions List that... of the commercial or defense industrial base of the People's Republic of China; or (2) Owned...

  15. 48 CFR 252.225-7007 - Prohibition on Acquisition of United States Munitions List Items from Communist Chinese Military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... China. United States Munitions List means the munitions list of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation in 22 CFR Part 121. (b) Any supplies or services covered by the United States Munitions List that... of the commercial or defense industrial base of the People's Republic of China; or (2) Owned...

  16. 48 CFR 252.225-7007 - Prohibition on Acquisition of United States Munitions List Items from Communist Chinese Military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... China. United States Munitions List means the munitions list of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation in 22 CFR Part 121. (b) Any supplies or services covered by the United States Munitions List that... of the commercial or defense industrial base of the People's Republic of China; or (2) Owned...

  17. 48 CFR 252.225-7007 - Prohibition on Acquisition of United States Munitions List Items from Communist Chinese Military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... China. United States Munitions List means the munitions list of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation in 22 CFR Part 121. (b) Any supplies or services covered by the United States Munitions List that... of the commercial or defense industrial base of the People's Republic of China; or (2) Owned...

  18. 48 CFR 252.225-7007 - Prohibition on Acquisition of United States Munitions List Items from Communist Chinese Military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... China. United States Munitions List means the munitions list of the International Traffic in Arms Regulation in 22 CFR Part 121. (b) Any supplies or services covered by the United States Munitions List that... of the commercial or defense industrial base of the People's Republic of China; or (2) Owned...

  19. Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

  20. A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

  1. Phytoremediation of munitions by aquatic plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, N.L.; McCutcheon, S.M.; Carriera, L.H.; Ou, T.

    1995-12-31

    An isolated enzyme system from plants and the whole plant containing the enzyme have been shown to degrade TNT, RDX and HMX to environmental acceptable compounds. As a result of detailed laboratory studies, the general process is on a sound scientific basis. The overall process along with the analytical procedures for chemical analysis are described. The process has been scaled up in the field in static systems. The results have been consistent with the laboratory findings. In the field pilot study employing a TNT contaminated sediment/water/parrot feather system, it was possible to drive the aqueous phase TNT and the transient amino intermediates to below 0.1 ppm (the limit of detection of these studies). The studies have been scaled up in the laboratory using emerged macrophytes in a flow through system.

  2. Depleted uranium instead of lead in munitions: the lesser evil.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2014-03-01

    Uranium has many similarities to lead in its exposure mechanisms, metabolism and target organs. However, lead is more toxic, which is reflected in the threshold limit values. The main potential hazard associated with depleted uranium is inhalation of the aerosols created when a projectile hits an armoured target. A person can be exposed to lead in similar ways. Accidental dangerous exposures can result from contact with both substances. Encountering uranium fragments is of minor significance because of the low penetration depth of alpha particles emitted by uranium: they are unable to penetrate even the superficial keratin layer of human skin. An additional cancer risk attributable to the uranium exposure might be significant only in case of prolonged contact of the contaminant with susceptible tissues. Lead intoxication can be observed in the wounded, in workers manufacturing munitions etc; moreover, lead has been documented to have a negative impact on the intellectual function of children at very low blood concentrations. It is concluded on the basis of the literature overview that replacement of lead by depleted uranium in munitions would be environmentally beneficial or largely insignificant because both lead and uranium are present in the environment. PMID:24594921

  3. The joint DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Repa, J.V. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The joint Department of Defense (DoD)/Department of Energy (DOE) Munitions Technology Development Program is a cooperative, jointly funded effort of research and development to improve nonnuclear munitions technology across all service mission areas. This program is enabled under a Memorandum of Understanding, approved in 1985 between the DoD and the DOE, that tasks the nuclear weapons laboratories of the DOE to solve problems in conventional defense. The selection of the technical areas to be investigated is based on their importance to the military services, the needs that are common to the conventional and nuclear weapons programs, the expertise of the performing organization, and the perceived benefit to the overall national defense efforts. The research benefits both DoD and DOE programs; therefore, funding, planning, and monitoring are joint activities. Technology Coordination Groups (TCGs), organized by topical areas, serve as technology liaisons between the DoD and DOE for the exchange of information. The members of the TCGs are technical experts who meet semiannually in an informal workshop format to coordinate multiagency requirements, establish project plans, monitor technical activity, and develop classification guidance. A technical advisory committee of senior DoD and DOE managers administers the program and provides guidance on policy and strategy. The abstracts in this volume were collected from the technical progress report for fiscal year 1993. The annual report is organized by major technology areas. Telephone and fax numbers for the principal contacts are provided with each abstract.

  4. Evaluation of ingredients for the development of new insensitive munitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Johnston, Lois A.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2004-12-01

    Several ingredients being considered by the U.S. Army for the development of new insensitive munitions have been examined. One set of ingredients consists of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX). In this set, the decomposition of the mixture was examined to determine whether adding DNPH to RDX would generate a sufficient quantity of gas to rupture the case of a munition prior to the onset of the rapid reaction of RDX, thus mitigating the violence of reaction. The second set of ingredients consists of three different reduced sensitivity RDX (RS-RDX) powders manufactured by SNPE and Dyno-Nobel. In this set, the objective was to determine properties of RS-RDX powders that may distinguish them from normal RDX powder and may account for their reduced shock sensitivity. The decomposition reactions and sublimation properties of these materials were examined using two unique instruments: the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) instrument and the Fourier Transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry instrument. These instruments provide the capability to examine the details of decomposition reactions in energetic materials. DNPH does not appear to be a good candidate to mitigate the violence of the RDX reaction in a munition. DNPH decomposes between 170 C and 180 C. When mixed with RDX it decomposes between 155 C and 170 C. It decomposes to form 1,3-dintrobenzene (DNB), ammonia, water and nitrogen. Of these compounds only nitrogen and ammonia are capable of generating high pressures within a munition. When DNPH is mixed with RDX, the DNB formed in the decomposition of DNPH interacts with RDX on the surface of the RDX powder leading to a higher rate of formation of CH2O and N2O. The CH2O is consumed by reaction with DNPH to form 2-methylene-1-(2,4-dintrophenyl)hydrazine. As a result, DNPH does not generate a large quantity of gas that will lead to rupture of a munition case. Another

  5. Biodegradation of munitions compounds by a sulfate reducing bacterial enrichment culture

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of several munitions compounds was studied. The compounds included 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocine, 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene. All of the compounds studied were degraded by the sulfate reducing bacterial (SRB) enrichment culture. The SRB culture did not use the munitions compounds as their sole source of carbon. However, all the munitions compounds tested served as the sole source of nitrogen for the SRB culture. Degradation of munitions compounds was achieved by a co-metabolic process. The SRB culture used a variety of carbon sources including pyruvate, ethanol, formate, lactate, and H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}. The SRB culture was an incomplete oxidizer, unable to carry out the terminal oxidation of organic substrates to CO{sub 2} as the sole product, and it did not use acetate or methanol as a carbon source. In addition to serving as nitrogen sources, the munitions compounds also served as electron acceptors in the absence of sulfate. A soil slurry experiment with 5% and 10% munitions compounds-contaminated soil showed that the contaminant TNT was metabolized by the SRB culture in the presence of pyruvate as electron donor. This culture may be useful in decontaminating munitions compounds-contaminated soil and water under anaerobic conditions.

  6. A database system for characterization of munitions items in conventional ammunition demilitarization stockpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, K.C.; Chiu, S.Y.; Ditmars, J.D.; Huber, C.C.; Nortunen, L.; Sabb, R.

    1994-05-01

    The MIDAS (Munition Items Disposition Action System) database system is an electronic data management system capable of storage and retrieval of information on the detailed structures and material compositions of munitions items designated for demilitarization. The types of such munitions range from bulk propellants and small arms to projectiles and cluster bombs. The database system is also capable of processing data on the quantities of inert, PEP (propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics) and packaging materials associated with munitions, components, or parts, and the quantities of chemical compounds associated with parts made of PEP materials. Development of the MIDAS database system has been undertaken by the US Army to support disposition of unwanted ammunition stockpiles. The inventory of such stockpiles currently includes several thousand items, which total tens of thousands of tons, and is still growing. Providing systematic procedures for disposing of all unwanted conventional munitions is the mission of the MIDAS Demilitarization Program. To carry out this mission, all munitions listed in the Single Manager for Conventional Ammunition inventory must be characterized, and alternatives for resource recovery and recycling and/or disposal of munitions in the demilitarization inventory must be identified.

  7. Time-lapse camera studies of sea-disposed chemical munitions in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Margo H.; Fornari, Daniel J.; Rognstad, Mark R.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Mah, Christopher L.; Davis, Logan K.; Flores, Kyle R. M.; Main, Erin L.; Bruso, Natalie L.

    2016-06-01

    The interactions between fauna and sea-disposed munitions provide important evidence regarding whether munitions constituents affect the health of the ocean environment and its inhabitants. To date few studies of these interactions have been conducted at deep-water disposal sites; typically observations of fauna in the vicinity of sea-disposed munitions are limited to the few minutes or hours required to collect physical samples at a specific location. During the 2012 Hawaii Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) field program we deployed two deep-sea time-lapse camera systems with the objectives of cataloging the diversity of fauna visiting sea-disposed chemical munitions and observing faunal behavior and physiology. Over the 1- and 3-day deployments we recorded 28 different species of fishes, crustaceans, mollusks, cnidarians, and echinoderms at the two sites. Both cameras captured the previously undocumented behavior of brisingid sea stars repositioning themselves along chemical munitions casings. Despite the fact that brisingid sea stars are able to move, for the duration of both time-lapse experiments they remained on chemical munitions casings. We interpret this result to indicate that the advantages of residing on a hard substrate slightly elevated above the seafloor outweigh the effects of chemical munitions constituents for brisingid sea stars. One type of physiological anomaly observed on several arms of the brisingid sea stars at the time-lapse sites led to the collection and examination of six specimens. As reported by Mah (2015. Deep Sea Res. II, 2015, XX-XX), these physiological features are the result of parasitic crustaceans and are not caused by chemical munitions constituents.

  8. Department of Defense FY 1990/FY 1991 biennial budget estimates submitted to Congress January 1989. Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Chemical Demilitarization Program was established in response to Section 1412 of the 1986 Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 99-145) that directs the DOD to destroy the complete unitary chemical stockpile by 1994 in conjunction with the production of binary chemical weapons. The Fiscal Year 1989 Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 100-456) extended program completion to 1997. Estimates contained in this budget reflect the 1997 completion date. The Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction Defense appropriation includes operations and maintenance, procurement, and research and development budget activities. Construction funds in support of chemical demilitarization are contained in the Military Construction, Army Budget request. The Chemical Demilitarization Program provides resources to develop and test monitoring and disposal technology; equip, operate, and maintain disposal facilities; provide safe and secure transportation of chemical agents and munitions for disposal; dispose of all waste products; and decontaminate and dismantle all disposal equipment at the conclusion of toxic operations. Chemical agents and munitions are stored within the continental United States, Johnston Atoll, and the Federal Republic of Germany. Funds within this appropriation will by used to destroy the entire unitary lethal chemical stockpile. Also included are funds for Emergency Response and Program Oversight.

  9. Overview of the laser activities at Rheinmetall Waffe Munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Klaus; Riesbeck, Thomas; Schünemann, B.; Graf, A.; Jung, Markus; Schreiber, Th.; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, A.

    2012-11-01

    The paper will give an overview over the laser weapon activities at RWM (Rheinmetall Waffe Munition) over the last years. Starting from the actual scenarios for laser weapon applications as: CRAM (Counter Rocket Artillery Mortar), Air Defence and UXO (unexploded ordnance) clearing. The basic requirements of a future laser weapon as beam diameter, beam quality, tracking capability, adaptive optics were deduced. For the UXO scenario a mobile directed energy laser demonstrator for humanitarian mine and UXO clearing based on fiber lasers is presented. Based on the parameters the system concept including the cooling system, power supply and the integration into the armoured vehicle TM 170 are explained. The contribution show first experiments of UXO and IED clearing. Different technical approaches to achieve laser power in the 100 kW regime combined with very good beam quality are discussed to fulfil the requirements of the CRAM and Air Defence scenario. Spectral coupling and the beam superimposing both are performed by Rheinmetall Waffe Munition. At the spectral coupling the basic technology parameters for the fiber laser and the dielectric grating as the latest results were put into context with the power levels reached at other groups. For the beam super imposing technology the basic experiments regarding the tracking capability and compensation of the atmosphere on the test range at Unterlüß will be explained. A generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator based on 2 Laser Weapon Modules (LWM) from RWM each 5 kW fiber Laser with beam forming and tracking integrate by the team of RWM and RAD (Rheinmetall Air Defense) into a Ground based Air Defend system consisting of Skyguard and Millenium turret are presented. The flight path of the UAV within the valley of the life firing range at Ochsenboden Switzerland is shown. Selected results of the successful tests against UAV's are presented. It shows the capability of the generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator to track and

  10. Bioinspired polarization navigation sensor for autonomous munitions systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, G. C.; Quang, T.; Farrahi, T.; Deshpande, A.; Narayan, C.; Shrestha, S.; Li, Y.; Agarwal, M.

    2013-05-01

    Small unmanned aerial vehicles UAVs (SUAVs), micro air vehicles (MAVs), Automated Target Recognition (ATR), and munitions guidance, require extreme operational agility and robustness which can be partially offset by efficient bioinspired imaging sensor designs capable to provide enhanced guidance, navigation and control capabilities (GNC). Bioinspired-based imaging technology can be proved useful either for long-distance surveillance of targets in a cluttered environment, or at close distances limited by space surroundings and obstructions. The purpose of this study is to explore the phenomenology of image formation by different insect eye architectures, which would directly benefit the areas of defense and security, on the following four distinct areas: a) fabrication of the bioinspired sensor b) optical architecture, c) topology, and d) artificial intelligence. The outcome of this study indicates that bioinspired imaging can impact the areas of defense and security significantly by dedicated designs fitting into different combat scenarios and applications.

  11. Analytical Methods for Detonation Residues of Insensitive Munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Marianne E.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical methods are described for the analysis of post-detonation residues from insensitive munitions. Standard methods were verified or modified to obtain the mass of residues deposited per round. In addition, a rapid chromatographic separation was developed and used to measure the mass of NTO (3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one), NQ (nitroguanidine) and DNAN (2,4-dinitroanisole). The HILIC (hydrophilic-interaction chromatography) separation described here uses a trifunctionally-bonded amide phase to retain the polar analytes. The eluent is 75/25 v/v acetonitrile/water acidified with acetic acid, which is also suitable for LC/MS applications. Analytical runtime was three minutes. Solid phase extraction and LC/MS conditions are also described.

  12. Heat of detonation, the cylinder test, and performance munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Akst, I.B.

    1989-01-01

    Heats of detonation of CHNO explosives correlate well with copper cylinder test expansion data. The detonation products/calorimetry data can be used to estimate performance in the cylinder test, in munitions, and for new molecules or mixtures of explosives before these are made. Confidence in the accuracy of the performance estimates is presently limited by large deviations of a few materials from the regression predictions; but these same deviations, as in the insensitive explosive DINGU and the low carbon systems, appear to be sources of information useful for detonation and explosives research. The performance correlations are functions more of the detonation products and thermochemical energy than they are of the familiar parameters of detonation pressure and velocity, and the predictions are closer to a regression line on average than are those provided by CJ calculations. The prediction computations are simple but the measurements (detonation calorimetry/products and cylinder experiments) are not. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Application of composite materials to impact-insensitive munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neradka, Vincent F.; Chang, Yale; Grady, Joseph E.; Trowbridge, Daniel A.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is outlined for developing bullet-impact-insensitive munitions based on composite materials that provide rapid venting of the rocket-motor case. Impact experiments are conducted with test specimens of hybrid laminates of graphite/epoxy and epoxy reinforcing with woven glass fibers. The dynamic strain response and initial impact force are measured with strain gauges, and perforation damage is examined in the plates. The results show that impact damage can be designed by means of parametric variations of the fiber, matrix, and ply orientations. It is suggested that rocket-motor cases can be designed with composite materials to provide rapid venting during the failure mode. The experimental ballistic testing performed provides data that can be used comparatively with analytical data on composite materials.

  14. Evaluation of a chemical munition dumpsite in the Baltic Sea based on geophysical and chemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Missiaen, Tine; Söderström, Martin; Popescu, Irina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-08-01

    This paper discusses the results of geophysical and chemical investigations carried out in a chemical munition dumpsite in the southern Baltic Sea, east of the island of Bornholm. After WW2 over 32,000 tons of chemical war material was dumped here including shells and bombs as well as small drums and containers. The geophysical investigations combined very-high-resolution seismics and gradiometric measurements. The results indicate the presence of a large number of objects buried just below the seafloor. The size of the objects and their distribution, with a marked increase in density towards the center of the dumpsite, suggests that we are dealing with dumped war material. Sediment and near-bottom water samples, taken within the dumpsite and in the surrounding area, were analysed for the presence of various chemical warfare agents (CWA) including Adamsite, Clark, sulphur mustard, tabun, chlorobenzene and arsine oil. The results indicate a widespread contamination that reaches far beyond the dumpsite boundary. CWA degradation products were found in most of the sediment samples. The contamination was mostly related to arsenic containing compounds; only one sample indicated the presence of sulfur mustard. Although the correlation between detected objects and CWA concentrations is not always straightforward, the overall results suggest that a lot of the dumped war material is leaking and that over the years the contamination has reached the seafloor sediments. PMID:20593551

  15. Nitroaromatic munition compounds: environmental effects and screening values.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Opresko, D M; Maxwell, C J; Welsh, C J; Cretella, F M; Reno, P H; Daniel, F B

    1999-01-01

    Available data on the occurrence, transport, transformation, and toxicity of eight nitroaromatic munition compounds and their degradation products, TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, RDX, HMX, and tetryl were used to identify potential fate in the environment and to calculate screening benchmarks or safe environmental levels for aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Results of monitoring studies revealed that some of these compounds persist at sites where they were produced or processed. Most of the compounds are present in soil, sediment, and surface water or groundwater at military sites. Soil adsorption coefficients indicate that these chemicals are only moderately adsorbed to soil and may leach to groundwater. Most of these compounds are transformed by abiotic or biotic mechanisms in environmental media. Primary transformation mechanisms involve photolysis (TNT, RDX, HMX, tetryl), hydrolysis (tetryl), and microbial degradation (TNT, TNB, DNB, DNA, 2-ADNT, and HMX). Microbial degradation for both nitro and nitramine aromatic compounds involves rapid reduction of nitro groups to amino groups, but further metabolism is slow. With the exception of DNB, complete mineralization did not usually occur under the conditions of the studies. RDX was resistant to microbial degradation. Available ecotoxicological data on acute and chronic studies with freshwater fish and invertebrates were summarized, and water quality criteria or ecotoxicological screening benchmarks were developed. Depending on the available data, criteria/benchmarks were calculated according to USEPA Tier I or Tier II guidelines. The munitions chemicals are moderately to highly toxic to freshwater organisms, with chronic screening values < 1 mg/L. For some chemicals, these low values are caused by inherent toxicity; in other cases, they result from the conservative methods used in the absence of data. For nonionic organic munitions chemicals, sediment quality benchmarks were calculated (based on Kow values and the

  16. Water quality criteria/toxicological benchmarks for nitroaromatic munitions compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, S.S.; Opresko, D.M.; Hovatter, P.S.; Daniel, F.B.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need to develop screening level and cleanup criteria for nitroaromatic compounds at US Army Superfund sites. Using available methodologies, Water Quality Criteria (WQC) for aquatic organisms and toxicological benchmarks for terrestrial plants and wildlife were developed for eight nitroaromatic munitions compounds and/or their degradation products: 2,4,6-trinitroluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 3,5-dinitroaniline, 2-amino-4, 6-dinitrotoluene, RDX, HMX, and tetryl. Depending on available data, acute and chronic WQC for aquatic species were developed based on US EPA Tier 1 or Tier 2 guidelines. Criteria for sediment-associated organisms were derived based on Equilibrium Partitioning. In the absence of criteria or guidance for effects on terrestrial wildlife, plants and soil processes, ecotoxicological benchmarks, i.e., NOAELs and LOECs for effects on these organisms were identified. Benchmarks for terrestrial wildlife species were derived from experimental data identifying toxicological endpoints for wildlife or laboratory species. NOAELs were based on endpoints of population growth and survival following oral exposures. These values were used as the basis for calculation of NOAELs or screening benchmarks for food and water intake for seven selected mammalian wildlife species: the short-tailed shrew, white footed mouse, meadow vole, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer. Equivalent NOAELs were calculated by scaling the test data on the basis of differences in body weight. Benchmarks for terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates and heterotrophic processes were based on LOECs.

  17. Low-noise magnetic sensing for marine munitions characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory; Keranen, Joe; Billings, Stephen; Fonda, Raul; Foley, Jack; Bassani, Chet

    2011-06-01

    Because the recovery of underwater munitions is many times more expensive than recovering the same items on dry land, there is a continuing need to advance marine geophysical characterization methods. To efficiently and reliably conduct surveying in marine environments, low-noise geophysical sensors are being configured to operate close to the sea bottom. We describe systems that are deployed from surface vessels via rigid or flexible tow cables or mounted directly to submersible platforms such as unmanned underwater vehicles. Development and testing of a towed configuration has led to a 4 meter wide hydrodynamically stable tow wing with an instrumented top-side assembly mounted on the stern of a surface survey vessel. An integrated positioning system combined with an instrumented cable management system, vessel and wing attitude and wing depth measurements to provide sub-meter positional accuracy in up to 25 meter water depths and within 1 to 2 meters of the seafloor. We present the results of data collected during an instrument validation survey over a series of targets emplaced at measured locations. Performance of the system was validated through analyses of data collected at varying speeds, headings, and height above the seafloor. Implementation of the system during live-site operations has demonstrated its capability to survey hundreds of acres of marine or lacustrine environment. Unique deployment concepts that utilize new miniaturized and very low noise sensors show promise for expanding the applicability of magnetic sensing at marine sites.

  18. Temporally resolved infrared spectra from the detonation of advanced munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Joe Motos; Gross, Kevin C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2009-05-01

    A suite of instruments including a 100 kHz 4-channel radiometer, a rapid scanning Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, and two high-speed visible imagers was used to observe the detonation of several novel insensitive munitions being developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. The spectral signatures exhibited from several different explosive compositions are discernable and may be exploited for event classification. The spectra are initially optically thick, resembling a Planckian distribution. In time, selective emission in the wings of atmospheric absorption bands becomes apparent, and the timescale and degree to which this occurs is correlated with aluminum content in the explosive formulation. By analyzing the high-speed imagery in conjunction with the time-resolved spectral measurements, it may be possible to interpret these results in terms of soot production and oxidation rates. These variables allow for an investigation into the chemical kinetics of explosions and perhaps reveal other phenomenology not yet readily apparent. With an increased phenomenological understanding, a model could be created to explain the kinetic behavior of the temperature and by-product concentration profiles and thus improve the ability of military sensing platforms to identify explosive types and sources.

  19. Precision targeting in guided munition using IR sensor and MmW radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, S.; Hablani, H. B.; Arya, H.

    2015-10-01

    Conventional munitions are not guided with sensors and therefore miss the target, particularly if the target is mobile. The miss distance of these munitions can be decreased by incorporating sensors to detect the target and guide the munition during flight. This paper is concerned with a Precision Guided Munition(PGM) equipped with an infrared sensor and a millimeter wave radar [IR and MmW, for short]. Three-dimensional flight of the munition and its pitch and yaw motion models are developed and simulated. The forward and lateral motion of a target tank on the ground is modeled as two independent second-order Gauss-Markov process. To estimate the target location on the ground and the line-of-sight rate to intercept it an Extended Kalman Filter is composed whose state vector consists of cascaded state vectors of missile dynamics and target dynamics. The line-of-sight angle measurement from the infrared seeker is by centroiding the target image in 40 Hz. The centroid estimation of the images in the focal plane is at a frequency of 10 Hz. Every 10 Hz, centroids of four consecutive images are averaged, yielding a time-averaged centroid, implying some measurement delay. The miss distance achieved by including by image processing delays is 1:45m.

  20. 76 FR 68694 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    .... Munitions List (USML) to describe more precisely the military aircraft and related defense articles...: Revising Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (Dec. 9, 2010) and ``Revision to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (Dec. 10, 2010)). The notices also called for...

  1. 22 CFR 123.8 - Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. 123.8 Section 123.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE....8 Special controls on vessels, aircraft and satellites covered by the U.S. Munitions List. (a) Transferring registration or control to a foreign person of any aircraft, vessel, or satellite on the...

  2. 48 CFR 225.770 - Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. 225.770 Section 225... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. This...

  3. 48 CFR 225.770 - Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. 225.770 Section 225... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. This...

  4. 48 CFR 225.770 - Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. 225.770 Section 225... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. This...

  5. 48 CFR 225.770 - Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. 225.770 Section 225... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. This...

  6. 48 CFR 225.770 - Prohibition on acquisition of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. This section implements Section 1211 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006 (Pub. L. 109-163). See... of United States Munitions List items from Communist Chinese military companies. 225.770 Section...

  7. Optimizing electromagnetic induction sensors for dynamic munitions classification surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan S.; Keranen, Joe; Schultz, Gregory

    2014-06-01

    Standard protocol for detection and classification of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) comprises a two-step process that includes an initial digital geophysical mapping (DGM) survey to detect magnetic field anomalies followed by a cued survey at each anomaly location that enables classification of these anomalies. The initial DGM survey is typically performed using a low resolution single axis electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor while the follow-up cued survey requires revisiting each anomaly location with a multi-axis high resolution EMI sensor. The DGM survey comprises data collection in tightly spaced transects over the entire survey area. Once data collection in this area is complete, a threshold analysis is applied to the resulting magnetic field anomaly map to identify anomalies corresponding to potential targets of interest (TOI). The cued sensor is deployed in static mode where this higher resolution sensor is placed over the location of each anomaly to record a number of soundings that may be stacked and averaged to produce low noise data. These data are of sufficient quality to subsequently classify the object as either TOI or clutter. While this approach has demonstrated success in producing effective classification of UXO, conducting successive surveys is time consuming. Additionally, the low resolution of the initial DGM survey often produces errors in the target picking process that results in poor placement of the cued sensor and often requires several revisits to the anomaly location to ensure adequate characterization of the target space. We present data and test results from an advanced multi-axis EMI sensor optimized to provide both detection and classification from a single survey. We demonstrate how the large volume of data from this sensor may be used to produce effective detection and classification decisions while only requiring one survey of the munitions response area.

  8. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1

    SciTech Connect

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  9. Development of the prototype Munitions Case Moisture Meter, Model ORNL-1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agouridis, D.C.; Gayle, T.M.; Griest, W.H.

    1993-02-24

    There is a great need for a rapid and simple means of determining the moisture content in combustible cartridge case (ccc) munitions. Previous studies have demonstrated that accumulation of moisture in ccc rounds, such as the M829, leads to softening of the case wall and weakening of the adhesive joint. Moisture in the ccc can lead to incomplete combustion of the case upon firing the round. Currently, there are no facile methods for measuring the moisture content. A prototype portable meter for non-destructive and rapid estimation of moisture in ccc has been developed. The Munitions Case Moisture Meter Model ORNL-1 demonstrates the feasibility of developing an instrument based on the moisture dependence of dielectric properties, to measure moisture in ccc munitions in storage and in the field. These instruments are simple, inexpensive, lightweight, portable, low-power battery operated, and intrinsically safe. They provide nondestructive, noninvasive, and rapid measurements. Calibration data for the prototype are not available at this time. Therefore, calibration of the meter and the development of a scale reading directly moisture content in munitions rounds could not be completed. These data will be supplied by the US Army from its tests of the meter with actual munitions. However, experimental results on empty cccs in laboratory conditions demonstrate satisfactory performance of the instrument. Additional work is needed to bring the prototype to its optimum usefulness and accuracy for field measurements. This includes: Calibration of the meter scale with full-up munitions; Data and evaluation procedures to adjust the performance of the meter for different environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity; and Studies of the dielectric properties of moist ccc materials, as a function of frequency and temperature, are needed for adjustment of the meter for optimal performance.

  10. Very-high-resolution seismic and magnetic investigations of a chemical munition dumpsite in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missiaen, Tine; Feller, Pascal

    2008-09-01

    Very-high-resolution (VHR) seismic and magnetic investigations were carried out over a chemical munition dumpsite in the Bornholm Basin, south-western Baltic Sea. The main goal of the investigations was to image the shallow internal structure of the dumpsite and to map the lateral and vertical distribution of the dumped war material. The shallow geology was imaged in great detail on the seismic data. Seven seismic-stratigraphic units were identified, related to different stages in the Holocene and late-glacial history. A large number of diapir-like features were observed that most likely represent fluid expulsion phenomena. Four shipwrecks were identified in the dumpsite area. The wrecks have partly sunk into the soft upper sediments, their height above the sea floor reaching no more than 2 m. Seismic and magnetic data indicate the presence of a large number of buried objects. In most cases there is a good correlation between the seismic and magnetic data sets. The objects are generally buried no deeper than 1 to 2 m. Their size varies between 1.5 and 5 m, occasionally up to 10 m. Shallow pits in the sea bed are likely due to the impact of dumping. The data confirm the wide variety of dumped war material ranging from bombs and shells to encasements and containers. The distribution of the buried objects seems rather heterogeneous, with locally high object concentrations surrounded by areas of lower object density. The results of this case study demonstrate the benefit of complementary, concurrent geophysical investigations for munition dumpsite research. Finally this will yield a better assessment of the current status of the dumpsite and the possible ecological risks related to the dumped war material.

  11. Inspection of the Department`s export licensing process for dual-use and munitions commodities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-10

    The purpose of our inspection was to review the Department of Energy`s (Energy) export licensing process for dual-use and military (munitions) commodities subject to nuclear nonproliferation controls. Specifically, we reviewed Energy`s authorities, procedures, and policies pertaining to the export licensing process and examined procedures for safeguarding data transmitted between Energy and other agencies involved in the export licensing process. We also reviewed Energy`s role as a member of the Subgroup on Nuclear Export Coordination. Our review of the sample of 60 export cases did not find evidence to lead us to believe that Energy`s recommendations for these cases were inappropriate or incorrect. We identified, however, problems regarding management systems associated with the export license review process. We found that without documentation supporting export licensing decisions by the Export Control Operations Division (ECOD), we could not determine whether ECOD analysts considered all required criteria in their review of export cases referred to Energy. For example, we found that the ECOD did not retain records documenting the bases for its advice, recommendations, or decisions regarding its reviews of export license cases or revisions to lists of controlled commodities and, therefore, was not in compliance with certain provisions of the Export Administration Act, as amended, and Energy records management directives. Additionally, we found that the degree of compliance by Energy with the export licensing review criteria contained in the Export Administration Regulations and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 could not be determined because ECOD did not retain records documenting the bases for its advice and recommendations on export cases.

  12. 40 CFR 266.203 - Standards applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... human health and the environment. (c) Amendments to DOD shipping controls. The Department of Defense... transportation of solid waste military munitions. 266.203 Section 266.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... under 40 CFR part 261, are listed or identified as a hazardous waste (and thus are subject to...

  13. 40 CFR 266.203 - Standards applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... human health and the environment. (c) Amendments to DOD shipping controls. The Department of Defense... transportation of solid waste military munitions. 266.203 Section 266.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... under 40 CFR part 261, are listed or identified as a hazardous waste (and thus are subject to...

  14. ENHANCED RHIZODEGRADATION OF MUNITIONS EXPLOSIVES TNT AND RDX BY SELECTED PLANT SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and water contamination by the military munitions explosives TNT (2,4.6-trinitrotoluene)and RDX (1,3,5-hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitrotriazine)and their degradation products have raised many public health and environmental concerns. Phytoremediation techniques could provide a potential cost-effective...

  15. 40 CFR 266.203 - Standards applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under 40 CFR part 261, are listed or identified as a hazardous waste (and thus are subject to regulation under 40 CFR parts 260 through 270), unless all the following conditions are met: (i) The waste military... transportation of solid waste military munitions. 266.203 Section 266.203 Protection of Environment...

  16. 40 CFR 266.205 - Standards applicable to the storage of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous waste characteristic or are listed as hazardous waste under 40 CFR Part 261, are listed or identified as a hazardous waste (and thus are subject to regulation under 40 CFR Parts 260 through 279... munitions and that exhibit a hazardous waste characteristic or are listed as hazardous waste under 40...

  17. Liver Toxicity of Munition Compounds 2,4-and 2,6- and Technical Grade Dinitrotoluene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Munitions compounds 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) are the two most common of the six isomers of dinitrotoluene (DNT). Technical grade dinitrotoluene (tgDNT) is a mixture of the six DNT isomers and is comprised of 76% 2,4-DNT and 19% 2,6-DNT with t...

  18. 40 CFR 266.203 - Standards applicable to the transportation of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under 40 CFR part 261, are listed or identified as a hazardous waste (and thus are subject to regulation under 40 CFR parts 260 through 270), unless all the following conditions are met: (i) The waste military... transportation of solid waste military munitions. 266.203 Section 266.203 Protection of Environment...

  19. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  20. 33 CFR 165.170 - Safety Zone; Military Munitions Recovery, Raritan River, Raritan, NJ.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... enforcement vessels assigned or approved by the COTP. (c) Regulations. (1) The general regulations in 33 CFR... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Military Munitions..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  1. 19 CFR 4.73 - Neutrality; exportation of arms and munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neutrality; exportation of arms and munitions. 4.73 Section 4.73 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.73...

  2. Powered low cost autonomous attack system: a network-centric munition concept demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, James C.; O'Neal, John K.; Brown, Robert A.

    2006-05-01

    The Powered Low Cost Autonomous Attack System (PLOCAAS) is an Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) program. The PLOCAAS objective is to demonstrate a suite of technologies in an affordable miniature munition to autonomously search, detect, identify, attack and destroy ground mobile targets of military interest. PLOCAAS incorporates a solid state Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) seeker and Autonomous Target Acquisition (ATA) algorithms, miniature turbojet engine, multi-mode warhead, and an integrated INS/GPS into a 36" long, high lift-to-drag ratio airframe. Together, these technologies provide standoff beyond terminal defenses, wide area search capability, and high probability of target report with low false target attack rate with high loadouts. Four LADAR seeker captive flight tests provided the sequestered data for robust Air Force ATA algorithm performance assessment. During Part I of the ATD, three successful free-flight tests were completed in which the LADAR seeker and Autonomous Target Acquisition (ATA) algorithms have detected, acquired, identified, and tracked ground mobile targets. Part II of the ATD demonstrated the ability to redirect the munition post release via a commercial satellite datalink. In addition to summarizing all program accomplishments, this paper will present results and lessons learned from Part II of the ATD. Part II's objective was to demonstrate the military utility of a two- ay data-link. The data-link allows an Operator-In-The-Loop (OITL) to monitor and control multiple cooperative, wide-area-search munitions and enables these munitions to serve as non-traditional Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets in a networkcentric environment.

  3. Distribution of chemical warfare agent, energetics, and metals in sediments at a deep-water discarded military munitions site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Christian; Shjegstad, Sonia M.; Silva, Jeff A. K.; Edwards, Margo H.

    2016-06-01

    There is a strong need to understand the behavior of chemical warfare agent (CWA) at underwater discarded military munitions (DMM) sites to determine the potential threat to human health or the environment, yet few studies have been conducted at sites in excess of 250 m, the depth at which most U.S. chemical munitions were disposed. As part of the Hawai'i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA), sediments adjacent to chemical and conventional DMM at depths of 400-650 m were sampled using human occupied vehicles (HOVs) in order to quantify the distribution of CWA, energetics, and select metals. Sites in the same general area, with no munitions within 50 m in any direction were sampled as a control. Sulfur mustard (HD) and its degradation product 1,4-dithiane were detected at each CWA DMM site, as well as a single sample with the HD degradation product 1,4-thioxane. An energetic compound was detected in sediment to a limited extent at one CWA DMM site. Metals common in munitions casings (i.e., Fe, Cu, and Pb) showed similar trends at the regional and site-wide scales, likely reflecting changes in marine sediment deposition and composition. This study shows HD and its degradation products can persist in the deep-marine environment for decades following munitions disposal.

  4. Munitions having an insensitive detonator system for initiating large failure diameter explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, III, William Leroy

    2015-08-04

    A munition according to a preferred embodiment can include a detonator system having a detonator that is selectively coupled to a microwave source that functions to selectively prime, activate, initiate, and/or sensitize an insensitive explosive material for detonation. The preferred detonator can include an explosive cavity having a barrier within which an insensitive explosive material is disposed and a waveguide coupled to the explosive cavity. The preferred system can further include a microwave source coupled to the waveguide such that microwaves enter the explosive cavity and impinge on the insensitive explosive material to sensitize the explosive material for detonation. In use the preferred embodiments permit the deployment and use of munitions that are maintained in an insensitive state until the actual time of use, thereby substantially preventing unauthorized or unintended detonation thereof.

  5. Initial-phase optimization for bioremediation of munition compound-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.B.; Crawford, D.L.; Crawford, R.L.; Roberts, D.J. )

    1993-07-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), RDX, and HMX, munition compounds, persist as soil and ground water contaminants at many USA military sites. Incineration is the only available proven technology for remediation, but this technology is very expensive for small locations. Biodegradation of TNT and other hazardous energetic nitroaromatic compounds is another possibility. This paper reports the application of a procedure previously used for the strict anaerobic microbial bioremediation of nitroaromatic herbicide-contaminated soils to the remediation of munition compound-contaminated soils. Anaerobic metabolism occurs in two stages: reductive stage in which TNT is reduced to its amino derivatives and degradation to nonaromatic products stage. The optimization of the reductive stage of TNT metabolism is also described here. The organism used is the white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Outdoor dissolution of detonation residues of three insensitive munitions (IM) formulations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Dontsova, Katerina; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    We seek to understand the environmental fate of three new insensitive munitions, explosive formulations developed to reduce the incidence of unintended detonations. To this end, we measured the size distribution of residues from low order detonations of IMX 101, IMX 104, and PAX 21-filled munitions and are studying how these three formulations weather and dissolve outdoors. The largest pieces collected from the detonations were centimeter-sized and we studied 12 of these in the outdoors test. We found that the particles break easily and that the dissolution of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) is quasi-linear as a function of water volume. DNAN is the matrix and the least soluble major constituent of the three formulations. We used DNAN's linear dissolution rate to estimate the life span of the pieces. Particles ranging in mass from 0.3 to 3.5 g will completely dissolve in 3-21 years given 100 cm y(-1) precipitation rates.

  7. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Zimmerman, G.P.; Staub, W.P.; Hillsman, E.L.

    1990-09-01

    This is the 1990 Addendum (Volume 2) for the Phase I report on the disposal of chemicals and munitions at Anniston Army Depot. Included in the Addendum are responses to reviewers' comments on population density estimates, seismicity information, fault locations, and references. Reviewing agencies errata, and conclusions are also listed. Information presented does not change the principal conclusion reached by the Phase I report, that on-site disposal remains valid for Anniston Army Depot. (SM)

  8. In-line fuzing development for tactical airfield attack munition (TAAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.J.

    1981-03-18

    The shock-hardened new-concept safing, arming, and in-line fuzing system developed for US Air Force modular weapons is being advanced for the Tactical Airfield Attack Munition (TAAM) as an alternate fuzing system. The high power slapper detonator system is being reduced in volume by an approximate factor of 10 and the energy by a factor of 3. In addition, the fuze has the capability of functioning after many hours of delay to provide area-denial capabilities.

  9. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  10. A novel class of MEMS accelerometers for very high-G munitions environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake

    2016-05-01

    The state of art in shock resistant MEMS accelerometer design is to reduce the size of the proof-mass, thereby reducing the generated forces and moments due to shock loading. Physical stops are also provided to limit proof-mass motion to prevent damage to various moving components. The reduction of the proof-mass size reduces the sensor sensitivity. In addition, to increase the sensor dynamic response, proof-mass motion needs to be minimally damped, resulting in a significant sensor settling time after experiencing a high shock loading such as those experienced by gun-fired munitions during firing. The settling time is particularly important for accelerometers that are used in gun-fired munitions and mortars for navigation and guidance. This paper describes the development of a novel class of accelerometers that are provided with the means of locking the sensor proof-mass in its "null" position when subjected to acceleration levels above a prescribed threshold, thereby protecting the moving parts of the accelerometer. In munitions applications, the proof-mass is thereby locked in its null position during the firing and is released during the flight to measure flight acceleration with minimal settling time. Details of the design and operation of the developed sensors and results of their prototyping and testing are presented. The application of the developed technology to other types of inertial sensors and devices is discussed.

  11. A novel class of MEMS accelerometers for very high-G munitions environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake

    2016-04-01

    The state of art in shock resistant MEMS accelerometer design is to reduce the size of the proof-mass, thereby reducing the generated forces and moments due to shock loading. Physical stops are also provided to limit proof-mass motion to prevent damage to various moving components. The reduction of the proof-mass size reduces the sensor sensitivity. In addition, to increase the sensor dynamic response, proof-mass motion needs to be minimally damped, resulting in a significant sensor settling time after experiencing a high shock loading such as those experienced by gun-fired munitions during firing. The settling time is particularly important for accelerometers that are used in gun-fired munitions and mortars for navigation and guidance. This paper describes the development of a novel class of accelerometers that are provided with the means of locking the sensor proof-mass in its "null" position when subjected to acceleration levels above a prescribed threshold, thereby protecting the moving parts of the accelerometer. In munitions applications, the proof-mass is thereby locked in its null position during the firing and is released during the flight to measure flight acceleration with minimal settling time. Details of the design and operation of the developed sensors and results of their prototyping and testing are presented. The application of the developed technology to other types of inertial sensors and devices is discussed.

  12. Inspection report: the Department of Energy's export licensing process for dual-use and munitions commodities

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Gregory H.

    1999-05-01

    Export of commodities, encouraged by both the private sector and the Federal Government, helps to improve our position in the global economy and is in the national interest of the US. However, exports of commodities or technologies, without regard to whether they may significantly contribute to the military potential of individual countries or combination of countries or enhance the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, may adversely affect the national security of the US. The Federal Government, therefore, implements several laws, Executive Orders, and regulations to control the export of certain commodities and technologies. These commodities and technologies require a license for export. Some of the controlled items are designated as ''dual-use,'' that is, commodities and technologies that have both civilian and military application. Some dual-use commodities are designated as ''nuclear dual-use''--items controlled for nuclear nonproliferation purposes. Another group of controlled commodities is designated as munitions, which are goods and technologies that have solely military uses. The Department of Energy (Energy) conducts reviews of export license applications for nuclear dual-use items and certain munitions. On August 26, 1998, the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs requested that the Inspectors General from the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, State, and Treasury, and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), update and expand on a 1993 interagency review conducted by the Inspectors General of the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State of the export licensing processes for dual-use and munitions commodities.

  13. A novel class of MEMS accelerometers for guidance and control of gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Pereira, Carlos M.

    2015-05-01

    The state of art in shock resistant MEMS accelerometer design is to reduce the size of the proof-mass, thereby reducing the generated forces and moments due to shock loading. Physical stops are also provided to limit proof-mass motion to prevent damage to various moving components. The reduction of the proof-mass size reduces the sensor sensitivity. In addition, to increase the sensor dynamic response, proof-mass motion needs to be minimally damped, resulting in a significant sensor settling time after experiencing a high shock loading such as those experienced by gun-fired munitions during firing. The settling time is particularly important for accelerometers that are used in gun-fired munitions and mortars for navigation and guidance. This paper describes the development of a novel class of accelerometers that are provided with the means of locking the sensor proof-mass in its "null" position when subjected to acceleration levels above prescribed thresholds, thereby protecting the moving parts of the accelerometer. In munitions applications, the proof-mass is thereby locked in its null position during the firing and released during the flight to begin to measure flight acceleration with minimal settling time. Details of the design and operation of the developed sensors and results of their prototyping and testing are presented. The application of the developed technology to other types of inertial sensors and devices is discussed.

  14. Novel piezoelectric-based energy-harvesting power sources for gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Murray, R.; Pereira, C.; Nguyen, H.-L.

    2007-04-01

    A novel class of piezoelectric-based energy-harvesting power sources is presented for gun-fired munitions and other similar applications that require very high G survivability. The power sources are designed to harvest energy from the firing acceleration as well as vibratory motion of munitions during the flight and convert it to electrical energy to power onboard electronics. The developed piezoelectric-based energy harvesting power sources produce enough electrical energy for applications such as fuzing. The power sources are designed to withstand firing accelerations in excess of 100,000 G. In certain applications such as fuzing, the developed power sources have the potential of completely eliminating the need for chemical batteries. In fuzing applications, the developed power sources have the added advantage of providing additional safety, since with such power sources the fuzing electronics are powered only after the munitions have exited the barrel and have traveled a safe distance from the weapon platform. The design of a number of prototypes, including their packaging for high G hardening, and the results of laboratory and air-gun testing are presented. Methods to increase the efficiency of such energy-harvesting power sources and minimize friction and damping losses are discussed.

  15. Toxic-Waste Disposal by Combustion in Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Stephens, J. B.; Moynihan, P. I.; Compton, L. E.; Kalvinskas, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical wastes burned with minimal handling in storage containers. Technique for disposing of chemical munitions by burning them inside shells applies to disposal of toxic materials stored in drums. Fast, economical procedure overcomes heat-transfer limitations of conventional furnace designs by providing direct contact of oxygenrich combustion gases with toxic agent. No need to handle waste material, and container also decontaminated in process. Oxygen-rich torch flame cuts burster well and causes vaporization and combustion of toxic agent contained in shell.

  16. 32 CFR 174.16 - Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chemical agent hazards from past DoD military munitions-related or chemical warfare-related activities... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real property containing explosive or chemical... REALIGNMENT Environmental Matters § 174.16 Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards....

  17. 32 CFR 174.16 - Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chemical agent hazards from past DoD military munitions-related or chemical warfare-related activities... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Real property containing explosive or chemical... REALIGNMENT Environmental Matters § 174.16 Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards....

  18. 32 CFR 174.16 - Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chemical agent hazards from past DoD military munitions-related or chemical warfare-related activities... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Real property containing explosive or chemical... REALIGNMENT Environmental Matters § 174.16 Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards....

  19. 32 CFR 174.16 - Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chemical agent hazards from past DoD military munitions-related or chemical warfare-related activities... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Real property containing explosive or chemical... REALIGNMENT Environmental Matters § 174.16 Real property containing explosive or chemical agent hazards....

  20. Pyrotechnic hazards classification and evaluation program test report. Heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassnacht, P. O.

    1971-01-01

    A heat flux study of deflagrating pyrotechnic munitions is presented. Three tests were authorized to investigate whether heat flux measurements may be used as effective hazards evaluation criteria to determine safe quantity distances for pyrotechnics. A passive sensor study was conducted simultaneously to investigate their usefulness in recording events and conditions. It was concluded that heat flux measurements can effectively be used to evaluate hazards criteria and that passive sensors are an inexpensive tool to record certain events in the vicinity of deflagrating pyrotechnic stacks.

  1. Piezoelectric-based electrical energy harvesting and storage methods and electronics for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Pereira, C.; Ervin, M.; Feng, D.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Armament Research development Center (ARDEC) and the Army Research Laboratories in Adelphi, Maryland, and their small business collaborator (Omnitek Partners, LLC) have been developing alternatives to current reserve batteries for certain munitions applications. It is shown that using a novel passive method, efficiency of over 70 percent could be achieved in the transfer of generated electrical charges to appropriate selected storage mediums. The paper also describes the development of test-beds to simulate electrical charge generation of the energy harvesting power sources during the firing and the flight for use in the design and evaluation of the collection electronics.

  2. Analysis of munitions constituents in IMX formulations by HPLC and HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Russell, A L; Seiter, J M; Coleman, J G; Winstead, B; Bednar, A J

    2014-10-01

    The use of Insensitive Munitions eXplosives (IMX) is increasing as the Army seeks to replace certain conventional munitions constituents, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotolene (TNT), for improved safety. The IMX formulations are more stable and therefore less prone to accidental detonation while designed to match the performance of legacy materials. Two formulations, IMX 101 and 104 are being investigated as a replacement for TNT in artillery rounds and composition B Army mortars, respectively. The chemical formulations of IMX-101 and 104 are comprised of four constituents;2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 1-nitroguanidine (NQ), and Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) which are mixed in various ratios to achieve the desired performance. The current work details the analysis of the IMX constituents by single column HPLC-UV-ESI-MS. Detection limits determined are in agreement with similar HPLC analysis of compounds, ranging from 7 to 9μg/L. Gradient mobile phases are used to allow separation of the 4 target compounds in more complex mixture of other concomitant compounds. Mass spectra are used to confirm analyte identity with chromatographic retention time. PMID:25059196

  3. Skin penetration surrogate for the evaluation of less lethal kinetic energy munitions.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia A; Resslar, Marianne; Stewart, Shelby

    2012-07-10

    Although the benefits of the use of less lethal kinetic energy munitions are numerous, there is a need to evaluate the munitions prior to deployment to ensure their intended effect. The objective of the current research was to validate a surrogate that could be used to predict the risk of penetration of these devices. Existing data from biomechanical testing with post-mortem human specimens (PMHS) served as the foundation for this research. Development of the surrogate involved simulating the various layers of the skin and underlying soft tissues using a combination of materials. A standardized 12-gauge impactor was used to assess each combination. The energy density that resulted in a 50% risk of penetration for the anterior thorax region (23.99 J/cm(2)) from the previous research was matched using a specific combination of layers. Twelve various combinations of materials were tested with the 50% risk of penetration determined. The final validated surrogate consisted of a Laceration Assessment Layer (LAL) of natural chamois and .6 cm of closed-cell foam over a Penetration Assessment Layer (PAL) of 20% ordnance gelatin. This surrogate predicted a 50% risk of penetration at 23.88 J/cm(2). Injury risk curves for the PMHS and surrogate development work are presented.

  4. Evaluation of a soil slurry reactor system for treating soil contaminated with munitions compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathy, R.; Manning, J.; Montemagno, C.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    Two 0.5-L semicontinuous soil slurry reactors were operated for seven months to evaluate the performance of the slurry reactor system in bioremediating soil contaminated with munitions compounds. Nitrogen and carbon were supplemented. The soil slurry was mixed continuously and aerated 10 min/day. Ten percent of the contaminated soil was replaced every week. The 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) concentration in soil began to drop after 15 days of treatment, falling to less than 0.5 mg/kg from 7800 mg/kg. Total plate counts in both reactors indicated that the bacterial population was maintained, with an average plate count of about 10{sup 8} CFU/mL. The soil slurry was slightly acidic. In addition to TNT, the slurry reactor also removed the other munitions compounds trinitrobenzene (TNB), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), RDX, and HMX. Radiolabeling studies on the reactor biomass showed that 23% of [{sup C}14]TNT was mineralized, while 27% was used as biomass and 8% was adsorbed on to the soil. The rest of the [{sup 14}C]TNT was accounted for as TNT metabolites. Increasing the frequency of soil replacement from once to two or three times weekly did not affect the TNT removal rates. However, the slurry system showed signs of stress, with highly acidic conditions and low oxygen uptake rates.

  5. Interactions between ingredients in IMX-101: Reactive Chemical Processes Control Insensitive Munitions Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneous Thermogravimetric Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometry (STMBMS) measurements have been conducted on a new Insensitive Munitions (IM) formulation. IMX-101 is the first explosive to be fully IM qualified under new NATO STANAG guidelines for fielded munitions. The formulation uses dinitroanisole (DNAN) as a new melt cast material to replace TNT, and shows excellent IM performance when formulated with other energetic ingredients. The scope of this work is to explain this superior IM performance by investigating the reactive processes occurring in the material when subjected to a well-controlled thermal environment. The dominant reactive processes observed were a series of complex chemical interactions between the three main ingredients (DNAN, NQ, and NTO) that occurs well below the onset of the normal decomposition process of any of the individual ingredients. This process shifts the thermal response of the formulations to a much lower temperature, where the kinetically controlled reaction processes are much slower. This low temperature shift has the effect of allowing the reactions to consume the reactive solids (NQ, NTO) well before the reaction rates increase and reach thermal runaway, resulting in a relatively benign response to the external stimuli. The main findings on the interaction processes are presented.

  6. A review of piezoelectric-based electrical energy harvesting methods and devices for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Pereira, Carlos M.; Feng, Dake

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a review of piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices and their charge collection and storage electronics for use in very harsh environment of gun-fired munitions. A number of novel classes of such energy-harvesting power sources that have been developed for gun-fired munitions and similar applications, including one with integrated safety and firing setback event detection electronics and logic circuitry. The power sources are designed to harvest energy from firing acceleration and vibratory motions during the flight. As an example, the application of the developed piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices with event detection circuitry to the development of self-powered initiators or switching devices with full no-fire safety circuitry for protection against accidental drops, transportation vibration, and other similar low amplitude accelerations and/or high amplitude but short duration acceleration events is presented. The designs allow the use of a very small piezoelectric elements, thereby making such devices to be highly miniaturized. These devices can be readily hardened to withstand very high G firing setback accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and the harsh firing environments. The design of prototypes and testing in shock loading machines, air guns and actual firing are presented.

  7. Use of a Salmonella microsuspension bioassay to detect the mutagenicity of munitions compounds at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    George, S E; Huggins-Clark, G; Brooks, L R

    2001-01-25

    Past production and handling of munitions has resulted in soil contamination at various military facilities. Depending on the concentrations present, these soils pose both a reactivity and toxicity hazard and the potential for groundwater contamination. Many munitions-related chemicals have been examined for mutagenicity in the Ames test, but because the metabolites may be present in low environmental concentrations, a more sensitive method is needed to elucidate the associated mutagenicity. RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), tetryl (N-methyl-N-2,4,6-tetranitroaniline), TNB (1,3,5-trinitrobenzene) and metabolites were examined for mutagenicity in a microsuspension modification of the Salmonella histidine reversion assay with and without metabolic activation. TNB and tetryl were positive in TA98 (32.5, 5.2revertants/nmole) and TA100 (7.4, 9.5revertants/nmole) without metabolic activation and were more potent than TNT (TA98, 0.3revertants/nmole; TA100, 2.4revertants/nmole). With the exception of the tetranitroazoxytoluene derivatives, TNT metabolites were less mutagenic than TNT. RDX and two metabolites were negative in both strains, however, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine was positive in TA100 with and without S9. Microsuspension bioassay results tend to correlate well with published Ames test data, however, there are discrepancies among the published data sets and the microsuspension assay results.

  8. Event sensing and energy-harvesting power sources for gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Murray, R.; Pereira, C.; Nguyen, H.-L.

    2009-03-01

    A novel class of piezoelectric-based event sensing and energy-harvesting power sources is presented for gunfired munitions. The power sources are designed to harvest energy from firing acceleration and vibratory motions during the flight. The piezoelectric element may be used to measure setback acceleration level, indicate the barrel exit time and impact time and force levels for fuzing purposes. The developed power sources have the added advantage of providing safety, since the fuzing electronics are powered only after the munitions have exited the barrel. The developed piezoelectric-based energy harvesting power sources produce enough electrical energy for applications such as fuzing. The power sources are designed to withstand firing accelerations in excess of 120,000 G. In certain applications such as fuzing, the developed power sources have the potential of completely eliminating the need for chemical batteries. The design of a number of prototypes, including their packaging for high G hardening, and the results of laboratory, air-gun and firing tests are presented.

  9. Analysis of munitions constituents in IMX formulations by HPLC and HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Russell, A L; Seiter, J M; Coleman, J G; Winstead, B; Bednar, A J

    2014-10-01

    The use of Insensitive Munitions eXplosives (IMX) is increasing as the Army seeks to replace certain conventional munitions constituents, such as 2,4,6-trinitrotolene (TNT), for improved safety. The IMX formulations are more stable and therefore less prone to accidental detonation while designed to match the performance of legacy materials. Two formulations, IMX 101 and 104 are being investigated as a replacement for TNT in artillery rounds and composition B Army mortars, respectively. The chemical formulations of IMX-101 and 104 are comprised of four constituents;2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 1-nitroguanidine (NQ), and Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) which are mixed in various ratios to achieve the desired performance. The current work details the analysis of the IMX constituents by single column HPLC-UV-ESI-MS. Detection limits determined are in agreement with similar HPLC analysis of compounds, ranging from 7 to 9μg/L. Gradient mobile phases are used to allow separation of the 4 target compounds in more complex mixture of other concomitant compounds. Mass spectra are used to confirm analyte identity with chromatographic retention time.

  10. A Market-Basket Approach to Predict the Acute Aquatic Toxicity of Munitions and Energetic Materials.

    PubMed

    Burgoon, Lyle D

    2016-06-01

    An ongoing challenge in chemical production, including the production of insensitive munitions and energetics, is the ability to make predictions about potential environmental hazards early in the process. To address this challenge, a quantitative structure activity relationship model was developed to predict acute fathead minnow toxicity of insensitive munitions and energetic materials. Computational predictive toxicology models like this one may be used to identify and prioritize environmentally safer materials early in their development. The developed model is based on the Apriori market-basket/frequent itemset mining approach to identify probabilistic prediction rules using chemical atom-pairs and the lethality data for 57 compounds from a fathead minnow acute toxicity assay. Lethality data were discretized into four categories based on the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals. Apriori identified toxicophores for categories two and three. The model classified 32 of the 57 compounds correctly, with a fivefold cross-validation classification rate of 74 %. A structure-based surrogate approach classified the remaining 25 chemicals correctly at 48 %. This result is unsurprising as these 25 chemicals were fairly unique within the larger set.

  11. Piezoelectric energy-harvesting power source and event detection sensors for gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Jahangir; Feng, Dake; Pereira, Carlos M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a review of piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices and their charge collection electronics for use in very harsh environment of gun-fired munitions. A number of novel classes of such energy harvesting power sources have been developed for gun-fired munitions and similar applications, including those with integrated safety and firing setback event detection electronics and logic circuitry. The power sources are designed to harvest energy from firing acceleration and vibratory motions during the flight. As an example, the application of the developed piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices with event detection circuitry for the development of self-powered initiators with full no-fire safety circuitry for protection against accidental drops, transportation vibration, and other similar low amplitude accelerations and/or high amplitude but short duration acceleration events is presented. The design allows the use of a very small piezoelectric element, thereby allowing such devices to be highly miniaturized. These devices can be readily hardened to withstand very high G firing setback accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and the harsh firing environment. The design of prototypes and testing under realistic conditions are presented.

  12. 77 FR 35317 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to revise Category IX (military training equipment) of the U.S... Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revisions to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called for the establishment of a ``bright...

  13. 77 FR 70958 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ...: Revising Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revisions to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called for... definition provided by the Department of State in the June 19, 2012, proposed rule (77 FR 36428). Request...

  14. 78 FR 23675 - Importation of Defense Articles and Defense Services-U.S. Munitions Import List (2011R-20P)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... part of its Export Administration Regulations (EAR). See, e.g., 76 FR 41958 (July 15, 2011). Export... citation for 27 CFR Part 447 is revised to read as follows: Authority: 22 U.S.C. 2778; E.O. 13637, 78 FR... Articles and Defense Services--U.S. Munitions Import List (2011R-20P) AGENCY: Bureau of Alcohol,...

  15. 78 FR 31444 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... ``International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Defense Services,'' 76 FR 20590). In that rule, the Department.... 13637, 78 FR 16129. 0 2. Section 120.9 is revised to read as follows: Sec. 120.9 Defense service. (a) A.... 13637, 78 FR 16129. 0 4. Section 121.1 is amended by revising U.S. Munitions List Category XV to read...

  16. 76 FR 76097 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Establishment of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... List: Revising Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revision to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called... currently lists only ``naval nuclear propulsion plants,'' leading exporters to question whether other...

  17. 76 FR 76100 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ..., the Department published as a proposed rule a revised Category VII that included tiering (75 FR 76930...: Revising Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (Dec. 9, 2010) and ``Revision to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (Dec. 10, 2010)). The notices also called for...

  18. 76 FR 80305 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... perform specific military functions such as by providing military communication, electronic warfare... Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revision to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called for the establishment of a ``bright...

  19. 76 FR 80302 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... military communication, electronic warfare, target designation, surveillance, target detection, or sensor... Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revision to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called for the establishment of a ``bright...

  20. THE ROLE OF REMOTE SENSING IN IDENTIFYING BURIED WORLD WAR 1 MUNITIONS AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D.C.

    EPA Science Inventory

    During World War 1, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among others. Afte...

  1. THE ROLE OF REMOTE SENSING IN IDENTIFYING BURIED WORLD WAR I MUNITIONS AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D.C.

    EPA Science Inventory

    During World War 1, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among others. Afte...

  2. THE ROLE OF REMOTE SENSING AND GIS IN IDENTIFYING BURIED WORLD WAR I MUNITIONS AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, DC

    EPA Science Inventory

    During World War 1, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among others. Afte...

  3. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pine Bluff Arsenal, Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Final phase 1, Environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.D.; Morrisey, J.A.; Staub, W.P.; Boston, C.R.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Leibsch, E.; Rickert, L.W.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1991-09-01

    The Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) near Pine Bluff, Arkansas, is one of eight continental United States (CONUS) Army installations where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at PBA consists of approximately 12%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts). The purpose of this report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at PBA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those on which the FPEIS is based. New population data were used to compute fatalities using the same computation methods and values for all other parameters as in the FPEIS. Results indicate that all alternatives are indistinguishable when the potential health impacts to the PBA community are considered. However, risks from on-site disposal are in all cases equal to or less than risks from other alternatives. Furthermore, no unique resources with the potential to prevent or delay implementation of on-site disposal at PBA have been identified.

  4. 77 FR 29575 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... infrared or ultraviolet frequency spectrums; *(3) High temperature (greater than 300 deg F operation... Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to revise Category XIII (materials and miscellaneous articles) of the U.S. Munitions List (USML) to describe more precisely the materials warranting control on the...

  5. Influence of carbon and metal oxide nanomaterials on aqueous concentrations of the munition constituents cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and tungsten.

    PubMed

    Brame, Jonathon A; Kennedy, Alan J; Lounds, Christopher D; Bednar, Anthony J; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Scott, Andrea M; Stanley, Jacob K

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing likelihood of interactions between nanomaterials and munitions constituents in the environment resulting from the use of nanomaterials as additives to energetic formulations and potential contact in waste streams from production facilities and runoff from training ranges. The purpose of the present research was to determine the ability of nano-aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to adsorb the munitions constituents cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) and tungsten (W) from aqueous solution as a first step in determining the long-term exposure, transport, and bioavailability implications of such interactions. The results indicate significant adsorption of RDX by MWCNTs and of W by nano-Al(2)O(3) (but not between W and MWCNT or RDX and nano-Al(2)O(3)). Kinetic sorption and desorption investigations indicated that the most sorption occurs nearly instantaneously (<5 min), with a relatively slower, secondary binding leading to statistically significant but relatively smaller increases in adsorption over 30 d. The RDX sorption that occurred during the initial interaction was irreversible, with long-term, reversible sorption likely the result of a secondary interaction; as interaction time increased, however, the portion of W irreversibly sorbed onto nano-Al(2)O(3) also increased. The present study shows that strong interactions between some munitions constituents and nanomaterials following environmental release are likely. Time-dependent binding has implications for the bioavailability, migration, transport, and fate of munitions constituents in the environment.

  6. 78 FR 6765 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revisions to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10, 2010)). The notices also called for the establishment... provided by the Department of State in the June 19, 2012, proposed rule (77 FR 36428). Request for...

  7. 77 FR 33698 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... order, and a security classification guide developed pursuant thereto or equivalent, or to the... (see ``Commerce Control List: Revising Descriptions of Items and Foreign Availability,'' 75 FR 76664 (December 9, 2010) and ``Revisions to the United States Munitions List,'' 75 FR 76935 (December 10,...

  8. Degradation of high energetic and insensitive munitions compounds by Fe/Cu bimetal reduction.

    PubMed

    Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Pavlov, Julius; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Strickland, David; Smolinski, Benjamin; Braida, Washington

    2012-06-15

    A reductive technology based on a completely mixed two-phase reactor (bimetallic particles and aqueous stream) was developed for the treatment of aqueous effluents contaminated with nitramines and nitro-substituted energetic materials. Experimental degradation studies were performed using solutions of three high energetics (RDX, HMX, TNT) and three insensitive-munitions components (NTO, NQ, DNAN). The study shows that, on laboratory scale, these energetic compounds are easily degraded in solution by suspensions of bimetallic particles (Fe/Ni and Fe/Cu) prepared by electro-less deposition. The type of bimetal pair (Fe/Cu or Fe/Ni) does not appear to affect the degradation kinetics of RDX, HMX, and TNT. The degradation of all components followed apparent first-order kinetics. The half-lives of all compounds except NTO were under 10 min. Additional parameters affecting the degradation processes were solids loading and initial pH.

  9. Physicochemical properties of an insensitive munitions compound, N-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA).

    PubMed

    Boddu, Veera M; Abburi, Krishnaiah; Maloney, Stephen W; Damavarapu, Reddy

    2008-06-30

    Accurate information on physicochemical properties of an organic contaminant is essential for predicting its environmental impact and fate. These properties also provide invaluable information for the overall understanding of environmental distribution, biotransformation, and potential treatment processes. In this study the aqueous solubility (Sw), octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow), and Henry's law constant (K(H)) were determined for an insensitive munitions (IM) compound, N-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA), at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K. Effect of ionic strength on solubility, using electrolytes such as NaCl and CaCl2, was also studied. The data on the physicochemical parameters were correlated using the standard Van't Hoff equation. All three properties exhibited a linear relationship with reciprocal temperature. The enthalpy and entropy of phase transfer were derived from the experimental data.

  10. Photochemical transformation of the insensitive munitions compound 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Rao, Balaji; Wang, Wei; Cai, Qingsong; Anderson, Todd; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-15

    The insensitive munitions compound 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) is increasingly being used as a replacement for traditional, sensitive munitions compounds (e.g., trinitrotoluene [TNT]), but the environmental fate and photo-transformation of DNAN in natural water systems are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the photo-transformation rates of DNAN with both ultraviolet (UV) and sunlight irradiation under different environmentally relevant conditions. Sunlight photo-transformation of DNAN in water was found to follow predominantly pseudo-first-order decay kinetics with an average half-life (t(1/2)) of approximately 0.70 d and activation energy (E(a)) of 53 kJ mol(-1). Photo-transformation rates of DNAN were dependent on the wavelength of the light source: irradiation with UV-B light (280-315 nm) resulted in a greater quantum yield of transformation (φ(UV-B)=3.7×10(-4)) than rates obtained with UV-A light (φ(UV-A)=2.9×10(-4) at 316-400 nm) and sunlight (φ(sun)=1.1×10(-4)). Photo-oxidation was the dominant mechanism for DNAN photo-transformation, based on the formation of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) as major N species and 2,4-dinitrophenol as the minor species. Environmental factors (e.g., temperature, pH, and the presence or absence of naturally dissolved organic matter) displayed modest to little effects on the rate of DNAN photo-transformation. These observations indicate that sunlight-induced photo-transformation of DNAN may represent a significant abiotic degradation pathway in surface water, which may have important implications in evaluating the potential impacts and risks of DNAN in the environment.

  11. Bioaccumulation of chemical warfare agents, energetic materials, and metals in deep-sea shrimp from discarded military munitions sites off Pearl Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Shelby; Silva, Jeff A. K.; Dupra, Vilma; Edwards, Margo

    2016-06-01

    The bioaccumulation of munitions-related chemicals at former military deep-water disposal sites is poorly understood. This paper presents the results of human-food-item biota sampling to assess the potential for bioaccumulation of chemical warfare agents, energetic materials, arsenic, and additional munitions-related metals in deep-sea shrimp tissue samples collected during the Hawai'i Undersea Military Munitions Assessment (HUMMA) project to date. The HUMMA investigation area is located within a former munitions sea-disposal site located south of Pearl Harbor on the island of O'ahu, Hawai'i, designated site Hawaii-05 (HI-05) by the United States Department of Defense. Indigenous deep-sea shrimp (Heterocarpus ensifer) were caught adjacent to discarded military munitions (DMM) and at control sites where munitions were absent. Tissue analysis results showed that chemical warfare agents and their degradation products were not present within the edible portions of these samples at detectable concentrations, and energetic materials and their degradation products were detected in only a few samples at concentrations below the laboratory reporting limits. Likewise, arsenic, copper, and lead concentrations were below the United States Food and Drug Administration's permitted concentrations of metals in marine biota tissue (if defined), and their presence within these samples could not be attributed to the presence of DMM within the study area based on a comparative analysis of munitions-adjacent and control samples collected. Based on this current dataset, it can be concluded that DMM existing within the HUMMA study area is not contributing to the bioaccumulation of munitions-related chemicals for the biota species investigated to date.

  12. Dispersion sensitivity of the eight inch advanced ramjet munitions technology projectile due to wind and minor thrust errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, S. R.

    1984-09-01

    Advanced Ramjet Munitions Technology (ARMT) is an ongoing DARPA project to research ramjet munitions. The ARMT eight inch projectile uses ramjet thrust for a boosted trajectory, but operates on a thrust drag balance concept to create pseudovacuum trajectory during powered flight. The trajectory was analyzed using an IBM-370 computer simulation for three and five degrees of freedom. Work was also done to adapt the Ballistics Research Laboratories six degrees of freedom program to the IBM system. Projectile aerodynamic and mass properties were obtained from the Norden Systems Wind Tunnel Data. Dispersion from the vaccuum trajectory due to wind prior to ramjet burnout proved minor. Dispersion due to constant thrust errors under 5% was within a 600 radius at terminal guidance over a range of 33 miles.

  13. Environmental genotoxicity assessment along the transport routes of chemical munitions leading to the dumping areas in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Baršienė, Janina; Butrimavičienė, Laura; Grygiel, Włodzimierz; Stunžėnas, Virmantas; Valskienė, Roberta; Greiciūnaitė, Janina; Stankevičiūtė, Milda

    2016-02-15

    The frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nuclear buds (NB) and nuclear buds on filament (NBf) were examined in 660 specimens of herring (Clupea harengus) collected in 2009-2014 at 65 study stations located mainly along the chemical munition transport routes in the Baltic Sea. The frequency of nuclear abnormalities was strongly increased in herring caught at four stations located close to chemical munition dumping sites, or CWAs - substances (chemical warfare agents) in sediments. Significant increase of MN, NB and NBf was observed in fish caught November 2010-2013 compared to 2009. The most significantly increased genotoxicity responses were recorded in fish caught at stations along CW (chemical weapons) transport routes, close to the Bornholm CW dumping area, in zones with CWAs in sediments and with oil-gas platforms. PMID:26763319

  14. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final Phase 1 environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Hillsman, E.L.; Johnson, R.O.; Miller, R.L.; Patton, T.G.; Schoepfle, G.M.; Tolbert, V.R.; Feldman, D.L.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Morrissey, J.; Rickert, L.W.; Staub, W.P.; West, D.C.

    1993-02-01

    The Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) near Hermiston, Oregon, is one of eight US Army installations in the continental United States where lethal unitary chemical agents and munitions are stored, and where destruction of agents and munitions is proposed under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP). The chemical agent inventory at UMDA consists of 11.6%, by weight, of the total US stockpile. The destruction of the stockpile is necessary to eliminate the risk to the public from continued storage and to dispose of obsolete and leaking munitions. In 1988 the US Army issued a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP that identified on-site disposal of agents and munitions as the environmentally preferred alternative (i.e., the alternative with the least potential to cause significant adverse impacts), using a method based on five measures of risk for potential human health and ecosystem/environmental effects; the effectiveness and adequacy of emergency preparedness capabilities also played a key role in the FPEIS selection methodology. In some instances, the FPEIS included generic data and assumptions that were developed to allow a consistent comparison of potential impacts among programmatic alternatives and did not include detailed conditions at each of the eight installations. The purpose of this Phase 1 report is to examine the proposed implementation of on-site disposal at UMDA in light of more recent and more detailed data than those included in the FPEIS. Specifically, this Phase 1 report is intended to either confirm or reject the validity of on-site disposal for the UMDA stockpile. Using the same computation methods as in the FPEIS, new population data were used to compute potential fatalities from hypothetical disposal accidents. Results indicate that onsite disposal is clearly preferable to either continued storage at UMDA or transportation of the UMDA stockpile to another depot for disposal.

  15. Piezoelectric-based event sensing and energy-harvesting power sources for thermal battery initiation in gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Feng, D.; Pereira, C.

    2014-06-01

    A novel class of piezoelectric-based energy harvesting devices with integrated safety and firing setback event detection electronics and logic circuitry that can be used in gun-fired munitions is presented. In this paper, the application of the device to the development of initiators for thermal reserve batteries in gun-fire munitions is presented. The novel and highly efficient electrical energy collection and storage and event detection and safety electronics used allows the use of a very small piezoelectric element. As a result, such devices can be highly miniaturized for used in small reserve batteries. For thermal battery initiation, when the prescribed firing setback acceleration profile, i.e., the prescribed all-fire condition is detected, a highly efficient charge collection electronic circuitry routes the charges generated by the piezoelectric element of the device to the initiator bridge element, thereby causing the thermal battery pyrotechnic material to be ignited. For munitions powered by thermal reserve batteries, the present initiation device provides a self-powered initiator with full no-fire safety circuitry for protection against accidental drops, transportation vibration, and other similar low amplitude accelerations and/or high amplitude but short duration acceleration events. The device is shown to be readily set to initiate thermal batteries under almost any all-fire conditions. The device can be readily hardened to withstand very high G firing setback accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and the harsh firing environment. The design of prototypes and testing under realistic conditions are presented.

  16. Destruction of OPA from munitions demilitarization in supercritical water oxidation: kinetics of total organic carbon disappearance.

    PubMed

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol; Hong, Deasik

    2006-01-01

    The destruction of OPA from munitions demilitarization has been accomplished in supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) with oxygen as oxidant in an isothermal continuous-flow reactor. The experiments were conducted at a temperature of 689-887 K and a fixed pressure of 25 MPa, with a residence time that ranged from 7 s to 14 s. The destruction efficiency was measured by total organic carbon (TOC) conversion. At the reaction condition, the initial TOC concentrations of OPA were varied from 1.41 mmol/L to 19.57 mmol/L and the oxygen concentrations were varied from 15.03 mmol/L to 81.85 mmol/L. Experimental data showed that all the TOC conversions were >80% under the above experimental conditions. The kinetics of TOC disappearance, which is essential for the design, optimization, and control of reliable commercial SCWO reactor was developed by taking into account the dependence of the oxidant and TOC concentration on the reaction rate. A global TOC disappearance rates expression was regressed from the data of 38 experiments, to a 95% confidence level. The resulting activation energy was determined to be 44.01 +/- 1.52 kJ/mol, and the pre-exponential factor was (1.67 +/- 0.45) x 10(2) L(1.14) mmol(-0.14) s(-1). The reaction orders for the TOC and the oxidant were 0.98 +/- 0.01 and 0.16 +/- 0.02, respectively.

  17. The Public Health Service role in the disposal of chemical munitions.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S T; Anderson, L W; Caldwell, G G

    1985-01-01

    Within the last decade, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has increasingly emphasized environmental public health activities. The Center for Environmental Health (CEH), one of nine major units of the CDC, was established as a focus for assessment and prevention of environmentally related diseases. Many new, legislatively mandated programs have been delegated to CEH. One such mandated responsibility in Public Laws 91-121 and 91-441 directs the Department of Health and Human Services or its designee to review the Department of Defense (DOD) plans to dispose of or to transport chemical warfare agents. The Chemical Munitions Demilitarization Program, CEH, reviews DOD plans and makes recommendations to ensure that hazards to public health and safety have been provided for in the plans. In addition, these CEH staffers periodically review approved activities at DOD facilities, assessing their monitoring and evaluation programs. CEH staffers also contact State and local health and environmental agencies to identify and evaluate any concerns of the agencies or the public relating to these activities. PMID:2991969

  18. The Public Health Service role in the disposal of chemical munitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, S T; Anderson, L W; Caldwell, G G

    1985-01-01

    Within the last decade, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has increasingly emphasized environmental public health activities. The Center for Environmental Health (CEH), one of nine major units of the CDC, was established as a focus for assessment and prevention of environmentally related diseases. Many new, legislatively mandated programs have been delegated to CEH. One such mandated responsibility in Public Laws 91-121 and 91-441 directs the Department of Health and Human Services or its designee to review the Department of Defense (DOD) plans to dispose of or to transport chemical warfare agents. The Chemical Munitions Demilitarization Program, CEH, reviews DOD plans and makes recommendations to ensure that hazards to public health and safety have been provided for in the plans. In addition, these CEH staffers periodically review approved activities at DOD facilities, assessing their monitoring and evaluation programs. CEH staffers also contact State and local health and environmental agencies to identify and evaluate any concerns of the agencies or the public relating to these activities.

  19. Microanalytical X-ray imaging of depleted uranium speciation in environmentally aged munitions residues.

    PubMed

    Crean, Daniel E; Livens, Francis R; Stennett, Martin C; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N; Hyatt, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    Use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions has resulted in contamination of the near-surface environment with penetrator residues. Uncertainty in the long-term environmental fate of particles produced by impact of DU penetrators with hard targets is a specific concern. In this study DU particles produced in this way and exposed to the surface terrestrial environment for longer than 30 years at a U.K. firing range were characterized using synchrotron X-ray chemical imaging. Two sites were sampled: a surface soil and a disposal area for DU-contaminated wood, and the U speciation was different between the two areas. Surface soil particles showed little extent of alteration, with U speciated as oxides U3O7 and U3O8. Uranium oxidation state and crystalline phase mapping revealed these oxides occur as separate particles, reflecting heterogeneous formation conditions. Particles recovered from the disposal area were substantially weathered, and U(VI) phosphate phases such as meta-ankoleite (K(UO2)(PO4) · 3H2O) were dominant. Chemical imaging revealed domains of contrasting U oxidation state linked to the presence of both U3O7 and meta-ankoleite, indicating growth of a particle alteration layer. This study demonstrates that substantial alteration of DU residues can occur, which directly influences the health and environmental hazards posed by this contamination. PMID:24451034

  20. Adsorption of Emerging Munitions Contaminants on Cellulose Surface: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manoj K; Poda, Aimee

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript reports results of an integrated theoretical and experimental investigation of adsorption of two emerging contaminants (DNAN and FOX-7) and legacy compound TNT on cellulose surface. Cellulose was modeled as trimeric form of the linear chain of 1 → 4 linked of β-D-glucopyranos in (4)C1 chair conformation. Geometries of modeled cellulose, munitions compounds and their complexes were optimized at the M06-2X functional level of Density Functional Theory using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set in gas phase and in water solution. The effect of water solution was modeled using the CPCM approach. Nature of potential energy surfaces was ascertained through harmonic vibrational frequency analysis. Interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set was used. Molecular electrostatic potential mapping was performed to understand the reactivity of the investigated systems. It was predicted that adsorbates will be weakly adsorbed on the cellulose surface in water solution than in the gas phase.

  1. Analysis of munitions constituents in groundwater using a field-portable GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Russell, A L; Hayes, C A; Jones, W T; Tackett, P; Splichal, D E; Georgian, T; Parker, L V; Kirgan, R A; MacMillan, D K

    2012-05-01

    The use of munitions constituents (MCs) at military installations can produce soil and groundwater contamination that requires periodic monitoring even after training or manufacturing activities have ceased. Traditional groundwater monitoring methods require large volumes of aqueous samples (e.g., 2-4 L) to be shipped under chain of custody, to fixed laboratories for analysis. The samples must also be packed on ice and shielded from light to minimize degradation that may occur during transport and storage. The laboratory's turn-around time for sample analysis and reporting can be as long as 45 d. This process hinders the reporting of data to customers in a timely manner; yields data that are not necessarily representative of current site conditions owing to the lag time between sample collection and reporting; and incurs significant shipping costs for samples. The current work compares a field portable Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) for analysis of MCs on-site with traditional laboratory-based analysis using High Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV absorption detection. The field method provides near real-time (within ~1 h of sampling) concentrations of MCs in groundwater samples. Mass spectrometry provides reliable confirmation of MCs and a means to identify unknown compounds that are potential false positives for methods with UV and other non-selective detectors.

  2. Using transfer functions as a method for predicting lightning effects on munitions storage bunkers

    SciTech Connect

    Struck, J.K.; Chiefa, M.A.; Grenert, J.E.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements have recently been conducted and computer models constructed to determine the coupling of lightning energy into munition storage bunkers as detailed in companion conference papers. In this paper transfer functions from the incident current to the measured parameters are used to construct simple circuit models that explain much of the important observed quantitative and qualitative information and differences in transfer functions are used to identify nonlinearities in the response data. In particular, V{sub oc} -- the open-circuit voltage generated between metal objects in the structure, I{sub sc} -- the short-circuit current generated in a wire connecting metal objects in the structure, and a typical current measurement in the buried counterpoise system behave in a relatively simple manner explainable by one or several circuit elements. The circuit elements inferred from measured data are comparable in magnitude with those developed from simple analytical models for inductance and resistance. These analytical models are more useful in predicting bounding electromagnetic environment values rather than providing exact time domain waveforms. 2 refs.

  3. Using transfer functions as a method for predicting lightning effects on munitions storage bunkers

    SciTech Connect

    Struck, J.K.; Chiefa, M.A.; Grenert, J.E. ); Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Measurements have recently been conducted and computer models constructed to determine the coupling of lightning energy into munition storage bunkers as detailed in companion conference papers. In this paper transfer functions from the incident current to the measured parameters are used to construct simple circuit models that explain much of the important observed quantitative and qualitative information and differences in transfer functions are used to identify nonlinearities in the response data. In particular, V{sub oc} -- the open-circuit voltage generated between metal objects in the structure, I{sub sc} -- the short-circuit current generated in a wire connecting metal objects in the structure, and a typical current measurement in the buried counterpoise system behave in a relatively simple manner explainable by one or several circuit elements. The circuit elements inferred from measured data are comparable in magnitude with those developed from simple analytical models for inductance and resistance. These analytical models are more useful in predicting bounding electromagnetic environment values rather than providing exact time domain waveforms. 2 refs.

  4. Toxicokinetic Model Development for the Insensitive Munitions Component 2,4-Dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Goodwin, Michelle R; Hulgan, Angela D; Gut, Chester P; Bannon, Desmond I

    2015-01-01

    The Armed Forces are developing new explosives that are less susceptible to unintentional detonation (insensitive munitions [IMX]). 2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is a component of IMX. Toxicokinetic data for DNAN are required to support interpretation of toxicology studies and refinement of dose estimates for human risk assessment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed by gavage (5, 20, or 80 mg DNAN/kg), and blood and tissue samples were analyzed to determine the levels of DNAN and its metabolite 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP). These data and data from the literature were used to develop preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The model simulations indicated saturable metabolism of DNAN in rats at higher tested doses. The PBPK model was extrapolated to estimate the toxicokinetics of DNAN and DNP in humans, allowing the estimation of human-equivalent no-effect levels of DNAN exposure from no-observed adverse effect levels determined in laboratory animals, which may guide the selection of exposure limits for DNAN.

  5. Joint photomicrobial process for the degradation of the insensitive munition N-guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12).

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Halasz, Annamaria; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2013-05-21

    N-Guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12) is a very insensitive energetic material intended to be used in the composition of next-generation insensitive munitions. To help predict the environmental behavior and fate of FOX-12, we conducted a study to determine its photodegradability and biodegradability. When dissolved in water, FOX-12, a guanylurea-dinitramide salt, also named GUDN, dissociated instantly to produce the dinitramide moiety and guanylurea, as demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. When an aqueous solution of FOX-12 was subjected to photolysis using a solar-simulated photoreactor, we found a rapid removal of the dinitramide with concurrent formation of N₂O, NO₂(-), and NO₃(-). The second component, guanylurea, was photostable. However, when FOX-12 was incubated aerobically with the soil isolate Variovorax strain VC1 and protected from light, the dinitramide component of FOX-12 was recalcitrant but guanylurea degraded effectively to ammonia, guanidine, and presumably CO₂. When FOX-12 was incubated with strain VC1 in the presence of light, both components of FOX-12 degraded, giving similar products to those described above. We concluded that the new insensitive explosive FOX-12 can be effectively degraded by a joint photomicrobial process and, therefore, should not cause persistent contamination of surface waters.

  6. Ecotoxicological assessment of a high energetic and insensitive munitions compound: 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN).

    PubMed

    Dodard, Sabine G; Sarrazin, Manon; Hawari, Jalal; Paquet, Louise; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2013-11-15

    The high explosive nitroaromatic 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) is less shock sensitive than 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and is proposed as a TNT replacement for melt-cast formulations. Before using DNAN in munitions and potentially leading to environmental impact, the present study examines the ecotoxicity of DNAN using selected organisms. In water, DNAN decreased green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata growth (EC50 = 4.0mg/L), and bacteria Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence (Microtox, EC50 = 60.3mg/L). In soil, DNAN decreased perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne growth (EC50 =7 mg/kg), and is lethal to earthworms Eisenia andrei (LC50 = 47 mg/kg). At sub-lethal concentrations, DNAN caused an avoidance response (EC50 = 31 mg/kg) by earthworms. The presence of DNAN and 2-amino-4-nitroanisole in earthworms and plants suggested a role of these compounds in DNAN toxicity. Toxicity of DNAN was compared to TNT, tested under the same experimental conditions. These analyses showed that DNAN was equally, or even less deleterious to organism health than TNT, depending on the species and toxicity test. The present studies provide baseline toxicity data to increase the understanding of the environmental impact of DNAN, and assist science-based decision makers for improved management of potential DNAN contaminated sites.

  7. Joint photomicrobial process for the degradation of the insensitive munition N-guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12).

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Halasz, Annamaria; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Hawari, Jalal

    2013-05-21

    N-Guanylurea-dinitramide (FOX-12) is a very insensitive energetic material intended to be used in the composition of next-generation insensitive munitions. To help predict the environmental behavior and fate of FOX-12, we conducted a study to determine its photodegradability and biodegradability. When dissolved in water, FOX-12, a guanylurea-dinitramide salt, also named GUDN, dissociated instantly to produce the dinitramide moiety and guanylurea, as demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. When an aqueous solution of FOX-12 was subjected to photolysis using a solar-simulated photoreactor, we found a rapid removal of the dinitramide with concurrent formation of N₂O, NO₂(-), and NO₃(-). The second component, guanylurea, was photostable. However, when FOX-12 was incubated aerobically with the soil isolate Variovorax strain VC1 and protected from light, the dinitramide component of FOX-12 was recalcitrant but guanylurea degraded effectively to ammonia, guanidine, and presumably CO₂. When FOX-12 was incubated with strain VC1 in the presence of light, both components of FOX-12 degraded, giving similar products to those described above. We concluded that the new insensitive explosive FOX-12 can be effectively degraded by a joint photomicrobial process and, therefore, should not cause persistent contamination of surface waters. PMID:23594309

  8. Adsorption of Emerging Munitions Contaminants on Cellulose Surface: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manoj K; Poda, Aimee

    2016-06-01

    This manuscript reports results of an integrated theoretical and experimental investigation of adsorption of two emerging contaminants (DNAN and FOX-7) and legacy compound TNT on cellulose surface. Cellulose was modeled as trimeric form of the linear chain of 1 → 4 linked of β-D-glucopyranos in (4)C1 chair conformation. Geometries of modeled cellulose, munitions compounds and their complexes were optimized at the M06-2X functional level of Density Functional Theory using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set in gas phase and in water solution. The effect of water solution was modeled using the CPCM approach. Nature of potential energy surfaces was ascertained through harmonic vibrational frequency analysis. Interaction energies were corrected for basis set superposition error and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set was used. Molecular electrostatic potential mapping was performed to understand the reactivity of the investigated systems. It was predicted that adsorbates will be weakly adsorbed on the cellulose surface in water solution than in the gas phase. PMID:27084096

  9. Uptake of munitions materiels (TNT, RDX) by crop plants and potential interactions of nitrogen nutrition

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, R.J.; Harvey, S.D.; Cataldo, D.A.; Mitchell, W.

    1995-12-31

    Munitions materiel such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and their combustion/decomposition products can accumulate/cycle in terrestrial environs. High soil organic matter and fertility have been previously shown to negatively correlate with both TNT or RDX uptake in plants such as grass, wheat, and bean. The present study was therefore conducted using low fertility soil to assess uptake and distribution patterns of C-radiolabelled TNT and RDX (15 and 30 {micro}g/g) within corn (Zea mays), spinach (Spinacea oleraceae), carrot (Daucus carota), and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) grown to maturity in growth chambers. Uptake by the plants at maturity (90- to 120-days) ranged from 1.8 to 2.7% of total amended {sup 14}C-TNT for carrots and corn respectively and 17 to 33% of total amended {sup 14}C-RDX for corn and carrots respectively. Distribution patterns of total radiolabel indicate that the TNT-derived label was primarily retained within the roots (60 to 85%) while the RDX-derived label was distributed to the shoots (85 to 97%). Less than 0.01 {micro}g/g dry wt. TNT was found in all analyzed shoot tissues with > 90% of the TNT-derived radiolabel in the form of polar metabolites. Concentrations of RDX in shoot tissues of corn exceeded 180 {micro}g/g dry wt. Alfalfa grown in unfertilized, fertilized (NO{sub 3}), or unfertilized-inoculated (Rhizobia) soil exhibited a 70 to 100% increase in dry wt. after 45 days in the TNT-amended (15 {micro}g/g) fertilized and unfertilized-inoculated plants versus the controls. A potential TNT/nitrogen interaction will be discussed.

  10. An Investigation to Improve Quality Evaluations of Primers and Propellant for 20mm Munitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Holmes, C.; McGrory, J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    To reduce the frequency of electrically initiated, 20mm munition hangfires (delayed ignitions), a joint Army/NASA investigation was conducted to recommend quality evaluation improvements for acceptance of both primers and gun propellant. This effort focused only on evaluating ignition and combustion performance as potential causes of hangfires: poor electrical initiation of the primer, low output performance of the primer, low ignition sensitivity of the gun propellant, and the effects of cold temperature. The goal was to determine the "best" of the Army and NASA test methods to assess the functional performance of primers and gun propellants. The approach was to evaluate the performance of both high-quality and deliberately defective primers to challenge the sensitivity of test methods. In addition, the ignition sensitivity of different manufacturing batches of gun propellants was evaluated. The results of the investigation revealed that improvements can be made in functional evaluations that can assist in identifying and reducing ignition and performance variations. The "best" functional evaluation of primers and propellant is achieved through a combination of both Army and NASA test methods. Incorporating the recommendations offered in this report may provide for considerable savings in reducing the number of cartridge firings, while significantly lowering the rejection rate of primer, propellant and cartridge lots. The most probable causes for ignition and combustion-related hangfires were the lack of calcium silicide in the primer mix, a low output performance of primers, and finally, poor ignition sensitivity of gun propellant. Cold temperatures further reduce propellant ignition sensitivity, as well as reducing burn rate and chamber pressures.

  11. Next Generation Munitions Handler: Human-Machine Interface and Preliminary Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Jansen, J.F.; Pin, F.G.; Rowe, J.C.

    1999-04-25

    The Next Generation Munitions Handler/Advanced Technology Demonstrator (NGMI-VATTD) is a technology demonstrator for the application of an advanced robotic device for re-arming U.S. Air Force (USAF) and U.S. Navy (USN) tactical fighters. It comprises two key hardware components: a heavy-lift dexterous manipulator (HDM) and a nonholonomic mobility platform. The NGMWATTD is capable of lifting weapons up to 4400 kg (2000 lb) and placing them on any weapons rack on existing fighters (including the F-22 Raptor). This report describes the NGMH mission with particular reference to human-machine interfaces. It also describes preliminary testing to garner feedback about the heavy-lift manipulator arm from experienced fighter load crewmen. The purpose of the testing was to provide preliminary information about control system parameters and to gather feed- back from users about manipulator arm functionality. To that end, the Air Force load crewmen interacted with the NGMWATTD in an informal testing session and provided feedback about the performance of the system. Certain con- trol system parameters were changed during the course of the testing and feedback from the participants was used to make a rough estimate of "good" initial operating parameters. Later, formal testing will concentrate within this range to identify optimal operating parameters. User reactions to the HDM were generally positive, All of the USAF personnel were favorably impressed with the capabilities of the system. Fine-tuning operating parameters created a system even more favorably regarded by the load crews. Further adjustment to control system parameters will result in a system that is operationally efficient, easy to use, and well accepted by users.

  12. Computer-based test system for the Tactical Airfield Attack Munition (TAAM) safing, arming, and fuzing system

    SciTech Connect

    Warhus, J.; Castleton, R.; Lanning, S.

    1981-12-01

    Testing and quality assurance of large numbers of firing systems are an essential part of the development of the Tactical Airfield Attack Munition (TAAM). A computerized test and data acquisition system has been developed to make the testing and quality assurance workload manageable. The system hardware utilizes an LSI-11/23 computer, a Tektronix 7612 transient digitizer, and various other programmable instruments and power supplies. The system is capable of measuring and analyzing mechanical shock and fireset transient waveforms, automating testing sequences, and making records and comparisons of the test results. The system architecture is flexible for general purpose firing system development work.

  13. Integration of a V&V smart munition model into OneSAF testbed baseline for simulation and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes the integration of a verified and validated (V&V) smart munition model for the Army's Hornet sublet into OneSAF Testbed Baseline for equipment performance simulation, testing, and training. This effort improves realism of current Hornet behavior in the Testbed by implementing sublet fly-out to model the effects of target type, speed, and environmental conditions on target acquisition. Also addressed are issues of maintaining a V&V of the model and at the same time reducing fidelity of the model to obtain real-time simulation of the sublet fly-out and target acquisition.

  14. Chemical-Stockpile Disposal Program. Chemical agent and munition disposal. Summary of the US Army's experience. Final report, July 1972-August 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Flamm, K.J.; Kwan, Q.; McNulty, W.B.

    1987-09-21

    This report was prepared in support of the U.S. Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and Discuss the Army's industrial-scale chemical agent and munitions disposal experience. Since 1969, when the National Academy of Science recommended that ocean dumping be discontinued as a method of chemical agent and munition disposal, the Army has destroyed nearly 15 million pounds of chemical agents by either chemical neutralization or incineration. This experience has been incorporated into the design of the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System, which is being constructed on a small island in the Pacific Ocean, and the proposed CSDP disposal plants.

  15. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  16. 22 CFR 123.11 - Movements of vessels and aircraft covered by the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States. 123.11 Section 123.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123... defense article, without a temporary export license (Form DSP-73) from the Department of State. (See §...

  17. 22 CFR 123.11 - Movements of vessels and aircraft covered by the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States. 123.11 Section 123.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123... defense article, without a temporary export license (Form DSP-73) from the Department of State. (See §...

  18. 22 CFR 123.11 - Movements of vessels and aircraft covered by the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the U.S. Munitions List outside the United States. 123.11 Section 123.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS LICENSES FOR THE EXPORT OF DEFENSE ARTICLES § 123... defense article, without a temporary export license (Form DSP-73) from the Department of State. (See §...

  19. THE ROLE OF THE REMOTE SENSING IN IDENTIFYING BURIED WORLD WAR I MUNITIONS AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D.C.

    EPA Science Inventory



    During World War 1, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Army as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among othe...

  20. THER ROLE OF REMOTE SENSING AND GIS IN IDENTIFYING AND REMOVING BURIED WORLD WAR I MUNITIONS AT THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, DC

    EPA Science Inventory

    During World War I, The American University in Washington D.C. was used by the U.S. Am1y as an experiment station for the development and testing of a variety of battlefield munitions including chemical weapons such as Mustard Gas, Phosgene, Ricin and Lewisite, among others. Afte...

  1. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA SEEDLING ROOTS EXPOSED TO THE MUNITION HEXAHYDRO-1,3,5-TRINITRO-1,3,5-TRIAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arabidopsis thaliana root transcriptome responses to the munition, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), were assessed using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Comparison of the transcriptional profile for the RDX response to a profile previously described for Ar...

  2. 41 CFR 102-36.430 - May we dispose of excess Munitions List Items (MLIs)/Commerce Control List Items (CCLIs)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May we dispose of excess Munitions List Items (MLIs)/Commerce Control List Items (CCLIs)? 102-36.430 Section 102-36.430 Public... export licensing when transported from the U.S....

  3. Toxicity of the conventional energetics TNT and RDX relative to new insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO in Rana pipiens tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jacob K; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Biedenbach, James M; Chappell, Pornsawan; Gust, Kurt A

    2015-04-01

    An initiative within the US military is targeting the replacement of traditional munitions constituents with insensitive munitions to reduce risk of accidental detonation. The purpose of the present study was to comparatively assess toxicity of the traditional munitions constituents 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) with the new insensitive munitions constituents 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO). The following exposure durations were performed with Rana pipiens (leopard frog) tadpoles: TNT and DNAN, 96 h and 28 d; RDX, 10 d and 28 d; NTO, 28 d. The 96-h 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values and 95% confidence intervals for TNT and DNAN were 4.4 mg/L (4.2 mg/L, 4. 7 mg/L) and 24.3 mg/L (21.3 mg/L, 27.6 mg/L), respectively. No significant impacts on survival were observed in the 10-d exposure to RDX up to 25.3 mg/L. Effects on tadpole swimming distance were observed with a lowest-observed-effect concentration (LOEC) of 5.9 mg/L RDX. In the 28-d exposures, the LOECs for survival for TNT, DNAN, and NTO were 0.003 mg/L, 2.4 mg/L, and 5.0 mg/L, respectively. No significant mortality was observed in the RDX chronic 28-d exposure up to the highest treatment level tested of 28.0 mg/L. Neither tadpole developmental stage nor growth was significantly affected in any of the 28-d exposures. Rana pipiens were very sensitive to chronic TNT exposure, with an LOEC 3 orders of magnitude lower than those for insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO.

  4. Toxicokinetic Model Development for the Insensitive Munitions Component 3-Nitro-1,2,4-Triazol-5-One.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Phillips, Elizabeth A; Goodwin, Michelle R; Bannon, Desmond I

    2015-01-01

    3-Nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) is a component of insensitive munitions that are potential replacements for conventional explosives. Toxicokinetic data can aid in the interpretation of toxicity studies and interspecies extrapolation, but only limited data on the toxicokinetics and metabolism of NTO are available. To supplement these limited data, further in vivo studies of NTO in rats were conducted and blood concentrations were measured, tissue distribution of NTO was estimated using an in silico method, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models of the disposition of NTO in rats and macaques were developed and extrapolated to humans. The model predictions can be used to extrapolate from designated points of departure identified from rat toxicology studies to provide a scientific basis for estimates of acceptable human exposure levels for NTO.

  5. Estimation of the potential leakage of the chemical munitions based on two hydrodynamical models implemented for the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakacki, Jaromir; Golenko, Mariya

    2014-05-01

    Two hydrodynamical models (Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and Parallel Ocean Program (POP)) have been implemented for the Baltic Sea area that consists of locations of the dumped chemical munitions during II War World. The models have been configured based on similar data source - bathymetry, initial conditions and external forces were implemented based on identical data. The horizontal resolutions of the models are also very similar. Several simulations with different initial conditions have been done. Comparison and analysis of the bottom currents from both models have been performed. Based on it estimating of the dangerous area and critical time have been done. Also lagrangian particle tracking and passive tracer were implemented and based on these results probability of the appearing dangerous doses and its time evolution have been presented. This work has been performed in the frame of the MODUM project financially supported by NATO.

  6. Arsenal of democracy in the face of change: Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), their evolution and some economic considerations, Working Paper No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, C.V.

    1990-08-01

    A brief study was made of some of the forces driving the move to Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), including the quest for military effectiveness, combat experience, and logistic compression. PGMs cost from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per Kg but are tens to hundreds of times more effective than conventional munitions. A year's peacetime plateau production of each US PGM can be carried by a few C-5 aircraft. Surge quantities of PGMs are within US airlift capabilities, taking some of the risk out of off-shore procurement. The improving capability of antiaircraft PGMs and the escalating cost of combat aircraft (50 to 100-fold in constant dollars since WW II) may bring into question the economic viability of manned attack aircraft. The same may be true to a slightly lesser degree for heavy armored vehicles. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions (Joseph F. Bunnett and Marian Mikotajczyk, Eds.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    What do Knute Rockne, Notre Dame's famed football coach, and Lewisite, a chemical warfare agent dubbed "the dew of death", have in common? Both owe their discovery to Father Julius Arthur Nieuwland.1 Rockne's legacy lives on in the Fighting Irish and their tradition of excellence on the gridiron. Lewisite, together with other arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents, provide a legacy that lives on, too, but with less cheerful consequences. The book Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions makes clear the challenges faced in dealing with those consequences. This book documents the proceedings of a workshop devoted to arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents and their associated munitions. The workshop, held in Poland in 1996, included nine lectures, eight posters, and three discussion groups; and the contents of all these are presented. Major support for the workshop came from the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO as part of on ongoing series of meetings, cooperative research projects, and related efforts dealing with problems leftover from the Cold War and, in the case of the arsenicals and mustards, from conflicts dating to World War I. These problems can be seen in contemporary accounts, including a January 1999 news report that the U.S. Department of Defense intends to survey Washington, DC, areas near both American University and the Catholic University of America (CUA), site of the original synthesis of Lewisite, for chemical warfare agents and other materials disposed at the end of World War I.2 The first nine chapters of the book present the workshop's lectures. Of these, readers interested in chemical weapon destruction might find especially useful the first chapter, in which Ron Mansley of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons presents a scholarly overview covering historical aspects of the arsenicals and mustards; their production and use; prospective destruction

  8. Bioaccumulation kinetics of the conventional energetics TNT and RDX relative to insensitive munitions constituents DNAN and NTO in Rana pipiens tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Lotufo, Guilherme R; Biedenbach, James M; Sims, Jerre G; Chappell, Pornsawan; Stanley, Jacob K; Gust, Kurt A

    2015-04-01

    The manufacturing of explosives and their loading, assembling, and packing into munitions for use in testing on training sites or battlefields has resulted in contamination of terrestrial and aquatic sites that may pose risk to populations of sensitive species. The bioaccumulative potential of the conventional explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and of the insensitive munitions (i.e., less shock sensitive) compound 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) were assessed using the Northern leopard frog, Rana pipiens. Trinitrotoluene entering the organism was readily biotransformed to aminodinitrotoluenes, whereas no transformation products were measured for RDX or DNAN. Uptake clearance rates were relatively slow and similar among compounds (1.32-2.19 L kg(-1) h(-1) ). Upon transfer to uncontaminated water, elimination rate was very fast, resulting in the prediction of fast time to approach steady state (5 h or less) and short elimination half-lives (1.2 h or less). A preliminary bioconcentration factor of 0.25 L kg(-1) was determined for the insensitive munitions compound 3-nitro-1,2,4-trizole-5-one (NTO) indicating negligible bioaccumulative potential. Because of the rapid elimination rate for explosives, tadpoles inhabiting contaminated areas are expected to experience harmful effects only if under constant exposure conditions given that body burdens can rapidly depurate preventing tissue concentrations from persisting at levels that may cause detrimental biological effects.

  9. A Bayesian model for the identification of differentially expressed genes in Daphnia magna exposed to munition pollutants.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Antczak, Philipp; Falciani, Francesco; Vannucci, Marina

    2015-09-01

    In this article we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model for the identification of differentially expressed genes in Daphnia magna organisms exposed to chemical compounds, specifically munition pollutants in water. The model we propose constitutes one of the very first attempts at a rigorous modeling of the biological effects of water purification. We have data acquired from a purification system that comprises four consecutive purification stages, which we refer to as "ponds," of progressively more contaminated water. We model the expected expression of a gene in a pond as the sum of the mean of the same gene in the previous pond plus a gene-pond specific difference. We incorporate a variable selection mechanism for the identification of the differential expressions, with a prior distribution on the probability of a change that accounts for the available information on the concentration of chemical compounds present in the water. We carry out posterior inference via MCMC stochastic search techniques. In the application, we reduce the complexity of the data by grouping genes according to their functional characteristics, based on the KEGG pathway database. This also increases the biological interpretability of the results. Our model successfully identifies a number of pathways that show differential expression between consecutive purification stages. We also find that changes in the transcriptional response are more strongly associated to the presence of certain compounds, with the remaining contributing to a lesser extent. We discuss the sensitivity of these results to the model parameters that measure the influence of the prior information on the posterior inference.

  10. Disposal of chemical agents and munitions stored at Pueblo Depot Activity, Colorado. Final, Phase 1: Environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.W.; Blasing, T.J.; Ensminger, J.T.; Johnson, R.O.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Shor, J.T.; Staub, W.P.; Tolbert, V.R.; Zimmerman, G.P.

    1995-04-01

    Under the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), the US Army proposes to dispose of lethal chemical agents and munitions stored at eight existing Army installations in the continental United States. In 1988, the US Army issued the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS) for the CSDP. The FPEIS and the subsequent Record of Decision (ROD) identified an on-site disposal process as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. That is, the FPEIS determined the environmentally preferred alternative to be on-site disposal in high-temperature incinerators, while the ROD selected this alternative for implementation as the preferred method for destruction of the stockpile. In this Phase I report, the overall CSDP decision regarding disposal of the PUDA Stockpile is subjected to further analyses, and its validity at PUDA is reviewed with newer, more detailed data than those providing the basis for the conclusions in the FPEIS. The findings of this Phase I report will be factored into the scope of a site-specific environmental impact statement to be prepared for the destruction of the PUDA stockpile. The focus of this Phase I report is on those data identified as having the potential to alter the Army`s previous decision regarding disposal of the PUDA stockpile; however, several other factors beyond the scope of this Phase I report must also be acknowledged to have the potential to change or modify the Army`s decisions regarding PUDA.

  11. Microbial toxicity of the insensitive munitions compound, 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), and its aromatic amine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jidong; Olivares, Christopher; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2013-11-15

    2,4-Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munitions compound considered to replace conventional explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). DNAN undergoes facile microbial reduction to 2-methoxy-5-nitroaniline (MENA) and 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN). This study investigated the inhibitory effect of DNAN, MENA, and DAAN toward various microbial targets in anaerobic (acetoclastic methanogens) and aerobic (heterotrophs and nitrifiers) sludge, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri, used in the Microtox assay. Aerobic heterotrophic and nitrifying batch experiments with DAAN could not be performed because the compound underwent extensive autooxidation in these assays. DNAN severely inhibited methanogens, nitrifying bacteria, and A. fischeri (50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) ranging 41-57μM), but was notably less inhibitory to aerobic heterotrophs (IC50>390 μM). Reduction of DNAN to MENA and DAAN lead to a marked decrease in methanogenic inhibition (i.e., DNAN>MENA≈DAAN). Reduction of all nitro groups in DNAN also resulted in partial detoxification in assays with A. fischeri. In contrast, reduction of a single nitro group did not alter the inhibitory impact of DNAN toward A. fischeri and nitrifying bacteria given the similar IC50 values determined for MENA and DNAN in these assays. These results indicate that reductive biotransformation could reduce the inhibitory potential of DNAN.

  12. Benthic communities in chemical munitions dumping site areas within the Baltic deeps with special focus on nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwicki, Lech; Grzelak, Katarzyna; Bełdowski, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of biological effects of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) dumped in the Baltic Sea has been one of the tasks of the Chemical Munitions Search & Assessment (CHEMSEA) project. Three sites have been selected for investigation: Bornholm Deep, Gotland Deep and Gdansk Deep. Fauna collected from these locations were compared with the reference area located between the studied regions at similar depths below 70 m. In total, four scientific cruises occurred in different seasons between 2011 and 2013. The total lack of any representatives of macrozoobenthos in all of the investigated dumping sites was noted. As a practical matter, the Baltic deeps were inhabited by nematodes as the only meiofauna representatives. Therefore, nematodes were used as a key group to explore the faunal communities inhabiting chemical dumping sites in the Baltic deeps. In total, 42 nematode genera belonging to 18 families were identified, and the dominant genus was Sabatieria (Comesomatidae), which constituted 37.6% of the overall nematode community. There were significant differences in nematode community structure (abundance and taxa composition) between the dumping areas and the reference site (Kruskal-Wallis H=30.96, p<0.0001). Such clear differences suggest that nematode assemblages could mirror the environmental conditions.

  13. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-8 - United States Munitions List items which require demilitarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... by 27 CFR 55.23. The following procedures shall apply in any disposal of explosives: (i) All... is located in 22 CFR part 121. A system of demilitarization codes has been developed and an... Department of Defense, are contained in the Defense Demilitarization Manual (DoD 4160.21-M-1). This §...

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-8 - United States Munitions List items which require demilitarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... by 27 CFR 55.23. The following procedures shall apply in any disposal of explosives: (i) All... is located in 22 CFR part 121. A system of demilitarization codes has been developed and an... Department of Defense, are contained in the Defense Demilitarization Manual (DoD 4160.21-M-1). This §...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-8 - United States Munitions List items which require demilitarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by 27 CFR 55.23. The following procedures shall apply in any disposal of explosives: (i) All... is located in 22 CFR part 121. A system of demilitarization codes has been developed and an... Department of Defense, are contained in the Defense Demilitarization Manual (DoD 4160.21-M-1). This §...

  16. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-8 - United States Munitions List items which require demilitarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by 27 CFR 55.23. The following procedures shall apply in any disposal of explosives: (i) All... is located in 22 CFR part 121. A system of demilitarization codes has been developed and an... Department of Defense, are contained in the Defense Demilitarization Manual (DoD 4160.21-M-1). This §...

  17. 41 CFR 101-42.1102-8 - United States Munitions List items which require demilitarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... by 27 CFR 55.23. The following procedures shall apply in any disposal of explosives: (i) All... is located in 22 CFR part 121. A system of demilitarization codes has been developed and an... Department of Defense, are contained in the Defense Demilitarization Manual (DoD 4160.21-M-1). This §...

  18. A Bayesian Model for the Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Daphnia Magna Exposed to Munition Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Cassese, Alberto; Guindani, Michele; Antczak, Philipp; Falciani, Francesco; Vannucci, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this paper we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model for the identification of differentially expressed genes in Daphnia Magna organisms exposed to chemical compounds, specifically munition pollutants in water. The model we propose constitutes one of the very first attempts at a rigorous modeling of the biological effects of water purification. We have data acquired from a purification system that comprises four consecutive purification stages, which we refer to as “ponds”, of progressively more contaminated water. We model the expected expression of a gene in a pond as the sum of the mean of the same gene in the previous pond plus a gene-pond specific difference. We incorporate a variable selection mechanism for the identification of the differential expressions, with a prior distribution on the probability of a change that accounts for the available information on the concentration of chemical compounds present in the water. We carry out posterior inference via MCMC stochastic search techniques. In the application, we reduce the complexity of the data by grouping genes according to their functional characteristics, based on the KEGG pathway database. This also increases the biological interpretability of the results. Our model successfully identifies a number of pathways that show differential expression between consecutive purification stages. We also find that changes in the transcriptional response are more strongly associated to the presence of certain compounds, with the remaining contributing to a lesser extent. We discuss the sensitivity of these results to the model parameters that measure the influence of the prior information on the posterior inference. PMID:25771699

  19. Evidence for differential effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and other munitions compounds on specific subpopulations of soil microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

    1998-11-01

    The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and other munitions compounds on indigenous microbial communities in several soils were examined. Culturable heterotrophs, concentrations of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and basal respiration rates exhibited slight negative correlations with high TNT and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) levels. Heat-shock-resistant culturable heterotrophs, percentage of gram-positive soil isolates, mole percent of branched PLFA, and 10Me18:0 (tuberculostearic acid) were observed to be significantly lower in highly contaminated soils. Total soil nitrogen levels were positively correlated with high TNT and TNB concentrations, whereas total soil carbon exhibited no significant correlation with either compound. Multivariate analysis of PLFA data resulted in distinct separation of soils with respect to their degree of contamination, with specific signature PLFAs for gram-positive bacteria, fungi, and protozoa being negatively associated with high contaminant levels. Apparent concentrations of TNT resulting in 50% reductions in indicators of gram-positive populations were much higher than values from pure culture experiments, possibly as a result of low bioavailability due to sorption onto clay and soil organic matter. Few effects of other munitions compounds were observed. Closer examination of a highly contaminated soil revealed that the number of culturable heterotrophs growing on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when 67 {micro}g TNT/ml was added to the medium; a 99% decrease was observed for soil contaminated with less than 20 {micro}g TNT/g. Highly contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms that were able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {micro}g TNT/ml. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8--16 {micro}g TNT/ml was present in the culture medium. These results indicate that chronic exposure to munitions compounds can dramatically alter soil microbial

  20. Large loop EMI sensor for detection of deeply buried munitions in magnetic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jonathan S.; Billings, Stephen; Keranen, Joe; Schultz, Gregory; Bassani, Chet

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an active source Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) sensor that offers extended detection ranges (> 2m) with minimal sensitivity to magnetic geology. The Ultra Deep Search (ULTRA) EMI system employs a large (20 - 40m), stationary, surface-laid transmitter loop that produces a relatively uniform magnetic field within the search region. This primary field decays slowly with depth due to the non-dipolar nature of the field within the search volume. An array of 3-axis receiver cubes measures the time derivative of secondary field decays produced by subsurface metallic objects. The large-loop transmitter combined with the vector sensing induction coil receivers produces a deep search capability that remains robust in environments containing highly magnetic soils. In this paper, we assess the general detection capabilities of the ULTRA system and present data collected over a set of standardized UXO targets. Additionally, we evaluate the potential for target feature extraction through dipole fit analysis of several data sets.

  1. Magnetic and GPR surveys of a former munitions foundry site at the Denver Federal Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, David L.; Beanland, Shay; Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Powers, Michael H.

    2000-01-01

    We made magnetometer and ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys over part of the foundation of a World War II-era foundry located on the Denver Federal Center. The site contains a number of highly magnetic source bodies, concrete foundation walls, and underground openings, buried under a clay cap. The cap is several feet thick and has a conductivity of about 35 mS/m, making the features underneath it a poor target for conventional GPR. Indeed, the raw data look unlike typical GPR data, but rather show reverberation (?) bands under sidewalks and other shallow buried sources. Using a newly-written computer package, we made plan maps of the GPR response at different time slices. The sliced GPR data did not outline buried foundry foundations, as we had hoped it might. The resulting plan maps of the sliced data show sidewalks and other blobby features, some of which correspond to magnetometer highs.

  2. Metabolism and bioaccumulation of nitroaromatic munitions by-products in earthworms and plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, T.V.; Chang, L.W.; Smith, M.K.; Daniel, F.B.; Wiechman, B.; Reddy, G.

    1994-12-31

    Previously the authors have used earthworm and plant bioassays to evaluate the toxicity of nitroaromatic ammunition by-products. In the present study, they investigated the uptake, metabolism and possible bioaccumulation of these compounds in earthworms and plants. Earthworms were maintained on artificial soil supplemented with {sup 14}[C] trinitrobenzene (TNB). The authors also studied the translocation, metabolism and bioaccumulation of {sup 14}[C] 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB) by germinating oat and lettuce seeds planted on artificial soil. Acetone extracts of tissue and gut contents of earthworms exposed to TNB for different intervals contained only a small fraction of the original radioactivity, which did not increase with time. The radioactivity extracted from earthworms co-eluted with 1,3-dinitroaniline (DNAN) on HPLC and the amount of radioactivity decreased with time. In the DNB plant studies, five day old oat seedlings accumulated 17% of {sup 14}[C] radioactivity. HPLC of acetone extracts revealed unidentified radioactive peaks but DNB radioactivity was not detected. The radioactivity from butanol extracts of both oats and lettuce coeluted with aniline and 3-nitroaniline and the radioactivity increased with time. These results suggest that oats and lettuce bioaccumulate DNB metabolites, which might result in the transfer of toxicants to herbivores.

  3. Insights into the dissolution and the three-dimensional structure of insensitive munitions formulations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Ringelberg, David B; Dontsova, Katerina; Daghlian, Charles P; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Two compounds, 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) are the main ingredients in a suite of explosive formulations that are being, or soon will be, fielded at military training ranges. We aim to understand the dissolution characteristics of DNAN and NTO and three insensitive muntions (IM) formulations that contain them. This information is needed to accurately predict the environmental fate of IM constituents, some of which may be toxic to people and the environment. We used Raman spectroscopy to identify the different constituents in the IM formulations and micro computed tomography to image their three-dimensional structure. These are the first three-dimensional images of detonated explosive particles. For multi-component explosives the solubility of the individual constituents and the fraction of each constituent wetted by water controls the dissolution. We found that the order of magnitude differences in solubility amongst the constituents of these IM formulations quickly produced hole-riddled particles when these were exposed to water. Micro-computed tomography showed that particles resulting from field detonations were fractured, producing conduits by which water could access the interior of the particle. We think that micro-computed tomography can also be used to determine the initial composition of IM particles and to track how their compositions change as the particles dissolve. This information is critical to quantifying dissolution and developing physically based dissolution models.

  4. Insights into the dissolution and the three-dimensional structure of insensitive munitions formulations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan; Ringelberg, David B; Dontsova, Katerina; Daghlian, Charles P; Walsh, Marianne E; Walsh, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Two compounds, 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) are the main ingredients in a suite of explosive formulations that are being, or soon will be, fielded at military training ranges. We aim to understand the dissolution characteristics of DNAN and NTO and three insensitive muntions (IM) formulations that contain them. This information is needed to accurately predict the environmental fate of IM constituents, some of which may be toxic to people and the environment. We used Raman spectroscopy to identify the different constituents in the IM formulations and micro computed tomography to image their three-dimensional structure. These are the first three-dimensional images of detonated explosive particles. For multi-component explosives the solubility of the individual constituents and the fraction of each constituent wetted by water controls the dissolution. We found that the order of magnitude differences in solubility amongst the constituents of these IM formulations quickly produced hole-riddled particles when these were exposed to water. Micro-computed tomography showed that particles resulting from field detonations were fractured, producing conduits by which water could access the interior of the particle. We think that micro-computed tomography can also be used to determine the initial composition of IM particles and to track how their compositions change as the particles dissolve. This information is critical to quantifying dissolution and developing physically based dissolution models. PMID:23916749

  5. Development of colorimetric field screening methods for munitions compounds in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas F.; Walsh, Marianne E.; Schumacher, Patricia W.; Thorne, Philip G.

    1995-10-01

    Simple colorimetric tests have been developed to screen for the presence of TNT, TNB, DNT, DNB, tetryl, RDX, HMX, nitroglycerine (NG), PETN, nitrocellulose (NC), nitroguanidine (NQ), picric acid and ammonium picrate in soil. Soils are extracted by manual shaking with acetone. For the nitroaromatics, the extracts are reacted with potassium hydroxide and sodium sulfite to form their colored Janowsky complexes. For RDX, HMX, NG, PETN, NC and NQ, extracts are passed through an anion exchange resin to remove nitrate, and then acidified with acetic acid; the nitramines and nitrate esters are reduced with zinc to form nitrous acid. The nitrous acid is detected by the Griess reaction using a Hach Nitriver 3 powder pillow, which produces a highly colored azo dye. Detection of these analytes can be obtained visually and concentrations estimated from absorbance measurements at 540 nm for TNT, TNB and tetryl, 570 nm for DNTs and DNB, and at 510 nm for RDX, HMX, NG, PETN, NC and NQ. For picric acid/ammonium picrate, the acetone extract is passed through a basic ion-exchange column that retains picrate ion. The column is rinsed with methanol to elute interferences, and the picrate is desorbed with acetone containing several drops of sulfuric acid. The extract is diluted with deionized water, and the concentration of picrate is obtained from the absorbance at 400 nm. Detection limits are about 1 (mu) g/g for all analytes except NG, NC and NQ, which are slightly higher. Results from field screening at a number of sites have been correlated with laboratory analyses for TNT and RDX. The results indicate that the field screening methods do not suffer from false negatives and the rate of false positives is low. Concentration estimates from field screening compared favorably with results from the standard laboratory methods.

  6. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems. Initial assessment of plant DNA mutation spectra as a biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.; Cataldo, D.A.; Fellows, R.J.; Jarrell, A.E.; Harvey, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    Munitions material can enter the environment as a result of manufacturing activities and field usage. Predictor methodologies, or biomarkers would enhance evaluation of environmental impacts. The goal of this exploratory study deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mutation frequency as a biomarker for munitions exposure. The approach e resolution of an effective repetitive sequence probe for the identification of characteristic mutations, and (2) the development of a testing media [a clonal cell line of carrot (Daucus carota) spension cells]. Commercially available probes demonstrated marginal resolution therefore a low-C{sub o}t library was then constructed. Three colonies from the low-C{sub o}t DNA library were screened and the DNA isolates sequenced. A suspension culture of carrot (Daucus carota) was developed. A mutation spectra experiment was initiated at a 10-mg TNT/L exposure concentration with the attempt to clone over 1500 single TNT-exposed cells. Over the following six months greater than 98% of the initially isolated cells were unable to survive and produce micro calluses. The remaining calli were too few to be statistically significant and the experiment was terminated. The biomarker concept itself remains to be disproved, but the need for large numbers of uniform clones to differentiate true mutations suggest that more direct techniques using whole tissues need to be developed.

  7. Advanced MicroObserver UGS integration with and cueing of the BattleHawk squad level loitering munition and UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Bob; Finklea, John; Kershaw, James; Loughman, Cathy; Shaffner, Patti; Frost, Dean; Deller, Sean

    2014-06-01

    Textron's Advanced MicroObserver(R) is a next generation remote unattended ground sensor system (UGS) for border security, infrastructure protection, and small combat unit security. The original MicroObserver(R) is a sophisticated seismic sensor system with multi-node fusion that supports target tracking. This system has been deployed in combat theaters. The system's seismic sensor nodes are uniquely able to be completely buried (including antennas) for optimal covertness. The advanced version adds a wireless day/night Electro-Optic Infrared (EOIR) system, cued by seismic tracking, with sophisticated target discrimination and automatic frame capture features. Also new is a field deployable Gateway configurable with a variety of radio systems and flexible networking, an important upgrade that enabled the research described herein. BattleHawkTM is a small tube launched Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) with a warhead. Using transmitted video from its EOIR subsystem an operator can search for and acquire a target day or night, select a target for attack, and execute terminal dive to destroy the target. It is designed as a lightweight squad level asset carried by an individual infantryman. Although BattleHawk has the best loiter time in its class, it's still relatively short compared to large UAVs. Also it's a one-shot asset in its munition configuration. Therefore Textron Defense Systems conducted research, funded internally, to determine if there was military utility in having the highly persistent MicroObserver(R) system cue BattleHawk's launch and vector it to beyond visual range targets for engagement. This paper describes that research; the system configuration implemented, and the results of field testing that was performed on a government range early in 2013. On the integrated system that was implemented, MicroObserver(R) seismic detections activated that system's camera which then automatically captured images of the target. The geo-referenced and time-tagged Micro

  8. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-11-19

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu. PMID:17686582

  9. Precision guided antiaircraft munition

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1987-01-01

    A small diameter, 20 mm to 50 mm, guided projectile is used in antiaircraft defense. A pulsing laser designator illuminates the target aircraft. Energy reflected from the aircraft is received by the guided projectile. The guided projectile is fired from a standard weapon but the spining caused by the riflings are removed before active tracking and guidance occurs. The received energy is focused by immersion optics onto a bridge cell. AC coupling and gating removes background and allows steering signals to move extended vanes by means of piezoelectric actuators in the rear of the guided projectile.

  10. Halomonhystera disjuncta - a young-carrying nematode first observed for the Baltic Sea in deep basins within chemical munitions disposal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzelak, Katarzyna; Kotwicki, Lech

    2016-06-01

    Three deep basins in the Baltic Sea were investigated within the framework of the CHEMSEA project (Chemical Munitions Search & Assessment), which aims to evaluate the ecological impact of chemical warfare agents dumped after World War II. Nematode communities, which comprise the most numerous and diverse organisms in the surveyed areas, were investigated as a key group of benthic fauna. One of the most successful nematode species was morphologically identified as Halomonhystera disjuncta (Bastian, 1865). The presence of this species, which is an active coloniser that is highly resistant to disturbed environments, may indicate that the sediments of these disposal sites are characterised by toxic conditions that are unfavourable for other metazoans. Moreover, ovoviviparous reproductive behaviour in which parents carry their brood internally, which is an important adaptation to harsh environmental conditions, was observed for specimens from Gdansk Deep and Gotland Deep. This reproductive strategy, which is uncommon for marine nematodes, has not previously been reported for nematodes from the Baltic Sea sediment.

  11. Interaction of hydration, aging, and carbon content of soil on the evaporation and skin bioavailability of munition contaminants.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, William G; Kammen, Harold O; Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A; Leach, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    Water plays a key role in enhancing the permeability of human skin to many substances. To further understand its ability to potentially increase the bioavailability of soil contaminants, artificial sweat was applied to excised pig skin prior to dosing with munition-contaminated soils. Skin was mounted in chambers to allow simultaneous measurement of evaporation and penetration and to control air flow, which changed the dwell time of skin surface water within a l-h period post application of test materials. Additional variables included type of compound, aging of spiked soil samples, and carbon content of soil. To this end, the evaporation and skin penetration of C-14 labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were determined from two soil types, Yolo, having 1.2% carbon, and Tinker, having 9.5% carbon. RDX soil samples aged 27 mo and 62 mo were compared to freshly spiked soils samples. Similarly, 26DNT samples aged 35-36 mo and TNT samples aged 18 mo were compared to freshly spiked samples. Approximately 10 microg/cm(2) of radiolabeled compound was applied in 10 mg/cm(2) of soil. Radiolabel recovered from the dermis and tissue culture media (receptor fluid) was summed to determine percent absorption from the soils. Radiolabel recovered from vapor traps determined evaporation. Mean skin absorption of all compounds was higher for low-carbon soil, regardless of soil age and skin surface water as affected by air flow conditions. For 26DNT, a simultaneous increase in evaporation and penetration with conditions that favored enhanced soil hydration of freshly prepared samples was consistent with a mechanism that involved water displacement of 26DNT from its binding sites. A mean penetration of 17.5 +/- 3.6% was observed for 26DNT in low-carbon soil, which approached the value previously reported for acetone vehicle (24 +/- 6%). 26DNT penetration was reduced to 0.35% under dryer conditions and to 0

  12. Interaction of hydration, aging, and carbon content of soil on the evaporation and skin bioavailability of munition contaminants.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, William G; Kammen, Harold O; Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A; Leach, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    Water plays a key role in enhancing the permeability of human skin to many substances. To further understand its ability to potentially increase the bioavailability of soil contaminants, artificial sweat was applied to excised pig skin prior to dosing with munition-contaminated soils. Skin was mounted in chambers to allow simultaneous measurement of evaporation and penetration and to control air flow, which changed the dwell time of skin surface water within a l-h period post application of test materials. Additional variables included type of compound, aging of spiked soil samples, and carbon content of soil. To this end, the evaporation and skin penetration of C-14 labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were determined from two soil types, Yolo, having 1.2% carbon, and Tinker, having 9.5% carbon. RDX soil samples aged 27 mo and 62 mo were compared to freshly spiked soils samples. Similarly, 26DNT samples aged 35-36 mo and TNT samples aged 18 mo were compared to freshly spiked samples. Approximately 10 microg/cm(2) of radiolabeled compound was applied in 10 mg/cm(2) of soil. Radiolabel recovered from the dermis and tissue culture media (receptor fluid) was summed to determine percent absorption from the soils. Radiolabel recovered from vapor traps determined evaporation. Mean skin absorption of all compounds was higher for low-carbon soil, regardless of soil age and skin surface water as affected by air flow conditions. For 26DNT, a simultaneous increase in evaporation and penetration with conditions that favored enhanced soil hydration of freshly prepared samples was consistent with a mechanism that involved water displacement of 26DNT from its binding sites. A mean penetration of 17.5 +/- 3.6% was observed for 26DNT in low-carbon soil, which approached the value previously reported for acetone vehicle (24 +/- 6%). 26DNT penetration was reduced to 0.35% under dryer conditions and to 0

  13. Sharps container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Angelene M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for use in disposing of potentially hazardous items and more particularly a Sharps receptacle for used hypodermic needles and the like. A Sharps container is constructed from lightweight alodined nonmagnetic metal material with a cup member having an elongated tapered shape and length greater than its transverse dimensions. A magnet in the cup member provides for metal retention in the container. A nonmagnetic lid member has an opening and spring biased closure flap member. The flap member is constructed from stainless steel. A Velcro patch on the container permits selective attachment at desired locations.

  14. Evaluation of the metabolic fate of munitions material (TNT & RDX) in plant systems and initial assessment of material interaction with plant genetic material (DNA). Initial assessment of plant DNA adducts as biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.D.; Clauss, T.W.; Fellows, R.J.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Genetic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) has long been suspected of being a fundamental event leading to cancer. A variety of causal factors can result in DNA damage including photodimerization of base pairs, ionizing radiation, specific reaction of DNA with environmental pollutants, and nonspecific oxidative damage caused by the action of highly reactive oxidizing agents produced by metabolism. Because organisms depend on an unadulterated DNA template for reproduction, DNA repair mechanisms are an important defense for maintaining genomic integrity. The objective of this exploratory project was to evaluate the potential for TNT to form DNA adducts in plants. These adducts, if they exist in sufficient quantities, could be potential biomarkers of munitions exposure. The ultimate goal is to develop a simple analytical assay for the determination of blomarkers that is indicative of munitions contamination. DNA repair exists in dynamic equilibrium with DNA damage. Repair mechanisms are capable of keeping DNA damage at remarkably low concentrations provided that the repair capacity is not overwhelmed.

  15. Performance properties of formulations containing diaminozoxyfurazan as replacements for PBXN-7

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Elizabeth Green; Morris, John S; Sanders, Victor E

    2010-11-09

    In an effort to increase safety and take advantage of extremely insensitive explosives like TATB, PBXN-7 was developed. It is an integral part of the insensitive munition (IM) effort and has contributed significantly to improvements seen in slow cook-off (SCO). Other explosives exist, while not as insensitive as TATB, which show promise in performance while maintaining insensitivity to common insults. Furazan chemistry developments over the past 30 years have yielded several, and Diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) is one of the forerunners. DAAF has many intriguing properties, which indicated it might be a good fit in formulations designed to replace PBXN-7. A project funded through the Joint Insensitive Munitions Technology Program was launched in 2009 to develop and test formulations containing DAAF and RDX, DAAF and HMX, DAAF and TATB, and DAAF (by itself). All used the same binder, Viton, in 5 weight percent. The testing included performance testing with rate stick, shock sensitivity testing with the IHE gap test, and cold temperature performance testing with rate sticks and front curvature measurements.

  16. CONTAINMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous waste containment's primary objective is to isolate wastes deemed as hazardous from man and environmental systems of air, soil, and water. Hazardous wastes differ from other waste classifications due to their increased potential to cause human health effects or environ...

  17. Collapsing Containers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Justina L.; Battino, Rubin

    1994-01-01

    Describes variations on atmospheric pressure demonstrations and some systematic studies. Demonstrations use steam, generated either externally or internally to the container, to sweep out residual air. Preferred vessels collapsed slowly. Demonstrations use plastic milk jugs set in layers of aluminum foil, pop bottles immersed in 4-L beakers…

  18. Continuous treatment of the insensitive munitions compound N-methyl-p-nitro aniline (MNA) in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Wang, Junqin; Luna, Carlos D Silva; Field, Jim A; Abrell, Leif; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-02-01

    N-methyl-p-nitroaniline (MNA) is an ingredient of insensitive munitions (IM) compounds that serves as a plasticizer and helps reduce unwanted detonations. As its use becomes widespread, MNA waste streams will be generated, necessitating viable treatment options. We studied MNA biodegradation and its inhibition potential to a representative anaerobic microbial population in wastewater treatment, methanogens. Anaerobic biodegradation and toxicity assays were performed and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) was operated to test continuous degradation of MNA. MNA was transformed almost stoichiometrically to N-methyl-p-phenylenediamine (MPD). MPD was not mineralized; however, it was readily autoxidized and polymerized extensively upon aeration at pH = 9. In the UASB reactor, MNA was fully degraded up to a loading rate of 297.5 μM MNA d(-1). Regarding toxicity, MNA was very inhibitory to acetoclastic methanogens (IC50 = 103 μM) whereas MPD was much less toxic, causing only 13.9% inhibition at the highest concentration tested (1025 μM). The results taken as a whole indicate that anaerobic sludge can transform MNA to MPD continuously, and that the transformation decreases the cytotoxicity of the parent pollutant. MPD can be removed through extensive polymerization. These insights could help define efficient treatment options for waste streams polluted with MNA. PMID:26454121

  19. Biotransformation and Degradation of the Insensitive Munitions Compound, 3-Nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one, by Soil Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Krzmarzick, Mark J; Khatiwada, Raju; Olivares, Christopher I; Abrell, Leif; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A

    2015-05-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) are a new class of explosives that are increasingly being adopted by the military. The ability of soil microbial communities to degrade IMs is relatively unknown. In this study, microbial communities from a wide range of soils were tested in microcosms for their ability to degrade the IM, 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO). All seven soil inocula tested were able to readily reduce NTO to 3-amino-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (ATO) via 3-hydroxyamino-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (HTO), under anaerobic conditions with H2 as an electron donor. Numerous other electron donors were shown to be suitable for NTO-reducing bacteria. The addition of a small amount of yeast extract (10 mg/L) was critical to diminish lag times and increased the biotransformation rate of NTO in nearly all cases indicating yeast extract provided important nutrients for NTO-reducing bacteria. The main biotransformation product, ATO, was degradable only in aerobic conditions, as evidenced by a rise in the inorganic nitrogen species nitrite and nitrate, indicative of nitrogen-mineralization. NTO was nonbiodegradable in aerobic microcosms with all soil inocula. PMID:25839647

  20. Biotransformation and Degradation of the Insensitive Munitions Compound, 3-Nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one, by Soil Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Krzmarzick, Mark J; Khatiwada, Raju; Olivares, Christopher I; Abrell, Leif; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Chorover, Jon; Field, James A

    2015-05-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) are a new class of explosives that are increasingly being adopted by the military. The ability of soil microbial communities to degrade IMs is relatively unknown. In this study, microbial communities from a wide range of soils were tested in microcosms for their ability to degrade the IM, 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO). All seven soil inocula tested were able to readily reduce NTO to 3-amino-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (ATO) via 3-hydroxyamino-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (HTO), under anaerobic conditions with H2 as an electron donor. Numerous other electron donors were shown to be suitable for NTO-reducing bacteria. The addition of a small amount of yeast extract (10 mg/L) was critical to diminish lag times and increased the biotransformation rate of NTO in nearly all cases indicating yeast extract provided important nutrients for NTO-reducing bacteria. The main biotransformation product, ATO, was degradable only in aerobic conditions, as evidenced by a rise in the inorganic nitrogen species nitrite and nitrate, indicative of nitrogen-mineralization. NTO was nonbiodegradable in aerobic microcosms with all soil inocula.

  1. Continuous treatment of the insensitive munitions compound N-methyl-p-nitro aniline (MNA) in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Christopher I; Wang, Junqin; Luna, Carlos D Silva; Field, Jim A; Abrell, Leif; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-02-01

    N-methyl-p-nitroaniline (MNA) is an ingredient of insensitive munitions (IM) compounds that serves as a plasticizer and helps reduce unwanted detonations. As its use becomes widespread, MNA waste streams will be generated, necessitating viable treatment options. We studied MNA biodegradation and its inhibition potential to a representative anaerobic microbial population in wastewater treatment, methanogens. Anaerobic biodegradation and toxicity assays were performed and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) was operated to test continuous degradation of MNA. MNA was transformed almost stoichiometrically to N-methyl-p-phenylenediamine (MPD). MPD was not mineralized; however, it was readily autoxidized and polymerized extensively upon aeration at pH = 9. In the UASB reactor, MNA was fully degraded up to a loading rate of 297.5 μM MNA d(-1). Regarding toxicity, MNA was very inhibitory to acetoclastic methanogens (IC50 = 103 μM) whereas MPD was much less toxic, causing only 13.9% inhibition at the highest concentration tested (1025 μM). The results taken as a whole indicate that anaerobic sludge can transform MNA to MPD continuously, and that the transformation decreases the cytotoxicity of the parent pollutant. MPD can be removed through extensive polymerization. These insights could help define efficient treatment options for waste streams polluted with MNA.

  2. 78 FR 45017 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Revision of U.S. Munitions List...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ..., 2013 (78 FR 22740). The aforementioned notice also contained policies and procedures regarding the... published as a proposed rule (RIN 1400-AD25) on November 28, 2012, for public comment (see 77 FR ] 70958... Department of Commerce's companion rule published on the same day (see 77 FR 70945), the Administration...

  3. Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container

    DOEpatents

    Sparks, Michael H.

    2001-06-12

    The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

  4. Assessment of Energetic Compounds, Semi-volatile Organic Compounds, and Trace Elements in Streambed Sediment and Stream Water from Streams Draining Munitions Firing Points and Impact Areas, Fort Riley, Kansas, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coiner, R.L.; Pope, L.M.; Mehl, H.E.

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of energetic compounds (explosive and propellant residues) and associated semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and trace elements in streambed sediment and stream water from streams draining munitions firing points and impact areas at Fort Riley, northeast Kansas, was performed during 2007-08 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army. Streambed sediment from 16 sampling sites and stream-water samples from 5 sites were collected at or near Fort Riley and analyzed for as many as 17 energetic compounds, 65 SVOCs, and 27 trace elements. None of the energetic compounds or SVOCs were detected in streambed sediment collected from sites within the Fort Riley Military Reservation. This may indicate that these compounds either are not transported from dispersal areas or that analytical methods are not sensitive enough to detect the small concentrations that may be transported. Concentrations of munitions-associated trace elements did not exceed sediment-quality guidelines recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and are not indicative of contamination of streambed sediment at selected streambed sampling sites, at least in regards to movement from dispersal areas. Analytical results of stream-water samples provided little evidence of contamination by energetic compounds, SVOCs, or associated trace elements. Perchlorate was detected in 19 of 20 stream-water samples at concentrations ranging from an estimated 0.057 to an estimated 0.236 ug/L (micrograms per liter) with a median concentration of an estimated 0.114 ug/L, substantially less than the USEPA Interim Health Advisory criterion (15 ug/L), and is in the range of documented background concentrations. Because of these small concentrations and possible natural sources (precipitation and groundwater), it is likely that the occurrence of perchlorate in stream water is naturally occurring, although a definitive identification of the source of perchlorate in

  5. The development of an on-site container

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R. E.; McAllaster, M. E.; Jones, P. L.; McKinney, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a package for the on-site. transport of chemical munitions for the US Army. This package was designed to prevent the release of lethal quantities of chemical agents during transportation of munitions to the demilitarization facilities on-site. The packaging prevents auto-ignition of the munitions by limiting the thermal and structural assault on the munitions during an accident. This package, with some modifications to account for contents, may be suitable for the on-site transport of mixed wastes at United States Department of Energy facilities. This paper discusses the design and verification testing of the package. The safety criteria for the package were modeled after the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) hypothetical accident sequence and modified to take credit for operational controls. The modified accident sequence consisted of drop, puncture, and thermal events. The post-accident leak rate was established to prevent harm to an exposed worker. The packaging has a mass of 8600 kg and can accommodate up to 3600 kg of contents. The interior of the package is 188 cm in diameter and 232 cm long. Two sample ports can be used to sample the interior of the package prior to opening the closure and an o-ring test port can be used to determine the leak rates prior to and after transport.

  6. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  7. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  8. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  9. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  10. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  11. Personal Container Artists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the study of personal containers and their uses in art creation for children. States that children are fascinated by boxes and containers. Provides examples of personal containers, such as lunch boxes, pencil cases, purses and valets, and school bags. (CMK)

  12. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  13. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  14. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  15. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  16. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, Stanley R.

    1985-01-01

    A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

  17. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  18. CONTAIN independent peer review

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Corradini, M.L.; Denning, R.S.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Loyalka, S.K.; Smith, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    The CONTAIN code was developed by Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide integrated analyses of containment phenomena. It is used to predict nuclear reactor containment loads, radiological source terms, and associated physical phenomena for a range of accident conditions encompassing both design-basis and severe accidents. The code`s targeted applications include support for containment-related experimental programs, light water and advanced light water reactor plant analysis, and analytical support for resolution of specific technical issues such as direct containment heating. The NRC decided that a broad technical review of the code should be performed by technical experts to determine its overall technical adequacy. For this purpose, a six-member CONTAIN Peer Review Committee was organized and a peer review as conducted. While the review was in progress, the NRC issued a draft ``Revised Severe Accident Code Strategy`` that incorporated revised design objectives and targeted applications for the CONTAIN code. The committee continued its effort to develop findings relative to the original NRC statement of design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications. However, the revised CONTAIN design objectives and targeted applications were considered by the Committee in assigning priorities to the Committee`s recommendations. The Committee determined some improvements are warranted and provided recommendations in five code-related areas: (1) documentation, (2) user guidance, (3) modeling capability, (4) code assessment, and (5) technical assessment.

  19. Portable containment sleever apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Michael J.; Brown, Roger A.

    2000-01-01

    A sleever apparatus includes an inner member with a central passage through which an item to be sleeved is passed. An outer member surrounds the inner member and defines a space between the members for holding a supply of containment material, which is preferably plastic sleeving. The apparatus has a handle which allows a user to hold the apparatus and walk the apparatus along the length of the item to be sleeved. As the user passes the item through the sleever apparatus, the containment material exits through a slit at one end of the apparatus in order to contain the item. The sleever apparatus may be formed of disposable materials, such as cardboard, and may be intended for a single use application. Alternatively, the sleever apparatus may be comprised of more permanent materials such as PVC or fiberglass. The sleever apparatus may include a serrated end for cutting the containment material and may include appropriate tubing and valves for either directing an inert gas into the containment material around the item or for withdrawing air from within the containment material in order to create a vacuum. In one embodiment, the sleever apparatus has a cartridge that can be replaced with another cartridge once the supply of the containment material has been depleted.

  20. OBOE containment prospectus

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, N R

    1999-11-19

    The OBOE series of experiments presents a new fielding concept for LLNL subcritical experiments. An experimental alcove will be reused for many different experiments. Each individual experiment will be conducted within a steel experimental vessel. After each experiment, the vessel will be moved to the back of the alcove and entombed in grout. The alcove is designed with sufficient space to entomb 12 experiment vessels. Each experiment in the OBOE series of experiments is composed of one experimental package. Each experimental package will have high explosive (HE) and special nuclear material (SNM) in a subcritical assembly. Each experimental package will be placed in a steel experimental vessel within the OBOE zero-room. Each experiment will be detonated inside its experimental vessel in the OBOE zero-room that is formed by a steel and concrete barrier at the entrance to the U1a.102C drift. The containment plan for the OBOE series of experiments utilizes a two containment vessel concept. The first containment vessel is formed by the primary containment barrier that seals the U1a.102C drift. The second containment vessel is formed by the secondary containment barrier in the U1a.100 drift. While it is likely that the experiment vessel will contain the SNM from an experiment, the containment plan for the OBOE series only assumes that the steel experiment vessel provides shock mitigation and is a heat sink for the heat produced by the detonation of the HE. It is possible that one or more of the experimental vessels may seep SNM in the zero-room from a failure of a seal on the vessel. We are presenting a containment plan for the entire series of OBOE experiments. At this time, we do not know exactly how many experiments will actually be conducted in the OBOE series. However, we do know that the maximum number of experiments in the OBOE series is 12. After the final experiment in the OBOE series, a larger experiment will be conducted in the U1a.102C alcove. This

  1. Container for radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  2. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  3. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  4. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  5. Underground nuclear waste containments

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1995-11-01

    In the United States, about a hundred million gallons of high-level nuclear waste are stored in underground containments. Basically, these containments are of two different designs: single-shell and double-shell structures. The single-shell structures consist of reinforced concrete cylindrical walls seated on circular mats and enclosed on top with torispherical domes or circular flat roofs. The walls and the basemats are lined with carbon steel. The double-shell structures provide another layer of protection and constitute a completely enclosed steel containment within the single-shell structure leaving an annular space between the two walls. Single-shell containments are of earlier vintage and were built in the period 1945-1965. Double-shell structures were built through the 1960s and 1970s. Experience gained in building and operating the single-shell containments was used in enhancing the design and construction of the double-shell structures. Currently, there are about 250 underground single-shell and double-shell structures containing the high-level waste with an inventory of about 800 million curies. During their service lives, especially in early stages, these structures were subjected to thermal excursions of varying extents; also, they have aged in the chemical environment. Furthermore, in their remaining service lives, the structures may be subjected to loads for which they were not designed, such as larger earthquakes or chemical explosions. As a result, the demonstration of safety of these underground nuclear containments poses a challenge to structural engineers, which increases with time. Regardless of current plans for gradual retrieval of the waste and subsequent solidification for disposal, many of these structures are expected to continue to contain the waste through the next 20-40 years. In order to verify their structural capabilities in fulfilling this mission, several studies were recently performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  6. Container cover closure apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Griesau, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to handling and/or storing hazardous waste materials, such as radioactive materials, and is more specifically directed to loading and/or unloading radioactive material into or out of a container, such as a drum, by remote operation, and more particularly the present invention relates to the remote opening and/or closing of a container secured by a compression ring.

  7. Interpretation and containment.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, L

    2000-02-01

    The author explores two aspects of the analyst's effort to imagine the inner world of his patient and the way that they are manifest in the clinical moment. The first of these is the analyst's recognition and interpretation of his patient's elaborated fantasies. This current of the analyst's imagination is most often evoked by the patient's communication of whole-object transferences, which occurs largely in his verbal associations. The second is the analyst's reception and transformation of his patient's primitive emotional experience, a process that Bion has called containment. This second imaginative current is most often evoked by the patient's communication of part-object transferences, which occurs largely in affect and action. Interpretation and containment both go on at once in clinical work, although one or the other is usually dominant. Attention to the interplay of interpretation and containment in the clinical moment enables us to identify the articulation of whole- and part-object transferences and to integrate ego-psychological and Kleinian frames of reference in clinical work. In addition, the concept of mutual containment opens Kleinian theory to the possibility of a two-person psychology in which the roles of analyst and patient are more symmetrical than they are usually conceived to be within this frame of reference. The author presents two clinical examples to demonstrate the interplay of interpretation and containment. In the first, these processes operate smoothly. In the second, the process of containment is strained but ultimately successful.

  8. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  9. Explosion containment device

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  10. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  11. Silicone-containing composition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Mustafa

    2012-01-24

    A silicone-containing composition comprises the reaction product of a first component and an excess of an isocyanate component relative to the first component to form an isocyanated intermediary. The first component is selected from one of a polysiloxane and a silicone resin. The first component includes a carbon-bonded functional group selected from one of a hydroxyl group and an amine group. The isocyanate component is reactive with the carbon-bonded functional group of the first component. The isocyanated intermediary includes a plurality of isocyanate functional groups. The silicone-containing composition comprises the further reaction product of a second component, which is selected from the other of the polysiloxane and the silicone resin. The second component includes a plurality of carbon-bonded functional groups reactive with the isocyanate functional groups of the isocyanated intermediary for preparing the silicone-containing composition.

  12. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2004-10-12

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  13. Advanced Containment System

    DOEpatents

    Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Kawamura, Hideki; Richardson, John G.; Noda, Masaru

    2005-05-24

    An advanced containment system for containing buried waste and associated leachate. A trench is dug on either side of the zone of interest containing the buried waste so as to accommodate a micro tunnel boring machine. A series of small diameter tunnels are serially excavated underneath the buried waste. The tunnels are excavated by the micro tunnel boring machine at a consistent depth and are substantially parallel to each other. As tunneling progresses, steel casing sections are connected end to end in the excavated portion of the tunnel so that a steel tube is formed. Each casing section has complementary interlocking structure running its length that interlocks with complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent casing section. Thus, once the first tube is emplaced, placement of subsequent tubes is facilitated by the complementary interlocking structure on the adjacent, previously placed, casing sections.

  14. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  15. Material containment enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David O.

    1993-01-01

    An isolation enclosure and a group of isolation enclosures useful when a relatively large containment area is required. The enclosure is in the form of a ring having a section removed so that a technician may enter the center area of the ring. In a preferred embodiment, an access zone is located in the transparent wall of the enclosure and extends around the inner perimeter of the ring so that a technician can insert his hands into the enclosure to reach any point within. The inventive enclosures provide more containment area per unit area of floor space than conventional material isolation enclosures.

  16. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B.; Brown, R.L.; Cantrell, J.R.; Wilcox, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  17. Crash resistant container

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Jim D.

    1994-01-01

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance.

  18. Crash resistant container

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, J.D.

    1994-08-16

    A container for hazardous materials capable of protecting the enclosed materials from high speed impact is disclosed. Energy absorption is provided by a multiplicity of crushable layers of either wire mesh or perforated metal sheets which thin and flow together under impact loading. Layers of a higher tensile strength material are interspersed within the crushable layers to confine them and increase performance. 1 fig.

  19. WASTE CONTAINMENT OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    BSE waste is derived from diseased animals such as BSE (bovine spongiform encepilopothy, also known as Mad Cow) in cattle and CWD (chronic wasting disease) in deer and elk. Landfilling is examined as a disposal option and this presentation introduces waste containment technology...

  20. Silicone containing solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The addition of a small amount, for example 1% by weight, of a liquid silicone oil to a metal containing solid rocket propellant provides a significant reduction in heat transfer to the inert nozzle walls. Metal oxide slag collection and blockage of the nozzle are eliminated and the burning rate is increased by about 5% to 10% thus improving ballistic performance.

  1. Polyazomethines containing trifluoromethylbenzene units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Soluble, amorphous, aromatic polyazomethine polymers and copolymers were prepared by reacting a dialdehyde monomer with a diamine monomer containing trifluoromethylbenzene and various combinations thereof in a solvent, such as N,N-dimethylacetamide. The reaction was heated to reflux yielding a polyazomethine which, after cooling to room temperature, was precipitated. These polymers and copolymers may be used to make films, coatings, composites and adhesives.

  2. Polyazomethines containing trifluoromethylbenzene units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Soluble, amorphous, aromatic polyazomethine polymers and copolymers were prepared by reacting a dialdehyde monomer with a diamine monomer containing trifluoromethylbenzene and various combinations thereof in a solvent, such as N,N-dimethylacetamide. The reaction was heated to reflux yielding a polyazomethine which, after cooling to room temperature, was precipitated. These polymers and copolymers may be used to make films, coatings, composites and adhesives.

  3. Herbs Indoors. Container Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Duane

    This package consists of two bilingual instructional booklets for use in helping Indochinese refugees learn basic gardening skills. Included in the package are Cambodian, Vietnamese, and English translations of instructions for raising herbs indoors and Cambodian and English translations of guidelines for container gardening. The herb booklet…

  4. NORBO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The NORBO event was detonated in hole U8c of Nevada Test Site. A low level radiation was detected in the emplacement hole below the top stemming plug after subsurface collapse. The NORBO containment was considered successful. Maps, measuring methods and emplacement are described.

  5. CEBRERO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The CEBRERO event was detonated in hole U9cw of the Nevada Test Site. Detonation time was 1:00 PM PST on August 14, 1985. No subsidence was observed. Radiation arrivals were detected to a depth of 145 m in the emplacement hole; however, no radiation was detected at any elevation above that. The CEBRERO event containment was satisfactory.

  6. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  7. Radionuclide Behavior in Containments.

    2000-02-14

    MATADOR analyzes the transport and deposition of radionuclides as vapor or aerosol through Light Water Reactor (LWR) containments during severe accidents and calculates environmental release fractions of radionuclides as a function of time. It is intended for use in system risk studies. The principal output is information on the timing and magnitude of radionuclide releases to the environment as a result of severely degraded core accidents. MATADOR considers the transport of radionuclides through the containmentmore » and their removal by natural deposition and the operation of engineered safety systems such as sprays. Input data on the source term from the primary system, the containment geometry, and thermal-hydraulic conditions are required.« less

  8. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  9. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  10. CORNUCOPIA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, B.; Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-03-01

    The CORNUCOPIA event was detonated on July 24, 1986. A crater resulted from the event that was 137.5 m in diameter and a maximum depth of 16.9 m. No radiation was detected above the ground surface and containment was satisfactory. This report describes measuring methods utilized, maps indicating the location of the event, and a discussion, with data, concerning the collapse progression.

  11. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOEpatents

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  12. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  13. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  14. Cost Containment in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Culyer, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Health care cost containment is not in itself a sensible policy objective, because any assessment of the appropriateness of health care expenditure in aggregate, as of that on specific programs, requires a balancing of costs and benefits at the margin. International data on expenditures can, however, provide indications of the likely impact on costs and expenditures of structural features of health care systems. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development for both European countries and a wider set are reviewed, and some current policies in Europe that are directed at controlling health care costs are outlined. PMID:10313433

  15. ARMADA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    ARMADA was detonated in hole U9cs of Nevada Test Site. Depth of burial was 265 m in the Paintbrush Tuff of area 9, about 400 m above the Paleozoic formation and 310 m above the standing water level. Detonation time was 05:53 PDT on April 22, 1983, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 0.4 hour after detonation. Resulting crater had a mean radius of 72.9 m and a max depth of 7.7 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the ARMADA containment was considered successful.

  16. Containment materials: Status and summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen containment materials are studied. The safe, reliable, and economic containment of hydrogen is essential to the success of virtually any hydrogen energy transport and storage scheme. The potential problems associated with hydrogen containment are presented.

  17. Double Helical Fluid Containment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Brian

    2003-11-01

    In the absence of gravity or at micro-scales, helical wires can support cylindrical volumes of fluid of infinite length, making them convenient as conduits. However, fixed contact line double helical fluid volumes have the additional property that they can be drained to zero volume without loss of stability to constant pressure disturbances. Thus the two-wire support is a convenient microgravity or micro-scale container as well as conduit. For evenly spaced wires, continuous draining of a cylindrical volume to zero is possible for double helices ranging from moderate pitch to the parallel wire case. Double helices of steeper pitch are stable as cylinders and at zero volume, but are unstable for some range of intermediate volumes. This unstable zone is very strongly dependent on the offset between the helical wires, varying rapidly for offsets other than 180 degrees. Preliminary experimental results validate the theoretical predictions.

  18. FUEL CONTAINER CLOSURE

    DOEpatents

    Stone, C.C.; Noland, R.A.

    1962-07-17

    A method of producing a spherical closed end on a small thin-walled tube forming a container for reactor fuel is described. An end cap inserted in the tube has a long slender external projection extending axially of the tube. A heavy electrical current is applied to the projection, and simultaneously a portion of the tube very near the end cap is chilled. A part of the projection is vaporized, and the balance is melted, along with portions of the end cap and the tube. As a result, the end cap is welded to the tube, and the projection in melting is spread out to form a spherical surface on the end cap. (AEC)

  19. SALUT: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The SALUT event was detonated in hole U20ak of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in Fig. 1.1. The device had a depth-of-burial of 607 m in the Scrugham Peak rhyolite of Area 20, about 15 m above the standing water level (SWL), as shown in Figures 1.2 and 1.3. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in Fig. 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 08:15 PDT on June 12, 1985 and about 10 hours, 17 minutes later a sub-surface collapse progressed upwards to a depth between 200 and 270 m. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole and the SALUT containment was considered successful.

  20. LABAN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The LABAN event was detonated in hole U2ff of the Nevada Test Site. The device had a depth-of-burial of 326 m in the alluvium of Area 4, about 240 m above the standing water level (SWL). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes and Narver. Detonation time was 06:33 PDT on August 3, 1983. About 75 minutes later the chimney began collapsing to the surface. A major collapse event occurred 5 minutes later with episodes continuing for the next 20 minutes. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole at depths less than 106 m and the LABAN containment was considered successful.

  1. TARKO containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The TARKO event was detonated in hole U2fd of the Nevada Test Site. The TARKO device had a depth-of-burial of 369 m in the alluvium area 2, about 280 m above the Paleozoic formation and 200 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:00 PST on February 27,1980, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 4 hours after the detonation resulting in a crater having a mean radius of 45.7 m and a maximum depth of 13.6 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the TARKO containment was considered successful.

  2. CABOC containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    The CABOC event was detonated in hole U2cp of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The CABOC device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 335 m in the Paintbrush Tuffs of area 2, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and 260 m above the standing water level, as shown. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 13:05 PST on December l, 1981, and subsurface collapse progressed to a depth of between 37 and 77 m at about 57 minutes after the detonation. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CABOC containment was considered successful.

  3. DAUPHIN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Hienle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The DAUPHIN event was detonated in hole U9cq of the Nevada Test Site. The DAUPHIN device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 319 m in the Tunnel Beds Tuffs of area 9, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and about 300 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 08:50 PST on November 14, 1980, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 27. 5 minutes after the detonation resulting in an asymmetric crater having a mean radius of 71.9 m and a maximum depth of 13.0 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the DAUPHIN containment was considered successful.

  4. AKAVI containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-08-01

    The AKAVI event was detonated in hole U2es of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 494 m in the Paintbrush Tuff of area 2, about 90 m above the standing water level and 300 m above the Paleozoic formation. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:00 PST on December 3, 1981 and 103 minutes later a surface collapse occurred leaving a crater with mean radius of 90.5 m and maximum depth of 19.5 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the AKAVI containment was considered successful.

  5. CHEEDAM containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-04-01

    The CHEEDAM event was detonated in hole U2et of the Nevada Test Site. The CHEEDAM device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 342 m in the Tunnel Beds Tuffs of area 2, about 85 m above the Paleozoic formation, and 240 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 09:00 PST on February 17,1983, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 1.1 hour after detonation. The resulting crater had a mean radius of 57.9 m and a maximum depth of 10.0 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CHEEDAM containment was considered successful.

  6. Containment data report - KARAB

    SciTech Connect

    Heinle, R

    1998-07-01

    The KARAB event was detonated in hole U4ah of the Nevada Test Site. The KARAB device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 331 m in the Tunnel Beds tuff of area 4, about 200 m above the Paleozoic formation and the standing water level. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:51 PST on March 16, 1978 and collapse progressed to the surface about 53 minutes after detonation. The resulting surface crater had an average radius of 60.3 m and a maximum depth of 7.6 m. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and containment of the KARAB event was considered successful. This paper describes the site of the event and reports on stemming performance and collapse phenomena

  7. VIDE containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1996-03-01

    The VIDE event was detonated in hole U8k of the Nevada Test Site as indicated. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 327 m in the bedded tuffs of area 9, about 200 m above the Paleozoic and the standing water level. Stemming of the 1.83 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 07:35 PDT on April 30, 1981 and 53.5 minutes later a subsurface collapse or stemming fall to a depth of about 180 m occurred. No radiation arrivals were detected in the emplacement hole above the bottom stemming plug and the VIDE containment was considered successful.

  8. HAVARTI containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1997-06-01

    The HAVARTI event was detonated in hole U10bg of the Nevada Test Site. The HAVARTI device had a depth-of-burial of 200 m in the Tunnel Bed tuffs of area 10, about 280 m above the Paleozoic formation and 330 m above the standing water level. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole is described. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver). Detonation time was 06:41 PDT on August 5 1981. At a depth of 149 m there was an indication of subsurface collapse occurring 1780 s after detonation. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the HAVARTI containment was considered successful.

  9. Cluster Munitions Civilian Protection Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Feinstein, Dianne [D-CA

    2011-03-10

    03/10/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. (text of measure as introduced: CR S1561) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. Thermal treatment of dyes from military munitions

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed thermal treatment equipment to treat Navy smoke and dye compounds. Navy smokes were burned in the Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) in the early 1980s. These test results were used in the development of a portable system consisting of a Thermal Treatment Unit (TTU), feed preparation and pumping skid, utility skid, and control trailer. This equipment was started up at Navy facilities at China Lake, CA where several destruction removal efficiency tests were completed in 1993 burning smoke compositions. The equipment was set up at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in 1996 where tests were completed burning green Navy spotting dyes. Operating and test results from the NTS efforts resulted in clearer understanding of equipment deficiencies, dye characteristics and composition, and secondary wastes generated. Future tests, scheduled for July, 1996 will demonstrate higher bum rates, better pH measurement and control, and stack emission test results for other colored dyes.

  11. Defining the next generation munitions handler

    SciTech Connect

    Cassiday, B.K.; Koury, G.J.; Pin, F.G.

    1995-07-01

    RHIC 8 cm aperture dipole magnets and quadrupole cold masses are being built for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) by Northrop-Grumman Corporation at a production rate of one dipole magnet and two quadrupole cold masses per day. This work was preceded by a lengthy Technology Transfer effort which is described elsewhere. This paper describes the tooling which is being used for the construction effort, the production operations at each workstation, and also the use of trend plots of critical construction parameters as a tool for monitoring performance in production. A report on the improvements to production labor since the start of the programs is also provided. The magnet and cold mass designs, and magnetic test results are described in more detail in a separate paper.

  12. Do pyrotechnics contain radium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Musilek, Andreas

    2009-07-01

    Many pyrotechnic devices contain barium nitrate which is used as an oxidizer and colouring agent primarily for green-coloured fireworks. Similarly, strontium nitrate is used for red-coloured pyrotechnic effects. Due to their chemical similarities to radium, barium and strontium ores can accumulate radium, causing a remarkable activity in these minerals. Radium in such contaminated raw materials can be processed together with the barium or strontium, unless extensive purification of the ores was undertaken. For example, the utilization of 'radiobarite' for the production of pyrotechnic ingredients can therefore cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols when the firework is displayed, resulting in negative health effects upon inhalation of these aerosols. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of gamma-photon-emitting radionuclides in several pyrotechnic devices. The highest specific activities were due to K-40 (up to 20 Bq g-1, average value 14 Bq g-1). Radium-226 activities were in the range of 16-260 mBq g-1 (average value 81 mBq g-1). Since no uranium was found in any of the samples, indeed, a slight enrichment of Ra-226 in coloured pyrotechnics can be observed. Radioactive impurities stemming from the Th-232 decay chain were found in many samples as well. In the course of novel developments aiming at the 'greening' of pyrotechnics, the potential radioactive hazard should be considered as well.

  13. WEXFORD containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The WEXFORD event was detonated in hole U2cr of the Nevada Test Site. A plan view map of the local region of hole U2cr showing the surface projections of the faults and the local drill holes is given. The device had a depth-of-burial of 314 m in the Tunnel Beds tuff of Area 2, about 120 m above the standing water level (SWL). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes and Narver. Detonation time was 07:45 PDT on August 30, 1984 and about 26 minutes later the chimney collapsed to the surface leaving a small, off-center crater which grew, over several days, until it took on a cookie cutter form encompassing the emplacement hole and having a mean diameter of about 35 m. An interior, highly asymmetric crater had a mean diameter of about 12 m. No functioning monitors detected radiation arrivals in the emplacement hole above a depth of 130 m and the WEXFORD containment was considered successful.

  14. CARNELIAN containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T

    1998-07-01

    The CARNELIAN event was detonated in hole U4af of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1 .l. The CARNELIAN device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 208 m in the alluvium of Area 4 , about 70 m above the Paleozoic formation and 330 m above the standing water level, as shown in the geologic cross-sections of figure 1.2(l) Figure 1 3 displays the local surface area showing nearby events Stemming of the 2 44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1 4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver(2) Detonation time was about 07 00 PDT on July 28,1977, and collapse progressed to the surface at about 19 minutes after the detonation resulting in a crater having a "cookie-cutter" geometry (steep walls with a relatively flat bottom) with a mean radius of 32 2 m and a maximum depth of 10 5 m No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CARNELIAN containment was considered successful

  15. Organic containment separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the composite tube, (b) passing a solvent through the composite tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the composite tube. Further, an extraction apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a composite tube including a polymeric base material selected from the group of polyolefins and polyfluorocarbons and particles of a carbon allotrope material adfixed to the inner wall of the polymeric base material, the composite tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.1 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the composite tube is disclosed.

  16. KRYDOST: Containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, R.

    1995-05-01

    The KRYDOST event was detonated in hole U2co of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1.1. The device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 335 m in the Paintbrush tuff of Area 2, about 200 m above the Paleozoic and about 260 m above the standing water level, as shown in figures 1.2 and 1.3(l). Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. An additional exploratory hole (Ue2co) was drilled 15-24 m to the south-south east of the emplacement hole. This hole was grouted from depth to the surface. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver(2). I During drilling, a deeply dipping fault was discovered to intersect both the emplacement and the satellite holes and an associated antithetic fault also found to intersect the emplacement hole as seen in figures 1.2 and 1.3. Detonation time was 13:00 PDT on May 6, 1982 and about 3 hours later a subsurface collapse to about half the DOB occurred. No radiation arrivals were detected above the ground surface and the KRYDOST containment was considered successful.

  17. CABRA containment data report

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, T.; Heinle, T.

    1996-03-01

    The CABRA event was detonated in hole U20aj of the Nevada Test Site as indicated in figure 1.1. The CABRA device had a depth-of-burial (DOB) of 542 m in the Tuffs and rhyolites of area 20, about 20 m above the standing water level, as shown in figure 1.2(l). Figure 1.3 is a plan map of the immediate Vicinity of hole U20aj showing the drill holes used in the construction of the cross section plot of figure 1.2. Stemming of the 2.44 m diameter emplacement hole followed the plan shown in figure 1.4. A log of the stemming operations was maintained by Holmes & Narver. Detonation time was 12:20 PST on March 26,1983, and a sub-surface collapse to a depth of 380 m was observed. No radiation arrivals were detected above ground and the CABRA containment was considered successful.

  18. CONTAIN code analyses of direct containment heating (DCH) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.; Tadios, E.L.; Washington, K.E.

    1995-06-01

    In some nuclear reactor core melt accidents, a potential exists for molten core debris to be dispersed into the containment under high pressure. Resulting energy transfer to the containment atmosphere can pressurize the containment. This process, known as direct containment heating (DCH), has been the subject of extensive experimental and analytical programs sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DCH modeling has been a major focus for the development of the CONTAIN code. In support of the peer review, extensive analyses of DCH experiments were performed in order to assess the CONTAIN code`s DCH models and improve understanding of DCH phenomenology. The present paper summarizes this assessment effort.

  19. Prenatal Experiences of Containment in the Light of Bion's Model of Container/Contained

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiello, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the idea of possible proto-experiences of the prenatal child in the context of Bion's model of container/contained. The physical configuration of the embryo/foetus contained in the maternal uterus represents the starting point for an enquiry into the unborn child's possible experiences of its state of being contained in a…

  20. CONTAINER MATERIALS, FABRICATION AND ROBUSTNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Louthan, M.; Rawls, G.; Sindelar, R.; Zapp, P.; Mcclard, J.

    2009-11-10

    The multi-barrier 3013 container used to package plutonium-bearing materials is robust and thereby highly resistant to identified degradation modes that might cause failure. The only viable degradation mechanisms identified by a panel of technical experts were pressurization within and corrosion of the containers. Evaluations of the container materials and the fabrication processes and resulting residual stresses suggest that the multi-layered containers will mitigate the potential for degradation of the outer container and prevent the release of the container contents to the environment. Additionally, the ongoing surveillance programs and laboratory studies should detect any incipient degradation of containers in the 3013 storage inventory before an outer container is compromised.

  1. 32 CFR 179.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... restricted access and exclusionary areas. (40 CFR 266.201) Munitions and explosives of concern distinguishes... munitions that contain a CA fill and any explosive component. Examples are M55 rockets with CA, the M23 VX..., including bulk explosives and chemical warfare agents; chemical munitions, rockets, guided and...

  2. 32 CFR 179.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... restricted access and exclusionary areas. (40 CFR 266.201) Munitions and explosives of concern distinguishes... munitions that contain a CA fill and any explosive component. Examples are M55 rockets with CA, the M23 VX..., including bulk explosives and chemical warfare agents; chemical munitions, rockets, guided and...

  3. 32 CFR 179.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... environment. Chemical Warfare Materiel (CWM) means generally configured as a munition containing a chemical..., including bulk explosives and chemical warfare agents; chemical munitions, rockets, guided and ballistic... restricted access and exclusionary areas. (40 CFR 266.201) Munitions and explosives of concern...

  4. Direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, K.E.; Williams, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    The potential exists in a nuclear reactor core melt severe accident for molten core debris to be dispersed under high pressure into the containment building. If this occurs, the set of phenomena that result in the transfer of energy to the containment atmosphere and its surroundings is referred to as direct containment heating (DCH). Because of the potential for DCH to lead to early containment failure, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has sponsored an extensive research program consisting of experimental, analytical, and risk integration components. An important element of the analytical research has been the development and assessment of direct containment heating models in the CONTAIN code. This report documents the DCH models in the CONTAIN code. DCH models in CONTAIN for representing debris transport, trapping, chemical reactions, and heat transfer from debris to the containment atmosphere and surroundings are described. The descriptions include the governing equations and input instructions in CONTAIN unique to performing DCH calculations. Modifications made to the combustion models in CONTAIN for representing the combustion of DCH-produced and pre-existing hydrogen under DCH conditions are also described. Input table options for representing the discharge of debris from the RPV and the entrainment phase of the DCH process are also described. A sample calculation is presented to demonstrate the functionality of the models. The results show that reasonable behavior is obtained when the models are used to predict the sixth Zion geometry integral effects test at 1/10th scale.

  5. Glycosylation Substrate Specificity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 Pilin*S

    PubMed Central

    Horzempa, Joseph; Comer, Jason E.; Davis, Sheila A.; Castric, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The β-carbon of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244 pilin C-terminal Ser is a site of glycosylation. The present study was conducted to determine the pilin structures necessary for glycosylation. It was found that although Thr could be tolerated at the pilin C terminus, the blocking of the Ser carboxyl group with the addition of an Ala prevented glycosylation. Pilin from strain PA103 was not glycosylated by P. aeruginosa 1244, even when the C-terminal residue was converted to Ser. Substituting the disulfide loop region of strain PA103 pilin with that of strain 1244 allowed glycosylation to take place. Neither conversion of 1244 pilin disulfide loop Cys residues to Ala nor the deletion of segments of this structure prevented glycosylation. It was noted that the PA103 pilin disulfide loop environment was electronegative, whereas that of strain 1244 pilin had an overall positive charge. Insertion of a positive charge into the PA103 pilin disulfide loop of a mutant containing Ser at the C terminus allowed glycosylation to take place. Extending the “tail” region of the PA103 mutant pilin containing Ser at its terminus resulted in robust glycosylation. These results suggest that the terminal Ser is the major pilin glycosylation recognition feature and that this residue cannot be substituted at its carboxyl group. Although no other specific recognition features are present, the pilin surface must be compatible with the reaction apparatus for glycosylation to occur. PMID:16286455

  6. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Franklin R.

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  7. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  8. Modeling direct containment heating phenomena with CONTAIN 1. 12

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.O.; Russell, N.A.; Washington, K.E.

    1991-01-01

    CONTAIN is a detailed mechanistic computer code developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the integrated analysis of light water reactor severe accident containment phenomena. The most recent version of the code, CONTAIN 1.12, incorporates models for the phenomena of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) and the subsequent processes collectively known as Direct Containment Heating (DCH). CONTAIN 1.12 was used to model the Limited Flight Path 8A (LFP8A) experiment conducted at the Surtsey test facility at Sandia National Laboratories. In the experiment, 50 kg of molten thermite was injected into a scale model of the Surry cavity and then blown into the Surtsey vessel by high pressure steam. A seven-cell best-estimate CONTAIN model, using only a minimum of measured data, was used to simulate the LFP8A experiment. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results indicated that CONTAIN 1.12 was accurately modeling the physical processes involved in DCH phenomena, but the method of injecting the molten debris into the cavity in the CONTAIN model was causing the code to overpredict the chemical reaction and heat transfer rates between the molten debris and the system atmosphere. CONTAIN 1.12 predicted the peak vessel pressure to within less than 2% of the experimental value, but missed the timing on the pressure peak by approximately 1.75 s over the course of a 10 s calculation. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  10. Polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Novel polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups (PISOX) were prepared by the reaction of functionalized siloxane compounds with hydroxy containing polyimides (PIOH). The pendent siloxane groups on the polyimide backbone offer distinct advantages such as lowering the dielectric constant and moisture resistance and enhanced atomic oxygen resistance. The siloxane containing polyimides are potentially useful as protective silicon oxide coatings and are useful for a variety of applications where atomic oxygen resistance is needed.

  11. SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, H.D.; Biggs, B.B.; Tariello, P.J.; George, K.O.

    1963-01-15

    A shipping container is described for transponting a large number of radioactive nuclear fuel element modules which produce a substantial amount of heat. The container comprises a primary pressure vessel and shield, and a rotatable head having an access port that can be indexed with module holders in the container. In order to remove heat generated in the fuel eleme nts, a heat exchanger is arranged within the container and in contact with a heat exchange fluid therein. The heat exchanger communicates with additional external heat exchangers, which dissipate heat to the atmosphere. (AEC)

  12. Plasmids as Tools for Containment.

    PubMed

    García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Active containment systems are a major tool for reducing the uncertainty associated with the introduction of monocultures, genetically engineered or not, into target habitats for a large number of biotechnological applications (e.g., bioremediation, bioleaching, biopesticides, biofuels, biotransformations, live vaccines, etc.). While biological containment reduces the survival of the introduced organism outside the target habitat and/or upon completion of the projected task, gene containment strategies reduce the lateral spread of the key genetic determinants to indigenous microorganisms. In fundamental research, suicide circuits become relevant tools to address the role of gene transfer, mainly plasmid transfer, in evolution and how this transfer contributes to genome plasticity and to the rapid adaptation of microbial communities to environmental changes. Many lethal functions and regulatory circuits have been used and combined to design efficient containment systems. As many new genomes are being sequenced, novel lethal genes and regulatory elements are available, e.g., new toxin-antitoxin modules, and they could be used to increase further the current containment efficiencies and to expand containment to other organisms. Although the current containment systems can increase the predictability of genetically modified organisms in the environment, containment will never be absolute, due to the existence of mutations that lead to the appearance of surviving subpopulations. In this sense, orthogonal systems (xenobiology) appear to be the solution for setting a functional genetic firewall that will allow absolute containment of recombinant organisms. PMID:26104372

  13. Capillary surfaces in exotic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A survey is presented of results to date for capillary surfaces in exotic'' containers. These containers have the property that each one admits a continuum of distinct equilibrium free surfaces, all bounding with the container walls the same volume of fluid, making the same contact angle at the trip interface curve, and having identical mechanical energies. The containers can be so designed that they are themselves axially symmetric but that the fluid configurations of minimizing energy cannot be axially symmetric. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Canadian Drug Products Containing ASA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, William A.; Shearer, Cameron A.; Kirkpatrick, Susan L.

    1977-01-01

    A list of nearly 200 Canadian ASA-containing drug products is presented. Information was supplied by the major pharmaceutical companies and data were also obtained from various Canadian reference sources. This information should aid the physician and other health-related personnel in identifying ASA-containing products and counselling the salicylate-endangered patient. PMID:21304856

  15. Lightweight engine containment. [Kevlar shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, A. T.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar fabric styles and weaves were studied, as well as methods of application for advanced gas turbine engines. The Kevlar material was subjected to high speed impacts by simple projectiles fired from a rifle, as well as more complex shapes such as fan blades released from gas turbine rotors in a spin pit. Just contained data was developed for a variety of weave and/or application techniques, and a comparative containment weight efficiency was established for Kevlar containment applications. The data generated during these tests is being incorporated into an analytical design system so that blade containment trade-off studies between Kevlar and metal case engine structures can be made. Laboratory tests and engine environment tests were performed to determine the survivability of Kevlar in a gas turbine environment.

  16. VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of municipal ahd hazardous waste in the United States is primarily accomplished by containment in lined and capped landfills. Evapotranspiration cover systems offer an alternative to conventional landfill cap systems. These covers work on completely different principles ...

  17. Synthetic Metal-Containing Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, Ian

    2004-04-01

    The development of the field of synthetic metal-containing polymers - where metal atoms form an integral part of the main chain or side group structure of a polymer - aims to create new materials which combine the processability of organic polymers with the physical or chemical characteristics associated with the metallic element or complex. This book covers the major developments in the synthesis, properties, and applications of synthetic metal-containing macromolecules, and includes chapters on the preparation and characterization of metal-containing polymers, metallocene-based polymers, rigid-rod organometallic polymers, coordination polymers, polymers containing main group metals, and also covers dendritic and supramolecular systems. The book describes both polymeric materials with metals in the main chain or side group structure and covers the literature up to the end of 2002.

  18. Seal device for ferromagnetic containers

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Ross E.; Jason, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    A temporary seal or patch assembly prevents the escape of contents, e.g., fluids and the like, from within a container having a breach therethrough until the contents can be removed and/or a repair effected. A frame that supports a sealing bladder can be positioned over the breach and the frame is then attached to the container surface, which must be of a ferromagnet material, by using switchable permanent magnets. The permanent magnets are designed to have a first condition that is not attracted to the ferromagnetic surface and a second conditions whereby the magnets are attracted to the surface with sufficient force to support the seal assembly on the surface. Latching devices may be attached to the frame and engage the container surface with hardened pins to prevent the lateral movement of the seal assembly along the container surface from external forces such as fluid drag or gravity.

  19. Bethlehem landfill groundwater containment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hasemeier, R.F.; Knight, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The groundwater containment measures at the City of Bethlehem Landfill near Bethlehem, Pennsylvania include a 13-well pumping system; capping of closed landfill areas; a new landfill liner to decrease recharge; containment of a degraded aquifer; and substantial data reporting requirements to demonstrate effectiveness of the pump and treat system. The containment system functions as a barrier to downgradient contaminant migration. Reduction of groundwater recharge creates a very dynamic abatement system requiring monitoring. Performance monitoring of portions of the groundwater containment is continuous and accomplished through a centralized computer interface. Automated system control and data management reduces the human attention required to maintain a constant hydrodynamic barrier. Abatement system operational data is combined with other site monitoring data, including well water levels, water chemistry data, tonnage reports, and operational data, to fulfill permit reporting requirements for performance.

  20. Seal device for ferromagnetic containers

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, R.E.; Jason, A.J.

    1994-10-18

    A temporary seal or patch assembly prevents the escape of contents, e.g., fluids and the like, from within a container having a breach there through until the contents can be removed and/or a repair effected. A frame that supports a sealing bladder can be positioned over the breach and the frame is then attached to the container surface, which must be of a ferromagnet material, by using switchable permanent magnets. The permanent magnets are designed to have a first condition that is not attracted to the ferromagnetic surface and a second conditions whereby the magnets are attracted to the surface with sufficient force to support the seal assembly on the surface. Latching devices may be attached to the frame and engage the container surface with hardened pins to prevent the lateral movement of the seal assembly along the container surface from external forces such as fluid drag or gravity. 10 figs.

  1. Flywheel containment and safety considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppa, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Flywheel safety and containment design technology are discussed. The effects of axial loading resulting from composite rotor burst tests are considered. Analysis of the radial burst problem is also included.

  2. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  3. [Hallucinogenic psilocybine containing mushrooms. Toxins contained in Danish wild mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Lassen, J F; Ravn, H B; Lassen, S F

    1990-01-29

    A number of the wild Danish mushrooms contain the hallucinogenic agent psilocybin which resembles LSD in many ways. The commonest of these are the "liberty cap" or "magic mushrooms" (Psilocybe semilanceata). On the basis of experience from USA and western Europa, increase in employment of this mushrooms as a hallucinogenic intoxicant may be anticipated in Denmark. The history, epidemiology, botany and pharmacology of the mushroom are reviewed. Clinical pictures and treatment are described for: 1) Acute poisoning with psilocybin-containing fungi, 2) Late sequelae of consumption of psilocybin-containing fungi and 3) Poisoning with more poisonous fungi on account of incorrect identification. General practitioners, duty roster doctors, doctors in casualty departments and in acute psychiatric departments should be aware of these problems. Intoxication with psilocybin may be confused with panic anxiety or euphoria in persons with mydriasis and other sympathomimetic symptoms. The possibility of more serious mushroom poisoning on account of incorrect identification should be borne in mind.

  4. Anaerobic treatment of army ammunition production wastewater containing perchlorate and RDX.

    PubMed

    Atikovic, Emina; Suidan, Makram T; Maloney, Stephen W

    2008-08-01

    Perchlorate is an oxidizer that has been routinely used in solid rocket motors by the Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX) is a major component of military high explosives and is used in a wide variety of munitions. Perchlorate bearing wastewater typically results from production of solid rocket motors, while RDX is transferred to Army industrial wastewaters during load, assemble and pack operations for new munitions, and hot water or steam washout for disposal and deactivation of old munitions (commonly referred to as demilitarization, or simply demil). Biological degradation in Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors (AFBR), has been shown to be an effective method for the removal of both perchlorate and RDX in contaminated wastewater. The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate and RDX, individually and when co-mingled, using ethanol as an electron donor under steady state conditions. Three AFBRs were used to assess the effectiveness of this process in treating the wastewater. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored relative to perchlorate, RDX, and chemical oxygen demand removal effectiveness. The experimental results demonstrated that the biodegradation of perchlorate and RDX was more effective in bioreactors receiving the single contaminant than in the bioreactor where both contaminants were fed.

  5. Split ring containment attachment device

    SciTech Connect

    Sammel, A.G.

    1995-12-31

    A containment attachment device is described for operatively connecting a glovebag to plastic sheeting covering hazardous material. The device includes an inner split ring member connected on one end to a middle ring member wherein the free end of the split ring member is inserted through a slit in the plastic sheeting to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting. A collar portion having an outer ring portion is provided with fastening means for securing the device together wherein the glovebag is operatively connected to the collar portion. Hazardous material such as radioactive waste may be sealed in plastic bags for small items or wrapped in plastic sheeting for large items. Occasionally the need arises to access the hazardous material in a controlled manner, that is, while maintaining total containment. Small items could be placed entirely inside a containment glovebag. However, it may not be possible or practical to place large items inside a containment; instead, one or more glovebags could be attached to the plastic sheeting covering the hazardous material. It is this latter application for which the split ring containment attachment device is intended.

  6. Building a secondary containment system

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.

    1994-10-01

    Retail fertilizer and pesticide dealers across the United States are installing secondary containment at their facilities or are seriously considering it. Much of this work is in response to new state regulations; however, many dealers not facing new regulations are upgrading their facilities to reduce their liability, lower their insurance costs, or comply with anticipated regulations. The Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center (NFERC) has assisted dealers in 22 states in retrofitting containment to their facilities. Simultaneous improvements in the operational efficiency of the facilities have been achieved at many of the sites. This paper is based on experience gained in that work and details the rationale used in planning secondary containment and facility modifications.

  7. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  8. Shipping container for fissile material

    DOEpatents

    Crowder, H.E.

    1984-12-17

    The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

  9. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  10. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  11. Containment of composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Coppa, A. P.

    1979-01-01

    A lightweight containment was developed for turbofan engine fan blades. Subscale ballistic-type tests were first run on a number of concepts. The most promising configuration was selected and further evaluated by larger scale tests in a rotating test rig. Weight savings made possible by the use of this new containment system were determined and extrapolated to a CF6-size engine. An analytical technique was also developed to predict the released blades motion when involved in the blade/casing interaction process. Initial checkout of this procedure was accomplished using several of the tests run during the program.

  12. Container Soil-Water Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spomer, L. Art; Hershey, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity that illustrates the relationship between the soil found in containers and soil in the ground including the amount of air and water found in each. Sponges are used to represent soil. Materials, procedures, and probable results are described. (KR)

  13. Soft container for explosive nuts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, D. C.; Drummond, W. E.; Miller, G.

    1981-01-01

    Flexible fabric fits over variety of assembly shapes to contain debris produced by detonations or safety tests. Bag material is woven multifilament polyamide or aramid. Belt loops hold bag to clamp. Ring supports explosive nut structure and detonator wires, and after nut is mounted, bag and clamp are slipped over ring and fastened.

  14. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-07-13

    The present invention provides phyllosilicate-polymer compositions which are useful as liquid crystalline composites. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while at the same time be transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles liquid crystalline composite, liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  15. Diamines Containing Pendent Phenylethynyl Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Controlled molecular weight imide oligomers and co-oligomers containing pendent phenylethynyl groups (PEPIs) and endcapped with nonreactive or phenylethynyl groups have been prepared by the cyclodehydration of the precursor amide acid oligomers or co-oligomers containing pendent phenylethynyl groups and endcapped with nonreactive or phenylethynyl groups. The amine terminated amide acid oligomers or co-oligomers are prepared from the reaction of dianhydride(s) with an excess of diamine(s) and diamine containing pendent phenylethynyl groups and subsequently endcapped with a phenylethynyl phthalic anhydride or monofunctional anhydride. The anhydride terminated amide acid oligomers and co-oligomers are prepared from the reaction of diamine(s) and diamine containing pendent phenylethynyl group(s) with an excess of dianhydride(s) and subsequently endcapped with a phenylethynyl amine or monofunctional amine. The polymerizations are carried out in polar aprotic solvents such as and N,N-dimethylacetamide under nitrogen at room temperature. The amide acid oligomers or co-oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated either thermally or chemically to the corresponding imide oligomers. The polymers and copolymers prepared from these materials exhibit a unique and unexpected combination of properties that includes higher glass transition temperatures after curing and higher retention of neat resin, adhesive and carbon fiber reinforced mechanical properties at temperatures up to 204 C under wet conditions without sacrificing melt flow behavior and processability as compared to similar materials. These materials are useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings, and composite matrices.

  16. 27 CFR 30.44 - Weighing containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Weighing containers. 30.44... Weighing containers. (a) Weighing containers of more than 10 wine gallons. The weight of containers having.... (b) Weighing containers of 10 wine gallons or less. The weight for containers of a capacity of...

  17. Passive tamper-indicating secure container

    SciTech Connect

    Bartberger, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a passive tamper-indicating secure container that has been designed to demonstrate concepts, features, and materials that can be used in passive container applications. (In a passive security system, physical phenomena provide visual indication of tampering.) The basic container {open_quotes}volume within a volume{close_quotes} assembly consists of a transparent plastic outer container and an aluminum inner container. Both containers incorporate passive, fingerprinted layers as part of the tamper-indicating container system. Many of the tamper-indicating features can be visually inspected without disassembling the container. The status of container development and potential applications for the container are addressed.

  18. Spacetimes containing slowly evolving horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, William; Booth, Ivan

    2006-08-15

    Slowly evolving horizons are trapping horizons that are ''almost'' isolated horizons. This paper reviews their definition and discusses several spacetimes containing such structures. These include certain Vaidya and Tolman-Bondi solutions as well as (perturbatively) tidally distorted black holes. Taking into account the mass scales and orders of magnitude that arise in these calculations, we conjecture that slowly evolving horizons are the norm rather than the exception in astrophysical processes that involve stellar-scale black holes.

  19. Liquid crystalline composites containing phyllosilicates

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko; David J.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention provides barrier films having reduced gas permeability for use in packaging and coating applications. The barrier films comprise an anisotropic liquid crystalline composite layer formed from phyllosilicate-polymer compositions. Phyllosilicate-polymer liquid crystalline compositions of the present invention can contain a high percentage of phyllosilicate while remaining transparent. Because of the ordering of the particles in the liquid crystalline composite, barrier films comprising liquid crystalline composites are particularly useful as barriers to gas transport.

  20. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  1. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  2. Nonaggregating Microspheres Containing Aldehyde Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Cobalt gamma irradiation of hydrophilic monomers in presence of acrolein yields exceptionally-stable, nonaggregating microspheres. Mixtures of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrolein form homogeneous solutions in distilled water containing 0.4 percent polyethylene oxide (PEO). After deaeration with nitrogen, mixtures irradiated at room temperature with gamma rays from cobalt source; total exposure time 4 hours, at rate of 0.2 milliroentgen per hour. Reaction product centrifuged three times for purification and kept in distilled water.

  3. REM-containing silicate concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Shabanova, O. V.; Pavlov, I. V.; Pavlov, M. V.; Shabanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    A new method of advanced complex processing of ores containing rare-earth elements (REE) is proposed to obtain porous X-ray amorphous aluminosilicate material with a stable chemical composition which concentrates oxides of rare-earth metals (REM). The ferromanganese oxide ores of Chuktukon deposit (Krasnoyarsk Region, RF) were used for the experiment. The obtained aluminosilicate material is appropriate for treatment with 5 - 15% solutions of mineral acids to leach REM.

  4. Characterization of aerosols containing microcystin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 mum. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  5. Haem iron-containing peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Isaac, I S; Dawson, J H

    1999-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes that utilize hydrogen peroxide to oxidize substrates. A histidine residue on the proximal side of the haem iron ligates most peroxidases. The various oxidation states and ligand complexes have been spectroscopically characterized. HRP-I is two oxidation states above ferric HRP. It contains an oxoferryl (= oxyferryl) iron with a pi-radical cation that resides on the haem. HRP-II is one oxidation state above ferric HRP and contains an oxoferryl iron. HRP-III is equivalent to the oxyferrous state. Only compounds I and II are part of the peroxidase reaction cycle. CCP-ES contains an oxoferryl iron but the radical cation resides on the Trp-191 residue and not on the haem. CPO is the only known peroxidase that is ligated by a cysteine residue rather than a histidine residue, on the proximal side of the haem iron. CPO is a more versatile enzyme, catalysing numerous types of reaction: peroxidase, catalase and halogenation reactions. The various CPO species are less stable than other peroxidase species and more elusive, thus needing further characterization. The roles of the amino acid residues on the proximal and distal sides of the haem need more investigation to further decipher their specific roles. Haem proteins, especially peroxidases, are structure-function-specific. PMID:10730188

  6. Cashew juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Moreira; Rabelo, Maria Cristiane; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme dextransucrase in a medium containing sucrose and an acceptor as substrate synthesizes prebiotics oligosaccharides. The cashew apple juice works as a source of acceptors because it is rich in glucose and fructose (enzyme acceptors). The use of cashew apple juice becomes interesting because it aims at harnessing the peduncle of the cashew that is wasted during the nut processing, which is the product of greater economic expression. The production of dextransucrase enzyme was done by fermentative process by inoculating the bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F into a culture medium containing sucrose as the only carbon source. Thus, the aim of this work was the production of prebiotic oligosaccharides by enzymatic process with addition of the dextransucrase enzyme to the clarified cashew apple juice. Dextran yield was favored by the combination of low concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars. The formation of oligosaccharides was favored by increasing the concentration of reducing sugars and by the combination of high concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars, the highest concentration of oligosaccharides obtained was 104.73 g/L and the qualitative analysis showed that at concentrations of 25 g/L and 75 g/L of sucrose and reducing sugar, respectively, it is possible to obtain oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization up to 12. The juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharide is a potential new functional beverage.

  7. Profiles in garbage glass containers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1997-09-01

    Glass containers are made from sand, limestone, soda ash, cullet (crushed bottles), and various additives, including those used to color brown, green, or blue bottles. Sixty percent of the glass used in the US is clear (flint) and one-fourth is brown (amber). Almost half of the green bottles are imported wind and beer bottles. Other glass products include flat glass such as windows; fiberglass insulation; and glassware. These products use different manufacturing processes and different additives than container glass. This profile covers only container glass. Glass bottles are commonly collected in curb-side programs. Losses due to breakage and the abrasiveness of glass during collection and processing offset their low collection and processing costs. Breakage solutions include installation of interior baffles or nets in the collection trucks, special glass-only truck compartments, and limiting the number of times glass is transferred after collection before final processing. Ten states require deposits on glass bottles for beer and soft drinks and related items.

  8. Cashew juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Moreira; Rabelo, Maria Cristiane; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme dextransucrase in a medium containing sucrose and an acceptor as substrate synthesizes prebiotics oligosaccharides. The cashew apple juice works as a source of acceptors because it is rich in glucose and fructose (enzyme acceptors). The use of cashew apple juice becomes interesting because it aims at harnessing the peduncle of the cashew that is wasted during the nut processing, which is the product of greater economic expression. The production of dextransucrase enzyme was done by fermentative process by inoculating the bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F into a culture medium containing sucrose as the only carbon source. Thus, the aim of this work was the production of prebiotic oligosaccharides by enzymatic process with addition of the dextransucrase enzyme to the clarified cashew apple juice. Dextran yield was favored by the combination of low concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars. The formation of oligosaccharides was favored by increasing the concentration of reducing sugars and by the combination of high concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars, the highest concentration of oligosaccharides obtained was 104.73 g/L and the qualitative analysis showed that at concentrations of 25 g/L and 75 g/L of sucrose and reducing sugar, respectively, it is possible to obtain oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization up to 12. The juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharide is a potential new functional beverage. PMID:25190866

  9. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  10. Plant biotin-containing carboxylases.

    PubMed

    Nikolau, Basil J; Ohlrogge, John B; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2003-06-15

    Biotin-containing proteins are found in all forms of life, and they catalyze carboxylation, decarboxylation, or transcarboxylation reactions that are central to metabolism. In plants, five biotin-containing proteins have been characterized. Of these, four are catalysts, namely the two structurally distinct acetyl-CoA carboxylases (heteromeric and homomeric), 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and geranoyl-CoA carboxylase. In addition, plants contain a noncatalytic biotin protein that accumulates in seeds and is thought to play a role in storing biotin. Acetyl-CoA carboxylases generate two pools of malonyl-CoA, one in plastids that is the precursor for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis and the other in the cytosol that is the precursor for fatty acid elongation and a large number of secondary metabolites. 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes a reaction in the mitochondrial pathway for leucine catabolism. The exact metabolic function of geranoyl-CoA carboxylase is as yet unknown, but it may be involved in isoprenoid metabolism. This minireview summarizes the recent developments in our understanding of the structure, regulation, and metabolic functions of these proteins in plants.

  11. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  12. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling containers. 20.1904 Section 20.1904 Energy....1904 Labeling containers. (a) The licensee shall ensure that each container of licensed material bears... handling or using the containers, or working in the vicinity of the containers, to take precautions...

  13. 7 CFR 51.911 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 51.911 Section 51.911 Agriculture... Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.911 Container. Container... of grapes in packages containing 5 pounds or less, mean the master container in which the...

  14. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  15. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  16. Metal ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

  17. MINOS atmospheric neutrino contained events

    SciTech Connect

    Habig, A.; /Minnesota U.

    2007-10-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment has continued to collect atmospheric neutrino events while doing a precision measurement of NuMI beam {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance oscillations. The 5.4 kton iron calorimeter is magnetized to provide the unique capability of discriminating between {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} interactions on an event-by-event basis and has been collecting atmospheric neutrino data since July 2003. An analysis of the neutrino events with interaction vertices contained inside the detector will be presented.

  18. Treatment of mercury containing waste

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D.; Melamed, Dan; Patel, Bhavesh R; Fuhrmann, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for the treatment of mercury containing waste in a single reaction vessel which includes a) stabilizing the waste with sulfur polymer cement under an inert atmosphere to form a resulting mixture and b) encapsulating the resulting mixture by heating the mixture to form a molten product and casting the molten product as a monolithic final waste form. Additional sulfur polymer cement can be added in the encapsulation step if needed, and a stabilizing additive can be added in the process to improve the leaching properties of the waste form.

  19. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  20. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  1. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, P; Tutelyan, V A

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement use among athletes to enhance performance is proliferating as more individuals strive for obtaining that chemical competitive edge. As a result the concomitant use of dietary supplements containing performance-enhancing substances of those falling in the categories outlined in the current review, can also be expected to rise. This despite ever-increasing sophisticated analytical methodology techniques being used to assay dietary supplement and urine samples in doping laboratories. The reasons for this include that a variety of these chemical entities, many of them on the prohibited drug list of the WADA, are being produced on commercial scales in factories around the world (ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, sibutramine, methylhexaneamine, prohormones, 'classic' anabolic steroids, clenbuterol, peptide hormones etc.), aggressive marketing strategies are being employed by companies and these supplements can be easily ordered via e.g. the internet. It can also be anticipated that there will be an increase in the number of supplements containing 'designer' steroids and other 'newer' molecules. Chromatographic techniques combined with mass spectrometry leading to identification of molecular fragments and productions will assist in determining these substances. To prevent accidental doping, information regarding dietary supplements must be provided to athletes, coaches and sports doctors at all levels of competition. The risks of accidental doping via dietary supplement ingestion can be minimized by using 'safe' products listed on databases, e.g. such as those available in The Netherlands and Germany.

  2. Dietary supplements containing prohibited substances.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, P; Tutelyan, V A

    2013-01-01

    Dietary supplement use among athletes to enhance performance is proliferating as more individuals strive for obtaining that chemical competitive edge. As a result the concomitant use of dietary supplements containing performance-enhancing substances of those falling in the categories outlined in the current review, can also be expected to rise. This despite ever-increasing sophisticated analytical methodology techniques being used to assay dietary supplement and urine samples in doping laboratories. The reasons for this include that a variety of these chemical entities, many of them on the prohibited drug list of the WADA, are being produced on commercial scales in factories around the world (ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, sibutramine, methylhexaneamine, prohormones, 'classic' anabolic steroids, clenbuterol, peptide hormones etc.), aggressive marketing strategies are being employed by companies and these supplements can be easily ordered via e.g. the internet. It can also be anticipated that there will be an increase in the number of supplements containing 'designer' steroids and other 'newer' molecules. Chromatographic techniques combined with mass spectrometry leading to identification of molecular fragments and productions will assist in determining these substances. To prevent accidental doping, information regarding dietary supplements must be provided to athletes, coaches and sports doctors at all levels of competition. The risks of accidental doping via dietary supplement ingestion can be minimized by using 'safe' products listed on databases, e.g. such as those available in The Netherlands and Germany. PMID:24741950

  3. Improving containment strategies in biopharming.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Denis J

    2007-09-01

    This review examines the challenges of segregating biopharmed crops expressing pharmaceutical or veterinary agents from mainstream crops, particularly those destined for food or feed use. The strategy of using major food crops as production vehicles for the expression of pharmaceutical or veterinary agents is critically analysed in the light of several recent episodes of contamination of the human food chain by non-approved crop varieties. Commercially viable strategies to limit or avoid biopharming intrusion into the human food chain require the more rigorous segregation of food and non-food varieties of the same crop species via a range of either physical or biological methods. Even more secure segregation is possible by the use of non-food crops, non-crop plants or in vitro plant cultures as production platforms for biopharming. Such platforms already under development range from outdoor-grown Nicotiana spp. to glasshouse-grown Arabidopsis, lotus and moss. Amongst the more effective methods for biocontainment are the plastid expression of transgenes, inducible and transient expression systems, and physical containment of plants or cell cultures. In the current atmosphere of heightened concerns over food safety and biosecurity, the future of biopharming may be largely determined by the extent to which the sector is able to maintain public confidence via a more considered approach to containment and security of its plant production systems.

  4. Radiological containment selection, design, and specification guide

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document provides guidance to Tank Waste Remediation Systems personnel in determining what containment is appropriate for work activities, what containments are available, general applications of each, design criteria, and other information needed to make informed decisions concerning containment application.

  5. High Energy Flywheel Containment Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Trase, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel testing facility is being constructed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility is to be used for life cycle testing of various flywheel rotors. The lifecycle testing consists of spinning a rotor from a low rpm (approx. 20,000 ) to a high rpm (approx. 60,000) and then back to the low rpm. This spin cycle will model that which the rotor will see during use. To simulate the lifetime of the rotor, the spin cycle will be performed tens of thousands of times. A typical life cycle spin test is expected to last six months. During this time the rotor will be spun through a cycle every five minutes. The test will run continuously for the six month period barring a flywheel failure. Since it is not reasonable to have the surrounding area evacuated of personnel for the duration of the testing, the flywheel facility has to be designed to withstand a flywheel rotor failure and insure that there is no danger to any personnel in the adjacent buildings or surrounding areas. In order to determine if the facility can safely contain a flywheel rotor failure an analysis of the facility in conjunction with possible flywheel failure modes was performed. This analysis is intended as a worst case evaluation of the burst liner and vacuum tank's ability to contain a failure. The test chamber consists of a cylindrical stainless steel vacuum tank, two outer steel containment rings, and a stainless steel burst liner. The stainless steel used is annealed 302, which has an ultimate strength of 620 MPa (90,000 psi). A diagram of the vacuum tank configuration is shown. The vacuum tank and air turbine will be located below ground in a pit. The tank is secured in the pit with 0.3 m (12 in.) of cement along the base and the remaining portion of the tank is surrounded by gravel up to the access ports. A 590 kg (1300 lb.) bulkhead is placed on top of the pit during operation and the complete facility is housed within a concrete structure which has 7.5 cm (3 in.) thick walls. A cutaway

  6. Metal containing polymeric functional microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  7. Self-contained breathing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Giorgini, E. A.; Simmonds, M. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A self-contained breathing apparatus with automatic redundant fluid pressure controls and a facemask mounted low pressure whistle alarm is described. The first stage of the system includes pair of pressure regulators connected in parallel with different outlet pressures, both of which reduce the pressure of the stored supply gas to pressures compatible with the second stage breathing demand regulator. A primary regulator in the first stage delivers a low output pressure to the demand regulator. In the event of a failure closed condition of the primary regulator an automatic transfer valve switches on the backup regulator. A warning that the supply pressure has been depleted is also provided by a supply pressure actuated transfer valve which transfers the output of the first stage pressure regulators from the primary to the backup regulator. The alarm is activated in either the failure closed condition or if the supply pressure is reduced to a dangerously low level.

  8. Collagen containing microcapsules: smart containers for disease controlled therapy.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, Laura; Erokhina, Svetlana; Soumetz, Federico Caneva; Bianchini, Paolo; Konovalov, Oleg; Diaspro, Alberto; Ruggiero, Carmelina; Erokhin, Victor

    2011-05-01

    The protein collagen is the major component of connective tissue and it is involved in many biological functions. Its degradation is at the basis of different pathological processes. The up-regulated expression of matrix metalloproteinases and the down-regulated expression of their inhibitors are the causes for such degradation. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possibility to fabricate collagen based containers for drug encapsulation and release by cellular demand by the action of matrix metalloproteinases. In present work collagen type I based microcapsules were fabricated by means of the layer-by-layer assembly of oppositely charged collagen and poly (stirene sulfonate) onto colloidal particles, followed by removal of the cores to obtain hollow microcapsules. The process of shell growth on planar supports was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance. X-ray reflectivity measurements were carried out at the solid/water interface to study the interaction of matrix metalloproteinase 1 with LbL films of collagen. The morphology of hollow capsules was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, and compared to that of capsules exposed to the matrix metalloproteinase 1. Finally the matrix metalloproteinase 1 mediated permeability of capsules variation was studied by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. The results demonstrated the possibility to fabricate a drug delivery system where the release of the drug is dependent on the biochemistry of the pathological state.

  9. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel.

  10. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, R.S.

    1992-12-08

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel. 9 figs.

  11. Characterization and mobility of arsenic and heavy metals in soils polluted by the destruction of arsenic-containing shells from the Great War.

    PubMed

    Thouin, Hugues; Le Forestier, Lydie; Gautret, Pascale; Hube, Daniel; Laperche, Valérie; Dupraz, Sebastien; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2016-04-15

    Destruction of chemical munitions from World War I has caused extensive local top soil contamination by arsenic and heavy metals. The biogeochemical behavior of toxic elements is poorly documented in this type of environment. Four soils were sampled presenting different levels of contamination. The range of As concentrations in the samples was 1937-72,820mg/kg. Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Pb reached 90,190mg/kg, 9113mg/kg and 5777mg/kg, respectively. The high clay content of the subsoil and large amounts of charcoal from the use of firewood during the burning process constitute an ample reservoir of metals and As-binding materials. However, SEM-EDS observations showed different forms of association for metals and As. In metal-rich grains, several phases were identified: crystalline phases, where arsenate secondary minerals were detected, and an amorphous phase rich in Fe, Zn, Cu, and As. The secondary arsenate minerals, identified by XRD, were adamite and olivenite (zinc and copper arsenates, respectively) and two pharmacosiderites. The amorphous material was the principal carrier of As and metals in the central part of the site. This singular mineral assemblage probably resulted from the heat treatment of arsenic-containing shells. Microbial characterization included total cell counts, respiration, and determination of As(III)-oxidizing activities. Results showed the presence of microorganisms actively contributing to metabolism of carbon and arsenic, even in the most polluted soil, thereby influencing the fate of bioavailable As on the site. However, the mobility of As correlated mainly with the availability of iron sinks. PMID:26849330

  12. Characterization and mobility of arsenic and heavy metals in soils polluted by the destruction of arsenic-containing shells from the Great War.

    PubMed

    Thouin, Hugues; Le Forestier, Lydie; Gautret, Pascale; Hube, Daniel; Laperche, Valérie; Dupraz, Sebastien; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2016-04-15

    Destruction of chemical munitions from World War I has caused extensive local top soil contamination by arsenic and heavy metals. The biogeochemical behavior of toxic elements is poorly documented in this type of environment. Four soils were sampled presenting different levels of contamination. The range of As concentrations in the samples was 1937-72,820mg/kg. Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Pb reached 90,190mg/kg, 9113mg/kg and 5777mg/kg, respectively. The high clay content of the subsoil and large amounts of charcoal from the use of firewood during the burning process constitute an ample reservoir of metals and As-binding materials. However, SEM-EDS observations showed different forms of association for metals and As. In metal-rich grains, several phases were identified: crystalline phases, where arsenate secondary minerals were detected, and an amorphous phase rich in Fe, Zn, Cu, and As. The secondary arsenate minerals, identified by XRD, were adamite and olivenite (zinc and copper arsenates, respectively) and two pharmacosiderites. The amorphous material was the principal carrier of As and metals in the central part of the site. This singular mineral assemblage probably resulted from the heat treatment of arsenic-containing shells. Microbial characterization included total cell counts, respiration, and determination of As(III)-oxidizing activities. Results showed the presence of microorganisms actively contributing to metabolism of carbon and arsenic, even in the most polluted soil, thereby influencing the fate of bioavailable As on the site. However, the mobility of As correlated mainly with the availability of iron sinks.

  13. 7 CFR 58.923 - Filling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filling containers. 58.923 Section 58.923 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.923 Filling containers. (a) The filling of small containers with product shall be done in a sanitary manner. The containers shall not contaminate or detract from the quality of the product in any...

  14. 7 CFR 201.42 - Small containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Small containers. 201.42 Section 201.42 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Sampling in the Administration of the Act § 201.42 Small containers. In sampling seed in small containers that it is not practical to sample as required in § 201.41, a portion of one unopened container...

  15. 7 CFR 58.729 - Forming containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Forming containers. 58.729 Section 58.729 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.729 Forming containers. Containers either lined or unlined shall be assembled and stored in a sanitary manner to prevent contamination. The handling of containers by filler crews should be done...

  16. 46 CFR 160.036-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Container. 160.036-6 Section 160.036-6 Shipping COAST... § 160.036-6 Container. (a) General. The container for storing the signals on lifeboats and liferafts is not required to be of a special design or be approved by the Coast Guard. The container must meet...

  17. 27 CFR 19.581 - Authorized containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... articles, and the provisions of 27 CFR part 24 apply to containers used for storage or transfer of wine... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authorized containers. 19..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Containers §...

  18. 21 CFR 1230.47 - Rejected containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rejected containers. 1230.47 Section 1230.47 Food... FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT Imports § 1230.47 Rejected containers. (a) In all cases where the containers... notification to the importer that the containers must be exported under customs supervision within 3...

  19. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48 Container regulation. Whenever the Committee deems it advisable to establish a container regulation for any variety...

  20. 27 CFR 44.187 - Shipping containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shipping containers. 44... Shipping containers. Each shipping case, crate, or other container in which tobacco products, or cigarette... same containers in which they were received from the factory. (72 Stat. 1418, as amended; 26...

  1. 46 CFR 160.026-3 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Water, Emergency Drinking (In Hermetically Sealed Containers), for Merchant Vessels § 160.026-3 Container. (a) General. The emergency drinking water container shall... print. After filling, sealing, autoclaving, and marking, the container shall be dip-coated with one...

  2. 46 CFR 160.026-3 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Water, Emergency Drinking (In Hermetically Sealed Containers), for Merchant Vessels § 160.026-3 Container. (a) General. The emergency drinking water container shall... print. After filling, sealing, autoclaving, and marking, the container shall be dip-coated with one...

  3. 46 CFR 160.026-3 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Water, Emergency Drinking (In Hermetically Sealed Containers), for Merchant Vessels § 160.026-3 Container. (a) General. The emergency drinking water container shall... print. After filling, sealing, autoclaving, and marking, the container shall be dip-coated with one...

  4. 46 CFR 160.026-3 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Water, Emergency Drinking (In Hermetically Sealed Containers), for Merchant Vessels § 160.026-3 Container. (a) General. The emergency drinking water container shall... print. After filling, sealing, autoclaving, and marking, the container shall be dip-coated with one...

  5. 46 CFR 160.026-3 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Water, Emergency Drinking (In Hermetically Sealed Containers), for Merchant Vessels § 160.026-3 Container. (a) General. The emergency drinking water container shall... print. After filling, sealing, autoclaving, and marking, the container shall be dip-coated with one...

  6. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  7. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1990-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  8. Contained radiological analytical chemistry module

    DOEpatents

    Barney, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

  9. 75 FR 26268 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Permit To Transfer Containers to a Container Station

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Containers to a Container Station AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... concerning the: Permit to Transfer Containers to a Container Station. This request for comment is being made... Containers to a Container Station. OMB Number: 1651-0049. Form Number: None. Abstract: This...

  10. 75 FR 33705 - Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ...; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment'' (71 FR 47330) (container and containment rule... effects on human health and the environment. The container and containment regulations include... environment. EPA had anticipated that the August 16, 2010 deadline would allow an appropriate length of...

  11. Biopolymers Containing Unnatural Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-06-30

    Although the main chain structure of polymers has a profound effect on their materials properties, the side groups can also have dramatic effects on their properties including conductivity, liquid crystallinity, hydrophobicity, elasticity and biodegradability. Unfortunately control over the side chain structure of polymers remains a challenge – it is difficult to control the sequence of chain elongation when mixtures of monomers are polymerized, and postpolymerization side chain modification is made difficult by polymer effects on side chain reactivity. In contrast, the mRNA templated synthesis of polypeptides on the ribosome affords absolute control over the primary sequence of the twenty amino acid monomers. Moreover, the length of the biopolymer is precisely controlled as are sites of crosslinking. However, whereas synthetic polymers can be synthesized from monomers with a wide range of chemically defined structures, ribosomal biosynthesis is largely limited to the 20 canonical amino acids. For many applications in material sciences, additional building blocks would be desirable, for example, amino acids containing metallocene, photoactive, and halogenated side chains. To overcome this natural constraint we have developed a method that allows unnatural amino acids, beyond the common twenty, to be genetically encoded in response to nonsense or frameshift codons in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells with high fidelity and good yields. Here we have developed methods that allow identical or distinct noncanonical amino acids to be incorporated at multiple sites in a polypeptide chain, potentially leading to a new class of templated biopolymers. We have also developed improved methods for genetically encoding unnatural amino acids. In addition, we have genetically encoded new amino acids with novel physical and chemical properties that allow selective modification of proteins with synthetic agents. Finally, we have evolved new metal-ion binding sites in proteins

  12. Rinsing and management of pesticides' containers.

    PubMed

    Huyghebaert, B; Mostade, O; Pigeon, O; Galoux, M; Oger, R

    2002-01-01

    In order to reduce the effects on the environment, it is necessary to improve the management of pesticides' containers. Usually, users burn or bury empty containers. These methods, even though decreasing must be avoided or even forbidden. Since 1996, empty containers are systematically collected in Belgium and are specifically removed by the firm Phytofar Recover created by the Belgian Federation of pesticides' manufacturers. Since the beginning, the recovery rate (percentage of containers recovered compared with the containers sold) goes on increasing to exceed 85% in 2001. These action and results are a world first (more than 500 tons of empty containers are collected yearly). Once collected, empty containers are subjected to the European Policy about toxic wastes since they contained dangerous products. Their removal must follow a specific removal process by incineration at very high temperature (> 1200 degrees C) with a specific filtration of the smoke. The treatment cost is high and reaches 2 Euros per kg of container. If the container is rinsed and the residue does not exceed 1000, 10,000 or 30,000 mg per kg of container (depending on the dangerousness of product: very toxic, corrosive or toxic), it will be considered as domestic waste and will therefore follow a much more economical energy production process. The study aims at determining the quantities of residue contained in empty containers and the parameters reducing the rinsing efficiency: the formulation (EC, WP, WG), the container's size, packaging's type (plastic container or paper bag), the rinsing technique. Almost 150 tests and analyses of residue have been carried out. A manual rinsing procedure has been set up in order to meet the standards about residue. Rinsing three times with an average volume of water (20 to 30%) allows to reach the lowest residue level. As bags containing powder (WG or WP) container not be rinsed, it is necessary to empty them completely. It is however difficult to reach

  13. IP-1 Certification of Cargo Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagler, Lisle

    2010-10-05

    The purpose and scope of this engineering note is to demonstrate that the structural design of the cargo container complies with the IP-1 container requirements of 49 CFR 173.410 as required by CFR 173.411.

  14. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    DOEpatents

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  15. 46 CFR 160.037-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-6 Container. (a....021 (§ 160.021-6) except that the wording on the container must be: “Hand Orange Smoke...

  16. 46 CFR 160.037-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-6 Container. (a....021 (§ 160.021-6) except that the wording on the container must be: “Hand Orange Smoke...

  17. 46 CFR 160.037-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-6 Container. (a....021 (§ 160.021-6) except that the wording on the container must be: “Hand Orange Smoke...

  18. 46 CFR 160.037-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-6 Container. (a....021 (§ 160.021-6) except that the wording on the container must be: “Hand Orange Smoke...

  19. 46 CFR 160.037-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Orange Smoke Distress Signals § 160.037-6 Container. (a....021 (§ 160.021-6) except that the wording on the container must be: “Hand Orange Smoke...

  20. Remote possibly hazardous content container sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Volz, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus capable of sampling enclosed containers, where the contents of the container is unknown. The invention includes a compressed air device capable of supplying air pressure, device for controlling the amount of air pressure applied, a pneumatic valve, a sampling device having a hollow, sampling insertion needle suspended therein and device to communicate fluid flow between the container and a containment vessel, pump or direct reading instrument.

  1. Container Prevents Oxidation Of Metal Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodford, William H.; Power, Christopher A.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Burns, David H.

    1992-01-01

    Sealed high-vacuum container holds metal powder required free of contamination by oxygen from point of manufacture to point of use at vacuum-plasma-spraying machine. Container protects powder from air during filling, storage, and loading of spraying machine. Eliminates unnecessary handling and transfer of powder from one container to another. Stainless-steel container sits on powder feeder of vacuum-plasma-spraying machine.

  2. 7 CFR 58.729 - Forming containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forming containers. 58.729 Section 58.729 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Procedures § 58.729 Forming containers. Containers either lined or unlined shall be assembled and stored in...

  3. The Day Care Clinic as Container.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bovensiepen, Gustav

    1994-01-01

    Describes the operations of a clinic for the long-term psychiatric treatment of adolescents in Germany. The different types of container as opposed to contained relationships evident in the clinic structure are discussed. The metaphor of the clinic as container for the troubled youth is useful in understanding its effectiveness. (SLD)

  4. 27 CFR 28.143 - Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Containers. 28.143 Section....143 Containers. (a) Beer. Beer being exported, used as supplies on vessels and aircraft, or..., or bulk containers. (b) Beer concentrate. Concentrate may not be removed for export, or for...

  5. 7 CFR 956.9 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 956.9 Section 956.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... OF SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON AND NORTHEAST OREGON Definitions § 956.9 Container. Container means a...

  6. 7 CFR 906.12 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 906.12 Section 906.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.12 Container. Container...

  7. 7 CFR 924.17 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 924.17 Section 924.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, lug, basket, carton, package, or any other type of...

  8. 7 CFR 945.16 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 945.16 Section 945.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Container. Container means a sack, box, bag, crate, hamper, basket, carton, package, barrel, or any...

  9. 27 CFR 20.177 - Encased containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Encased containers. 20.177... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Dealers § 20.177 Encased containers. (a) A dealer may package specially denatured spirits in unlabeled containers which are completely encased in...

  10. 27 CFR 20.145 - Encased containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Encased containers. 20.145... Denatured Alcohol § 20.145 Encased containers. Completely denatured alcohol may be packaged by distributors in unlabeled containers which are completely encased in wood, fiberboard, or similar material so...

  11. 7 CFR 966.13 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 966.13 Section 966.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.13 Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, hamper,...

  12. 7 CFR 958.17 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 958.17 Section 958.17 Agriculture... COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 958.17 Container. Container means a sack, box, bag, crate, hamper, basket, carton, package, or any other type of...

  13. 7 CFR 922.17 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 922.17 Section 922.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.17 Container. Container means a box,...

  14. 27 CFR 44.254 - Shipping containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shipping containers. 44.254 Section 44.254 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Requirements § 44.254 Shipping containers. Each shipping case, crate, or other container, in which cigars...

  15. 7 CFR 956.162 - Container markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container markings. 956.162 Section 956.162... WALLA VALLEY OF SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON AND NORTHEAST OREGON Rules and Regulations § 956.162 Container markings. Effective April 15, 1997, no handler shall ship any container of Walla Walla Sweet Onions...

  16. 27 CFR 28.94 - Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Containers. 28.94 Section... Manufacturing Bonded Warehouse § 28.94 Containers. Distilled spirits authorized to be withdrawn without payment... be withdrawn from such establishment in such containers as may be authorized in part 19 of...

  17. 27 CFR 27.121 - Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Containers. 27.121 Section... Spirits In Bulk § 27.121 Containers. Imported distilled spirits may be bottled in either domestic or imported containers conforming to the provisions of subpart N of this part. (72 Stat. 1374; 26 U.S.C. 5301)...

  18. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a...

  19. 7 CFR 160.32 - Marking containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking containers. 160.32 Section 160.32 Agriculture... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES Analysis, Inspection, and Grading on Request § 160.32 Marking containers. The interested person shall provide any labor necessary for marking the containers, after the contents have...

  20. 7 CFR 923.17 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 923.17 Section 923.17 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... COUNTIES IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.17 Container. Container means a box,...

  1. 7 CFR 959.13 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 959.13 Section 959.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 959.13 Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, hamper,...

  2. 7 CFR 946.18 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 946.18 Section 946.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.18 Container. Container means a sack, box, bag,...

  3. 40 CFR 63.688 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controls as specified in 40 CFR part 63, subpart PP—National Emission Standards for Containers. (ii) As an... 40 CFR part 63, subpart PP—National Emission Standards for Containers. (ii) As an alternative to... as specified in 40 CFR part 63, subpart PP—National Emission Standards for Containers. (c) When...

  4. 7 CFR 948.14 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 948.14 Section 948.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.14 Container. Container means a sack, bag, crate,...

  5. 7 CFR 916.14 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container. 916.14 Section 916.14 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.14 Container. Container means a box, bag, crate, lug, basket,...

  6. 46 CFR 160.021-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion-resistant to salt water and spray. The type container illustrated by Figure Number 160.021-6(a) is... top about 30 cm (1 ft.) below the surface of the water for two hours, remove container from water... interior for evidence of moisture penetration. If any moisture or water is evidenced, the container is...

  7. 27 CFR 30.44 - Weighing containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... fractional part of a gallon equivalent to 1 pound, to obtain the weight of the spirits in pounds and... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS GAUGING MANUAL Gauging Procedures Determination of Quantity by Weight § 30.44 Weighing containers. (a) Weighing containers of more than 10 wine gallons. The weight of containers...

  8. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  9. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or polysulfides....

  10. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  11. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  12. 49 CFR 173.189 - Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Batteries containing sodium or cells containing... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.189 Batteries containing sodium or cells containing sodium. (a) Batteries and cells may not contain any hazardous material other than sodium, sulfur or sodium compounds...

  13. Weapon container catalog. Volumes 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.A.; Higuera, M.C.

    1998-02-01

    The Weapon Container Catalog describes H-gear (shipping and storage containers, bomb hand trucks and the ancillary equipment required for loading) used for weapon programs and for special use containers. When completed, the catalog will contain five volumes. Volume 1 for enduring stockpile programs (B53, B61, B83, W62, W76, W78, W80, W84, W87, and W88) and Volume 2, Special Use Containers, are being released. The catalog is intended as a source of information for weapon program engineers and also provides historical information. The catalog also will be published on the SNL Internal Web and will undergo periodic updates.

  14. DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    F. Habashi

    1998-06-26

    The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting

  15. Containment loads due to direct containment heating and associated hydrogen behavior: Analysis and calculations with the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D C; Bergeron, K D; Carroll, D E; Gasser, R D; Tills, J L; Washington, K E

    1987-05-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues governing risk in many nuclear power plants involves the phenomenon called direct containment heating (DCH), in which it is postulated that molten corium ejected under high pressure from the reactor vessel is dispersed into the containment atmosphere, thereby causing sufficient heating and pressurization to threaten containment integrity. Models for the calculation of potential DCH loads have been developed and incorporated into the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis. Using CONTAIN, DCH scenarios in PWR plants having three different representative containment types have been analyzed: Surry (subatmospheric large dry containment), Sequoyah (ice condenser containment), and Bellefonte (atmospheric large dry containment). A large number of parameter variation and phenomenological uncertainty studies were performed. Response of DCH loads to these variations was found to be quite complex; often the results differ substantially from what has been previously assumed concerning DCH. Containment compartmentalization offers the potential of greatly mitigating DCH loads relative to what might be calculated using single-cell representations of containments, but the actual degree of mitigation to be expected is sensitive to many uncertainties. Dominant uncertainties include hydrogen combustion phenomena in the extreme environments produced by DCH scenarios, and factors which affect the rate of transport of DCH energy to the upper containment. In addition, DCH loads can be aggravated by rapid blowdown of the primary system, co-dispersal of moderate quantities of water with the debris, and quenching of de-entrained debris in water; these factors act by increasing steam flows which, in turn, accelerates energy transport. It may be noted that containment-threatening loads were calculated for a substantial portion of the scenarios treated for some of the plants considered.

  16. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.

    2004-02-12

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container.

  17. Performance of Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System

    SciTech Connect

    Fanous, F.; Greimann, L.; Wassef, W.; Bluhm, D.

    1993-01-01

    Deformation of a steel containment anchorage system during a severe accident may result in a leakage path at the containment boundaries. Current design criteria are based on either ductile or brittle failure modes of headed bolts that do not account for factors such as cracking of the containment basemat or deformation of the anchor bolt that may affect the behavior of the containment anchorage system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of a typical ice condenser containment`s anchorage system. This was accomplished by analyzing the Sequoyah Containment Anchorage System. Based on a strength of materials approach and assuming that the anchor bolts are resisting the uplift caused by the internal pressure, one can estimate that the failure of the anchor bolts would occur at a containment pressure of 79 psig. To verify these results and to calibrate the strength of materials equation, the Sequoyah containment anchorage system was analyzed with the ABAQUS program using a three-dimensional, finite-element model. The model included portions of the steel containment building, shield building, anchor bolt assembly, reinforced concrete mat and soil foundation material.

  18. Baseline Microstructural Characterization of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, Phillip E.; Dunn, Kerry A

    2005-07-31

    Three DOE Standard 3013 outer storage containers were examined to characterize the microstructure of the type 316L stainless steel material of construction. Two of the containers were closure-welded yielding production-quality outer 3013 containers; the third examined container was not closed. Optical metallography and Knoop microhardness measurements were performed to establish a baseline characterization that will support future destructive examinations of 3013 outer containers in the storage inventory. Metallography revealed the microstructural features typical of this austenitic stainless steel as it is formed and welded. The grains were equiaxed with evident annealing twins. Flow lines were prominent in the forming directions of the cylindrical body and flat lids and bottom caps. No adverse indications were seen. Microhardness values, although widely varying, were consistent with annealed austenitic stainless steel. The data gathered as part of this characterization will be used as a baseline for the destructive examination of 3013 containers removed from the storage inventory.

  19. System for inspection of stacked cargo containers

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, Stephen

    2011-08-16

    The present invention relates to a system for inspection of stacked cargo containers. One embodiment of the invention generally comprises a plurality of stacked cargo containers arranged in rows or tiers, each container having a top, a bottom a first side, a second side, a front end, and a back end; a plurality of spacers arranged in rows or tiers; one or more mobile inspection devices for inspecting the cargo containers, wherein the one or more inspection devices are removeably disposed within the spacers, the inspection means configured to move through the spacers to detect radiation within the containers. The invented system can also be configured to inspect the cargo containers for a variety of other potentially hazardous materials including but not limited to explosive and chemical threats.

  20. Hydrogen Event Containment Response Code System.

    1999-11-23

    Version: 00 Distribution is restricted to the United States Only. HECTR1.5 (Hydrogen Event-Containment Transient Response) is a lumped-volume containment analysis program that is most useful for performing parametric studies. Its main purpose is to analyze nuclear reactor accidents involving the transport and combustion of hydrogen, but HECTR can also function as an experiment analysis tool and can solve a limited set of other containment problems. Six gases; steam, nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbonmore » dioxide are modified along with sumps containing liquid water. HECTR can model virtually all the containment systems of importance in ice condenser, large dry and Mark III containments. A postprocessor, ACHILES1.5, is included. It processes the time-dependent variable output (compartment pressures, flow junction velocities, surface temperatures, etc.) produced by HECTR. ACHILES can produce tables and graphs of these data.« less

  1. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  2. Containment performance perspectives based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, J.R.; Lin, C.C.; Pratt, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    Perspectives on Containment Performance were obtained from the accident progression analyses, i.e. level 2 PRA analyses, found in the IPE submittals. Insights related to the containment failure modes, the releases associated with those failure modes, and the factors responsible for the types of containment failures and release sizes reported were gathered. The results summarized here are discussed in detail in volumes 1 and 2 of NUREG 1560. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Secure Container For Discarded Hypodermic Needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Angelene M.

    1992-01-01

    Container designed for safe retention of discarded blood-collecting hypodermic needles and similar sharp objects used in life-science experiments aboard spacecraft. Needles inserted through self-closing lid and retained magnetically. They are inserted, sharp end first, through spring-loaded flap. Long needles and needles on syringes cannot turn around in container. Can be emptied, cleaned, and reused. Used on Earth to provide unusually secure containment of sharp objects.

  4. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  5. 75 FR 62323 - Pesticide Management and Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment; Change to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Disposal; Standards for Pesticide Containers and Containment'' (71 FR 47330) (container and containment..., 2010. On June 15, 2010 (75 FR 33705), EPA promulgated a final rule that extended the labeling... revised labels. Also on June 15, 2010 (75 FR 33744), EPA published a proposed rule to provide a...

  6. 40 CFR 267.1107 - Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment? 267.1107 Section 267.1107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1107 Can a containment...

  7. 40 CFR 267.1107 - Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment? 267.1107 Section 267.1107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1107 Can a containment...

  8. 40 CFR 267.1107 - Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment? 267.1107 Section 267.1107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1107 Can a containment...

  9. 40 CFR 267.1107 - Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment? 267.1107 Section 267.1107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1107 Can a containment...

  10. 40 CFR 267.1107 - Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Can a containment building itself be considered secondary containment? 267.1107 Section 267.1107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FACILITIES OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Containment buildings § 267.1107 Can a containment...

  11. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-03-01

    This report uses the methodology and scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. The methodology calls for an initial screening phase in which the CCFP for each plant is calculated based on loads versus strength evaluations using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if the CCFP calculated in the screening phase is less than 0.01. This value is more stringent than the overall success criterion of 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 in the screening phase calculations, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  12. Plant sentinels and molecular probes that monitor environmental munitions contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.J.; DeWitt, J.G.; Hill, K.K.; Kuske, C.R.; Kim, D.Y.

    1994-08-01

    Plants accumulate TNT and similar compounds from soil. Their sessile nature requires that plants adapt to environmental changes by biochemical and molecular means. In principle, it is possible to develop a monitoring capability based on expression of any gene that is activated by specific environmental conditions. The authors have identified plant genes activated upon exposure to TNT. Partial gene sequences allow design of DNA probes that measure TNT-induced gene activity. These will be used to develop sensitive assays that monitor gene expression in plants growing in environments possibly contaminated with explosives.

  13. Modeling experiments that simulate fragment attacks on cased munitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    Roberts and Field (1993) have conducted experiments to observe the behavior of a cased high explosive (HE) charge subject to fragment attack at impact velocities below those needed for shock initiation. Two and three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been done to model these experiments. Questions about the degree of confinement of the HE and about the condition of the HE during the impact were addressed. The calculations indicate that the HE was not strongly confined in this experiment, primarily due to the lateral expansion of polycarbonate blocks on the sides of the target during the impact. HE was not ejected from the hole in the casing made by the projectile up to 30 {micro}s after the impact. There are hints from these calculations of how initiation of a homogeneous sample of HE might occur in the experiment. The first involves the reshock of a small amount of HE at {approximately} 20 {micro}s as a result of the impact of the sabot on the target. The second involves the heating of the HE from plastic work during the impact. The maximum temperature rise of the HE (exclusive of the small region that was reshocked) was {approximately} 80 k. However, this is the average temperature of a region the size of a computational cell, and phenomena such as shear bands or cracks could result in higher temperatures on a smaller scale than the cell size. The third involves heating of the HE from contact with the casing material. The maximum temperature rise of the casing material from plastic work is {approximately} 870 k. This temperature occurs at the edge of a plug of casing material sheared off by the projectile. Other parts of the casing are shock heated to higher energies but may not contact the HE.

  14. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  15. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label....

  16. 40 CFR 264.1086 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1086 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant emissions...

  17. 40 CFR 264.1086 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1086 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant emissions...

  18. 40 CFR 264.1086 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1086 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant emissions...

  19. 40 CFR 265.1087 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 265.1087 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant...

  20. 40 CFR 264.1086 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1086 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant emissions...

  1. 40 CFR 264.1086 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers § 264.1086 Standards: Containers. (a) The provisions of this section apply to the control of air pollutant emissions...

  2. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  3. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  4. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  5. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  6. Containment Prospectus for the PIANO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, N R

    2001-03-23

    PIANO is a dynamic, subcritical, zero-yield experiment intended for execution in the U1a.102C drift of the U1a complex at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1). The data from the PIANO experiment will be used in the Stockpile Stewardship Program to assess the aging of nuclear weapon components and to better model the long-term performance of the weapons in the enduring stockpile. The PIANO experiment is composed of one experimental package. The experimental package will have high explosive (HE) and special nuclear material (SNM) in a subcritical assembly. The containment plan for the PIANO series of experiments utilizes a two-containment-vessel concept. The first Containment vessel is formed by the primary containment barrier that seals the U1a.102C drift. The second containment vessel is formed by the secondary containment barrier in the U100 drift. The PIANO experiment is the final experiment to be conducted in the U1a.102C alcove. It will be an ''open'' experiment--meaning that PIANO will not utilize a confinement vessel as the previous OBOE experiments in this alcove did. We expect that the SNM from the PIANO experiment will be fully contained within the first containment vessel.

  7. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48...

  8. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48...

  9. 40 CFR 61.345 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the container is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, the owner or operator may... that the pressure in the container remains below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each cover and all openings... Permanent or Temporary Total Enclosure” in 40 CFR 52.741, appendix B. The enclosure may have permanent...

  10. 40 CFR 61.345 - Standards: Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the container is maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric pressure, the owner or operator may... that the pressure in the container remains below atmospheric pressure. (b) Each cover and all openings... Permanent or Temporary Total Enclosure” in 40 CFR 52.741, appendix B. The enclosure may have permanent...

  11. 46 CFR 160.021-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.021-6 Container. (a) General. Containers for stowage of hand red flare distress signals in lifeboats and life rafts on merchant... not less than 13 mm (1/2 in.) high the following wording: “HAND RED FLARE DISTRESS SIGNALS”....

  12. 46 CFR 160.021-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.021-6 Container. (a) General. Containers for stowage of hand red flare distress signals in lifeboats and life rafts on merchant... not less than 13 mm (1/2 in.) high the following wording: “HAND RED FLARE DISTRESS SIGNALS”....

  13. 46 CFR 160.021-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.021-6 Container. (a) General. Containers for stowage of hand red flare distress signals in lifeboats and life rafts on merchant... not less than 13 mm (1/2 in.) high the following wording: “HAND RED FLARE DISTRESS SIGNALS”....

  14. 46 CFR 160.021-6 - Container.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Hand Red Flare Distress Signals § 160.021-6 Container. (a) General. Containers for stowage of hand red flare distress signals in lifeboats and life rafts on merchant... not less than 13 mm (1/2 in.) high the following wording: “HAND RED FLARE DISTRESS SIGNALS”....

  15. Reliability analysis of containment isolation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelto, P.J.; Ames, K.R.; Gallucci, R.H.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Reliability Analysis of Containment Isolation System Project. Work was performed in five basic areas: design review, operating experience review, related research review, generic analysis and plant specific analysis. Licensee Event Reports (LERs) and Integrated Leak Rate Test (ILRT) reports provided the major sources of containment performance information used in this study. Data extracted from LERs were assembled into a computer data base. Qualitative and quantitative information developed for containment performance under normal operating conditions and design basis accidents indicate that there is room for improvement. A rough estimate of overall containment unavailability for relatively small leaks which violate plant technical specifications is 0.3. An estimate of containment unavailability due to large leakage events is in the range of 0.001 to 0.01. These estimates are dependent on several assumptions (particularly on event duration times) which are documented in the report.

  16. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1994-01-01

    A system for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary.

  17. Containment system for supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-07-05

    A system is described for containment of a supercritical water oxidation reactor in the event of a rupture of the reactor. The system includes a containment for housing the reaction vessel and a communicating chamber for holding a volume of coolant, such as water. The coolant is recirculated and sprayed to entrain and cool any reactants that might have escaped from the reaction vessel. Baffles at the entrance to the chamber prevent the sprayed coolant from contacting the reaction vessel. An impact-absorbing layer is positioned between the vessel and the containment to at least partially absorb momentum of any fragments propelled by the rupturing vessel. Remote, quick-disconnecting fittings exterior to the containment, in cooperation with shut-off valves, enable the vessel to be isolated and the system safely taken off-line. Normally-closed orifices throughout the containment and chamber enable decontamination of interior surfaces when necessary. 2 figures.

  18. Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

    1999-09-15

    Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

  19. Container Refurbishment Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aloi, t.; anthony, p; blair, t; forester, c; hall, k; hawk, t; gordon, b; johnsen, s; keck, g; clifford, m; reichert, d; rogers, p; richards, w; smallen, p; tilley, e

    2000-05-15

    In mid-1999, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the overall efficiency of the Container Refurbishment process. A cross-functional team was formed by the Industrial Engineering Services group within Product Certification Organization to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. The CTR team efforts have resulted in increased productivity equaling approximately $450K per year. The effort also significantly reduced the wait time required necessary to start assembly work on the shop floor. Increasing daily production time and identifying delays were key team goals. Following is a brief summary of accomplishments: (A) Productivity Improvements: (1) Reduced Radcon survey time for empty containers: (i) 50% at 9720-3 (ii) 67% at 9204-2 and (iii) 100% at 9212; (2) Eliminated container inspections at 9720-3; (3) Reduced charged time (includes hands-on labor and support functions) per empty container by 25%; (4) Reduced cycle time to refurbish a container by 25%. (Dramatic wait time reduction -Assembly); (5) Reduced the time for 9212 to receive empty, refurbished containers by 67-80%; (6) Reduced the time for 9204-2E to receive empty, refurbished containers from 1 day to immediate; (7) Implemented software to track time charged per container for continuous improvement; (8) Initiated continuous improvement efforts between Workstream experts and Refurbishment personnel, reworded complex Workstream prompts to allow worker data corrections, and reduces time of support groups, Workstream personnel, and Refurbishment personnel; (9) Consolidated refurbished, container warehousing areas, eliminated long travel times to areas outside the protected area portals to an area in the vicinity of the refurbishment area and a process area, benefits are improved container flow and better housekeeping; and (10) improved overall communication of team by flowcharting entire process. B. Annual Cost Savings: $453K

  20. Mass transfer from penetrations in waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Pescatore, C.; Sastre, C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that localized corrosion of a relatively small area of a waste container may impair the containment function to such an extent that larger releases may be possible than from the bare waste form. This would take place when a large number of holes coexist on the container while their concentration fields do not interact significantly with each other. After performing a steady state analysis of the release from a hole, it is shown that much fewer independent holes can coexist on a container surface than previously estimated. The calculated radionuclide release from multiple independent holes must be changed accordingly. Previous analyses did not proceed to a correct application of the linear superposition principle. This resulted in unacceptable physical conclusions and undue strain on the performance assessment necessary for a container licensing procedure. The paper also analyzes the steady state release from penetrations of finite length and whose concentration fields interact with one another. The predicted release from these penetrations is lower than the previously calculated release from holes of zero thickness. It is concluded here that the steady-state release from multiple holes on a waste container can not exceed the release from the bare waste form and that multiple perforations need not be a serious liability to container performance. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.